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Sample records for atomic layer graphene

  1. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C [Grupo de Fisica de Superfcies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao/Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J S, E-mail: caio@ufba.br [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente-INCT-E and A, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-280 Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp{sup 2} to sp{sup 3} transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the {Gamma} point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  2. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A

    2015-08-27

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  3. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-18

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  4. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R.; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  5. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; de Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the

  6. Bonding character of lithium atoms adsorbed on a graphene layer

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, P.V.C.; Mota,F.B.; Mascarenhas, A.J.S.; de Castilho, C. M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Acesso restrito: Texto completo. p. 529-531. This work uses first-principles calculations to investigate the aspects of the bonding character of lithium atoms adsorbed on a graphene layer. The presented results are in contradiction to other results that have recently appeared in the specialized literature, although they confirm some previous claims. In particular, a discussion of the characteristics of the bonding between lithium and carbon atoms and whether they interact via an sp2 ...

  7. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter; Van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; De Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.

  8. Buffer layer engineering on graphene via various oxidation methods for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-12-01

    The integration of a high-k oxide on graphene using atomic layer deposition requires an electrically reliable buffer layer. In this study, Y was selected as the buffer layer due to its highest oxidation ability among the rare-earth elements, and various oxidation methods (atmospheric, and high-pressure O2 and ozone annealing) were applied to the Y metal buffer layer. By optimizing the oxidation conditions of the top-gate insulator, we successfully improved the capacitance of the top gate Y2O3 insulator and demonstrated a large I on/I off ratio for bilayer graphene under an external electric field.

  9. Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, C.S.; Liberti, E.; Kim, J.S.; Xu, Q.; Fan, Y.; He, K.; Robertson, A.W.; Zandbergen, H.W.; Warner, J.H.; Kirkland, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the mean square amplitude of both in- and out-of-plane lattice vibrations for mono-layer graphene at temperatures ranging from ∼100 K to 1300 K. The amplitude of lattice vibrations was calculated from data extracted from selected area electron diffraction patterns recorded across a

  10. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  11. Surface diffusion coefficient of Au atoms on single layer graphene grown on Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Cacciato, G.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Universitá di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania, Italy and MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    A 5 nm thick Au film was deposited on single layer graphene sheets grown on Cu. By thermal processes, the dewetting phenomenon of the Au film on the graphene was induced so to form Au nanoparticles. The mean radius, surface-to-surface distance, and surface density evolution of the nanoparticles on the graphene sheets as a function of the annealing temperature were quantified by scanning electron microscopy analyses. These quantitative data were analyzed within the classical mean-field nucleation theory so to obtain the temperature-dependent Au atoms surface diffusion coefficient on graphene: D{sub S}(T)=[(8.2±0.6)×10{sup −8}]exp[−(0.31±0.02(eV)/(at) )/kT] cm{sup 2}/s.

  12. Encapsulation of graphene transistors and vertical device integration by interface engineering with atomic layer deposited oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Aria, Adrianus I.; Van Veldhoven, Zenas A.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Wang, Ruizhi; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Sui, Jinggao; Connolly, Malcolm R.; Hofmann, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple, scalable approach to achieve encapsulated graphene transistors with negligible gate hysteresis, low doping levels and enhanced mobility compared to as-fabricated devices. We engineer the interface between graphene and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 by tailoring the growth parameters to achieve effective device encapsulation whilst enabling the passivation of charge traps in the underlying gate dielectric. We relate the passivation of charge trap states in the vicinity of the graphene to conformal growth of ALD oxide governed by in situ gaseous H2O pretreatments. We demonstrate the long term stability of such encapsulation techniques and the resulting insensitivity towards additional lithography steps to enable vertical device integration of graphene for multi-stacked electronics fabrication.

  13. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  14. Uniform Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 on Graphene by Reversible Hydrogen Plasma Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A novel method to form ultrathin, uniform Al2O3 layers on graphene using reversible hydrogen plasma functionalization followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. ALD on pristine graphene is known to be a challenge due to the absence of dangling bonds, leading to nonuniform film coverage. We show that hydrogen plasma functionalization of graphene leads to uniform ALD of closed Al2O3 films down to 8 nm in thickness. Hall measurements and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the hydrogen plasma functionalization is reversible upon Al2O3 ALD and subsequent annealing at 400 °C and in this way does not deteriorate the graphene’s charge carrier mobility. This is in contrast with oxygen plasma functionalization, which can lead to a uniform 5 nm thick closed film, but which is not reversible and leads to a reduction of the charge carrier mobility. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations attribute the uniform growth on both H2 and O2 plasma functionalized graphene to the enhanced adsorption of trimethylaluminum (TMA) on these surfaces. A DFT analysis of the possible reaction pathways for TMA precursor adsorption on hydrogenated graphene predicts a binding mechanism that cleans off the hydrogen functionalities from the surface, which explains the observed reversibility of the hydrogen plasma functionalization upon Al2O3 ALD.

  15. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen, E-mail: hfxie@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, School of Science, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5 nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36 s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  16. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  17. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics on graphene using reversibly physisorbed ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandhyala, Srikar; Mordi, Greg; Lee, Bongki; Lee, Geunsik; Floresca, Carlo; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Ahn, Jinho; Wallace, Robert M; Chabal, Yves J; Kim, Moon J; Colombo, Luigi; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-03-27

    Integration of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) requires the ability to grow or deposit high-quality, ultrathin dielectric insulators on graphene to modulate the channel potential. Here, we study a novel and facile approach based on atomic layer deposition through ozone functionalization to deposit high-κ dielectrics (such as Al(2)O(3)) without breaking vacuum. The underlying mechanisms of functionalization have been studied theoretically using ab initio calculations and experimentally using in situ monitoring of transport properties. It is found that ozone molecules are physisorbed on the surface of graphene, which act as nucleation sites for dielectric deposition. The physisorbed ozone molecules eventually react with the metal precursor, trimethylaluminum to form Al(2)O(3). Additionally, we successfully demonstrate the performance of dual-gated GFETs with Al(2)O(3) of sub-5 nm physical thickness as a gate dielectric. Back-gated GFETs with mobilities of ~19,000 cm(2)/(V·s) are also achieved after Al(2)O(3) deposition. These results indicate that ozone functionalization is a promising pathway to achieve scaled gate dielectrics on graphene without leaving a residual nucleation layer.

  18. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young's modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young's modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed.

  19. Density Functional Theory Study of Atomic Layer Deposition of Zinc Oxide on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2015-12-01

    The dissociation of zinc ions (Zn(2+)) from vapor-phase zinc acetylacetonate, Zn(C5H7O2)2, or Zn(acac)2 and its adsorption onto graphene oxide via atomic layer deposition (ALD) were studied using a quantum mechanics approach. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to obtain an approximate solution to the Schrödinger equation. The graphene oxide cluster model was used to represent the surface of the graphene film after pre-oxidation. In this study, the geometries of reactants, transition states, and products were optimized using the B3LYB/6-31G** level of theory or higher. Furthermore, the relative energies of the various intermediates and products in the gas-phase radical mechanism were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311 + G(2df,2p) levels of theory. Additionally, a molecular orbital (MO) analysis was performed for the products of the decomposition of the Zn(acac)2 complex to investigate the dissociation of Zn(2+) and the subsequent adsorption of H atoms on the C5H7O2 cluster to form acetylacetonate enol. The reaction energies were calculated, and the reaction mechanism was accordingly proposed. A simulation of infrared (IR) properties was performed using the same approach to support the proposed mechanism via a complete explanation of bond forming and breaking during each reaction step.

  20. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... the Pt(100) surface will lift the reconstruction, a single graphene layer is observed to act as an effective coating, protecting the reactive surface from O2 exposure and thus preserving the reconstruction underneath the graphene layer in O2 pressures as high as 104 mbar. A similar protective effect...

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide on Single-Layer Graphene: An Atomic-Scale Study toward Understanding Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of a hybrid nanomaterial based on titanium oxide and single-layer graphene (SLG) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) is reported here. The morphology and crystallinity of the oxide layer on SLG can be tuned mainly with the deposition temperature, achieving either a uniform amorphous layer at 60 °C or ∼2 nm individual nanocrystals on the SLG at 200 °C after only 20 ALD cycles. A continuous and uniform amorphous layer formed on the SLG after 180 cycles at 60 °C can be converted to a polycrystalline layer containing domains of anatase TiO2 after a postdeposition annealing at 400 °C under vacuum. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM), characterization of the structure and chemistry was performed on an atomic scale and provided insight into understanding the nucleation and growth. AC-TEM imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that rocksalt TiO nanocrystals were occasionally formed at the early stage of nucleation after only 20 ALD cycles. Understanding and controlling nucleation and growth of the hybrid nanomaterial are crucial to achieving novel properties and enhanced performance for a wide range of applications that exploit the synergetic functionalities of the ensemble.

  2. Quantitative secondary electron imaging for work function extraction at atomic level and layer identification of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangbo; Fox, Daniel S; Maguire, Pierce; O'Connell, Robert; Masters, Robert; Rodenburg, Cornelia; Wu, Hanchun; Dapor, Maurizio; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hongzhou

    2016-02-16

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials usually have a layer-dependent work function, which require fast and accurate detection for the evaluation of their device performance. A detection technique with high throughput and high spatial resolution has not yet been explored. Using a scanning electron microscope, we have developed and implemented a quantitative analytical technique which allows effective extraction of the work function of graphene. This technique uses the secondary electron contrast and has nanometre-resolved layer information. The measurement of few-layer graphene flakes shows the variation of work function between graphene layers with a precision of less than 10 meV. It is expected that this technique will prove extremely useful for researchers in a broad range of fields due to its revolutionary throughput and accuracy.

  3. NiO/nanoporous graphene composites with excellent supercapacitive performance produced by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caiying; Chen, Chaoqiu; Huang, Peipei; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Li, Ping; Fan, Jinchuan; Song, Weiguo; Qin, Yong

    2014-12-19

    Nickel oxide (NiO) is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors because of its low cost and high theoretical specific capacitance of 2573 F g(-1). However, the low electronic conductivity and poor cycling stability of NiO limit its practical applications. To overcome these limitations, an efficient atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated here for the fabrication of NiO/nanoporous graphene (NG) composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors. ALD allows uniform deposition of NiO nanoparticles with controlled sizes on the surface of NG, thus offering a novel route to design NiO/NG composites for supercapacitor applications with high surface areas and greatly improved electrical conductivity and cycle stability. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the NiO/NG composites obtained by ALD exhibited excellent specific capacitance of up to ∼ 1005.8 F g(-1) per mass of the composite electrode (the specific capacitance value is up to ∼ 1897.1 F g(-1) based on the active mass of NiO), and stable performance after 1500 cycles. Furthermore, electrochemical performance of the NiO/NG composites is found to strongly depend on the size of NiO nanoparticles.

  4. Dispersion C3 coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms interacting with a graphene layer and with a carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate separation dependent van der Waal dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interactions of the Li, Na, K and Rb alkali atoms with a graphene layer and with a single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) using the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. The results from both the models are evaluated using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atoms. Accountability of these accurate values of dynamical polarizabilities of the alkali atoms in determination of the above $C_3$ coefficients are accentuated by comparing them with the coefficients evaluated using the dynamic dipole polarizabilities estimated from the single oscillator approximation which are typically employed in the earlier calculations. For practical description of the atom-surface interaction potentials the radial dependent $C_3$ coefficients are given for a wide range of separation distances between the ground states of the considered atoms and the wall surfaces and also for different values of nanotube radii. The coefficients for...

  5. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2 nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  6. Sub-nanometer atomic layer deposition for spintronics in magnetic tunnel junctions based on graphene spin-filtering membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marie-Blandine; Dlubak, Bruno; Weatherup, Robert S; Yang, Heejun; Deranlot, Cyrile; Bouzehouane, Karim; Petroff, Frédéric; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Fert, Albert; Seneor, Pierre

    2014-08-26

    We report on the successful integration of low-cost, conformal, and versatile atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectric in Ni–Al2O3–Co magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) where the Ni is coated with a spin-filtering graphene membrane. The ALD tunnel barriers, as thin as 0.6 nm, are grown layer-by-layer in a simple, low-vacuum, ozone-based process, which yields high-quality electron-transport barriers as revealed by tunneling characterization. Even under these relaxed conditions, including air exposure of the interfaces, a significant tunnel magnetoresistance is measured highlighting the robustness of the process. The spin-filtering effect of graphene is enhanced, leading to an almost fully inversed spin polarization for the Ni electrode of −42%. This unlocks the potential of ALD for spintronics with conformal, layer-by-layer control of tunnel barriers in magnetic tunnel junctions toward low-cost fabrication and down-scaling of tunnel resistances.

  7. Vertically Oriented Growth of GaN Nanorods on Si Using Graphene as an Atomically Thin Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Martin; Munshi, A Mazid; Sarau, George; Göbelt, Manuela; Tessarek, Christian; Fauske, Vidar T; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Yang, Jianfeng; Latzel, Michael; Hoffmann, Björn; Conibeer, Gavin; Weman, Helge; Christiansen, Silke

    2016-06-01

    The monolithic integration of wurtzite GaN on Si via metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy is strongly hampered by lattice and thermal mismatch as well as meltback etching. This study presents single-layer graphene as an atomically thin buffer layer for c-axis-oriented growth of vertically aligned GaN nanorods mediated by nanometer-sized AlGaN nucleation islands. Nanostructures of similar morphology are demonstrated on graphene-covered Si(111) as well as Si(100). High crystal and optical quality of the nanorods are evidenced through scanning transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman, and cathodoluminescence measurements supported by finite-difference time-domain simulations. Current-voltage characteristics revealed high vertical conduction of the as-grown GaN nanorods through the Si substrates. These findings are substantial to advance the integration of GaN-based devices on any substrates of choice that sustains the GaN growth temperatures, thereby permitting novel designs of GaN-based heterojunction device concepts.

  8. Quantitative annular dark-field imaging of single-layer graphene-II: atomic-resolution image contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shunsuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Kikkawa, Jun; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated how accurately atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) images match between experiments and simulations to conduct more reliable crystal structure analyses. Quantitative ADF imaging, in which the ADF intensity at each pixel represents the fraction of the incident probe current, allows us to perform direct comparisons with simulations without the use of fitting parameters. Although the conventional comparison suffers from experimental uncertainties such as an amorphous surface layer and specimen thickness, in this study we eliminated such uncertainties by using a single-layer graphene as a specimen. Furthermore, to reduce image distortion and shot noises in experimental images, multiple acquisitions with drift correction were performed, and the atomic ADF contrast was quantitatively acquired. To reproduce the experimental ADF contrast, we used three distribution functions as the effective source distribution in simulations. The optimum distribution function and its full-width at half-maximum were evaluated by measuring the residuals between the experimental and simulated images. It was found that the experimental images could be explained well by a linear combination of a Gaussian function and a Lorentzian function with a longer tail than the Gaussian function.

  9. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali and alkaline-earth ions and inert gas atoms with a graphene layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients ($C_3$s) of the alkali ions (Li$^+$, Na$^+$, K$^+$ and Rb$^+$), the alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$ and Ra$^+$) and the inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of Dirac model. For these calculations, we have evaluated the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are, finally, given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at the room temperature.

  10. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  11. Dual-protection of a graphene-sulfur composite by a compact graphene skin and an atomic layer deposited oxide coating for a lithium-sulfur battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Tian, Fuyang; Song, Hongquan; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Hong, Jong-Dal; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-03-12

    A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 0.2 C. A high capacity of 846 mA h g(-1) was achieved after charging/discharging for 100 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of over 92%. In the case of using LiNO3 as a shuttle inhibitor, this electrode showed an initial discharge capacity of 796 mA h g(-1) and a capacity retention of 81% after 250 cycles at a current density of 1 C with an average coulombic efficiency higher than 99.7%.

  12. Atomic structure of graphene on SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Masa; Chen, J H; Cullen, W G; Fuhrer, M S; Williams, E D

    2007-06-01

    We employ scanning probe microscopy to reveal atomic structures and nanoscale morphology of graphene-based electronic devices (i.e., a graphene sheet supported by an insulating silicon dioxide substrate) for the first time. Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy images reveal the presence of a strong spatially dependent perturbation, which breaks the hexagonal lattice symmetry of the graphitic lattice. Structural corrugations of the graphene sheet partially conform to the underlying silicon oxide substrate. These effects are obscured or modified on graphene devices processed with normal lithographic methods, as they are covered with a layer of photoresist residue. We enable our experiments by a novel cleaning process to produce atomically clean graphene sheets.

  13. Dual-protection of a graphene-sulfur composite by a compact graphene skin and an atomic layer deposited oxide coating for a lithium-sulfur battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Tian, Fuyang; Song, Hongquan; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Hong, Jong-Dal; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A high capacity of 846 mA h g-1 was achieved after charging/discharging for 100 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of over 92%. In the case of using LiNO3 as a shuttle inhibitor, this electrode showed an initial discharge capacity of 796 mA h g-1 and a capacity retention of 81% after 250 cycles at a current density of 1 C with an average coulombic efficiency higher than 99.7%.A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A

  14. Physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition of reliable ultrathin dielectric films on inert graphene surfaces for low-power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hyo Won; Heo, Jinseong; Lee, Min-Hyun; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, JiYeon; Lee, Yunseong; Cho, Yeonchoo; Jeon, Woojin; Suh, Hwansoo; Hwang, Sungwoo; Park, Seongjun

    2016-09-01

    Among the most fundamental challenges encountered in the successful incorporation of graphene in silicon-based electronics is the conformal growth of ultrathin dielectric films, especially those with thicknesses lower than 5 nm, on chemically inert graphene surfaces. Here, we present physisorbed-precursor-assisted atomic layer deposition (pALD) as an extremely robust method for fabricating such films. Using atomic-scale characterisation, it is confirmed that conformal and intact ultrathin Al2O3 films can be synthesised on graphene by pALD. The mechanism underlying the pALD process is identified through first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Further, this novel deposition technique is used to fabricate two types of wafer-scale devices. It is found that the incorporation of a 5 nm-thick pALD Al2O3 gate dielectric film improves the performance of metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors to a greater extent than does the incorporation of a conventional ALD Al2O3 film. We also employ a 5 nm-thick pALD HfO2 film as a highly scalable dielectric layer with a capacitance equivalent oxide thickness of 1 nm in graphene-based tunnelling field-effect transistors fabricated on a glass wafer and achieve a subthreshold swing of 30 mV/dec. This significant improvement in switching allows for the low-voltage operation of an inverter within 0.5 V of both the drain and the gate voltages, thus paving the way for low-power electronics.

  15. Atomic covalent functionalization of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-01-15

    Although graphene's physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp(2) bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene's electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (∼1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Toward this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  16. Atomic intercalation to measure adhesion of graphene on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Sorescu, Dan C.; Jeon, Seokmin; Belianinov, Alexei; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-10-01

    The interest in mechanical properties of two-dimensional materials has emerged in light of new device concepts taking advantage of flexing, adhesion and friction. Here we demonstrate an effective method to measure adhesion of graphene atop highly ordered pyrolytic graphite, utilizing atomic-scale `blisters' created in the top layer by neon atom intercalates. Detailed analysis of scanning tunnelling microscopy images is used to reconstruct atomic positions and the strain map within the deformed graphene layer, and demonstrate the tip-induced subsurface translation of neon atoms. We invoke an analytical model, originally devised for graphene macroscopic deformations, to determine the graphite adhesion energy of 0.221+/-0.011 J m-2. This value is in excellent agreement with reported macroscopic values and our atomistic simulations. This implies mechanical properties of graphene scale down to a few-nanometre length. The simplicity of our method provides a unique opportunity to investigate the local variability of nanomechanical properties in layered materials.

  17. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of h-BN(0001) Multilayers on Co(0001) and Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Graphene on h-BN(0001)/Co(0001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, M Sky; Beatty, John D; Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Reid, Kimberly; Rath, Ashutosh; Voyles, Paul M; Kelber, Jeffry A

    2016-03-22

    The direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by industrially scalable methods is of broad interest for spintronic and nanoelectronic device applications. Such applications often require atomically precise control of film thickness and azimuthal registry between layers and substrate. We report the formation, by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE), of multilayer h-BN(0001) films (up to 7 monolayers) on Co(0001). The ALE process employs BCl3/NH3 cycles at 600 K substrate temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) data show that this process yields an increase in h-BN average film thickness linearly proportional to the number of BCl3/NH3 cycles, with BN layers in azimuthal registry with each other and with the Co(0001) substrate. LEED diffraction spot profile data indicate an average BN domain size of at least 1900 Å. Optical microscopy data indicate the presence of some domains as large as ∼20 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ambient exposure studies demonstrate macroscopic and microscopic continuity of the h-BN film, with the h-BN film highly conformal to the Co substrate. Photoemission data show that the h-BN(0001) film is p-type, with band bending near the Co/h-BN interface. Growth of graphene by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is observed on the surface of multilayer h-BN(0001) at temperatures of 800 K. LEED data indicate azimuthal graphene alignment with the h-BN and Co(0001) lattices, with domain size similar to BN. The evidence of multilayer BN and graphene azimuthal alignment with the lattice of the Co(0001) substrate demonstrates that this procedure is suitable for scalable production of heterojunctions for spintronic applications.

  18. Proximity effects in cold atom artificial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graß, Tobias; Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Tarruell, Leticia; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    Cold atoms in an optical lattice with brick-wall geometry have been used to mimic graphene, a two-dimensional material with characteristic Dirac excitations. Here we propose to bring such artificial graphene into the proximity of a second atomic layer with a square lattice geometry. For non-interacting fermions, we find that such bilayer system undergoes a phase transition from a graphene-like semi-metal phase, characterized by a band structure with Dirac points, to a gapped band insulator phase. In the presence of attractive interactions between fermions with pseudospin-1/2 degree of freedom, a competition between semi-metal and superfluid behavior is found at the mean-field level. Using the quantum Monte Carlo method, we also investigate the case of strong repulsive interactions. In the Mott phase, each layer exhibits a different amount of long-range magnetic order. Upon coupling both layers, a valence-bond crystal is formed at a critical coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how these bilayer systems could be realized in existing cold atom experiments.

  19. Proximity effects in cold atom artificial graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Grass, Tobias; Tarruell, Leticia; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Cold atoms in an optical lattice with brick-wall geometry have been used to mimic graphene, a two-dimensional material with characteristic Dirac excitations. Here we propose to bring such artificial graphene into the proximity of a second atomic layer with a square lattice geometry. For non-interacting fermions, we find that such bilayer system undergoes a phase transition from a graphene-like semi-metal phase, characterized by a band structure with Dirac points, to a gapped band insulator phase. In the presence of attractive interactions between fermions with pseudospin-1/2 degree of freedom, a competition between semi-metal and superfluid behavior is found at the mean-field level. Upon tuning the coupling between the layers, the system exhibits re-entrant superfluid phases. Using the quantum Monte Carlo method, we also investigate the case of strong repulsive interactions. In the Mott phase, each layer exhibits a different amount of long-range magnetic order. Upon coupling both layers, a valence-bond crysta...

  20. Imaging of few‐layer graphene flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Albrektsen, Ole; Novikov, Sergey M.

    In this work, we successfully demonstrate how imaging ellipsometry can be applied to obtain high‐resolution thickness maps of few‐layer graphene (FLG) samples, with the results being thoroughly validated in a comparative study using several complementary techniques: Optical reflection microscopy...... (ORM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning confocal Raman microscopy. The thickness map, revealing distinct terraces separated by steps corresponding to mono‐ and bilayers of graphene, is extracted from a pixel‐to‐pixel fitting of ellipsometric spectra using optical constants derived by fitting...... slab model calculations to averaged spectra collected in large homogenous sample areas. An analysis of reflection spectra and contrast images acquired by ORM confirm the results by quantifying the number of graphene layers and retrieving the FLG optical constants using a simple Fresnel‐law‐based slab...

  1. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  2. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Atomic layer-by-layer deposition of h-BN(0001) on cobalt: a building block for spintronics and graphene electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, John; Cao, Yuan; Tanabe, Iori; Sky Driver, M.; Dowben, Peter A.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Raman measurements demonstrate that macroscopically continuous hexagonal BN(0001) (h-BN) multilayer layer films can be grown by atomic layer deposition on Co(0001) substrates. The growth procedure involves alternating exposures of BCl3 and NH3 at 550 K, followed by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum above 700 K to induce long-range order. XPS data demonstrate that the films have a consistent B:N atomic ratio of 1:1. LEED data show that the BN layers are azimuthally in registry, with an estimated domain size of ˜170 Å. The films are continuous over a macroscopic (1 cm × 1 cm) area as demonstrated by the fact that exposure of a h-BN(0001) bi-layer film to ambient at room temperature yields no observable Co oxidation, although some N oxidation is observed, and long range order is lost. The ability to grow large area, continuous multilayer BN films on Co, with atomic level control of film thickness, makes possible an array of magnetic tunnel junction and spin filter applications.

  4. Engineering the strain in graphene layers with Au decoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannu, Compesh, E-mail: compesh@gmail.com; Singh, Udai B.; Kumar, Sunil; Tripathi, A.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D.K., E-mail: dka4444@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    Graphene sheets decorated with Au nanodots are synthesized by deposition of Au of three different thicknesses and subsequent annealing at 400 °C. Different thicknesses of Au film for the formation of Au nanodots on graphene are measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and morphology is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy indicates 3–6-fold increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio depending on the content of Au deposited on graphene. The increase in disorder in Au decorated graphene layers is explained on the basis of interaction of Au atoms with Π bonds of graphene. The splitting and blueshift in G band signifies compressive strain in Au deposited graphene. X-ray diffraction studies using synchrotron radiation source confirm compressive strain in graphene, which increases with increase of Au film thickness.

  5. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images...... as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  6. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  7. Penetration of alkali atoms throughout a graphene membrane: theoretical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D W; Virojanadara, C

    2012-03-07

    Theoretical studies of penetration of various alkali atoms (Li, Na, Rb, Cs) throughout a graphene membrane grown on a silicon carbide substrate are reported and compared with recent experimental results. Results of first principles modeling demonstrate a rather low (about 0.8 eV) energy barrier for the formation of temporary defects in the carbon layer required for the penetration of Li at a high concentration of adatoms, a higher (about 2 eV) barrier for Na, and barriers above 4 eV for Rb and Cs. Experiments prove migration of lithium adatoms from the graphene surface to the buffer layer and SiC substrate at room temperature, sodium at 100 °C and impenetrability of the graphene membrane for Rb and Cs. Differences between epitaxial and free-standing graphene for the penetration of alkali ions are also discussed.

  8. Amorphous Ultrathin SnO2 Films by Atomic Layer Deposition on Graphene Network as Highly Stable Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; George, Steven M; Zhou, Changgong; Lian, Jie; Zhou, Yun

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous SnO2 (a-SnO2) thin films were conformally coated onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (G) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrochemical characteristics of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites were then determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge curves. Because the SnO2 ALD films were ultrathin and amorphous, the impact of the large volume expansion of SnO2 upon cycling was greatly reduced. With as few as five formation cycles best reported in the literature, a-SnO2/G nanocomposites reached stable capacities of 800 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 450 mAh g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The capacity from a-SnO2 is higher than the bulk theoretical values. The extra capacity is attributed to additional interfacial charge storage resulting from the high surface area of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites. These results demonstrate that metal oxide ALD on high surface area conducting carbon substrates can be used to fabricate high power and high capacity electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-10-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene-graphene and graphene-substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite.

  10. Graphene-coated atomic force microscope tips for reliable nanoscale electrical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, M; Bayerl, A; Gao, T; Porti, M; Nafria, M; Jing, G Y; Zhang, Y F; Liu, Z F; Duan, H L

    2013-03-13

    Graphene single-layer films are grown by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto commercially available conductive tips for atomic force microscopy. Graphene-coated tips are much more resistant to both high currents and frictions than commercially available, metal-varnished, conductive atomic force microscopy tips, leading to much larger lifetimes and more reliable imaging due to a lower tip-sample interaction.

  11. Quantum Transport in Graphene Heterostructures and Few Layer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes low temperature transport experiments designed to study graphene itself and its heterostructures. The external modifications, such as one dimensional periodic potentials, boron nitride (BN) substrate and mechanical strain, will modify the transport properties by changing graphene’s band structure. Graphene with different layers (bilayer, trilayer) will also have different physics. At first, we study the graphene under one dimensional periodic potentials. We use DNA linke...

  12. Graphene on SiC(0001 inspected by dynamic atomic force microscopy at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Telychko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated single-layer graphene on SiC(0001 by atomic force and tunneling current microscopy, to separate the topographic and electronic contributions from the overall landscape. The analysis revealed that the roughness evaluated from the atomic force maps is very low, in accord with theoretical simulations. We also observed that characteristic electron scattering effects on graphene edges and defects are not accompanied by any out-of-plane relaxations of carbon atoms.

  13. Direct growth of multilayer graphene by precipitation using W capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jumpei; Ueda, Yuki; Maruyama, Takahiro; Naritsuka, Shigeya

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the direct growth of multilayer graphene from amorphous carbon on a sapphire (0001) substrate by precipitation using a nickel catalyst layer and a tungsten capping layer was examined. The findings revealed that a tungsten carbide layer was formed on top of the catalyst, and this suppressed the diffusion of carbon atoms upwards towards the surface. This caused the graphene layer to precipitate below the catalyst layer rather than above it. Under optimized growth conditions, Raman spectroscopy indicated that a high-quality graphene layer was formed with a low D/G peak intensity ratio of 0.10.

  14. Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Growth on Graphene via Chemical Activation with Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Alaboson, Justice M. P.; Patwardhan, Sameer; Ryder, Christopher R.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically interfacing the inert basal plane of graphene with other materials has limited the development of graphene-based catalysts, composite materials, and devices. Here, we overcome this limitation by chemically activating epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) using atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen produces epoxide groups on graphene, which act as reactive nucleation sites for zinc oxide nanoparticle growth using the atomic layer deposition precursor diethyl zinc. In particular, exposure of epoxidized graphene to diethyl zinc abstracts oxygen, creating mobile species which diffuse on the surface to form metal oxide clusters. This mechanism is corroborated with a combination of scanning probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory, and can likely be generalized to a wide variety of related surface reactions on graphene. PMID:24206242

  15. Atomic resolution of nitrogen-doped graphene on Cu foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chundong; Schouteden, Koen; Wu, Qi-Hui; Li, Zhe; Jiang, Jianjun; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Atomic-level substitutional doping can significantly tune the electronic properties of graphene. Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the atomic-scale crystalline structure of graphene grown on polycrystalline Cu, the distribution of nitrogen dopants and their effect on the electronic properties of graphene were investigated. Both the graphene sheet growth and nitrogen doping were performed using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The results indicated that the nitrogen dopants preferentially sit at the grain boundaries of the graphene sheets and confirmed that plasma treatment is a potential method to incorporate foreign atoms into the graphene lattice to tailor the graphene’s electronic properties.

  16. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  17. Graphene mechanics: II. Atomic stress distribution during indentation until rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Bogdan I; Gräter, Frauke

    2014-06-28

    Previous Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments found single layers of defect-free graphene to rupture at unexpectedly high loads in the micronewton range. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled an AFM spherical tip pressing on a circular graphene sheet and studied the stress distribution during the indentation process until rupture. We found the graphene rupture force to have no dependency on the sheet size and a very weak dependency on the indenter velocity, allowing a direct comparison to experiment. The deformation showed a non-linear elastic behavior, with a two-dimensional elastic modulus in good agreement with previous experimental and computational studies. In line with theoretical predictions for linearly elastic sheets, rupture forces of non-linearly elastic graphene are proportional to the tip radius. However, as a deviation from the theory, the atomic stress concentrates under the indenter tip more strongly than predicted and causes a high probability of bond breaking only in this area. In turn, stress levels decrease rapidly towards the edge of the sheet, most of which thus only serves the role of mechanical support for the region under the indenter. As a consequence, the high ratio between graphene sheets and sphere radii, hitherto supposed to be necessary for reliable deformation and rupture studies, could be reduced to a factor of only 5-10 without affecting the outcome. Our study suggests time-resolved analysis of forces at the atomic level as a valuable tool to predict and interpret the nano-scale response of stressed materials beyond graphene.

  18. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  19. Electrochemistry at the edge of a single graphene layer in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Sutanuka; Shim, Jeong; Rivera, J.;

    2013-01-01

    We study the electrochemistry of single layer graphene edges using a nanopore-based structure consisting of stacked graphene and AlO dielectric layers. Nanopores, with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm, are formed by an electron beam sculpting process on the stacked layers. This leads to a unique...... edge structure which, along with the atomically thin nature of the embedded graphene electrode, demonstrates electrochemical current densities as high as 1.2 × 10 A/cm. The graphene edge embedded structure offers a unique capability to study the electrochemical exchange at an individual graphene edge......, isolated from the basal plane electrochemical activity. We also report ionic current modulation in the nanopore by biasing the embedded graphene terminal with respect to the electrodes in the fluid. The high electrochemical specific current density for a graphene nanopore-based device can have many...

  20. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert.

  1. Crystallographic orientation dependent etching of graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemes-Incze, Peter; Biro, Laszlo Peter [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, PO. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Magda, Gabor [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), PO Box 91, 1521 Budapest (Hungary); Kamaras, Katalin [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, PO Box 49, 1525, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-04-15

    Graphene has gripped the scientific community ever since its discovery in 2004, with very promising electronic properties and hopes to integrate graphene into nanoelectronic devices. For graphene to make its way into electronic devices, two major obstacles have to be overcome: reproducible preparation of large area graphene samples and patterning techniques to obtain functional components. In this paper we present a graphene etching technique, which is crystallographic orientation selective and allows for the patterning of graphene layers using a chemical reduction process. The process involves the reduction of the SiO{sub 2} support by the carbon in the graphene itself. This reaction only occurs at the sample edges and does not result in the degradation of the graphene crystal lattice itself. However, we have observed evidence of strong hole doping in our etched samples. This etching technique opens up new possibilities in graphene patterning and modification. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. 具有SiC缓冲层的Si衬底上直接沉积碳原子生长石墨烯%Direct Graphene Growth by Depositing Carbon Atoms on Si Substrate Covered by SiC Buffer Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐军; 康朝阳; 李利民; 徐彭寿

    2011-01-01

    石墨烯是近年发现的一种新型多功能材料.在合适的衬底上制备石墨烯成为目前材料制备的一大挑战.本文利用分子束外延(MBE)设备,在Si 衬底上生长高质量的SiC 缓冲层,然后利用直接沉积C原子的方法生长石墨烯,并通过反射式高能电子衍射(RHEED)、拉曼(Raman)光谱和近边X 射线吸收精细结构谱(NEXAFS)等实验技术对不同衬底温度(800、900、1000、1100 °C)生长的薄膜进行结构表征.实验结果表明,在以上衬底温度下都能生长出具有乱层堆垛结构的石墨烯薄膜.当衬底温度升高时,碳原子的活性增强,其成键的能力也增大,从而使形成的石墨烯结晶质量提高.衬底温度为1000 °C时结晶质量最好.其原因可能是当衬底温度较低时,碳原子活性太低不足以形成有序的六方C-sp2环.但过高的衬底温度会使SiC 缓冲层的孔洞缺陷增加,衬底的Si 原子有可能获得足够的能量穿过SiC薄膜的孔洞扩散到衬底表面,与沉积的碳原子反应生成无序的SiC,这一方面会减弱石墨烯的生长,另一方面也会使石墨烯的结晶质量变差.%Graphene is a newly discovered material with many functions. The preparation of graphene on suitable substrates is a challenge in the material preparation field. In this paper, graphene thin films were grown on Si substrates covered with SiC buffer layers (SiC/Si) by the direct deposition of carbon atoms using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) equipment. The structural properties of the samples produced at different substrate temperatures (800, 900, 1000, 1100 ° C) were investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The results indicate that the thin films grown at all temperatures exhibit the characteristics of graphene with a turbostratic stacking structure. As the substrate temperature increases the crystalline quality of the graphene

  3. Layered graphene structure of a hexagonal carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin, E-mail: beenchang@nuaa.edu.cn

    2013-06-01

    Experiments show that there is a novel hexagonal carbon polymorph restricted to the space group of P-62c, but the detailed atomic structure is not determined. Here we set carbon atoms occupying P-62c 4f or P-62c 2c and 2d Wyckoff positions, and calculate the total energy of the different cell structures changing the internal parameter by first-principles calculations, which demonstrates that the stable structures in energy (at local minima) are hexagonal carbon (P-62c 2c and 2d) and hexagonal diamond (P-62c 4f, z=1/16). The calculated bulk modulus 437±16 GPa and interlayer distance 2.062 Å of the layered graphene structure P-62c 2c and 2d are in good agreement with those of the proposed new carbon, which indicates that P-62c 2c and 2d is a possible precursor or intermediate hard phase during the structural transformation of carbon.

  4. Electronic and phonon bandstructures of pristine few layer and metal doped graphene using first principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K. Gupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the frame work of density functional theoretical calculations, the electronic and lattice dynamical properties of graphene (multilayers and supercell have been systematically investigated and analyzed using the plane wave pseudopotentials within the generalized gradient approximation and local density approximation functional. We have also studied the functionalization of graphene by adsorption and absorption of transition metals like Al and Ag. We find that the electronic properties exhibit large sensitivity to the number of layers and doping. The Al and Ag doped graphene exhibits peak at Fermi level in the density of states arising from the flat bands near Fermi level. The bonding of metal atoms and graphene leads to a charge transfer between them and consequently shift Fermi level with respect to the conical point at K-point. The adsorption of Ag/Al atoms suggests an effective interaction between the adatoms and graphene layers without disturbing the original graphene structure of lower graphene layers. Compared to single layer graphene, the optical phonon E2g mode and out of plane ZA mode at Γ-point splits in the bi-, tri- and four- layer graphene. We observe a shift for highest optical branch at Dirac K- point. We find that the different derivatives of graphene have different phonon dispersion relations. We demonstrate that there is removal of degeneracy of ZO/ZA modes at K- point with transition metal doping. The highest optical phonon branch becomes flat at Dirac point with doping of transition metals. Our study points that the substituted graphene sheets can have potential applications in ordered-disordered separated quantum films with two to four layers of atoms and new nano devices using graphene.

