WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic layer graphene

  1. Atomic layer deposition for graphene device integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervuurt, R.H.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Bol, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is a two dimensional material with extraordinary properties, which make it an interesting material for many optical and electronic devices. The integration of graphene in these devices often requires the deposition of thin dielectric layers on top of graphene. Atomic layer deposition (ALD)

  2. Atomic scale characterization of mismatched graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Li, Guohong; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of STM/STS of graphene with various degree of coupling. • Review of vertically twisted graphene with respect with each other. • Review of Landau levels in graphene layers weakly decoupled electronically. • Review of laterally twisted graphene forming grain boundaries. - Abstract: In the bourgeoning field of two dimensional layered materials and their atomically thin counterparts, it has been established that the electronic coupling between the layers of the material plays a key role in determining its properties [1,2]. We are just beginning to understand how each material is unique in that respect while working our way up to building new materials with functionalities enabled by interlayer interactions. In this review, we will focus on a system that despite its apparent simplicity possesses a wealth of intriguing physics: layers of graphene with various degree of coupling. The situations discussed here are graphene layers vertically twisted with respect with each other, weakly decoupled electronically and laterally twisted forming grain boundaries. We emphasize experiments that atomically resolve the electronic properties.

  3. Density of states of adsorbed sulphur atoms on pristine and defective graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The density of states for adsorbed sulphur atom on a graphene layer system is discussed for pristine graphene layer and for mono and divacancies on the graphene layer. To our knowledge this is the first time that an entire adsorption of the sulphur atom is reported at the plane of the carbon atoms, when there is a pair of closer vacancies at the graphene layer. (paper)

  4. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  5. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  6. Atomic layer deposited high-k dielectric on graphene by functionalization through atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong Woo; Kang, Myung Hoon; Oh, Seongkook; Yang, Byung Chan; Seong, Kwonil; Ahn, Hyo-Sok; Lee, Tae Hoon; An, Jihwan

    2018-05-01

    Atomic layer-deposited (ALD) dielectric films on graphene usually show noncontinuous and rough morphology owing to the inert surface of graphene. Here, we demonstrate the deposition of thin and uniform ALD ZrO2 films with no seed layer on chemical vapor-deposited graphene functionalized by atmospheric oxygen plasma treatment. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the ALD ZrO2 films were highly crystalline, despite a low ALD temperature of 150 °C. The ALD ZrO2 film served as an effective passivation layer for graphene, which was shown by negative shifts in the Dirac voltage and the enhanced air stability of graphene field-effect transistors after ALD of ZrO2. The ALD ZrO2 film on the functionalized graphene may find use in flexible graphene electronics and biosensors owing to its low process temperature and its capacity to improve device performance and stability.

  7. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xixiang; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge

  8. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kyong Nam

    2016-01-01

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar + ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO 2 grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar + ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar + ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene–HfO 2 –metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO 2 on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (<10 −11 A/cm 2 ) for Ar + ion-cleaned graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  10. Atomic layer MoS2-graphene van der Waals heterostructure nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; Lee, Jaesung; Feng, Philip X-L

    2017-11-30

    Heterostructures play significant roles in modern semiconductor devices and micro/nanosystems in a plethora of applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and transducers. While state-of-the-art heterostructures often involve stacks of crystalline epi-layers each down to a few nanometers thick, the intriguing limit would be hetero-atomic-layer structures. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of freestanding van der Waals heterostructures and their functional nanomechanical devices. By stacking single-layer (1L) MoS 2 on top of suspended single-, bi-, tri- and four-layer (1L to 4L) graphene sheets, we realize an array of MoS 2 -graphene heterostructures with varying thickness and size. These heterostructures all exhibit robust nanomechanical resonances in the very high frequency (VHF) band (up to ∼100 MHz). We observe that fundamental-mode resonance frequencies of the heterostructure devices fall between the values of graphene and MoS 2 devices. Quality (Q) factors of heterostructure resonators are lower than those of graphene but comparable to those of MoS 2 devices, suggesting interface damping related to interlayer interactions in the van der Waals heterostructures. This study validates suspended atomic layer heterostructures as an effective device platform and provides opportunities for exploiting mechanically coupled effects and interlayer interactions in such devices.

  11. Surface diffusion coefficient of Au atoms on single layer graphene grown on Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Cacciato, G.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Universitá di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania, Italy and MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    A 5 nm thick Au film was deposited on single layer graphene sheets grown on Cu. By thermal processes, the dewetting phenomenon of the Au film on the graphene was induced so to form Au nanoparticles. The mean radius, surface-to-surface distance, and surface density evolution of the nanoparticles on the graphene sheets as a function of the annealing temperature were quantified by scanning electron microscopy analyses. These quantitative data were analyzed within the classical mean-field nucleation theory so to obtain the temperature-dependent Au atoms surface diffusion coefficient on graphene: D{sub S}(T)=[(8.2±0.6)×10{sup −8}]exp[−(0.31±0.02(eV)/(at) )/kT] cm{sup 2}/s.

  12. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... against CO is observed at CO pressures below 106 mbar. However, at higher pressures CO is observed to intercalate under the graphene coating layer, thus lifting the reconstruction. The limitations of the coating effect are further tested by exposure to hot atomic hydrogen. While the coating can withstand...... these extreme conditions for a limited amount of time, after substantial exposure, the Pt(100) reconstruction is lifted. Annealing experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the basal plane of the graphene stays intact and point to a graphene-mediated mechanism for the H...

  13. Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on graphene through controlled ion beam treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Seok [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Il-Kwon; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Hyungjun [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei Ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Young, E-mail: knam1004@dju.kr, E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16419 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyong Nam, E-mail: knam1004@dju.kr, E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Daejeon University, Yongun-dong, Dong-gu, Daejeon 34520 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-23

    The polymer residue generated during the graphene transfer process to the substrate tends to cause problems (e.g., a decrease in electron mobility, unwanted doping, and non-uniform deposition of the dielectric material). In this study, by using a controllable low-energy Ar{sup +} ion beam, we cleaned the polymer residue without damaging the graphene network. HfO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer deposition on graphene cleaned using an Ar{sup +} ion beam showed a dense uniform structure, whereas that grown on the transferred graphene (before Ar{sup +} ion cleaning) showed a non-uniform structure. A graphene–HfO{sub 2}–metal capacitor fabricated by growing 20-nm thick HfO{sub 2} on graphene exhibited a very low leakage current (<10{sup −11} A/cm{sup 2}) for Ar{sup +} ion-cleaned graphene, whereas a similar capacitor grown using the transferred graphene showed high leakage current.

  14. Reliably counting atomic planes of few-layer graphene (n > 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yee Kan; Bae, Myung-Ho; Cahill, David G; Pop, Eric

    2011-01-25

    We demonstrate a reliable technique for counting atomic planes (n) of few-layer graphene (FLG) on SiO(2)/Si substrates by Raman spectroscopy. Our approach is based on measuring the ratio of the integrated intensity of the G graphene peak and the optical phonon peak of Si, I(G)/I(Si), and is particularly useful in the range n > 4 where few methods exist. We compare our results with atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements and Fresnel equation calculations. Then, we apply our method to unambiguously identify n of FLG devices on SiO(2) and find that the mobility (μ ≈ 2000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) is independent of layer thickness for n > 4. Our findings suggest that electrical transport in gated FLG devices is dominated by carriers near the FLG/SiO(2) interface and is thus limited by the environment, even for n > 4.

  15. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S.; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Wallace, Robert M; Mayer, Theresa S.; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF).

  16. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  17. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Turner, Kevin T; Bargatin, Igor; Shaygan, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al_2O_3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young’s modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young’s modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed. (paper)

  18. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati; Jiang, Qiu; Kurra, Narendra; Buttner, Ulrich; Wang, Xianbin; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  19. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  20. Direct imaging of atomic-scale ripples in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei L; Bhandari, Sagar; Yi, Wei; Bell, David C; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-05-09

    Graphene has been touted as the prototypical two-dimensional solid of extraordinary stability and strength. However, its very existence relies on out-of-plane ripples as predicted by theory and confirmed by experiments. Evidence of the intrinsic ripples has been reported in the form of broadened diffraction spots in reciprocal space, in which all spatial information is lost. Here we show direct real-space images of the ripples in a few-layer graphene (FLG) membrane resolved at the atomic scale using monochromated aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thickness of FLG amplifies the weak local effects of the ripples, resulting in spatially varying TEM contrast that is unique up to inversion symmetry. We compare the characteristic TEM contrast with simulated images based on accurate first-principles calculations of the scattering potential. Our results characterize the ripples in real space and suggest that such features are likely common in ultrathin materials, even in the nanometer-thickness range.

  1. NiO/nanoporous graphene composites with excellent supercapacitive performance produced by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Caiying; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong; Huang, Peipei; Li, Ping; Fan, Jinchuan; Song, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors because of its low cost and high theoretical specific capacitance of 2573 F g −1 . However, the low electronic conductivity and poor cycling stability of NiO limit its practical applications. To overcome these limitations, an efficient atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated here for the fabrication of NiO/nanoporous graphene (NG) composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors. ALD allows uniform deposition of NiO nanoparticles with controlled sizes on the surface of NG, thus offering a novel route to design NiO/NG composites for supercapacitor applications with high surface areas and greatly improved electrical conductivity and cycle stability. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the NiO/NG composites obtained by ALD exhibited excellent specific capacitance of up to ∼1005.8 F g −1 per mass of the composite electrode (the specific capacitance value is up to ∼1897.1 F g −1 based on the active mass of NiO), and stable performance after 1500 cycles. Furthermore, electrochemical performance of the NiO/NG composites is found to strongly depend on the size of NiO nanoparticles. (paper)

  2. Atom-scale covalent electrochemical modification of single-layer graphene on SiC substrates by diaryliodonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gearba, Raluca I.; Mueller, Kory M.; Veneman, Peter A.; Holliday, Bradley J.; Chan, Calvin K.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its high conductivity, graphene holds promise as an electrode for energy devices such as batteries and photovoltaics. However, to this end, the work function and doping levels in graphene need to be precisely tuned. One promising route for modifying graphene's electronic properties is via controlled covalent electrochemical grafting of molecules. We show that by employing diaryliodonium salts instead of the commonly used diazonium salts, spontaneous functionalization is avoided. This then allows for precise tuning of the grafting density. Moreover, by employing bis(4-nitrophenyl)iodonium(III) tetrafluoroborate (DNP) salt calibration curves, the surface functionalization density (coverage) of glassy carbon was controlled using cyclic voltammetry in varying salt concentrations. These electro-grafting conditions and calibration curves translated directly over to modifying single layer epitaxial graphene substrates (grown on insulating 6H-SiC (0 0 0 1)). In addition to quantifying the functionalization densities using electrochemical methods, samples with low grafting densities were characterized by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). We show that the use of buffer-layer free graphene substrates is required for clear observation of the nitrophenyl modifications. Furthermore, atomically-resolved STM images of single site modifications were obtained, showing no preferential grafting at defect sites or SiC step edges as supposed previously in the literature. Most of the grafts exhibit threefold symmetry, but occasional extended modifications (larger than 4 nm) were observed as well

  3. Chemistry and physics of a single atomic layer: strategies and challenges for functionalization of graphene and graphene-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Zheng, Yue Bing; Zhao, Feng; Li, Shoujian; Gao, Xingfa; Xu, Bingqian; Weiss, Paul S; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-01-07

    Graphene has attracted great interest for its superior physical, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties that enable a wide range of applications from electronics to nanoelectromechanical systems. Functionalization is among the significant vectors that drive graphene towards technological applications. While the physical properties of graphene have been at the center of attention, we still lack the knowledge framework for targeted graphene functionalization. In this critical review, we describe some of the important chemical and physical processes for graphene functionalization. We also identify six major challenges in graphene research and give perspectives and practical strategies for both fundamental studies and applications of graphene (315 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  4. First-principles study on silicon atom doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Hussain, Nayyar

    2018-01-01

    This paper illustrates the structural, electronic and optical properties of individual silicon (Si) atom-doped single layer graphene using density functional theory method. Si atom forms tight bonding with graphene layer. The effect of doping has been investigated by varying the concentration of Si atoms from 3.125% to 9.37% (i.e. From one to three Si atoms in 4 × 4 pure graphene supercell containing 32 carbon atoms), respectively. Electronic structure, partial density of states (PDOS) and optical properties of pure and Si atom-doped graphene sheet were calculated using VASP (Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package). The calculated results for pure graphene sheet were then compared with Si atom doped graphene. It is revealed that upon Si doping in graphene, a finite band gap appears at the high symmetric K-point, thereby making graphene a direct band gap semiconductor. Moreover, the band gap value is directly proportional to the concentration of impurity Si atoms present in graphene lattice. Upon analyzing the optical properties of Si atom-doped graphene structures, it is found that, there is significant change in the refractive index of the graphene after Si atom substitution in graphene. In addition, the overall absorption spectrum of graphene is decreased after Si atom doping. Although a significant red shift in absorption is found to occur towards visible range of radiation when Si atom is substituted in its lattice. The reflectivity of graphene improves in low energy region after Si atom substitution in graphene. These results can be useful for tuning the electronic structure and to manipulate the optical properties of graphene layer in the visible region.

  5. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe 2 O 3 unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe 2 O 3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe 2 O 3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe 2 O 3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  6. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hao, Haixia [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hui, Longfei [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Zhao, Fengqi [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Feng, Hao, E-mail: fenghao98@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); State Key Laboratory of Fluorine and Nitrogen Chemicals, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  7. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  8. Anomalous Insulator-Metal Transition in Boron Nitride-Graphene Hybrid Atomic Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    Juan de la Cierva” pro- gram (JCI-2010-08156), Spanish MICINN (FIS2010-21282- C02-01 and PIB2010US-00652), ACI-Promociona (ACI2009- 1036), “ Grupos ...percolation through metallic graphene networks and hopping conduction between edge states on randomly distributed insulating h-BN domains. REPORT...Tallahassee, Florida 32310, USA 3Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group and ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Fı́sica de Materiales, Centro de Fı́sica

  9. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe2O3) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe2O3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe2O3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe2O3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe2O3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  10. Inference on carbon atom arrangement in the turbostatic graphene layers in Tikak coal (India) by X-ray pair distribution function analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, Binoy K. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., West Bengal (India)

    2010-07-01

    This paper communicates the distribution of carbon atoms in a single poly-cyclic aromatic (PCA) layer (graphene) in Tikak coal from Assam, India. The pair distribution function (PDF) analysis performed indicates no evidence of any graphite like structure in this coal. The aromatic fraction is observed to be 74%; with the aliphatic fraction correspondingly estimated to be 26% in this coal. The average carbon atom has 2.5 nearest carbon atom neighbours at an average bond distance of 1.50{angstrom}. The average stacking height of the parallel aromatic layers (Lc) and the average diameter of the aromatic layers (La) are estimated to be 9.86 {angstrom} and 4.80 {angstrom} respectively. For this coal, the average number of stacking layers and the average number of atoms per layer are estimated to be four and eight respectively. In addition, the gamma band is observed at a d-value of 4.34{angstrom}. The comparison of the atom-pair correlation function to simulated one-dimensional structure function calculated for a model compound benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}) also indicates that C{sub 6} unit is the major components in this coal. The average carbon atom has at least one and one nearest aryl and alkyl C-C atom pairs separated by 1.39 and 1.54{angstrom} respectively.

  11. Mode-locking of an InAs Quantum Dot Based Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Using Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    catalyzed on either a copper foil or on nickel coated substrates. The graphene must be transferred off of these substrates and then on to the DBR/spacer to...properties of graphene in both the exfoliated single layer graphene (SLG) and few layer graphene (FLG) flakes . Sun et al. make use of bile salts to...semiconductors and dielectrics is the transfer of CVD graphene grown on copper foils. The graphene is grown on thin Cu-foils by CVD using methane and

  12. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  13. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  14. Imaging of few‐layer graphene flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Albrektsen, Ole; Novikov, Sergey M.

    In this work, we successfully demonstrate how imaging ellipsometry can be applied to obtain high‐resolution thickness maps of few‐layer graphene (FLG) samples, with the results being thoroughly validated in a comparative study using several complementary techniques: Optical reflection microscopy...... (ORM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning confocal Raman microscopy. The thickness map, revealing distinct terraces separated by steps corresponding to mono‐ and bilayers of graphene, is extracted from a pixel‐to‐pixel fitting of ellipsometric spectra using optical constants derived by fitting...... slab model calculations to averaged spectra collected in large homogenous sample areas. An analysis of reflection spectra and contrast images acquired by ORM confirm the results by quantifying the number of graphene layers and retrieving the FLG optical constants using a simple Fresnel‐law‐based slab...

  15. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O [Berkeley, CA; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, CA

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  16. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of boron-doped single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoong Ahm; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Kaneko, Katsumi; Terrones, Mauricio; Behrends, Jan; Eckmann, Axel; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Novoselov, Kostya S; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-07-24

    The introduction of foreign atoms, such as nitrogen, into the hexagonal network of an sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom monolayer has been demonstrated and constitutes an effective tool for tailoring the intrinsic properties of graphene. Here, we report that boron atoms can be efficiently substituted for carbon in graphene. Single-layer graphene substitutionally doped with boron was prepared by the mechanical exfoliation of boron-doped graphite. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the amount of substitutional boron in graphite was ~0.22 atom %. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that the boron atoms were spaced 4.76 nm apart in single-layer graphene. The 7-fold higher intensity of the D-band when compared to the G-band was explained by the elastically scattered photoexcited electrons by boron atoms before emitting a phonon. The frequency of the G-band in single-layer substitutionally boron-doped graphene was unchanged, which could be explained by the p-type boron doping (stiffening) counteracting the tensile strain effect of the larger carbon-boron bond length (softening). Boron-doped graphene appears to be a useful tool for engineering the physical and chemical properties of graphene.

  19. Highly n -doped graphene generated through intercalated terbium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukiya, L.; Nair, M. N.; Hajjar-Garreau, S.; Vonau, F.; Aubel, D.; Bubendorff, J. L.; Cranney, M.; Denys, E.; Florentin, A.; Reiter, G.; Simon, L.

    2018-01-01

    We obtained highly n -type doped graphene by intercalating terbium atoms between graphene and SiC(0001) through appropriate annealing in ultrahigh vacuum. After terbium intercalation angle-resolved-photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) showed a drastic change in the band structure around the K points of the Brillouin zone: the well-known conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer was superposed by a second conical dispersion band of a graphene monolayer with an electron density reaching 1015cm-2 . In addition, we demonstrate that atom intercalation proceeds either below the buffer layer or between the buffer layer and the monolayer graphene. The intercalation of terbium below a pure buffer layer led to the formation of a highly n -doped graphene monolayer decoupled from the SiC substrate, as evidenced by ARPES and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band structure of this highly n -doped monolayer graphene showed a kink (a deviation from the linear dispersion of the Dirac cone), which has been associated with an electron-phonon coupling constant one order of magnitude larger than those usually obtained for graphene with intercalated alkali metals.

  20. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  1. Counting molecular-beam grown graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaut, Annette S. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Wurstbauer, Ulrich [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pinczuk, Aron [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Garcia, Jorge M. [MBE Lab, IMM-Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Madrid, E-28760 (Spain); Pfeiffer, Loren N. [Electrical Engineering Department, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-06-17

    We have used the ratio of the integrated intensity of graphene's Raman G peak to that of the silicon substrate's first-order optical phonon peak, accurately to determine the number of graphene layers across our molecular-beam (MB) grown graphene films. We find that these results agree well both, with those from our own exfoliated single and few-layer graphene flakes, and with the results of Koh et al.[ACS Nano 5, 269 (2011)]. We hence distinguish regions of single-, bi-, tri-, four-layer, etc., graphene, consecutively, as we scan coarsely across our MB-grown graphene. This is the first, but crucial, step to being able to grow, by such molecular-beam-techniques, a specified number of large-area graphene layers, to order.

  2. Amorphous Ultrathin SnO2 Films by Atomic Layer Deposition on Graphene Network as Highly Stable Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; George, Steven M; Zhou, Changgong; Lian, Jie; Zhou, Yun

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous SnO2 (a-SnO2) thin films were conformally coated onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (G) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrochemical characteristics of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites were then determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge curves. Because the SnO2 ALD films were ultrathin and amorphous, the impact of the large volume expansion of SnO2 upon cycling was greatly reduced. With as few as five formation cycles best reported in the literature, a-SnO2/G nanocomposites reached stable capacities of 800 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 450 mAh g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The capacity from a-SnO2 is higher than the bulk theoretical values. The extra capacity is attributed to additional interfacial charge storage resulting from the high surface area of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites. These results demonstrate that metal oxide ALD on high surface area conducting carbon substrates can be used to fabricate high power and high capacity electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Feng, Qiong; Cheng, Yingchun; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal

  4. The edge- and basal-plane-specific electrochemistry of a single-layer graphene sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenjing; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yingru; Li, Chun; Peng, Hailin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan; Dai, Liming; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has a unique atom-thick two-dimensional structure and excellent properties, making it attractive for a variety of electrochemical applications, including electrosynthesis, electrochemical sensors or electrocatalysis, and energy conversion and storage. However, the electrochemistry of single-layer graphene has not yet been well understood, possibly due to the technical difficulties in handling individual graphene sheet. Here, we report the electrochemical behavior at single-layer graphene-based electrodes, comparing the basal plane of graphene to its edge. The graphene edge showed 4 orders of magnitude higher specific capacitance, much faster electron transfer rate and stronger electrocatalytic activity than those of graphene basal plane. A convergent diffusion effect was observed at the sub-nanometer thick graphene edge-electrode to accelerate the electrochemical reactions. Coupling with the high conductivity of a high-quality graphene basal plane, graphene edge is an ideal electrode for electrocatalysis and for the storage of capacitive charges. PMID:23896697

  5. Layer-controllable graphene by plasma thinning and post-annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lufang; Feng, Shaopeng; Xiao, Shaoqing; Shen, Gang; Zhang, Xiumei; Nan, Haiyan; Gu, Xiaofeng; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2018-05-01

    The electronic structure of graphene depends crucially on its layer number and therefore engineering the number of graphene's atomic stacking layers is of great importance for the preparation of graphene-based devices. In this paper, we demonstrated a relatively less invasive, high-throughput and uniform large-area plasma thinning of graphene based on direct bombardment effect of fast-moving ionic hydrogen or argon species. Any desired number of graphene layers including trilayer, bilayer and monolayer can be obtained. Structural changes of graphene layers are studied by optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Post annealing is adopted to self-heal the lattice defects induced by the ion bombardment effect. This plasma etching technique is efficient and compatible with semiconductor manufacturing processes, and may find important applications for graphene-based device fabrication.

  6. Cleaning graphene with a titanium sacrificial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, C. A.; Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Vogel, E. M.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is a promising material for future electronic applications and chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper is a promising method for synthesizing graphene on the wafer scale. The processing of such graphene films into electronic devices introduces a variety of contaminants which can be difficult to remove. An approach to cleaning residues from the graphene channel is presented in which a thin layer of titanium is deposited via thermal e-beam evaporation and immediately removed. This procedure does not damage the graphene as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, greatly enhances the electrical performance of the fabricated graphene field effect transistors, and completely removes the chemical residues from the surface of the graphene channel as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  7. Enhancement of the Stability of Fluorine Atoms on Defective Graphene and at Graphene/Fluorographene Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Zhimin; Jiang, Quanguo; Li, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Peeters, Francois M; Li, Sean; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-09-09

    Fluorinated graphene is one of the most important derivatives of graphene and has been found to have great potential in optoelectronic and photonic nanodevices. However, the stability of F atoms on fluorinated graphene under different conditions, which is essential to maintain the desired properties of fluorinated graphene, is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the diffusion of F atoms on pristine graphene, graphene with defects, and at graphene/fluorographene interfaces by using density functional theory calculations. We find that an isolated F atom diffuses easily on graphene, but those F atoms can be localized by inducing vacancies or absorbates in graphene and by creating graphene/fluorographene interfaces, which would strengthen the binding energy of F atoms on graphene and increase the diffusion energy barrier of F atoms remarkably.

  8. The Interaction between Graphene and Oxygen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the density function theory (DFT method, the interaction between the graphene and oxygen atom is simulated by the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G basis set. Due to the symmetry of graphene (C54H18, D6h, a representative patch is put forward to represent the whole graphene to simplify the description. The representative patch on the surface is considered to gain the potential energy surface (PES. By the calculation of the PES, four possible stable isomers of the C54H18-O radical can be obtained. Meanwhile, the structures and energies of the four possible stable isomers, are further investigated thermodynamically, kinetically, and chemically. According to the transition states, the possible reaction mechanism between the graphene and oxygen atom is given.

  9. Fabrication of a single layer graphene by copper intercalation on a SiC(0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Tomokage, Hajime; Suzuki, Takayuki; Tajiri, Takayuki; Kohno, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cu atoms deposited on a zero layer graphene grown on a SiC(0001) substrate, intercalate between the zero layer graphene and the SiC substrate after the thermal annealing above 600 °C, forming a Cu-intercalated single layer graphene. On the Cu-intercalated single layer graphene, a graphene lattice with superstructure due to moiré pattern is observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, and specific linear dispersion at the K ¯ point as well as a characteristic peak in a C 1s core level spectrum, which is originated from a free-standing graphene, is confirmed by photoemission spectroscopy. The Cu-intercalated single layer graphene is found to be n-doped

  10. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona; Lejeune, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, 09 JAN (2015), 013117:1-5 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : graphene * ultralow energy STEM * counting graphene layers * clean ing of graphene * 2D crystals Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  11. Field emission from vertically aligned few-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesevic, Alexander; Kemps, Raymond; Vanhulsel, Annick; Chowdhury, Manish Pal; Volodin, Alexander; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The electric field emission behavior of vertically aligned few-layer graphene was studied in a parallel plate-type setup. Few-layer graphene was synthesized in the absence of any metallic catalyst by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with gas mixtures of methane and hydrogen. The deposit consists of nanostructures that are several micrometers wide, highly crystalline stacks of four to six atomic layers of graphene, aligned vertically to the substrate surface in a high density network. The few-layer graphene is found to be a good field emitter, characterized by turn-on fields as low as 1 V/μm and field amplification factors up to several thousands. We observe a clear dependence of the few-layer graphene field emission behavior on the synthesis parameters: Hydrogen is identified as an efficient etchant to improve field emission, and samples grown on titanium show lower turn-on field values and higher amplification factors when compared to samples grown on silicon

  12. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lejeune, Michaël [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences d' Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30 eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50 eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  13. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  14. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  15. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J., E-mail: jiyoung.kim@utdallas.edu; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics for carbon-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Jandhyala, S.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon based nanomaterials like nanotubes and graphene have emerged as future generation electronic materials for device applications because of their interesting properties such as high-mobility and ability to carry high-current densities compared to conventional semiconductor materials like silicon. Therefore, there is a need to develop techniques to integrate robust gate dielectrics with high-quality interfaces for these materials in order to attain maximum performance. To date, a variety of methods including physical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition (ALD), physical assembly among others have been employed in order to integrate dielectrics for carbon nanotube and graphene based field-effect transistors. Owing to the difficulty in wetting pristine surfaces of nanotubes and graphene, most of the ALD methods require a seeding technique involving non-covalent functionalization of their surfaces in order to nucleate dielectric growth while maintaining their intrinsic properties. A comprehensive review regarding the various dielectric integration schemes for emerging devices and their limitations with respect to ALD based methods along with a future outlook is provided. - Highlights: • We introduce various dielectric integration schemes for carbon-based devices. • Physical vapor deposition methods tend to degrade device performance. • Atomic layer deposition on pristine surfaces of graphene and nanotube is difficult. • We review different seeding techniques for atomic layer deposition of dielectrics. • Compare the performance of graphene top-gate devices with different dielectrics

  17. Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, Tjeerd Rogier Johannes; Antipina, L.Y.; Temmen, M.; Reichling, M.; Sorokin, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    By the use of non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CaF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the

  18. Rapid growth of single-layer graphene on the insulating substrates by thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Dai, D.; Chen, G.X.; Yu, J.H. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Nishimura, K. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Advanced Nano-processing Engineering Lab, Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kogakuin University (Japan); Lin, C.-T. [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Jiang, N., E-mail: jiangnan@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zhan, Z.L., E-mail: zl_zhan@sohu.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A rapid thermal CVD process has been developed to directly grow graphene on the insulating substrates. • The treating time consumed is ≈25% compared to conventional CVD procedure. • Single-layer and few-layer graphene can be formed on quartz and SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates, respectively. • The formation of thinner graphene at the interface is due to the fast precipitation rate of carbon atoms during cooling. - Abstract: The advance of CVD technique to directly grow graphene on the insulating substrates is particularly significant for further device fabrication. As graphene is catalytically grown on metal foils, the degradation of the sample properties is unavoidable during transfer of graphene on the dielectric layer. Moreover, shortening the treatment time as possible, while achieving single-layer growth of graphene, is worthy to be investigated for promoting the efficiency of mass production. Here we performed a rapid heating/cooling process to grow graphene films directly on the insulating substrates by thermal CVD. The treating time consumed is ≈25% compared to conventional CVD procedure. In addition, we found that high-quality, single-layer graphene can be formed on quartz, but on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate only few-layer graphene can be obtained. The pronounced substrate effect is attributed to the different dewetting behavior of Ni films on the both substrates at 950 °C.

  19. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Graphene Multilayer Films via Covalent Bonds for Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To maximize the utilization of its single-atom thin nature, a facile scheme to fabricate graphene multilayer films via a layer-by-layer self-assembled process was presented. The structure of multilayer films was constructed by covalently bonding graphene oxide (GO using p-phenylenediamine (PPD as a covalent cross-linking agent. The assembly process was confirmed to be repeatable and the structure was stable. With the π-π conjugated structure and a large number of spaces in the framework, the graphene multi‐ layer films exhibited excellent electrochemical perform‐ ance. The uniform ultrathin electrode exhibited a capacitance of 41.71 μF/cm2 at a discharge current of 0.1 μA/cm2, and displayed excellent stability of 88.9 % after 1000 charge-discharge cycles.

  20. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Effect of water layer at the SiO2/graphene interface on pentacene morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, Manisha; Pavlica, Egon; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš; Bratina, Gvido

    2014-10-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to examine early stages of pentacene growth on exfoliated single-layer graphene transferred to SiO2 substrates. We have observed 2D growth with mean height of 1.5 ± 0.2 nm on as-transferred graphene. Three-dimensional islands of pentacene with an average height of 11 ± 2 nm were observed on graphene that was annealed at 350 °C prior to pentacene growth. Compellingly similar 3D morphology has been observed on graphene transferred onto SiO2 that was treated with hexamethyldisilazane prior to the transfer of graphene. On multilayer graphene we have observed 2D growth, regardless of the treatment of SiO2. We interpret this behavior of pentacene molecules in terms of the influence of the dipolar field that emerges from the water monolayer at the graphene/SiO2 interface on the surface energy of graphene.

  2. Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tjeerd R. J. Bollmann[1,2; Liubov Yu. Antipina[3,4; Matthias Temmen[2; Michael Reichling[2; Pavel B. Sorokin[5

    2015-01-01

    By the use of non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CAF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the CaF2 substrate, resulting from the graphene's preparation under ambient conditions on the hydrophilic substrate surface, are found to electronically modify the graphene as the material's electron density transfers from graphene to the hydration layer. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that the first 2 to 3 water layers adjacent to the graphene hole-dope the graphene by several percent of a unit charge per unit cell.

  3. Graphene Oxide as a Monoatomic Blocking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films of C22 fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were...

  4. Electric double-layer capacitance between an ionic liquid and few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Eri; Goto, Hidenori; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Ionic-liquid gates have a high carrier density due to their atomically thin electric double layer (EDL) and extremely large geometrical capacitance Cg. However, a high carrier density in graphene has not been achieved even with ionic-liquid gates because the EDL capacitance CEDL between the ionic liquid and graphene involves the series connection of Cg and the quantum capacitance Cq, which is proportional to the density of states. We investigated the variables that determine CEDL at the molecular level by varying the number of graphene layers n and thereby optimising Cq. The CEDL value is governed by Cq at n 4. This transition with n indicates a composite nature for CEDL. Our finding clarifies a universal principle that determines capacitance on a microscopic scale, and provides nanotechnological perspectives on charge accumulation and energy storage using an ultimately thin capacitor.

  5. Selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jae-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Hyeon-Sik; Whang, Dongmok; Joo, Won-Jae; Hwang, SungWoo

    2015-01-01

    Graphene growth on a copper surface via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition has several advantages in terms of providing high-quality graphene with the potential for scale-up, but the product is usually inhomogeneous due to the inability to control the graphene layer growth. The non-uniform regions strongly affect the reliability of the graphene in practical electronic applications. Herein, we report a novel graphene transfer method that allows for the selective exfoliation of single-layer graphene from non-uniform graphene grown on a Cu foil. Differences in the interlayer bonding energy are exploited to mechanically separate only the top single-layer graphene and transfer this to an arbitrary substrate. The dry-transferred single-layer graphene showed electrical characteristics that were more uniform than those of graphene transferred using conventional wet-etching transfer steps. (paper)

  6. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Salas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom. Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  7. Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, V. A.; Karpunin, V. V.; Mironova, K. I.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings is investigated. An analytical expression for the magnetic moment as a function of the magnetic field flux through the one-dimensional quantum rings is obtained. This expression has the oscillation character. The oscillation period is equal to one flux quanta.

  8. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    the Ir clusters show equal ratio of ABC and ACB stacking. Pt/Rh clusters show mainly (∝75 %) ABC stacking and Ir/Pd clusters show exclusively ABC stacking - note the Ir(111) substrate stacking is chosen to be ABC-like. During gas exposure the clusters gain in height, while simultaneously the ordering of the cluster lattice decreases. The order of ACB stacked Pt/Rh clusters decreases more rapidly, so that a weakening of the cluster binding due to ACB stacking is proposed. In addition a size reduction of the lowest cluster layer to a hexagonal arrangement of 19 atoms was observed, which seems to be the energetically favoured interface area between graphene/Ir(111) and the investigated metal clusters. Platinum clusters containing fewer than 40 atoms have been investigated with surface sensitive X-ray diffraction. The cluster height could be determined and a reduced atom distance among the cluster was observed. CO exposure decreased the in-plane atom distance even more. This effect could be reverted by a subsequent oxygen exposure (2CO + O_2 → 2 CO_2). For Pt/Rh clusters with fewer than 60 atoms the element distribution was investigated and revealed an enrichment of Rh at the two topmost cluster layers. This element distribution was found for co-deposition and sequential deposition of the material and is therefore independent of the order of deposition. Oxygen exposure led to the formation of a rhodium surface oxide, which could be prevented by preceding CO exposure. In case of Ir/Pd clusters containing ∝60 atoms we found preferences for a core/shell structure with iridium atoms at core sites. Exposure to p(H_2)=1 bar did not result in the formation of the palladium β-phase, so that a reduced hydrogen solubility of graphene/Ir(111) supported palladium clusters is assumed. The reduced hydrogen solubility is probably a consequence of substrate induced strain among the cluster atoms.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of ion-irradiated multi-layer graphenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukagoshi, Akira [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Honda, Shin-ichi, E-mail: s-honda@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Osugi, Ryo [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okada, Hiraku [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Niibe, Masahito [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Terasawa, Mititaka [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Hirase, Ryuji; Izumi, Hirokazu; Yoshioka, Hideki [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan); Niwase, Keisuke [Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo 673-1494 (Japan); Taguchi, Eiji [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Lee, Kuei-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Oura, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Low-energy Ar ions (0.5–2 keV) were irradiated to multi-layer graphenes and the damage process, the local electronic states, and the degree of alignment of the basal plane, and the oxidation process upon ion irradiation were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By Raman spectroscopy, we observed two stages similar to the case of irradiated graphite, which should relate to the accumulations of vacancies and turbulence of the basal plane, respectively. XAS analysis indicated that the number of sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon (sp{sup 2}-C) atoms decreased after ion irradiation. Angle-resolved XAS revealed that the orientation parameter (OP) decreased with increasing ion energy and fluence, reflecting the turbulence of the basal plane under irradiation. In situ XPS shows the oxidation of the irradiated multi-layer graphenes after air exposure.

  10. Layered assembly of graphene oxide and Co-Al layered double hydroxide nanosheets as electrode materials for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Dong; Dong, Xin Yi; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Pei, Xian Feng; Chen, Xin Jiang; Chen, Biao; Jin, Jian

    2011-03-28

    An innovative strategy of fabricating electrode material by layered assembling two kinds of one-atom-thick sheets, carboxylated graphene oxide (GO) and Co-Al layered double hydroxide nanosheet (Co-Al LDH-NS) for the application as a pseudocapacitor is reported. The Co-Al LDH-NS/GO composite exhibits good energy storage properties.

  11. Symmetry Breaking in Few Layer Graphene Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostwick, A.; Ohta, T.; McChesney, J.L.; Emtsev, K.; Seyller,Th.; Horn, K.; Rotenberg, E.

    2007-05-25

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticledynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axisscreening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of thespectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiCusing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this articlewe review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extractingsuch parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments againstthe possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  12. Fluorinated graphene and hexagonal boron nitride as ALD seed layers for graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Yang; Meng, Nan; Luo, Jikui; Wang, Hongtao; Hasan, Tawfique; Wang, Xinran; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin dielectric materials prepared by atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) technology are commonly used in graphene electronics. Using the first-principles density functional theory calculations with van der Waals (vdW) interactions included, we demonstrate that single-side fluorinated graphene (SFG) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) exhibit large physical adsorption energy and strong electrostatic interactions with H 2 O-based ALD precursors, indicating their potential as the ALD seed layer for dielectric growth on graphene. In graphene-SFG vdW heterostructures, graphene is n-doped after ALD precursor adsorption on the SFG surface caused by vertical intrinsic polarization of SFG. However, graphene-h-BN vdW heterostructures help preserving the intrinsic characteristics of the underlying graphene due to in-plane intrinsic polarization of h-BN. By choosing SFG or BN as the ALD seed layer on the basis of actual device design needs, the graphene vdW heterostructures may find applications in low-dimensional electronics. (paper)

  13. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.

  14. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Implementing graphene foils in existing neutral atom detector designs will increase their angular and energy resolution, and also improve their mass discrimination...

  15. Adsorption configurations of two nitrogen atoms on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V. K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-01-01

    We present calculations for different possible configurations of two nitrogen adatoms on graphene using the code VASP, based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). Two N atoms adsorbed on the graphene sheet can share a bond in two ways. They take positions either just above two adjacent carbon atoms or they form a bridge across opposite bonds of a hexagon in the graphene sheet. Both these configurations result into structural distortion of the sheet. Another stable configuration involving two N atoms consists of an N 2 molecule which is physisorbed at a distance 3.69 Å on the graphene sheet. Two N atoms can also be adsorbed on alternate bridge sites of neighbouring hexagons of graphene. This configuration again leads to distortion of the sheet in perpendicular direction

  16. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki; Kalita, Golap

    2014-01-01

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  17. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  18. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  19. Improving the electrical properties of graphene layers by chemical doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-01-01

    Although the electronic properties of graphene layers can be modulated by various doping techniques, most of doping methods cost degradation of structural uniqueness or electrical mobility. It is matter of huge concern to develop a technique to improve the electrical properties of graphene while sustaining its superior properties. Here, we report the modification of electrical properties of single- bi- and trilayer graphene by chemical reaction with potassium nitrate (KNO 3 ) solution. Raman spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements showed the n-doping effect of graphene by KNO 3 . The effect was most dominant in single layer graphene, and the mobility of single layer graphene was improved by the factor of more than 3. The chemical doping by using KNO 3 provides a facile approach to improve the electrical properties of graphene layers sustaining their unique characteristics. (paper)

  20. Chemical reaction between single hydrogen atom and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi

    2007-04-01

    We study chemical reaction between a single hydrogen atom and a graphene, which is the elemental reaction between hydrogen and graphitic carbon materials. In the present work, classical molecular dynamics simulation is used with modified Brenner's empirical bond order potential. The three reactions, that is, absorption reaction, reflection reaction and penetration reaction, are observed in our simulation. Reaction rates depend on the incident energy of the hydrogen atom and the graphene temperature. The dependence can be explained by the following mechanisms: (1) The hydrogen atom receives repulsive force by π-electrons in addition to nuclear repulsion. (2) Absorbing the hydrogen atom, the graphene transforms its structure to the 'overhand' configuration such as sp 3 state. (3) The hexagonal hole of the graphene is expanded during the penetration of the hydrogen atom. (author)

  1. Single 3d transition metal atoms on multi-layer graphene systems: electronic configurations, bonding mechanisms and role of the substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sessi, V.; Stepanow, S.; Rudenko, A.N.; Krotzky, S.; Kern, K.; Hiebel, F.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.; Šipr, Ondřej; Honolka, Jan; Brookes, N.B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, Jun (2014), 1-11 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0853 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : graphene * magnetic adsorbates * x-ray absorption spectroscopy * surface magnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.558, year: 2014

  2. Study of EUV induced defects on few-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Rizo, P.J.; Zoethout, E.; Scaccabarozzi, L.; Lee, Christopher James; Banine, V.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    Defects in graphene greatly affect its properties1-3. Radiation induced-defects may reduce the long-term survivability of graphene-based nano-devices. Here, we expose few-layer graphene to extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 13.5nm) radiation and show there is a power-dependent increase in defect density. We

  3. Transfer-free batch fabrication of single layer graphene transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levendorf, Mark P; Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S; Garg, Shivank; Park, Jiwoong

    2009-12-01

    Full integration of graphene into conventional device circuitry would require a reproducible large scale graphene synthesis that is compatible with conventional thin film technology. We report the synthesis of large scale single layer graphene directly onto an evaporated copper film. A novel fabrication method was used to directly pattern these graphene sheets into devices by simply removing the underlying copper film. Raman and conductance measurements show that the mechanical and electrical properties of our single layer graphene are uniform over a large area, ( Ferrari, A. C. et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 187401.) which leads to a high device yield and successful fabrication of ultra long (>0.5 mm) graphene channels. Our graphene based devices present excellent electrical properties including a promising carrier mobility of 700 cm(2)/V.s and current saturation characteristics similar to devices based on exfoliated graphene ( Meric, I.. et al. Nat Nanotechnol. 2008, 3, 654-659).

  4. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively

  5. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N.

    2014-02-01

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  6. Effect on hydrogen adsorption due to a lonely or a pair of carbon vacancies on the graphene layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2017-01-01

    The influence on the hydrogen molecule adsorption on a pristine and a defective graphene layer is compared. The different lengths for the C-C bonds on the graphene layer with one vacancy are visualized and compared respect to pristine graphene. The energy of formation of one vacancy is calculated and a comparison of the binding energy for the hydrogen molecule is presented when the molecule is adsorbed on pristine graphene or on the defective graphene layer. The adsorption is studied for a single vacancy and at least for two different pairs of carbon vacancies. The qualitative general result, and contrary to the expected effect of the carbon vacancies on the hydrogen adsorption is that the rearrangement of the carbon atoms on the defective graphene layer allows only a relatively small increase in the magnitude of the binding energy for the hydrogen molecule. (paper)

  7. Surface adhesion properties of graphene and graphene oxide studied by colloid-probe atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yanhuai; Zhang Ping; Ren Huming; Zhuo Qin; Yang Zhongmei; Jiang Xu; Jiang Yong

    2011-01-01

    Surface adhesion properties are important to various applications of graphene-based materials. Atomic force microscopy is powerful to study the adhesion properties of samples by measuring the forces on the colloidal sphere tip as it approaches and retracts from the surface. In this paper we have measured the adhesion force between the colloid probe and the surface of graphene (graphene oxide) nanosheet. The results revealed that the adhesion force on graphene and graphene oxide surface were 66.3 and 170.6 nN, respectively. It was found the adhesion force was mainly determined by the water meniscus, which was related to the surface contact angle of samples.

  8. Enhancement of absorption in vertically-oriented graphene sheets growing on a thin copper layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozouvan, Tamara; Poperenko, Leonid [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Department of Physics 4, Prospect Glushkova, Kyiv, 03187 (Ukraine); Kravets, Vasyl, E-mail: vasyl_kravets@yahoo.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Shaykevich, Igor [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Department of Physics 4, Prospect Glushkova, Kyiv, 03187 (Ukraine)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films. • Chemical vapour deposition method. • Scanning tunneling microscopy revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of graphene layer. • We report a significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets. - Abstract: The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films grown on thin copper Cu (1 μm) layer using chemical vapour deposition method were investigated via spectroscopic ellipsometry and nanoscopic measurements. Angle variable ellipsometry measurements were performed to analyze the features of dispersion of the complex refractive index and optical conductivity. It was observed significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets layer with respect to the bulk graphite due to interaction between excited localized surface plasmon at surface of thin Cu layer and graphene’s electrons. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with atomic spatial resolution revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of the deposited graphene layer. The obtained results provide direct evidence of the strong influence of the growing condition and morphology of nanostructure on electronic and optical behaviours of graphene film.

  9. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  10. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  11. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  12. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.; Smith, Casey; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. Coulomb oscillations in three-layer graphene nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettinger, J; Stampfer, C; Molitor, F; Graf, D; Ihn, T; Ensslin, K

    2008-01-01

    We present transport measurements on a tunable three-layer graphene single electron transistor (SET). The device consists of an etched three-layer graphene flake with two narrow constrictions separating the island from source and drain contacts. Three lateral graphene gates are used to electrostatically tune the device. An individual three-layer graphene constriction has been investigated separately showing a transport gap near the charge neutrality point. The graphene tunneling barriers show a strongly nonmonotonic coupling as a function of gate voltage indicating the presence of localized states in the constrictions. We show Coulomb oscillations and Coulomb diamond measurements proving the functionality of the graphene SET. A charging energy of ∼0.6 meV is extracted.

  15. Fabrication of ATO/Graphene Multi-layered Transparent Conducting Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Chen, Fei; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chuanbin; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2013-03-01

    A novel transparent conducting oxide based on the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films has been developed to satisfy the application of transparent conductive electrode in solar cells. The ATO thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition method with high quality, namely the sheet resistance of 49.5 Ω/sq and average transmittance of 81.9 %. The prepared graphene sheet is well reduced and shows atomically thin, spotty distributed appearance on the top of the ATO thin films. The XRD and optical micrographs are used to confirm the successfully preparation of the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films. The Hall measurements and UV-Vis spectrophotometer are conducted to evaluate the sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the innovative structure. It is found that graphene can improve the electrical properties of the ATO thin films with little influence on the optical transmittance.

  16. Fabrication of ATO/Graphene Multi-layered Transparent Conducting Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Na; Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Wang Chuanbin; Zhang Lianmeng

    2013-01-01

    A novel transparent conducting oxide based on the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films has been developed to satisfy the application of transparent conductive electrode in solar cells. The ATO thin films are prepared by pulsed laser deposition method with high quality, namely the sheet resistance of 49.5 Ω/sq and average transmittance of 81.9 %. The prepared graphene sheet is well reduced and shows atomically thin, spotty distributed appearance on the top of the ATO thin films. The XRD and optical micrographs are used to confirm the successfully preparation of the ATO/graphene multi-layered thin films. The Hall measurements and UV-Vis spectrophotometer are conducted to evaluate the sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the innovative structure. It is found that graphene can improve the electrical properties of the ATO thin films with little influence on the optical transmittance.

  17. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-15

    , whereupon the Ir clusters show equal ratio of ABC and ACB stacking. Pt/Rh clusters show mainly (∝75 %) ABC stacking and Ir/Pd clusters show exclusively ABC stacking - note the Ir(111) substrate stacking is chosen to be ABC-like. During gas exposure the clusters gain in height, while simultaneously the ordering of the cluster lattice decreases. The order of ACB stacked Pt/Rh clusters decreases more rapidly, so that a weakening of the cluster binding due to ACB stacking is proposed. In addition a size reduction of the lowest cluster layer to a hexagonal arrangement of 19 atoms was observed, which seems to be the energetically favoured interface area between graphene/Ir(111) and the investigated metal clusters. Platinum clusters containing fewer than 40 atoms have been investigated with surface sensitive X-ray diffraction. The cluster height could be determined and a reduced atom distance among the cluster was observed. CO exposure decreased the in-plane atom distance even more. This effect could be reverted by a subsequent oxygen exposure (2CO + O{sub 2} → 2 CO{sub 2}). For Pt/Rh clusters with fewer than 60 atoms the element distribution was investigated and revealed an enrichment of Rh at the two topmost cluster layers. This element distribution was found for co-deposition and sequential deposition of the material and is therefore independent of the order of deposition. Oxygen exposure led to the formation of a rhodium surface oxide, which could be prevented by preceding CO exposure. In case of Ir/Pd clusters containing ∝60 atoms we found preferences for a core/shell structure with iridium atoms at core sites. Exposure to p(H{sub 2})=1 bar did not result in the formation of the palladium β-phase, so that a reduced hydrogen solubility of graphene/Ir(111) supported palladium clusters is assumed. The reduced hydrogen solubility is probably a consequence of substrate induced strain among the cluster atoms.

  18. Layer Dependence of Graphene for Oxidation Resistance of Cu Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-qing Song; Xiao-ping Wang

    2017-01-01

    We studied the oxidation resistance of graphene-coated Cu surface and its layer dependence by directly growing monolayer graphene with different multilayer structures coexisted,diminishing the influence induced by residue and transfer technology.It is found that the Cu surface coated with the monolayer graphene demonstrate tremendous difference in oxidation pattern and oxidation rate,compared to that coated with the bilayer graphene,which is considered to be originated from the strain-induced linear oxidation channel in monolayer graphene and the intersection of easily-oxidized directions in each layer of bilayer graphene,respectively.We reveal that the defects on the graphene basal plane but not the boundaries are the main oxidation channel for Cu surface under graphene protection.Our finding indicates that compared to putting forth efforts to improve the quality of monolayer graphene by reducing defects,depositing multilayer graphene directly on metal is a simple and effective way to enhance the oxidation resistance of graphene-coated metals.