  5. Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, T.R.J.; Antipina, L.Y.; Temmen, M.; Reichling, M.; Sorokin, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    By the use of non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CaF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the Ca

  6. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nika, Denis L. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States); Cocemasov, Alexandr I. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Balandin, Alexander A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T < 15 K, specific heat varies with temperature as T{sup n}, where n = 1 for graphene, n = 1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n = 1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

  8. Effect of water layer at the SiO2/graphene interface on pentacene morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, Manisha; Pavlica, Egon; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš; Bratina, Gvido

    2014-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to examine early stages of pentacene growth on exfoliated single-layer graphene transferred to SiO2 substrates. We have observed 2D growth with mean height of 1.5 ± 0.2 nm on as-transferred graphene. Three-dimensional islands of pentacene with an average height of 11 ± 2 nm were observed on graphene that was annealed at 350 °C prior to pentacene growth. Compellingly similar 3D morphology has been observed on graphene transferred onto SiO2 that was treated with hexamethyldisilazane prior to the transfer of graphene. On multilayer graphene we have observed 2D growth, regardless of the treatment of SiO2. We interpret this behavior of pentacene molecules in terms of the influence of the dipolar field that emerges from the water monolayer at the graphene/SiO2 interface on the surface energy of graphene.

  9. Atomic Collapse in Graphene: Lost of Unitarity

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, David; Loewe, Marcelo; Raya, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the problem of atomic collapse in graphene by monopole impurities, both electric and magnetic, within the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. For electric impurities, upon factorizing the radial Dirac Hamiltonian and identifying the supercharges, existence of a critical charge that makes the ground state {\\em fall-into-the-center} translates into lost of unitarity for the corresponding Hamiltonian. For the problem of magnetic monopole impurities, preservation of unitarity for all values of the parameters of the corresponding potential translates into the absence of atomic collapse in this case.

  10. Electrochemical preparation of few layer-graphene nanosheets via reduction of oriented exfoliated graphene oxide thin films in acetamide-urea-ammonium nitrate melt under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilimon, V.S.; Sampath, S., E-mail: sampath2562@gmail.co

    2011-01-31

    Electrochemical reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide, prepared from pre-exfoliated graphite, in acetamide-urea-ammonium nitrate ternary eutectic melt results in few layer-graphene thin films. Negatively charged exfoliated graphene oxide is attached to positively charged cystamine monolyer self-assembled on a gold surface. Electrochemical reduction of the oriented graphene oxide film is carried out in a room temperature, ternary molten electrolyte. The reduced film is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), conductive AFM, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Ternary eutectic melt is found to be a suitable medium for the regulated reduction of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide-based sheets on conducting surfaces.

  11. Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tjeerd R. J. Bollmann[1,2; Liubov Yu. Antipina[3,4; Matthias Temmen[2; Michael Reichling[2; Pavel B. Sorokin[5

    2015-01-01

    By the use of non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CAF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the CaF2 substrate, resulting from the graphene's preparation under ambient conditions on the hydrophilic substrate surface, are found to electronically modify the graphene as the material's electron density transfers from graphene to the hydration layer. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that the first 2 to 3 water layers adjacent to the graphene hole-dope the graphene by several percent of a unit charge per unit cell.

  12. Graphene Oxide as a Monoatomic Blocking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films of C22 fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were...

  13. Antibacterial activity of graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybowska-Sarapuk, Ł.; Kotela, A.; Krzemiński, J.; Janczak, D.; Wróblewska, M.; Marchel, H.; Łegorz, P.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial biofilm is a direct cause of complications in management of various medical conditions. There is an ongoing search for a feasible method to prevent its growth, as an alternative to antibiotics, which are ineffective. The aim of the study was to prepare and evaluate a detailed algorithm for production of graphene coatings, using economically efficient methods of printed electronics (such as ink-jet printing or spray coating), and assess their antibacterial properties. Based on the preliminary results of our work we suggest that graphene coating may inhibit the formation of microbial biofilms. Further research is needed to verify antibacterial properties of graphene coatings and its future applications in prevention of biofilm-related infections, e.g. by coating surgical instruments, catheters or tracheostomy tubes. In addition, we propose a series of hypotheses to be evaluated in further work.

  14. Graphene and graphene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides in energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Feng, Hongbin; Li, Jinghong

    2014-06-12

    Being confronted with the energy crisis and environmental problems, the exploration of clean and renewable energy materials as well as their devices are urgently demanded. Two-dimensional (2D) atomically-thick materials, graphene and grpahene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have showed vast potential as novel energy materials due to their unique physicochemical properties. In this Review, we outline the typical application of graphene and grpahene-like TMDs in energy conversion and storage fields, and hope to promote the development of 2D TMDs in this field through the analysis and comparisons with the relatively natural graphene. First, a brief introduction of electronic structures and basic properties of graphene and TMDs are presented. Then, we summarize the exciting progress of these materials made in both energy conversion and storage field including solar cells, electrocatalysis, supercapacitors and lithium ions batteries. Finally, the prospects and further developments in these exciting fields of graphene and graphene-like TMDs materials are also suggested.

  15. Enhancement of absorption in vertically-oriented graphene sheets growing on a thin copper layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozouvan, Tamara; Poperenko, Leonid; Kravets, Vasyl; Shaykevich, Igor

    2017-02-01

    The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films grown on thin copper Cu (1 μm) layer using chemical vapour deposition method were investigated via spectroscopic ellipsometry and nanoscopic measurements. Angle variable ellipsometry measurements were performed to analyze the features of dispersion of the complex refractive index and optical conductivity. It was observed significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets layer with respect to the bulk graphite due to interaction between excited localized surface plasmon at surface of thin Cu layer and graphene's electrons. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with atomic spatial resolution revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of the deposited graphene layer. The obtained results provide direct evidence of the strong influence of the growing condition and morphology of nanostructure on electronic and optical behaviours of graphene film.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Joseph C., Jr.

    Carbon is an extremely versatile element due to the ability of its electronic structure to allow strong bonds with many elements including other carbon atoms. This allows for the formation of many types of large and complex architectures, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, at the nanoscale. One of the most fascinating allotropes of carbon is graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice with carbon in sp2 hybridization, which building block for layered graphite and other nanocarbons.[1] Because of its unique structure, graphene displays several interesting properties including high thermal[2-4] and electrical mobility and conductivity[1,5]. The initial studies on graphene were performed on mechanically exfoliated samples, which were limited to few microns in size. In the recent years, large areas of single- and few-layer graphene (˜few cm x cm) are being produced by chemical vapor deposition technique for practical applications. However, chemical vapor deposition grown graphene is highly polycrystalline with interfaces such as edges, grain boundaries, dislocations, and point defects. This inevitable presence of defects in graphene influences its electrical and thermal transport. While many studies have previously focused on the influence of defects on electrical mobility and conductivity, there is little information on the influence of defects on the thermal properties of graphene. This study specifically investigates the effect of both intrinsic and extrinsic defects on the in-plane thermal properties of graphene using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The in-plane thermal conductivity of few-layered graphene (FLG) was measured using Raman spectroscopy, following the work of Balandin et al. [4]The thermal conductivity was estimated from a shift of the characteristic G-band of graphene as a function of the excitation laser power. The graphene samples were synthesized on nickel substrates using chemical vapor deposition, and transferred to copper TEM grids and

  17. Spectroscopic characterization of ion-irradiated multi-layer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Akira [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Honda, Shin-ichi, E-mail: s-honda@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Osugi, Ryo [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okada, Hiraku [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Niibe, Masahito [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Terasawa, Mititaka [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Hirase, Ryuji; Izumi, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Hideki [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); Niwase, Keisuke [Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Taguchi, Eiji [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Lee, Kuei-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Oura, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Low-energy Ar ions (0.5–2 keV) were irradiated to multi-layer graphenes and the damage process, the local electronic states, and the degree of alignment of the basal plane, and the oxidation process upon ion irradiation were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By Raman spectroscopy, we observed two stages similar to the case of irradiated graphite, which should relate to the accumulations of vacancies and turbulence of the basal plane, respectively. XAS analysis indicated that the number of sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon (sp{sup 2}-C) atoms decreased after ion irradiation. Angle-resolved XAS revealed that the orientation parameter (OP) decreased with increasing ion energy and fluence, reflecting the turbulence of the basal plane under irradiation. In situ XPS shows the oxidation of the irradiated multi-layer graphenes after air exposure.

  18. Atomically thin semiconducting layers and nanomembranes: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews the main physical properties of atomically thin semiconductors and the electronic devices based on them. We start with graphene, describing its physical properties and growth methods, followed by a discussion of its electronic device applications. Then, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are analyzed as a prototype of atomically thin semiconductors, their physical properties, growth methods, and electronic devices are discussed in detail. Finally, non-layered semiconducting membranes with thicknesses ranging from a few nanometers to about 50 nm, and considered as counterparts of atomically thin semiconductors, are analyzed, and their applications presented.

  19. One-Atom-Thick IR Metamaterials and Transformation Optics Using Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Vakil, Ashkan

    2011-01-01

    Here we theoretically show, by designing and manipulating spatially inhomogeneous, non-uniform conductivity patterns across a single flake of graphene, that this single-atom-layered material can serve as a "one-atom-thick" platform for infrared metamaterials and transformation optical devices. It is known that by varying the chemical potential using gate electric and/or magnetic fields, the graphene conductivity in the THz and IR frequencies can be changed. This versatility provides the possibility that different "patches" on a single flake of graphene possess different conductivities, suggesting a mechanism to construct "single-atom-thick" IR metamaterials and transformation optical structures. Our computer simulation results pave the way for envisioning numerous IR photonic functions and metamaterial concepts-all on a "one-atom-thick" platform-of such we list a few here: edge waveguides, bent ribbon-like paths guiding light, photonic splitters and combiners, "one-atom-thick" IR scattering elements as buildi...

  20. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  1. Graphene growth at the interface between Ni catalyst layer and SiO2/Si substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Song, Kwan-Woo; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2011-07-01

    Graphene was synthesized deliberately at the interface between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate as well as on top surface of Ni film using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which is suitable for large-scale and low-cost synthesis of graphene. The carbon atom injected at the top surface of Ni film can penetrate and reach to the Ni/SiO2 interface for the formation of graphene. Once we have the graphene in between Ni film and SiO2/Si substrate, the substrate spontaneously provides insulating SiO2 layer and we may easily get graphene/SiO2/Si structure simply by discarding Ni film. This growth of graphene at the interface can exclude graphene transfer step for electronic application. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy show that graphene was successfully synthesized at the back of Ni film and the coverage of graphene varies with temperature and time of synthesis. The coverage of graphene at the interface depends on the amount of carbon atoms diffused into the back of Ni film.

  2. Energetic Stabilities, Structural and Electronic Properties of Monolayer Graphene Doped with Boron and Nitrogen Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seba Sara Varghese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of single-layer graphene doped with boron and nitrogen atoms with varying doping concentrations and configurations have been investigated here via first-principles density functional theory calculations. It was found that the band gap increases with an increase in doping concentration, whereas the energetic stability of the doped systems decreases with an increase in doping concentration. It was observed that both the band gaps and the cohesive energies also depend on the atomic configurations considered for the substitutional dopants. Stability was found to be higher in N-doped graphene systems as compared to B-doped graphene systems. The electronic structures of B- and N-doped graphene systems were also found to be strongly influenced by the positioning of the dopant atoms in the graphene lattice. The systems with dopant atoms at alternate sublattices have been found to have the lowest cohesive energies and therefore form the most stable structures. These results indicate an ability to adjust the band gap as required using B and N atoms according to the choice of the supercell, i.e., the doping density and substitutional dopant sites, which could be useful in the design of graphene-based electronic and optical devices.

  3. Adsorption of monovalent metal atoms on graphene: a theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C [Grupo de Fisica de Superficies e Materiais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus Universitario da Federacao/Ondina, 40170-115, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J S, E-mail: caio@ufba.br [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia em Energia e Ambiente-INCT-E and A-CIENAM, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2010-03-19

    This work investigates, using first-principles calculations, electronic and structural properties of hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium that are adsorbed, in a regular pattern, on a graphene surface. The results for H-graphene (graphane) and Li-graphene were compared with previous calculations. The present results do not support previous claims that the Li-C bond in such a layer would result in an sp{sup 2} to an sp{sup 3} transition of carbon orbitals, being more compatible with some ionic character for the covalent bond and with lithium acting as an electron acceptor in a bridging environment. Calculations were also performed for the Na, K, and Rb-graphene systems, resulting in a similar electronic behaviour but with a more pronounced ionic character than for Li-graphene. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of such ad-graphene layers, with only the Li-graphene being possible to be spontaneously obtained.

  4. Resistance and rupture analysis of single- and few-layer graphene nanosheets impacted by various projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Liu, Ling

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a quasi-classical model for the collision of various nanoparticles with single- and few-layer graphene nanosheets was introduced as a multi-scale approach that couples non-equilibrium molecular dynamics with the Finite Element Method. As a resistance criterion, it was observed that the coefficient of restitution and the induced stresses depend on the impact velocity of projectile. These parameters were evaluated computationally, and it was revealed that certain resulting behaviors differ from behaviors at the macro scale. By obtaining an out-of-plane yield stress limit of 1.0 TPa for graphene, the stress analysis of single- and multi-layer graphene sheets revealed that the limit projectile velocity needed for the yielding of graphene sheets increases with the increase in the number of layers. For aluminum nanoparticles, this increase is almost linear, and for other metals, it slightly deviates from the linear trend. It was also observed that the graphene sheets have a different rupture form when impacted by gaseous molecules than by metal particles. Considering the very high momentum of gas molecules and their shock-like behavior during high-speed collisions with a graphene sheet, pores with a size of one carbon atom can be created in graphene sheets. Since a single-layer graphene sheet can withstand a projectile which is 3.64 times larger than a projectile impacting a 20-layer graphene sheet, spaced graphene sheets seem to be more effective in absorbing the impact energy of projectiles than conventional few-layer graphene sheets.

  5. Exposure of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) to atomic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisinger, Nathan P; Rutter, Gregory M; Crain, Jason N; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2009-04-01

    Graphene films on SiC exhibit coherent transport properties that suggest the potential for novel carbon-based nanoelectronics applications. Recent studies suggest that the role of the interface between single layer graphene and silicon-terminated SiC can strongly influence the electronic properties of the graphene overlayer. In this study, we have exposed the graphitized SiC to atomic hydrogen in an effort to passivate dangling bonds at the interface, while investigating the results utilizing room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy.

  6. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  7. Benchmarking the penetration-resistance efficiency of multilayer graphene sheets due to spacing the graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghzadeh, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the penetration-resistance efficiency of single-layer and multilayer graphene sheets has been investigated by means of the multiscale approach. The employed multiscale approach has been implemented by establishing a direct correlation between the finite element method and the molecular dynamics approach and validated by comparing its results with those of the existing experimental works. Since by using numerous techniques, a new class of graphene sheets can be fabricated in which the graphene layers are spaced farther apart (more than the usual distance between layers), this paper has concentrated on the optimal spacing between graphene layers with the goal of improving the impact properties of graphene sheets as important candidates for novel impact-resistant panels. For this purpose, the relative protection (protection with respect to weight) values of graphene sheets were obtained, and it was observed that the relative protection of a single-layer graphene sheet is about 3.64 times that of a 20-layer graphene sheet. This study also showed that a spaced multilayer graphene sheet, with its inter-layer distance being 20 times the usual spacing between ordinary graphene layers, has an impact resistance which is about 20 % higher than that of an ordinary 20-layer graphene sheet. The findings of this paper can be appropriately used in the design and fabrication of future-generation impact-resistant protective panels.

  8. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  9. Atomic level spatial variations of energy states along graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jamie H; Lin, Yung-Chang; He, Kuang; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2014-11-12

    The local atomic bonding of carbon atoms around the edge of graphene is examined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). High-resolution 2D maps of the EELS combined with atomic resolution annular dark field STEM images enables correlations between the carbon K-edge EELS and the atomic structure. We show that energy states of graphene edges vary across individual atoms along the edge according to their specific C-C bonding, as well as perpendicular to the edge. Unique spectroscopic peaks from the EELS are assigned to specific C atoms, which enables unambiguous spectroscopic fingerprint identification for the atomic structure of graphene edges with unprecedented detail.

  10. Mode-locking of an InAs Quantum Dot Based Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Using Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    disperse the graphene by physical adsorption on its surface. The dispersions are mixed with poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) in a polymer mixer. The...is a more bring color . The bottom structure shows the image of the structure after the incorporation of the GSAM in the VECSEL cavity. The single

  11. Layer compression and enhanced optical properties of few-layer graphene nanosheets induced by ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yang; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been recognized as an attractive two-dimensional material for fundamental research and wide applications in electronic and photonic devices owing to its unique properties. The technologies to modulate the properties of graphene are of continuous interest to researchers in multidisciplinary areas. Herein, we report on the first experimental observation of the layer-to-layer compression and enhanced optical properties of few-layer graphene nanosheets by applying the irradiation of energetic ion beams. After the irradiation, the space between the graphene layers was reduced, resulting in a tighter contact between the few-layer graphene nanosheet and the surface of the substrate. This processing also enhanced the interaction between the graphene nanosheets and the evanescent-field wave near the surface, thus reinforcing the polarization-dependent light absorption of the graphene layers (with 3-fold polarization extinction ratio increment). Utilizing the ion-irradiated graphene nanosheets as saturable...

  12. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  13. The work function of few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaerts, O.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Volodin, A.; Van Haesendonck, C.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the work function of few-layer graphene is reported. The influence of the number of layers on the work function is investigated in the presence of a substrate, a molecular dipole layer, and combinations of the two. The work function of few-layer graphene is almost independent of the number of layers with only a difference between monolayer and multilayer graphene of about 60 meV. In the presence of a charge-donating substrate the charge distribution is found to decay exponentially away from the substrate and this is directly reflected in the work function of few-layer graphene. A dipole layer changes the work function only when placed in between the substrate and few-layer graphene through a change of the charge transfer between the two.

  14. Delaminated graphene at silicon carbide facets: atomic scale imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Giuseppe; Ramasse, Quentin M; Deretzis, Ioannis; La Magna, Antonino; Spinella, Corrado; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2013-04-23

    Atomic-resolution structural and spectroscopic characterization techniques (scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy) are combined with nanoscale electrical measurements (conductive atomic force microscopy) to study at the atomic scale the properties of graphene grown epitaxially through the controlled graphitization of a hexagonal SiC(0001) substrate by high temperature annealing. This growth technique is known to result in a pronounced electron-doping (∼10(13) cm(-2)) of graphene, which is thought to originate from an interface carbon buffer layer strongly bound to the substrate. The scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis, carried out at an energy below the knock-on threshold for carbon to ensure no damage is imparted to the film by the electron beam, demonstrates that the buffer layer present on the planar SiC(0001) face delaminates from it on the (112n) facets of SiC surface steps. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals that the delaminated layer has a similar electronic configuration to purely sp2-hybridized graphene. These observations are used to explain the local increase of the graphene sheet resistance measured around the surface steps by conductive atomic force microscopy, which we suggest is due to significantly lower substrate-induced doping and a resonant scattering mechanism at the step regions. A first-principles-calibrated theoretical model is proposed to explain the structural instability of the buffer layer on the SiC facets and the resulting delamination.

  15. Isotropy of optical excitations in few-layer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shyu, F.L. [Department of Physics, R.O.C. Military Academy, 830 Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, C.W., E-mail: giorgio@fonran.com.t [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lin, M.F., E-mail: mflin@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, 701 Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-26

    The geometric and the most band structures of monolayer and AB-stacked bilayer graphenes exhibit strong anisotropy. Nevertheless, the absorption spectra are isotropic for the polarization vector on graphene plane. The velocity matrix elements dominate this property. These results suggest that AA- and AB-stacked few-layer graphenes and graphites manifest this feature.

  16. Water desalination using nanoporous single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P.; Smirnov, Sergei N.; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon M.

    2015-05-01

    By creating nanoscale pores in a layer of graphene, it could be used as an effective separation membrane due to its chemical and mechanical stability, its flexibility and, most importantly, its one-atom thickness. Theoretical studies have indicated that the performance of such membranes should be superior to state-of-the-art polymer-based filtration membranes, and experimental studies have recently begun to explore their potential. Here, we show that single-layer porous graphene can be used as a desalination membrane. Nanometre-sized pores are created in a graphene monolayer using an oxygen plasma etching process, which allows the size of the pores to be tuned. The resulting membranes exhibit a salt rejection rate of nearly 100% and rapid water transport. In particular, water fluxes of up to 106 g m-2 s-1 at 40 °C were measured using pressure difference as a driving force, while water fluxes measured using osmotic pressure as a driving force did not exceed 70 g m-2 s-1 atm-1.

  17. Water desalination using nanoporous single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Smirnov, Sergei N; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Unocic, Raymond R; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng; Mahurin, Shannon M

    2015-05-01

    By creating nanoscale pores in a layer of graphene, it could be used as an effective separation membrane due to its chemical and mechanical stability, its flexibility and, most importantly, its one-atom thickness. Theoretical studies have indicated that the performance of such membranes should be superior to state-of-the-art polymer-based filtration membranes, and experimental studies have recently begun to explore their potential. Here, we show that single-layer porous graphene can be used as a desalination membrane. Nanometre-sized pores are created in a graphene monolayer using an oxygen plasma etching process, which allows the size of the pores to be tuned. The resulting membranes exhibit a salt rejection rate of nearly 100% and rapid water transport. In particular, water fluxes of up to 10(6) g m(-2) s(-1) at 40 °C were measured using pressure difference as a driving force, while water fluxes measured using osmotic pressure as a driving force did not exceed 70 g m(-2) s(-1) atm(-1).

  18. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Karamat; S. Sonuşen; Ü. Çelik; Y. Uysallı; E. Özgönül; A. Oral

    2015-01-01

    The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties;in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM) value of 30 cm ? 1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm ? 1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm ? 1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm ? 1 as compare to single layer graphene which showed its

  19. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  20. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  1. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  2. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  3. Electromechanical coupling in atomically thin MoS2 and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Benameur, Muhammed Malik; Allain, Adrien; Ghadimi, Amirhossein; Tosun, Mahmut; Kis, Andras; Gargiulo, Fernando; Autès, Gabriel; Yazyev, Oleg V.

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) based on novel materials such as graphene and MoS2 allow studying their electromechanical characteristics. Here, we incorporate single and bilayer MoS2 and graphene into NEMS and investigated their electromechanical behavior. We observe a Strain-induced bandgap modulation in atomically thin MoS2 membranes with a thickness dependent modulation rate. Finite element modeling is used to extract the piezoresistive gauge factor for MoS2. In the case of graphene, deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance where an upper limit is estimated for the gauge factor. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. Our numerical simulations indicate that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our results reveal that atomically thin MoS2 membranes show strong piezoresistive effect, comparable to the state-of-the-art silicon sensors. Moreover, bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly novel physics allowing the rare observation of room temperature electronic interference phenomena.

  4. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  5. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Stacking sequence and interlayer coupling in few-layer graphene revealed by in situ imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Dong, Jichen; Cui, Yi; Eres, Gyula; Timpe, Olaf; Fu, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Schloegl, R.; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2016-01-01

    In the transition from graphene to graphite, the addition of each individual graphene layer modifies the electronic structure and produces a different material with unique properties. Controlled growth of few-layer graphene is therefore of fundamental interest and will provide access to materials with engineered electronic structure. Here we combine isothermal growth and etching experiments with in situ scanning electron microscopy to reveal the stacking sequence and interlayer coupling strength in few-layer graphene. The observed layer-dependent etching rates reveal the relative strength of the graphene–graphene and graphene–substrate interaction and the resulting mode of adlayer growth. Scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory calculations confirm a strong coupling between graphene edge atoms and platinum. Simulated etching confirms that etching can be viewed as reversed growth. This work demonstrates that real-time imaging under controlled atmosphere is a powerful method for designing synthesis protocols for sp2 carbon nanostructures in between graphene and graphite. PMID:27759024

  7. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  8. Bending stiffness and interlayer shear modulus of few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Yi, Chenglin; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2015-03-09

    Interlayer shear deformation occurs in the bending of multilayer graphene with unconstrained ends, thus influencing its bending rigidity. Here, we investigate the bending stiffness and interlayer shear modulus of few-layer graphene through examining its self-folding conformation on a flat substrate using atomic force microscopy in conjunction with nonlinear mechanics modeling. The results reveal that the bending stiffness of 2–6 layers graphene follows a square-power relationship with its thickness. The interlayer shear modulus is found to be in the range of 0.36–0.49 GPa. The research findings show that the weak interlayer shear interaction has a substantial stiffening effect for multilayer graphene.

  9. Nanosecond spin relaxation times in single layer graphene spin valves with hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simranjeet; Katoch, Jyoti; Xu, Jinsong; Tan, Cheng; Zhu, Tiancong; Amamou, Walid; Hone, James; Kawakami, Roland

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental study of spin transport in single layer graphene using atomic sheets of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as a tunnel barrier for spin injection. While h-BN is expected to be favorable for spin injection, previous experimental studies have been unable to achieve spin relaxation times in the nanosecond regime, suggesting potential problems originating from the contacts. Here, we investigate spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with h-BN barriers and observe room temperature spin lifetimes in excess of a nanosecond, which provides experimental confirmation that h-BN is indeed a good barrier material for spin injection into graphene. By carrying out measurements with different thicknesses of h-BN, we show that few layer h-BN is a better choice than monolayer for achieving high non-local spin signals and longer spin relaxation times in graphene.

  10. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  11. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...... of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new...... experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene....

  12. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A., E-mail: mah37@psu.edu [Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 314, Leonhard Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak-Joo [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advanced Meta-Materials (CAMM), 156 Gajungbuk-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  13. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, N.J.; Smith, D.; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, R.S.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; van Huis, M.A.; Swart, I.

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images a

  14. Magnetic Moment and Anisotropy of Individual Co Atoms on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, F.; Dubout, Q.; Autès, G.; Patthey, F.; Calleja, F.; Gambardella, P.; Yazyev, O. V.; Brune, H.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of single Co atoms on graphene on Pt(111). By means of scanning tunneling microscopy spin-excitation spectroscopy, we infer a magnetic anisotropy of K=-8.1meV with out-of-plane hard axis and a magnetic moment of 2.2μB. Co adsorbs on the sixfold graphene hollow site. Upon hydrogen adsorption, three differently hydrogenated species are identified. Their magnetic properties are very different from those of clean Co. Ab initio calculations support our results and reveal that the large magnetic anisotropy stems from strong ligand field effects due to the interaction between Co and graphene orbitals.

  15. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R S; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-02-14

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.

  16. Strong piezoelectricity in single-layer graphene deposited on SiO2 grating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Zelenovskiy, Pavel; Romanyuk, Konstantin; Luchkin, Sergey; Kopelevich, Yakov; Kholkin, Andrei

    2015-06-25

    Electromechanical response of materials is a key property for various applications ranging from actuators to sophisticated nanoelectromechanical systems. Here electromechanical properties of the single-layer graphene transferred onto SiO2 calibration grating substrates is studied via piezoresponse force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The correlation of mechanical strains in graphene layer with the substrate morphology is established via Raman mapping. Apparent vertical piezoresponse from the single-layer graphene supported by underlying SiO2 structure is observed by piezoresponse force microscopy. The calculated vertical piezocoefficient is about 1.4 nm V(-1), that is, much higher than that of the conventional piezoelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate and comparable to that of relaxor single crystals. The observed piezoresponse and achieved strain in graphene are associated with the chemical interaction of graphene's carbon atoms with the oxygen from underlying SiO2. The results provide a basis for future applications of graphene layers for sensing, actuating and energy harvesting.

  17. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  18. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P.; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05385k

  19. Energetics of atomic scale structure changes in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Bichoutskaia, Elena

    2015-05-21

    The presence of defects in graphene has an essential influence on its physical and chemical properties. The formation, behaviour and healing of defects are determined by energetic characteristics of atomic scale structure changes. In this article, we review recent studies devoted to atomic scale reactions during thermally activated and irradiation-induced processes in graphene. The formation energies of vacancies, adatoms and topological defects are discussed. Defect formation, healing and migration are quantified in terms of activation energies (barriers) for thermally activated processes and by threshold energies for processes occurring under electron irradiation. The energetics of defects in the graphene interior and at the edge is analysed. The effects of applied strain and a close proximity of the edge on the energetics of atomic scale reactions are overviewed. Particular attention is given to problems where further studies are required.

  20. Graphene-based multilayers constructed from layer-by-layer self-assembly techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Liu, Xiaomian; Cong, Hailin; Yuan, Hua; Wang, Dong; Li, Zejing

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and development of graphene-based multilayers fabricated from layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique. Graphene multilayer films, due to their excellent performances and specific applications, have attracted widespread attention during recent decades. In this paper, the preparation and property of self-assembled graphene multilayer films are introduced. The application of different graphene multilayer films in transparent conducting films (TCFs), field effect transistors (FETs), lithium ion batteries (LIBs), supercapacitors, and solar cells are summarized and discussed. The perspectives for the future developments of self-assembled graphene multilayer films are proposed.

  1. Observing atomic collapse resonances in artificial nuclei on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Shytov, Andrey V; Brar, Victor W; Choi, Sangkook; Wu, Qiong; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Regan, William; Zettl, Alex; Kawakami, Roland K; Louie, Steven G; Levitov, Leonid S; Crommie, Michael F

    2013-05-10

    Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, A.; Rizo, P. J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, C. J.; Banine, V.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    We use Raman spectroscopy to show that exposing few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5 nm) radiation, i.e., relatively low photon energy, results in an increasing density of defects. Furthermore, exposure to EUV radiation in a H2 background increases the graphene dosage sensitivity, du

  3. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  4. Edge states of graphene wrinkles in single-layer graphene grown on Ni(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Xiao, Wende; Wang, Dongfei; Yang, Kai; Tao, Lei; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2016-10-01

    As quasi-one-dimensional (1D) structures with characteristic widths of nanometer scale, graphene wrinkles (GWs) have been widely observed in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. Similar to conventional 1D graphene-based nanostructures, e.g., carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, 1D electron confinement has been observed in the GWs. However, it remains an open question whether the GWs have effective edges and exhibit corresponding edge states. Here, we report on the edge states of the GWs in single-layer graphene grown on Ni(111) by means of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We show that the GWs are decoupled from the substrate, while the surrounding planar graphene are strongly coupled with the substrate. The different graphene-substrate coupling leads to effective edges and 1D character of the GWs. The chiral edges of the GWs give rise to pronounced edge states around the Fermi level in the density of states.

  5. Epitaxial few-layer graphene: towards single crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibino, H; Kageshima, H; Nagase, M, E-mail: hibino@will.brl.ntt.co.j [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-09-22

    We review our research towards single-crystal growth of epitaxial few-layer graphene (FLG) on SiC substrates. We have established a method for evaluating the number of graphene layers microscopically using low-energy electron microscopy. Scanning probe microscopy in air is also useful for estimating the number-of-layers distribution in epitaxial FLG. The number-of-layers dependence of the work function and C1s binding energy is determined using photoelectron emission microscopy. We investigate the growth processes of epitaxial FLG on the basis of the microscopic observations of surface morphology and graphene distribution. To gain insights into the growth mechanism, we calculate the SiC surface structures with various C coverages using a first-principles scheme. Uniform bilayer graphene a few micrometres in size is obtained by annealing in UHV.

  6. Reduction of graphene oxide to graphene, A study of changes in the atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, A.; Wagner, A.; Mattevi, C.; Chov, A.; Liao, K.; Macosko, C.; Chhowalla, M.; Mkhoyan, K. A.

    2012-02-01

    An economic method for large scale production of graphene is based on exfoliation of graphite into 1-atom thick sheets by oxidation, creating graphene oxide (GO) and subsequent reduction of GO into graphene. Reduced GO sheets approach the highly desired properties of graphene, such as electrical conductivity and mechanical strength, to various degrees, but not completely. To understand why, we must understand the nanostructure of the sheets. Different methods of reduction result in products that are similar to graphene, but these products retain some oxidized areas or contain regions with sp^3 bonded carbon. The concentration and distribution of these defects on the reduced GO sheet affect the properties of the 2D material. Here, we have characterized the atomic structure of GO and reduced GO via high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data taken during thermal reduction of GO shows changes in the fine structure of carbon K-edge as the carbon changes from an oxidized form to elemental amorphous carbon to graphite like form, clearly delineating the process of reduction of GO to graphene. Products of several other reduction methods are also characterized revealing information on electronic environment surrounding carbon atoms, distribution of crystalline areas, and oxygen removal from GO.

  7. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  8. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  9. Atomic structure of epitaxial graphene sidewall nanoribbons: flat graphene, miniribbons, and the confinement gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Nair, Maya N; Gloter, Alexandre; Zobelli, Alberto; Sicot, Muriel; Malterre, Daniel; Nevius, Meredith S; de Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2015-01-14

    Graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewall facets of SiC have demonstrated exceptional quantized ballistic transport up to 15 μm at room temperature. Angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has shown that the ribbons have the band structure of charge neutral graphene, while bent regions of the ribbon develop a bandgap. We present scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of armchair nanoribbons grown on recrystallized sidewall trenches etched in SiC. We show that the nanoribbons consist of a single graphene layer essentially decoupled from the facet surface. The nanoribbons are bordered by 1-2 nm wide bent miniribbons at both the top and bottom edges of the nanoribbons. We establish that nanoscale confinement in the graphene miniribbons is the origin of the local large band gap observed in ARPES. The structural results presented here show how this gap is formed and provide a framework to help understand ballistic transport in sidewall graphene.

  10. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  11. Ballistic electron propagation through periodic few-layer graphene nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, Daniela; Mihalache, Iulia

    2016-10-01

    We have studied electron propagation in periodic structures containing mono- and few-layer graphene regions and/or semiconducting stripes. The calculation of the transmission coefficient in all cases has been performed using transfer matrices inside regions with the same material/potential energy, as well as interface matrices between regions in which the evolution laws of charge carriers differ. Numerical simulations of the transmission coefficient, as well as of the low-temperature conductance, suggest that different periodic structures modulate differently the electrical current. The obtained results can be used to model ballistic transport in all-graphene devices, in particular in few-layer graphene structures.

  12. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm−2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer. PMID:28220816

  13. Layer-by-Layer Insight into Electrostatic Charge Distribution of Few-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, Hossein; Lu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In few-layer graphene (FLG) systems on a dielectric substrate such as SiO2, the addition of each extra layer of graphene can drastically alter their electronic and structural properties. Here, we map the charge distribution among the individual layers of finite-size FLG systems using a novel spatial discrete model that describes both electrostatic interlayer screening and fringe field effects. Our results reveal that the charge density in the region very close to the edges is screened out an order of magnitude more weakly than that across the central region of the layers. Our discrete model suggests that the interlayer charge screening length in 1–8 layer thick graphene systems depends mostly on the overall gate/molecular doping level rather than on temperature, in particular at an induced charge density >5 × 1012 cm‑2, and can reliably be determined to be larger than half the interlayer spacing but shorter than the bilayer thickness. Our model can be used for designing FLG-based devices, and offers a simple rule regarding the charge distribution in FLG: approximately 70%, 20%, 6% and 3% (99% overall) of the total induced charge density reside within the four innermost layers, implying that the gate-induced electric field is not definitely felt by >4th layer.

  14. Addressing Raman features of individual layers in isotopically labeled Bernal stacked bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sara D.; Weis, Johan Ek; Frank, Otakar; Fridrichová, Michaela; Kalbac, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In this report important Raman modes for the evaluation of strain in graphene (the 2D and 2D‧) are analyzed. The isotope labeling is used to disentangle contribution of individual graphene layers of graphene bilayer to the studied Raman modes. It is shown that for Bernal-stacked bilayers, the 2D and the 2D‧ Raman modes have three distinct components that can be assigned to processes originating solely from the top graphene layer, bottom graphene layer, and from a combination of processes originating both from the top and bottom layers. The reported results thus enable addressing the properties of individual graphene layers in graphene bilayer by Raman spectroscopy.

  15. Adsorption of beryllium atoms and clusters both on graphene and in a bilayer of graphite investigated by DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Yves; Fernandez, Nicolas; Allouche, Alain; Linsmeier, Christian

    2013-01-09

    We herein investigate the interaction of beryllium with a graphene sheet and in a bilayer of graphite by means of periodic DFT calculations. In all cases, we find the beryllium atoms to be more weakly bonded on graphene than in the bilayer. Be(2) forms both magnetic and non-magnetic structures on graphene depending on the geometrical configuration of adsorption. We find that the stability of the Be/bilayer system increases with the size of the beryllium clusters inserted into the bilayer of graphite. We also find a charge transfer from beryllium to the graphite layers. All these results are analysed in terms of electronic structure.

  16. Nondestructive and in situ determination of graphene layers using optical fiber Fabry-Perot interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Peng, Xiaobin; Liu, Qianwen; Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao; Fan, Shangchun

    2017-02-01

    Thickness measurement plays an important role for characterizing optomechanical behaviors of graphene. From the view of graphene-based Fabry-Perot (F-P) sensors, a simple, nondestructive and in situ method of determining the thickness of nanothick graphene membranes was demonstrated by using optical fiber F-P interference. Few-layer/multilayer graphene sheets were suspendedly adhered onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125 µm inner diameter by van der Waals interactions to construct micro F-P cavities. Along with the Fresnel’s law and complex index of refraction of the membrane working as a light reflector of an F-P interferometer, the optical reflectivity of graphene was modeled to investigate the effects of light wavelength and temperature. Then the average thickness of graphene membranes were extracted by F-P interference demodulation, and yielded a very strong cross-correlation coefficient of 99.95% with the experimental results observed by Raman spectrum and atomic force microscope. The method could be further extended for determining the number of layers of other 2D materials.

  17. Complex Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Adam M; Olynick, Deirdre

    2015-10-14

    Complex materials are defined as nanostructured materials with combinations of structure and/or composition that lead to performance surpassing the sum of their individual components. There are many methods that can create complex materials; however, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is uniquely suited to control composition and structural parameters at the atomic level. The use of ALD for creating complex insulators, semiconductors, and conductors is discussed, along with its use in novel structural applications.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  19. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  20. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  1. Layer-by-layer graphene/TCNQ stacked films as conducting anodes for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2012-06-26

    Large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for transparent conducting electrode applications in flexible optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer photovoltaic devices using a pristine CVD graphene anode is still not appealing due to its much lower conductivity than that of conventional indium tin oxide. We report a layer-by-layer molecular doping process on graphene for forming sandwiched graphene/tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)/graphene stacked films for polymer solar cell anodes, where the TCNQ molecules (as p-dopants) were securely embedded between two graphene layers. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on these multilayered graphene/TCNQ anodes are fabricated and characterized. The P3HT/PCBM device with an anode structure composed of two TCNQ layers sandwiched by three CVD graphene layers shows optimum PCE (∼2.58%), which makes the proposed anode film quite attractive for next-generation flexible devices demanding high conductivity and transparency.

  2. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-05-16

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states.

  3. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  4. Ultraviolet dielectric hyperlens with layered graphene and boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junxia; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01

    The concept of hyperlens, as a novel transformation optics device, is a promising real-time super-resolution lens that can effectively transform evanescent waves into propagating waves and thus break the diffraction limit. However, previous hyperlens implementations usually adopted metal which would absorb most energy during light transmission and thus deteriorate imaging efficiency. Here we propose a novel hyperlens design based on dielectric layered graphene and h-boron nitride (h-BN) whose performance can surpass the counterpart design with metal. Our first-principle and Kramers-Kronig relation calculation shows that both layered graphene and layered h-BN exhibit strong anisotropic properties in ultraviolet spectrum regions, where their permittivity components perpendicular to the optic axis can be negative while the components parallel to the optic axis can be positive. Based on the anisotropic properties, flat and cylindrical hyperlenses are designed and numerically verified with layered graphene at 1200...

  5. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G; Qiao, Rui

    2014-12-17

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g. the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. The nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.

  6. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  7. Sublattice Localized Electronic States in Atomically Resolved Graphene-Pt(111) Edge-Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Merino-Mateo, Pablo; Pinardi, Anna Lisa; Méndez, Javier; López, María Francisca; Pérez, Rubén; Martín-Gago, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the connection of graphene with metal surfaces is a necessary step for developing atomically precise graphene-based technology. Combining high-resolution STM experiments and DFT calculations, we have unambiguously unveiled the atomic structure of the boundary between a graphene zigzag edge and a Pt(111) step. The graphene edges minimize their strain by inducing a 3-fold edge-reconstruction on the metal side. We show the existence of an unoccupied electronic state that is mostly ...

  8. Elastic Buckling Behaviour of General Multi-Layered Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ming Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elastic buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets is rigorously investigated. Van der Waals forces are modelled, to a first order approximation, as linear physical springs which connect the nodes between the layers. Critical buckling loads and their associated modes are established and analyzed under different boundary conditions, aspect ratios and compressive loading ratios in the case of graphene sheets compressed in two perpendicular directions. Various practically possible loading configurations are examined and their effect on buckling characteristics is assessed. To model more accurately the buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets, a physically more representative and realistic mixed boundary support concept is proposed and applied. For the fundamental buckling mode under mixed boundary support, the layers with different boundary supports deform similarly but non-identically, leading to resultant van der Waals bonding forces between the layers which in turn affect critical buckling load. Results are compared with existing known solutions to illustrate the excellent numerical accuracy of the proposed modelling approach. The buckling characteristics of graphene sheets presented in this paper form a comprehensive and wholesome study which can be used as potential structural design guideline when graphene sheets are employed for nano-scale sensing and actuation applications such as nano-electro-mechanical systems.

  9. Layer Number Dependence of Li(+) Intercalation on Few-Layer Graphene and Electrochemical Imaging of Its Solid-Electrolyte Interphase Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jingshu; Burgess, Mark; Zhang, Jiarui; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-04-26

    A fundamental question facing electrodes made out of few layers of graphene (FLG) is if they display chemical properties that are different to their bulk graphite counterpart. Here, we show evidence that suggests that lithium ion intercalation on FLG, as measured via stationary voltammetry, shows a strong dependence on the number of layers of graphene that compose the electrode. Despite its extreme thinness and turbostratic structure, Li ion intercalation into FLG still proceeds through a staging process, albeit with different signatures than bulk graphite or multilayer graphene. Single-layer graphene does not show any evidence of ion intercalation, while FLG with four graphene layers displays limited staging peaks, which broaden and increase in number as the layer number increases to six. Despite these mechanistic differences on ion intercalation, the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) was observed on all electrodes. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in the feedback mode was used to demonstrate changes in the surface conductivity of FLG during SEI evolution. Observation of ion intercalation on large area FLG was conditioned to the fabrication of "ionic channels" on the electrode. SECM measurements using a recently developed Li-ion sensitive imaging technique evidenced the role of these channels in enabling Li-ion intercalation through localized flux measurements. This work highlights the impact of nanostructure and microstructure on macroscopic electrochemical behavior and provides guidance to the mechanistic control of ion intercalation using graphene, an atomically thin interface where surface and bulk reactivity converge.

  10. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W.; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H.; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  12. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  13. Synthesis, properties, and dispersion of few-layer graphene fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayfer, Ekaterina D; Makotchenko, Viktor G; Kibis, Lidiya S; Boronin, Andrei I; Pazhetnov, Egor M; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I; Fedorov, Vladimir E

    2013-09-01

    We have fluorinated few-layer graphene (FLG) by using a low-temperature fluorination route with gaseous ClF3. The treatment process resulted in a new graphene derivative with a finite approximate composition of C2F. TEM studies showed that the product consisted of thin transparent sheets with no more than 10 fluorographene layers stacked together. Spectroscopic methods revealed a predominantly covalent nature of the C-F bonds in the as-synthesized product and we found no evidence for the existence of so-called "semi-ionic" C-F bonds, as observed in bulk C(x)F. In contrast to the case of graphite and typical (thick) expanded graphites, fluorination of FLG did not lead to the intercalation of ClF3 molecules, owing to the lack of a 3D layered structure. The approximate "critical" number of graphene layers that were necessary to form a phase of intercalated compound was estimated to be more than 12, thus providing a "chemical proof" of the difference between the properties of few-layered graphenes and bulk graphites. Fluorographene C2F was successfully delaminated into thinner layers in organic solvents, which is an important property for its integration into electronic devices, nanohybrids, etc.

  14. Interfacial effect on the electrochemical properties of the layered graphene/metal sulfide composites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yagang; Chen, Biao; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Liu, Enzuo

    2016-09-01

    The layered graphene/metal sulfide composites exhibit excellent electrochemical properties as anode materials for lithium ion battery, due to the synergistic effect between metal sulfide and graphene which still needs to be further understood. In this study, Li adsorption and diffusion on MoS2 and SnS2 monolayers and Li2S surface, as well as at their interfaces with graphene, are systematically investigated through first-principles calculations. The analysis of charge density difference, Bader charge, and density of states indicates that the adsorbed Li atoms interact with both the S atoms at metal sulfide surfaces and C atoms in graphene, resulting in larger Li adsorption energies at the interfaces compared with that on the corresponding surfaces, but with almost no enhancement of the energy barriers for Li atom diffusion. The enhanced Li adsorption capability at Li2S/G interface contributes to the extra storage capacity of graphene/metal sulfide composites. Furthermore, the synergistic mechanism between metal sulfide and graphene is revealed. Moreover, band structure analysis shows the electronic conductivity is enhanced with the incorporation of graphene. The results corroborate the interfacial pseudocapacity-like Li atom storage mechanism, and are helpful for the design of layered graphene/metal sulfide composites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

  15. Spatial atomic layer deposition: a route towards further industrialization of atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Cameron, D.C.; Dickey, E.; George, S.M.; Kuznetsov, V.; Parsons, G.N.; Roozeboom, F.; Sundaram, G.; Vermeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique capable of producing ultrathin conformal films with atomic level control over thickness. A major drawback of ALD is its low deposition rate, making ALD less attractive for applications that require high throughput processing. An approach to overcome this

  16. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  17. Fabrication of graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yuze; Luo, Jing, E-mail: jingluo19801007@126.com; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-10-15

    A novel graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer film was fabricated by electrostatic interactions induced layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using water dispersible and negatively charged chemically converted graphene (CCG) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) as building blocks. CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide, which remained carboxyl group on its surface. The remaining carboxyl groups not only retain the dispersibility of CCG, but also allow the growth of the multilayer films via electrostatic interactions between graphene and PANI. The structure and morphology of the obtained CCG/PANI multilayer film are characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrum (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical properties of the resulting film are studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which showed that the resulting CCG/PANI multilayer film kept electroactivity in neutral solution and showed outstanding cyclic stability up to 100 cycles. Furthermore, the composite film exhibited good electrocatalytic ability toward ascorbic acid (AA) with a linear response from 1×10{sup −4} to 1.2×10{sup −3} M with the detect limit of 5×10{sup −6} M. This study provides a facile and effective strategy to fabricate graphene/PANI nanocomposite film with good electrochemical property, which may find potential applications in electronic devices such as electrochemical sensor. - Graphical abstract: A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. - Highlights: • A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. • The water dispersible and negatively charged graphene (CCG) was used as building block. • CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide with carboxyl group on its surface. • CCG/PANI film kept

  18. Synthesis and characterization of graphene layers prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition using triphenylphosphine as precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrapa, G.C.; Maia da Costa, M.E.H. Maia [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Larrude, D.G., E-mail: dunigl@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brazilian Center for Physical Research, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    The synthesis of a single-layer graphene using a low-pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system with triphenylphosphine as precursor is reported. The amount of triphenylphosphine used as precursor was in the range of 10–40 mg. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze samples prepared with 10 mg of the precursor, and these spectra were found typical of graphene. The Raman measurements indicate that the progressive degradation of graphene occurs as the amount of triphenylphosphine increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the different chemical environments involving carbon and phosphorous atoms. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also employed and the results reveal the formation of dispersed nanostructures on top of the graphene layer, In addition, the number of these nanostructures is directly related to the amount of precursor used for sample growth. - Highlights: • We grow graphene using the solid precursor triphenylphosphine. • Raman analysis confirms the presence of monolayer graphene. • SEM images show the presence of small dark areas dispersed on the graphene surface. • Raman I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio increases in the dark region of the graphene surface.

  19. Graphene-layered steps and their fields visualized by 4D electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Tae; Yurtsever, Aycan; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-06-04

    Enhanced image contrast has been seen at graphene-layered steps a few nanometers in height by means of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) using synchronous femtosecond pulses of light and electrons. The observed steps are formed by the edges of graphene strips lying on the surface of a graphene substrate, where the strips are hundreds of nanometers in width and many micrometers in length. PINEM measurements reflect the interaction of imaging electrons and induced (near) electric fields at the steps, and this leads to a much higher contrast than that achieved in bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging of the same strips. Theory and numerical simulations support the experimental PINEM findings and elucidate the nature of the electric field at the steps formed by the graphene layers. These results extend the range of applications of the experimental PINEM methodology, which has previously been demonstrated for spherical, cylindrical, and triangular nanostructures, to shapes of high aspect ratio (rectangular strips), as well as into the regime of atomic layer thicknesses.

  20. Adsorption of two sodium atoms on graphene -- A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gagandeep, E-mail: gaganj1981@yahoo.com [Department of Physics & Centre of Advanced Studies in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Chandigarh Engineering College, Landran, Mohali, Punjab (India); Rani, Babita, E-mail: babitabaghla15@gmail.com [Department of Physics & Centre of Advanced Studies in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Department of Physics, Punjabi University Patiala-147002 (India); Gupta, Shuchi, E-mail: sgupta@pu.ac.in [University Institute of Engineering & Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh -160014 (India); Dharamvir, Keya, E-mail: keya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics & Centre of Advanced Studies in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We perform a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of two sodium atoms on graphene using the SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, magnetic moment and charge transfer of the Na{sub n}-graphene (n=1, 2) system are calculated. Three initial horizontal orientations of the pair of sodium atoms on graphene are studied. Our calculations reveal that sodium atoms bind weakly to the graphene surface which is in agreement with previous results. We also notice a charge transfer of 0.288e from a sodium adatom to the graphene sheet altering its magnetic moment (−0.318 µ{sub B}) that is reduced from the gas phase value of the isolated atom (1 µ{sub B}). The calculated adsorption energies suggest that clustering of Na atoms on graphene is energetically favorable.

  1. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W [Columbia University

    2015-02-16

    atom, provides information about the electronic structure of graphene and is particularly sensitive to the sign and magnitude of the charge transfer between graphene and any surface adsorbed species. Results: (A) Graphene on SiO2 In an effort designed to unravel aspects of the mechanisms for chemistry on graphene surfaces, STM and STS were employed to show that graphene on SiO2 is oxidized at lower temperatures than either graphite or multi-layer graphene. Two independent factors control this charge transfer: (1) the degree of graphene coupling to the substrate, and (2) exposure to oxygen and moisture. (B) Graphene on Copper In the case of graphene grown on copper surfaces, we found that the graphene grows primarily in registry with the underlying copper lattice for both Cu(111) and Cu(100). On Cu(111) the graphene has a hexagonal superstructure with a significant electronic component, whereas it has a linear superstructure on Cu(100). (C) Nitrogen Doped Graphene on Copper Using STM we have also studied the electronic structure and morphology of graphene films grown on a copper foil substrate in which N atoms substitute for carbon in the 2-D graphene lattice. The salient features of the results of this study were: (1) Nitrogen doped graphene on Cu foil exhibits a triangular structure with an “apparent” slight elevation of ~ 0.8 Å at N atom substitution sites; (2) Nitrogen doping results in ~0.4 electrons per N atom donated to the graphene lattice; (3) Typical N doping of graphene on Cu foil shows mostly single site Carbon atom displacement (~ 3N/1000C); (4) Some multi-site C atom displacement is observed (<10% of single site events). (D) Boron Doped Graphene on Copper We also used scanning tunneling microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice

  2. Electron tunneling in single layer graphene with an energy gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xu-Guang; Zhang Chao; Xu Gong-Jie; Cao Jun-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    When a single layer graphene is epitaxially grown on silicon carbide, it will exhibit a finite energy gap like a conventional semiconductor, and its energy dispersion is no longer linear in momentum in the low energy regime. In this paper, we have investigated the tunneling characteristics through a two-dimensional barrier in a single layer graphene with an energy gap. It is found that when the electron is at a zero angle of incidence, the transmission probability as a function of incidence energy has a gap. Away from the gap the transmission coefficient oscillates with incidence energy which is analogous to that of a conventional semiconductor. The conductance under zero temperature has a gap. The properties of electron transmission may be useful for developing graphene-based nano-electronics.

  3. Band Gap Opening Induced by the Structural Periodicity in Epitaxial Graphene Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Nair, Maya; Palacio, Irene; Celis, Arlensiú; Zobelli, Alberto; Gloter, Alexandre; Kubsky, Stefan; Turmaud, Jean-Philippe; Conrad, Matthew; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Conrad, Edward H; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Tejeda, Antonio

    2017-04-12

    The epitaxial graphene buffer layer on the Si face of hexagonal SiC shows a promising band gap, of which the precise origin remains to be understood. In this work, we correlate the electronic to the atomic structure of the buffer layer by combining angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM). We show that the band structure in the buffer has an electronic periodicity related to the structural periodicity observed in STM images and published X-ray diffraction. Our HR-STEM measurements show the bonding of the buffer layer to the SiC at specific locations separated by 1.5 nm. This is consistent with the quasi 6 × 6 periodic corrugation observed in the STM images. The distance between buffer C and SiC is 1.9 Å in the bonded regions and up to 2.8 Å in the decoupled regions, corresponding to a 0.9 Å corrugation of the buffer layer. The decoupled regions are sp(2) hybridized. Density functional tight binding (DFTB) calculations demonstrate the presence of a gap at the Dirac point everywhere in the buffer layer, even in the decoupled regions where the buffer layer has an atomic structure close to that of graphene. The surface periodicity also promotes band in the superperiodic Brillouin zone edges as seen by photoemission and confirmed by our calculations.

  4. Electronic properties of impurity-infected few-layer graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mehran [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Spurred by achievements in devising different multilayered graphene-based nano-systems, based on the random tight-binding Hamiltonian model and within the coherent potential approximation, the influence of varying the number of layers and the effect of doping by the boron and nitrogen impurities on the density of states of a mono- and few-layer armchair- and zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons are theoretically investigated. When the nanoribbons are pristine, with increasing the number of layers the band gap of the armchair nanoribbons is decreased, yet the zigzag ribbons remain metallic and depending on the number of the layers few peaks are appeared around the zero-energy level. Moreover, in the presence of impurities, the band gap of the armchair nanoribbons is decreased for each number of layers. The Van-Hove singularities are steadily broadened and the density of states move to a higher (lower) value of the energy as a result of doping with boron (nitrogen) atoms. This study could provide with us to explore and devise new optoelectronic devices based on the impurity-infected graphene nanoribbons with tunable widths and edges.

  5. Strain Engineering of Kapitza Resistance in Few-Layer Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10–10 m2K/W at ...

  6. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  7. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C., E-mail: gsolomon@nano.ku.dk [Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, 2100 København Ø (Denmark)

    2015-12-07

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  8. Short-range ordering of ion-implanted nitrogen atoms in SiC-graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willke, P.; Druga, T.; Wenderoth, M. [IV. Physikalisches Institut der Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Amani, J. A.; Weikert, S.; Hofsäss, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut der Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Thakur, S.; Maiti, K. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials' Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-09-15

    We perform a structural analysis of nitrogen-doped graphene on SiC(0001) prepared by ultra low-energy ion bombardment. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that nitrogen atoms are incorporated almost exclusively as graphitic substitution in the graphene honeycomb lattice. With an irradiation energy of 25 eV and a fluence of approximately 5 × 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2}, we achieve a nitrogen content of around 1%. By quantitatively comparing the position of the N-atoms in the topography measurements with simulated random distributions, we find statistically significant short-range correlations. Consequently, we are able to show that the dopants arrange preferably at lattice sites given by the 6 × 6-reconstruction of the underlying substrate. This selective incorporation is most likely triggered by adsorbate layers present during the ion bombardment. This study identifies low-energy ion irradiation as a promising method for controlled doping in epitaxial graphene.

  9. Nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Ruey-Lin; Han, Dezhuan

    2014-02-24

    Based on the effective medium model, nonlocal optical properties in periodic lattice of graphene layers with the period much less than the wavelength are investigated. Strong nonlocal effects are found in a broad frequency range for TM polarization, where the effective permittivity tensor exhibits the Lorentzian resonance. The resonance frequency varies with the wave vector and coincides well with the polaritonic mode. Nonlocal features are manifest on the emergence of additional wave and the occurrence of negative refraction. By examining the characters of the eigenmode, the nonlocal optical properties are attributed to the excitation of plasmons on the graphene surfaces.

  10. Selective gas transport through few-layered graphene and graphene oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Won; Yoon, Hee Wook; Yoon, Seon-Mi; Yoo, Byung Min; Ahn, Byung Kook; Cho, Young Hoon; Shin, Hye Jin; Yang, Hoichang; Paik, Ungyu; Kwon, Soongeun; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Ho Bum

    2013-10-04

    Graphene is a distinct two-dimensional material that offers a wide range of opportunities for membrane applications because of ultimate thinness, flexibility, chemical stability, and mechanical strength. We demonstrate that few- and several-layered graphene and graphene oxide (GO) sheets can be engineered to exhibit the desired gas separation characteristics. Selective gas diffusion can be achieved by controlling gas flow channels and pores via different stacking methods. For layered (3- to 10-nanometer) GO membranes, tunable gas transport behavior was strongly dependent on the degree of interlocking within the GO stacking structure. High carbon dioxide/nitrogen selectivity was achieved by well-interlocked GO membranes in high relative humidity, which is most suitable for postcombustion carbon dioxide capture processes, including a humidified feed stream.

  11. Negative Differential Resistance in Atomic Carbon Chain-Graphene Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安丽萍; 刘春梅; 刘念华

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of atomic carbon chain-graphene junctions by using the density-functionla theory combining with the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The results show that the transport properties are sensitively dependent on the contact geometry of carbon chain. From the calculated I-V curve we find negative differential resistance (NDR) in the two types of junctions. The NDR can be considered as a result of molecular orbitals moving related to the bias window.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  13. Kapitza Resistance between Few-Layer Graphene and Water: Liquid Layering Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Dmitry; Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2015-01-01

    The Kapitza resistance (RK) between few-layer graphene (FLG) and water was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The RK was found to depend on the number of the layers in the FLG though, surprisingly, not on the water blockthickness. This distinct size dependence is attributed to the larg...

  14. Electrochemical double-layer capacitors based on functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Michael Allan

    Graphene is a promising electrode material for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) used for energy storage due to its high electrical conductivity and theoretical specific surface area. However, the intrinsic capacitance of graphene is known to be low and governed by the electronic side of the interface. Furthermore, graphene tends to aggregate and stack together when processed into thick electrode films. This significantly lowers the ion-accessible specific surface area (SSA). Maximizing both the SSA and the intrinsic capacitance are the main problems addressed in this thesis in an effort to improve the specific capacitance and energy density of EDLCs. In contrast to pristine graphene, functionalized graphene produced by the thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide contains residual functional groups and lattice defects. To study how these properties affect the double-layer capacitance, a model electrode system capable of measuring the intrinsic electrochemical properties of functionalized graphene was developed. To prevent artifacts and uncertainties related to measurements on porous electrodes, the functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) were assembled as densely tiled monolayers using a Langmuir-Blodgett technique. In this way, charging can be studied in a well-defined 2D geometry. The possibility of measuring and isolating the intrinsic electrochemical properties of FGS monolayers was first demonstrated by comparing capacitance and redox probe measurements carried out on coatings deposited on passivated gold and single crystal graphite substrates. This monolayer system was then used to follow the double-layer capacitance of the FGS/electrolyte interface as the structure and chemistry of graphene was varied by thermal treatments ranging from 300 °C to 2100 °C. Elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the resulting chemical and structural transformation upon heat treatment. It was demonstrated that intrinsically defective

  15. Building 3D Layer-by-Layer Graphene-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Architecture with Tunable Interlayer Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-26

    the entire surface of graphene within such 3D layer-by-layer hybrid nanomaterials would be exposed to electrolyte ions to facilitate the charging...B.; Li, Y. L.; Li, Y. M.; Li, J. H.; Deng, Z. X. Noncovalent DNA decorations of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide toward water -soluble metal...Building 3D Layer-by-Layer Graphene −Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Architecture with Tunable Interlayer Distance Chenming Xue,† Min Gao,† Yuhua Xue,‡ Lin

  16. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  17. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  18. Cross-sectional imaging of individual layers and buried interfaces of graphene-based heterostructures and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, S. J.; Gholinia, A.; Jalil, R.; Romani, S.; Britnell, L.; Elias, D. C.; Novoselov, K. S.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Geim, A. K.; Gorbachev, R.

    2012-09-01

    By stacking various two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals on top of each other, it is possible to create multilayer heterostructures and devices with designed electronic properties. However, various adsorbates become trapped between layers during their assembly, and this not only affects the resulting quality but also prevents the formation of a true artificial layered crystal upheld by van der Waals interaction, creating instead a laminate glued together by contamination. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has shown that graphene and boron nitride monolayers, the two best characterized 2D crystals, are densely covered with hydrocarbons (even after thermal annealing in high vacuum) and exhibit only small clean patches suitable for atomic resolution imaging. This observation seems detrimental for any realistic prospect of creating van der Waals materials and heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces. Here we employ cross sectional TEM to take a side view of several graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. We find that the trapped hydrocarbons segregate into isolated pockets, leaving the interfaces atomically clean. Moreover, we observe a clear correlation between interface roughness and the electronic quality of encapsulated graphene. This work proves the concept of heterostructures assembled with atomic layer precision and provides their first TEM images.

  19. Fabrication of patterned flexible graphene devices via facile direct transfer of as-grown bi-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Heun; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Yoon, Jangyeol [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kuk Ki; Park, Seung Min [Department of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jeong Sook, E-mail: jeongsha@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Patterned bi-layer graphene was directly transferred onto various polymer substrates by using micro-contact printing technique. • Coating of dimethylformamide onto the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp enhanced the adhesion between the bi-layer graphene and the PDMS stamp. • Patterned graphene devices showed mechanically stable electrical properties upon repeated bending cycles. - Abstract: We report on the fabrication of patterned flexible graphene devices via a facile direct transfer of bi-layer graphene grown on alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrate, and the use of Ag nanowire stickers as flexible electrodes. Patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps coated with vaporized dimethylformamide (DMF) are utilized to transfer as-grown graphene directly onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The facile direct transfer is attributed to the enhanced adhesion of the bi-layer graphene to PDMS, due to DMF-coating, as well as the weak adhesion between the bi-layer graphene and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. In this way, flexible patterned graphene devices have been fabricated with Ag nanowire stickers as electrodes. Stable electrical conduction characteristics were measured over repetitive bending with a bending radius down to 5 mm.

  20. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  1. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  2. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  3. Graphene-like single-layered covalent organic frameworks: synthesis strategies and application prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan-He; Guan, Cui-Zhong; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2014-10-29

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and transition metal chalcogenides, show many interesting dimension-related materials properties. Inspired by the development of 2D inorganic nanomaterials, single-layered covalent organic frameworks (sCOFs), featuring atom-thick sheets and crystalline extended organic structures with covalently bonded building blocks, have attracted great attention in recent years. With their unique graphene-like topological structure and the merit of structural diversity, sCOFs promise to possess novel and designable properties. However, the synthesis of sCOFs with well-defined structures remains a great challenge. Herein, the recent development of the bottom-up synthesis methods of 2D sCOFs, such as thermodynamic equilibrium control methods, growth-kinetics control methods, and surface-assisted covalent polymerization methods, are reviewed. Finally, some of the critical properties and application prospects of these materials are outlined.

  4. The effect of atomic-scale defects and dopants on graphene electronic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Martinazzo, Rocco; Casolo, Simone; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2011-01-01

    Graphene, being one-atom thick, is extremely sensitive to the presence of adsorbed atoms and molecules and, more generally, to defects such as vacancies, holes and/or substitutional dopants. This property, apart from being directly usable in molecular sensor devices, can also be employed to tune graphene electronic properties. Here we briefly review the basic features of atomic-scale defects that can be useful for material design. After a brief introduction on isolated $p_z$ defects, we analy...

  5. Graphene-protected iron layer on Ni(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedkov, Yuriy [FHI, Berlin (Germany); Fonin, Mikhail; Ruediger, Ulrich [Uni, Konstanz (Germany); Laubschat, Clemens [TU, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic thin films with out-of-plane (or perpendicular) magnetic anisotropy play an important role in nanotechnology. Such systems can be used as perpendicular recording media which are predicted to allow information storage densities of up to 1 Tbit/in.{sup 2} a quadrupling of today's highest areal densities. Along with the widely used materials with out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy such as CoPt or FePt alloys, face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe thin films also showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have recently attracted considerable interest as possible candidates for applications in novel magnetic data storage devices. Here Fe which originally has body centered cubic (bcc) structure can be stabilized in {gamma} phase (fcc) at room temperature in thin epitaxial films grown on suitable fcc substrates. Here we report a photoemission study of the Fe intercalation underneath a graphene layer on Ni(111). The process of intercalation was monitored by means of x-ray photoemission of corresponding core levels as well as ultraviolet photoemission of the graphene-derived {pi} states in the valence band. Thin fcc Fe layers (2-5 ML thickness) at the interface between a graphene capping layer and Ni(111) form epitaxial films passivated from the reactive environment.

  6. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2014-11-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp(2) carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations.

  7. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

  8. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  9. Chemical nature of boron and nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene strongly influences its electronic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Petr; Zbořil, Radek; Pumera, Martin; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-07-21

    Boron and nitrogen doped graphenes are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, such as energy storage, generation and sensing. The doped graphenes can be prepared by a broad variety of chemical approaches. The substitution of a carbon atom should induce n-type behavior in the case of nitrogen and p-type behavior in the case of boron-doped graphene; however, the real situation is more complex. The electrochemical experiments show that boron-doped graphene prepared by hydroboration reaction exhibits similar properties as the nitrogen doped graphene; according to theory, the electrochemical behavior of B and N doped graphenes should be opposite. Here we analyze the electronic structure of N/B-doped graphene (at ∼5% coverage) by theoretical calculations. We consider graphene doped by both substitution and addition reactions. The density of states (DOS) plots show that graphene doped by substitution of the carbon atom by N/B behaves as expected, i.e., as an n/p-doped material. N-doped graphene also has a lower value of the workfunction (3.10 eV) with respect to that of the pristine graphene (4.31 eV), whereas the workfunction of B-doped graphene is increased to the value of 5.57 eV. On the other hand, the workfunctions of graphene doped by addition of -NH2 (4.77 eV) and -BH2 (4.54 eV) groups are both slightly increased and therefore the chemical nature of the dopant is less distinguishable. This shows that mode of doping depends significantly on the synthesis method used, as it leads to different types of behaviour, and, in turn, different electronic and electrochemical properties of doped graphene, as observed in electrocatalytic experiments. This study has a tremendous impact on the design of doped graphene systems from the point of view of synthetic chemistry.

  10. High resolution transmission electron microscope Imaging and first-principles simulations of atomic-scale features in graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-thin membranes such as graphene[1] are of great importance for basic science and technology applications. Graphene sets the ultimate limit of thinness, demonstrating that a free-standing single atomic layer not only exists but can be extremely stable and strong [2--4]. However, both theory [5, 6] and experiments [3, 7] suggest that the existence of graphene relies on intrinsic ripples that suppress the long-wavelength thermal fluctuations which otherwise spontaneously destroy long range order in a two dimensional system. Here we show direct imaging of the atomic features in graphene including the ripples resolved using monochromatic aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compare the images observed in TEM with simulated images based on an accurate first-principles total potential. We show that these atomic scale features can be mapped through accurate first-principles simulations into high resolution TEM contrast. [1] Geim, A. K. & Novoselov, K. S. Nat. Mater. 6, 183-191, (2007). [2] Novoselov, K. S.et al. Science 306, 666-669, (2004). [3] Meyer, J. C. et al. Nature 446, 60-63, (2007). [4] Lee, C., Wei, X. D., Kysar, J. W. & Hone, J. Science 321, 385-388, (2008). [5] Nelson, D. R. & Peliti, L. J Phys-Paris 48, 1085-1092, (1987). [6] Fasolino, A., Los, J. H. & Katsnelson, M. I. Nat. Mater. 6, 858-861, (2007). [7] Meyer, J. C. et al. Solid State Commun. 143, 101-109, (2007).

  11. Vapour phase growth and grain boundary structure of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmaei, Sina; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Wu; Zou, Xiaolong; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; Yakobson, Boris I; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Single-layered molybdenum disulphide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for the next generation of nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapour phase synthesis of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area, single- and few-layered films. Using high-resolution electron microscopy imaging, the atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulphide atomic layers are examined, and the primary mechanisms for grain boundary formation are evaluated. Grain boundaries consisting of 5- and 7- member rings are directly observed with atomic resolution, and their energy landscape is investigated via first-principles calculations. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

  12. A X-ray diffraction analysis on graphene layers of Assam coal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Binoy K Saikia; Rajani K Boruah; Pradip K Gogoi

    2009-01-01

    The so-called turbostatic structure of carbons in coal with randomly oriented stacking of the lamellae (graphene) produces intense peaks, which are the dominant features in its X-ray diffraction profiles. The diffractogram may be conveniently divided into two regions of reciprocal space, the medium S region (1 < S < 3 Å) and a high S region (S > 3 Å) where = 4 -1 sin. To better understand the molecular level structure of high sulphur Assam coal, two coal samples (Tirap-1 and Tirap-2) from Tirap colliery of Makum coalfield, Assam (India) has been interpreted in this study by using the X-ray diffraction profiles. Random layered (graphene) structural parameters of these coals were determined by using X-ray diffraction technique, which showed that the and are 64.99 Å and 22.63 Å for Tirap-2 and 55.54 Å and 23.80 Å for that of Tirap-1 coals respectively. The position of band was found to be at 4.34 Å and 4.13 Å for Tirap-2 and Tirap-1 coals respectively. The number of layers and average number of carbon atoms (N) per aromatic graphene were found to be 21 and 8 for both the coal samples. Proximate, ultimate and ash analysis of the two coal samples were also carried out in this investigation.

  13. A X-ray diffraction analysis on graphene layers of Assam coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, B.K.; Boruah, R.K.; Gogoi, P.K. [CSIR, Jorhat (India)

    2009-01-15

    The so-called turbostatic structure of carbons in coal with randomly oriented stacking of the lamellae (graphene) produces intense peaks, which are the dominant features in its X-ray diffraction profiles. The diffractogram may be conveniently divided into two regions of reciprocal space, the medium S region (1 < S < 3 {angstrom}) and a high S region (S > 3 {angstrom}) where S = 4 {pi} {lambda} {sup -1}sin{theta}. To better understand the molecular level structure of high sulphur Assam coal, two coal samples (Tirap-1 and Tirap-2) from Tirap colliery of Makum coalfield, Assam (India) has been interpreted in this study by using the X-ray diffraction profiles. Random layered (graphene) structural parameters of these coals were determined by using X-ray diffraction technique, which showed that the L{sub a} and L{sub c} are 64.99 angstrom and 22.63 angstrom for Tirap-2 and 55.54 angstrom and 23.80 angstrom for that of Tirap-1 coals respectively. The position of {gamma} band was found to be at 4.34 {angstrom} and 4.13 angstrom for Tirap-2 and Tirap-1 coals respectively. The number of layers and average number of carbon atoms (N) per aromatic graphene were found to be 21 and 8 for both the coal samples. Proximate, ultimate and ash analysis of the two coal samples were also carried out in this investigation.

  14. Electronic Properties of Graphene Encapsulated with Different Two-Dimensional Atomic Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the only substrate that has so far allowed graphene devices exhibiting micron-scale ballistic transport. Can other atomically flat crystals be used as substrates for making quality graphene heterostructures? Here we report on our search for alternative substrates. The devices fabricated by encapsulating graphene with molybdenum or tungsten disulphides and hBN are found to exhibit consistently high carrier mobilities of about 60,000 cm$^{2}$V$^{-1}$s$^{-1}$. In contr...

  15. Substrate-Independent Growth of Atomically Precise Chiral Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Contributing to the need for new graphene nanoribbon (GNR) structures that can be synthesized with atomic precision, we have designed a reactant that renders chiral (3,1)-GNRs after a multistep reaction including Ullmann coupling and cyclodehydrogenation. The nanoribbon synthesis has been successfully proven on different coinage metals, and the formation process, together with the fingerprints associated with each reaction step, has been studied by combining scanning tunneling microscopy, core-level spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. In addition to the GNR’s chiral edge structure, the substantial GNR lengths achieved and the low processing temperature required to complete the reaction grant this reactant extremely interesting properties for potential applications. PMID:27548516

  16. Layer-by-layer assembly of thin films containing exfoliated pristine graphene nanosheets and polyethyleneimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2014-03-11

    A method for the modification of surface properties through the deposition of stabilized graphene nanosheets is described. Here, the thickness of the film is controlled through the use of the layer-by-layer technique, where the sequential adsorption of the cationic polyethyleneimine (PEI) is followed by the adsorption of anionic graphene sheets modified with layers of polyethylene oxide-polypropylene oxide-polyethylene oxide (PEO-PPO-PEO) surfactants. The graphene particles were prepared using the surfactant-assisted liquid-phase exfoliation technique, with the low residual negative charge arising from edge defects. The buildup of the multilayer assembly through electrostatic interactions was strongly influenced by the solution conditions, including pH, ionic strength, and ionic species. Thereby, not only could the thickness of the film be tailored through the choice of the number of bilayers deposited but the viscoelastic properties of the film could also be modified by changing solution conditions at which the different species were deposited. The quartz crystal microbalance was used to measure the mass of graphene and polyelectrolyte immobilized at the interface as well as to probe the energy dissipated in the adsorbed layer.

  17. First-principles study of hydrogen adsorption on titanium-decorated single-layer and bilayer graphenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Hong-Zhe; Wang Yong-Long; He Kai-Hua; Wei Ming-Zhen; Ouyang Yu; Chen Li

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen molecules on titanium-decorated (Ti-decorated) single-layer and bilayer graphenes is studied using density functional theory (DFT) with the relativistic effect.Both the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) are used for obtaining the region of the adsorption energy of H2 molecules on Ti-decorated graphene.We find that a graphene layer with titanium (Ti) atoms adsorbed on both sides can store hydrogen up to 9.51 wt% with average adsorption energy in a range from-0.170 eV to-0.518 eV.Based on the adsorption energy criterion,we find that chemisorption is predominant for H2 molecules when the concentration of H2 molecules absorbed is low while physisorption is predominant when the concentration is high.The computation results for the bilayer graphene decorated with Ti atoms show that the lower carbon layer makes no contribution to hydrogen adsorption.

  18. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition of Few-Layer Graphene on Copper Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Víctor-Manuel Freire; Badia-Canal, Jordi; Roca, Carles Corbella; Miralles, Esther Pascual; Serra, Enric Bertran; Bella, José-Luís Andújar

    2013-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on copper is an efficient technology for producing high-quality graphene for large areas. The objective of this work is to deposit graphene/few-layer graphene (FLG) using different types of copper substrate by a new hot-wire CVD process. We carried out the processes at temperatures below 1000 °C with acetylene (C2H2) as a precursor gas. After a general characterization of the samples, the results mostly indicate the formation of FLG on copper samples by this method. Nevertheless, the presence of pure, crystalline, and sufficiently flat surfaces is needed for depositing high-quality graphene layers.