  19. Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rut’kov, E. V.; Lavrovskaya, N. P.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Gall, N. R.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that, in contradiction with the fundamental results obtained for free graphene, graphene films grown on the Rh(111) surface to thicknesses from one to ~(12–15) single layers do not absorb visible electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface and influence neither the brightness nor true temperature of the sample. At larger thicknesses, such absorption occurs. This effect is observed for the surfaces of other metals, specifically, Pt(111), Re(1010), and Ni(111) and, thus, can be considered as being universal. It is thought that the effect is due to changes in the electronic properties of thin graphene layers because of electron transfer between graphene and the metal substrate.

  20. Optical transparency of graphene layers grown on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rut’kov, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Lavrovskaya, N. P. [State University of Aerospace Instrumentation (Russian Federation); Sheshenya, E. S., E-mail: sheshenayket@gmail.ru; Gall, N. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    It is shown that, in contradiction with the fundamental results obtained for free graphene, graphene films grown on the Rh(111) surface to thicknesses from one to ~(12–15) single layers do not absorb visible electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface and influence neither the brightness nor true temperature of the sample. At larger thicknesses, such absorption occurs. This effect is observed for the surfaces of other metals, specifically, Pt(111), Re(1010), and Ni(111) and, thus, can be considered as being universal. It is thought that the effect is due to changes in the electronic properties of thin graphene layers because of electron transfer between graphene and the metal substrate.

  1. Multilayer films of cationic graphene-polyelectrolytes and anionic graphene-polyelectrolytes fabricated using layer-by-layer self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Adila; Oh, Kyoung Ah; Koo, Hyeyoung; Lee, Hyung jung; Park, Min

    2011-01-01

    Extremely thin sheets of carbon atoms called graphene have been predicted to possess excellent thermal properties, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stiffness. To harness such properties in composite materials for multifunctional applications, one would require the incorporation of graphene. In this study, new thin film composites were created using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of polymer-coated graphitic nanoplatelets. The positive and negative polyelectrolytes used to cover graphene sheets were poly allylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and poly sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (PSS). The synthesized poly allylamine hydrochloride-graphene (PAH-G) and poly sodium 4-styrenesulfonate-gaphene (PSS-G) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The multilayer films created by spontaneous sequential adsorption of PAH-G and PSS-G were characterized by ultra violet spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and AFM. The electrical conductivity of the graphene/polyelectrolyte multilayer film composites measured by the four-point probe method was 0.2 S cm -1 , which was sufficient for the construction of advanced electro-optical devices and sensors.

  2. Dynamical screening of the van der Waals interaction between graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dappe, Y J; Bolcatto, P G; Ortega, J; Flores, F

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between graphene layers is analyzed combining local orbital DFT and second order perturbation theory. For this purpose we use the linear combination of atomic orbitals-orbital occupancy (LCAO-OO) formalism, that allows us to separate the interaction energy as the sum of a weak chemical interaction between graphene layers plus the van der Waals interaction (Dappe et al 2006 Phys. Rev. B 74 205434). In this work, the weak chemical interaction is calculated by means of corrected-LDA calculations using an atomic-like sp 3 d 5 basis set. The van der Waals interaction is calculated by means of second order perturbation theory using an atom-atom interaction approximation and the atomic-like-orbital occupancies. We also analyze the effect of dynamical screening in the van der Waals interaction using a simple model. We find that this dynamical screening reduces by 40% the van der Waals interaction. Taking this effect into account, we obtain a graphene-graphene interaction energy of 70 ± 5 meV/atom in reasonable agreement with the experimental evidence.

  3. Dynamical screening of the van der Waals interaction between graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dappe, Y J; Bolcatto, P G; Ortega, J; Flores, F

    2012-10-24

    The interaction between graphene layers is analyzed combining local orbital DFT and second order perturbation theory. For this purpose we use the linear combination of atomic orbitals-orbital occupancy (LCAO-OO) formalism, that allows us to separate the interaction energy as the sum of a weak chemical interaction between graphene layers plus the van der Waals interaction (Dappe et al 2006 Phys. Rev. B 74 205434). In this work, the weak chemical interaction is calculated by means of corrected-LDA calculations using an atomic-like sp(3)d(5) basis set. The van der Waals interaction is calculated by means of second order perturbation theory using an atom-atom interaction approximation and the atomic-like-orbital occupancies. We also analyze the effect of dynamical screening in the van der Waals interaction using a simple model. We find that this dynamical screening reduces by 40% the van der Waals interaction. Taking this effect into account, we obtain a graphene-graphene interaction energy of 70 ± 5 meV/atom in reasonable agreement with the experimental evidence.

  4. Stability of gold atoms and dimers adsorbed on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varns, R; Strange, P

    2008-01-01

    We report density functional theory (DFT) calculations for gold atoms and dimers on the surface of graphene. The calculations were performed using the plane wave pseudopotential method. Calculations were performed for a variety of geometries, and both the graphene surface and gold atoms were allowed to fully relax. In agreement with experiment, our results show that the gold-gold interaction is considerably stronger than the gold-graphene interaction, implying that uniform coverage could not be attained. The minimum energy configuration for a single gold atom is found to be directly above a carbon atom, while for the dimer it is perpendicular to the surface and directly above a carbon-carbon bond. Our results are consistent with previous similar calculations

  5. Strong piezoelectricity in single-layer graphene deposited on SiO2 grating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Rodrigues, Gonçalo; Zelenovskiy, Pavel; Romanyuk, Konstantin; Luchkin, Sergey; Kopelevich, Yakov; Kholkin, Andrei

    2015-06-25

    Electromechanical response of materials is a key property for various applications ranging from actuators to sophisticated nanoelectromechanical systems. Here electromechanical properties of the single-layer graphene transferred onto SiO2 calibration grating substrates is studied via piezoresponse force microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The correlation of mechanical strains in graphene layer with the substrate morphology is established via Raman mapping. Apparent vertical piezoresponse from the single-layer graphene supported by underlying SiO2 structure is observed by piezoresponse force microscopy. The calculated vertical piezocoefficient is about 1.4 nm V(-1), that is, much higher than that of the conventional piezoelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate and comparable to that of relaxor single crystals. The observed piezoresponse and achieved strain in graphene are associated with the chemical interaction of graphene's carbon atoms with the oxygen from underlying SiO2. The results provide a basis for future applications of graphene layers for sensing, actuating and energy harvesting.

  6. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy image...

  7. Monitoring the layer-by-layer self-assembly of graphene and graphene oxide by spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Chang, Meng-Jie; Wang, Hang-Xing; Xie, Yu-Long; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of graphene oxide, graphene and copper (II) phthalocyanine dye have been successfully fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly approach. We present the first variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) investigation on these graphene-dye hybrid thin films. The thickness evaluation suggested that our LbL assembly process produces highly uniform and reproducible thin films. We demonstrate that the refractive indices of the graphene-dye thin films undergo dramatic variation in the range close to the absorption of the dyes. This investigation provides new insight to the optical properties of graphene containing thin films and shall help to establish an appropriate optical model for graphene-based hybrid materials.

  8. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  9. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  10. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Cezhou; Wang, Pengfei; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density

  11. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  12. Preparation and Investigation of the Microtribological Properties of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Films via Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshou Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO films with controlled layers, deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates, were prepared by electrostatic self-assembly of negatively charged GO sheets. Afterward, graphene films were prepared by liquid-phase reduction of as-prepared GO films using hydrazine hydrate. The microstructures and microtribological properties of the samples were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, water contact angle measurement, and atomic force microscopy. It is found that, whether GO films or graphene films, the adhesion force and the coefficients of friction both show strong dependence on the number of self-assembled layers, which both allow a downward trend as the number of self-assembled layers increases due to the interlayer sliding and the puckering effect when the tip slipped across the top surface of the films. Moreover, in comparison with the GO films with the same self-assembled layers, the graphene films possess lower adhesion force and coefficient of friction attributed to the difference of surface functional groups.

  13. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our key innovation will be the use of single-layer graphene as LENA conversion foils, with appropriate microgrids and nanogrids to support the foils. Phase I...

  14. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  15. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  16. Atomic and electronic structures of divacancy in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei Jianwei [School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2012-01-15

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the electronic structures and transport properties of defective graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in the presence of pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defects. Electronic band structure results reveal that 5-8-5 defects in the defective zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) is unfavorable for electronic transport. However, such defects in the defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) give rise to smaller band gap than that in the pristine AGNR, and eventually results in semiconductor to metal-like transition. The distinct roles of 5-8-5 defects in two kinds of edged-GNR are attributed to the different coupling between {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk} and {pi} subbands influenced by the defects. Our findings indicate the possibility of a new route to improve the electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons via tailoring the atomic structures by ion irradiation.

  17. Few-layer graphene growth from polystyrene as solid carbon source utilizing simple APCVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Shahrokh; Afzalzadeh, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research article presents development of an economical, simple, immune and environment friendly process to grow few-layer graphene by controlling evaporation rate of polystyrene on copper foil as catalyst and substrate utilizing atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Evaporation rate of polystyrene depends on molecular structure, amount of used material and temperature. We have found controlling rate of evaporation of polystyrene by controlling the source temperature is easier than controlling the material weight. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as Raman Spectroscopy has been used for characterization of the layers. The frequency of G‧ to G band ratio intensity in some samples varied between 0.8 and 1.6 corresponding to few-layer graphene. Topography characterization by atomic force microscopy confirmed Raman results.

  18. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  19. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-09-21

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of ∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen-Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications.

  20. Direct visualization of atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Geng; Lu, Jianchen; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun; Lin, Xiao; Berger, Reinhard; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated atomically precise nitrogen-doped chevron-type graphene nanoribbons by using the on-surface synthesis technique combined with the nitrogen substitution of the precursors. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy indicate that the well-defined nanoribbons tend to align with the neighbors side-by-side with a band gap of 1.02 eV, which is in good agreement with the density functional theory calculation result. The influence of the high precursor coverage on the quality of the nanoribbons is also studied. We find that graphene nanoribbons with sufficient aspect ratios can only be fabricated at sub-monolayer precursor coverage. This work provides a way to construct atomically precise nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons.

  1. Formation of a highly doped ultra-thin amorphous carbon layer by ion bombardment of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotr Michałowski, Paweł; Pasternak, Iwona; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Guinea, Francisco; Strupiński, Włodek

    2018-07-01

    Ion bombardment of graphene leads to the formation of defects which may be used to tune properties of the graphene based devices. In this work, however, we present that the presence of the graphene layer on a surface of a sample has a significant impact on the ion bombardment process: broken sp2 bonds react with the incoming ions and trap them close to the surface of the sample, preventing a standard ion implantation. For an ion bombardment with a low impact energy and significant dose (in the range of 1014 atoms cm‑2) an amorphization of the graphene layer is observed but at the same time, most of the incoming ions do not penetrate the sample but stop at the surface, thus forming a highly doped ultra-thin amorphous carbon layer. The effect may be used to create thin layers containing desired atoms if no other technique is available. This approach is particularly useful for secondary ion mass spectrometry where a high concentration of Cs at the surface of a sample significantly enhances the negative ionization probability, allowing it to reach better detection limits.

  2. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  3. Nondestructive and in situ determination of graphene layers using optical fiber Fabry–Perot interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Cheng; Peng, Xiaobin; Liu, Qianwen; Fan, Shangchun; Gan, Xin; Lv, Ruitao

    2017-01-01

    Thickness measurement plays an important role for characterizing optomechanical behaviors of graphene. From the view of graphene-based Fabry–Perot (F–P) sensors, a simple, nondestructive and in situ method of determining the thickness of nanothick graphene membranes was demonstrated by using optical fiber F–P interference. Few-layer/multilayer graphene sheets were suspendedly adhered onto the endface of a ferrule with a 125 µ m inner diameter by van der Waals interactions to construct micro F–P cavities. Along with the Fresnel’s law and complex index of refraction of the membrane working as a light reflector of an F–P interferometer, the optical reflectivity of graphene was modeled to investigate the effects of light wavelength and temperature. Then the average thickness of graphene membranes were extracted by F–P interference demodulation, and yielded a very strong cross-correlation coefficient of 99.95% with the experimental results observed by Raman spectrum and atomic force microscope. The method could be further extended for determining the number of layers of other 2D materials. (paper)

  4. Adsorption of beryllium atoms and clusters both on graphene and in a bilayer of graphite investigated by DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Yves; Fernandez, Nicolas; Allouche, Alain; Linsmeier, Christian

    2013-01-09

    We herein investigate the interaction of beryllium with a graphene sheet and in a bilayer of graphite by means of periodic DFT calculations. In all cases, we find the beryllium atoms to be more weakly bonded on graphene than in the bilayer. Be(2) forms both magnetic and non-magnetic structures on graphene depending on the geometrical configuration of adsorption. We find that the stability of the Be/bilayer system increases with the size of the beryllium clusters inserted into the bilayer of graphite. We also find a charge transfer from beryllium to the graphite layers. All these results are analysed in terms of electronic structure.

  5. Intra- and inter-layer charge redistribution in biased bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Ning Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial redistribution of the electron density in bilayer graphene in the presence of an interlayer bias within density functional theory. It is found that the interlayer charge redistribution is inhomogeneous between the upper and bottom layers and the transferred charge from the upper layer to the bottom layer linearly increases with the external voltage which further makes the gap at K point linearly increase. However, the band gap will saturate to 0.29 eV in the strong-field regime, but it displays a linear field dependence at the weak-field limit. Due to the AB-stacked way, two carbon atoms per unit cell in the same layer are different and there is also a charge transfer between them, making the widths of π valence bands reduced. In the bottom layer, the charge transfers from the direct atoms which directly face another carbon atom to the indirect atoms facing the center of the hexagon on the opposite layer, while the charge transfers from the indirect atoms to the direct atoms in the upper layer. Furthermore, there is a diploe between the upper and bottom layers which results in the reduction of the interlayer hopping interaction.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  7. Chemical gating of epitaxial graphene through ultrathin oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Omiciuolo, Luca; Baraldi, Alessandro; Lizzit, Silvano

    2015-08-07

    We achieved a controllable chemical gating of epitaxial graphene grown on metal substrates by exploiting the electrostatic polarization of ultrathin SiO2 layers synthesized below it. Intercalated oxygen diffusing through the SiO2 layer modifies the metal-oxide work function and hole dopes graphene. The graphene/oxide/metal heterostructure behaves as a gated plane capacitor with the in situ grown SiO2 layer acting as a homogeneous dielectric spacer, whose high capacity allows the Fermi level of graphene to be shifted by a few hundreds of meV when the oxygen coverage at the metal substrate is of the order of 0.5 monolayers. The hole doping can be finely tuned by controlling the amount of interfacial oxygen, as well as by adjusting the thickness of the oxide layer. After complete thermal desorption of oxygen the intrinsic doping of SiO2 supported graphene is evaluated in the absence of contaminants and adventitious adsorbates. The demonstration that the charge state of graphene can be changed by chemically modifying the buried oxide/metal interface hints at the possibility of tuning the level and sign of doping by the use of other intercalants capable of diffusing through the ultrathin porous dielectric and reach the interface with the metal.

  8. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M.; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T. O.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  9. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  10. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S. [QUANTOP, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Taylor, Jacob M. [Joint Quantum Institute/NIST, College Park, Maryland 20899 (United States); Herring, Patrick K.; Cassidy, Maja C. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Charles M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  11. Metal-doped graphene layers composed with boron nitride-graphene as an insulator: a nano-capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2014-11-01

    A model of a nanoscale dielectric capacitor composed of a few dopants has been investigated in this study. This capacitor includes metallic graphene layers which are separated by an insulating medium containing a few h-BN layers. It has been observed that the elements from group IIIA of the periodic table are more suitable as dopants for hetero-structures of the {metallic graphene/hBN/metallic graphene} capacitors compared to those from groups IA or IIA. In this study, we have specifically focused on the dielectric properties of different graphene/h-BN/graphene including their hetero-structure counterparts, i.e., Boron-graphene/h-BN/Boron-graphene, Al-graphene/h-BN/Al-graphene, Mg-graphene/h-BN/Mg-graphene, and Be-graphene/h-BN/Be-graphene stacks for monolayer form of dielectrics. Moreover, we studied the multi dielectric properties of different (h-BN)n/graphene hetero-structures of Boron-graphene/(h-BN)n/Boron-graphene.

  12. Elastic Buckling Behaviour of General Multi-Layered Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ming Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elastic buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets is rigorously investigated. Van der Waals forces are modelled, to a first order approximation, as linear physical springs which connect the nodes between the layers. Critical buckling loads and their associated modes are established and analyzed under different boundary conditions, aspect ratios and compressive loading ratios in the case of graphene sheets compressed in two perpendicular directions. Various practically possible loading configurations are examined and their effect on buckling characteristics is assessed. To model more accurately the buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets, a physically more representative and realistic mixed boundary support concept is proposed and applied. For the fundamental buckling mode under mixed boundary support, the layers with different boundary supports deform similarly but non-identically, leading to resultant van der Waals bonding forces between the layers which in turn affect critical buckling load. Results are compared with existing known solutions to illustrate the excellent numerical accuracy of the proposed modelling approach. The buckling characteristics of graphene sheets presented in this paper form a comprehensive and wholesome study which can be used as potential structural design guideline when graphene sheets are employed for nano-scale sensing and actuation applications such as nano-electro-mechanical systems.

  13. Nanoscale Mechanical Characterization of Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minzhen

    Graphene materials, exhibiting outstanding mechanical properties, are excellent candidates as reinforcement in high-performance polymer nanocomposites. In this dissertation, advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are applied to study the nanomechanics of graphene/polymer nanocomposites, specifically the graphene/polymer interfacial strength and the stress transfer at the interface. Two novel methods to directly characterize the interfacial strength between individual graphene sheets and polymers using AFM are presented and applied to a series of polymers and graphene sheets. The interfacial strength of graphene/polymer varies greatly for different combinations. The strongest interaction is found between graphene oxide (GO) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a strongly polar, water-based polymer. On the other hand, polystyrene, a non polar polymer, has the weakest interaction with GO. The interfacial bond strength is attributed to hydrogen bonding and physical adsorption. Further, the stress transfer in GO/PVA nanocomposites is studied quantitatively by monitoring the strain in individual GO sheet inside the polymer via AFM and Raman spectroscopy. For the first time, the strains of individual GO sheets in nanocomposites are imaged and quantified as a function of the applied external strains. The matrix strain is directly transferred to GO sheets for strains up to 8%. At higher strain levels, the onset of the nanocomposite failure and a stick-slip behavior is observed. This study reveals that GO is superior to pure graphene as reinforcement in nanocomposites. These results also imply the potential to make a new generation of nanocomposites with exceptional high strength and toughness. In the second part of this dissertation, AFM is used to study the structure of silk proteins and the morphology of spider silks. For the first time, shear-induced self-assembly of native silk fibroin is observed. The morphology of the Brown Recluse spider silk is investigated and a

  14. Edge field emission of large-area single layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleshch, Victor I., E-mail: klesch@polly.phys.msu.ru [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bandurin, Denis A. [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Orekhov, Anton S. [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, RAS, Moscow 119333 (Russian Federation); Purcell, Stephen T. [ILM, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS, UMR 5586, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Obraztsov, Alexander N. [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu 80101 (Finland)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Stable field emission was observed from the edge of large-area graphene on quartz. • A strong hysteresis in current–voltage characteristics was observed. • The hysteresis was explained by mechanical peeling of graphene edge from substrate. • Reversible peeling of graphene edge may be used in microelectromechanical systems. - Abstract: Field electron emission from the edges of large-area (∼1 cm × 1 cm) graphene films deposited onto quartz wafers was studied. The graphene was previously grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper. An extreme enhancement of electrostatic field at the edge of the films with macroscopically large lateral dimensions and with single atom thickness was achieved. This resulted in the creation of a blade type electron emitter, providing stable field emission at low-voltage with linear current density up to 0.5 mA/cm. A strong hysteresis in current–voltage characteristics and a step-like increase of the emission current during voltage ramp up were observed. These effects were explained by the local mechanical peeling of the graphene edge from the quartz substrate by the ponderomotive force during the field emission process. Specific field emission phenomena exhibited in the experimental study are explained by a unique combination of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. Various potential applications ranging from linear electron beam sources to microelectromechanical systems are discussed.

  15. Two-dimensional carbon crystals. Electrical transport in single- and double-layer graphene; Zweidimensionale Kohlenstoffkristalle. Elektrischer Transport in Einzel- und Doppellagen-Graphen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Hennrik

    2012-02-03

    In his work atomically thin layers of carbon, socalled graphene, are investigated. These systems exhibit outstanding electronic properties which are analysed using magnetotransport measurements. For this purpose, different types of samples are prepared, analysed and discussed. In addition to conventional single layer and single crystal bilayer systems, folded flakes with twisted planes are examined. Since monolayer graphene is a two dimensional crystal in which every atom sits at the surface, it is very sensitive to any type of perturbation. Three different cases are investigated: Firstly, dopants are removed from the surface and the change in transport properties is monitored. Secondly, the regime of small carrier concentrations is used to observe field induced recharging of inhomogeneities. Thirdly, an atomic force microscope is used to alter the graphene itself in a defined region. The implications of this modification are again investigated using magnetotransport measurements. The influence of one layer on another one is studied in decoupled two layer samples. A folded sample with separatly contacted layers is used to show transport through the folded region. For jointly contacted layers parallel transport measurements are performed to analyse screening effects of an applied electric field and substrate influence. The interaction of the two layers is shown by a significant reduction of the Fermivelocity.

  16. Magnetism of a relaxed single atom vacancy in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunyi; Hu, Yonghong; Xue, Li; Sun, Tieyu; Wang, Yu

    2018-04-01

    It has been suggested in literature that defects in graphene (e.g. absorbed atoms and vacancies) may induce magnetizations due to unpaired electrons. The nature of magnetism, i.e. ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic, is dependent on a number of structural factors including locations of magnetic moments and lattice symmetry. In the present work we investigated the influence of a relaxed single atom vacancy in garphnene on magnetization which were obtained under different pinning boundary conditions, aiming to achieve a better understanding of the magnetic behaviors of graphene. Through first principles calculations, we found that major spin polarizations occur on atoms that deviate slightly from their original lattice positions, and pinning boundaries could also affect the relaxed positions of atoms and determine which atom(s) would become the main source(s) of total spin polarizations and magnetic moments. When the pinning boundary condition is free, a special non-magnetic and semi-conductive structure may be obtained, suggesting that magnetization should more readily occur under pinning boundary conditions.

  17. Improving Fire Resistance of Cotton Fabric through Layer-by-Layer Assembled Graphene Multilayer Nanocoating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Wonjun; Chung, Il Jun; Kim, Junwoo; Seo, Seongmin; Park, Yong Tae; Choi, Kyungwho

    2018-05-01

    In this study, thin films containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), stabilized with poly(4-styrene-sulfonic acid) (PSS), were assembled by a simple and cost-effective layer-by-layer (LbL) technique in order to introduce the anti-flammability to cotton. These antiflammable layers were characterized by using UV-vis spectrometry and quartz crystal microbalance as a function of the number of bilayers deposited. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the morphology of the thin film coatings on the cotton fabric. The graphene-polymer thin films introduced anti-flammable properties through thermally stable carbonaceous layers at a high temperature. The thermal stability and flame retardant property of graphene-coated cotton was demonstrated by thermogravimetric analysis, cone calorimetry, and vertical flame test. The results indicate that LbL-assembled graphene-polymer thin films can be applied largely in the field of flame retardant.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  19. Fabrication of graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yuze; Luo, Jing; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-01-01

    A novel graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer film was fabricated by electrostatic interactions induced layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using water dispersible and negatively charged chemically converted graphene (CCG) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) as building blocks. CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide, which remained carboxyl group on its surface. The remaining carboxyl groups not only retain the dispersibility of CCG, but also allow the growth of the multilayer films via electrostatic interactions between graphene and PANI. The structure and morphology of the obtained CCG/PANI multilayer film are characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrum (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical properties of the resulting film are studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which showed that the resulting CCG/PANI multilayer film kept electroactivity in neutral solution and showed outstanding cyclic stability up to 100 cycles. Furthermore, the composite film exhibited good electrocatalytic ability toward ascorbic acid (AA) with a linear response from 1×10 −4 to 1.2×10 −3 M with the detect limit of 5×10 −6 M. This study provides a facile and effective strategy to fabricate graphene/PANI nanocomposite film with good electrochemical property, which may find potential applications in electronic devices such as electrochemical sensor. - Graphical abstract: A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. - Highlights: • A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. • The water dispersible and negatively charged graphene (CCG) was used as building block. • CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide with carboxyl group on its surface. • CCG/PANI film kept electroactivity in

  20. Fabrication of graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yuze; Luo, Jing, E-mail: jingluo19801007@126.com; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-10-15

    A novel graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer film was fabricated by electrostatic interactions induced layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using water dispersible and negatively charged chemically converted graphene (CCG) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) as building blocks. CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide, which remained carboxyl group on its surface. The remaining carboxyl groups not only retain the dispersibility of CCG, but also allow the growth of the multilayer films via electrostatic interactions between graphene and PANI. The structure and morphology of the obtained CCG/PANI multilayer film are characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrum (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical properties of the resulting film are studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which showed that the resulting CCG/PANI multilayer film kept electroactivity in neutral solution and showed outstanding cyclic stability up to 100 cycles. Furthermore, the composite film exhibited good electrocatalytic ability toward ascorbic acid (AA) with a linear response from 1×10{sup −4} to 1.2×10{sup −3} M with the detect limit of 5×10{sup −6} M. This study provides a facile and effective strategy to fabricate graphene/PANI nanocomposite film with good electrochemical property, which may find potential applications in electronic devices such as electrochemical sensor. - Graphical abstract: A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. - Highlights: • A novel graphene/polyaniline (CCG/PANI) film was prepared by layer-by-layer assembly. • The water dispersible and negatively charged graphene (CCG) was used as building block. • CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide with carboxyl group on its surface. • CCG/PANI film kept

  1. Graphene oxide layers modified by light energetic ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Mikšová, Romana; Kováčiková, Helena; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Luxa, J.; Bouša, D.; Štrochová, B.; Sofer, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 16 (2017), s. 10282-10291 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-05167S; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : graphene oxide * reduction * irradiation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  2. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  3. Vibrational analysis of single-layered graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhaee-Pour, A; Ahmadian, M T [Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation (CEDRA), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghdabadi, R [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Nano Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sakhaee@alum.sharif.edu, E-mail: naghdabd@sharif.edu

    2008-02-27

    A molecular structural mechanics method has been implemented to investigate the vibrational behavior of single-layered graphene sheets. By adopting this approach, mode shapes and natural frequencies are obtained. Vibrational analysis is performed with different chirality and boundary conditions. Numerical results from the atomistic modeling are employed to develop predictive equations via a statistical nonlinear regression model. With the proposed equations, fundamental frequencies of single-layered graphene sheets with considered boundary conditions can be predicted within 3% difference with respect to the atomistic simulation.

  4. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  5. Plasmon resonance in single- and double-layer CVD graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Di; Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting Fung

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015.......Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015....

  6. Synthesis and characterization of graphene layers prepared by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition using triphenylphosphine as precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrapa, G.C.; Maia da Costa, M.E.H. Maia [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Larrude, D.G., E-mail: dunigl@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, F.L. [Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, 22451-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brazilian Center for Physical Research, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    The synthesis of a single-layer graphene using a low-pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system with triphenylphosphine as precursor is reported. The amount of triphenylphosphine used as precursor was in the range of 10–40 mg. Raman spectroscopy was employed to analyze samples prepared with 10 mg of the precursor, and these spectra were found typical of graphene. The Raman measurements indicate that the progressive degradation of graphene occurs as the amount of triphenylphosphine increases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the different chemical environments involving carbon and phosphorous atoms. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also employed and the results reveal the formation of dispersed nanostructures on top of the graphene layer, In addition, the number of these nanostructures is directly related to the amount of precursor used for sample growth. - Highlights: • We grow graphene using the solid precursor triphenylphosphine. • Raman analysis confirms the presence of monolayer graphene. • SEM images show the presence of small dark areas dispersed on the graphene surface. • Raman I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio increases in the dark region of the graphene surface.

  7. Nanomechanical mapping of graphene layers and interfaces in suspended graphene nanostructures grown via carbon diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, B.J. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Rabot, C. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Mazzocco, R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Delamoreanu, A. [Microelectronics Technology Laboratory (LTM), Joseph Fourier University, French National Research Center (CNRS), 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Zenasni, A. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Kolosov, O.V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Graphene's remarkable mechanical, electronic and thermal properties are strongly determined by both the mechanism of its growth and its interaction with the underlying substrate. Evidently, in order to explore the fundamentals of these mechanisms, efficient nanoscale methods that enable observation of features hidden underneath the immediate surface are needed. In this paper we use nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy that employs MHz frequency range ultrasonic vibrations and allows the observation of surface composition and subsurface interfaces with nanoscale resolution, to elucidate the morphology of few layer graphene (FLG) films produced via a recently reported method of carbon diffusion growth (CDG) on platinum-metal based substrate. CDG is known to result in FLG suspended over large areas, which could be of high importance for graphene transfer and applications where a standalone graphene film is required. This study directly reveals the detailed mechanism of CDG three-dimensional growth and FLG film detachment, directly linking the level of graphene decoupling with variations of the substrate temperature during the annealing phase of growth. We also show that graphene initially and preferentially decouples at the substrate grain boundaries, likely due to its negative expansion coefficient at cooling, forming characteristic “nano-domes” at the intersections of the grain boundaries. Furthermore, quantitative nanomechanical mapping of flexural stiffness of suspended FLG “nano-domes” using kHz frequency range force modulation microscopy uncovers the progression of “nano-dome” stiffness from single to bi-modal distribution as CDG growth progresses, suggesting growth instability at advanced CDG stages. - Highlights: • Exploring growth and film-substrate decoupling in carbon diffusion grown graphene • Nanomechanical mapping of few layer graphene and graphene–substrate interfaces • Quantitative stiffness mapping of

  8. Raman spectroscopy of few-layer graphene prepared by C2–C6 cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, Z.D.; Huang, Z.H.; Liu, C.S.; Fu, D.J.; Liu, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Few-layer graphene has been prepared on 300 nm-thick Ni films by C 2 –C 6 cluster ion implantation at 20 keV/cluster. Raman spectroscopy reveals significant influence of the number of atoms in the cluster, the implantation dose, and thermal treatment on the structure of the graphene layers. In particular, the graphene samples exhibit a sharp G peak at 1584 cm −1 and 2D peaks at 2711–2717 cm −1 . The I G /I 2D ratios higher than 1.70 and I G /I D ratio as high as 1.95 confirm that graphene sheets with low density of defects have been synthesized with much improved quality by ion implantation with larger clusters of C 4 –C 6

  9. Layer-by-layer evolution of structure, strain, and activity for the oxygen evolution reaction in graphene-templated Pt monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ali; Vitale, Adam; Joiner, Corey; Vogel, Eric; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2015-03-25

    In this study, we explore the dimensional aspect of structure-driven surface properties of metal monolayers grown on a graphene/Au template. Here, surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) is used to provide precise layer-by-layer growth of Pt monolayers on graphene. We find that after a few iterations of SLRR, fully wetted 4-5 monolayer Pt films can be grown on graphene. Incorporating graphene at the Pt-Au interface modifies the growth mechanism, charge transfers, equilibrium interatomic distances, and associated strain of the synthesized Pt monolayers. We find that a single layer of sandwiched graphene is able to induce a 3.5% compressive strain on the Pt adlayer grown on it, and as a result, catalytic activity is increased due to a greater areal density of the Pt layers beyond face-centered-cubic close packing. At the same time, the sandwiched graphene does not obstruct vicinity effects of near-surface electron exchange between the substrate Au and adlayers Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques are used to examine charge mediation across the Pt-graphene-Au junction and the local atomic arrangement as a function of the Pt adlayer dimension. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are used as probes to examine the electrochemically active area of Pt monolayers and catalyst activity, respectively. Results show that the inserted graphene monolayer results in increased activity for the Pt due to a graphene-induced compressive strain, as well as a higher resistance against loss of the catalytically active Pt surface.

  10. Hydration layers trapped between graphene and a hydrophilic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmen, M; Reichling, M; Bollmann, T R J; Ochedowski, O; Schleberger, M

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is mechanically exfoliated on CaF 2 (111) under ambient conditions. We demonstrate the formation of a several monolayer thick hydration layer on the hydrophilic substrate and its response to annealing at temperatures up to 750 K in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Upon heating, water is released, however, it is impossible to remove the first layer. The initially homogeneous film separates into water-containing and water-free domains by two-dimensional Ostwald ripening. Upon severe heating, thick graphene multilayers undergo rupture, while nanoblisters confining sealed water appear on thinner sheets, capable of the storage and release of material. From modeling the dimensions of the nanoblisters, we estimate the graphene/CaF 2 (111) interfacial adhesion energy to be 0.33±0.13 J m −2 , thereby viable for polymer-assisted transfer printing. (paper)

  11. Science and Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0067 Science & Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices Angel Rubio UNIVERSIDAD DEL PAIS VASCO - EUSKAL...DD-MM-YYYY)      27-09-2017 2.  REPORT TYPE      Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      19 Feb 2015 to 18 Feb 2017 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Science ...reporting documents for AOARD project 144088, “2D Materials and Devices Beyond Graphene Science & Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and

  12. Development of Biosensors From Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑞红; 孙红; 李霄寒; 于冲

    2017-01-01

    Graphene's success has stimulated great interest and research in the synthesis and characterization of graphene -like 2D materials, single and few -atom -thick layers of van der Waals materials, which show fascinating and technologically useful properties.This review presents an overview of recent electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on graphene and on graphene-like 2D materials.

  13. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  14. Production of High-quality Few-layer Graphene Flakes by Intercalation and Exfoliation

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Areej A.

    2017-11-30

    Graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial, has been given much attention since it was first isolated in 2004. Driving this intensive research effort are the unique properties of this one atom thick sheet of carbon, in particular its electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. While the technological applications proposed for graphene abound, its low-cost production in large scales is still a matter of interrogation. Simple methods to obtain few-layered graphene flakes of high structural quality are being investigated with the exfoliation of graphite taking a prominent place in this arena. From the many suggested approaches, the most promising involve the use of liquid media assisted by intercalants and shear forces acting on the basal layers of graphite. In this thesis, it is discussed how a novel method was developed to produce flakes with consistent lateral dimensions that are also few-layered and retain the expected structural and chemical characteristics of graphene. Here, the source material was a commercially available graphiteintercalated compound, also known as expandable graphite. Several exfoliation-inducing tools were investigated including the use of blenders, homogenizers, and ultrasonic processors. To aid in this process, various solvents and intercalants were explored under different reactive conditions. The more efficient approach in yielding defect-free thin flakes was the use of thermally expanded graphite in boiling dimethylformamide followed by ultrasonic processing and centrifugation. In parallel, a method to fraction the flakes as a function of their lateral size was developed. Ultimately, it was possible to obtain samples of graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of a few micrometers (<5 μm) and thickness of 1-3 nm (i.e. <10 layers).

  15. He/Ar-atom scattering from molecular monolayers: C{sub 60}/Pt(111) and graphene/Pt(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y; Sugawara, C; Satake, Y; Yokoyama, Y; Okada, R; Nakayama, T; Sasaki, M [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kondo, T; Oh, J; Nakamura, J [Institute of Material Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayes, W W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    Supersonic He and Ar atomic beam scattering from C{sub 60} and graphene monolayers adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface are demonstrated in order to obtain detailed insight into a gas-molecule collision that has not been studied in detail so far. The effective masses and phonon spectral densities of the monolayers seen by different projectiles are discussed based on classical models such as the hard cube model and the recently developed smooth surface model. Large effective masses are deduced for both the monolayers, suggesting collective effects of surface atoms in the single collision event. The effective Debye temperature of graphene was found to be similar to that reported in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), indicating that the graphene is decoupled well from the Pt substrate. A much smaller Debye-Waller factor was found for the C{sub 60} layer, probably reflecting the strong C{sub 60}-Pt(111) interaction.

  16. Adsorption of Cu, Ag, and Au atoms on graphene including van der Waals interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amft, Martin; Eriksson, Olle; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Lebegue, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    We performed a systematic density functional (DF) study of the adsorption of copper, silver, and gold adatoms on pristine graphene, especially accounting for van der Waals (vdW) interactions by the vdW-DF and PBE + D2 methods. In particular, we analyze the preferred adsorption site (among top, bridge, and hollow positions) together with the corresponding distortion of the graphene sheet and identify diffusion paths. Both vdW schemes show that the coinage metal atoms do bind to the graphene sheet and that in some cases the buckling of the graphene layer can be significant. Only the results for silver are qualitatively at variance with those obtained with the generalized gradient approximation, which gives no binding in this case. However in all three cases, we observe some quantitative differences between the vdW-DF and PBE + D2 methods. For instance the adsorption energies calculated with the PBE + D2 method are systematically higher than the ones obtained with vdW-DF. Moreover, the equilibrium distances computed with PBE + D2 are shorter than those calculated with the vdW-DF method. (paper)

  17. Predicting synergy in atomic layer etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Tan, Samantha [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yang, Wenbing [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kim, Taeseung [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Lill, Thorsten [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kabansky, Alexander [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Hudson, Eric A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Ohba, Tomihito [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Nojiri, Kazuo [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yu, Jengyi [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Wise, Rich [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Berry, Ivan L. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Pan, Yang [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Marks, Jeffrey [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a multistep process used today in manufacturing for removing ultrathin layers of material. In this article, the authors report on ALE of Si, Ge, C, W, GaN, and SiO2 using a directional (anisotropic) plasma-enhanced approach. The authors analyze these systems by defining an “ALE synergy” parameter which quantifies the degree to which a process approaches the ideal ALE regime. This parameter is inspired by the ion-neutral synergy concept introduced in the 1979 paper by Coburn and Winters. ALE synergy is related to the energetics of underlying surface interactions and is understood in terms of energy criteria for the energy barriers involved in the reactions. Synergistic behavior is observed for all of the systems studied, with each exhibiting behavior unique to the reactant–material combination. By systematically studying atomic layer etching of a group of materials, the authors show that ALE synergy scales with the surface binding energy of the bulk material. This insight explains why some materials are more or less amenable to the directional ALE approach. Furthermore, they conclude that ALE is both simpler to understand than conventional plasma etch processing and is applicable to metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics.

  18. Tuning the electronic structure of graphene through alkali metal and halogen atom intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sohail; Miró, Pere; Audiffred, Martha; Heine, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    The deposition, intercalation and co-intercalation of heavy alkali metals and light halogens atoms in graphene mono- and bilayers have been studied using first principles density-functional calculations. Both the deposition and the intercalation of alkali metals gives rise to n-type doping due to the formation of M+-C- pairs. The co-intercalation of a 1:1 ratio of alkali metals and halogens derives into the formation of ionic pairs among the intercalated species, unaltering the electronic structure of the layered material.

  19. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by ...

  20. Short-channel field-effect transistors with 9-atom and 13-atom wide graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, Juan Pablo; Fairbrother, Andrew; Borin Barin, Gabriela; Shi, Wu; Lee, Kyunghoon; Wu, Shuang; Yong Choi, Byung; Braganza, Rohit; Lear, Jordan; Kau, Nicholas; Choi, Wonwoo; Chen, Chen; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Dumslaff, Tim; Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fischer, Felix; Zettl, Alex; Ruffieux, Pascal; Yablonovitch, Eli; Crommie, Michael; Fasel, Roman; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-09-21

    Bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons and graphene nanoribbon heterostructures have promising electronic properties for high-performance field-effect transistors and ultra-low power devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors. However, the short length and wide band gap of these graphene nanoribbons have prevented the fabrication of devices with the desired performance and switching behavior. Here, by fabricating short channel (L ch  ~ 20 nm) devices with a thin, high-κ gate dielectric and a 9-atom wide (0.95 nm) armchair graphene nanoribbon as the channel material, we demonstrate field-effect transistors with high on-current (I on  > 1 μA at V d  = -1 V) and high I on /I off  ~ 10 5 at room temperature. We find that the performance of these devices is limited by tunneling through the Schottky barrier at the contacts and we observe an increase in the transparency of the barrier by increasing the gate field near the contacts. Our results thus demonstrate successful fabrication of high-performance short-channel field-effect transistors with bottom-up synthesized armchair graphene nanoribbons.Graphene nanoribbons show promise for high-performance field-effect transistors, however they often suffer from short lengths and wide band gaps. Here, the authors use a bottom-up synthesis approach to fabricate 9- and 13-atom wide ribbons, enabling short-channel transistors with 10 5 on-off current ratio.

  1. Ion-ion correlations across and between electrified graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Morales, Trinidad; Burbano, Mario; Haefele, Matthieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Salanne, Mathieu

    2018-05-01

    When an ionic liquid adsorbs onto a porous electrode, its ionic arrangement is deeply modified due to a screening of the Coulombic interactions by the metallic surface and by the confinement imposed upon it by the electrode's morphology. In particular, ions of the same charge can approach at close contact, leading to the formation of a superionic state. The impact of an electrified surface placed between two liquid phases is much less understood. Here we simulate a full supercapacitor made of the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and nanoporous graphene electrodes, with varying distances between the graphene sheets. The electrodes are held at constant potential by allowing the carbon charges to fluctuate. Under strong confinement conditions, we show that ions of the same charge tend to adsorb in front of each other across the graphene plane. These correlations are allowed by the formation of a highly localized image charge on the carbon atoms between the ions. They are suppressed in larger pores, when the liquid adopts a bilayer structure between the graphene sheets. These effects are qualitatively similar to the recent templating effects which have been reported during the growth of nanocrystals on a graphene substrate.

  2. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Minglei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Tang, Wencheng, E-mail: 101000185@seu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Ren, Qingqiang [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, Hunan (China); Wang, Sake [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, Jiangsu (China); JinYu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Du, Yanhui [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Yajun [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption of Be and Mg adatoms on graphene is physisorption. • Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms bond ionically to graphene and the most stable adsorption site for them is hollow site. • The zero band gap semiconductor graphene becomes metallic and magnetic after the adsorption of Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms. - Abstract: Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  3. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Minglei; Tang, Wencheng; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; JinYu; Du, Yanhui; Zhang, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The adsorption of Be and Mg adatoms on graphene is physisorption. • Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms bond ionically to graphene and the most stable adsorption site for them is hollow site. • The zero band gap semiconductor graphene becomes metallic and magnetic after the adsorption of Ca, Sr, and Ba adatoms. - Abstract: Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  4. Electrochemical double-layer capacitors based on functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Michael Allan

    Graphene is a promising electrode material for electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) used for energy storage due to its high electrical conductivity and theoretical specific surface area. However, the intrinsic capacitance of graphene is known to be low and governed by the electronic side of the interface. Furthermore, graphene tends to aggregate and stack together when processed into thick electrode films. This significantly lowers the ion-accessible specific surface area (SSA). Maximizing both the SSA and the intrinsic capacitance are the main problems addressed in this thesis in an effort to improve the specific capacitance and energy density of EDLCs. In contrast to pristine graphene, functionalized graphene produced by the thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide contains residual functional groups and lattice defects. To study how these properties affect the double-layer capacitance, a model electrode system capable of measuring the intrinsic electrochemical properties of functionalized graphene was developed. To prevent artifacts and uncertainties related to measurements on porous electrodes, the functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) were assembled as densely tiled monolayers using a Langmuir-Blodgett technique. In this way, charging can be studied in a well-defined 2D geometry. The possibility of measuring and isolating the intrinsic electrochemical properties of FGS monolayers was first demonstrated by comparing capacitance and redox probe measurements carried out on coatings deposited on passivated gold and single crystal graphite substrates. This monolayer system was then used to follow the double-layer capacitance of the FGS/electrolyte interface as the structure and chemistry of graphene was varied by thermal treatments ranging from 300 °C to 2100 °C. Elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the resulting chemical and structural transformation upon heat treatment. It was demonstrated that intrinsically defective

  5. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Babita, E-mail: babitabaghla15@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147002 (India); Jindal, V.K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Dharamvir, Keya, E-mail: keya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption and diffusion of Li atom across the B/N doped monovacancy graphene is studied using ab-initio DFT calculations. Our results show that bonding mechanism and binding of Li with graphene can be tuned with the help of N/B doping of defects. Also, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for lithium ion batteries as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Density

  6. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Babita; Jindal, V.K.; Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption and diffusion of Li atom across the B/N doped monovacancy graphene is studied using ab-initio DFT calculations. Our results show that bonding mechanism and binding of Li with graphene can be tuned with the help of N/B doping of defects. Also, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for lithium ion batteries as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Density

  7. Negative Differential Resistance in Atomic Carbon Chain-Graphene Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Liping; Liu Chunmei; Liu Nianhua

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of atomic carbon chain-graphene junctions by using the density-functional theory combining with the non-equilibrium Green's functions. The results show that the transport properties are sensitively dependent on the contact geometry of carbon chain. From the calculated I-V curve we find negative differential resistance (NDR) in the two types of junctions. The NDR can be considered as a result of molecular orbitals moving related to the bias window. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Durable Corrosion Resistance of Copper Due to Multi-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Tiwari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin graphene coating has been reported to provide considerable resistance against corrosion during short-term exposures, however, there is great variability in the corrosion resistance due to graphene coating in different studies. It may be possible to overcome the problem of hampered corrosion protection ability of graphene that is caused due to defective single layer graphene by applying multilayer graphene. Systematic electrochemical characterization showed that the multilayer graphene coating developed in the study provided significant corrosion resistance in a chloride solution and the corrosion resistance was sustained for long durations (~400 h, which is attributed to the multilayer graphene.

  9. Femtosecond laser patterning, synthesis, defect formation, and structural modification of atomic layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes recent research on laser-based processing of twodimensional (2D) atomic layered materials, including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Ultrafast lasers offer unique processing routes that take advantage of distinct interaction mechanisms with 2D materials to enable extremely localized energy deposition. Experiments have shown that ablative direct patterning of graphene by ultrafast lasers can achieve resolutions of tens of nanometers, as well as single-step pattern transfer. Ultrafast lasers also induce non-thermal excitation mechanisms that are useful for the thinning of TMDCs to tune the 2D material bandgap. Laser-assisted site-specific doping was recently demonstrated where ultrafast laser radiation under ambient air environment could be used for the direct writing of high-quality graphene patterns on insulating substrates. This article concludes with an outlook towards developing further advanced laser processing with scalability, in situ monitoring strategies and potential applications.

  10. Permeability of two-dimensional graphene and hexagonal-boron nitride to hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ankit; Ray, Nirat

    2018-05-01

    The permeability of atomic hydrogen in monolayer hexagonal Boron Nitride(h-BN) and graphene has been studied using first-principles density functional theory based simulations. For the specific cases of physisorption and chemisoroption, barrier heights are calculated using the nudged elastic band approach. We find that the barrier potential for physisorption through the ring is lower for graphene than h-BN. In the case of chemisorption, where the H atom passes through by making bonds with the atoms in the ring, the barrier potential for the graphene was found to be higher than that of h-BN. We conclude that the penetration of H atom with notable kinetic energy (graphene as compared to h-BN. Whereas through chemisorption, lower kinetic energy (>3eV) H-atoms have a higher chance to penetrate through h-BN than graphene.

  11. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen; Jou, Shyankay; Chen, Guan-Yu; Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  12. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jou, Shyankay, E-mail: sjou@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  13. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons

  14. Spatial atomic layer deposition: a route towards further industrialization of atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.; Cameron, D.C.; Dickey, E.; George, S.M.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Parsons, G.N.; Roozeboom, F.; Sundaram, G.; Vermeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial atomic layer deposition can be used as a high-throughput manufacturing technique in functional thin film deposition for applications such as flexible electronics. This; however, requires low-temperature processing and handling of flexible substrates. The authors investigate the process

  15. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  16. Electrostatic force microscopy and electrical isolation of etched few-layer graphene nano-domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunley, D. Patrick; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Boland, Mathias J.; Strachan, Douglas R., E-mail: doug.strachan@uky.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Nanostructured bi-layer graphene samples formed through catalytic etching are investigated with electrostatic force microscopy. The measurements and supporting computations show a variation in the microscopy signal for different nano-domains that are indicative of changes in capacitive coupling related to their small sizes. Abrupt capacitance variations detected across etch tracks indicates that the nano-domains have strong electrical isolation between them. Comparison of the measurements to a resistor-capacitor model indicates that the resistance between two bi-layer graphene regions separated by an approximately 10 nm wide etch track is greater than about 1×10{sup 12} Ω with a corresponding gap resistivity greater than about 3×10{sup 14} Ω⋅nm. This extremely large gap resistivity suggests that catalytic etch tracks within few-layer graphene samples are sufficient for providing electrical isolation between separate nano-domains that could permit their use in constructing atomically thin nanogap electrodes, interconnects, and nanoribbons.

  17. Electrostatic force microscopy and electrical isolation of etched few-layer graphene nano-domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunley, D. Patrick; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Boland, Mathias J.; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured bi-layer graphene samples formed through catalytic etching are investigated with electrostatic force microscopy. The measurements and supporting computations show a variation in the microscopy signal for different nano-domains that are indicative of changes in capacitive coupling related to their small sizes. Abrupt capacitance variations detected across etch tracks indicates that the nano-domains have strong electrical isolation between them. Comparison of the measurements to a resistor-capacitor model indicates that the resistance between two bi-layer graphene regions separated by an approximately 10 nm wide etch track is greater than about 1×10 12  Ω with a corresponding gap resistivity greater than about 3×10 14  Ω⋅nm. This extremely large gap resistivity suggests that catalytic etch tracks within few-layer graphene samples are sufficient for providing electrical isolation between separate nano-domains that could permit their use in constructing atomically thin nanogap electrodes, interconnects, and nanoribbons

  18. One-Pot Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Graphene/Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) Nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil P Lonkar; Jean-Marie Raquez; Philippe Dubois

    2015-01-01

    A facile and rapid method to synthesize graphene/layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanohybrids by a micro-wave technique is demonstrated. The synthesis procedure involves hydrothermal crystallization of Zn–Al LDH at the same time in situ reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to graphene. The microstructure, composition, and morphology of the resulting graphene/LDH nanohybrids were characterized. The results confirmed the formation of nanohybrids and the reduction of graphene oxide. The growth mechanism of LDH and in situ reduction of GO were discussed. The LDH sheet growth was found to prevent the scrolling of graphene layers in resulting hybrids. The electrochemical properties exhibit superior performance for graphene/Zn–Al LDH hybrids over pristine graphene. The present approach may open a strategy in hybridizing graphene with multimetallic nano-oxides and hydroxides using microwave method.