  20. Atomically Precise Bottom-up Fabrication of Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinming

    2011-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) -- narrow stripes of graphene -- are predicted to exhibit remarkable properties making them suitable for future electronic applications. Contrary to their two-dimensional (2D) parent material graphene, which exhibits semimetallic behavior, GNRs with widths smaller than 10 nm are predicted to be semiconductors due to quantum confinement and edge effects. Despite significant advances in GNR fabrication using chemical, sonochemical and lithographic methods as well as recent reports on the successful unzipping of carbon nanotubes into GNRs, the production of sub-10 nm GNRs with chemical precision remains a major challenge. In this talk, we will present a simple GNR fabrication method that allows for the production of atomically precise GNRs of different topologies and widths. Our bottom-up approach consists in the surface-assisted coupling of suitably designed molecular precursors into linear polyphenylenes and their subsequent cyclodehydrogenation, and results in GNRs whose topology, width and edge periphery are defined by the precursor monomers. By means of STM and Raman characterization, we demonstrate that this fabrication process allows for the atomically precise fabrication of complex GNR topologies. Furthermore, we have developed a reliable procedure to transfer GNRs fabricated on metal surfaces onto other substrates. It will for example be shown that millimeter sized sheets of crosslinked GNRs can be transferred onto silicon wafers, making them available for further processing, e.g. by lithography, prototype device fabrication and characterization. Coauthors: Pascal Ruffieux, Rached Jaafar, Marco Bieri, Thomas Braun, and Stephan Blankenburg, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, 3602 Thun and 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland; Matthias Muoth, ETH Zurich, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland; Ari P. Seitsonen, University of Zurich, Physical Chemistry Institute, 8057

  1. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2007-12-01

    Reaction pathways are presented for hydrogen-mediated isomerization of a five and six member carbon ring complex on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction sequence that reverses orientation of the ring complex, or 'flips' it, was identified. Competition between the flip reaction and 'ring separation' was examined. Ring separation is the reverse of the five and six member ring complex formation reaction, previously reported as 'ring collision'. The elementary steps of the pathways were analyzed using density-functional theory (DFT). Rate coefficients were obtained by solution of the energy master equation and classical transition state theory utilizing the DFT energies, frequencies, and geometries. The results indicate that the flip reaction pathway dominates the separation reaction and should be competitive with other pathways important to the graphene zigzag edge growth in high temperature environments.

  2. Graphene as an efficient interfacial layer for electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Bult, Justin B; Nanayakkara, Sanjini; Dillon, Anne C; Richards, Ryan M; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Engtrakul, Chaiwat

    2015-06-03

    This study presents an interfacial modification strategy to improve the performance of electrochromic films that were fabricated by a magnetron sputtering technique. High-quality graphene sheets, synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, were used to modify fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates, followed by the deposition of high-performance nanocomposite nickel oxide electrochromic films. Electrochromic cycling results revealed that a near-complete monolayer graphene interfacial layer improves the electrochromic performance in terms of switching kinetics, activation period, coloration efficiency, and bleached-state transparency, while maintaining ∼100% charge reversibility. The present study offers an alternative route for improving the interfacial properties between electrochromic and transparent conducting oxide films without relying on conventional methods such as nanostructuring or thin film composition control.

  3. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  5. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  6. Quantum Dots and Andreev Reflections in Graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.L.

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is an exceptionally thin semiconductor that consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms. The electrons in graphene live in a strictly two-dimensional (2D) world. In addition to this remarkable 2Dness, it is also peculiar that the behavior of the electrons in graphene is governed by th

  7. Detecting single graphene layer by using fluorescence from high-speed Ar^7+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    A highly-charged-ion interacting with graphite causes structural change in nano-scales [1]. While when the ion's kinetic energy reaches few MeVs, the induced is not the structural change but electronic excitation. An experiment [2] showed fluorescence from Ar^7+ ions penetrating through carbon foil with kinetic energy of 2 MeV. Motivated by this experiment, we tested interaction between an Ar^7+ ion and a graphene sheet by the time-dependent density functional approach, and found that the electronic excitation in the Ar^ 7+ ion is also the case even when the incident kinetic energy is 500 KeV and the target thickness is only mono-atomic layer. This simulation suggests the possibility of detecting a suspended mono-atomic layer of graphene [3] by monitoring fluorescence from the penetrated Ar^7+ ions. We will discuss its importance for analyzing bombardment of solids by highly charged, high-speed ions and possible experiments according to the present result. References: [1] T. Meguro, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 79, 3866 (2001). [2] S. Bashkin, H. Oona, E. Veje, Phys, Rev. A25, 417 (1982). [3] J. Mayer et al., Nature (London), 446, 60 (2007).

  8. Graphene reknits its holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Ramasse, Quentin M; Bangert, Ursel; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2012-08-08

    Nanoholes, etched under an electron beam at room temperature in single-layer graphene sheets as a result of their interaction with metal impurities, are shown to heal spontaneously by filling up with either nonhexagon, graphene-like, or perfect hexagon 2D structures. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was employed to capture the healing process and study atom-by-atom the regrown structure. A combination of these nanoscale etching and reknitting processes could lead to new graphene tailoring approaches.

  9. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  10. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  11. Evolution of Raman G and G'(2D) Modes in Folded Graphene Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-01-01

    Bernal- and non-Bernal-stacked graphene layers have been systematically studied by Raman imaging and spectroscopy. Two dominant Raman modes, G and G'(or 2D) of folded graphene layers exhibit three types of spectral features when interlayer lattice mismatch, defined by a rotational angle varies. Among these folded graphene layers, the most interesting one is the folded graphene layers that present an extremely strong G mode enhanced by a twist-induced Van Hove singularities. The evolution of Raman G and G' modes of such folded graphene layers are probed by changing the excitation photon energies. For the first time, doublet splitting of the G' mode in folded double-layer (1 + 1) and the G mode in folded tetra-layer (2 + 2) graphene are clearly observed. The G' mode splitting in folded double-layer graphene is attributed to the coexistence of inner and outer scattering processes and the trigonal warping effect. While the two peaks of the G mode in folded tetra-layer graphene are assigned to Raman-active mode (E...

  12. Gap opening and tuning in single-layer graphene with combined electric and magnetic field modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xin; Wang Hai-Long; Pan Hui; Xu Huai-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    The energy band structure of single-layer graphene under one-dimensional electric and magnetic field modulation is theoretically investigated. The criterion for bandgap opening at the Dirac point is analytically derived with a two-fold degeneracy second-order perturbation method. It is shown that a direct or an indirect bandgap semiconductor could be realized in a single-layer graphene under some specific configurations of the electric and magnetic field arrangement. Due to the bandgap generated in the single-layer graphene, the Klein tunneling observed in pristine graphene is completely suppressed.

  13. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  14. Biomass derived solvents for the scalable production of single layered graphene from graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Singh, Nripat; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-07-12

    Among four different biomass derived green and sustainable solvents namely levulinic acid (LA), ethyl lactate (EL), γ-valerolactone (GVL) and formic acid (FA) only LA was found to exfoliate graphite to single and few layered graphene sheets. During exfoliation, the formation of LA crystals embedded with single layered graphene sheets was observed. The process is scalable and the solvent can be recovered and reused in five subsequent cycles of exfoliation for the large scale production of graphene sheets.

  15. Surface-plasmons lasing in double-graphene-layer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinov, A. A. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Aleshkin, V. Ya. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of Russian Academy of Sciences, and Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Shur, M. S. [Department of Electrical, Electronics, and System Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute for Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    We consider the concept of injection terahertz lasers based on double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures with metal surface-plasmon waveguide and study the conditions of their operation. The laser under consideration exploits the resonant radiative transitions between GLs. This enables the double-GL laser room temperature operation and the possibility of voltage tuning of the emission spectrum. We compare the characteristics of the double-GL lasers with the metal surface-plasmon waveguides with those of such laser with the metal-metal waveguides.

  16. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Irigoyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO–polyelectrolyte (PE capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS. Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  17. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)-polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  18. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Institute Center for Microsystems–iMicro, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cimen, Furkan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Alkis, Sabri [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  19. An analysis of electrochemical energy storage using electrodes fabricated from atomically thin 2D structures of MoS2, graphene and MoS2/graphene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffstutler, Jacob D.

    The behavior of 2D materials has become of great interest in the wake of development of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and the discovery of monolayer graphene by Geim and Novoselov. This study aims to analyze the response variance of 2D electrode materials for EDLCs prepared through the liquid-phase exfoliation method when subjected to differing conditions. Once exfoliated, samples are tested with a series of structural characterization methods, including tunneling electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A new ionic liquid for EDLC use, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate is compared in performance to 6M potassium hydroxide aqueous electrolyte. Devices composed of liquid-phase exfoliated graphene / MoS2 composites are analyzed by concentration for ideal performance. Device performance under cold extreme temperatures for the ionic fluid is presented as well. A brief overview of by-layer analysis of graphene electrode materials is presented as-is. All samples were tested with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, with good capacitive results. The evolution of electrochemical behavior through the altered parameters is tracked as well.

  20. Prediction of structural and mechanical properties of atom-decorated porous graphene via density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Reza; Ajori, Shahram; Malakpour, Sina

    2016-04-01

    The considerable demand for novel materials with specific properties has motivated the researchers to synthesize supramolecular nanostructures through different methods. Porous graphene is the first two-dimensional hydrocarbon synthesized quite recently. This investigation is aimed at studying the mechanical properties of atom-decorated (functionalized) porous graphene by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculation within both local density approximations (LDA) and generalized gradient approximations (GGA). The atoms are selected from period 3 of periodic table as well as Li and O atom from period 2. The results reveal that metallic atoms and noble gases are adsorbed physically on porous graphene and nonmetallic ones form chemical bonds with carbon atom in porous graphene structure. Also, it is shown that, in general, atom decoration reduces the values of mechanical properties such as Young's, bulk and shear moduli as well as Poisson's ratio, and this reduction is more considerable in the case of nonmetallic atoms (chemical adsorption), especially oxygen atoms, as compared to metallic atoms and noble gases (physical adsorption).

  1. 石墨烯片的制备与表征%Preparation and characterization of graphene and few-layer graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯颖; 黄世华; 康凯; 段晓霞

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene was prepared from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by micromechanical cleavage and transferred to the silicaon coated with silicon dioxide ( SiO2/Si). The thickness of graphene on the SiO2/Si support was investigated by color and contrast variations under an optical microscope. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the number of layers. Results show that a monolayer,double layers and multiple layers of graphene were prepared. The optical microscope images can give a satisfactory identification of the graphene thickness on SiO2/Si. In the Raman spectrum the 2D band is narrower and G band is weaker for double layers than that for multiple layers. Chemical vapor deposition was also used to grow large area ( ~cm2) graphene. However, micromechanical cleavage is a more simple method to prepare graphene.%通过微机械剥离高定向热解石墨(HOPG)法和化学气相沉积法(CVD)分别制备了不同层数的石墨烯片,并将其转移到硅片上.利用石墨烯片在不同厚度SiO2硅片上光学显微图像颜色及对比度存在的差异,对其层数进行了识别与区分.采用原子力显微镜(AFM)和拉曼(Raman)光谱判定了所制石墨烯片的层数.结果表明:所制石墨烯片有单层、少数层和多层.与双层石墨烯片的Raman谱图比较,多层石墨烯片的2D模线宽变宽,G模强度增大.此外,CVD法可生长出大面积(~cm2)的石墨烯片.

  2. Mechanical properties of graphene cantilever from atomic force microscopy and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuli, R; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M

    2010-05-07

    We have studied the mechanical properties of a few-layer graphene cantilever (FLGC) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the suspended FLGC over an open hole have been derived from the AFM data. Force displacement curves using the Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov (DMT) and the massless cantilever beam models yield a Young modulus of E(c) approximately 37, E(a) approximately 0.7 TPa and a Hamakar constant of approximately 3 x 10( - 18) J. The threshold force to shear the FLGC was determined from a breaking force and modeling. In addition, we studied a graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which is a system similar to the FLGC; using density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane Young's modulus for the GNRs were calculated from the DFT outcomes approximately 0.82 TPa and the results were compared with the experiment. We found that the Young's modulus and the threshold shearing force are dependent on the direction of applied force and the values are different for zigzag edge and armchair edge GNRs.

  3. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-08-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces.

  4. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  5. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    ' interaction with graphene, and applied to address the challenge of dispersing bare-surfaced GNPs for efficient liquid-phase catalysis. We also revisited the functionalization of graphene and present a non-invasive surface introduction of interfaceable moieties. Isostructural to graphene, ultrathin BN sheet is another atomic-thick nanomaterial possessing a highly diverse set of properties inconceivable from graphene. Exfoliating UTBNSs has been challenging due to their exceptional intersheet-bonding and chemical-inertness. To develop applications of BN monolayers and evolve research, a facile lab-scale approach was desired that can produce processable dispersions of BN monolayers. We demonstrated a novel chlorosulfonic acid based treatment that resulted in protonation assisted layer-by-layer exfoliation of BN monolayers with highest reported yields till date. Further, the BN monolayers exhibited extensively protonated N centers, which are utilized for chemically interfacing GNPs, demonstrating their ability to act as excellent nano-templates. The scientific details obtained from the research shown here will significantly support current research activities and greatly impact their future applications. Our research findings have been published in ACS Nano, Small, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, MRS Proceedings and have gathered >45 citations.

  6. Low-frequency phonons of few-layer graphene within a tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Van Alsenoy, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Few-layer graphene is a layered carbon material with covalent bonding in the layers and weak van der Waals interactions between the layers. The interlayer energy is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the intralayer one, which hinders the description of the static and dynamic properties within electron band structure models. We overcome this difficulty by introducing two sets of matrix elements—one set for the covalent bonds in the graphene layers and another one for the van der Waals interactions between adjacent graphene layers in a tight-binding model of the band structure. Both sets of matrix elements are derived from an ab initio study on carbon dimers. The matrix elements are applied in the calculation of the phonon dispersion of graphite and few-layer graphene with AB and ABC layer stacking. The results for few-layer graphene with AB stacking agree well with the available experimental data, which justifies the application of the matrix elements to other layered carbon structures with van der Waals interactions such as few-layer graphene nanoribbons, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and carbon onions.

  7. Graphene-like two-dimensional layered nanomaterials: applications in biosensors and nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guohai; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Zhu, Junjie; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology provides promising opportunities for various important applications. The recent discovery of atomically-thick two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials can offer manifold perspectives to construct versatile devices with high-performance to satisfy multiple requirements. Many studies directed at graphene have stimulated renewed interest on graphene-like 2D layered nanomaterials (GLNs). GLNs including boron nitride nanosheets, graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2 and WS2) have attracted significant interest in numerous research fields from physics and chemistry to biology and engineering, which has led to numerous interdisciplinary advances in nano science. Benefiting from the unique physical and chemical properties (e.g. strong mechanical strength, high surface area, unparalleled thermal conductivity, remarkable biocompatibility and ease of functionalization), these 2D layered nanomaterials have shown great potential in biochemistry and biomedicine. This review summarizes recent advances of GLNs in applications of biosensors and nanomedicine, including electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy. Current challenges and future perspectives in these rapidly developing areas are also outlined. It is expected that they will have great practical foundation in biomedical applications with future efforts.

  8. Nanoprocessing of layered crystalline materials by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shojiro; Wang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    By taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy of crystalline materials, processing at a single-layer level can be realized for layered crystalline materials with periodically weak bonds. Mica (muscovite), graphite, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and boron nitride have layered structures, and there is little interaction between the cleavage planes existing in the basal planes of these materials. Moreover, it is easy to image the atoms on the basal plane, where the processed shape can be observed on the atomic level. This study reviews research evaluating the nanometer-scale wear and friction as well as the nanometer-scale mechanical processing of muscovite using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It also summarizes recent AFM results obtained by our research group regarding the atomic-scale mechanical processing of layered materials including mica, graphite, MoS2, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  9. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic characterizations of few-layer graphene by pulsed excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Witte, Russell S.; Xin, Hao

    2016-04-01

    We characterized the thermoacoustic and photoacoustic properties of large-area, few-layer graphene by pulsed microwave and optical excitations. Due to its high electric conductivity and low heat capacity per unit area, graphene lends itself to excellent microwave and optical energy absorption and acoustic signal emanation due to the thermoacoustic effect. When exposed to pulsed microwave or optical radiation, distinct thermoacoustic and photoacoustic signals generated by the few-layer graphene are obtained due to microwave and laser absorption of the graphene, respectively. Clear thermoacoustic and photoacoustic images of large-area graphene sample are achieved. A numerical model is developed and the simulated results are in good accordance with the measured ones. This characterization work may find applications in ultrasound generator and detectors for microwave and optical radiation. It may also become an alternative characterization approach for graphene and other types of two-dimensional materials.

  10. Strong THz and Infrared Optical Forces on a Suspended Single-Layer Graphene Sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Mousavi, S Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Single-layer graphene exhibits exceptional mechanical properties attractive for optomechanics: it combines low mass density, large tensile modulus, and low bending stiffness. However, at visible wavelengths, graphene absorbs weakly and reflects even less, thereby inadequate to generate large optical forces needed in optomechanics. Here, we numerically show that a single-layer graphene sheet is sufficient to produce strong optical forces under terahertz or infrared illumination. For a system as simple as graphene suspended atop a uniform substrate, high reflectivity from the substrate is crucial in creating a standing-wave pattern, leading to a strong optical force on graphene. This force is readily tunable in amplitude and direction by adjusting the suspension height. In particular, repellent optical forces can levitate graphene to a series of stable equilibrium heights above the substrate. One of the key parameters to maximize the optical force is the excitation frequency: peak forces are found near the scat...

  11. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dong [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiang, Lan, E-mail: jianglan@bit.edu.cn [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Feng; Li, Xin [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Qu, Liangti [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2015-10-23

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons.

  12. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    N. M. R. Peres, K. S. Novoselov , A. K. Geim, The electronic properties of graphene. Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 109 (2009). doi:10.1103/RevModPhys.81.109...12. K. S. Novoselov et al., Two-dimensional gas of massless Dirac fermions in graphene. Nature 438, 197 (2005). doi:10.1038/nature04233 Medline 13. Y

  13. Highly ordered ultralong magnetic nanowires wrapped in stacked graphene layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz El Mel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and magnetic characterization of ultralong (1 cm arrays of highly ordered coaxial nanowires with nickel cores and graphene stacking shells (also known as metal-filled carbon nanotubes. Carbon-containing nickel nanowires are first grown on a nanograted surface by magnetron sputtering. Then, a post-annealing treatment favors the metal-catalyzed crystallization of carbon into stacked graphene layers rolled around the nickel cores. The observed uniaxial magnetic anisotropy field oriented along the nanowire axis is an indication that the shape anisotropy dominates the dipolar coupling between the wires. We further show that the thermal treatment induces a decrease in the coercivity of the nanowire arrays. This reflects an enhancement of the quality of the nickel nanowires after annealing attributed to a decrease of the roughness of the nickel surface and to a reduction of the defect density. This new type of graphene–ferromagnetic-metal nanowire appears to be an interesting building block for spintronic applications.

  14. Size-controlled InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs with an ITO/graphene transparent layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Phil; Seong, Won-Seok; Min, Jung-Hong; Kong, Duk-Jo; Seo, Dong-Ju; Kim, Hyung-jun; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2016-11-01

    We introduce ITO on graphene as a current-spreading layer for separated InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs for the purpose of passivation-free and high light-extraction efficiency. Transferred graphene on InGaN/GaN nanorods effectively blocks the diffusion of ITO atoms to nanorods, facilitating the production of transparent ITO/graphene contact on parallel-nanorod LEDs, without filling the air gaps, like a bridge structure. The ITO/graphene layer sufficiently spreads current in a lateral direction, resulting in uniform and reliable light emission observed from the whole area of the top surface. Using KOH treatment, we reduce series resistance and reverse leakage current in nanorod LEDs by recovering the plasma-damaged region. We also control the size of the nanorods by varying the KOH treatment time and observe strain relaxation via blueshift in electroluminescence. As a result, bridge-structured LEDs with 8 min of KOH treatment show 15 times higher light-emitting efficiency than with 2 min of KOH treatment.

  15. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  16. Multi-layer graphene membrane based memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahlo, Andrei I.; Popov, Andrey M.; Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Ratkevich, Sergey V.

    2016-10-01

    The scheme and operational principles of the nanoelectromechanical memory cell based on the bending of a multi-layer graphene membrane by the electrostatic force are proposed. An analysis of the memory cell total energy as a function of the memory cell sizes is used to determine the sizes corresponding to a bistable memory cell with the conducting ON and non-conducting OFF states and to calculate the switching voltage between the OFF and ON states. It is shown that a potential barrier between the OFF and ON states is huge for practically all sizes of a bistable memory cell which excludes spontaneous switching and allows the proposed memory cell to be used for long-term archival storage.

  17. Electrochemically Produced Graphene for Microporous Layers in Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Leeuwner, Magrieta J; Wilkinson, David P; Gyenge, Előd L

    2016-07-01

    The microporous layer (MPL) is a key cathodic component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells owing to its beneficial influence on two-phase mass transfer. However, its performance is highly dependent on material properties such as morphology, porous structure, and electrical resistance. To improve water management and performance, electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EGN) microsheets are considered as an alternative to the conventional carbon black (CB) MPLs. The EGN-based MPLs decrease the kinetic overpotential and the Ohmic potential loss, whereas the addition of CB to form a composite EGN+CB MPL improves the mass-transport limiting current density drastically. This is reflected by increases of approximately 30 and 70 % in peak power densities at 100 % relative humidity (RH) compared with those for CB- and EGN-only MPLs, respectively. The composite EGN+CB MPL also retains the superior performance at a cathode RH of 20 %, whereas the CB MPL shows significant performance loss.

  18. Relaxation Properties of Single Layer Graphene on SiO2 Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weidong; Li, Shuai; Min, Jiaojiao; Shen, Cuili

    2015-04-01

    The relaxation properties of single layer graphene sheet on the SiO2 substrate are investigated through molecular dynamics simulation technique in this article. The graphene sheet models with different aspect ratios on SiO2 substrate are established and sufficiently relaxed at different thermodynamic temperatures. Subsequently, the morphology, equilibrium position and undulation of graphene on SiO2 substrate are discussed. It is observed that after sufficient relaxation processes, all the graphene sheets are adsorbed on SiO2 substrates and have some certain degree of undulations both on the edge and in the inner surface rather than perfect planar structures. Further observation from the simulation results shows that with different initial distances between the graphene sheet and SiO2 substrate, the graphene sheet would eventually stabilize to an identical equilibrium level at the same temperature. In addition, the final average distance between the graphene sheet and the substrate is a constant of 3.44 A at 0.01 K, in close proximity to the value of parameter r in Lennard-Jones potential function, and the higher the temperature is, the larger the final distance becomes. The results also indicate that for the same size of the graphene sheet, the increasing of temperature significantly aggravates the undulation of graphene sheet. With the increase of aspect ratios, the undulation of the graphene sheet is also aggravated, even the graphene sheet would crimp to a certain extent.

  19. SHG/2PF microscopy of single and multi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekachev, Alexander V.; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Vanbel, Maarten; Van der Veen, Monique A.; Stesmans, André L.; Heyns, Marc M.; De Gendt, Stefan; Verbiest, Thierry

    2012-10-01

    Since the discovery of graphene in 2004 by Novoselov and Geim, a lot of research emphasis has been directed towards its characterization. Most of the important scientific breakthroughs have been obtained on exfoliated graphene (produced via the well known `scotch tape' method), nowadays, different synthetic routes have been developed to obtain largescale graphene. Among several optical techniques, Raman spectroscopy is the one most often employed to characterize the defects, number of graphene layers and other properties of the graphitic films regardless of their fabrication method. In this work, we will report on the microscopic imaging of the two-photon fluorescence (2PF) properties and the second harmonic generation (SHG) in both single layer and few layer graphene.

  20. Few-layers graphene oxide for NO2 gas sensor on plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Muhammad M.; Isa, Siti S. Mat; Jamlos, M. F.; Murad, S. A. Z.; Isa, M. Mohamad; Kasjoo, S. R.; Ahmad, N.; Nor, N. I. M.; Khalid, N.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum filtration method was used in order to fabricate a homogeneous and uniform thin film of multi-layer graphene oxide on plastic substrate. This self-regulating technique allows the number of graphene oxide layer to be controlled thus controlling the film thickness by simply varying either the concentration of the graphene oxide in the suspension or the filtration volume. Measurement of the sheet resistance as a function of graphene oxide concentration in solution shows the percolation behavior of multi-layer films. The device was then exposed in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) environment at room temperature and 200 °C, under atmospheric pressure. Results demonstrate that the graphene oxide film shows good sensitivity and excellent recovery time using plastic substrate.

  1. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  2. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-14

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.

  3. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-03

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future.

  4. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic tra

  5. Unstacked double-layer templated graphene for high-rate lithium-sulphur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Tian, Gui-Li; Nie, Jing-Qi; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Preventing the stacking of graphene is essential to exploiting its full potential in energy-storage applications. The introduction of spacers into graphene layers always results in a change in the intrinsic properties of graphene and/or induces complexity at the interfaces. Here we show the synthesis of an intrinsically unstacked double-layer templated graphene via template-directed chemical vapour deposition. The as-obtained graphene is composed of two unstacked graphene layers separated by a large amount of mesosized protuberances and can be used for high-power lithium-sulphur batteries with excellent high-rate performance. Even after 1,000 cycles, high reversible capacities of ca. 530 mA h g-1 and 380 mA h g-1 are retained at 5 C and 10 C, respectively. This type of double-layer graphene is expected to be an important platform that will enable the investigation of stabilized three-dimensional topological porous systems and demonstrate the potential of unstacked graphene materials for advanced energy storage, environmental protection, nanocomposite and healthcare applications.

  6. In situ observation of graphene sublimation and multi-layer edge reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I; Lu, Ping; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju

    2009-06-23

    We induced sublimation of suspended few-layer graphene by in situ Joule-heating inside a transmission electron microscope. The graphene sublimation fronts consisted of mostly {1100} zigzag edges. Under appropriate conditions, a fractal-like "coastline" morphology was observed. Extensive multiple-layer reconstructions at the graphene edges led to the formation of unique carbon nanostructures, such as sp(2)-bonded bilayer edges (BLEs) and nanotubes connected to BLEs. Flat fullerenes/nanopods and nanotubes tunneling multiple layers of graphene sheets were also observed. Remarkably, >99% of the graphene edges observed during sublimation are BLEs rather than monolayer edges (MLEs), indicating that BLEs are the stable edges in graphene at high temperatures. We reproduced the "coastline" sublimation morphologies by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations. The simulation revealed geometrical and topological features unique to quasi-2-dimensional (2D) graphene sublimation and reconstructions. These reconstructions were enabled by bending, which cannot occur in first-order phase transformations of 3D bulk materials. These results indicate that substrate of multiple-layer graphene can offer unique opportunities for tailoring carbon-based nanostructures and engineering novel nano-devices with complex topologies.

  7. Controlled Synthesis of Atomically Layered Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN is an attractive material for many applications including electronics as a complement to graphene, anti-oxidation coatings, light emitters, etc. However, the synthesis of high-quality h-BN is still a great challenge. In this work, via controlled chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN films with a controlled thickness down to atomic layers. The quality of as-grown h-BN is confirmed by complementary characterizations including high-resolution transition electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. This work will pave the way for production of large-scale and high-quality h-BN and its applications as well.

  8. Systematic study on the sensitivity enhancement in graphene plasmonic sensors based on layer-by-layer self-assembled graphene oxide multilayers and their reduced analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyungwha; Rani, Adila; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yonghwi; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Sang Ouk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-01-14

    The use of graphene in conventional plasmonic devices was suggested by several theoretic research studies. However, the existing theoretic studies are not consistent with one another and the experimental studies are still at the initial stage. To reveal the role of graphenes on the plasmonic sensors, we deposited graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films on Au films and their refractive index (RI) sensitivity was compared for the first time in SPR-based sensors. The deposition of GO bilayers with number of deposition L from 1 to 5 was carried out by alternative dipping of Au substrate in positively- and negatively charged GO solutions. The fabrication of layer-by-layer self-assembly of the graphene films was monitored in terms of the SPR angle shift. GO-deposited Au film was treated with hydrazine to reduce the GO. For the rGO-Au sample, 1 bilayer sample showed a higher RI sensitivity than bare Au film, whereas increasing the rGO film from 2 to 5 layers reduced the RI sensitivity. In the case of GO-deposited Au film, the 3 bilayer sample showed the highest sensitivity. The biomolecular sensing was also performed for the graphene multilayer systems using BSA and anti-BSA antibody.

  9. Three-dimensional spirals of atomic layered MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Liu, Kaihui; Wong, Andrew Barnabas; Kim, Jonghwan; Hong, Xiaoping; Liu, Chong; Cao, Ting; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Feng; Yang, Peidong

    2014-11-12

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, including graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), can exhibit novel phenomena distinct from their bulk counterparts and hold great promise for novel electronic and optoelectronic applications. Controlled growth of such 2D materials with different thickness, composition, and symmetry are of central importance to realize their potential. In particular, the ability to control the symmetry of TMD layers is highly desirable because breaking the inversion symmetry can lead to intriguing valley physics, nonlinear optical properties, and piezoelectric responses. Here we report the first chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of spirals of layered MoS2 with atomically thin helical periodicity, which exhibits a chiral structure and breaks the three-dimensional (3D) inversion symmetry explicitly. The spirals composed of tens of connected MoS2 layers with decreasing areas: each basal plane has a triangular shape and shrinks gradually to the summit when spiraling up. All the layers in the spiral assume an AA lattice stacking, which is in contrast to the centrosymmetric AB stacking in natural MoS2 crystals. We show that the noncentrosymmetric MoS2 spiral leads to a strong bulk second-order optical nonlinearity. In addition, we found that the growth of spirals involves a dislocation mechanism, which can be generally applicable to other 2D TMD materials.

  10. Ultrathin Ultra-broadband Electro-Absorption Modulator based on Few-layer Graphene based Anisotropic Metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md Saifur

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a few-layered graphene-dielectric multilayer (metamaterial) electro-optic modulator has been proposed in the mid and far infrared range that works on electro-absorption mechanism. Graphene, both mono layer and few layer, is an actively tunable optical material that allows control of inter-band and intra-band transition by tuning its chemical potential. Utilizing this unique feature of graphene, we propose a multilayer graphene dielectric stack where few layer graphene is preferred over mono layer graphene. Although the total thickness of the stack still remains in the nanometer range, this device can exhibit superior performances in terms of (i) high modulation depth, (ii) ultra-broadband performance, (iii) ultra-low insertion loss due to inherent metamaterial properties, (iv) nanoscale footprint, (v) polarization independence and (vi) capability of being integrated to a silicon waveguide. Interestingly, these superior performances, achievable by using few layer graphene with carefully design...

  11. Quantum transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostinga, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    After the experimental discovery of graphene -a single atomic layer of graphite- a scientific rush started to explore graphene’s electronic behaviour. Graphene is a fascinating two-dimensional electronic system, because its electrons behave as relativistic particles. Moreover, it is a promising mate

  12. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  13. Seeing graphene-based sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemyung Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based sheets such as graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide have stimulated great interest due to their promising electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. Microscopy imaging is indispensable for characterizing these single atomic layers, and oftentimes is the first measure of sample quality. This review provides an overview of current imaging techniques for graphene-based sheets and highlights a recently developed fluorescence quenching microscopy technique that allows high-throughput, high-contrast imaging of graphene-based sheets on arbitrary substrate and even in solution.

  14. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, E. [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Lichtenstein, M.P.; Suñol, C. [Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques de Barcelona (IIBB-CSIC), Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), c/Rosselló 161, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Casañ-Pastor, N., E-mail: nieves@icmab.es [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx–graphene hybrid (IrOx–eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx–graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx–eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1–2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10 nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx–eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes. - Highlights: • Pristine Graphene is incorporated in coatings as nanostructured IrOx–eG hybrid. • IrOx-nanoparticles drive the electrodeposition of graphene. • Hybrid CSC is one order of magnitude the charge capacity of IrOx. • Per carbon atom, the CSC increase is 35 times larger than for graphene oxide. • Neurons are fully functional on the coating.

  15. A theoretical study of symmetry-breaking organic overlayers on single- and bi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cifuentes, Josue; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    An ``overlayer'' of molecules that breaks the AB symmetry of graphene can produce (modify) a band gap in single- (bi-) layer graphene.[2] Since the triangular shaped trimesic acid (TMA) molecule forms two familiar symmetry breaking configurations, we are motivated to model TMA physisorption on graphene surfaces in conjunction with experiments by Groce et al. at UMD. Using VASP, with ab initio van der Waals density functionals (vdW-DF), we simulate adsorption of TMA onto a graphene surface in several symmetry-breaking arrangements in order to predict/understand the effect of TMA adsorption on experimental observables. Supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 05-20471.

  16. Enhanced model for determining the number of graphene layers and their distribution from X-ray diffraction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beti Andonovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A model consisting of an equation that includes graphene thickness distribution is used to calculate theoretical 002 X-ray diffraction (XRD peak intensities. An analysis was performed upon graphene samples produced by two different electrochemical procedures: electrolysis in aqueous electrolyte and electrolysis in molten salts, both using a nonstationary current regime. Herein, the model is enhanced by a partitioning of the corresponding 2θ interval, resulting in significantly improved accuracy of the results. The model curves obtained exhibit excellent fitting to the XRD intensities curves of the studied graphene samples. The employed equation parameters make it possible to calculate the j-layer graphene region coverage of the graphene samples, and hence the number of graphene layers. The results of the thorough analysis are in agreement with the calculated number of graphene layers from Raman spectra C-peak position values and indicate that the graphene samples studied are few-layered.

  17. Correlating atomic structure and transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A; Botello-Méndez, Andrés R; Hong, Sung Ju; Stach, Eric A; Park, Yung Woo; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Drndić, Marija; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2014-08-13

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are promising candidates for next generation integrated circuit (IC) components; this fact motivates exploration of the relationship between crystallographic structure and transport of graphene patterned at IC-relevant length scales (edges after current annealing, presenting a pathway for the controlled fabrication of semiconducting GNRs with known edge geometry. Finally, we report on simulations of quantum transport in GNRs that are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  18. Atomic-layer engineering of oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, A. T.; Eckstein, J. N.; Dubuis, G.; Pavuna, D.; Božović, I.

    2012-02-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy technique has enabled synthesis of atomically smooth thin films, multilayers, and superlattices of cuprates and other complex oxides. Such heterostructures show high temperature superconductivity and enable novel experiments that probe the basic physics of this phenomenon. For example, it was established that high temperature superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetic phases separate on Ångström scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with high temperature superconductivity over an anomalously large length scale (the "Giant Proximity Effect"). We review some recent experiments on such films and superlattices, including X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy, transport measurements, highresolution transmission electron microscopy, resonant X-ray scattering, low-energy muon spin resonance, and ultrafast photo-induced reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations, a discovery of interface high temperature superconductivity that occurs in a single CuO2 plane, evidence for local pairs, and establishing tight limits on the temperature range of superconducting fluctuations.

  19. Atomic-Layer Engineering of Oxide Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozovic I.; Bollinger, A.T.; Eckstein, J.N.; Dubuis, G.; Pavuna, D.

    2012-03-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy technique has enabled synthesis of atomically smooth thin films, multilayers, and superlattices of cuprates and other complex oxides. Such heterostructures show high temperature superconductivity and enable novel experiments that probe the basic physics of this phenomenon. For example, it was established that high temperature superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetic phases separate on Angstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with high temperature superconductivity over an anomalously large length scale (the 'Giant Proximity Effect'). We review some recent experiments on such films and superlattices, including X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy, transport measurements, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, resonant X-ray scattering, low-energy muon spin resonance, and ultrafast photo-induced reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations, a discovery of interface high temperature superconductivity that occurs in a single CuO{sub 2} plane, evidence for local pairs, and establishing tight limits on the temperature range of superconducting fluctuations.

  20. Synthesis of Few-Layer Graphene Using DC PE-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun

    2011-12-01

    Few layer graphene (FLG) had been successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni films or foils on a large scale using DC Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (DC PE-CVD) as a result of the Raman spectra drawn out of the sample. The size of graphene films is dependent on the area of the Ni film as well as the DC PE-CVD chamber size. Synthesis time has an effect on the quality of graphene produced. However, further analysis and experiments must be pursued to further identify the optimum settings and conditions of producing better quality graphene. Applied plasma voltage on the other hand, had an influence on the minimization of defects in the graphene grown. It has also presented a method of producing a free standing PMMA/graphene membrane on a FeCl3(aq) solution which could then be transferred to a desired substrate.

  1. Investigating change of properties in gallium ion irradiation patterned single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Dong, Jinyao; Bai, Bing; Xie, Guoxin

    2016-10-01

    Besides its excellent physical properties, graphene promises to play a significant role in electronics with superior properties, which requires patterning of graphene for device integration. Here, we presented the changes in properties of single-layer graphene before and after patterning using gallium ion beam. Combined with Raman spectra of graphene, the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) image confirmed that a metal-insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. The changes in work function and Raman spectra of graphene indicated that the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. The patterning width of graphene presented an increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  3. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-04-01

    In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  4. Coal Char Derived Few-Layer Graphene Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Few-layer graphene films were synthesized through chemical vapor deposition technique using coal char as solid carbon source. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction were used to characterize the graphene films. The electrochemical performance of the coal char derived few layer graphene anodes for lithium ion batteries was investigated by charge/discharge curves  and  discharge  capacity  at  different  current  densities.  The  graphene  anode maintained the reversible capacity at ~0.025, 0.013, and 0.007 mAh/cm2  at a current density of 10, 30, and 50 µA/cm2, respectively. The coal char derived graphene anodes show potential applications in thin film batteries for nanoelectronics.

  5. Comparison of graphene oxide with reduced graphene oxide as hole extraction layer in organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Soon; Park, Yensil; Kim, Soo Young

    2013-05-01

    A comparison was performed between the use of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a hole extraction layer (HEL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Hydrazine hydrate (HYD) and the thermal method (Thermal) were adopted to change the GO to rGO. The GO HEL was deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode by spin coating, followed by the reduction process to form the rGO HELs. The success of the reduction processes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmittance, and 2-point probe method. The OPV cell with the GO (-3 nm) HEL exhibits an increased power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 2.5% under 100 mW/cm2 illumination under air mass conditions, which is higher than that of the OPV cell without HEL, viz. 1.78%. However, the PCE of the OPV cell with rGO HEL is not high as the values of 1.8% for the HYD-rGO and 1.9% for the Thermal-rGO. The ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy results showed that the work function of GO was 4.7 eV, but those of HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO were 4.2 eV and 4.5 eV, respectively. Therefore, it is considered that GO is adequate to extract the holes from the active layer, but HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO are not appropriate to use as HELs in OPV cells from the viewpoint of the energy alignment.