  19. One-Pot Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Graphene/Layered Double Hydroxide(LDH) Nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil P.Lonkar; Jean-Marie Raquez; Philippe Dubois

    2015-01-01

    A facile and rapid method to synthesize graphene/layered double hydroxide(LDH)nanohybrids by a microwave technique is demonstrated.The synthesis procedure involves hydrothermal crystallization of Zn–Al LDH at the same time in situ reduction of graphene oxide(GO)to graphene.The microstructure,composition,and morphology of the resulting graphene/LDH nanohybrids were characterized.The results confirmed the formation of nanohybrids and the reduction of graphene oxide.The growth mechanism of LDH and in situ reduction of GO were discussed.The LDH sheet growth was found to prevent the scrolling of graphene layers in resulting hybrids.The electrochemical properties exhibit superior performance for graphene/Zn–Al LDH hybrids over pristine graphene.The present approach may open a strategy in hybridizing graphene with multimetallic nano-oxides and hydroxides using microwave method.

  20. Clean Nanotube Unzipping by Abrupt Thermal Expansion of Molecular Nitrogen: Graphene Nanoribbons with Atomically Smooth Edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Terrones, M. [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Endo, M [Shinshu University; Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio [IPICyT; Kim, Y A [Shinshu University; Morelos-Bomez, Aaron [Shinshu University; Vega-Diaz, Sofia [Shinshu University

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel physicochemical route to produce highly crystalline nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons. The technique consists of an abrupt N2 gas expansion within the hollow core of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNx-MWNTs) when exposed to a fast thermal shock. The multiwalled nanotube unzipping mechanism is rationalized using molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations, which highlight the importance of open-ended nanotubes in promoting the efficient introduction of N2 molecules by capillary action within tubes and surface defects, thus triggering an efficient and atomically smooth unzipping. The so-produced nanoribbons could be few-layered (from graphene bilayer onward) and could exhibit both crystalline zigzag and armchair edges. In contrast to methods developed previously, our technique presents various advantages: (1) the tubes are not heavily oxidized; (2) the method yields sharp atomic edges within the resulting nanoribbons; (3) the technique could be scaled up for the bulk production of crystalline nanoribbons from available MWNT sources; and (4) this route could eventually be used to unzip other types of carbon nanotubes or intercalated layered materials such as BN, MoS2, WS2, etc.

  1. Graphene growth by transfer-free chemical vapour deposition on a cobalt layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháč, Petr; Hejna, Ondřej; Slepička, Petr

    2017-01-01

    The contribution deals with the preparation of graphene films by a transfer-free chemical vapour deposition process utilizing a thin cobalt layer. This method allows growing graphene directly on a dielectric substrate. The process was carried out in a cold-wall reactor with methane as carbon precursor. We managed to prepare bilayer graphene. The best results were obtained for a structure with a cobalt layer with a thickness of 50 nm. The quality of prepared graphene films and of the number of graphene layers were estimated using Raman spectroscopy. with a minimal dots diameter of 180 nm and spacing of 1000 nm were successfully developed.

  2. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  3. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  4. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect...... for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...

  5. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, T.; Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M.; Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch.; Saukkonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2–1 μm) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness (∼ 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu 3 Cp) 2 , Ti(OMe) 4 and O 3 precursors at 250 °C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO 2 /Si ∅200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 °C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {001} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {111} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O 3 ) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: ► Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. ► Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2–1 μm wide. ► Most STO grains were {001} oriented.

  6. Tungsten atomic layer deposition on polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); McCormick, J.A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); Cavanagh, A.S. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Goldstein, D.N. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Weimer, A.W. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); George, S.M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States)], E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu

    2008-07-31

    Tungsten (W) atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated on a variety of polymer films and polymer particles. These polymers included polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene and polymethylmethacrylate. The W ALD was performed at 80 {sup o}C using WF{sub 6} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} as the gas phase reactants. W ALD on flat polymer films can eventually nucleate and grow after more than 60 AB cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of W ALD on polystyrene after 50 AB cycles suggested that tungsten nanoclusters are present in the W ALD nucleation regime. The W ALD nucleation is greatly facilitated by a few cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. W ALD films were grown at 80 {sup o}C on spin-coated polymers on silicon wafers after 10 AB cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The W ALD film was observed to grow linearly with a growth rate of 3.9 A per AB cycle on the polymer films treated with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD seed layer. The W ALD films displayed an excellent, mirror-like optical reflectivity. The resistivity was 100-400 {mu}{omega} cm for W ALD films with thicknesses from 95-845 A. W ALD was also observed on polymer particles after W ALD in a rotary reactor. Without the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD seed layer, the nucleation of W ALD directly on the polymer particles at 80 {sup o}C required > 50 AB cycles. In contrast, the polymer particles treated with only 5 AB cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD were observed to blacken after 25 AB cycles of W ALD. W ALD on polymers may have applications for flexible optical mirrors, electromagnetic interference shielding and gas diffusion barriers.

  7. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  8. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  9. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  10. Electrochemistry at the edge of a single graphene layer in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Sutanuka; Shim, Jeong; Rivera, J.

    2013-01-01

    We study the electrochemistry of single layer graphene edges using a nanopore-based structure consisting of stacked graphene and AlO dielectric layers. Nanopores, with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm, are formed by an electron beam sculpting process on the stacked layers. This leads to a unique...

  11. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by PECVD system at a low temperature of 600 °C. • From different characterization techniques, the presence of single and few layered graphene was confirmed. • X-ray diffraction pattern of the graphene showed single crystalline nature of the film. • The as-grown graphene films were observed extremely good field emitters with long term emission current stability. - Abstract: In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  12. A X-ray diffraction analysis on graphene layers of Assam coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, B.K.; Boruah, R.K.; Gogoi, P.K. [CSIR, Jorhat (India)

    2009-01-15

    The so-called turbostatic structure of carbons in coal with randomly oriented stacking of the lamellae (graphene) produces intense peaks, which are the dominant features in its X-ray diffraction profiles. The diffractogram may be conveniently divided into two regions of reciprocal space, the medium S region (1 < S < 3 {angstrom}) and a high S region (S > 3 {angstrom}) where S = 4 {pi} {lambda} {sup -1}sin{theta}. To better understand the molecular level structure of high sulphur Assam coal, two coal samples (Tirap-1 and Tirap-2) from Tirap colliery of Makum coalfield, Assam (India) has been interpreted in this study by using the X-ray diffraction profiles. Random layered (graphene) structural parameters of these coals were determined by using X-ray diffraction technique, which showed that the L{sub a} and L{sub c} are 64.99 angstrom and 22.63 angstrom for Tirap-2 and 55.54 angstrom and 23.80 angstrom for that of Tirap-1 coals respectively. The position of {gamma} band was found to be at 4.34 {angstrom} and 4.13 angstrom for Tirap-2 and Tirap-1 coals respectively. The number of layers and average number of carbon atoms (N) per aromatic graphene were found to be 21 and 8 for both the coal samples. Proximate, ultimate and ash analysis of the two coal samples were also carried out in this investigation.

  13. Fabrication of graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer films by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jiaojiao; Chen, Yuze; Luo, Jing; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-10-01

    A novel graphene/polyaniline composite multilayer film was fabricated by electrostatic interactions induced layer-by-layer self-assembly technique, using water dispersible and negatively charged chemically converted graphene (CCG) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) as building blocks. CCG was achieved through partly reduced graphene oxide, which remained carboxyl group on its surface. The remaining carboxyl groups not only retain the dispersibility of CCG, but also allow the growth of the multilayer films via electrostatic interactions between graphene and PANI. The structure and morphology of the obtained CCG/PANI multilayer film are characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical properties of the resulting film are studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), which showed that the resulting CCG/PANI multilayer film kept electroactivity in neutral solution and showed outstanding cyclic stability up to 100 cycles. Furthermore, the composite film exhibited good electrocatalytic ability toward ascorbic acid (AA) with a linear response from 1×10-4 to 1.2×10-3 M with the detect limit of 5×10-6 M. This study provides a facile and effective strategy to fabricate graphene/PANI nanocomposite film with good electrochemical property, which may find potential applications in electronic devices such as electrochemical sensor.

  14. Fabrication of bi-layer graphene and theoretical simulation for its possible application in thin film solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Sanjay K; Mahala, Pramila; Nayak, Sasmita; Yang, Qiaoqin; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit; Janil, Omkar

    2014-04-01

    High quality graphene film is fabricated using mechanical exfoliation of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. The graphene films on glass substrates are characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A very high intensity ratio of 2D to G-band (to approximately 1.67) and narrow 2D-band full-width at half maximum (to approximately 40 cm(-1)) correspond to the bi-layer graphene formation. The bi-layer graphene/p-GaN/n-InGaN/n-GaN/GaN/sAl2O3 system is studied theoretically using TCAD Silvaco software, in which the properties of exfoliated bi-layer graphene are used as transparent and conductive film, and the device exhibits an efficiency of 15.24% compared to 13.63% for ITO/p-GaN/n-InGaN/n-GaN/GaN/Al2O3 system.

  15. Atomically precise graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions from a single molecular precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Omrani, Arash A.; Marangoni, Tomas; Wu, Meng; Rizzo, Daniel J.; Rodgers, Griffin F.; Cloke, Ryan R.; Durr, Rebecca A.; Sakai, Yuki; Liou, Franklin; Aikawa, Andrew S.; Chelikowsky, James R.; Louie, Steven G.; Fischer, Felix R.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2017-11-01

    The rational bottom-up synthesis of atomically defined graphene nanoribbon (GNR) heterojunctions represents an enabling technology for the design of nanoscale electronic devices. Synthetic strategies used thus far have relied on the random copolymerization of two electronically distinct molecular precursors to yield GNR heterojunctions. Here we report the fabrication and electronic characterization of atomically precise GNR heterojunctions prepared through late-stage functionalization of chevron GNRs obtained from a single precursor. Post-growth excitation of fully cyclized GNRs induces cleavage of sacrificial carbonyl groups, resulting in atomically well-defined heterojunctions within a single GNR. The GNR heterojunction structure was characterized using bond-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy, which enables chemical bond imaging at T = 4.5 K. Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy reveals that band alignment across the heterojunction interface yields a type II heterojunction, in agreement with first-principles calculations. GNR heterojunction band realignment proceeds over a distance less than 1 nm, leading to extremely large effective fields.

  16. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Kirchheim, Reiner; Pundt, Astrid A.

    2012-01-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nature of the surface states at the single-layer graphene/Cu(111) and graphene/polycrystalline-Cu interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliara, S.; Tognolini, S.; Bignardi, L.; Galimberti, G.; Achilli, S.; Trioni, M. I.; van Dorp, W. F.; Ocelik, V.; Rudolf, P.; Parmigiani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-layer graphene supported on a metal surface has shown remarkable properties relevant for novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the nature of the electronic states derived from unoccupied surface states and quantum well states, lying in the real-space gap between the graphene

  19. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, X; Zhou, Jian; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  20. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, X

    2017-04-25

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  1. Local electric field screening in bi-layer graphene devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal ePanchal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present experimental studies of both local and macroscopic electrical effects in uniform single- (1LG and bi-layer graphene (2LG devices as well as in devices with non-uniform graphene coverage, under ambient conditions. DC transport measurements on sub-micron scale Hall bar devices were used to show a linear rise in carrier density with increasing amounts of 2LG coverage. Electrical scanning gate microscopy was used to locally top gate uniform and non-uniform devices in order to observe the effect of local electrical gating. We experimentally show a significant level of electric field screening by 2LG. We demonstrate that SGM technique is an extremely useful research tool for studies of local screening effects, which provides a complementary view on phenomena that are usually considered only within a macroscopic experimental scheme.

  2. Geometrical nonlinear free vibration of multi-layered graphene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinbao; He Xiaoqiao; Kitipornchai, S; Zhang Hongwu

    2011-01-01

    A nonlinear continuum model is developed for the nonlinear vibration analysis of multi-layered graphene sheets (MLGSs), in which the nonlinear van der Waals (vdW) interaction between any two layers is formulated explicitly. The nonlinear equations of motion are studied by the harmonic-balance methods. Based on the present model, the nonlinear stiffened amplitude-frequency relations of double-layered graphene sheets (DLGSs) are investigated in the spectral neighbourhood of lower frequencies. The influence of the vdW interaction on the vibration properties of DLGSs is well illustrated by plotting the resulting modes' shapes, in which in-phase and anti-phase vibrations of DLGSs are studied. In particular, the large-amplitude vibration which associates with the anti-phase resonant frequencies, separating DLGS into single-layered GSs, is a promising application that needs to be explored further. In contrast, the vibration modes that are associated with the resonant frequencies are nonidentical and give various vibration patterns, which indicates that MLGSs are highly suited to being used as high-frequency resonators.

  3. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Large energy storage efficiency of the dielectric layer of graphene nanocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, A; Belkin, A; Ilin, E; Pak, M; Colla, Eugene V; Hubler, A

    2017-12-08

    Electric capacitors are commonly used in electronic circuits for the short-term storage of small amounts of energy. It is desirable however to use capacitors to store much larger energy amounts to replace rechargeable batteries. Unfortunately existing capacitors cannot store sufficient energy to be able to replace common electrochemical energy storage systems. Here we examine the energy storage capabilities of graphene nanocapacitors, which are tri-layer devices involving an Al film, Al 2 O 3 dielectric layer, and a single layer of carbon atoms, i.e., graphene. This is a purely electronic capacitor and therefore it can function in a wide temperature interval. The capacitor shows a high dielectric breakdown electric field strength, of the order of 1000 kV mm -1 (i.e., 1 GV m -1 ), which is much larger than the table value of the Al 2 O 3 dielectric strength. The corresponding energy density is 10-100 times larger than the energy density of a common electrolytic capacitor. Moreover, we discover that the amount of charge stored in the dielectric layer can be equal or can even exceed the amount of charge stored on the capacitor plates. The dielectric discharge current follows a power-law time dependence. We suggest a model to explain this behavior.

  5. Large energy storage efficiency of the dielectric layer of graphene nanocapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, A.; Belkin, A.; Ilin, E.; Pak, M.; Colla, Eugene V.; Hubler, A.

    2017-12-01

    Electric capacitors are commonly used in electronic circuits for the short-term storage of small amounts of energy. It is desirable however to use capacitors to store much larger energy amounts to replace rechargeable batteries. Unfortunately existing capacitors cannot store sufficient energy to be able to replace common electrochemical energy storage systems. Here we examine the energy storage capabilities of graphene nanocapacitors, which are tri-layer devices involving an Al film, Al2O3 dielectric layer, and a single layer of carbon atoms, i.e., graphene. This is a purely electronic capacitor and therefore it can function in a wide temperature interval. The capacitor shows a high dielectric breakdown electric field strength, of the order of 1000 kV mm-1 (i.e., 1 GV m-1), which is much larger than the table value of the Al2O3 dielectric strength. The corresponding energy density is 10-100 times larger than the energy density of a common electrolytic capacitor. Moreover, we discover that the amount of charge stored in the dielectric layer can be equal or can even exceed the amount of charge stored on the capacitor plates. The dielectric discharge current follows a power-law time dependence. We suggest a model to explain this behavior.

  6. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, T., E-mail: tom.blomberg@asm.com [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M. [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Saukkonen, T. [Aalto University, Puumiehenkuja 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2012-08-31

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2-1 {mu}m) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness ({approx} 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu{sub 3}Cp){sub 2}, Ti(OMe){sub 4} and O{sub 3} precursors at 250 Degree-Sign C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si Empty-Set 200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 Degree-Sign C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {l_brace}001{r_brace} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {l_brace}111{r_brace} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O{sub 3}) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2-1 {mu}m wide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most STO grains were {l_brace}001{r_brace} oriented.

  7. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  8. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  9. Barrier mechanism of multilayers graphene coated copper against atomic oxygen irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijing; Ren, Siming; Pu, Jibin; Xue, Qunji

    2018-06-01

    Graphene has been demonstrated as a protective coating for Cu under ambient condition because of its high impermeability and light-weight oxidation barrier. However, it lacks the research of graphene as a protective coating in space environment. Here, we experimentally and theoretically study the oxidation behavior of graphene-coated Cu in vacuum atomic oxygen (AO) condition. After AO irradiation, the experimental results show multilayer graphene has better anti-oxidation than monolayer graphene. Meanwhile, the calculation results show the oxidation appeared on the graphene's grain boundaries or the film's vacancy defects for the monolayer graphene coated Cu foil. Moreover, the calculation results show the oxidation process proceeds slowly in multilayers because of the matched defects overlaps each other to form a steric hindrance to suppress the O atom diffusion in the vertical direction, and the mismatched defects generates potential energy barriers for interlayer to suppress the O atom diffusion in the horizontal direction. Hence, multilayer graphene films could serve as protection coatings to prevent diffusion of O atom.

  10. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  11. Quantum Dots and Andreev Reflections in Graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.L.

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is an exceptionally thin semiconductor that consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms. The electrons in graphene live in a strictly two-dimensional (2D) world. In addition to this remarkable 2Dness, it is also peculiar that the behavior of the electrons in graphene is governed by

  12. Modeling hydrogen storage in boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokarev, A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms was considered as a novel material for hydrogen storage. Density functional theory calculations were used to model key properties of the material, such as geometry, hydrogen packing...

  13. Gap opening and tuning in single-layer graphene with combined electric and magnetic field modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xin; Wang Hai-Long; Pan Hui; Xu Huai-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    The energy band structure of single-layer graphene under one-dimensional electric and magnetic field modulation is theoretically investigated. The criterion for bandgap opening at the Dirac point is analytically derived with a two-fold degeneracy second-order perturbation method. It is shown that a direct or an indirect bandgap semiconductor could be realized in a single-layer graphene under some specific configurations of the electric and magnetic field arrangement. Due to the bandgap generated in the single-layer graphene, the Klein tunneling observed in pristine graphene is completely suppressed.

  14. Multiscale investigation of graphene layers on 6H-SiC(000-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Tiberj, Antoine; Huntzinger, Jean-Roch; Camassel, Jean; Hiebel, Fanny; Mahmood, Ather; Mallet, Pierre; Naud, Cecile; Veuillen, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this article, a multiscale investigation of few graphene layers grown on 6H-SiC(000-1) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions is presented. At 100-μm scale, the authors show that the UHV growth yields few layer graphene (FLG) with an average thickness given by Auger spectroscopy between 1 and 2 graphene planes. At the same scale, electron diffraction reveals a significant rotational disorder between the first graphene layer and the SiC surface, although well-defined preferre...

  15. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (˜0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  16. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  17. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  18. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H.; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated

  19. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Irigoyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO–polyelectrolyte (PE capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS. Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  20. Layer-dependent fluorination and doping of graphene via plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Minjiang; Zhou Haiqing; Qiu Caiyu; Yang Huaichao; Yu Fang; Sun Lianfeng

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the fluorination of n-layer graphene is systematically investigated using CHF 3 and CF 4 plasma treatments. The G and 2D Raman peaks of graphene show upshifts after each of the two kinds of plasma treatment, indicating p-doping to the graphene. Meanwhile, D, D′ and D + G peaks can be clearly observed for monolayer graphene, whereas these peaks are weaker for thicker n-layer graphene (n ≥ 2) at the same experimental conditions. The upshifts of the G and 2D peaks and the ratio of I(2D)/I(G) for CF 4 plasma treated graphene are larger than those of CHF 3 plasma treated graphene. The ratio of I(D)/I(G) of the Raman spectra is notably small in CF 4 plasma treated graphene. These facts indicate that CF 4 plasma treatment introduces more p-doping and fewer defects for graphene. Moreover, the fluorination of monolayer graphene by CF 4 plasma treatment is reversible through thermal annealing while that by CHF 3 plasma treatment is irreversible. These studies explore the information on the surface properties of graphene and provide an optimal method of fluorinating graphene through plasma techniques. (paper)

  1. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei; Fan, Zhongli; Zeng, Gaofeng; Lai, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found

  2. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-01-01

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V t shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10 4 cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V t shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V t shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  3. Probing the dielectric response of the interfacial buffer layer in epitaxial graphene via optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather M.; Rigosi, Albert F.; Chowdhury, Sugata; Yang, Yanfei; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Tavazza, Francesca; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Newell, David B.; Hight Walker, Angela R.

    2017-11-01

    Monolayer epitaxial graphene (EG) is a suitable candidate for a variety of electronic applications. One advantage of EG growth on the Si face of SiC is that it develops as a single crystal, as does the layer below, referred to as the interfacial buffer layer (IBL), whose properties include an electronic band gap. Although much research has been conducted to learn about the electrical properties of the IBL, not nearly as much work has been reported on the optical properties of the IBL. In this work, we combine measurements from Mueller matrix ellipsometry, differential reflectance contrast, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, as well as calculations from Kramers-Kronig analyses and density-functional theory, to determine the dielectric function of the IBL within the energy range of 1 eV to 8.5 eV.

  4. Simulation of the Dynamics of Isothermal Growth of Single-Layer Graphene on a Copper Catalyst in the Process of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futko, S. I.; Shulitskii, B. G.; Labunov, V. A.; Ermolaeva, E. M.

    2018-01-01

    A new kinetic model of isothermal growth of single-layer graphene on a copper catalyst as a result of the chemical vapor deposition of hydrocarbons on it at a low pressure has been developed on the basis of in situ measurements of the growth of graphene in the process of its synthesis. This model defines the synthesis of graphene with regard for the chemisorption and catalytic decomposition of ethylene on the surface of a copper catalyst, the diffusion of carbon atoms in the radial direction to the nucleation centers within the thin melted near-surface copper layer, and the nucleation and autocatalytic growth of graphene domains. It is shown that the time dependence of the rate of growth of a graphene domain has a characteristic asymmetrical bell-like shape. The dependences of the surface area and size of a graphene domain and the rate of its growth on the time at different synthesis temperatures and ethylene concentrations have been obtained. Time characteristics of the growth of graphene domains depending on the parameters of their synthesis were calculated. The results obtained can be used for determining optimum regimes of synthesis of graphene in the process of chemical vapor deposition of hydrocarbons on different catalysts with a low solubility of carbon.

  5. Layer-by-layer assembly of functionalized reduced graphene oxide for direct electrochemistry and glucose detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares [São Paulo State University - UNESP, Sorocaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Miyazaki, Celina Massumi [Federal University of São Carlos, UFSCar, Campus Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [São Paulo State University - UNESP, Sorocaba, São Paulo (Brazil); Leite de Moraes, Marli [Federal University of São Paulo, Unifesp, Campus São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Riul, Antonio [University of Campinas - Unicamp, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Ferreira, Marystela, E-mail: marystela@ufscar.br [Federal University of São Carlos, UFSCar, Campus Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    We report an electrochemical glucose biosensor made with layer-by-layer (LbL) films of functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and glucose oxidase (GOx). The LbL assembly using positively and negatively charged rGO multilayers represents a simple approach to develop enzymatic biosensors. The electron transport properties of graphene were combined with the specificity provided by the enzyme. rGO was obtained and functionalized using chemical methods, being positively charged with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) to form GPDDA, and negatively charged with poly(styrene sulfonate) to form GPSS. Stable aqueous dispersions of GPDDA and GPSS are easily obtained, enabling the growth of LbL films on various solid supports. The use of graphene in the immobilization of GOx promoted Direct Electron Transfer, which was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry. Amperometric measurements indicated a detection limit of 13.4 μmol·L{sup ‐1} and sensitivity of 2.47 μA·cm{sup −2}·mmol{sup −1}·L for glucose with the (GPDDA/GPSS){sub 1}/(GPDDA/GOx){sub 2} architecture, whose thickness was 19.80 ± 0.28 nm, as determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The sensor may be useful for clinical analysis since glucose could be detected even in the presence of typical interfering agents and in real samples of a lactose-free milk and an electrolyte solution to prevent dehydration. - Highlights: • Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase at functionalized reduced graphene oxide. • Thickness (layer-by-layer) LbL film determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). • Selective determination of glucose in the presence of several interferents. • Real sample test: commercial oral electrolyte solution and lactose-free milk.

  6. Layer-by-layer assembly of functionalized reduced graphene oxide for direct electrochemistry and glucose detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da; Leite de Moraes, Marli; Riul, Antonio; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-01-01

    We report an electrochemical glucose biosensor made with layer-by-layer (LbL) films of functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and glucose oxidase (GOx). The LbL assembly using positively and negatively charged rGO multilayers represents a simple approach to develop enzymatic biosensors. The electron transport properties of graphene were combined with the specificity provided by the enzyme. rGO was obtained and functionalized using chemical methods, being positively charged with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) to form GPDDA, and negatively charged with poly(styrene sulfonate) to form GPSS. Stable aqueous dispersions of GPDDA and GPSS are easily obtained, enabling the growth of LbL films on various solid supports. The use of graphene in the immobilization of GOx promoted Direct Electron Transfer, which was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry. Amperometric measurements indicated a detection limit of 13.4 μmol·L ‐1 and sensitivity of 2.47 μA·cm −2 ·mmol −1 ·L for glucose with the (GPDDA/GPSS) 1 /(GPDDA/GOx) 2 architecture, whose thickness was 19.80 ± 0.28 nm, as determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The sensor may be useful for clinical analysis since glucose could be detected even in the presence of typical interfering agents and in real samples of a lactose-free milk and an electrolyte solution to prevent dehydration. - Highlights: • Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase at functionalized reduced graphene oxide. • Thickness (layer-by-layer) LbL film determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). • Selective determination of glucose in the presence of several interferents. • Real sample test: commercial oral electrolyte solution and lactose-free milk.

  7. First-principles studies on 3d transition metal atom adsorbed twin graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lele; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xinlu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    Twin graphene is a new two-dimensional semiconducting carbon allotrope which is proposed recently. The structural, magnetic and electronic properties are investigated for 3d transition metal (TM) atom adsorbed twin graphene by means of GGA+U calculations. The results show most of single 3d transition metal atom except Zn can make twin graphene magnetization. The adsorption of single TM atom can also make the twin graphene systems turn to half metal (V adsorption), half-semiconductor (Fe adsorption) or metal (Sc, Cr, Mn, Co and Cu adsorption). The semiconducting nature still exists for Ti, Ni and Zn adsorption. All the 3d TM adatoms belong to n-type doping for transferring charge to the neighboring C atoms and have strong covalent bond with these C atoms. The influence of Hubbard U value on half-metallic V adsorbed system is also considered. As the U increases, the system can gradually transform from metal to half metal and metal. The effect of the coverage is investigated for two TM atoms (Sc-Fe) adsorption, too. We can know TM atoms adsorbed twin graphene have potentials to be spintronic device and nanomagnets from the results.

  8. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  9. Manipulation of inherent characteristics of graphene through N and Mg atom co-doping; a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Mirjat, Nayyar H.; Soomro, Aamir M.; Khokhar, Suhail; Shuai, Yong

    2018-04-01

    First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the structural, electronic, magnetic and optical properties of nitrogen (N) and magnesium (Mg) atom co-doped graphene systems. We observed that, N and Mg atom co-doping in graphene, introduces half-metallic properties in the electronic structure of graphene, introduces ferromagnetism behavior along with new trends in optical properties of graphene. Doping site and concentration of N and Mg atoms in graphene was changed and resulting effects of these changes on aforementioned properties were investigated. Through density of states plots we observed that, Mg atom sp orbitals mainly induced magnetic moments in graphene. It was revealed that, N/Mg atoms substitution in graphene introduces a red shift in absorption spectrum towards visible range and a finite absorption coefficient quantity value in 0 to 3 eV and 7 to 11 eV energy intervals is also produced, that is unavailable for absorption spectrum of intrinsic graphene. Moreover, N/Mg atoms co-doping produces increment in the reflectivity parameter of graphene in low lying energy region, while producing diminishing behavior in the higher energy range. These results offer a possibility to tune electronic, magnetic and optical characteristics of graphene sufficiently for utilization in graphene based spintronic and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Quantized edge modes in atomic-scale point contacts in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinikar, Amogh; Phanindra Sai, T.; Bhattacharyya, Semonti; Agarwala, Adhip; Biswas, Tathagata; Sarker, Sanjoy K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Jain, Manish; Shenoy, Vijay B.; Ghosh, Arindam

    2017-07-01

    The zigzag edges of single- or few-layer graphene are perfect one-dimensional conductors owing to a set of gapless states that are topologically protected against backscattering. Direct experimental evidence of these states has been limited so far to their local thermodynamic and magnetic properties, determined by the competing effects of edge topology and electron-electron interaction. However, experimental signatures of edge-bound electrical conduction have remained elusive, primarily due to the lack of graphitic nanostructures with low structural and/or chemical edge disorder. Here, we report the experimental detection of edge-mode electrical transport in suspended atomic-scale constrictions of single and multilayer graphene created during nanomechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The edge-mode transport leads to the observed quantization of conductance close to multiples of G0 = 2e2/h. At the same time, conductance plateaux at G0/2 and a split zero-bias anomaly in non-equilibrium transport suggest conduction via spin-polarized states in the presence of an electron-electron interaction.

  11. Bloch Surface Waves Using Graphene Layers: An Approach toward In-Plane Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Dubey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A dielectric multilayer platform was investigated as a foundation for two-dimensional optics. In this paper, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration of absorption of Bloch surface waves in the presence of graphene layers. Graphene is initially grown on a Cu foil via Chemical Vapor Deposition and transferred layer by layer by a wet-transfer method using poly(methyl methacrylate, (PMMA. We exploit total internal reflection configuration and multi-heterodyne scanning near-field optical microscopy as a far-field coupling method and near-field characterization tool, respectively. The absorption is quantified in terms of propagation lengths of Bloch surface waves. A significant drop in the propagation length of the BSWs is observed in the presence of graphene layers. The propagation length of BSWs in bare multilayer is reduced to 17 times shorter in presence of graphene monolayer, and 23 times shorter for graphene bilayer.

  12. Layer-by-layer construction of graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film on activated GCE for application as a nitrite sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Lili; Pu, Tao; Liu, Ying; He, Xingquan

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel nitrite sensor was prepared by using LBL technique which for the first time used the activated positively charged glassy carbon electrode (A-GCE) as the substrate. The nitrite sensor shows super stability for consecutive CV testing and rather low detection limit. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film was prepared by layer-by-layer (LBL) technique which for the first time used the activated positively charged glassy carbon electrode (A-GCE) as the substrate. The surface morphology of graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). It is found that graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film modified GCE exhibits good catalytic activity toward the oxidation of nitrite. The oxidation current barely decreases in consecutive CV test. Furthermore, the modified GCE shows long-term stability after 70 days. The super good stability can be attributed to the immobilization and dispersion of electroactive cobalt phthalocyanine by graphene, and using A-GCE as substrate which can enhance the interaction force between GCE and electroactive cobalt phthalocyanine. The nitrite sensor shows rather low detection limit of 0.084 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio = 3 (S/N = 3)

  13. Graphene-like two-dimensional layered nanomaterials: applications in biosensors and nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guohai; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Zhu, Junjie; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology provides promising opportunities for various important applications. The recent discovery of atomically-thick two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials can offer manifold perspectives to construct versatile devices with high-performance to satisfy multiple requirements. Many studies directed at graphene have stimulated renewed interest on graphene-like 2D layered nanomaterials (GLNs). GLNs including boron nitride nanosheets, graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2 and WS2) have attracted significant interest in numerous research fields from physics and chemistry to biology and engineering, which has led to numerous interdisciplinary advances in nano science. Benefiting from the unique physical and chemical properties (e.g. strong mechanical strength, high surface area, unparalleled thermal conductivity, remarkable biocompatibility and ease of functionalization), these 2D layered nanomaterials have shown great potential in biochemistry and biomedicine. This review summarizes recent advances of GLNs in applications of biosensors and nanomedicine, including electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy. Current challenges and future perspectives in these rapidly developing areas are also outlined. It is expected that they will have great practical foundation in biomedical applications with future efforts.

  14. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  15. Plasma assisted fabrication of multi-layer graphene/nickel hybrid film as enhanced micro-supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Q.; Li, W. L.; Zhao, W. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Xing, Y. P.; Li, X.; Xue, T.; Qi, W.; Zhang, K. L.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhao, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    A facile synthesis strategy has been developed for fabricating multi-layer graphene/nickel hybrid film as micro-supercapacitor electrodes by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The as-presented method is advantageous for rapid graphene growth at relatively low temperature of 650 °C. In addition, after pre-treating for the as-deposited nickel film by using argon plasma bombardment, the surface-to-volume ratio of graphene film on the treated nickel substrate is effectively increased by the increasing of surface roughness. This is demonstrated by the characterization results from transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy. Moreover, the electrochemical performance of the resultant graphene/nickel hybrid film as micro-supercapacitor working electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements. It was found that the increase of the surface-to-volume ratio of graphene/nickel hybrid film improved the specific capacitance of 10 times as the working electrode of micro-supercapacitor. Finally, by using comb columnar shadow mask pattern, the micro-supercapacitor full cell device was fabricated. The electrochemical performance measurements of the micro-supercapacitor devices indicate that the method presented in this study provides an effective way to fabricate micro-supercapacitor device with enhanced energy storage property.

  16. Layer-by-layer assembly of functionalized reduced graphene oxide for direct electrochemistry and glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; de Moraes, Marli Leite; Riul, Antonio; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-11-01

    We report an electrochemical glucose biosensor made with layer-by-layer (LbL) films of functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and glucose oxidase (GOx). The LbL assembly using positively and negatively charged rGO multilayers represents a simple approach to develop enzymatic biosensors. The electron transport properties of graphene were combined with the specificity provided by the enzyme. rGO was obtained and functionalized using chemical methods, being positively charged with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) to form GPDDA, and negatively charged with poly(styrene sulfonate) to form GPSS. Stable aqueous dispersions of GPDDA and GPSS are easily obtained, enabling the growth of LbL films on various solid supports. The use of graphene in the immobilization of GOx promoted Direct Electron Transfer, which was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry. Amperometric measurements indicated a detection limit of 13.4μmol·L(-1) and sensitivity of 2.47μA·cm(-2)·mmol(-1)·L for glucose with the (GPDDA/GPSS)1/(GPDDA/GOx)2 architecture, whose thickness was 19.80±0.28nm, as determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The sensor may be useful for clinical analysis since glucose could be detected even in the presence of typical interfering agents and in real samples of a lactose-free milk and an electrolyte solution to prevent dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical simulation of multi-layer graphene structures based on quantum-chemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, Y; Tuchin, A; Bokova, A; Bityutskaya, L

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure of the multi-layer graphene has been studied using the density functional theory (DFT). The dependence of the average interlayer distance on the number of layers ( n = 2 ÷ 6) has been determined. The analysis of the charge redistribution and the electron density of the bi- and three-layer graphene under the external pressure up to 50 GPa has been performed. The model of the interlayer conductivity of compressed multigraphene was offered (paper)

  18. Atomic layer deposition: prospects for solar cell manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, W.M.M.; Hoex, B.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film growth technology that is capable of depositing uniform and conformal films on complex, three-dimensional objects with atomic precision. ALD is a rapidly growing field and it is currently at the verge of being introduced in the semiconductor industry.

  19. Electron ionization and spin polarization control of Fe atom adsorbed graphene irradiated by a femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Dong; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Feng; Li, Xin; Qu, Liangti; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural properties and ionized spin electrons of an Fe–graphene system, in which the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the generalized gradient approximation is used. The electron dynamics, including electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization, is described for Fe atom adsorbed graphene under femtosecond laser irradiation. The theoretical results show that the electron ionization and ionized electron spin polarization are sensitive to the laser parameters, such as the incident angle and the peak intensity. The spin polarization presents the maximum value under certain laser parameters, which may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons. - Highlights: • The structural properties of Fe–graphene system are investigated. • The electron dynamics of Fe–graphene system under laser irradiation are described. • The Fe–graphene system may be used as a source of spin-polarized electrons

  20. Layer-selective synthesis of bilayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Choi, Kyoungjun; Robertson, John; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    A controlled synthesis of high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition demands a detailed understanding of the mechanism and kinetics. By decoupling the growth of the two layers via a growth-and-regrowth scheme, we report the kinetics and termination mechanisms of the bilayer graphene growth on copper. We observe, for the first time, that the secondary layer growth follows Gompertzian kinetics. Our observations affirm the postulate of a time-variant transition from a mass-transport-limited to a reaction-limited regimes and identify the mechanistic disparity between the monolayer growth and the secondary-layer expansion underneath the monolayer cover. It is the continuous carbon supply that drives the expansion of the graphene secondary layer, rather than the initially captured carbon amount, suggesting an essential role of the surface diffusion of reactant adsorbates in the interspace between the top graphene layer and the underneath copper surface. We anticipate that the layer selectivity of the growth relies on the entrance energetics of the adsorbed reactants to the graphene-copper interspace across the primary-layer edge, which could be engineered by tailoring the edge termination state. The temperature-reliant saturation area of the secondary-layer expansion is understood as a result of competitive attachment of carbon and hydrogen adatoms to the secondary-layer graphene edge.

  1. Carrier mobility and scattering lifetime in electric double-layer gated few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatti, E.; Galasso, S.; Tortello, M.; Nair, J.R.; Gerbaldi, C. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruna, M.; Borini, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), 10135 Torino (Italy); Daghero, D. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Gonnelli, R.S., E-mail: renato.gonnelli@polito.it [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We fabricated few-layer graphene FETs by mechanical exfoliation and standard microfabrication techniques. • We employed a Li-TFSI based ion gel to induce carrier densities as high as ≈6e14 e{sup −}/cm{sup 2} in the devices' channel. • We found a strong asymmetry in the sheet conductance and mobility doping dependences between electron and hole doping. • We combined the experimental results with ab initio DFT calculations to obtain the average scattering lifetime of the charge carriers. • We found that the increase in the carrier density and an unexpected increase in the density of charged scattering centers compete in determining the scattering lifetime. - Abstract: We fabricate electric double-layer field-effect transistor (EDL-FET) devices on mechanically exfoliated few-layer graphene. We exploit the large capacitance of a polymeric electrolyte to study the transport properties of three, four and five-layer samples under a large induced surface charge density both above and below the glass transition temperature of the polymer. We find that the carrier mobility shows a strong asymmetry between the hole and electron doping regime. We then employ ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations to determine the average scattering lifetime from the experimental data. We explain its peculiar dependence on the carrier density in terms of the specific properties of the electrolyte we used in our experiments.

  2. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  3. Size-controlled InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs with an ITO/graphene transparent layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Phil; Seong, Won-Seok; Min, Jung-Hong; Kong, Duk-Jo; Seo, Dong-Ju; Kim, Hyung-jun; Lee, Dong-Seon

    2016-11-01

    We introduce ITO on graphene as a current-spreading layer for separated InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs for the purpose of passivation-free and high light-extraction efficiency. Transferred graphene on InGaN/GaN nanorods effectively blocks the diffusion of ITO atoms to nanorods, facilitating the production of transparent ITO/graphene contact on parallel-nanorod LEDs, without filling the air gaps, like a bridge structure. The ITO/graphene layer sufficiently spreads current in a lateral direction, resulting in uniform and reliable light emission observed from the whole area of the top surface. Using KOH treatment, we reduce series resistance and reverse leakage current in nanorod LEDs by recovering the plasma-damaged region. We also control the size of the nanorods by varying the KOH treatment time and observe strain relaxation via blueshift in electroluminescence. As a result, bridge-structured LEDs with 8 min of KOH treatment show 15 times higher light-emitting efficiency than with 2 min of KOH treatment.

  4. Metallic behavior and enhanced adsorption energy of graphene on BN layer induced by Cu(111) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption properties and the electronic structure of graphene/BN and graphene/BN/Cu(111) systems by using van der Waals density functional theory. The ground-state adsorption site of graphene on BN/Cu(111) is found to be the same as that of graphene/BN. The Cu(111) substrate did not induce a significant change in the geometrical feature of graphene/BN. However, the adsorption energy of graphene on BN/Cu(111) is observed to be enhanced due to the Cu(111) substrate. In addition, we have found that the graphene layer displays a weak metallic character in graphene/BN/Cu(111) whereas an energy band gap is observed in the graphene in the graphene/BN bilayer system. Therefore, we have found that the metallic Cu(111) substrate affects the electronic structure and adsorption properties of graphene on BN/Cu(111), although it has no significant effect on the geometrical features.

  5. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  6. Contribution of Dielectric Screening to the Total Capacitance of Few-Layer Graphene Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Cheng; Jiang, De-en

    2016-03-03

    We apply joint density functional theory (JDFT), which treats the electrode/electrolyte interface self-consistently, to an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) based on few-layer graphene electrodes. The JDFT approach allows us to quantify a third contribution to the total capacitance beyond quantum capacitance (CQ) and EDL capacitance (CEDL). This contribution arises from the dielectric screening of the electric field by the surface of the few-layer graphene electrode, and we therefore term it the dielectric capacitance (CDielec). We find that CDielec becomes significant in affecting the total capacitance when the number of graphene layers in the electrode is more than three. Our investigation sheds new light on the significance of the electrode dielectric screening on the capacitance of few-layer graphene electrodes.

  7. Low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy of AlN ultrathin films by layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lee, Wei-Hao; Kao, Wei-Chung; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Lin, Ray-Ming; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2017-01-03

    Low-temperature epitaxial growth of AlN ultrathin films was realized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) together with the layer-by-layer, in-situ atomic layer annealing (ALA), instead of a high growth temperature which is needed in conventional epitaxial growth techniques. By applying the ALA with the Ar plasma treatment in each ALD cycle, the AlN thin film was converted dramatically from the amorphous phase to a single-crystalline epitaxial layer, at a low deposition temperature of 300 °C. The energy transferred from plasma not only provides the crystallization energy but also enhances the migration of adatoms and the removal of ligands, which significantly improve the crystallinity of the epitaxial layer. The X-ray diffraction reveals that the full width at half-maximum of the AlN (0002) rocking curve is only 144 arcsec in the AlN ultrathin epilayer with a thickness of only a few tens of nm. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy also indicates the high-quality single-crystal hexagonal phase of the AlN epitaxial layer on the sapphire substrate. The result opens a window for further extension of the ALD applications from amorphous thin films to the high-quality low-temperature atomic layer epitaxy, which can be exploited in a variety of fields and applications in the near future.

  8. Preservation of the Pt(100) surface reconstruction after growth of a continuous layer of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Bjerre, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that a layer of graphene can be grown on the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface and that the reconstruction is preserved after growth. A continuous sheet of graphene can be grown across domain boundaries and step edges without loss of periodicity or change in di...

  9. Unstacked double-layer templated graphene for high-rate lithium-sulphur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Tian, Gui-Li; Nie, Jing-Qi; Peng, Hong-Jie; Wei, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Preventing the stacking of graphene is essential to exploiting its full potential in energy-storage applications. The introduction of spacers into graphene layers always results in a change in the intrinsic properties of graphene and/or induces complexity at the interfaces. Here we show the synthesis of an intrinsically unstacked double-layer templated graphene via template-directed chemical vapour deposition. The as-obtained graphene is composed of two unstacked graphene layers separated by a large amount of mesosized protuberances and can be used for high-power lithium-sulphur batteries with excellent high-rate performance. Even after 1,000 cycles, high reversible capacities of ca. 530 mA h g-1 and 380 mA h g-1 are retained at 5 C and 10 C, respectively. This type of double-layer graphene is expected to be an important platform that will enable the investigation of stabilized three-dimensional topological porous systems and demonstrate the potential of unstacked graphene materials for advanced energy storage, environmental protection, nanocomposite and healthcare applications.

  10. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stebunov, Yury V.; Aftenieva, Olga A.; Arsenin, Aleksey V.

    2015-01-01

    sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover...

  11. A theoretical study of symmetry-breaking organic overlayers on single- and bi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cifuentes, Josue; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    An ``overlayer'' of molecules that breaks the AB symmetry of graphene can produce (modify) a band gap in single- (bi-) layer graphene.[2] Since the triangular shaped trimesic acid (TMA) molecule forms two familiar symmetry breaking configurations, we are motivated to model TMA physisorption on graphene surfaces in conjunction with experiments by Groce et al. at UMD. Using VASP, with ab initio van der Waals density functionals (vdW-DF), we simulate adsorption of TMA onto a graphene surface in several symmetry-breaking arrangements in order to predict/understand the effect of TMA adsorption on experimental observables. Supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 05-20471.

  12. Compositional characterization of atomic layer deposited alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Anu; Thomas, Subin; Kumar, K. Rajeev [Department of Instrumentation, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    As the microelectronic industry demands feature size in the order of few and sub nanometer regime, the film composition and other film properties become critical issues and ALD has emerged as the choice of industry. Aluminum oxide is a material with wide applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and protective and ion barrier layers. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an excellent dielectric because of its large band gap (8.7eV), large band offsets with silicon. We have deposited thin layers of alumina on silicon wafer (p-type) for gate dielectric applications by ALD technique and compositional characterizations of the deposited thin films were done using EDS, XPS and FTIR spectra.

  13. Compositional characterization of atomic layer deposited alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, Anu; Thomas, Subin; Kumar, K. Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    As the microelectronic industry demands feature size in the order of few and sub nanometer regime, the film composition and other film properties become critical issues and ALD has emerged as the choice of industry. Aluminum oxide is a material with wide applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and protective and ion barrier layers. Al 2 O 3 is an excellent dielectric because of its large band gap (8.7eV), large band offsets with silicon. We have deposited thin layers of alumina on silicon wafer (p-type) for gate dielectric applications by ALD technique and compositional characterizations of the deposited thin films were done using EDS, XPS and FTIR spectra

  14. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, E. [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Lichtenstein, M.P.; Suñol, C. [Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques de Barcelona (IIBB-CSIC), Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), c/Rosselló 161, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Casañ-Pastor, N., E-mail: nieves@icmab.es [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx–graphene hybrid (IrOx–eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx–graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx–eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1–2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10 nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx–eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes. - Highlights: • Pristine Graphene is incorporated in coatings as nanostructured IrOx–eG hybrid. • IrOx-nanoparticles drive the electrodeposition of graphene. • Hybrid CSC is one order of magnitude the charge capacity of IrOx. • Per carbon atom, the CSC increase is 35 times larger than for graphene oxide. • Neurons are fully functional on the coating.

  15. Quantum transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostinga, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    After the experimental discovery of graphene -a single atomic layer of graphite- a scientific rush started to explore graphene’s electronic behaviour. Graphene is a fascinating two-dimensional electronic system, because its electrons behave as relativistic particles. Moreover, it is a promising

  16. Structure stability and magnetism in graphene impurity complexes with embedded V and Nb atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Jyoti [Department of Physics, University College, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Kashyap, Manish K., E-mail: manishdft@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Taya, Ankur; Rani, Priti [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Saini, Hardev S. [Department of Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001, Haryana (India); Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • V/Nb embedding in graphene containing monovacancies/divacancies is presented. • Spin polarization near/equal to 100% ensures use of studied nanosystems in spin filter devices. • Bandstructures are analyzed to identify shifting of Dirac cone of graphene. - Abstract: The appearance of vacancy defects could produce appropriate magnetic moment in graphene and the sensitivity to absorb atoms/molecules also increases with this. In this direction, a DFT study of embedding V and Nb atom in graphene containing monovacancies (MV) and divacancies (DV) is reported. Complete/almost complete spin polarization is detected for V/Nb embedding. The origin of magnetism has been identified via interaction of 3d-states of embedded atom with C-p states present in the vicinity of embedded site. The band structures have been analyzed to counter the observed semiconducting nature of graphene in minority spin on embedding V/Nb atom. The isosurface analysis also confirms the induced magnetism of present nanosystems. The present results reveal that these nanosystems have the potential for futuristic applications like spintronics and energy resources.

  17. Incorporating isolated molybdenum (Mo) atoms into Bilayer Epitaxial Graphene on 4H-SiC(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Wan, Wen; Li, Hui; Wong, Swee Liang; Lv, Lu; Gao, Yongli; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The atomic structures and electronic properties of isolated Mo atoms in bilayer epitaxial graphene (BLEG) on 4H-SiC(0001) are investigated by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). LT-STM results reveal that isolated Mo dopants prefer to substitute C atoms at α-sites, and preferentially locate between the graphene bilayers. First-principles calculations confirm that the embedding of single Mo dopants within BLEG is energetically favorable as compared to monolayer graphene. The calculated bandstructures show that Mo-doped BLEG is n-doped, and each Mo atom introduces a local magnetic moment of 1.81 μB. Our findings demonstrate a simple and stable method to incorporate single transition metal dopants into the graphene lattice to tune its electronic and magnetic properties for possible use in graphene spin devices. NRF-CRP (Singapore) grants R-143-000-360-281and R-144-000-295-281. ``Shenghua Professorship'' startup funding from CSU and the support from the NSF of China (Grant No.11304398).

  18. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  19. Atomic-scaled characterization of graphene PN junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Wang, Dennis; Dadgar, Ali; Agnihotri, Pratik; Lee, Ji Ung; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene p-n junctions are essential devices for studying relativistic Klein tunneling and the Veselago lensing effect in graphene. We have successfully fabricated graphene p-n junctions using both lithographically pre-patterned substrates and the stacking of vertical heterostructures. We then use our 4-probe STM system to characterize the junctions. The ability to carry out scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in our STM instrument is essential for us to locate and measure the junction interface. We obtain both the topography and dI/dV spectra at the junction area, from which we track the shift of the graphene chemical potential with position across the junction interface. This allows us to directly measure the spatial width and roughness of the junction and its potential barrier height. We will compare the junction properties of devices fabricated by the aforementioned two methods and discuss their effects on the performance as a Veselago lens.