  6. Spectroscopic detection of atom-surface interactions in an atomic vapour layer with nanoscale thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, K A; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2015-01-01

    We measure the resonance line shape of atomic vapor layers with nanoscale thickness confined between two sapphire windows. The measurement is performed by scanning a probe laser through resonance and collecting the scattered light. The line shape is dominated by the effects of Dicke narrowing, self-broadening, and atom-surface interactions. By fitting the measured line shape to a simple model we discuss the possibility to extract information about the atom-surface interaction.

  7. Graphene as a spacer to layer-by-layer assemble electrochemically functionalized nanostructures for molecular bioelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Jingfang; Cheng, Hanjun; Yu, Ping; Ye, Jianshan; Mao, Lanqun

    2011-09-06

    This study demonstrates the capability of graphene as a spacer to form electrochemically functionalized multilayered nanostructures onto electrodes in a controllable manner through layer-by-layer (LBL) chemistry. Methylene green (MG) and positively charged methylimidazolium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as examples of electroactive species and electrochemically useful components for the assembly, respectively. By using graphene as the spacer, the multilayered nanostructures of graphene/MG and graphene/MWNT could be readily formed onto electrodes with the LBL method on the basis of the electrostatic and/or π-π interaction(s) between graphene and the electrochemically useful components. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were used to characterize the assembly processes, and the results revealed that nanostructure assembly was uniform and effective with graphene as the spacer. Electrochemical studies demonstrate that the assembled nanostructures possess excellent electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH and could thus be used as electronic transducers for bioelectronic devices. This potential was further demonstrated by using an alcohol dehydrogenase-based electrochemical biosensor and glucose dehydrogenase-based glucose/O(2) biofuel cell as typical examples. This study offers a simple route to the controllable formation of graphene-based electrochemically functionalized nanostructures that can be used for the development of molecular bioelectronic devices such as biosensors and biofuel cells.

  8. Graphene mode locked, wavelength-tunable, dissipative soliton fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Han; Knize, R J; Zhao, Luming; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2010-01-01

    Atomic layer graphene possesses wavelength-insensitive ultrafast saturable absorption, which can be exploited as a full-band mode locker. Taking advantage of the wide band saturable absorption of the graphene, we demonstrate experimentally that wide range (1570 nm - 1600nm) continuous wavelength tunable dissipative solitons could be formed in an erbium doped fiber laser mode locked with few layer graphene.

  9. Scanning tunnelling microscopy of suspended graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Muryn, Chris; Bangert, Ursel; Mattocks, Philip; Wincott, Paul; Vaughan, David; Li, Xuesong; Colombo, Luigi; Ruoff, Rodney S; Hamilton, Bruce; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2012-05-21

    Suspended graphene has been studied by STM for the first time. Atomic resolution on mono- and bi-layer graphene samples has been obtained after ridding the graphene surface of contamination via high-temperature annealing. Static local corrugations (ripples) have been observed on both types of structures.

  10. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  11. Work function of few layer graphene covered nickel thin films measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eren, B. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Material Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gysin, U.; Marot, L., E-mail: Laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Glatzel, Th.; Steiner, R.; Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-01-25

    Few layer graphene and graphite are simultaneously grown on a ∼100 nm thick polycrystalline nickel film. The work function of few layer graphene/Ni is found to be 4.15 eV with a variation of 50 meV by local measurements with Kelvin probe force microscopy. This value is lower than the work function of free standing graphene due to peculiar electronic structure resulting from metal 3d-carbon 2p(π) hybridization.

  12. Tunable electromagnetic chirality induced by graphene inclusions in multi-layered metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Rizza, Carlo; Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the electromagnetic response of a novel class of multi-layered metamaterials obtained by alternating graphene sheets and dielectric layers, the whole structure not exhibiting a plane of reflection symmetry along the stacking direction. We show that the electromagnetic response of the structure is characterized by a magneto-electric coupling described by an effective chiral parameter. Exploiting the intrinsic tunability of the graphene-light coupling, we prove that one can tune both the dielectric and the chiral electromagnetic response by varying the graphene chemical potential through external voltage gating.

  13. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  14. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition with Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates ranging from glass, polymers, aerogels, and metals to high aspect ratio geometries. This talk will focus on the utilization of ALD for engineering applications.

  15. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of copper nanofilms on ruthenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregziabiher, Daniel K.; Kim, Youn-Geun; Thambidurai, Chandru; Ivanova, Valentina; Haumesser, Paul-Henri; Stickney, John L.

    2010-04-01

    As ULSI scales to smaller and smaller dimensions, it has become necessary to form layers of materials only a few nm thick. In addition, trenches are now being incorporated in ULSI formation which require conformal coating and will not be amenable to CMP. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is being developed to address such issues. ALD is the formation of materials layer by layer using self-limiting reactions. This article describes the formation of Cu seed layers (for the Cu damascene process) on a Ru barrier layer. The deposit was formed by the electrochemical analog of ALD, using electrochemical self-limiting reactions which are referred to as underpotential deposition (UPD). Monolayer restricted galvanic displacement was used to form atomic layers of Cu. First Pb UPD was deposited, forming a sacrificial layer, and then a Cu +2 solution was flushed into the cell and Pb was exchanged for Cu. A linear dependence was shown for Cu growth over 8 ALD cycles, and STM showed a conformal deposition, as expected for an ALD process. Relative Cu coverages were determined using Auger electron spectroscopy, while absolute Cu coverages were obtained from coulometry during oxidative stripping of the deposits. Use of a Cl - containing electrolyte results in Cu deposits covered with an atomic layer of Cl atoms, which have been shown to protect the surfaced from oxidation during various stages of the deposition process. The 10 nm thick Ru substrates were formed on Si(1 0 0) wafers, and were partially oxidized upon receipt. Electrochemical reduction, prior to Cu deposition, removed the oxygen and some traces of carbon, the result of transport. Ion bombardment proved to clean all oxygen and carbon traces from the surface.

  16. Iridium wire grid polarizer fabricated using atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knez Mato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, an effective multistep process toward fabrication of an iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications involving a frequency doubling process based on ultrafast electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition is presented. The choice of iridium as grating material is based on its good optical properties and a superior oxidation resistance. Furthermore, atomic layer deposition of iridium allows a precise adjustment of the structural parameters of the grating much better than other deposition techniques like sputtering for example. At the target wavelength of 250 nm, a transmission of about 45% and an extinction ratio of 87 are achieved.

  17. Layer-dependent nanoscale electrical properties of graphene studied by conductive scanning probe microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Shihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nanoscale electrical properties of single-layer graphene (SLG, bilayer graphene (BLG and multilayer graphene (MLG are studied by scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM. The quantum capacitance of graphene deduced from SCM results is found to increase with the layer number (n at the sample bias of 0 V but decreases with n at -3 V. Furthermore, the quantum capacitance increases very rapidly with the gate voltage for SLG, but this increase is much slowed down when n becomes greater. On the other hand, the magnitude of the EFM phase shift with respect to the SiO2 substrate increases with n at the sample bias of +2 V but decreases with n at -2 V. The difference in both quantum capacitance and EFM phase shift is significant between SLG and BLG but becomes much weaker between MLGs with a different n. The layer-dependent quantum capacitance behaviors of graphene could be attributed to their layer-dependent electronic structure as well as the layer-varied dependence on gate voltage, while the layer-dependent EFM phase shift is caused by not only the layer-dependent surface potential but also the layer-dependent capacitance derivation.

  18. Enhancement of capillary electrochromatographic separation performance by conductive polymer in a layer-by-layer fabricated graphene stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wenpeng; Bao, Tao; Chen, Zilin

    2014-04-25

    In this work, we fabricated a novel graphene-based capillary column for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) by a layer-by-layer strategy. To immobilize graphene onto the inner surface of silica capillary, a bio-inspired method was first used to functionalize the capillary surface with a layer of polydopamine (PDA). Graphene oxide (GO) was then introduced and can covalently react with polydopamine, realizing immobilization of graphene as a result. To enhance the modification efficiency of polydopamine, a conductive polymer, polyaniline (PANI) was introduced to be a sub-layer; polydopamine was then introduced following with GO, to generate a multilayer GO-PDA-PANI@capillary. Interestingly, separation efficiency of the graphene-based capillary was enhanced significantly by using conductive PANI as a sub-layer. The morphology of different layers modified on the capillary column was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electroosmotic flow (EOF) characteristics of capillaries modified with different layers were also investigated by varying the pH value of mobile phase. GO-PDA-PANI@capillary showed good separation efficiency towards alkylbenzenes by OT-CEC mode, with theoretic plate numbers up to 133,918 for benzene. The separation was found to follow a reversed-phase chromatographic retention mechanism. Repeatability of the GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was studied, with relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day runs less than 2.89%, and column-to-column runs less than 6.17%. The separation performance of GO-PDA-PANI@capillary was also compared with that of the reported graphene modified capillary.

  19. Evenly transferred single-layered graphene membrane assisted by strong substrate adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjae; Kim, Hoijoon; Seol, Daehee; Park, Taejin; Leem, Mirine; Ha, Hyunwoo; An, Hyesung; You Kim, Hyun; Jeong, Seong-Jun; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-04-01

    We explored the transfer of a single-layered graphene membrane assisted by substrate adhesion. A relatively larger adhesion force was measured on the SiO2 substrate compared with its van der Waals contribution, which is expected to result from the additional contribution of the chemical bonding force. Density functional theory calculations verified that the strong adhesion force was indeed accompanied by chemical bonding. The transfer of single-layered graphene and subsequent deposition of the dielectric layer were best performed on the SiO2 substrate exhibiting a larger adhesion force. This study suggests the selection and/or modification of the underlying substrate for proper transfer of graphene as well as other 2D materials similar to graphene.

  20. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Piazzale E. Fermi, 1, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior.

  1. A further comparison of graphene and thin metal layers for plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyong; Gao, Pingqi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-05-01

    Which one is much more suitable for plasmonic materials, graphene or metal? To address this problem well, the plasmonic properties of thin metal sheets at different thicknesses have been investigated and compared with a graphene layer. As demonstration examples, the propagation properties of insulator-metal-insulator and metamaterials (MMs) structures are also shown. The results manifest that the plasmonic properties of the graphene layer are comparable to that of thin metal sheets with the thickness of tens of nanometers. For the graphene MMs structure, by using the periodic stack structure in the active region, the resonant transmission strength significantly improves. At the optimum period number, 3-5 periods of graphene/SiO2, the graphene MMs structure manifests good frequency and amplitude tunable properties simultaneously, and the resonant strength is also strong with large values of the Q-factor. Therefore, graphene is a good tunable plasmonic material. The results are very helpful to develop novel graphene plasmonic devices, such as modulators, antenna and filters.

  2. A further comparison of graphene and thin metal layers for plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoyong; Gao, Pingqi; Shi, Wangzhou

    2016-05-21

    Which one is much more suitable for plasmonic materials, graphene or metal? To address this problem well, the plasmonic properties of thin metal sheets at different thicknesses have been investigated and compared with a graphene layer. As demonstration examples, the propagation properties of insulator-metal-insulator and metamaterials (MMs) structures are also shown. The results manifest that the plasmonic properties of the graphene layer are comparable to that of thin metal sheets with the thickness of tens of nanometers. For the graphene MMs structure, by using the periodic stack structure in the active region, the resonant transmission strength significantly improves. At the optimum period number, 3-5 periods of graphene/SiO2, the graphene MMs structure manifests good frequency and amplitude tunable properties simultaneously, and the resonant strength is also strong with large values of the Q-factor. Therefore, graphene is a good tunable plasmonic material. The results are very helpful to develop novel graphene plasmonic devices, such as modulators, antenna and filters.

  3. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L.

    2014-05-01

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior.

  4. Hybrid platforms of graphane–graphene 2D structures: prototypes for atomically precise nanoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Mota,F.B.; Rivelino, R.; Medeiros, P.V.C.; Mascarenhas, A.J.S.; de Castilho, C. M. C.

    2014-01-01

    p.23558-23563 First-principles calculations demonstrate that line/ribbon defects, resulting from a controlled dehydrogenation in graphane, lead to the formation of low-dimensional electron-rich tracks in a monolayer. The present simulations point out that hybrid graphane–graphene nanostructures exhibit important elements, greatly required for the fabrication of efficient electronic circuits at the atomic level.

  5. The origins of friction and the growth of graphene, investigated at the atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarle, van D.W.

    2016-01-01

    This work covers two closely related topics: a theoretical study on the origins of friction and an experimental study on the growth of graphene. Both fundamental studies are focusing on the atomic processes involved. The study on friction treats the dissipation that takes places at one single fricti

  6. PEDOT:PSS/Graphene Nanocomposite Hole-Injection Layer in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsuan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on effects of doping graphene in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene: poly(styrene sulfonate, PEDOT:PSS, as a PEDOT:PSS/graphene nanocomposite hole injection layer on the performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs. Graphene oxides were first synthesized and then mixed in the PEDOT:PSS solution with specifically various amounts. Graphenes were reduced in the PEDOT:PSS matrix through thermal reduction. PLED devices with hole-injection nanocomposite layer containing particular doping concentration were fabricated, and the influence of doping concentration on device performance was examined by systematically characterizations of various device properties. Through the graphene doping, the resistance in the hole-injection layer and the turn-on voltage could be effectively reduced that benefited the injection and transport of holes and resulted in a higher overall efficiency. The conductivity of the hole-injection layer was monotonically increased with the increase of doping concentration, performance indices from various aspects, however, did not show the same dependence because faster injected holes might alter not only the balance of holes and electrons but also their combination locations in the light-emitting layer. Results show that optimal doping concentration was the case with 0.03 wt% of graphene oxide.

  7. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoOx interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoOx/CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  8. Method and apparatus for depositing atomic layers on a substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A.J.P.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Deelen, J. van

    2016-01-01

    Method of depositing an atomic layer on a substrate. The method comprises supplying a precursor gas from a precursor-gas supply of a deposition head that may be part of a rotatable drum. The precursor gas is provided from the precursor-gas supply towards the substrate. The method further comprises m

  9. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and mo

  10. Method and system for continuous atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.

    2017-03-21

    A system and method for continuous atomic layer deposition. The system and method includes a housing, a moving bed which passes through the housing, a plurality of precursor gases and associated input ports and the amount of precursor gases, position of the input ports, and relative velocity of the moving bed and carrier gases enabling exhaustion of the precursor gases at available reaction sites.

  11. Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition of transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and indium doped ZnO films have been grown by Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition at atmospheric pressure. The electrical properties of ZnO films are controlled by varying the indium content in the range from 0 to 15 %. A minimum resistivity value of 3 mΩ•cm is measured in 180 nm thick films for

  12. Cost-Effective Systems for Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Michael; Medina, Phillip A., IV; Antic, Aleks; Rosin, Joseph T.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and testing of two different home-built atomic layer deposition (ALD) systems for the growth of thin films with sub-monolayer control over film thickness. The first reactor is a horizontally aligned hot-walled reactor with a vacuum purging system. The second reactor is a vertically aligned cold-walled reactor with a…

  13. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  14. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55 mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  15. Shape-alterable and -recoverable graphene/polyurethane bi-layered composite film for supercapacitor electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Zhixin; Yan, Xingbin; Xue, Qunji

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, a graphene/shape-memory polyurethane (PU) composite film, used for a supercapacitor electrode, is fabricated by a simple bonding method. In the composite, formerly prepared graphene paper is closely bonded on the surface of the PU slice, forming a bi-layered composite film. Based on the good flexibility of graphene paper and the outstanding shape holding capacity of PU phase, the resulting composite film can be changed into various shapes. Also, the composite film shows excellent shape recovery ability. The graphene/PU composite film used as the electrode maintains a satisfactory electrochemical capacitance of graphene material and there is no decay in the specific capacitance after long-cycle testing, making it attractive for novel supercapacitors with special shapes and shape-memory ability.

  16. Dissipative optomechanics of a single-layer graphene in a microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Lin-Da; Liu, Yong-Chun; Yan, Meng-Yuan; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We study the optomechanical coupling of a single-layer graphene with a high-Q Fabry-P?erot microcavity in the membrane-in-the-middle configuration. In ordinary dissipative coupling systems, mechanical oscillators modulate the loss associated with the input coupling of the cavity mode; while in our system, the graphene oscillator couples dissipatively with the cavity mode through modulating its absorption loss. By analyzing the effects of the interband transition of a graphene suspended near the node of the cavity field, we obtain strong and tunable dissipative coupling without excessively reducing the optical quality factor. Finally, it is found that the exural mode of the graphene could be cooled down to its ground state in the present coupling system. This study provides new insights for graphene optomechanics in the visible range.

  17. Enhancement of light extraction efficiency of vertical LED with patterned graphene as current spreading layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sumitra; Sai Nandini, Annam Deepthi; Pal, Suchandan; Dhanavantri, Chenna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report an optimised pattern of surface textured graphene current spreading layer (CSL) for the enhancement of light extraction efficiency (LEE) in InGaN/GaN vertical light emitting diodes (V-LEDs). It is found that by texturing graphene surface LEE improves drastically. This improvement is attributed to better current spreading of graphene and increased random and multiple scattering of light through textured surfaces. Simulation results illustrate that V-LEDs with surface textured (hexagonal pattern) ITO as CSL shows threefold improvement in light extraction efficiency compared to V-LEDs with no surface texturing on ITO CSL. Further, LEE of V-LEDs having patterned graphene CSL is compared with that for indium tin oxide (ITO) CSL. V-LEDs with optimised hexagonal patterning on graphene CSL shows 13.42% enhancement of LEE compared to that of LED with hexagonal patterning on ITO surface.

  18. Preservation of the Pt(100) surface reconstruction after growth of a continuous layer of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Bjerre, Jacob;

    2012-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that a layer of graphene can be grown on the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface and that the reconstruction is preserved after growth. A continuous sheet of graphene can be grown across domain boundaries and step edges without loss of periodicity or change...... to accommodation of edge dislocations. The defect formation energy and the induced buckling of the graphene have been characterized by DFT calculations....... in direction. Density functional theory calculations on a simple model system support the observation that the graphene can have different rotation angles relative to the hex-reconstructed Pt surface. The graphene sheet direction can be changed by incorporating pentagon-heptagon defects giving rise...

  19. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2009-07-12

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  20. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselev, Alexander; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Marks, Tobin J.; Lauhon, Lincoln J.; Hersam, Mark C.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2013-12-01

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al2O3 and HfO2 films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al2O3/HfO2 stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  1. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselev, Alexander, E-mail: tseleva@ornl.gov; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  2. Coherent nonlinear electromagnetic response in twisted bilayer and few-layer graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vipin Kumar; Enamullah; Upendra Kumar; Girish S Setlur

    2014-10-01

    The phenomenon of Rabi oscillations far from resonance is described in bilayer and few-layer graphene. These oscillations in the population and polarization at the Dirac point in -layer graphene are seen in the nth harmonic termin the external driving frequency. The underlying reason behind these oscillations is attributable to the pseudospin degree of freedom possessed by all these systems. Conventional Rabi oscillations, which occur only near resonance, are seen in multiple harmonics in multilayer graphene. However, the experimentally measurable current density exhibits anomalous behaviour only in the first harmonic in all the graphene systems. A fully numerical solution of the optical Bloch equations is in complete agreement with the analytical results, thereby justifying the approximation schemes used in the latter. The same phenomena are also described in twisted bilayer graphene with and without an electric potential difference between the layers. It is found that the anomalous Rabi frequency is strongly dependent on twist angle for weak applied fields – a feature absent in single-layer graphene, whereas the conventional Rabi frequency is relatively independent of the twist angle.

  3. Raman enhancement effect on two-dimensional layered materials: graphene, h-BN and MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xi; Fang, Wenjing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Araujo, Paulo T; Zhang, Xu; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F; Lin, Yuxuan; Zhang, Jin; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-06-11

    Realizing Raman enhancement on a flat surface has become increasingly attractive after the discovery of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS). Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, exhibiting a flat surface without dangling bonds, were thought to be strong candidates for both fundamental studies of this Raman enhancement effect and its extension to meet practical applications requirements. Here, we study the Raman enhancement effect on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), by using the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule as a probe. This molecule can sit on these layered materials in a face-on configuration. However, it is found that the Raman enhancement effect, which is observable on graphene, hBN, and MoS2, has different enhancement factors for the different vibrational modes of CuPc, depending strongly on the surfaces. Higher-frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 1342, 1452, 1531 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on graphene than that on h-BN, while the lower frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 682, 749, 1142, 1185 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on h-BN than that on graphene. MoS2 demonstrated the weakest Raman enhancement effect as a substrate among these three 2D materials. These differences are attributed to the different enhancement mechanisms related to the different electronic properties and chemical bonds exhibited by the three substrates: (1) graphene is zero-gap semiconductor and has a nonpolar C-C bond, which induces charge transfer (2) h-BN is insulating and has a strong B-N bond, while (3) MoS2 is semiconducting with the sulfur atoms on the surface and has a polar covalent bond (Mo-S) with the polarity in the vertical direction to the surface. Therefore, the different Raman enhancement mechanisms differ for each material: (1) charge transfer may occur for graphene; (2) strong dipole-dipole coupling may occur for h-BN, and (3) both charge transfer and dipole-dipole coupling may

  4. Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of single Iron atom at graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Hao, Yanjun; Xu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    A systemic theoretical study of one iron atom on graphene ribbon edges (Fe/GR) has been carried out by using density functional theory. Thermodynamic stabilities, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe/GR with different edge types and adsorption locations were investigated. According to the Clar's aromatic sextet rule, the formation energies and density of states of Fe atom are found to rely tightly on the ribbon's periodic length. Moreover, Fe atoms on reconstructed zz edges are also stable with low formation energies and semiconducting properties. Finally, the magnetic properties are found sensitive with the structural details, especially the local bond environment. The present theoretical results constitute a useful picture for the deep comprehending on the interface details of the lateral Fe/graphene heterostructures.

  5. First-principles study on bottom-up fabrication process of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of a polyanthracene formation in the bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons on Au(111) using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. We show that the structure of precursor molecules plays a decisive role in the C-C coupling reaction. The reaction energy of the dimerization of anthracene dimers is a larger negative value than that of the dimerization of anthracene monomers, suggesting that the precursor molecule used in experiments has a favorable structure for graphene nanoribbon fabrication.

  6. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  7. Application of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support material in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, Burcu; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    The fuel cell electrode layer is a significant part of a fuel cell. The electrode layer is composed of the catalyst and porous electrode or gas diffusion layer. Catalyst has critical importance due to the influence on the cost and durability of fuel cells. The production of novel catalyst support materials could open up new ways in order to ensure the catalytic activity by lowering the amount of catalyst loaded [1]. At this point, utilization of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support...

  8. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness electrolyte of Li salts and organic solvents under high current density and exfoliated efficiently into few-layer graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper.

  9. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id; Darma, Yudi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  10. A highly sensitive pressure sensor using a double-layered graphene structure for tactile sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sungwoo; Kim, Youngjun; Oh, Hyeong-Sik; Bae, Giyeol; Park, Wanjun

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a graphene sensor using two separated single-layered graphenes on a flexible substrate for use as a pressure sensor, such as for soft electronics. The working pressure corresponds to the range in which human perception recognizes surface morphologies. A specific design of the sensor structure drives the piezoresistive character due to the contact resistance between two graphene layers and the electromechanical properties of graphene itself. Accordingly, sensitivity in resistance change is given by two modes for low pressure (-0.24 kPa(-1)) and high pressure (0.039 kPa(-1)) with a crossover pressure (700 Pa). This sensor can detect infinitesimal pressure as low as 0.3 Pa with uniformly applied vertical force. With the attachment of the artificial fingerprint structure (AFPS) on the sensor, the detection ability for both the locally generated shear force and actual human touch confirms recognition of the surface morphology constructed by periodic structures.

  11. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Electrical characterization of graphene oxide and organic dielectric layers based on thin film transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karteri, İbrahim, E-mail: ibrahimkarteri@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science And Engineering, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaraş 4610 (Turkey); Karataş, Şükrü [Department of Physics, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaraş 4610 (Turkey); Yakuphanoğlu, Fahrettin [Department of Physics, Fırat University, Elazıg 2310 (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • We report the synthesis of graphene oxide nanosheets and electrical characterization of graphene oxide based thin film transistor. • Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared by using modified Hummers method. • We used insulator layers which are polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl phenol (PVP) for graphene oxide based thin flim transistor. - Abstract: We have studied the electrical characteristics of graphene oxide based thin flim transistor with the polymer insulators such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP). Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared by using modified Hummers method. The structural properties of GO nanosheets were characterized with Ultraviolet Visible (UV–vis), FT-IR spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction (XRD). Graphene oxide based thin flim transistor (GO-TFT) was prepared by a spin-coating and thermal evaporation technique. The electrical characterization of GO-TFT was analyzed by output and transfer characteristics by using Keithley-4200 semiconductor characterization system (SCS). The graphene oxide based thin flim transistor devices show p-type semiconducting behavior. The mobility, threshold voltage, sub-threshold swing value and I{sub on}/I{sub off} of GO-TFT were found to be 0.105 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, −8.7 V, 4.03 V/decade and 10, respectively.

  13. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting.

  14. Basics of quantum field theory of electromagnetic interaction processes in single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-09-01

    The content of this work is the study of electromagnetic interaction in single-layer graphene by means of the perturbation theory. The interaction of electromagnetic field with Dirac fermions in single-layer graphene has a peculiarity: Dirac fermions in graphene interact not only with the electromagnetic wave propagating within the graphene sheet, but also with electromagnetic field propagating from a location outside the graphene sheet and illuminating this sheet. The interaction Hamiltonian of the system comprising electromagnetic field and Dirac fermions fields contains the limits at graphene plane of electromagnetic field vector and scalar potentials which can be shortly called boundary electromagnetic field. The study of S-matrix requires knowing the limits at graphene plane of 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field which also can be shortly called boundary 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field. As the first example of the application of perturbation theory, the second order terms in the perturbative expansions of boundary 2-point Green functions of electromagnetic field as well as of 2-point Green functions of Dirac fermion fields are explicitly derived. Further extension of the application of perturbation theory is also discussed.

  15. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  16. Trapping Surface Electrons on Graphene Layers and Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Niesner, D.; Fauster, Th.; Dadap, J. I.; Zaki, N.; Knox, K. R.; Yeh, P. -C.; Bhandari, R.; Osgood, R. M.; Petrović, M; Kralj, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission to map the bound, unoccupied electronic structure of the weakly coupled graphene/Ir(111) system. The energy, dispersion, and lifetime of the lowest three image-potential states are measured. In addition, the weak interaction between Ir and graphene permits observation of resonant transitions from an unquenched Shockley-type surface state of the Ir substrate to graphene/Ir image-potential states. The image-potential-state l...

  17. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stebunov, Yury V.; Aftenieva, Olga A.; Arsenin, Aleksey V.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel...... sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover...

  18. Atomic-Layer-Confined Doping for Atomic-Level Insights into Visible-Light Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fengcai; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Yongfu; Liang, Liang; Liu, Katong; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Qun; Pan, Bicai; Luo, Yi; Xie, Yi

    2015-08-03

    A model of doping confined in atomic layers is proposed for atomic-level insights into the effect of doping on photocatalysis. Co doping confined in three atomic layers of In2S3 was implemented with a lamellar hybrid intermediate strategy. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of Co ions brings about several new energy levels and increased density of states at the conduction band minimum, leading to sharply increased visible-light absorption and three times higher carrier concentration. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the electron transfer time of about 1.6 ps from the valence band to newly formed localized states is due to Co doping. The 25-fold increase in average recovery lifetime is believed to be responsible for the increased of electron-hole separation. The synthesized Co-doped In2S3 (three atomic layers) yield a photocurrent of 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.5 V vs. RHE, nearly 10 and 17 times higher than that of the perfect In2S3 (three atomic layers) and the bulk counterpart, respectively.

  19. Van Der Waals heterogeneous layer-layer carbon nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on graphene and graphane sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Zhao, Rui-Sheng; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zheng, Hong; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-04-15

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings, such as π···π stacking, CH···π are very essential for supramolecular carbon nanostructures. Graphite is a typical homogenous carbon matter based on π···π stacking of graphene sheets. Even in systems not involving aromatic groups, the stability of diamondoid dimer and layer-layer graphane dimer originates from C - H···H - C noncovalent interaction. In this article, the structures and properties of novel heterogeneous layer-layer carbon-nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on [n]-graphane and [n]-graphene and their derivatives are theoretically investigated for n = 16-54 using dispersion corrected density functional theory B3LYP-D3 method. Energy decomposition analysis shows that dispersion interaction is the most important for the stabilization of both double- and multi-layer-layer [n]-graphane@graphene. Binding energy between graphane and graphene sheets shows that there is a distinct additive nature of CH···π interaction. For comparison and simplicity, the concept of H-H bond energy equivalent number of carbon atoms (noted as NHEQ), is used to describe the strength of these noncovalent interactions. The NHEQ of the graphene dimers, graphane dimers, and double-layered graphane@graphene are 103, 143, and 110, indicating that the strength of C-H···π interaction is close to that of π···π and much stronger than that of C-H···H-C in large size systems. Additionally, frontier molecular orbital, electron density difference and visualized noncovalent interaction regions are discussed for deeply understanding the nature of the C-H···π stacking interaction in construction of heterogeneous layer-layer graphane@graphene structures. We hope that the present study would be helpful for creations of new functional supramolecular materials based on graphane and graphene carbon nano-structures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Graphene as a Buffer Layer for Silicon Carbide-on-Insulator Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Yasui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report an innovative technique for growing the silicon carbide-on-insulator (SiCOI structure by utilizing polycrystalline single layer graphene (SLG as a buffer layer. The epitaxial growth was carried out using a hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (HM-CVD technique. Cubic SiC (3C-SiC thin film in (111 domain was realized at relatively low substrate temperature of 750 °C. 3C-SiC energy bandgap of 2.2 eV was confirmed. The Si-O absorption band observed in the grown film can be caused by the out-diffusion of the oxygen atom from SiO2 substrate or oxygen doping during the cleaning process. Further experimental works by optimizing the cleaning process, growth parameters of the present growth method, or by using other growth methods, as well, are expected to realize a high quality SiCOI structure, thereby opening up the way for a breakthrough in the development of advanced ULSIs with multifunctionalities.

  1. Bio-inspired two-dimensional nanofluidic generators based on a layered graphene hydrogel membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Chi; Wu, Yanzhe; Jiang, Yanan; Gao, Jun; Li, Dan; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-13

    An electrogenetic layered graphene hydrogel membrane (GHM) possesses ultra-large interlayer spacing of about 10 nm, forming charged 2D nanocapillaries between graphene sheets that selectively permeate counter-ions and exclude co-ions. When an electrolyte flow goes through the GHM, it functions as an integrated 2D nanofluidic generator converting hydraulic motion into electricity. The maximum streaming conductance density approaches 16.8 μA cm(-2) bar(-1) .

  2. Cellular uptake and distribution of graphene oxide coated with layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiye; Lu, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhongjun; Nie, Guangjun; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    We report a facile approach for the fabrication of a new class of graphene oxide (GO)-based nanoassemblies by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The single-layer thickness and intrinsic negatively charged carboxyl groups of GO nanosheets provide a natural platform for LbL assembly of polyelectrolyte nanofilms by electrostatic forces at mild and aqueous conditions. The general applicability of our approach is demonstrated by the preparation of GO nanoassemblies with sizes of 100-200 nm using various charged polyelectrolytes, including synthetic polymers, polypeptides, and DNA oligonucleotides. Systemic assessment of cytotoxicity and acute stress response show that no discernable signs of cytotoxicity are associated with exposure of GO and its nanoassemblies [GO/PLL (poly ( l-lysine)), GO/PLL/PSS (poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)), GO/PLL-PEG (PEGlayted PLL), GO/PLL/PLGA-PEG (PEGlayted poly ( l-glutamic acid))] up to 1 μg/mL. Studies on cellular uptake and subcellular localization show that a representative nanoassembly, GO/PLL-PEG, can effectively cross cell membranes and localize mainly in lysosomal compartments, without induction of noticeable harmful effects as confirmed by detection of mitochondrial depolarization and lysosomal pH.

  3. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-11-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  4. Femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on multi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltaos, Angela; Kovačević, Aleksander G.; Matković, Aleksandar; Ralević, Uroš; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Jovanović, Djordje; Jelenković, Branislav M.; Gajić, Radoš

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present an observation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on graphene. LIPSS on other materials have been observed for nearly 50 years, but until now, not on graphene. Our findings for LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were consistent with previous reports of LIPSS on other materials, thus classifying them as high spatial frequency LIPSS. LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were generated in an air environment by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser with excitation wavelength λ of 840 nm, pulse duration τ of ˜150 fs, and a fluence F of ˜4.3-4.4 mJ/cm2. The observed LIPSS were perpendicular to the laser polarization and had dimensions of width w of ˜30-40 nm and length l of ˜0.5-1.5 μm, and spatial periods Λ of ˜70-100 nm (˜λ/8-λ/12), amongst the smallest of spatial periods reported for LIPSS on other materials. The spatial period and width of the LIPSS were shown to decrease for an increased number of laser shots. The experimental results support the leading theory behind high spatial frequency LIPSS formation, implying the involvement of surface plasmon polaritons. This work demonstrates a new way to pattern multi-layer graphene in a controllable manner, promising for a variety of emerging graphene/LIPSS applications.

  5. Femtosecond laser induced periodic surface structures on multi-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltaos, Angela, E-mail: abeltaos@ualberta.ca; Kovačević, Aleksander G.; Matković, Aleksandar; Ralević, Uroš; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Jovanović, Djordje; Jelenković, Branislav M.; Gajić, Radoš [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-11-28

    In this work, we present an observation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on graphene. LIPSS on other materials have been observed for nearly 50 years, but until now, not on graphene. Our findings for LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were consistent with previous reports of LIPSS on other materials, thus classifying them as high spatial frequency LIPSS. LIPSS on multi-layer graphene were generated in an air environment by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser with excitation wavelength λ of 840 nm, pulse duration τ of ∼150 fs, and a fluence F of ∼4.3–4.4 mJ/cm{sup 2}. The observed LIPSS were perpendicular to the laser polarization and had dimensions of width w of ∼30–40 nm and length l of ∼0.5–1.5 μm, and spatial periods Λ of ∼70–100 nm (∼λ/8–λ/12), amongst the smallest of spatial periods reported for LIPSS on other materials. The spatial period and width of the LIPSS were shown to decrease for an increased number of laser shots. The experimental results support the leading theory behind high spatial frequency LIPSS formation, implying the involvement of surface plasmon polaritons. This work demonstrates a new way to pattern multi-layer graphene in a controllable manner, promising for a variety of emerging graphene/LIPSS applications.

  6. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-12-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  7. Stepwise Reduction of Immobilized Mono layer Graphene Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; He, Yudong; Lang, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Chemically converted graphene is highly relevant for transparent conducting film applications such as display and photovoltaic uses. So far, the major obstacle for realizing the potential has been to fully reduce/deoxygenate the graphene oxide (GO), which is challenging in part due...... to the pronounced aggregation that accompanies deoxygenation of GO in solution. Surface immobilization of monolayered graphene oxide (mGO) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated as a method to circumvent this problem. Two types of LB films with different density of mGO flakes were prepared, i.e., diluted...... spectroscopy (XPS) along with electrical characterization. XPS measurements confirmed a full conversion into virtually oxygen-free chemically converted graphene. The electrical characterization revealed large variations in the conductivity for single sheets in the diluted LB films, with an average conductivity...

  8. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Fam, Derrick Wenhui; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  9. Ab-initio investigation of the influence of chemical compounds on graphene layer properties in fabricated IR detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, L.; Wozny, J.; Szczecinska, N.; Lisik, Z.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of H2O, NaOH and propanol on properties of graphene layer placed on SiO2 has been investigated. These chemical particles are present during technological steps required for a device fabrication and may lead to significant changes of graphene properties. The investigation has been done by means of ab-initio simulation based on the DFT method. A MedeA-VASP package was used to investigate behavior of graphene layer in the vicinity of chemical compounds. Presented studies show that properties of graphene are significantly modified when particles of H2O and NaOH are captured in-between graphene layer and SiO2. Special attention should be paid to NaOH which, according to simulations, decays and modifies the properties of graphene layer.

  10. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S

    2014-06-21

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  11. Graphene functionalization by single atoms doping - a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natan, Amir; Segev, Elad; Hersam, Mark; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-03-01

    We present first principles results and analysis for the electronic structure of chemically modified graphene. We analyze the cases of fluorine adsorption and nitrogen substitution and show that a simple analytical model can describe the doping level as a function of dopant concentration for both cases. We show the relationship between different physical parameters and the electronic band structure of the modified material and its doping level. Finally, we discuss the possible effects of substrate and of different dopant patterns on the band structure and possible applications. amirnatan@post.tau.ac.il

  12. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  14. Adsorption of metal atoms at a buckled graphene grain boundary using model potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helgee, Edit E.; Isacsson, Andreas [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Two model potentials have been evaluated with regard to their ability to model adsorption of single metal atoms on a buckled graphene grain boundary. One of the potentials is a Lennard-Jones potential parametrized for gold and carbon, while the other is a bond-order potential parametrized for the interaction between carbon and platinum. Metals are expected to adsorb more strongly to grain boundaries than to pristine graphene due to their enhanced adsorption at point defects resembling those that constitute the grain boundary. Of the two potentials considered here, only the bond-order potential reproduces this behavior and predicts the energy of the adsorbate to be about 0.8 eV lower at the grain boundary than on pristine graphene. The Lennard-Jones potential predicts no significant difference in energy between adsorbates at the boundary and on pristine graphene. These results indicate that the Lennard-Jones potential is not suitable for studies of metal adsorption on defects in graphene, and that bond-order potentials are preferable.

  15. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  16. Growing vertical ZnO nanorod arrays within graphite: efficient isolation of large size and high quality single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; E, Yifeng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2013-07-18

    We report a unique strategy for efficiently exfoliating large size and high quality single-layer graphene directly from graphite into DMF dispersions by growing ZnO nanorod arrays between the graphene layers in graphite.

  17. Triggering the atomic layers control of hexagonal boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yangxi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, Changrui, E-mail: crzhang12@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Jiang, Da; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Haomin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmxie@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Thickness of h-BN films can be controlled from double atomic layers to over ten atomic layers by adjusting the CVD parameters, quite different from the reported thickness control of up to tens of nanometers. (The interlayer distance of h-BN is 0.333 nm.) • Growth mechanisms of h-BN are discussed, especially for bilayer h-BN films. • Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful synthesis of large scale hexagonal boron nitride films with controllable atomic layers. The films are grown on thin nickel foils via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition with borazine as the precursor. The atomic layers of h-BN films can be controlled in a narrow range by adjusting growth time and the cooling rates. Transmission electron microscope results shows the h-BN films exhibit high uniformity and good crystalline. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the B/N elemental ratio is about 1.01. The h-BN films exhibit a pronounced deep ultraviolet absorption at 203.0 nm with a large optical band gap of 6.02 ± 0.03 eV. The results suggest potential applications of h-BN films in deep ultraviolet and dielectric materials. Growth mechanisms of h-BN films with thickness control are discussed, especially when the synthesized h-BN films after a higher cooling rate show an in-plane rotation angle between bilayers. Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films.

  18. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  19. On the hydrogen-graphene layers interactions, relevance to the onboard storage problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, Y S; Ochsner, A

    2012-10-01

    Empirical evaluations of fundamental characteristics of the physical and chemical interaction of hydrogen with graphene layers in different kinds of graphite and novel carbonaceous nanomaterials of graphene layer structure have been carried out. This was done by using the approaches of the thermodynamics of reversible and irreversible processes for analysis of the adsorption, absorption, diffusion, the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and other experimental data and comparing such analytical results with first-principles calculations. Such an analysis of a number of the known experimental and theoretical data has shown a real possibility of the multilayer specific adsorption (intercalation) of hydrogen between graphene layers in novel carbonaceous nanomaterials. This is of relevance for solving the bottle-neck problem of the hydrogen on-board storage in fuel-cell-powered vehicles, and other technical applications.

  20. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-02-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance.

  1. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance. PMID:28169306

  2. The Tribological Properties of Multi-Layered Graphene as Additives of PAO2 Oil in Steel–Steel Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Bao Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layered graphene was prepared by supercritical CO2 exfoliation of graphite. As the additives of polyalphaolefin-2 (PAO2 oil, its tribological properties were investigated using four-ball test method. The friction reduction and anti-wear ability of pure lubricant was improved by the addition of graphene. With a favorable concentration, the graphene was dispersive. The PAO2 oil with 0.05 wt % graphene showed better tribological properties than that for the other concentration of graphene additives. It could be used as a good lubricant additive for its excellent tribological characteristics, and the multi-layered graphene can bear the load of the steel ball and prevent direct contact of the mating metal surfaces. However, a higher concentration would cause the agglomeration of graphene and weaken the improvement of tribological properties.

  3. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J., E-mail: keren.kanarik@lamresearch.com; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, California 94538 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices.

  4. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons adsorbed with single iron atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉娥; 肖杨; 颜晓红; 戴昌杰

    2015-01-01

    We have performed density-functional calculations of the transport properties of the zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) adsorbed with a single iron atom. Two adsorption configurations are considered, i.e., iron adsorbed on the edge and on the interior of the nanoribbon. The results show that the transport features of the two configurations are similar. However, the transport properties are modified due to the scattering effects induced by coupling of the ZGNR band states to the localized 3d-orbital state of the iron atom. More importantly, one can find that several dips appear in the transmission curve, which is closely related to the above mentioned coupling. We expect that our results will have potential applications in graphene-based spintronic devices.

  5. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  6. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotipalli, R.; Delamare, R.; Poncelet, O.; Tang, X.; Francis, L. A.; Flandre, D.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012-1013 cm-2) in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit). This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm) Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD). Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) (20 nm), SiO2 (20 nm) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) (20 nm) also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G) measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV). The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit) on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn), and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  7. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingchao, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [Holland Computing Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Hong, Yang [Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Yue, Yanan, E-mail: zhang@unl.edu, E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China)

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  8. Tensile mechanical properties of nano-layered copper/graphene composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yezeng; Huang, Feng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Wei, Fuxiang; Meng, Qingkun; Yang, Weiming; Qi, Jiqiu

    2017-03-01

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid copper confined to graphene layers has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the liquid copper undergoes an obvious transition to a crystal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy and radial distribution function. Moreover, five different simulation models are used to investigate the effects of the number of graphene layers on the mechanical properties of the composites. It is found that the strength and plasticity of the composites have been improved significantly.

  9. Self-forming oriented layer slip and macroscale super-low friction of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Ji, Li; Li, Hongxuan; Wang, Jinqing; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2017-02-01

    Graphite lubrication is not effective in vacuum, and the failure mechanism is still under debate. Here, we show that graphene as two-dimensional (2D) "graphite paper" can overcome this shortcoming of graphite. Graphene exhibits stable super-low friction in a vacuum environment at the engineering scale because it can self-form a highly ordered lamellar structure on the sliding interface during the friction process owing to its unique 2D nano-effects. Experimental observation of the layer-slip phenomenon on the low-energy-state outside layers provides direct evidence to understand the lubrication mechanism of graphitic materials.

  10. Graphene and Graphene Nanomesh Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Haruyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spintronics, which manipulate spins but not electron charge, are highly valued as energy and thermal dissipationless systems. A variety of materials are challenging the realization of spintronic devices. Among those, graphene, a carbon mono-atomic layer, is very promising for efficient spin manipulation and the creation of a full spectrum of beyond-CMOS spin-based nano-devices. In the present article, the recent advancements in graphene spintronics are reviewed, introducing the observation of spin coherence and the spin Hall effect. Some research has reported the strong spin coherence of graphene. Avoiding undesirable influences from the substrate are crucial. Magnetism and spintronics arising from graphene edges are reviewed based on my previous results. In spite of carbon-based material with only sp2 bonds, the zigzag-type atomic structure of graphene edges theoretically produces spontaneous spin polarization of electrons due to mutual Coulomb interaction of extremely high electron density of states (edge states localizing at the flat energy band. We fabricate honeycomb-like arrays of low-defect hexagonal nanopores (graphene nanomeshes; GNMs on graphenes, which produce a large amount of zigzag pore edges, by using a nonlithographic method (nanoporous alumina templates and critical temperature annealing under high vacuum and hydrogen atmosphere. We observe large-magnitude ferromagnetism, which arises from polarized spins localizing at the hydrogen-terminated zigzag-nanopore edges of the GNMs, even at room temperature. Moreover, spin pumping effects are found for magnetic fields applied in parallel with the few-layer GNM planes. Strong spin coherence and spontaneously polarized edge spins of graphene can be expected to lead to novel spintronics with invisible, flexible, and ultra-light (wearable features.

  11. ZnO layers grown by Atomic Layer Deposition: A new material for transparent conductive oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godlewski, M., E-mail: godlew@ifpan.edu.p [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Science, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw (Poland); Guziewicz, E.; Luka, G.; Krajewski, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw (Poland); Lukasiewicz, M.; Wachnicki, L.; Wachnicka, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Science, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw (Poland); Kopalko, K. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, Warsaw (Poland); Sarem, A.; Dalati, B. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tishreen University, Latakia (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate possibility of a control (by selection of zinc precursors and variation of a growth temperature) of electrical properties of ZnO films grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). ZnO films grown by ALD are used in test photovoltaic devices (solar cells) as transparent conductive oxides for upper, transparent layer in inorganic and organic solar cells, and as n-type partners of p-type CdTe.

  12. Failure of multi-layer graphene coatings in acidic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Feng; Stoot, Adam Carsten; Bøggild, Peter

    2016-01-01

    with thick, high-quality chemical vapor deposited multilayered graphene is exposed to acidic solutions, a dramatic evolution of gas is observed at the coating–substrate interface. The gas bubbles grow and merge, eventually rupturing and delaminating the coating. This behavior, attributed to cathodic hydrogen...... evolution, can also occur spontaneously on a range of other technologically important metals and alloys based on iron, zinc, aluminum and manganese; this makes these findings relevant for practical applications of graphene-based coatings.Being impermeable to all gases, graphene has been proposed...... is exposed to acidic solutions, a dramatic evolution of gas is observed at the coating–substrate interface. The gas bubbles grow and merge, eventually rupturing and delaminating the coating. This behavior, attributed to cathodic hydrogen evolution, can also occur spontaneously on a range of other...

  13. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  14. Charge-carrier screening in single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, David A; Regan, William; Fedorov, Alexei V; Zettl, A; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2013-04-05

    The effect of charge-carrier screening on the transport properties of a neutral graphene sheet is studied by directly probing its electronic structure. We find that the Fermi velocity, Dirac point velocity, and overall distortion of the Dirac cone are renormalized due to the screening of the electron-electron interaction in an unusual way. We also observe an increase of the electron mean free path due to the screening of charged impurities. These observations help us to understand the basis for the transport properties of graphene, as well as the fundamental physics of these interesting electron-electron interactions at the Dirac point crossing.

  15. Ultrathin ultra-broadband electro-absorption modulator based on few-layer graphene based anisotropic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2017-02-01

    In this article, a few-layered graphene-dielectric multilayer (metamaterial) electro-optic modulator has been proposed in the mid and far infrared range that works on electro-absorption mechanism. Graphene, both mono layer and few layer, is an actively tunable optical material that allows control of inter-band and intra-band transition by tuning its chemical potential. Utilizing this unique feature of graphene, we propose a multilayer graphene dielectric stack where few layer graphene is preferred over mono layer graphene. Although the total thickness of the stack still remains in the nanometer range, this device can exhibit superior performances in terms of (i) high modulation depth, (ii) ultra-broadband performance, (iii) ultra-low insertion loss due to inherent metamaterial properties, (iv)nano-scale footprint, (v) polarization independence and (vi) capability of being integrated to a silicon waveguide. Interestingly, these superior performances, achievable by using few layer graphene with carefully designed metamaterial, may not be possible with mono layer graphene. Our proposals have been validated by both the effective medium theory and general transfer matrix method.

  16. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  17. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  18. Optical properties of spray coated layers with carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes as well as graphene are allotropic forms of carbon. Graphene is a two dimensional (2D) form of atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice, while carbon nanotube is a cylindrical nanostructure composed of a rolled sheet of graphene lattice at specific and discrete angles. Both of discussed materials have a high potential for modern engineering, especially in organic and printed electronics. High transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and low electrical resistance are desirable features in various applications and may be fulfilled with studied carbon nanomaterials. They have chances to become an important technological improvement in customers electronic devices by applying them to electrodes production in flexible screens and light sources. Graphene end carbon nanotubes are conceptually similar. However, characteristic properties of these two substances are different. In the article authors present the results of the transmission in visible electromagnetic spectrum characteristics of different samples. This parameter and the resistance of electrodes are tested, analysed and compared. Characteristics of optical transmittance against resistance with the optimal point of that relationship are presented in paper. Moreover, dependency of graphene nanoplatelets agglomerates arrangement against type of nano-fillers is shown. Two groups of tested inks contain graphene nanoplatelets with different fillers diameters. The third group contains carbon nanotubes. Described parameters are important for production process and results of analysis can be used by technologists working with elastic electronics.

  19. Atomically Thin-Layered Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eric; Kim, Ki Seok; Yeom, Geun Young; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2017-02-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are becoming significant because of their interesting semiconducting and photonic properties. In particular, TMDs such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten diselenide (WSe2), titanium disulfide (TiS2), tantalum sulfide (TaS2), and niobium selenide (NbSe2) are increasingly attracting attention for their applications in solar cell devices. In this review, we give a brief introduction to TMDs with a focus on MoS2; and thereafter, emphasize the role of atomically thin MoS2 layers in fabricating solar cell devices, including bulk-heterojunction, organic, and perovskites-based solar cells. Layered MoS2 has been used as the hole-transport layer (HTL), electron-transport layer (ETL), interfacial layer, and protective layer in fabricating heterojunction solar cells. The trilayer graphene/MoS2/n-Si solar cell devices exhibit a power-conversion efficiency of 11.1%. The effects of plasma and chemical doping on the photovoltaic performance of MoS2 solar cells have been analyzed. After doping and electrical gating, a power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.03% has been observed for the MoS2/h-BN/GaAs heterostructure solar cells. The MoS2-containing perovskites-based solar cells show a PCE as high as 13.3%. The PCE of MoS2-based organic solar cells exceeds 8.40%. The stability of MoS2 solar cells measured under ambient conditions and light illumination has been discussed. The MoS2-based materials show a great potential for solar cell devices along with high PCE; however, in this connection, their long-term environmental stability is also of equal importance for commercial applications.

  20. Growth and optical characteristics of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk In Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of high-quality, smooth, and flat ZnO thin films on graphene layers and their photoluminescence (PL characteristics. For the growth of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers, ZnO nanowalls were grown using metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on oxygen-plasma treated graphene layers as an intermediate layer. PL measurements were conducted at low temperatures to examine strong near-band-edge emission peaks. The full-width-at-half-maximum value of the dominant PL emission peak was as narrow as 4 meV at T = 11 K, comparable to that of the best-quality films reported previously. Furthermore, the stimulated emission of ZnO thin films on the graphene layers was observed at the low excitation energy of 180 kW/cm2 at room temperature. Their structural and optical characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and PL spectroscopy.

  1. Van der Waals forces and electron-electron interactions in two strained graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Harnish, Peter; Sylvester, Alexander; Kotov, Valeri N.

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the van der Waals (vdW) interaction energy at T=0 between two undoped graphene layers which are separated by a finite distance. Our study is carried out within the Random Phase Approximation and the interaction energy is obtained for variation in the strength of effective Coulomb interaction and anisotropy due to applied uniaxial strain. We consider the following three models for the anisotropic case: a) where one of the two layers is uniaxially strained, b) the two layers are strained in the same direction, and c) one of the layers is strained in the perpendicular direction. We find that for all the three models and any given value of the coupling, the vdW interaction energy increases with increasing anisotropy. The effect is most striking for the case when both the layers are strained in the parallel direction where we observe up to an order of magnitude increase in the strained graphene relative to the unstrained case. We also investigate the effect of intra-layer electron-electron interactions in the region of large separation between the strained graphene layers. We conclude that the many-body contributions to the correlation energy are non-negligible and the vdW interaction energy decreases as a function of increasing distance between the layers. Alexander Sylvester acknowledges financial assistance from the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) focussing on complex materials.

  2. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions on few-layered graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guixia; Ren, Xuemei; Gao, Xing; Tan, Xiaoli; Li, Jiaxing; Chen, Changlun; Huang, Yuying; Wang, Xiangke

    2011-11-07

    Few-layered graphene oxide (FGO) was synthesized from graphite by using the modified Hummers method, and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The prepared FGO was used to adsorb Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The abundant oxygen-containing groups on the surfaces of FGO played an important role in Pb(II) ion adsorption on FGO. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was dependent on pH values and independent of ionic strength. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was mainly dominated by strong surface complexation. From the adsorption isotherms, the maximum adsorption capacities (C(smax)) of Pb(II) ions on FGO calculated from the Langmuir model were about 842, 1150, and 1850 mg g(-1) at 293, 313, and 333 K, respectively, higher than any currently reported. The FGO had the highest adsorption capacities of today's nanomaterials. The thermodynamic parameters calculated from the temperature dependent adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on FGO was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  3. High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH3 gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007 m(2)  g(-1) ), high electrical conductivity (1532 S m(-1) ), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt %) for electrical double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) , and a capacitance of 261 F g(-1) was retained at 50 A g(-1) , which indicated a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability and preserved 96 % of the initial specific capacitance after 100 000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy results provided evidenced for the recovery of π conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.

  4. Properties of Ultra-Thin Hafnium Oxide and Interfacial Layer Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taeho Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Kyung-Il Hong; Duck-Kyun Choi; Jinho Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-thin hafnium-oxide gate dielectric films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique using HfCl4 and H2O precursor on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the interface layer is Hf-silicate rather than phase separated Hf-silicide and silicon oxide structure. The Hf-silicate interfacial layer partially changes into SiOx after high temperature annealing, resulting in a complex HfO2-silicate-SiOx dielectric structure. Electrical measurements confirms that HfO2 on Si is stable up to 700 ℃ for 30 s under N2 ambient.

  5. Heat Conduction across Monolayer and Few-Layer Graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    J. C.; Scardaci, V.; Casiraghi, C.; Lazzeri, M.; Mauri, F.; Piscanec, S.; Jiang, D.; Novoselov, K. S.; Roth , S.; Geim, A. K. Raman Spectrum of...Liu, L.; Mak, K. F.; Flynn, G. W.; Heinz , T. F. Ultraflat Graphene. Nature 2009, 462, 339–341. (29) Zheng, X.; Cahill, D. G.; Weaver, R.; Zhao, J.-C

  6. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  7. Highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction using crystalline layered three-dimensional molybdenum disulfides grown on graphene film.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behranginia, Amirhossein; Asadi, Mohammad; Liu, Cong; Yasaei, Poya; Kumar, Bijandra; Phillips, Patrick; Foroozan, Tara; Waranius, Joseph C.; Kim, Kibum; Abiade, Jeremiah; Klie, Robert F.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2016-01-26

    Electrochemistry is central to applications in the field of energy storage and generation. However, it has advanced far more slowly over the last two decades, mainly because of a lack of suitable and affordable catalysts. Here, we report the synthesis of highly crystalline layered three-dimensional (3D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalysts with bare Mo-edge atoms and demonstrate their remarkable performance for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We found that Mo-edge-terminated 3D MoS2 directly grown on graphene film exhibits a remarkable exchange current density (18.2 mu A cm(-2)) and turnover frequency (>4 S-1) for HER. The obtained exchange current density is 15.2 and 2.3 times higher than that of MoS2/graphene and MoS2/Au catalysts, respectively, both with sulfided Mo-edge atoms. An easily scalable and robust growth process on a wide variety of substrates, along with prolonged stability, suggests that this material is a promising catalyst in energy-related applications.

  8. Nonreciprocal propagation of surface plasmon mode guided through graphene layer on magnetized semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagyaraj, C.; Mathew, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the nonreciprocal effect induced by magnetized semiconductor substrate on surface plasmon mode guided through monolayer graphene. Dispersion relation for the fundamental antisymmetric mode is derived analytically. Nonreciprocal propagation characteristics of fundamental mode is studied as a function of wavelength, graphene layer chemical potential and biasing magnetic field. Fundamental mode exhibits appreciable nonreciprocal dispersion for transversal magnetization of semiconductor substrate in midinfrared and terahertz frequencies. Cutoff wavelength for backward propagating mode is observed above 2.5 T of external biasing field. Cutoff wavelength is found to be decreasing with increase in the biasing magnetic field and cladding index, also identified to be independent of graphene layer chemical potential. Proposed waveguide structure suggests the possibility of realizing one way propagating plasmonic waveguides with widely tunable guiding characteristics and related functional devices such as isolators, modulators, phase shifters and switches for integrated photonic circuits.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of nanolaminate oxide films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, M.; Weisheit, M.; Kolanek, K.; Michling, M.; Engelmann, H. J.; Schmeisser, D.

    2011-11-01

    Among the methods for depositing thin films, atomic layer deposition is unique for its capability of growing conformal thin films of compounds with a control of composition and thickness at the atomic level. The conformal growth of thin films can be of particular interest for covering nanostructures since it assures the homogeneous growth of the ALD film in all directions, independent of the position of the sample with respect to the incoming precursor flow. Here we describe the technique for growing the HfO2/Al2O3 bilayer on Si substrate and our in situ approach for its investigation by means of synchrotron radiation photoemission. In particular, we study the interface interactions between the two oxides for various thickness compositions ranging from 0.4 to 2.7 nm. We find that the ALD of HfO2 on Si induces the increase of the interfacial SiO2 layer, and a change in the band bending of Si. On the contrary, the ALD of Al2O3 on HfO2 shows negligible interaction between layers as the binding energies of Hf4f, Si2p, and O1s core level peaks and the valence band maximum of HfO2 do not change and the interfacial SiO2 does not increase.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition Films as Diffusion Barriers for Silver Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Amy; Breitung, Eric; Drayman-Weisser, Terry; Gates, Glenn; Rubloff, Gary W.; Phaneuf, Ray J.

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated as a means to create transparent oxide diffusion barrier coatings to reduce the rate of tarnishing for silver objects in museum collections. Accelerated aging by heating various thicknesses (5 to 100nm) of ALD alumina (Al2O3) thin films on sterling and fine silver was used to determine the effectiveness of alumina as a barrier to silver oxidation. The effect of aging temperature on the thickness of the tarnish layer (Ag2S) created at the interface of the ALD coating and the bulk silver substrate was determined by reflectance spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS). Reflectance spectroscopy was an effective rapid screening tool to determine tarnishing rates and the coating's visual impact. X-Ray Photoelectric Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) analysis showed a phase transformation in the Ag2S tarnish layer at 177 C and saturation in the thickness of the silver sulfide layer, indicating possible self-passivation of the tarnish layer.

  11. Triangular Black Phosphorus Atomic Layers by Liquid Exfoliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Soonjoo; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Kim, Yooseok; Kim, Hyeran; Bang, Junhyeok; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youngjun; Park, Byoungnam; Lee, Jouhahn

    2016-03-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the most promising material among the two-dimensional materials due to its layered structure and the excellent semiconductor properties. Currently, thin BP atomic layers are obtained mostly by mechanical exfoliation of bulk BP, which limits applications in thin-film based electronics due to a scaling process. Here we report highly crystalline few-layer black phosphorus thin films produced by liquid exfoliation. We demonstrate that the liquid-exfoliated BP forms a triangular crystalline structure on SiO2/Si (001) and amorphous carbon. The highly crystalline BP layers are faceted with a preferred orientation of the (010) plane on the sharp edge, which is an energetically most favorable facet according to the density functional theory calculations. Our results can be useful in understanding the triangular BP structure for large-area applications in electronic devices using two-dimensional materials. The sensitivity and selectivity of liquid-exfoliated BP to gas vapor demonstrate great potential for practical applications as sensors.

  12. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  13. Nanoporous SiO2 thin films made by atomic layer deposition and atomic etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, Lilit; Kley, E.-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    A new route to prepare nanoporous SiO2 films by mixing atomic-layer-deposited alumina and silica in an Å-scale is presented. The selective removal of Al2O3 from the composites using wet chemical etching with phosphoric acid resulted in nanoporous thin SiO2 layers. A diffusion-controlled dissolution mechanism is identified whereby an interesting reorganization of the residual SiO2 is observed. The atomic scale oxide mixing is decisive in attaining and tailoring the film porosity. The porosity and the refractive index of nanoporous silica films were tailored from 9% to 69% and from 1.40 to 1.13, respectively. The nanoporous silica was successfully employed as antireflection coatings and as diffusion membranes to encapsulate nanostructures.

  14. Selective ionic transport through tunable subnanometer pores in single-layer graphene membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, Sean C; Boutilier, Michael S H; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Laoui, Tahar; Atieh, Muataz; Karnik, Rohit

    2014-03-12

    We report selective ionic transport through controlled, high-density, subnanometer diameter pores in macroscopic single-layer graphene membranes. Isolated, reactive defects were first introduced into the graphene lattice through ion bombardment and subsequently enlarged by oxidative etching into permeable pores with diameters of 0.40 ± 0.24 nm and densities exceeding 10(12) cm(-2), while retaining structural integrity of the graphene. Transport measurements across ion-irradiated graphene membranes subjected to in situ etching revealed that the created pores were cation-selective at short oxidation times, consistent with electrostatic repulsion from negatively charged functional groups terminating the pore edges. At longer oxidation times, the pores allowed transport of salt but prevented the transport of a larger organic molecule, indicative of steric size exclusion. The ability to tune the selectivity of graphene through controlled generation of subnanometer pores addresses a significant challenge in the development of advanced nanoporous graphene membranes for nanofiltration, desalination, gas separation, and other applications.

  15. Examining the impact of multi-layer graphene using cellular and amphibian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Mouchet, Florence; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Janowska, Izabela; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Soula, Brigitte; Galibert, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, graphene has been defined as the revolutionary material showing an incredible expansion in industrial applications. Different graphene forms have been applied in several contexts, spreading from energy technologies and electronics to food and agriculture technologies. Graphene showed promises also in the biomedical field. Hopeful results have been already obtained in diagnostic, drug delivery, tissue regeneration and photothermal cancer ablation. In view of the enormous development of graphene-based technologies, a careful assessment of its impact on health and environment is demanded. It is evident how investigating the graphene toxicity is of fundamental importance in the context of medical purposes. On the other hand, the nanomaterial present in the environment, likely to be generated all along the industrial life-cycle, may have harmful effects on living organisms. In the present work, an important contribution on the impact of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on health and environment is given by using a multifaceted approach. For the first purpose, the effect of the material on two mammalian cell models was assessed. Key cytotoxicity parameters were considered such as cell viability and inflammatory response induction. This was combined with an evaluation of MLG toxicity towards Xenopus laevis, used as both in vivo and environmental model organism.

  16. Effects of ultraviolet nanosecond laser irradiation on structural modification and optical transmission of single layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhong; Kang, Xiaoli; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-03-01

    Structural modifications and optical transmission change of single layer graphene (SLG) on transparent SiO2 substrate induced by nanosecond 355 nm laser irradiation were systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser-excited Raman, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis transmission spectra. In this study, to avoid damage to graphene, the selected irradiation fluence was set to be smaller than the laser damage threshold of SLG. Laser-driven formation of nano-dots, carbon clusters and spherical carbon morphologies were clearly presented using SEM magnification images, and the formation mechanism of such structures were discussed. Raman spectra revealed formation of D' peak and the continuously increasing of ID/IG intensity ratio with the concurrent increase of laser fluence, indicating the increase in amount of structural defects and disordering in SLG. XPS results disclosed that the oxygen content in SLG increases with laser fluence. The formation and relative content increase of Cdbnd O, Csbnd Osbnd C and Osbnd Cdbnd O bonds in SLG induced by laser irradiation were also revealed by XPS. Laser-driven micro-structure modifications of crystalline graphene to nano-crystalline graphene and photo-chemical reactions between graphene and O2 and H2O in air environment were suggested to be responsible for the Raman and XPS revealed modifications in SLG. It is worthy to point out that the above mentioned structural modifications only caused a slight decrease (graphene aiming at modifying its structure and thus taiorling its properties.

  17. A Simple Road for the Transformation of Few-Layer Graphene into MWNTs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintana, Mildred; Grzelczak, Marek; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Bals, Sara; Kooi, Bart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    We report the direct formation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by ultrasonication of graphite in dimethylformamide (DMF) upon addition of ferrocene aldehyde (Fc-CHO). The tubular structures appear exclusively at the edges of graphene layers and contain Fe clusters. Pc in conjunction with benz

  18. Giant enhancement in vertical conductivity of stacked CVD graphene sheets by self-assembled molecular layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanpeng; Yuan, Li; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Yi; Li, Linjun; Gao, Libo; Nerngchamnong, Nisachol; Nai, Chang Tai; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Feng, Yuan Ping; Nijhuis, Christian A.; Loh, Kian Ping

    2014-11-01

    Layer-by-layer-stacked chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene films find applications as transparent and conductive electrodes in solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and touch panels. Common to lamellar-type systems with anisotropic electron delocalization, the plane-to-plane (vertical) conductivity in such systems is several orders lower than its in-plane conductivity. The poor electronic coupling between the planes is due to the presence of transfer process organic residues and trapped air pocket in wrinkles. Here we show the plane-to-plane tunnelling conductivity of stacked CVD graphene layers can be improved significantly by inserting 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester between the graphene layers. The six orders of magnitude increase in plane-to-plane conductivity is due to hole doping, orbital hybridization, planarization and the exclusion of polymer residues. Our results highlight the importance of interfacial modification for enhancing the performance of LBL-stacked CVD graphene films, which should be applicable to other types of stacked two-dimensional films.

  19. Ultra-Short Optical Pulse Generation with Single-Layer Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, C -C; Bunch, J S; Schibli, T R

    2010-01-01

    Pulses as short as 260 fs have been generated in a diode-pumped low-gain Er:Yb:glass laser by exploiting the nonlinear optical response of single-layer graphene. The application of this novel material to solid-state bulk lasers opens up a way to compact and robust lasers with ultrahigh repetition rates.

  20. Estimating the elastic properties of few-layer graphene from the free-standing indentation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lixin; Wang, Yugang; Cao, Guoxin

    2013-11-27

    Using molecular mechanics simulations, the elastic properties of multi-layer graphene (MLG) are investigated; this includes both the linear analysis based on the indentation load-displacement relationship and the nonlinear analysis based on the strain energy. The elastic properties of graphene layers in MLG are similar to each other and also quite close to those of monolayer graphene. The van der Waals (VDW) interaction between graphene layers (interlayer interaction) will create a difference between the indenter tip displacement and the deviation of MLG in indentation, which will cause an overestimation of the elastic modulus of MLG based on classic indentation analysis. This overestimation can be as high as 20%. In addition, the interlayer interaction will significantly affect the nonlinear elastic behavior of MLG in free-standing indentation. With an increase in the number of layers of MLG, the second-order elastic stiffness of MLG is very sensitive to the indentation loading range, and the third-order nonlinear elastic constant is significantly increased.

  1. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  2. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...... dioxide (TiO2) overlayers on silicon-based photocathodes generate extremely stable electrodes. These electrodes can produce an onset potential of +0.510 V vs. RHE and a hydrogen evolution saturation current of 22 mA cm−2 using the red part of the AM1.5 solar spectrum (λ > 635 nm, 38.6 mW cm−2). A PEC...

  3. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  4. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  5. Atomic-layer deposition of Lu2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarel, G.; Bonera, E.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.; Fedushkin, I. L.; Schumann, H.; Lebedinskii, Yu.; Zenkevich, A.

    2004-07-01

    Rare earth oxides could represent a valuable alternative to SiO2 in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Lu2O3 is proposed because of its predicted thermodynamical stability on silicon and large conduction band offset. We report on the growth by atomic-layer deposition of lutetium oxide films using the dimeric {[C5H4(SiMe3)]2LuCl}2 complex, which has been synthesized for this purpose, and H2O. The films were found to be stoichiometric, with Lu2O3 composition, and amorphous. Annealing in nitrogen at 950°C leads to crystallization in the cubic bixbyite structure. The dielectric constant of the as-grown Lu2O3 layers is 12±1.

  6. Blistering during the atomic layer deposition of iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genevée, Pascal, E-mail: pascal-genevee@chimie-paristech.fr, E-mail: a.szeghalmi@uni-jena.de; Ahiavi, Ernest; Janunts, Norik; Pertsch, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Szeghalmi, Adriana, E-mail: pascal-genevee@chimie-paristech.fr, E-mail: a.szeghalmi@uni-jena.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Oliva, Maria [Fraunhofer IOF, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The authors report on the formation of blisters during the atomic layer deposition of iridium using iridium acetylacetonate and oxygen precursors. Films deposited on fused silica substrates led to sparsely distributed large blisters while in the case of silicon with native oxide additional small blisters with a high density was observed. It is found that the formation of blisters is favored by a higher deposition temperature and a larger layer thickness. Postdeposition annealing did not have a significant effect on the formation of blisters. Finally, changing purge duration during the film growth allowed us to avoid blistering and evidenced that impurities released from the film in gas phase were responsible for the formation of blisters.

  7. Damage on multi-layer graphene by femtosecond laserablation%多层石墨烯在飞秒激光作用下的损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴家云; 吴鑫; 严冬; 赵海燕

    2015-01-01

    Multi-layer graphene generated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)was ablated by femtosecond laser,and the obtained single-pulse ablation threshold of multi-layer graphene was 0.22 mW.The samples before and after processing were characterized by optical microscopy,atomic force microscope (AFM),and Raman spectroscopy,and the damage effects of femtosecond laser ablation on multi-layer graphene were demonstrated.The results show that femtosecond laser remains potential advantagesin gra-phene micro pattern processing with the precision of sub-micro meter;meanwhile,thinning phenomenonfor multi-layer graphene occurs at the edge of ablation area.%使用飞秒激光对化学气相沉积(CVD)法制备的多层石墨烯进行辐照,得到了多层石墨烯的单脉冲破坏阈值为0.22 mW;利用光学显微镜、原子力显微镜(AFM)和拉曼光谱对加工前、后的试样进行表征,阐述了飞秒激光对多层石墨烯的烧蚀损伤效应,发现飞秒激光在石墨烯微图案化加工方面具有潜在的优势,能够达到亚微米级的加工精度;同时在烧蚀边缘区域,多层石墨烯出现减薄现象。

  8. Ultra-compact injection terahertz laser using the resonant inter-layer radiative transitions in multi-graphene-layer structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinov, Alexander A; Aleshkin, Vladimir Ya; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi; Svintsov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of laser resonators represents a crucial issue for the design of terahertz semiconductor lasers with high gain and low absorption loss. In this paper, we put forward and optimize the surface plasmonic metal waveguide geometry for the recently proposed terahertz injection laser based on resonant radiative transitions between tunnel-coupled grapheme layers. We find an optimal number of active graphene layer pairs corresponding to the maximum net modal gain. The maximum gain increases with frequency and can be as large as ~ 500 cm-1 at 8 THz, while the threshold length of laser resonator can be as small as ~ 50 mkm. Our findings substantiate the possibility of ultra-compact voltage-tunable graphene-based lasers operating at room temperature.

  9. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  10. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W. [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, Massachusetts 01507 (United States); Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  12. Atomic layer deposition ultrathin film origami using focused ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, O. D.; Brown, J. J.; Eigenfeld, N. T.; Gertsch, J. C.; Bright, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) micromachining is a powerful tool for maskless lithography and in recent years FIB has been explored as a tool for strain engineering. Ion beam induced deformation can be utilized as a means for folding freestanding thin films into complex 3D structures. FIB of high energy gallium (Ga+) ions induces stress by generation of dislocations and ion implantation within material layers, which create creases or folds upon mechanical relaxation enabled by motion of the material layers. One limitation on such processing is the ability to fabricate flat freestanding thin film structures. This capability is limited by the residual stresses formed during processing and fabrication of the films, which can result in initial curvature and deformation of films upon release from a sacrificial fabrication layer. This paper demonstrates folding in freestanding ultrathin films (1:1000) by ion-induced stress relaxation. The ultrathin flat structures are fabricated using atomic layer deposition on sacrificial polyimide. We have demonstrated vertical folding with 30 keV Ga+ ions in structures with lateral dimensions varying from 10 to 50 μm.

  13. Quantifying the growth of individual graphene layers by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2016-01-01

    The growth dynamics of layered carbon is studied by means of in situ transmission electron microscopy in order to obtain a deeper insight into the growth by chemical vapor deposition, which at present is the technique of choice for growing layered carbon. In situ growth of layered carbon structures...... on nickel using acetylene as carbon precursor gas is studied in the electron microscope at various gas pressures. By following the growth of individual graphene layers on the Ni surface, local growth rates are determined as a function of precursor pressure. Two growth regimes are identified, an initial...

  14. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  15. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  16. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, BongSoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-09-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and electron mobility of 0.17 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.

  17. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon nitride using neopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Weeks@intermolecular.com; Nowling, Greg; Fuchigami, Nobi; Bowes, Michael; Littau, Karl [Intermolecular, 3011 North 1st Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Progress in transistor scaling has increased the demands on the material properties of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) thin films used in device fabrication and at the same time placed stringent restrictions on the deposition conditions employed. Recently, low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition has emerged as a viable technique for depositing these films with a thermal budget compatible with semiconductor processing at sub-32 nm technology nodes. For these depositions, it is desirable to use precursors that are free from carbon and halogens that can incorporate into the film. Beyond this, it is necessary to develop processing schemes that minimize the wet etch rate of the film as it will be subjected to wet chemical processing in subsequent fabrication steps. In this work, the authors introduce low temperature deposition of SiN{sub x} using neopentasilane [NPS, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 4}Si] in a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process with a direct N{sub 2} plasma. The growth with NPS is compared to a more common precursor, trisilylamine [TSA, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 3 }N] at identical process conditions. The wet etch rates of the films deposited with NPS are characterized at different plasma conditions and the impact of ion energy is discussed.

  18. An Atomically Layered InSe Avalanche Photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Sidong; Wen, Fangfang; Ge, Liehui; Najmaei, Sina; George, Antony; Gong, Yongji; Gao, Weilu; Jin, Zehua; Li, Bo; Lou, Jun; Kono, Junichiro; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel; Halas, Naomi J

    2015-05-13

    Atomically thin photodetectors based on 2D materials have attracted great interest due to their potential as highly energy-efficient integrated devices. However, photoinduced carrier generation in these media is relatively poor due to low optical absorption, limiting device performance. Current methods for overcoming this problem, such as reducing contact resistances or back gating, tend to increase dark current and suffer slow response times. Here, we realize the avalanche effect in a 2D material-based photodetector and show that avalanche multiplication can greatly enhance the device response of an ultrathin InSe-based photodetector. This is achieved by exploiting the large Schottky barrier formed between InSe and Al electrodes, enabling the application of a large bias voltage. Plasmonic enhancement of the photosensitivity, achieved by patterning arrays of Al nanodisks onto the InSe layer, further improves device efficiency. With an external quantum efficiency approaching 866%, a dark current in the picoamp range, and a fast response time of 87 μs, this atomic layer device exhibits multiple significant advances in overall performance for this class of devices.