  20. Phonon scattering and thermal conductance properties in two coupled graphene nanoribbons modulated with bridge atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Shi-Hua; Tang, Li-Ming; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The phonon scattering and thermal conductance properties have been studied in two coupled graphene nanoribbons connected by different bridge atoms by using density functional theory in combination with non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The results show that a wide range of thermal conductance tuning can be realized by changing the chemical bond strength and atom mass of the bridge atoms. It is found that the chemical bond strength (bridge atom mass) plays the main role in phonon scattering at low (high) temperature. A simple equation is presented to describe the relationship among the thermal conductance, bridge atom, and temperature.

  1. AA stacking, tribological and electronic properties of double-layer graphene with krypton spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V; Poklonski, Nikolai A; Siahlo, Andrei I; Vyrko, Sergey A

    2013-10-21

    Structural, energetic, and tribological characteristics of double-layer graphene with commensurate and incommensurate krypton spacers of nearly monolayer coverage are studied within the van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. It is shown that when the spacer is in the commensurate phase, the graphene layers have the AA stacking. For this phase, the barriers to relative in-plane translational and rotational motion and the shear mode frequency of the graphene layers are calculated. For the incommensurate phase, both of the barriers are found to be negligibly small. A considerable change of tunneling conductance between the graphene layers separated by the commensurate krypton spacer at their relative subangstrom displacement is revealed by the use of the Bardeen method. The possibility of nanoelectromechanical systems based on the studied tribological and electronic properties of the considered heterostructures is discussed.

  2. Mobility controlled linear magnetoresistance with 3D anisotropy in a layered graphene pallet

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Peng; He, Xin; Li, Jun; Wen, Yan; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui Ming; Yang, Yang; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2016-01-01

    A bulk sample of pressed graphene sheets was prepared under hydraulic pressure (similar to 150 MPa). The cross-section of the sample demonstrates a layered structure, which leads to 3D electrical transport properties with anisotropic mobility

  3. Unusual reflection of electromagnetic radiation from a stack of graphene layers at oblique incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bludov, Yu V; Peres, N M R; Vasilevskiy, M I

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction of electromagnetic (EM) radiation with single-layer graphene and a stack of parallel graphene sheets at arbitrary angles of incidence. It is found that the behavior is qualitatively different for transverse magnetic (or p-polarized) and transverse electric (or s-polarized) waves. In particular, the absorbance of single-layer graphene attains a minimum (maximum) for the p (s)-polarization at the angle of total internal reflection when the light comes from a medium with a higher dielectric constant. In the case of equal dielectric constants of the media above and beneath graphene, for grazing incidence graphene is almost 100% transparent to p-polarized waves and acts as a tunable mirror for the s-polarization. These effects are enhanced for a stack of graphene sheets, so the system can work as a broad band polarizer. It is shown further that a periodic stack of graphene layers has the properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal, with gaps (or stop bands) at certain frequencies. When an incident EM wave is reflected from this photonic crystal, the tunability of the graphene conductivity renders the possibility of controlling the gaps, and the structure can operate as a tunable spectral-selective mirror. (paper)

  4. Adsorption of Ca2+ on single layer graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Amalia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Christodoulatos, Christos; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2017-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) holds great promise for a broad array of applications in many fields, but also poses serious potential risks to human health and the environment. In this study, the adsorptive properties of GO toward Ca 2+ and Na + were investigated using batch adsorption experiments, zeta potential measurements, and spectroscopic analysis. When pH increased from 4 to 9, Ca 2+ adsorption by GO and the zeta potential of GO increased significantly. Raman spectra suggest that Ca 2+ was strongly adsorbed on the GO via -COOCa + formation. On the other hand, Na + was adsorbed into the electrical diffuse layer as an inert counterion to increase the diffuse layer zeta potential. While the GO suspension became unstable with increasing pH from 4 to 10 in the presence of Ca 2+ , it was more stable at higher pH in the NaCl solution. The findings of this research provide insights in the adsorption of Ca 2+ on GO and fundamental basis for prediction of its effect on the colloidal stability of GO in the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Direct synthesis of few-layer graphene supported platinum nanocatalyst for methanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong; Ma, Xiaohui; Sheng, Leimei; An, Kang; Yu, Liming; Zhao, Hongbin; Xu, Jiaqiang; Ren, Wei; Zhao, Xinluo

    2014-11-01

    High-crystalline few-layer graphene supported Pt nanoparticles have been synthesized by arc discharge evaporation of carbon electrodes containing Pt element. A high-temperature treatment under hydrogen atmosphere has been carried out to obtain a new type of Pt/graphene catalyst for methanol oxidation in direct methanol fuel cell. The morphology and structure characterizations of as-grown few-layer graphene supported Pt nanoparticles and Pt/graphene catalysts have been studied by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammograms and chronoamperometric curves show that our present Pt/graphene catalysts have larger current density for methanol oxidation, higher tolerance to carbon monoxide poisoning, and better stability during the operating procedure, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  6. On nonlinear dynamics of a dipolar exciton BEC in two-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, O.L.; Kezerashvili, R.Ya.; Kolmakov, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) of dipolar excitons in two-layer graphene is studied. It is demonstrated that a steady turbulent state is formed in this system. A comparison between the dynamics of the exciton BEC in two-layer graphene and those in GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum wells shows that turbulence is a general effect in a BEC.

  7. Support effects on adsorption and catalytic activation of O2 in single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng-Yang; Yang, Wei-Jie; Ding, Xun-Lei; Lv, Gang; Yan, Wei-Ping

    2018-03-07

    The adsorption and catalytic activation of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates were investigated systematically by density functional theory calculation. It is found that the support effects of graphene-based substrates have a significant influence on the stability of the single atom catalysts, the adsorption configuration, the electron transfer mechanism, the adsorption energy and the energy barrier. The differences in the stable adsorption configuration of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with different graphene-based substrates can be well understood by the symmetrical matching principle based on frontier molecular orbital analysis. There are two different mechanisms of electron transfer, in which the Fe atom acts as the electron donor in single vacancy graphene-based substrates while the Fe atom mainly acts as the bridge for electron transfer in double vacancy graphene-based substrates. The Fermi softness and work function are good descriptors of the adsorption energy and they can well reveal the relationship between electronic structure and adsorption energy. This single atom iron catalyst with single vacancy graphene modified by three nitrogen atoms is a promising non-noble metal single atom catalyst in the adsorption and catalytic oxidation of O 2 . Furthermore, the findings can lay the foundation for the further study of graphene-based support effects and provide a guideline for the development and design of new non-noble-metal single atom catalysts.

  8. Work function of few layer graphene covered nickel thin films measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eren, B. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Material Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gysin, U.; Marot, L., E-mail: Laurent.marot@unibas.ch; Glatzel, Th.; Steiner, R.; Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-01-25

    Few layer graphene and graphite are simultaneously grown on a ∼100 nm thick polycrystalline nickel film. The work function of few layer graphene/Ni is found to be 4.15 eV with a variation of 50 meV by local measurements with Kelvin probe force microscopy. This value is lower than the work function of free standing graphene due to peculiar electronic structure resulting from metal 3d-carbon 2p(π) hybridization.

  9. Supercritical fluid extraction of bi & multi-layer graphene sheets from graphite by using exfoliation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Gauravi; Dave, Bhoomi; Khanna, Sakshum

    2018-05-01

    In recent times, researchers have turned to explore the possibility of using Supercritical Fluid (SCFs) system to penetrate into the inert-gaping of graphite and exfoliate it into a number of layer graphene sheets. The supercritical fluid holds excellent wetting surfaces with low interfacial tension and high diffusion coefficients. Although SCFs exfoliation approach looks promising to developed large scale & low-cost graphene sheet but has not received much attention. To arouse interest and reflection on this approach, this review is organized to summarize the recent progress in graphene production by SCF technology. Here we present the simplest route to obtained layers of graphene sheets by intercalating and exfoliating graphite using supercritical CO2 processing. The layers graphene nano-sheets were collected in dichloromethane (DCM) solution which prevents the restocking of sheets. The obtained graphene sheets show the desired characteristics and thus can be used in physical, chemical and biological sciences. Thus this method provides an effortless and eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of layers of graphene sheets.

  10. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. The correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  11. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4-37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2-7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8-28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  12. Layered graphene-mica substrates induce melting of DNA origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Pham, Phi H. Q.; Crow, Daniel T.; Burke, Peter J.; Norton, Michael L.

    2018-04-01

    Monolayer graphene supported on mica substrates induce melting of cross-shaped DNA origami. This behavior can be contrasted with the case of origami on graphene on graphite, where an expansion or partially re-organized structure is observed. On mica, only well-formed structures are observed. Comparison of the morphological differences observed for these probes after adsorption on these substrates provides insights into the sensitivity of DNA based nanostructures to the properties of the graphene monolayer, as modified by its substrate.

  13. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with graphene layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhen; Li, Zishen; Jiang, Yang; Ma, Ziguang; Fang, Yutao; Li, Yangfeng; Wang, Wenxin; Jia, Haiqiang; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a novel hybrid graphene/InGaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) structure has been fabricated. Compared to the sample conventional structure (CS), the utilization of graphene transferred on top GaN layer significantly enhances the internal quantum efficiency and relatively photoluminescence intensity. Furthermore, the excitons in the MQWs of sample hybrid structure (HS) have a shorter decay lifetime of 3.4 ns than that of 6.7 ns for sample CS. These results are probably attributed to the free carriers in the graphene layer, which can screen the piezoelectric field in the active region and thus present a free quantum-confined Stark effect-like behavior. Our work demonstrates that the graphene on the top GaN layer can effectively increase the recombination rate in sample HS, which may further improve LEDs' performance. (orig.)

  14. Deformation sensor based on polymer-supported discontinuous graphene multi-layer coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carotenuto, G.; Schiavo, L.; Romeo, V.; Nicolais, L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene can be conveniently used in the modification of polymer surfaces. Graphene macromolecules are perfectly transparent to the visible light and electrically conductive, consequently these two properties can be simultaneously provided to polymeric substrates by surface coating with thin graphene layers. In addition, such coating process provides the substrates of: water-repellence, higher surface hardness, low-friction, self-lubrication, gas-barrier properties, and many other functionalities. Polyolefins have a non-polar nature and therefore graphene strongly sticks on their surface. Nano-crystalline graphite can be used as graphene precursor in some chemical processes (e.g., graphite oxide synthesis by the Hummer method), in addition it can be directly applied to the surface of a polyolefin substrate (e.g., polyethylene) to cover it by a thin graphene multilayer. In particular, the nano-crystalline graphite perfectly exfoliate under the application of a combination of shear and friction forces and the produced graphene single-layers perfectly spread and adhere on the polyethylene substrate surface. Such polymeric materials can be used as ITO (indium-tin oxide) substitute and in the fabrication of different electronic devices. Here the fabrication of transparent resistive deformation sensors based on low-density polyethylene films coated by graphene multilayers is described. Such devices are very sensible and show a high reversible and reproducible behavior

  15. Layering of confined water between two graphene sheets and its liquid–liquid transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xuyan; Duan Yunrui; Wang Long; Liu Sida; Li Tao; Li Yifan; Li Hui

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to explore the layering structure and liquid–liquid transition of liquid water confined between two graphene sheets with a varied distance at different pressures. Both the size of nanoslit and pressure could cause the layering and liquid–liquid transition of the confined water. With increase of pressure and the nanoslit’s size, the confined water could have a more obvious layering. In addition, the neighboring water molecules firstly form chain structure, then will transform into square structure, and finally become triangle with increase of pressure. These results throw light on layering and liquid–liquid transition of water confined between two graphene sheets. (paper)

  16. Hierarchical Layered WS2 /Graphene-Modified CdS Nanorods for Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Quanjun; Cheng, Feiyue; Lang, Di

    2016-05-10

    Graphene-based ternary composite photocatalysts with genuine heterostructure constituents have attracted extensive attention in photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Here we report a new graphene-based ternary composite consisting of CdS nanorods grown on hierarchical layered WS2 /graphene hybrid (WG) as a high-performance photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation. The optimal content of layered WG as a co-catalyst in the ternary CdS/WS2 /graphene composites was found to be 4.2 wt %, giving a visible light photocatalytic H2 -production rate of 1842 μmol h(-1)  g(-1) with an apparent quantum efficiency of 21.2 % at 420 nm. This high photocatalytic H2 -production activity is due to the deposition of CdS nanorods on layered WS2 /graphene sheets, which can efficiently suppress charge recombination, improve interfacial charge transfer, and provide reduction active sites. The proposed mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of CdS nanorods modified with hierarchical layered WG was further confirmed by transient photocurrent response. This work shows that a noble-metal-free hierarchical layered WS2 /graphene nanosheets hybrid can be used as an effective co-catalyst for photocatalytic water splitting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dynamic Tunneling Junctions at the Atomic Intersection of Two Twisted Graphene Edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellunato, Amedeo; Vrbica, Sasha D; Sabater, Carlos; de Vos, Erik W; Fermin, Remko; Kanneworff, Kirsten N; Galli, Federica; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M; Schneider, Grégory F

    2018-04-11

    The investigation of the transport properties of single molecules by flowing tunneling currents across extremely narrow gaps is relevant for challenges as diverse as the development of molecular electronics and sequencing of DNA. The achievement of well-defined electrode architectures remains a technical challenge, especially due to the necessity of high precision fabrication processes and the chemical instability of most bulk metals. Here, we illustrate a continuously adjustable tunneling junction between the edges of two twisted graphene sheets. The unique property of the graphene electrodes is that the sheets are rigidly supported all the way to the atomic edge. By analyzing the tunneling current characteristics, we also demonstrate that the spacing across the gap junction can be controllably adjusted. Finally, we demonstrate the transition from the tunneling regime to contact and the formation of an atomic-sized junction between the two edges of graphene.

  18. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  19. Chemical and morphological modifications of single layer graphene submitted to annealing in water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, Guilherme Koszeniewski; Corrêa, Silma Alberton; Galves, Lauren Aranha; Lopes, João Marcelo J.; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Radtke, Cláudio

    2018-01-01

    Modifications of single layer graphene transferred to SiO2/Si substrates resulting from annealing in water vapor were investigated. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy evidenced graphene puckering between 400 and 500 °C. Synchrotron radiation based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed variation of sp2 and sp3C bonding configurations specially in this same temperature range. Moreover, oxygen related functionalities are formed as a result of water vapor annealing. Based on these results and complementary Raman and nuclear reaction analysis, one distinguishes three different regimes of water interaction with graphene concerning modifications of the graphene layer. In the low temperature range (200-400 °C), no prominent modification of graphene itself is observed. At higher temperatures (400-500 °C), to accommodate newly formed oxygen functionalities, the flat and continuous sp2 bonding network of graphene is disrupted, giving rise to a puckered layer. For 600 °C and above, shrinking of graphene domains and a higher doping level take place.

  20. Electrochemically Produced Graphene for Microporous Layers in Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Leeuwner, Magrieta J; Wilkinson, David P; Gyenge, Előd L

    2016-07-07

    The microporous layer (MPL) is a key cathodic component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells owing to its beneficial influence on two-phase mass transfer. However, its performance is highly dependent on material properties such as morphology, porous structure, and electrical resistance. To improve water management and performance, electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EGN) microsheets are considered as an alternative to the conventional carbon black (CB) MPLs. The EGN-based MPLs decrease the kinetic overpotential and the Ohmic potential loss, whereas the addition of CB to form a composite EGN+CB MPL improves the mass-transport limiting current density drastically. This is reflected by increases of approximately 30 and 70 % in peak power densities at 100 % relative humidity (RH) compared with those for CB- and EGN-only MPLs, respectively. The composite EGN+CB MPL also retains the superior performance at a cathode RH of 20 %, whereas the CB MPL shows significant performance loss. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Winata, Toto

    2016-01-01

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 – 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  2. Elastic interaction of hydrogen atoms on graphene: A multiscale approach from first principles to continuum elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Vastola, Guglielmo; Jhon, Mark H.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2016-10-01

    The deformation of graphene due to the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms on its surface and the long-range elastic interaction between hydrogen atoms induced by these deformations are investigated using a multiscale approach based on first principles, empirical interactions, and continuum modeling. Focus is given to the intrinsic low-temperature structure and interactions. Therefore, all calculations are performed at T =0 , neglecting possible temperature or thermal fluctuation effects. Results from different methods agree well and consistently describe the local deformation of graphene on multiple length scales reaching 500 Å . The results indicate that the elastic interaction mediated by this deformation is significant and depends on the deformation of the graphene sheet both in and out of plane. Surprisingly, despite the isotropic elasticity of graphene, within the linear elastic regime, atoms elastically attract or repel each other depending on (i) the specific site they are chemisorbed; (ii) the relative position of the sites; (iii) and if they are on the same or on opposite surface sides. The interaction energy sign and power-law decay calculated from molecular statics agree well with theoretical predictions from linear elasticity theory, considering in-plane or out-of-plane deformations as a superposition or in a coupled nonlinear approach. Deviations on the exact power law between molecular statics and the linear elastic analysis are evidence of the importance of nonlinear effects on the elasticity of monolayer graphene. These results have implications for the understanding of the generation of clusters and regular formations of hydrogen and other chemisorbed atoms on graphene.

  3. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoO x ) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoO x interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoO x /CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  4. Tuning the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene by noncovalent functionalization: effects of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yonghui; Zhou Kaige; Xie Kefeng; Zeng Jing; Zhang Haoli; Peng Yong

    2010-01-01

    Using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, we have theoretically investigated the binding of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms on graphene sheets, and revealed the effects of the different noncovalent functionalizations on the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene. The adsorptions of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) induce hybridization between the molecular levels and the graphene valence bands, and transform the zero-gap semiconducting graphene into a metallic graphene. However, the current versus voltage (I-V) simulation indicates that the noncovalent modifications by organic molecules are not sufficient to significantly alter the transport property of the graphene for sensing applications. We found that the molecule/graphene interaction could be dramatically enhanced by introducing metal atoms to construct molecule/metal/graphene sandwich structures. A chemical sensor based on iron modified graphene shows a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than that of pristine graphene. The results of this work could help to design novel graphene-based sensing or switching devices.

  5. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S

    2004-08-15

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H{sub 2} plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states.

  6. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H 2 plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states

  7. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., R knockout ≈ R accumulation ). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  8. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium di...

  9. Energy-enhanced atomic layer deposition : offering more processing freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potts, S.E.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a popular deposition technique comprising two or more sequential, self-limiting surface reactions, which make up an ALD cycle. Energy-enhanced ALD is an evolution of traditional thermal ALD methods, whereby energy is supplied to a gas in situ in order to convert a

  10. Atomic layer deposition for nanostructured Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, H.C.M.; Donders, M.E.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Notten, P.H.L.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring is targeted as a solution to achieve the improvements required for implementing Li-ion batteries in a wide range of applications. These applications range in size from electrical vehicles down to microsystems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) could be an enabling technology for

  11. Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition of transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and indium doped ZnO films have been grown by Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition at atmospheric pressure. The electrical properties of ZnO films are controlled by varying the indium content in the range from 0 to 15 %. A minimum resistivity value of 3 mΩ•cm is measured in 180 nm thick films for

  12. Vibration atomic layer deposition for conformal nanoparticle coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Suk Won; Woo Kim, Jun; Jong Choi, Hyung; Hyung Shim, Joon, E-mail: shimm@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A vibration atomic layer deposition reactor was developed for fabricating a conformal thin-film coating on nanosize particles. In this study, atomic layer deposition of 10–15-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was conducted on a high-surface-area acetylene black powder with particle diameters of 200–250 nm. Intense vibration during the deposition resulted in the effective separation of particles, overcoming the interparticle agglomeration force and enabling effective diffusion of the precursor into the powder chunk; this phenomenon led to the formation of a conformal film coating on the nanopowder particles. It was also confirmed that the atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films initially grew on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder particles as discrete islands, presumably because chemisorption of the precursor and water occurred only on a few sites on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder surface. Relatively sluggish growth of the films during the initial atomic layer deposition cycles was identified from composition analysis.

  13. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of alxzn1-xo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Wu, Y.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of growing multicomponent oxides by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition has been investigated. To this end, Al xZn1-xO films have been deposited using diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and water as Zn, Al, and O precursors, respectively. When the metal precursors

  14. NREL's Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition Enables Lithium-Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battery Technology News Release: NREL's Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition Enables Lithium-Ion Battery increasingly demanding needs of any battery application. These lithium-ion batteries feature a hybrid solid further customized lithium-ion battery materials for high performance devices by utilizing our patented

  15. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  16. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Seung S; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  17. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2009-07-12

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  18. Loading direction-dependent shear behavior at different temperatures of single-layer chiral graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Shuhong; Yu, Peishi; Zhao, Junhua

    2018-06-01

    The loading direction-dependent shear behavior of single-layer chiral graphene sheets at different temperatures is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that the shear properties (such as shear stress-strain curves, buckling strains, and failure strains) of chiral graphene sheets strongly depend on the loading direction due to the structural asymmetry. The maximum values of both the critical buckling shear strain and the failure strain under positive shear deformation can be around 1.4 times higher than those under negative shear deformation. For a given chiral graphene sheet, both its failure strain and failure stress decrease with increasing temperature. In particular, the amplitude to wavelength ratio of wrinkles for different chiral graphene sheets under shear deformation using present MD simulations agrees well with that from the existing theory. These findings provide physical insights into the origins of the loading direction-dependent shear behavior of chiral graphene sheets and their potential applications in nanodevices.

  19. A combined scanning tunneling microscope-atomic layer deposition tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, James F; Van Stockum, Philip B; Iwadate, Hitoshi; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-12-01

    We have built a combined scanning tunneling microscope-atomic layer deposition (STM-ALD) tool that performs in situ imaging of deposition. It operates from room temperature up to 200 °C, and at pressures from 1 × 10(-6) Torr to 1 × 10(-2) Torr. The STM-ALD system has a complete passive vibration isolation system that counteracts both seismic and acoustic excitations. The instrument can be used as an observation tool to monitor the initial growth phases of ALD in situ, as well as a nanofabrication tool by applying an electric field with the tip to laterally pattern deposition. In this paper, we describe the design of the tool and demonstrate its capability for atomic resolution STM imaging, atomic layer deposition, and the combination of the two techniques for in situ characterization of deposition.

  20. Near-field microwave microscopy of high-κ oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselev, Alexander, E-mail: tseleva@ornl.gov; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100 nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

  1. Raman enhancement effect on two-dimensional layered materials: graphene, h-BN and MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xi; Fang, Wenjing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Araujo, Paulo T; Zhang, Xu; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F; Lin, Yuxuan; Zhang, Jin; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-06-11

    Realizing Raman enhancement on a flat surface has become increasingly attractive after the discovery of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS). Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, exhibiting a flat surface without dangling bonds, were thought to be strong candidates for both fundamental studies of this Raman enhancement effect and its extension to meet practical applications requirements. Here, we study the Raman enhancement effect on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), by using the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule as a probe. This molecule can sit on these layered materials in a face-on configuration. However, it is found that the Raman enhancement effect, which is observable on graphene, hBN, and MoS2, has different enhancement factors for the different vibrational modes of CuPc, depending strongly on the surfaces. Higher-frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 1342, 1452, 1531 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on graphene than that on h-BN, while the lower frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 682, 749, 1142, 1185 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on h-BN than that on graphene. MoS2 demonstrated the weakest Raman enhancement effect as a substrate among these three 2D materials. These differences are attributed to the different enhancement mechanisms related to the different electronic properties and chemical bonds exhibited by the three substrates: (1) graphene is zero-gap semiconductor and has a nonpolar C-C bond, which induces charge transfer (2) h-BN is insulating and has a strong B-N bond, while (3) MoS2 is semiconducting with the sulfur atoms on the surface and has a polar covalent bond (Mo-S) with the polarity in the vertical direction to the surface. Therefore, the different Raman enhancement mechanisms differ for each material: (1) charge transfer may occur for graphene; (2) strong dipole-dipole coupling may occur for h-BN, and (3) both charge transfer and dipole-dipole coupling may

  2. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  3. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id; Darma, Yudi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  4. Nonlocal laser annealing to improve thermal contacts between multi-layer graphene and metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, Victor A; Alaferdov, Andrei V; Vaz, Alfredo R; Moshkalev, Stanislav A; Baranov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of thermal conductivity measurements by the micro-Raman technique for suspended multi-layer graphene flakes has been shown to depend critically on the quality of the thermal contacts between the flakes and the metal electrodes used as the heat sink. The quality of the contacts can be improved by nonlocal laser annealing at increased power. The improvement of the thermal contacts to initially rough metal electrodes is attributed to local melting of the metal surface under laser heating, and increased area of real metal–graphene contact. Improvement of the thermal contacts between multi-layer graphene and a silicon oxide surface was also observed, with more efficient heat transfer from graphene as compared with the graphene–metal case. (paper)

  5. Vanishing stick-slip friction in few-layer graphenes: the thickness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Wang, Hui

    2011-07-15

    We report the thickness dependence of intrinsic friction in few-layer graphenes, adopting molecular dynamics simulations. The friction force drops dramatically with decreasing number of layers and finally approaches zero with two or three layers. The results, which are robust over a wide range of temperature, shear velocity, and pressure are quantitatively explained by a theoretical model with regard to lateral stiffness, slip length, and maximum lateral force, which could provide a new conceptual framework for understanding stick-slip friction. The results reveal the crucial role of the dimensional effect in nanoscale friction, and could be helpful in the design of graphene-based nanodevices.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene via solid–gas reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xianqing; Zhong, Jun; Shi, Yalin; Guo, Jin; Huang, Guolong; Hong, Caihao; Zhao, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel approach to synthesis of N-doped few-layer graphene has been developed. • The high doping levels of N in products are achieved. • XPS and XANES results reveal a thermal transformation of N bonding configurations. • The developed method is cost-effective and eco-friendly. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene sheets with high doping concentration were facilely synthesized through solid–gas reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with ammonia vapor in a self-designed hydrothermal system. The morphology, surface chemistry and electronic structure of N-doped graphene sheets were investigated by TEM, AFM, XRD, XPS, XANES and Raman characterizations. Upon hydrothermal treatment, up to 13.22 at% of nitrogen could be introduced into the crumpled few-layer graphene sheets. Both XPS and XANES analysis reveal that the reaction between oxygen functional groups in GO and ammonia vapor produces amide and amine species in hydrothermally treated GO (HTGO). Subsequent thermal annealing of the resultant HTGO introduces a gradual transformation of nitrogen bonding configurations in graphene sheets from amine N to pyridinic and graphitic N with the increase of annealing temperature. This study provides a simple but cost-effective and eco-friendly method to prepare N-doped graphene materials in large-scale for potential applications

  7. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2?nm have been obtained b...