  19. Tunable surface plasmon-polaritons in a gyroelectric slab sandwiched between two graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoding; Cao, Ming; Liu, Chang; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the properties of surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs) in a gyroelectric slab sandwiched between two graphene layers, where the external static magnetic field is applied in the Voigt geometry. It is shown that the dispersion characteristics and propagation lenghts of the SPPs for both the optical and the acoustic branches can be tuned flexibly by the external magnetic field and graphene's chemical potential, and that the nonreciprocal properties of the SPPs caused by the external magnetic field are rather obvious. The results provide a method for adjusting and improving the dispersion and propagation properties of the SPPs, which might be helpful for the design of the related plasmonic devices.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of nanometer-sized gaps in suspended few-layer graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetti, S.; Martini, L.; Candini, A.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene nanodevices, such as ultra-narrow constrictions and nanometer-spaced gaps, are emerging as appealing candidates for various applications, ranging from advanced quantum devices to single-molecule junctions and even DNA sequencing. Here, we present the realization and characterization of nanometer-sized gaps in suspended few-layer graphene devices via feedback-controlled electroburning at room temperature. By analyzing the electrical behavior after the electroburning process, we identify two distinct regimes for the resulting devices, deriving a simple yet effective quantitative criterion to determine the complete opening of the nanogaps.

  1. Broadband electromagnetic response and ultrafast dynamics of few-layer epitaxial graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyunyong; Borondics, Ferenc; Siegel, David A.; Zhou, Shuyun Y.; Martin, Michael C.; Lanzara, Alessandra; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2009-03-26

    We study the broadband optical conductivity and ultrafast carrier dynamics of epitaxial graphene in the few-layer limit. Equilibrium spectra of nominally buffer, monolayer, and multilayer graphene exhibit significant terahertz and near-infrared absorption, consistent with a model of intra- and interband transitions in a dense Dirac electron plasma. Non-equilibrium terahertz transmission changes after photoexcitation are shown to be dominated by excess hole carriers, with a 1.2-ps mono-exponential decay that refects the minority-carrier recombination time.

  2. Nucleation and growth of single layer graphene on electrodeposited Cu by cold wall chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shantanu; Drucker, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    The nucleation density and average size of graphene crystallites grown using cold wall chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on 4 μm thick Cu films electrodeposited on W substrates can be tuned by varying growth parameters. Growth at a fixed substrate temperature of 1000 °C and total pressure of 700 Torr using Ar, H2 and CH4 mixtures enabled the contribution of total flow rate, CH4:H2 ratio and dilution of the CH4/H2 mixture by Ar to be identified. The largest variation in nucleation density was obtained by varying the CH4:H2 ratio. The observed morphological changes are analogous to those that would be expected if the deposition rate were varied at fixed substrate temperature for physical deposition using thermal evaporation. The graphene crystallite boundary morphology progresses from irregular/jagged through convex hexagonal to regular hexagonal as the effective C deposition rate decreases. This observation suggests that edge diffusion of C atoms along the crystallite boundaries, in addition to H2 etching, may contribute to shape evolution of the graphene crystallites. These results demonstrate that graphene grown using cold wall CVD follows a nucleation and growth mechanism similar to hot wall CVD. As a consequence, the vast knowledge base relevant to hot wall CVD may be exploited for graphene synthesis by the industrially preferable cold wall method.

  3. Superior coagulation of graphene oxides on nanoscale layered double hydroxides and layered double oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yidong; Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Zhongshan; Yao, Wen; Ai, Yuejie; Liu, Yunhai; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Alharbi, Njud S; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-12-01

    With the development and application of graphene oxides (GO), the potential toxicity and environmental behavior of GO has become one of the most forefront environmental problems. Herein, a novel nanoscale layered double hydroxides (glycerinum-modified nanocrystallined Mg/Al layered double hydroxides, LDH-Gl), layered double oxides (calcined LDH-Gl, LDO-Gl) and metallic oxide (TiO2) were synthesized and applied as superior coagulants for the efficient removal of GO from aqueous solutions. Coagulation of GO as a function of coagulant contents, pH, ionic strength, GO contents, temperature and co-existing ions were studied and compared, and the results showed that the maximum coagulation capacities of GO were LDO-Gl (448.3 mg g(-1)) > TiO2 (365.7 mg g(-1)) > LDH-Gl (339.1 mg g(-1)) at pH 5.5, which were significantly higher than those of bentonite, Al2O3, CaCl2 or other natural materials due to their stronger reaction active and interfacial effect. The presence of SO3(2-) and HCO3(-) inhibited the coagulation of GO on LDH-Gl and LDO-Gl significantly, while other cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Ni(2+), Al(3+)) or anion (Cl(-)) had slightly effect on GO coagulation. The interaction mechanism of GO coagulation on LDO-Gl and TiO2 might due to the electrostatic interactions and strong surface complexation, while the main driving force of GO coagulation on LDH-Gl might be attributed to electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond, which were further evidenced by TEM, SEM, FT-IR and XRD analysis. The results of natural environmental simulation showed that LDO-Gl, TiO2 or other kinds of natural metallic oxides could be superior coagulants for the efficient elimination of GO or other toxic nanomaterials from aqueous solutions in real environmental pollution cleanup.

  4. Rice husk-derived graphene with nano-sized domains and clean edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Yang, Kap-Seung; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Toda, Ikumi; Yamada, Takumi; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu; Hayashi, Takuya; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2014-07-23

    A new synthetic method is demonstrated for transforming rice husks into bulk amounts of graphene through its calcination and chemical activation. The bulk sample consists of crystalline nano-sized graphene and corrugated individual graphene sheets; the material generally contains one, two, or a few layers, and corrugated graphene domains are typically observed in monolayers containing topological defects within the hexagonal lattice and edges. Both types of graphenes exhibit atomically smooth surfaces and edges.

  5. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  6. Orbital-dependent Electron-Hole Interaction in Graphene and Associated Multi-Layer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tianqi; Su, Haibin

    2015-11-01

    We develop an orbital-dependent potential to describe electron-hole interaction in materials with structural 2D character, i.e. quasi-2D materials. The modulated orbital-dependent potentials are also constructed with non-local screening, multi-layer screening, and finite gap due to the coupling with substrates. We apply the excitonic Hamiltonian in coordinate-space with developed effective electron-hole interacting potentials to compute excitons’ binding strength at M (π band) and Γ (σ band) points in graphene and its associated multi-layer forms. The orbital-dependent potential provides a range-separated property for regulating both long- and short-range interactions. This accounts for the existence of the resonant π exciton in single- and bi-layer graphenes. The remarkable strong electron-hole interaction in σ orbitals plays a decisive role in the existence of σ exciton in graphene stack at room temperature. The interplay between gap-opening and screening from substrates shed a light on the weak dependence of σ exciton binding energy on the thickness of graphene stacks. Moreover, the analysis of non-hydrogenic exciton spectrum in quasi-2D systems clearly demonstrates the remarkable comparable contribution of orbital dependent potential with respect to non-local screening process. The understanding of orbital-dependent potential developed in this work is potentially applicable for a wide range of materials with low dimension.

  7. Double-sided F and Cl adsorptions on graphene at various atomic ratios: Geometric, orientation and electronic structure aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widjaja, Hantarto [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Jiang, Zhong-Tao, E-mail: Z.Jiang@murdoch.edu.au [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Altarawneh, Mohammednoor [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Yin, Chun-Yang [School of Science and Engineering, Teesside University, Borough Road, Middlesbrough TS1 3BA (United Kingdom); Goh, Bee-Min [School of Chemistry, Bedson Building, Newcastle University, NE1 7RU United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Mondinos, Nicholas [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia); Amri, Amun [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Riau, Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z. [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • We examined the orientation (zigzag, armchair) effects of F/Cl-adsorbed graphene. • Both F/Cl-adsorbed graphene systems show contrasting adsorption trends. • F favours full and 25% adsorption coverage while Cl favours 25% adsorption coverage. - Abstract: Elemental adsorption on graphene offers an effective procedure in fine-tuning electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. The effects of dopants depend on adsorption site, the degree of coverage as well as on the configuration of the deployed supercell. In this contribution, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structures of F and Cl adsorption (double-sided, top site) on graphene in terms of adsorption orientation, atomic ratios, i.e., from C:F/Cl = 18:2 to C:F/Cl = 2:2. Despite being members of the halogens group, F- and Cl-adsorbed on graphene show contrasting trends. F is adsorbed to graphene more strongly than Cl. F favours full and 25% adsorption coverage, while Cl favours 25% coverage. Both F and Cl cases open band gap (at Fermi energy) at certain atomic concentration coverage, but none creates magnetization.

  8. Dual-cut graphene transistors with constant-current regions fabricated by the atomic force microscope anode oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chong-Rong; Dou, Kun Peng; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Chang, Chung-En; Kaun, Chao-Cheng; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Graphene bandgap opening is an important issue for the application of this material. We have demonstrated that by atomic force microscope (AFM) anode oxidation, long nonconductive oxidation lines can be fabricated on graphene surfaces. By using this fabrication technique with the dual-cut transistor architecture, the phenomenon of constant-current regions near the Dirac point can be observed in devices at room temperature when the cut separation is smaller than 100 nm. The results may provide evidence of the phenomenon of graphene bandgap opening at room temperature. The theoretical bandgap values are further estimated by density-function-derived tight-binding calculations.

  9. Single-Layer Graphene Enhances the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Jianzhang; Lv, Longwei; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, although several studies have demonstrated the potential of graphene-coated substrates in promoting attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the effects of single-layer graphene on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs (hMSCs) remains unclear, especially in vivo. In this study, we transferred chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown single-layer graphene to glass slides and observed its effects on adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro. Then, in vivo, we incubated hASCs and hBMMSCs on single-layer graphene-coated smooth titanium (Ti) disks before implanting them into the back subcutaneous area of nude mice. We found that single-layer graphene accelerated cell adhesion to the substrate without influencing cell proliferation of hMSCs. Moreover, we present the first study that explores the epigenetic role of single-layer graphene in determining stem cell fate. By utilizing epigenetic approaches, we reveal that single-layer graphene promotes osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, potentially by upregulating methylation of H3K4 at the promoter regions of osteogenesis-associated genes. Overall, our results highlight the potential of this material in implants and injured tissues in clinical applications.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of W - based layers on SiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrova, S.; Holleman, J.; Wolters, R.A.M.; Aarnink, A.A.I.

    2003-01-01

    W and W1-xNx , where x= 15- 22 at%, thin films were grown using the ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition) principle. Growth rate of W films is about 4- 5 monolayers/ cycle at 300- 350 ºC. Growth rate of W1-xNx is 0.5 monolayer/cycle at 325- 350 ºC. Standard Deviation (STDV) of thickness is about 2%

  11. Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yonhua; Yeh, Shoupu; Fang, Wei Cheng; Chu, Yuehchieh

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) and multi-layer-graphene-like hybrid carbon films have been synthesized by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) on oxidized silicon which is pre-seeded with diamond nanoparticles. MPECVD of N-UNCD on nanodiamond seeds produces a base layer, from which carbon structures nucleate and grow perpendicularly to form standing carbon platelets. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering measurements reveal that these carbon platelets are comprised of ultrananocrystalline diamond embedded in multilayer-graphene-like carbon structures. The hybrid carbon films are of low electrical resistivity. UNCD grains in the N-UNCD base layer and the hybrid carbon platelets serve as high-density diamond nuclei for the deposition of an electrically insulating UNCD film on it. Biocompatible carbon-based heaters made of low-resistivity hybrid carbon heaters encapsulated by insulating UNCD for possible electrosurgical applications have been demonstrated.

  12. Reusable urine glucose sensor based on functionalized graphene oxide conjugated Au electrode with protective layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical based system with multiple layers coated on a functionalized graphene oxide Au electrode was developed to measure glucose concentration in urine in a more stable way. Two types of gold printed circuit boards were fabricated and graphene oxide was immobilized on their surface by chemical adsorption. Multiple layers, composed of a couple of polymers, were uniformly coated on the surface electrode. This device exhibited higher electrochemical responses against glucose, a greater resistivity in the presence of interferential substances in urine, and durable stabilities for longer periods of time than conventional units. The efficiency in current level according to the order and ratio of solution was evaluated during the immobilization of the layer. The fabricated electrodes were then also evaluated using hyperglycemic clinical samples and compared with the patterns of blood glucose measured with commercially available glucose meters. Our findings show that not only was their pattern similar but this similarity is well correlated.

  13. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebunov, Yury V; Aftenieva, Olga A; Arsenin, Aleksey V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2015-10-07

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing.

  14. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  15. Graphene-like optical light field and its interaction with two-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Courtial, Johannes; Radwell, N.; Selyem, A.; Franke-Arnold, S.; Aldossary, O. M.; Babiker, M.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical basis leading to the creation of a light field with a hexagonal honeycomb structure resembling graphene is considered along with its experimental realization and its interaction with atoms. It is argued that associated with such a light field is an optical dipole potential which leads to the diffraction of the atoms, but the details depend on whether the transverse spread of the atomic wave packet is larger than the transverse dimensions of the optical lattice (resonant Kapitza-Dirac effect) or smaller (optical Stern-Gerlach effect). Another effect in this context involves the creation of gauge fields due to the Berry phase acquired by the atom moving in the light field. The experimental realization of the light field with a honeycomb hexagonal structure is described using holographic methods and we proceed to explore the atom diffraction in the Kapitza-Dirac regime as well as the optical Stern-Gerlach regime, leading to momentum distributions with characteristic but different hexagonal structures. The artificial gauge fields too are shown to have the same hexagonal spatial structure and their magnitude can be significantly large. The effects are discussed with reference to typical parameters for the atoms and the fields.

  16. Theoretical study of the dynamics of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on graphene multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaied, Mohammed; Moreno, J. A.; Caturla, M. J.; Ynduráin, Félix; Palacios, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of H atoms adsorbed on graphene bilayers with Bernal stacking. First, through extensive density functional theory calculations, including van der Waals interactions, we obtain the activation barriers involved in the desorption and migration processes of a single H atom. These barriers, along with attempt rates and the energetics of H pairs, are used as input parameters in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to study the time evolution of an initial random distribution of adsorbed H atoms. The simulations reveal that, at room temperature, H atoms occupy only one sublattice before they completely desorb or form clusters. This sublattice selectivity in the distribution of H atoms may last for sufficiently long periods of time upon lowering the temperature down to 0 ∘C . The final fate of the H atoms, namely, desorption or cluster formation, depends on the actual relative values of the activation barriers which can be tuned by doping. In some cases, a sublattice selectivity can be obtained for periods of time experimentally relevant even at room temperature. This result shows the possibility for observation and applications of the ferromagnetic state associated with such distribution.

  17. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec−1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm−2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction. PMID:28220847

  18. Atomic layer confined vacancies for atomic-level insights into carbon dioxide electroreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Sun, Zhongti; Liu, Wei; Jiao, Xingchen; Zu, Xiaolong; Hu, Qitao; Sun, Yongfu; Yao, Tao; Zhang, Wenhua; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2017-02-01

    The role of oxygen vacancies in carbon dioxide electroreduction remains somewhat unclear. Here we construct a model of oxygen vacancies confined in atomic layer, taking the synthetic oxygen-deficient cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers as an example. Density functional theory calculations demonstrate the main defect is the oxygen(II) vacancy, while X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy reveals their distinct oxygen vacancy concentrations. Proton transfer is theoretically/experimentally demonstrated to be a rate-limiting step, while energy calculations unveil that the presence of oxygen(II) vacancies lower the rate-limiting activation barrier from 0.51 to 0.40 eV via stabilizing the formate anion radical intermediate, confirmed by the lowered onset potential from 0.81 to 0.78 V and decreased Tafel slope from 48 to 37 mV dec-1. Hence, vacancy-rich cobalt oxide single-unit-cell layers exhibit current densities of 2.7 mA cm-2 with ca. 85% formate selectivity during 40-h tests. This work establishes a clear atomic-level correlation between oxygen vacancies and carbon dioxide electroreduction.

  19. A theoretical study of pump–probe experiment in single-layer, bilayer and multilayer graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enamullah; Vipin Kumar; Upendra Kumar; Girish S Setlur

    2014-06-01

    The pump–probe experiment is typically used to study relaxation phenomena in nonlinear optical systems. Here we use it as a tool to study the phenomenon of anomalous Rabi oscillations in graphene that was predicted recently in single-layer graphene. Unlike conventional Rabi oscillations, anomalous Rabi oscillations are unique to graphene (and possibly to surface states of topological insulators (TIs)), attributable to the pseudospin (conventional spin for TI) degree of freedom and Dirac-fermion character of the graphene system. A pump pulse of a finite duration long enough to contain a large number of cycles induces a current density that oscillates with the frequency of the pump pulse. The amplitude associated with these fast oscillations is seen to exhibit much slower oscillations with a frequency given by $2^2_R/$–the anomalous Rabi frequency, where $_R$ is the conventional Rabi frequency and is the frequency of the external pump field. This effect is easily probed by a probe pulse subsequent to the pump, where it manifests itself as periodic oscillations of the probe susceptibility as a function of pump duration at each probe frequency. Alternatively, it is also seen as an oscillatory function of the pump–probe delay with other variables remaining fixed. This period corresponds to the anomalous Rabi frequency. An analysis of the previously reported experimental data confirms the presence of anomalous Rabi oscillations in graphene.

  20. Electroabsorption modulator based on inverted-rib-type silicon waveguide including double graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonghan; Kwon, Min-Suk

    2017-04-01

    We investigate, theoretically, a compact graphene-based electroabsorption modulator (EAM). The compactness of the EAM arises from an inverted-rib-type (IRT) silicon waveguide including a graphene–oxide–graphene stack. The EAM consists of input and output waveguides, which are conventional silicon strip waveguides, and the IRT waveguide efficiently connected to them through tapering regions. The stack is located in the region where the fundamental transverse electric mode of the IRT waveguide is mainly confined. Hence, the IRT waveguide mode strongly interacts with the graphene layers. Moreover, the IRT waveguide can be realized without complex high-precision processes. The calculated modulation depth of the IRT waveguide is 0.41 dB μm‑1 when the chemical potential of graphene is tuned between 0.2 and 0.6 eV. It is more than two times larger than those of previous graphene-covered silicon waveguides. The EAM, with a 3 dB extinction ratio, employs an IRT waveguide of length 7–8 μm. This EAM is analyzed and found to have an optical bandwidth of 100 nm, an electrical bandwidth of up to 46.4 GHz, and energy consumption smaller than 630 fJ bit‑1. Such EAMs based on IRT waveguides may play an important role in off-chip optical interconnection.

  1. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  2. The application of highly doped single-layer graphene as the top electrodes of semitransparent organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhike; Li, Jinhua; Sun, Zhen-Hua; Tai, Guoan; Lau, Shu-Ping; Yan, Feng

    2012-01-24

    A single-layer graphene film with high conductance and transparency was realized by effective chemical doping. The conductance of single-layer graphene was increased for more than 400% when it was doped with Au nanoparticles and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulfonic acid). Then semitransparent organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were fabricated with single-layer graphene and indium tin oxide (ITO) as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. The performance of the devices was optimized by tuning the active layer thickness and doping the single-layer graphene electrodes. The maximum efficiency of 2.7% was observed in the devices with the area of 20 mm(2) illuminated from graphene electrode under the AM1.5 solar simulator. It is notable that all of the devices showed higher efficiency from the graphene than ITO side, which was attributed to the better transmittance of the graphene electrodes. In addition, the influence of the active area of the organic solar cell on its photovoltaic performance was studied. We found that, when the active areas increased from 6 to 50 mm(2), the power conversion efficiencies decreased from 3% to 2.3% because of the increased series resistances and the decreased edge effect of the devices.

  3. Single- and few-layer graphene growth on stainless steel substrates by direct thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Robin; Ashokreddy, A.; Vijayan, C.; Pradeep, T.

    2011-04-01

    Increasing interest in graphene research in basic sciences and applications emphasizes the need for an economical means of synthesizing it. We report a method for the synthesis of graphene on commercially available stainless steel foils using direct thermal chemical vapor deposition. Our method of synthesis and the use of relatively cheap precursors such as ethanol (CH3CH2OH) as a source of carbon and SS 304 as the substrate proved to be economically viable. The presence of single- and few-layer graphene was confirmed using confocal Raman microscopy/spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements were further used to establish the influence of various elemental species present in stainless steel on graphene growth. The role of cooling rate on surface migration of certain chemical species (oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn) that promote or hinder the growth of graphene is probed. Such analysis of the chemical species present on the surface can be promising for graphene based catalytic research.

  4. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...... copolymer template. This mask-free and nonchemical/nonplasma route offers an exciting platform for nanopatterning of graphene and other UV-transparent materials for device engineering....

  5. Utilization of multiple graphene layers in fuel cells. 1. An improved technique for the exfoliation of graphene-based nanosheets from graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, Burcu; Okyay, Firuze; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    An improved, safer and mild method was proposed for the exfoliation of graphene like sheets from graphite to be used in fuel cells. The major aim in the proposed method is to reduce the number of layers in the graphite material and to produce large quantities of graphene bundles to be used as catalyst support in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Graphite oxide was prepared using potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid as oxidant and acetic anhydride as intercalating agent. The oxidation pro...

  6. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    layer deposition (ALD), on the other hand, is a highly suitable and still relatively unexplored approach for the synthesis of noble metal catalysts. It is a vapor phase growth method, primarily used to deposit thin lms. ALD is based on self-limiting chemical reactions of alternately injected precursors...... for the realization of such tiny devices. It is a mature technology, suitable for mass production, where versatile structuring is available at the micro and nano regime. Carbon black supported catalysts synthesized by wet chemistry methods are not readily applicable for standard microfabrication techniques. Atomic...... on the sample surface. Its unique growth characteristic enables conformal and uniform lms of controlled thickness and composition. In certain conditions ALD commences by island growth, resulting in discrete nanoparticle formation, which is generally preferred for catalytic applications. Pt-Ru is the best...

  7. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  8. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  9. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Wang, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Zang, J.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China) and College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China)]. E-mail: diamondzjb@163.com; Li, Y.N. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China)

    2007-01-30

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH{sub 4}). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH{sub 4} saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability.

  10. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  11. Atomic layer deposition overcoating: tuning catalyst selectivity for biomass conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Gu, Xiang-Kui; Canlas, Christian; Kropf, A Jeremy; Aich, Payoli; Greeley, Jeffrey P; Elam, Jeffrey W; Meyers, Randall J; Dumesic, James A; Stair, Peter C; Marshall, Christopher L

    2014-11-01

    The terraces, edges, and facets of nanoparticles are all active sites for heterogeneous catalysis. These different active sites may cause the formation of various products during the catalytic reaction. Here we report that the step sites of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) can be covered precisely by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, whereas the terrace sites remain as active component for the hydrogenation of furfural. Increasing the thickness of the ALD-generated overcoats restricts the adsorption of furfural onto the step sites of Pd NPs and increases the selectivity to furan. Furan selectivities and furfural conversions are linearly correlated for samples with or without an overcoating, though the slopes differ. The ALD technique can tune the selectivity of furfural hydrogenation over Pd NPs and has improved our understanding of the reaction mechanism. The above conclusions are further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  12. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-02

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  13. Few layer graphene synthesis via SiC decomposition at low temperature and low vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Emre; Mercan, Elif; Emre Oren, Ersin; Cambaz Buke, Goknur

    2016-04-01

    Based on the large-scale availability and good electrical properties, the epitaxial graphene (EG) on SiC exhibits a big potential for future electronic devices. However, it is still necessary to work continuously on lowering the formation temperature and vacuum values of EG while improving the quality and increasing the lateral size to fabricate high-performance electronic devices at reduced processing costs. In this study, we investigated the effect of the presence of Mo plate and hydrogen atmosphere as well as the vacuum annealing durations on SiC decomposition. Our studies showed that the graphene layers can be produced at lower annealing temperatures (1200 °C) and vacuum values (10-4 Torr) in the presence of Mo plate and hydrogen. For high quality continuous graphene formation, Mo plate should be in contact with SiC. If there is a gap between Mo and SiC, non-wetting oxide droplets on few layer graphene (FLG) are recorded. Moreover, it is found that the morphology of these islands can be controlled by changing the annealing time and atmosphere conditions, and applying external disturbances such as vibration.

  14. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  15. Buckling of a single-layered graphene sheet on an initially strained InGaAs thin plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taziev, R M; Ya Prinz, V, E-mail: taziev@thermo.isp.nsc.ru [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-29

    The elastic buckling behavior of a defect-free single-layered graphene sheet deposited on a strained InGaAs substrate is investigated. Such a buckled sandwich structure can be formed by local etching of an initially strained InGaAs substrate. We numerically investigated the necessary buckling conditions for a single-layered graphene sheet of circular geometry on an initially strained InGaAs thin plate. A criterion for buckling for various axisymmetric buckling shapes was obtained. It is shown that for a thin circular InGaAs plate with a monolayer graphene sheet of radius 80 nm and thickness 4 nm three axisymmetric buckling shapes can be obtained. For an initial value of the elastic deformation of the plate of 3%, the in-plane strain in graphene can reach a value of 1%. This deformation is shown to be distributed inhomogeneously along the radius of the graphene monolayer.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on nanographite films: structure and field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Smolnikova, Elena A.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Tuyakova, Feruza; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides (MO) was used to modify the properties of nanographite (NG) films produced by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. NG films consist of a few layers of graphene flakes (nanowalls) and nanoscrolls homogeneously distributed over a silicon substrate with a predominantly vertical orientation of graphene sheets to the substrate surface. TiO2 and Al2O3 layers, with thicknesses in the range of 50 to 250 nm, were deposited on NG films by ALD. The obtained NG-MO composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that ALD forms a uniform coating on graphene flakes, while on the surface of needle-like nanoscrolls it forms spherical nanoparticles. Field emission properties of the films were measured in a flat vacuum diode configuration. Analysis based on obtained current-voltage characteristics and electrostatic calculations show that emission from NG-TiO2 films is determined by the nanoscrolls protruding from the TiO2 coverage. The TiO2 layers with thicknesses of <200 nm almost do not affect the overall field emission characteristics of the films. At the same time, these layers are able to stabilize the NG films' surface and can lead to an improvement of the NG cold cathode performance in vacuum electronics.

  17. How Water Meets Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Fenter, Paul; McDonough, Jake; Presser, Volker; Gogotsi, Yuri; Wander, Matthew; Shuford, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    The interactions of electrolyte fluids with solids control many complex interfacial processes encountered in electrochemical energy storage systems. In this talk, we will demonstrate how to develop a fundamental atomic-scale understanding of interfacial structures at the water-graphene interface, a model fluid-solid interface combination. We have performed systematic measurements of high resolution X-ray reflectivity from epitaxial graphene films in contact with electrolytes including deionized water and aqueous salt solutions. The electron density profiles and structural models from the fully analyzed data reveal the intrinsic interfacial structures. It is noted that the interfacial water structure above the first graphene layer exhibits remarkable differences with those of subsequent graphene layers. The latter one, resembling water on freestanding graphene, is well predicted by parallel computational simulations. Moreover, the pH of aqueous solutions was found to have a subtle influence on the interfacial water structure above the first graphene layer. This may well be an indication of the interfacial structural distortions that might exist in this layer, and which may play an important role in controlling the chemical activity of monolayer epitaxial graphene.

  18. Nanofiltration across Defect-Sealed Nanoporous Monolayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, Sean C; Jang, Doojoon; Bose, Suman; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Song, Yi; Laoui, Tahar; Kong, Jing; Karnik, Rohit

    2015-05-13

    Monolayer nanoporous graphene represents an ideal membrane for molecular separations, but its practical realization is impeded by leakage through defects in the ultrathin graphene. Here, we report a multiscale leakage-sealing process that exploits the nonpolar nature and impermeability of pristine graphene to selectively block defects, resulting in a centimeter-scale membrane that can separate two fluid reservoirs by an atomically thin layer of graphene. After introducing subnanometer pores in graphene, the membrane exhibited rejection of multivalent ions and small molecules and water flux consistent with prior molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate the feasibility of constructing defect-tolerant monolayer graphene membranes for nanofiltration, desalination, and other separation processes.

  19. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Ashraf, A.; Dwyer, D.; Kisslinger, K.; Zhang, L.; Pang, Y.; Efstathiadis, H.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 1012 e/cm2 or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene’s properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 1013 e/cm2), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 1013 e/cm2 when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors.

  20. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  1. XRD and RBS studies of quasi-amorphous zinc oxide layers produced by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guziewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: guzel@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Turos, Andrzej [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Stonert, Anna [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Snigurenko, Dmytro; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Diduszko, Ryszard [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501 Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Although zinc oxide has been widely investigated for many important applications such as laser diodes, photovoltaics, and sensors, some basic properties of this material have not been established up to now. One of these are stopping power values which are crucial for the Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry analysis. For this kind of measurements, amorphous materials should be used. In this paper we show the results of stopping power measurements for ZnO films grown by Atomic Layer Deposition. The films were grown on a silicon (100) substrate and parameters of the growth were chosen in a way that prevents crystallization of ZnO films. A series of ZnO films with thickness between 20 and 160 nm have been investigated. Extended film characterization has proven that the obtained nanopolycrystalline ZnO films can be considered as truly amorphous with respect to ion beam applications. ZnO films have been used for precise stopping power measurement of MeV He-ions in the energy range from 200 to 5000 keV. These results provide indispensable data for ion beam modification and analysis of ZnO. - Highlights: • Thin ZnO films of low crystallographic quality were obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition at 60 °C. • Nanopolycrystalline structure and atomically flat surface has been measured by X-ray diffraction. • Stopping power measurements show a very good agreement with the calculated values.

  2. An atomic charge model for graphene oxide for exploring its bioadhesive properties in explicit water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, D; Dragneva, N; Floriano, W B; Mawhinney, R C; Fanchini, G; French, S; Rubel, O

    2014-07-28

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been shown to exhibit properties that are useful in applications such as biomedical imaging, biological sensors, and drug delivery. The binding properties of biomolecules at the surface of GO can provide insight into the potential biocompatibility of GO. Here we assess the intrinsic affinity of amino acids to GO by simulating their adsorption onto a GO surface. The simulation is done using Amber03 force-field molecular dynamics in explicit water. The emphasis is placed on developing an atomic charge model for GO. The adsorption energies are computed using atomic charges obtained from an ab initio electrostatic potential based method. The charges reported here are suitable for simulating peptide adsorption to GO.

  3. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-07

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting.

  5. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert F; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Hock, Adam S; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 225 °C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low-temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150 °C, while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225 °C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Dessmann, Nils; Staedter, Matthias; Friedrich, Daniel; Michling, Marcel; Schmeisser, Dieter [BTU-Cottbus, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present a study of the initial growth of TiO{sub 2} on Si(111) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The Si substrate was etched with NH{sub 4}F before ALD to remove the native oxide film and to produce a Si-H termination. In-situ experiments by means of photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were conducted with synchrotron radiation on Ti-oxide films produced using Ti-tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP) and water as precursors. O 1s, Ti 2p, C 1s, and S i2p core level, and O 1s and Ti 2p absorption edges show the transition of the Ti-oxide properties during the first layers. The growth starts with a very small growth rate (0.03 nm/cycle) due to the growth inhibition of the Si-H termination and proceeds with higher growth rate (0.1 nm/cycle) after 1.5 nm Ti-oxide has been deposited.

  7. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  8. Wettability of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rishi; Maroo, Shalabh C; Wang, Evelyn N

    2013-04-10

    Graphene, an atomically thin two-dimensional material, has received significant attention due to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Studies focused on understanding the wettability of graphene for thermo-fluidic and surface-coating applications, however, have been sparse. Meanwhile, wettability results reported in literature via static contact angle measurement experiments have been contradictory and highlight the lack of clear understanding of the underlying physics that dictates wetting behavior. In this work, dynamic contact angle measurements and detailed graphene surface characterizations were performed to demonstrate that the defects present in CVD grown and transferred graphene coatings result in unusually high contact angle hysteresis (16-37°) on these otherwise smooth surfaces. Hence, understanding the effect of the underlying substrate based on static contact angle measurements as reported in literature is insufficient. The advancing contact angle measurements on mono-, bi-, and trilayer graphene sheets on copper, thermally grown silica (SiO2), and glass substrates were observed to be independent of the number of layers of graphene and in good agreement with corresponding molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations. Irrespective of the number of graphene layers, the advancing contact angle values were also in good agreement with the advancing contact angle on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), reaffirming the negligible effect of the underlying substrate. These results suggest that the advancing contact angle is a true representation of a graphene-coated surface while the receding contact angle is significantly influenced by intrinsic defects introduced during the growth and transfer processes. These observations, where the underlying substrates do not affect the wettability of graphene coatings, is shown to be due to the large interlayer spacing resulting from the loose interlamellar coupling between

  9. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. The impact of the thermal conductivity of a dielectric layer on the self-heating effect of a graphene transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T S; Gao, M; Huang, Z L; Zhang, Y; Feng, Xue; Lin, Y

    2015-08-28

    The self-heating effect of a graphene transistor on the transport properties was studied. Different dielectric layers, SiO2 and AlN, which have different thermal conductivities, were used to tune the thermal dissipation of the graphene transistor. An obvious change in channel resistance and a shift of charge neutrality point were observed during the operation of the transistor with SiO2, while the change is slight when AlN is the dielectric layer. This observation is considered to be related to the temperature determined desorption rate of p-type dopants in graphene.

  11. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  12. Theoretical analysis of transverse impact response in double layer graphene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Natsuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing future nanoscale devices or nanostructures as new element in structural mechanics, it is very important to predict the responses for these elements against various mechanical loading conditions. In this letter, an analytical solution of the impact response in double layer graphene sheets (DLGSs is presented using a continuum mechanics theory. In this analytical model, the DLGSs are considered as a layer stack of two individual graphene sheet (GS bound together by van der Waals (vdW forces. The influence of impact velocity and mass on the impact response are predicted by using numerical simulation. The result shows that impact response of GSs subjected to nanomass has exceedingly short times with picoseconds order.

  13. Terahertz wave generation and detection in double-graphene layered van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Deepika; Boubanga Tombet, Stephane; Watanabe, Takayuki; Arnold, Stevanus; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2016-12-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of terahertz emission and detection in a double graphene layered (GL) heterostructure which comprises a thin hexagonal-boron nitride tunnel-barrier layer sandwiched between two separately contacted GLs. Inter-GL population inversion is induced by electrically biasing the structure. Resonant tunneling and negative differential resistance is expected when the two graphene band structures are perfectly aligned. However, in the case of small misalignments we demonstrate that the photon-absorption/emission-assisted non-resonant- and resonant-tunneling causes all excess charges in the n-type GL to recombine with the holes in the p-type GL giving rise to an increased measured dc current. This work highlights a novel strategy for the realization of efficient voltage-tunable terahertz emitters and detectors.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation for interlayer interactions of graphene nanoribbons with multiple layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemnezhad, Reza; Zare, Mojtaba; Hosseini-Hashemi, Shahrokh; Shokrollahi, Hassan

    2016-10-01

    A new study is conducted with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to investigate the effect of shear modulus value of the interlayer van der Waals (vdWs) interactions on free vibration of cantilever multi-layer graphene nanoribbons (MLGNRs). The corresponding calibrated nonlocal parameters of the nonlocal model are obtained accordingly. The vdWs interactions are treated as the cores between every two adjacent graphene layers and their equivalent shear modulus is calculated using MD simulation. The obtained resonant frequencies via the nonlocal sandwich model are compared to the MD simulation results to calibrate the nonlocal parameter. Results reveal a strong conclusion that the calibrated nonlocal parameter is dependent on the values of interlayer shear modulus.

  15. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets studied by scanning probe microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Huai Ding; Hu-Ming Ren; Fei-Hu Chang; Ping Zhang; Yong Jiang

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by frictional force microscopy (FFM). STM imaging provided direct evidence and the morphology was influenced by oxygen-containing groups and defects. The atomic scale structural disorder in a hexagonal two-dimensional network of carbon atoms changes the surface condition, which also caused the frictional property variations of the samples.

  16. Layer-by-layer fabrication of chemical-bonded graphene coating for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2011-10-01

    A new fabrication strategy of the graphene-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber is developed. Graphite oxide was first used as starting coating material that covalently bonded to the fused-silica substrate using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as cross-linking agent and subsequently deoxidized by hydrazine to give the graphene coating in situ. The chemical bonding between graphene and the silica fiber improve its chemical stability, and the obtained fiber was stable enough for more than 150 replicate extraction cycles. The graphene coating was wrinkled and folded, like the morphology of the rough tree bark. Its performance is tested by headspace (HS) SPME of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) followed by GC/MS analysis. The results showed that the graphene-coated fiber exhibited higher enrichment factors (EFs) from 2-fold for naphthalene to 17-fold for B(b)FL as compared to the commercial polydimethylsioxane (PDMS) fiber, and the EFs increased with the number of condensed rings of PAHs. The strong adsorption affinity was believed to be mostly due to the dominant role of π-π stacking interaction and hydrophobic effect, according to the results of selectivity study for a variety of organic compounds including PAHs, the aromatic compounds with different substituent groups, and some aliphatic hydrocarbons. For PAHs analysis, the graphene-coated fiber showed good precision (<11%), low detection limits (1.52-2.72 ng/L), and wide linearity (5-500 ng/L) under the optimized conditions. The repeatability of fiber-to-fiber was 4.0-10.8%. The method was applied to simultaneous analysis of eight PAHs with satisfactory recoveries, which were 84-102% for water samples and 72-95% for soil samples, respectively.

  17. Characterization of hafnium oxide resistive memory layers deposited on copper by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, B.D.; Bishop, S.M. [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Leedy, K.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Cady, N.C., E-mail: ncady@albany.edu [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hafnium oxide-based resistive memory devices have been fabricated on copper bottom electrodes. The HfO{sub x} active layers in these devices were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 °C with tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) as the metal precursor and an O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. Depth profiles of the HfO{sub x} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a copper concentration on the order of five atomic percent throughout the HfO{sub x} film. In addition to the Cu doped HfO{sub x}, a thin layer (20 nm) of Cu{sub x}O is present at the surface. This surface layer is believed to have formed during the ALD process, and greatly complicates the analysis of the switching mechanism. The resistive memory structures fabricated from the ALD HfO{sub x} exhibited non-polar resistive switching, independent of the top metal electrode (Ni, Pt, Al, Au). Resistive switching current voltage (I–V) curves were analyzed using Schottky emission and ionic hopping models to gain insight into the physical mechanisms underpinning the device behavior. During the forming process it was determined that, at voltages in excess of 2.5 V, an ionic hopping model is in good agreement with the I–V data. The extracted ion hopping distance ∼ 4 Å was within the range of interatomic spacing of HfO{sub 2} during the forming process consistent with ionic motion of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Lastly the on state I–V data was dominated at larger voltages by Schottky emission with an estimated barrier height of ∼ 0.5 eV and a refractive index of 2.59. The consequence of the Schottky emission analysis indicates the on state resistance to be a product of a Pt/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu filament(s)/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu structure. - Highlights: • HfO{sub 2} was grown via atomic layer deposition at 250 and 100 °C on Cu substrates. • A Cu{sub 2}O surface layer and Cu doping were observed in post-deposition of HfO{sub 2}. • Resistive memory devices were fabricated and

  18. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal-Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li-Ming; GU Ben-Yuan; ZHOU Yun-Song

    2007-01-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure ofair-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  19. A journey from order to disorder - atom by atom transformation from graphene to a 2D carbon glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Franz R; Kotakoski, Jani; Kaiser, Ute; Meyer, Jannik C

    2014-02-11

    One of the most interesting questions in solid state theory is the structure of glass, which has eluded researchers since the early 1900's. Since then, two competing models, the random network theory and the crystallite theory, have both gathered experimental support. Here, we present a direct, atomic-level structural analysis during a crystal-to-glass transformation, including all intermediate stages. We introduce disorder on a 2D crystal, graphene, gradually, utilizing the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope, which allows us to capture the atomic structure at each step. The change from a crystal to a glass happens suddenly, and at a surprisingly early stage. Right after the transition, the disorder manifests as a vitreous network separating individual crystallites, similar to the modern version of the crystallite theory. However, upon increasing disorder, the vitreous areas grow on the expense of the crystallites and the structure turns into a random network. Thereby, our results show that, at least in the case of a 2D structure, both of the models can be correct, and can even describe the same material at different degrees of disorder.

  20. Synthesis of nanotitania decorated few-layer graphene for enhanced visible light driven photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Reny Thankam; Abdul Rasheed, P; Sandhyarani, N

    2014-08-15

    We report a simple method for decorating carboxyl functionalized few-layer graphene with titania (TiO2) nanoparticles by sonication and stirring under room temperature. The nanocomposites showed a remarkable improvement in visible light driven photocatalysis. From Raman and XRD analysis the number of layers of graphene was found to be 3. The TiO2 decorated few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets were characterized by electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, XRD and UV-vis spectroscopy. Titania nanoparticles were uniformly decorated on FLG matrix. The incorporation of titania on FLG enhanced the visible light photocatalytic activity of titania, lowered the electron hole recombination and improved the electron hole mobility. The enhanced life time of the charge carriers was confirmed from the photocurrent measurements. Compared to bare TiO2 nanoparticles the FLG-TiO2 nanocomposites exhibited rapid degradation of Rhodamine B (Rhd B) under solar radiation. It was found that adsorption of dye molecules and the rate of degradation have been greatly enhanced in the FLG decorated with TiO2. The rapid degradation of Rhd B using carboxyl functionalized FLG-TiO2 within 8 min under solar radiation and 20 min under 30 W UV tube with very low concentration (0.01 wt.%) of the photocatalyst is the highlight of the present report. The mechanism of degradation and charge separation ability of the nanocomposite are also explored.

  1. Strong enhancement of Faraday rotation using one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystals containing graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2014-12-20

    We propose a one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystal single heterojunction infiltrated with a single graphene layer to achieve large Faraday rotation (FR) angles as well as high transmission simultaneously. The effects of the external magnetic field values, incidence angle, number of unit cells, layer thickness of constituents of the conjugated photonic crystals, chemical potential of graphene, and ambient temperature on the Faraday rotation angle and transmission are investigated. Our results reveal that both the sign reversal and shifting of the FR peak can be obtained by changing the width of layers in the conjugated photonic crystal. In the case of negative FR angle, an increase of magnetic field enhances the FR angle and degrades the transmission. However, in the case of positive FR angle, when the magnetic field increases to a certain value, the FR angle is improved too. Further increase of the magnetic field leads to a decrease of FR angle. With increasing the number of unit cells, the FR angle is enhanced at the cost of decreasing the transmission. It is shown that normal incidence results in higher FR angle and transmission. It is also demonstrated that sign reversal and change of the FR angle is possible by manipulating the chemical potential of graphene and the ambient temperature.

  2. Impact of graphene and single-layer BN insertion on bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tungsten oxide resistive memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Duhwan; Jo, Yongcheol; Han, Jaeseok; Woo, Hyeonseok [Division of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungsang, E-mail: hskim@dongguk.edu [Division of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.K., E-mail: kkkim@dongguk.edu [Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, J.P. [Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Hyunsik, E-mail: hyunsik7@dongguk.edu [Division of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-31

    The role of the atomic interface in the resistive switching in Al–WO{sub 3}–Al devices is investigated by inserting metallic graphene or insulating hexagonal BN sheet between the top Al electrode and WO{sub 3} film. Clear reversible bipolar-type resistive switching phenomena were observed, regardless of the interface modification. However, endurance and retention properties were affected by the nature of the interface. While the device containing the graphene interface showed significantly improved performance, another device containing the hexagonal BN sheet showed degraded performance. These experimental findings suggest that atomic configuration of the electrode/oxide interface plays a key role in determining the resistive switching characteristics. - Highlights: • We fabricated WO{sub 3}-based non-volatile memories. • Effects of interface on memory performance were studied using graphene and BN. • The graphene-inserted device showed significantly improved performance.

  3. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O' Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Cumpson, Peter [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-21

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  4. Magnetotransport properties of a few-layer graphene-ferromagnetic metal junctions in vertical spin valve devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entani, Shiro, E-mail: entani.shiro@jaea.go.jp; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Seiji [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Magnetotransport properties were studied for the vertical spin valve devices with two junctions of permalloy electrodes and a few-layer graphene interlayer. The graphene layer was directly grown on the bottom electrode by chemical vapor deposition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the permalloy surface fully covered with a few-layer graphene is kept free from oxidation and contamination even after dispensing and removing photoresist. This enabled fabrication of the current perpendicular to plane spin valve devices with a well-defined interface between graphene and permalloy. Spin-dependent electron transport measurements revealed a distinct spin valve effect in the devices. The magnetotransport ratio was 0.8% at room temperature and increased to 1.75% at 50 K. Linear current-voltage characteristics and resistance increase with temperature indicated that ohmic contacts are realized at the relevant interfaces.

  5. Highly Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Nanofibrillated Cellulose/Graphene Nanosheets Hybrid Films for Thermal Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Jiao, Dejin; Cui, Siqi; Hou, Xingshuang; Ding, Peng; Shi, Liyi

    2017-01-25

    An anisotropic thermally conductive film with tailorable microstructures and macroproperties is fabricated using a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of graphene oxide (GO) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on a flexible NFC substrate driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, followed by chemical reduction process. The resulting NFC/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid film reveals an orderly hierarchical structure in which the RGO nanosheets exhibit a high degree of orientation along the in-plane direction. The assembly cycles dramatically increase the in-plane thermal conductivity (λX) of the hybrid film to 12.6 W·m(-1)·K(-1), while the cross-plane thermal conductivity (λZ) shows a lower value of 0.042 W·m(-1)·K(-1) in the hybrid film with 40 assembly cycles. The thermal conductivity anisotropy reaches up to λX/λZ = 279, which is substantially larger than that of similar polymeric nanocomposites, indicating that the LbL assembly on a flexible NFC substrate is an efficient technique for the preparation of polymeric nanocomposites with improved heat conducting property. Moreover, the layered hybrid film composed of 1D NFC and 2D RGO exhibits synergetic mechnical properties with outstanding flexibility and a high tensile strength (107 MPa). The combination of anisotropic thermal conductivity and superior mechanical performance may facilitate the applications in thermal management.

  6. Technical report on "BES Early Career. Control Graphene Electronic Structure for Energy Technology"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-11

    Graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon, exhibits incredible structural flexibility, electrical transport, and optical responses. And remarkably, the graphene electronic structure can be varied through interlayer coupling, nanoscale patterning, and electrical gating. In this project we made significant contribution to better understand and control physical properties of graphene and other novel two-dimensional layered materials.

  7. Fabrication of graphene-nanoflake/poly(4-vinylphenol) polymer nanocomposite thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization and its application as flexible resistive switching device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Ali, Junaid [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Kyoung-Hoan, E-mail: khna@dankook.ac.kr [College of Engineering, Dankook University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes synthesis of graphene/poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) nanocomposite and deposition of thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) for fabrication flexible resistive switching device. EHDA technique proved its viability for thin film deposition after surface morphology analyses by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and non-destructive 3D Nano-profilometry, as the deposited films were, devoid of abnormalities. The commercially available graphene micro-flakes were exfoliated and broken down to ultra-small (20 nm–200 nm) nano-flakes by ultra-sonication in presence of N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). These graphene nanoflakes with PVP nanocomposite, were successfully deposited as thin films (thickness ~140±7 nm, R{sub a}=2.59 nm) on indium–tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Transmittance data revealed that thin films are up to ~87% transparent in visible and NIR region. Resistive switching behaviour of graphene/PVP nanocomposite thin film was studied by using the nanocomposite as active layer in Ag/active layer/ITO sandwich structure. The resistive switching devices thus fabricated, showed characteristic OFF to ON (high resistance to low resistance) transition at low voltages, when operated between ±3 V, characterized at 10 nA compliance currents. The devices fabricated by this approach exhibited a stable room temperature, low power current–voltage hysteresis and well over 1 h retentivity, and R{sub OFF}/R{sub ON}≈35:1. The device showed stable flexibility up to a minimum bending diameter of 1.8 cm.

  8. Heterogeneous fluorescence intermittency in single layer reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jixin; Volkan-Kacso, Sandor; Eltom, Ahmed; Morozov, Yurii; McDonald, Matthew P.; Ruth, Anthony; Kuno, Masaru; Janko, Boldizsar

    Fluorescence intermittency, or blinking, has been observed in a wide range of systems, including quantum dots, nanorods, and nanowires. Striking similarities have been documented in the optical response of these nanoscale emitters. However, the mechanism behind blinking still remains elusive. For the first time, blinking has been observed in a two-dimensional system in recent experiments on reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Here we reveal the power spectral density (PSD) of the blinking in rGO shares the same 1/f-like behavior of previously known blinking systems; meanwhile, the heterogeneous dynamic evolution and spatial correlation make rGO a unique blinking system. To investigate the origin of blinking, we self-consistently explain the evolution of rGO blinking using the phenomenological multiple recombination center (MRC) model that captures common features of nanoscale blinking. Furthermore, tight binding method and ab-initio method calculations of carbon nanodots are utilized to look for the microscopic structure corresponding to the RCs in the MRC model. M. K. thanks the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, the Army Research Office (W911NF-12-1-0578) for support. B.J. was supported in part by the U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38.

  9. Electronic Structure of Single-Crystal Monolayer Graphene on Hydrogen-Terminated Germanium Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Joon; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joung Real; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, atomically flat 2-Dimensional layered nano material, has a lot of interesting characteristics from its unusual electronic structure. Almost properties of graphene are influenced by its crystallinity, therefore the uniform growth of single crystal graphene and layer control over the wafer scale areas remains a challenge in the fields of electronic, photonic and other devices based on graphene. Here, we report the method to make wafer scale single crystal monolayer graphene on hydrogen terminated germanium(110) surface and properties and electronic band structure of the graphene by using the tool of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron transport measurement, electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  10. Complete corrosion inhibition through graphene defect passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Chang, Kai-Wen; Jhu, Jian Gang; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chen, Kuang Yao; Yang, Chang Chung; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2014-01-28

    Graphene is expected to enable superior corrosion protection due to its impermeability and chemical inertness. Previous reports, however, demonstrate limited corrosion inhibition and even corrosion enhancement of graphene on metal surfaces. To enable the reliable and complete passivation, the origin of the low inhibition efficiency of graphene was investigated. Combining electrochemical and morphological characterization techniques, nanometer-sized structural defects in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene were found to be the cause for the limited passivation effect. Extremely fast mass transport on the order of meters per second both across and parallel to graphene layers results in an inhibition efficiency of only ∼50% for Cu covered with up to three graphene layers. Through selective passivation of the defects by atomic layer deposition (ALD) an enhanced corrosion protection of more than 99% was achieved, which compares favorably with commercial corrosion protection methods.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of wafer-scale graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hugen; Xia, Fengnian; Zhu, Wenjuan; Freitag, Marcus; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Bol, Ageeth A; Tulevski, George; Avouris, Phaedon

    2011-12-27

    We report spectroscopy results from the mid- to far-infrared on wafer-scale graphene, grown either epitaxially on silicon carbide or by chemical vapor deposition. The free carrier absorption (Drude peak) is simultaneously obtained with the universal optical conductivity (due to interband transitions) and the wavelength at which Pauli blocking occurs due to band filling. From these, the graphene layer number, doping level, sheet resistivity, carrier mobility, and scattering rate can be inferred. The mid-IR absorption of epitaxial two-layer graphene shows a less pronounced peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 eV compared to that in exfoliated bilayer graphene. In heavily chemically doped single-layer graphene, a record high transmission reduction due to free carriers approaching 40% at 250 μm (40 cm(-1)) is measured in this atomically thin material, supporting the great potential of graphene in far-infrared and terahertz optoelectronics.

  12. Reduced graphene oxide with ultrahigh conductivity as carbon coating layer for high performance sulfur@reduced graphene oxide cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbin; Peng, Zhenhuan; Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xikun; Fang, Jianhui; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2014-01-01

    We developed hydrogen iodide (HI) reduction of rGO and surfactant-assisted chemical reaction- deposition method to form hybrid material of sulfur (S) encapsulated in reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets for rechargeable lithium batteries. The surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-deposition method strategy provides intimate contact between the S and graphene oxide. Chemical reduced rGO with high conductivity as carbon coating layer prevented the dissolution of polysulfide ions and improved the electron transfer. This novel core-shell structured S@rGO composites with high S content showed high reversible capacity, good discharge capacity retention and enhanced rate capability used as cathodes in rechargeable Li/S cells. We demonstrated here that an electrode prepared from a S@rGO with up to 85 wt% S maintains a stable discharge capacity of about 980 mAh g-1 at 0.05 C and 570 mAh g-1 at 1C after 200 cycles charge/discharge. These results emphasize the importance of rGO with high electrical conductivity after HI-reduced rGO homogeneously coating on the surface of S, therefore, effectively alleviating the shuttle phenomenon of polysulfides in organic electrolyte. Our surfactant-assisted chemical reaction-HI reduction approach should offer a new technique for the design and synthesis of battery electrodes based on highly conducting carbon materials.

  13. Bimodal behaviour of charge carriers in graphene induced by electric double layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sing-Jyun; Yang, Ruey-Jen

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is performed into the electronic properties of graphene in the presence of liquid as a function of the contact area ratio. It is shown that the electric double layer (EDL) formed at the interface of the graphene and the liquid causes an overlap of the conduction bands and valance bands and increases the density of state (DOS) at the Fermi energy (EF). In other words, a greater number of charge carriers are induced for transport and the graphene changes from a semiconductor to a semimetal. In addition, it is shown that the dependence of the DOS at EF on the contact area ratio has a bimodal distribution which responses to the experimental observation, a pinnacle curve. The maximum number of induced carriers is expected to occur at contact area ratios of 40% and 60%. In general, the present results indicate that modulating the EDL provides an effective means of tuning the electronic properties of graphene in the presence of liquid. PMID:27464986

  14. In situ nitrogenated graphene-few-layer WS2 composites for fast and reversible Li+ storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongyun; Ji, Ge; Ding, Bo; Ma, Yue; Qu, Baihua; Chen, Weixiang; Lee, Jim Yang

    2013-08-01

    Two-dimensional nanosheets can leverage on their open architecture to support facile insertion and removal of Li+ as lithium-ion battery electrode materials. In this study, two two-dimensional nanosheets with complementary functions, namely nitrogen-doped graphene and few-layer WS2, were integrated via a facile surfactant-assisted synthesis under hydrothermal conditions. The layer structure and morphology of the composites were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission microscopy. The effects of surfactant amount on the WS2 layer number were investigated and the performance of the layered composites as high energy density lithium-ion battery anodes was evaluated. The composite formed with a surfactant : tungsten precursor ratio of 1 : 1 delivered the best cyclability (average of only 0.08% capacity fade per cycle for 100 cycles) and good rate performance (80% capacity retention with a 50-fold increase in current density from 100 mA g-1 to 5000 mA g-1), and may find uses in power-oriented applications.Two-dimensional nanosheets can leverage on their open architecture to support facile insertion and removal of Li+ as lithium-ion battery electrode materials. In this study, two two-dimensional nanosheets with complementary functions, namely nitrogen-doped graphene and few-layer WS2, were integrated via a facile surfactant-assisted synthesis under hydrothermal conditions. The layer structure and morphology of the composites were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission microscopy. The effects of surfactant amount on the WS2 layer number were investigated and the performance of the layered composites as high energy density lithium-ion battery anodes was evaluated. The composite formed with a surfactant : tungsten precursor ratio of 1 : 1 delivered the best cyclability (average of only 0.08% capacity fade per cycle for 100 cycles) and good rate performance (80

  15. Microscopic theoretical model study of band gap opening in AA-stacked bi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sivabrata; Parashar, S. K. S.; Rout, G. C.

    2016-05-01

    We address here a tight-binding theoretical model calculation for AA-stacked bi-layer graphene taking into account of a biased potential between two layers to study the density of states and the band dispersion within the total Brillouin zone. We have calculated the electronic Green's function for electron operator corresponding to A and B sub lattices by Zubarev's Green's function technique from which the electronic density of states and the electron band energy dispersion are calculated. The numerically computed density of states and band energy dispersions are investigated by tuning the biased potential to exhibit the band gap by varying the different physical parameters.

  16. Friedel oscillations at the surfaces of rhombohedral $N$-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    C. Dutreix; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    The low-energy physics of rhombohedral $N$-layer graphene mainly arises on the external layers, where most of the {\\pi} electrons are located. Their Bloch band structure defines a two-band semimetal; the dispersion relation scales as $\\pm q^{N}$ with the momentum norm $q$ in the vicinity of two nonequivalent valleys. In this paper, we address the problem of elastic scattering through a localized impurity located either on the surface of the material or within the bulk, and focus on the quantu...

  17. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  18. Synthesis of Freestanding Graphene on SiC by a Rapid-Cooling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianfeng; Norimatsu, Wataru; Iwata, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Keita; Ito, Takahiro; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2016-11-01

    Graphene has a negative thermal expansion coefficient; that is, when heated, the graphene lattice shrinks. On the other hand, the substrates typically used for graphene growth, such as silicon carbide, have a positive thermal expansion coefficient. Hence, on cooling graphene on SiC, graphene expands but SiC shrinks. This mismatch will physically break the atomic bonds between graphene and SiC. We have demonstrated that a graphenelike buffer layer on SiC can be converted to a quasifreestanding monolayer graphene by a rapid-cooling treatment. The decoupling of graphene from the SiC substrate was actually effective for reducing the electric carrier scattering due to interfacial phonons. In addition, the rapidly cooled graphene obtained in this way was of high-quality, strain-free, thermally stable, and strongly hole doped. This simple, classical, but quite novel technique for obtaining quasifreestanding graphene could open a new path towards a viable graphene-based semiconductor industry.

  19. Atomic layer epitaxy of 3-5 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapkus, P. D.; Wittig, C.; Allen, S.

    1986-08-01

    This program is intended to develop a process for the growth of GaAs and related compounds by Atomic Layer Epitaxy (ALE). The program involves fundamental studies of gas phase kinetics of the organometallic and hydrides to be used in the process as well as surface reaction studies to determine the surface of various organometallics. We have chosen in this program to effect ALE growth in a dense H2 atmosphere. We believe that the reactivity of H2 is important to the removal, by hydrogenation, of the alkyl radicals from the growing surface. To better understand the process we are pursuing fundamental information in two areas. First, basic measurements of the reactivity band reaction products of organometallics and hydrides and of photogenerated species with compound semiconductor surfaces are being undertaken that will determine the feasibility of using photoactivation and in thermal catalytic reactions in the gas phase to accomplish ALE. Second, epitaxial growth experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of an ALE process employing photodecomposition of surface absorbed species as well as thermal catalytic reactions.

  20. Continuous production of nanostructured particles using spatial atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ommen, J. Ruud van, E-mail: j.r.vanommen@tudelft.nl; Kooijman, Dirkjan; Niet, Mark de; Talebi, Mojgan; Goulas, Aristeidis [Department of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a novel spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) process based on pneumatic transport of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoclusters of platinum (Pt) of ∼1 nm diameter are deposited onto titania (TiO{sub 2}) P25 nanoparticles resulting to a continuous production of an active photocatalyst (0.12–0.31 wt. % of Pt) at a rate of about 1 g min{sup −1}. Tuning the precursor injection velocity (10–40 m s{sup −1}) enhances the contact between the precursor and the pneumatically transported support flows. Decreasing the chemisorption temperature (from 250 to 100 °C) results in more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoclusters as it decreases the reaction rate as compared to the rate of diffusion into the nanoparticle agglomerates. Utilizing this photocatalyst in the oxidation reaction of Acid Blue 9 showed a factor of five increase of the photocatalytic activity compared to the native P25 nanoparticles. The use of spatial particle ALD can be further expanded to deposition of nanoclusters on porous, micron-sized particles and to the production of core–shell nanoparticles enabling the robust and scalable manufacturing of nanostructured powders for catalysis and other applications.

  1. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Parsons, Gregory [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, Philip [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oldham, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mundy, Zach [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  2. Synthesis of platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubers, Alia Marie

    Demand for energy continues to increase, and without alternatives to fossil fuel combustion the effects on our environment will become increasingly severe. Fuel cells offer a promising improvement on current methods of energy generation; they are able to convert hydrogen fuel into electricity with a theoretical efficiency of up to 83% and interface smoothly with renewable hydrogen production. Fuel cells can replace internal combustion engines in vehicles and are used in stationary applications to power homes and businesses. The efficiency of a fuel cell is maximized by its catalyst, which is often composed of platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon. Economical production of fuel cell catalysts will promote adoption of this technology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a possible method for producing catalysts at a large scale when employed in a fluidized bed. ALD relies on sequential dosing of gas-phase precursors to grow a material layer by layer. We have synthesized platinum nanoparticles on a carbon particle support (Pt/C) by ALD for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and electrochemical hydrogen pumps. Platinum nanoparticles with different characteristics were deposited by changing two chemistries: the carbon substrate through functionalization; and the deposition process by use of either oxygen or hydrogen as ligand removing reactants. The metal depositing reactant was trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV). Functionalizing the carbon substrate increased nucleation during deposition resulting in smaller and more dispersed nanoparticles. Use of hydrogen produced smaller nanoparticles than oxygen, due to a gentler hydrogenation reaction compared to using oxygen's destructive combustion reaction. Synthesized Pt/C materials were used as catalysts in an electrochemical hydrogen pump, a device used to separate hydrogen fuel from contaminants. Catalysts deposited by ALD on functionalized carbon using a hydrogen chemistry were the most

  3. Facile fabrication of 3D layer-by-layer graphene-gold nanorod hybrid architecture for hydrogen peroxide based electrochemical biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenming Xue

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D layer-by-layer graphene-gold nanorod (GNR architecture has been constructed. The resulting hybrid nanomaterials’ architecture has been tested for detecting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 through the electrocatalytic reaction on a three electrode disposable biosensor platform. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to characterize and assess the performance of the biosensor. The 3D layer-by-layer modified electrode exhibited the highest sensitivity compared to the active carbon, graphene-oxide, cysteine-graphene oxide and GNR coated electrodes. This research explored the feasibility of using the 3D hybrid graphene-GNR as a template for biosensor. The 3D hybrid structure exhibited higher sensitivity than GNRs alone. SEM showed the explanation that GNRs had self-aggregates reducing the contact surface area when coated on the active carbon electrode, while there were no such aggregates in the 3D structure, and TEM illustrated that GNRs dispersed well in the 3D structure. This research demonstrated a better way to prepare well-separated metal nanoparticles by using the 3D layer-by-layer structure. Consequently, other single and bi-metallic metal nanoparticles could be incorporated into such structure. As a practical example, 3D layer-by-layer nanomaterials modified active carbon electrode was used for detecting glucose showing very good sensitivity and minimum interference by ascorbic acid and uric acid in test solution, which indicated a good selectivity of the biosensor as well.

  4. Atomically thin layers of B-N-C-O with tunable composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Birol; de-Luna-Bugallo, Andres; Panaitescu, Eugen; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Liu, Fangze; Vargas, Anthony; Jiang, Xueping; Kharche, Neerav; Yavuzcetin, Ozgur; Alnaji, Majed; Ford, Matthew J; Lok, Jay; Zhao, Yongyi; King, Nicholas; Dhar, Nibir K; Dubey, Madan; Nayak, Saroj K; Sridhar, Srinivas; Kar, Swastik

    2015-07-01

    In recent times, atomically thin alloys of boron, nitrogen, and carbon have generated significant excitement as a composition-tunable two-dimensional (2D) material that demonstrates rich physics as well as application potentials. The possibility of tunably incorporating oxygen, a group VI element, into the honeycomb sp(2)-type 2D-BNC lattice is an intriguing idea from both fundamental and applied perspectives. We present the first report on an atomically thin quaternary alloy of boron, nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen (2D-BNCO). Our experiments suggest, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations corroborate, stable configurations of a honeycomb 2D-BNCO lattice. We observe micrometer-scale 2D-BNCO domains within a graphene-rich 2D-BNC matrix, and are able to control the area coverage and relative composition of these domains by varying the oxygen content in the growth setup. Macroscopic samples comprising 2D-BNCO domains in a graphene-rich 2D-BNC matrix show graphene-like gate-modulated electronic transport with mobility exceeding 500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and Arrhenius-like activated temperature dependence. Spin-polarized DFT calculations for nanoscale 2D-BNCO patches predict magnetic ground states originating from the B atoms closest to the O atoms and sizable (0.6 eV thin platform.

  5. Electrochemical Bubbling Transfer of Graphene Using a Polymer Support with Encapsulated Air Gap as Permeation Stopping Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical bubbling transfer of graphene is a technique with high industrial potential due to its scalability, time- and cost-effectiveness, and ecofriendliness. However, the graphene is often damaged due to the turbulence and the trapped bubbles formed by the direct H2O and H+ permeation through the supporting polymer. We invent a graphene mechanical support of polyethylene terephthalate foil/plastic frame/poly(methyl methacrylate sandwich, with an encapsulated air gap as the permeation stopping layer. The graphene damage is drastically reduced, as confirmed by the morphology and structural and electrical characterization, ultimately improving the controllability/reproducibility of the bubbling transfer of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.

  6. Powder, paper and foam of few-layer graphene prepared in high yield by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation of expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liqiong; Li, Weiwei; Li, Peng; Liao, Shutian; Qiu, Shengqiang; Chen, Mingliang; Guo, Yufen; Li, Qi; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Liwei

    2014-04-09

    A facile and high-yield approach to the preparation of few-layer graphene (FLG) by electrochemical intercalation exfoliation (EIE) of expanded graphite in sulfuric acid electrolyte is reported. Stage-1 H2SO4-graphite intercalation compound is used as a key intermediate in EIE to realize the efficient exfoliation. The yield of the FLG sheets (graphene structures. Flexible and freestanding graphene papers made of the FLG flakes retain excellent conductivity (≈24,500 S m(-1)). Three-dimensional (3D) graphene foams with light weight are fabricated from the FLG flakes by the use of Ni foams as self-sacrifice templates. Furthermore, 3D graphene/Ni foams without any binders, which are used as supercapacitor electrodes in aqueous electrolyte, provide the specific capacitance of 113.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), retaining 90% capacitance after 1000 cycles.

  7. Evidence for strain-induced local conductance modulations in single-layer graphene on SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, M L; Lai, A P; Velasco, J; Hughes, C R; Beyer, A D; Bockrath, M W; Lau, C N; Yeh, N-C

    2009-07-01

    Graphene has emerged as an electronic material that is promising for device applications and for studying two-dimensional electron gases with relativistic dispersion near two Dirac points. Nonetheless, deviations from Dirac-like spectroscopy have been widely reported with varying interpretations. Here we show evidence for strain-induced spatial modulations in the local conductance of single-layer graphene on SiO(2) substrates from scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) studies. We find that strained graphene exhibits parabolic, U-shaped conductance vs bias voltage spectra rather than the V-shaped spectra expected for Dirac fermions, whereas V-shaped spectra are recovered in regions of relaxed graphene. Strain maps derived from the STM studies further reveal direct correlation with the local tunneling conductance. These results are attributed to a strain-induced frequency increase in the out-of-plane phonon mode that mediates the low-energy inelastic charge tunneling into graphene.

  8. Raman investigation of few-layer graphene on different substrate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong-Kwon; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, Urszula; Roth, Siegmar [WCU Flexible Nano-systems, School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Yamazaki, Shiro [Institute of Applied Physics and INCH, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9-11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We report Raman analysis of few-layer graphene (FLG) transferred on flat and patterned substrate structures. These different surface structures created by patterning an area of a Si-substrate produce differences in the interaction between FLG and the substrate surface. The topography measurement performed by scanning tunneling potentiometry shows that the FLG on the patterned substrate was deformed periodically with 3-4 nm depth variation. Raman spectroscopy reveals that two important features related to the G- and 2D-modes in graphitic structures show different sensitivity to the interaction with the substrate for single-layer graphene (SLG), FLG, and graphite. Whereas SLG and FLG placed on the patterned substrate demonstrate a strong shift of both 2D- and G-peaks to lower frequencies with respect to the flat part, the multilayer graphene in a graphite flake shows almost no difference between patterned and non-patterned substrates. We identified the origin of the observed changes in the Raman spectra of SLG and FLG as effects created by the underlying substrate. Especially, substrate induced periodic strain and surface interaction were taken into account to interpret the results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Micrometer-Thick Graphene Oxide-Layered Double Hydroxide Nacre-Inspired Coatings and Their Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, You-Xian; Yao, Hong-Bin; Mao, Li-Bo; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Marwani, Hadi M; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-02-10

    Robust, functional, and flame retardant coatings are attractive in various fields such as building construction, food packaging, electronics encapsulation, and so on. Here, strong, colorful, and fire-retardant micrometer-thick hybrid coatings are reported, which can be constructed via an enhanced layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets. The fabricated GO-LDH hybrid coatings show uniform nacre-like layered structures that endow them good mechanic properties with Young's modulus of ≈ 18 GPa and hardness of ≈ 0.68 GPa. In addition, the GO-LDH hybrid coatings exhibit nacre-like iridescence and attractive flame retardancy as well due to their well-defined 2D microstructures. This kind of nacre-inspired GO-LDH hybrid thick coatings will be applied in various fields in future due to their high strength and multifunctionalities.

  10. Solution-processable graphene oxide as an efficient hole transport layer in polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Sian; Tu, Kun-Hua; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Wei; Chhowalla, Manish

    2010-06-22

    The utilization of graphene oxide (GO) thin films as the hole transport and electron blocking layer in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is demonstrated. The incorporation of GO deposited from neutral solutions between the photoactive poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer and the transparent and conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) leads to a decrease in recombination of electrons and holes and leakage currents. This results in a dramatic increase in the OPV efficiencies to values that are comparable to devices fabricated with PEDOT:PSS as the hole transport layer. Our results indicate that GO could be a simple solution-processable alternative to PEDOT:PSS as the effective hole transport and electron blocking layer in OPV and light-emitting diode devices.

  11. Optical Band Gap and Thermal Diffusivity of Polypyrrole-Nanoparticles Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A polypyrrole-nanoparticles reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite layer was prepared using electrochemical method. The prepared samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The band gap of nanocomposite layers was calculated from UV-visible spectra and the thermal diffusivity of layers was measured using a photoacoustic technique. As experimental results, the optical band gap was in the range between 3.580 eV and 3.853 eV, and thermal diffusivity was increased with increasing the layer thickness from 2.873 cm2/s to 12.446 cm2/s.

  12. Microstructure and Functional Mechanism of Friction Layer in Ni3Al Matrix Composites with Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bing; Zhu, Qingshuai; Shi, Xiaoliang; Zhai, Wenzheng; Yang, Kang; Huang, Yuchun

    2016-10-01

    Microstructure and functional mechanism of friction layer need to be further researched. In the present work, the friction coefficients and wear rates are analyzed through response surface methodology to obtain an empirical model for the best response. Fitting results show that the tribological performance of Ni3Al matrix composites (NMCs) with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) is better than that of NMCs without GNPs, especially at high sliding velocities and high loads. Further research suggests that the formation of integrated friction layer, which consists of a soft microfilm on a hard coating, is the major reason to cause the differences. Of which, the wear debris layer (WDL) with a low shear strength can reduce the shear force. The ultrafine layer (UL), which is much harder and finer, can effectively avoid fracture and improve the load support capacity. Moreover, the GNPs in WDL and UL can be easily sheared and help to withstand the loads, trending to be parallel to the direction of shear force.

  13. The mechanical robustness of atomic-layer- and molecular-layer-deposited coatings on polymer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Foster, Ross R.; Zhang, Yadong; Jen, Shih-Hui; Bertrand, Jacob A.; Lu, Zhixing; Seghete, Dragos; O'Patchen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng; George, Steven M.; Dunn, Martin L.

    2009-05-01

    The mechanical robustness of atomic layer deposited alumina and recently developed molecular layer deposited aluminum alkoxide ("alucone") films, as well as laminated composite films composed of both materials, was characterized using mechanical tensile tests along with a recently developed fluorescent tag to visualize channel cracks in the transparent films. All coatings were deposited on polyethylene naphthalate substrates and demonstrated a similar evolution of damage morphology according to applied strain, including channel crack initiation, crack propagation at the critical strain, crack densification up to saturation, and transverse crack formation associated with buckling and delamination. From measurements of crack density versus applied tensile strain coupled with a fracture mechanics model, the mode I fracture toughness of alumina and alucone films was determined to be KIC=1.89±0.10 and 0.17±0.02 MPa m0.5, respectively. From measurements of the saturated crack density, the critical interfacial shear stress was estimated to be τc=39.5±8.3 and 66.6±6.1 MPa, respectively. The toughness of nanometer-scale alumina was comparable to that of alumina thin films grown using other techniques, whereas alucone was quite brittle. The use of alucone as a spacer layer between alumina films was not found to increase the critical strain at fracture for the composite films. This performance is attributed to the low toughness of alucone. The experimental results were supported by companion simulations using fracture mechanics formalism for multilayer films. To aid future development, the modeling method was used to study the increase in the toughness and elastic modulus of the spacer layer required to render improved critical strain at fracture. These results may be applied to a broad variety of multilayer material systems composed of ceramic and spacer layers to yield robust coatings for use in chemical barrier and other applications.

  14. Fabrication and Properties of Organic-Inorganic Nanolaminates Using Molecular and Atomic Layer Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    55, 1030-1039 (2009).* 2. B.B. Burton, D.N. Goldstein and S.M. George, "Atomic Layer Deposition of MgO Using Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl) magnesium ...Atomic Layer Deposition Using Tin 2,4-Pentanedionate and Hydrogen Sulfide , J. Phys. Chem. C 114, 17597-17603 (2010).* 28. L.A. Riley, A.S

  15. Simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid using layer-by-layer graphene and chitosan assembled multilayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xuexiang; Cao, Qingxue; Liang, Lixin; Chen, Jianrong; You, Chunping; Ruan, Yongmin; Lin, Hongjun; Wu, Lanju

    2013-12-15

    Multilayer films containing graphene (Gr) and chitosan (CS) were prepared on glassy carbon electrodes with layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. After being characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the electrochemical sensor based on the resulted films was developed to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The LBL assembled electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and UA. In addition, the self-assembly electrode possessed an excellent sensing performance for detection of DA and UA with a linear range from 0.1 μM to 140 µM and from 1.0 µM to 125 µM with the detection limit as low as 0.05 µM and 0.1 µM based on S/N=3, respectively.

  16. Graphene nano-ribbon waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    He, S; He, Y

    2013-01-01

    Graphene as a one-atom-thick platform for infrared metamaterial plays an important role in optical science and engineering. Here we study the unique properties of some plasmonic waveguides based on graphene nano-ribbon. It is found that a graphene ribbon of finite width leads to the occurrence of coupled edge mode. The single-mode region of a single freestanding graphene ribbon is identified at a fixed frequency of 30 THz. A low-loss waveguide structure, consisting of a graphene layer, a silica buffer layer and silicon substrate is proposed to reduce the propagation loss and obtain a high figure of merit for future integration of waveguide devices. Furthermore, two coupled ribbon configurations, namely, side-side coupling and top-bottom coupling, are investigated. As a device example, a nano-ring cavity of ultra-small size is designed.

  17. Double-dark-resonance-enhanced Kerr nonlinearity in a single layer of graphene nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.; Hossein Asadpour, Seyyed

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme is proposed for the giant enhanced Kerr nonlinearity in a single layer of graphene nanostructure based on quantum optics and nonlinear optical sciences. The linear and the nonlinear susceptibility of the monolayer graphene system are presented in details by using the density matrix method and perturbation theory. After deriving the equations of motion in the steady-state regime, we analytically solve the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the system. Our numerical results show that the giant enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be obtained in the double-dark-resonance condition with zero linear and nonlinear absorption. Our results may have potential applications in quantum information science in infrared and terahertz regimes.

  18. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  19. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solookinejad, G., E-mail: ghsolooki@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  20. A 130 GHz Electro-Optic Ring Modulator with Double-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The optical absorption coefficient of graphene will change after injecting carriers. Based on this principle, a high-speed double-layer graphene electro-optic modulator with a ring resonator structure was designed in this paper. From the numerical simulations, we designed a modulator. Its optical bandwidth is larger than 130 GHz, the switching energy is 0.358 fJ per bit, and the driven voltage is less than 1.2 V. At the same time, the footprint of the proposed modulator is less than 10 microns squared, which makes the process compatible with the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS process. This will provide the possibility for the on-chip integration of the photoelectric device.