  9. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  10. Analytical modeling of effect of interlayer on effective moduli of layered graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.C.Roach; Y.C.Lu

    2017-01-01

    Nanocomposites enhanced with two-dimensional,layered graphene fillers are a new class of engineering materials that exhibit superior properties and characteristics to composites with conventional fillers.However,the roles of "interlayers" in layered graphene fillers have yet to be fully explored.This paper examines the effect of interlayers on mechanical properties of layered graphene polymer composites.As an effective filler,the fundamental properties (in-plane Young's modulus EL1,out-of-plane Young's modulus EL2;shear modulus GL12,major Poisson's ratio 1L12) of the layered graphene were computed by using the Arridge's lamellar model.The effects of interlayers on effective moduli of layered graphene epoxy composites were examined through the Tandon-Weng model.The properties of the interlayer show noticeable impact on elastic properties of the composites,particular the out-of-plane properties (Young's modulus E2 and shear modulus G12).The interlayer spacing is seen to have much great influence on properties of the composites.As the interlayer spacing increases from 0.34 nm to 2 nm,all elastic properties of the composites have been greatly decreased.

  11. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Stop Band Gap in Periodic Layers of Confined Atomic Vapor/Dielectric Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Li Li; Lu Yi-Xin; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xu Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A stop band gap is predicted in periodic layers of a confined atomic vapor/dielectric medium. Reflection and transmission profile of the layers over the band gap can be dramatically modified by the confined atoms and the number of layer periods. These gap and line features can be ascribed to the enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision, transient behavior of atom-light interaction and Fabry—Pérot effects in a thermal confined atomic system

  13. Effect of layer number and layer stacking registry on the formation and quantification of defects in graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    da Costa, Sara; Ek Weis, Johan; Frank, Otakar; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 98, MAR 2016 (2016), s. 592-598 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Multi-layered graphene * Applied research * Plasma applications Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  14. One-Minute Room-Temperature Transfer-Free Production of Mono- and Few-Layer Polycrystalline Graphene on Various Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenglin; Zeng, Yike; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui; Yu, Yan

    2016-01-14

    Graphene deposited on various substrates has attracted the attention of the scientific and technical communities for use in a wide range of applications. Graphene on substrates is commonly produced by two types of methods, namely, methods that require a transfer step and transfer-free methods. Compared with methods that require a transfer step, transfer-free methods have a simpler procedure and a lower cost. Thus, transfer-free methods have considerable potential to meet the industrial and commercial demands of production methods. However, some limitations of the current transfer-free methods must be overcome, such as the high temperatures encountered during production, the relatively long manufacturing times, incompatibilities for both rigid and flexible substrates, and an inability to extend the process to other two-dimensional (2-D) atomic crystals. In this work, a room-temperature rubbing method is developed for the rapid transfer-free production of defect-free polycrystalline graphene on rigid and flexible substrates. Starting with inexpensive commercially obtained graphite powder, mono- and few-layer graphene can be fabricated directly on various substrates, with an average production time of less than one minute (from raw graphite to graphene on the substrate). Importantly, this method can be extended to other 2-D atomic crystals.

  15. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Monocrystalline zinc oxide films grown by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachnicki, L.; Krajewski, T.; Luka, G.; Witkowski, B.; Kowalski, B.; Kopalko, K.; Domagala, J.Z.; Guziewicz, M.; Godlewski, M.; Guziewicz, E.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we report on the monocrystalline growth of (00.1) ZnO films on GaN template by the Atomic Layer Deposition technique. The ZnO films were obtained at temperature of 300 o C using dietylzinc (DEZn) as a zinc precursor and deionized water as an oxygen precursor. High resolution X-ray diffraction analysis proves that ZnO layers are monocrystalline with rocking curve FWHM of the 00.2 peak equals to 0.07 o . Low temperature photoluminescence shows a sharp and bright excitonic line with FWHM of 13 meV.

  17. Magneto-transport in the zero-energy Landau level of single-layer and bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitler, U; Giesbers, A J M; Elferen, H J van; Kurganova, E V; McCollam, A; Maan, J C

    2011-01-01

    We present recent low-temperature magnetotransport experiments on single-layer and bilayer graphene in high magnetic field up to 33 T. In single layer graphene the fourfold degeneracy of the zero-energy Landau level is lifted by a gap opening at filling factor ν = 0. In bilayer graphene, we observe a partial lifting of the degeneracy of the eightfold degenerate zero-energy Landau level.

  18. Growing vertical ZnO nanorod arrays within graphite: efficient isolation of large size and high quality single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; E, Yifeng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2013-07-18

    We report a unique strategy for efficiently exfoliating large size and high quality single-layer graphene directly from graphite into DMF dispersions by growing ZnO nanorod arrays between the graphene layers in graphite.

  19. Fabrication of Hyperbolic Metamaterials using Atomic Layer Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy

     technology allowing thickness control on atomic scale. As the deposition relies on a surface reaction, conformal pinhole free films can be deposited on various substrates with advanced topology. This method has been a central theme of the project and a core fabrication technique of plasmonic and dielectric...... in dielectric host, the fabrication is still challenging, since ultrathin, continuous, pinhole free nanometer-scale coatings are desired. The required high-quality thin layers have been fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD). It is a relatively new, cyclic, self-limiting thin film deposition......, especially in the infrared range, result in high loss and weak connement to the surface. Additionally, the most implemented metals in plasmonics such as Au and Ag are diffcult to pattern at nanoscale due to their limited chemistry, adhesion or oxidation issues. Therefore the implementation of...

  20. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  1. Facile electrochemical synthesis of few layered graphene from discharged battery electrode and its

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Tiwari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A cost-effective, simple and non-hazardous route for synthesis of few-layered graphene from waste zinc carbon battery (ZCB electrodes via electrochemical expansion (ECE has been reported. In this synthesis, we have electrochemically exfoliated the graphene layers, by intercalating sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS surfactant into graphitic layers at different D.C. voltages with a constant SDBS concentration. The graphene sheets were isolated, purified and characterized by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectrometry, Ultraviolet absorption (UV, Selected area electron diffraction (SAED and Cyclic voltammetry. Best result was obtained at 4.5 V of D.C. A possible mechanism for the intercalation process has been proposed. A promising application of the produced material for supercapacitor application has also been explored in combination with polyaniline.

  2. Graphene: Polymer composites as moisture barrier and charge transport layer toward solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorikar, Tushar; Kavitha, M. K.; Tong, Shi Wun; Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Loh, Kian Ping; Jaiswal, Manu

    2018-05-01

    Graphene: polymer composite based electrically conducting films are realized by a facile solution processable method. Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) measurements on the composite films, reveal a low work function of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) obtained from hydrazine hydrate reduction of graphene oxide (GO). We suggest that the low work function could potentially make rGO: PMMA composite suitable for electron conducting layer in perovskite solar cells in place of traditionally used expensive PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) layer. Further, we demonstrate from the gravimetric experiments conducted on rGO: PMMA films, that the same coating is also resistant to moisture permeation. This latter property can be used to realize a protective coating layer for perovskite films, which are prone to moisture induced degradation. Thus, dual functionality of rGO-PMMA films is demonstrated towards integration with perovskite solar cells. Architecture of perovskite solar cell based on these concepts is proposed.

  3. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  4. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  5. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J., E-mail: keren.kanarik@lamresearch.com; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, California 94538 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices.

  6. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanarik, Keren J.; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices

  7. Adsorption of metal atoms at a buckled graphene grain boundary using model potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgee, Edit E.; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two model potentials have been evaluated with regard to their ability to model adsorption of single metal atoms on a buckled graphene grain boundary. One of the potentials is a Lennard-Jones potential parametrized for gold and carbon, while the other is a bond-order potential parametrized for the interaction between carbon and platinum. Metals are expected to adsorb more strongly to grain boundaries than to pristine graphene due to their enhanced adsorption at point defects resembling those that constitute the grain boundary. Of the two potentials considered here, only the bond-order potential reproduces this behavior and predicts the energy of the adsorbate to be about 0.8 eV lower at the grain boundary than on pristine graphene. The Lennard-Jones potential predicts no significant difference in energy between adsorbates at the boundary and on pristine graphene. These results indicate that the Lennard-Jones potential is not suitable for studies of metal adsorption on defects in graphene, and that bond-order potentials are preferable

  8. Flexible bactericidal graphene oxide–chitosan layers for stem cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaheri, M.; Akhavan, O.; Simchi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of flexible graphene oxide–chitosan nanocomposite layers was reported. • The flexibility of the chitosan layers were improved by adding graphene oxide sheets. • The nanocomposite layers with 1.5 wt% graphene oxide content showed yielded flexible and antibacterial surfaces for stem cell proliferation. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO)–chitosan composite layers with stacked layer structures were synthesized using chemically exfoliated GO sheets (with lateral dimensions of ∼1 μm and thickness of ∼1 nm), and applied as antibacterial and flexible nanostructured templates for stem cell proliferation. By increasing the GO content from zero to 6 wt%, the strength and elastic modulus of the layers increased ∼80% and 45%, respectively. Similar to the chitosan layer, the GO–chitosan composite layers showed significant antibacterial activity (>77% inactivation after only 3 h) against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surface density of the actin cytoskeleton fibers of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on the chitosan and GO(1.5 wt%)–chitosan composite layers was found nearly the same, while it significantly decreased by increasing the GO content to 3 and 6 wt%. Our results indicated that although a high concentration of GO in the chitosan layer (here, 6 wt%) could decelerate the proliferation of the hMSCs on the flexible layer, a low concentration of GO (i.e., 1.5 wt%) not only resulted in biocompatibility but also kept the mechanical flexibility of the self-sterilized layers for high proliferation of hMSCs

  9. Flexible bactericidal graphene oxide–chitosan layers for stem cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaheri, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, O., E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of flexible graphene oxide–chitosan nanocomposite layers was reported. • The flexibility of the chitosan layers were improved by adding graphene oxide sheets. • The nanocomposite layers with 1.5 wt% graphene oxide content showed yielded flexible and antibacterial surfaces for stem cell proliferation. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO)–chitosan composite layers with stacked layer structures were synthesized using chemically exfoliated GO sheets (with lateral dimensions of ∼1 μm and thickness of ∼1 nm), and applied as antibacterial and flexible nanostructured templates for stem cell proliferation. By increasing the GO content from zero to 6 wt%, the strength and elastic modulus of the layers increased ∼80% and 45%, respectively. Similar to the chitosan layer, the GO–chitosan composite layers showed significant antibacterial activity (>77% inactivation after only 3 h) against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surface density of the actin cytoskeleton fibers of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on the chitosan and GO(1.5 wt%)–chitosan composite layers was found nearly the same, while it significantly decreased by increasing the GO content to 3 and 6 wt%. Our results indicated that although a high concentration of GO in the chitosan layer (here, 6 wt%) could decelerate the proliferation of the hMSCs on the flexible layer, a low concentration of GO (i.e., 1.5 wt%) not only resulted in biocompatibility but also kept the mechanical flexibility of the self-sterilized layers for high proliferation of hMSCs.

  10. Investigating change of properties in gallium ion irradiation patterned single-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quan, E-mail: wangq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Dong, Jinyao; Bai, Bing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Xie, Guoxin [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-14

    Besides its excellent physical properties, graphene promises to play a significant role in electronics with superior properties, which requires patterning of graphene for device integration. Here, we presented the changes in properties of single-layer graphene before and after patterning using gallium ion beam. Combined with Raman spectra of graphene, the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) image confirmed that a metal–insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. The changes in work function and Raman spectra of graphene indicated that the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. The patterning width of graphene presented an increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate. - Highlights: • The scanning capacitance microscopy image confirmed a metal–insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. • The changes indicated the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. • The patterning width of graphene presented a increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate.

  11. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingchao; Hong, Yang; Yue, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs

  12. Engineering of electronic properties of single layer graphene by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Ashish; Tripathi, Ambuj; Tyagi, Chetna; Avasthi, D. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, swift heavy ion irradiation induced effects on the electrical properties of single layer graphene are reported. The modulation in minimum conductivity point in graphene with in-situ electrical measurement during ion irradiation was studied. It is found that the resistance of graphene layer decreases at lower fluences up to 3 × 1011 ions/cm2, which is accompanied by the five-fold increase in electron and hole mobilities. The ion irradiation induced increase in electron and hole mobilities at lower fluence up to 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 is verified by separate Hall measurements on another irradiated graphene sample at the selected fluence. In contrast to the adverse effects of irradiation on the electrical properties of materials, we have found improvement in electrical mobility after irradiation. The increment in mobility is explained by considering the defect annealing in graphene after irradiation at a lower fluence regime. The modification in carrier density after irradiation is also observed. Based on findings of the present work, we suggest ion beam irradiation as a useful tool for tuning of the electrical properties of graphene.

  13. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  14. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yingfeng; Li, Meicheng; Gu, TianSheng; Bai, Fan; Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya; Yu, Yangxin

    2013-01-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  15. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid 'marbles' with molecularly thin graphene.

  16. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  17. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte; Conédéra, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime

  18. Hybrid Doping of Few-Layer Graphene via a Combination of Intercalation and Surface Doping

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed

    2017-05-23

    Surface molecular doping of graphene has been shown to modify its work function and increase its conductivity. However, the associated shifts in work function and increases in carrier concentration are highly coupled and limited by the surface coverage of dopant molecules on graphene. Here we show that few-layer graphene (FLG) can be doped using a hybrid approach, effectively combining surface doping by larger (metal-)organic molecules, while smaller molecules, such as Br2 and FeCl3, intercalate into the bulk. Intercalation tunes the carrier concentration more effectively, whereas surface doping of intercalated FLG can be used to tune its work function without reducing the carrier mobility. This multi-modal doping approach yields a very high carrier density and tunable work function for FLG, demonstrating a new versatile platform for fabricating graphene-based contacts for electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  19. Hybrid Doping of Few-Layer Graphene via a Combination of Intercalation and Surface Doping

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Amassian, Aram

    2017-01-01

    Surface molecular doping of graphene has been shown to modify its work function and increase its conductivity. However, the associated shifts in work function and increases in carrier concentration are highly coupled and limited by the surface coverage of dopant molecules on graphene. Here we show that few-layer graphene (FLG) can be doped using a hybrid approach, effectively combining surface doping by larger (metal-)organic molecules, while smaller molecules, such as Br2 and FeCl3, intercalate into the bulk. Intercalation tunes the carrier concentration more effectively, whereas surface doping of intercalated FLG can be used to tune its work function without reducing the carrier mobility. This multi-modal doping approach yields a very high carrier density and tunable work function for FLG, demonstrating a new versatile platform for fabricating graphene-based contacts for electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  20. Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps

  1. Hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures with atomic layer deposition/molecular layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit, E-mail: maarit.karppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2014-01-15

    A combination of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) and molecular layer deposition (MLD) techniques is successfully employed to fabricate thin films incorporating superlattice structures that consist of single layers of organic molecules between thicker layers of ZnO. Diethyl zinc and water are used as precursors for the deposition of ZnO by ALD, while three different organic precursors are investigated for the MLD part: hydroquinone, 4-aminophenol and 4,4′-oxydianiline. The successful superlattice formation with all the organic precursors is verified through x-ray reflectivity studies. The effects of the interspersed organic layers/superlattice structure on the electrical and thermoelectric properties of ZnO are investigated through resistivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements at room temperature. The results suggest an increase in carrier concentration for small concentrations of organic layers, while higher concentrations seem to lead to rather large reductions in carrier concentration.

  2. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  3. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Jun; Sun, Qing-Qing; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2012-03-01

    We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  4. Photoluminescence of phosphorus atomic layer doped Ge grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Nien, Li-Wei; Capellini, Giovanni; Virgilio, Michele; Costina, Ioan; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Seifert, Winfried; Srinivasan, Ashwyn; Loo, Roger; Scappucci, Giordano; Sabbagh, Diego; Hesse, Anne; Murota, Junichi; Schroeder, Thomas; Tillack, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    Improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) of Phosphorus (P) doped Ge by P atomic layer doping (ALD) is investigated. Fifty P delta layers of 8 × 1013 cm-2 separated by 4 nm Ge spacer are selectively deposited at 300 °C on a 700 nm thick P-doped Ge buffer layer of 1.4 × 1019 cm-3 on SiO2 structured Si (100) substrate. A high P concentration region of 1.6 × 1020 cm-3 with abrupt P delta profiles is formed by the P-ALD process. Compared to the P-doped Ge buffer layer, a reduced PL intensity is observed, which might be caused by a higher density of point defects in the P delta doped Ge layer. The peak position is shifted by ˜0.1 eV towards lower energy, indicating an increased active carrier concentration in the P-delta doped Ge layer. By introducing annealing at 400 °C to 500 °C after each Ge spacer deposition, P desorption and diffusion is observed resulting in relatively uniform P profiles of ˜2 × 1019 cm-3. Increased PL intensity and red shift of the PL peak are observed due to improved crystallinity and higher active P concentration.

  5. Controlling the layer localization of gapless states in bilayer graphene with a gate voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Bryant, Garnett W.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2018-04-01

    Experiments in gated bilayer graphene with stacking domain walls present topological gapless states protected by no-valley mixing. Here we research these states under gate voltages using atomistic models, which allow us to elucidate their origin. We find that the gate potential controls the layer localization of the two states, which switches non-trivially between layers depending on the applied gate voltage magnitude. We also show how these bilayer gapless states arise from bands of single-layer graphene by analyzing the formation of carbon bonds between layers. Based on this analysis we provide a model Hamiltonian with analytical solutions, which explains the layer localization as a function of the ratio between the applied potential and interlayer hopping. Our results open a route for the manipulation of gapless states in electronic devices, analogous to the proposed writing and reading memories in topological insulators.

  6. Graphene-Tapered ZnO Nanorods Array as a Flexible Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseup Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible solar cells have drawn a great deal of attention due to their various advantages including deformable and wearable characteristics. In the solar cells, the antireflection layer plays an important role in the improvement in the conversion efficiency by increasing the light transmission and suppressing the Fresnel refraction. For the successful implantation of the antireflection layer into the flexible solar cells, the flexible mechanical property of the antireflection layer is also necessary. However, the study on flexible antireflection layer for the flexible solar cells or optoelectronics is still lacking. In this study, we report the graphene-tapered ZnO nanorods array as a flexible antireflection layer for the application in flexible solar cells. Flexible two-dimensional graphene sheet and the tapered morphology of ZnO nanorods enable conformal coverage on the flexible substrate with curved surface and significant improvements in antireflection properties, respectively.

  7. Multiscale investigation of graphene layers on 6H-SiC(000-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiebel Fanny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, a multiscale investigation of few graphene layers grown on 6H-SiC(000-1 under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV conditions is presented. At 100-μm scale, the authors show that the UHV growth yields few layer graphene (FLG with an average thickness given by Auger spectroscopy between 1 and 2 graphene planes. At the same scale, electron diffraction reveals a significant rotational disorder between the first graphene layer and the SiC surface, although well-defined preferred orientations exist. This is confirmed at the nanometer scale by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. Finally, STM (at the nm scale and Raman spectroscopy (at the μm scale show that the FLG stacking is turbostratic, and that the domain size of the crystallites ranges from 10 to 100 nm. The most striking result is that the FLGs experience a strong compressive stress that is seldom observed for graphene grown on the C face of SiC substrates.

  8. Graphene as transmissive electrodes and aligning layers for liquid-crystal-based electro-optic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajratan; Shalov, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    In a conventional liquid crystal (LC) cell, polyimide layers are used to align the LC homogeneously in the cell, and transmissive indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes are used to apply the electric field to reorient the LC along the field. It is experimentally presented here that monolayer graphene films on the two glass substrates can function concurrently as the LC aligning layers and the transparent electrodes to fabricate an LC cell, without using the conventional polyimide and ITO substrates. This replacement can effectively decrease the thickness of all the alignment layers and electrodes from about 100 nm to less than 1 nm. The interaction between LC and graphene through π-π electron stacking imposes a planar alignment on the LC in the graphene-based cell-which is verified using a crossed polarized microscope. The graphene-based LC cell exhibits an excellent nematic director reorientation process from planar to homeotropic configuration through the application of an electric field-which is probed by dielectric and electro-optic measurements. Finally, it is shown that the electro-optic switching is significantly faster in the graphene-based LC cell than in a conventional ITO-polyimide LC cell.

  9. Ultrathin Planar Graphene Supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Ajayan, Pullikel M [Rice University; Yoo, Jung Joon [KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; Balakrishnan, Kaushik [Rice University; Srivastava, Anchal [Rice University; Conway, Michelle [Rice University; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohan [Rice University; Yu, Jin [Rice University; Vajtai, Robert [Rice University

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of atomically thin and flat layers of conducting materials such as graphene, new designs for thin film energy storage devices with good performance have become possible. Here, we report an in-plane fabrication approach for ultrathin supercapacitors based on electrodes comprised of pristine graphene and multi-layer reduced graphene oxide. The in-plane design is straightforward to implement and exploits efficiently the surface of each graphene layer for energy storage. The open architecture and the effect of graphene edges enable even the thinnest of devices, made from as grown 1-2 graphene layers, to reach specific capacities up to 80 Fcm-2. While, much higher (394 Fcm-2) specific capacities are observed in case of multi-layered graphene oxide electrodes, owing to the better utilization of the available electrochemical surface area. The performances of devices with pristine as well as thicker graphene based structures are examined using a combination of experiments and model calculations. The demonstrated all solid-state supercapacitors provide a prototype for a broad range of thin-film based energy storage devices.

  10. Blending effect of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene–graphene composite layers for flexible thin film transistors with a polymer gate dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Sarbani; Adriyanto, Feri; Wang, Yeong-Her

    2014-01-01

    Solution processible poly(4-vinylphenol) is employed as a transistor dielectric material for low cost processing on flexible substrates at low temperatures. A 6,13-bis (triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS) pentacene–graphene hybrid semiconductor is drop cast to fabricate bottom-gate and bottom-contact field-effect transistor devices on flexible and glass substrates under an ambient air environment. A few layers of graphene flakes increase the area in the conduction channel, and form bridge connections between the crystalline regions of the semiconductor layer which can change the surface morphology of TIPS pentacene films. The TIPS pentacene–graphene hybrid semiconductor-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) cross-linked with a poly(4-vinylphenol) gate dielectric exhibit an effective field-effect mobility of 0.076 cm 2  V −1  s −1 and a threshold voltage of −0.7 V at V gs = −40 V. By contrast, typical TIPS pentacene shows four times lower mobility of 0.019 cm 2  V −1  s −1 and a threshold voltage of 5 V. The graphene/TIPS pentacene hybrids presented in this paper can enhance the electrical characteristics of OTFTs due to their high crystallinity, uniform large-grain distribution, and effective reduction of crystal misorientation of the organic semiconductor layer, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical microscopy studies. (paper)

  11. Blending effect of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene-graphene composite layers for flexible thin film transistors with a polymer gate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sarbani; Adriyanto, Feri; Wang, Yeong-Her

    2014-02-28

    Solution processible poly(4-vinylphenol) is employed as a transistor dielectric material for low cost processing on flexible substrates at low temperatures. A 6,13-bis (triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS) pentacene-graphene hybrid semiconductor is drop cast to fabricate bottom-gate and bottom-contact field-effect transistor devices on flexible and glass substrates under an ambient air environment. A few layers of graphene flakes increase the area in the conduction channel, and form bridge connections between the crystalline regions of the semiconductor layer which can change the surface morphology of TIPS pentacene films. The TIPS pentacene-graphene hybrid semiconductor-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) cross-linked with a poly(4-vinylphenol) gate dielectric exhibit an effective field-effect mobility of 0.076 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a threshold voltage of -0.7 V at V(gs) = -40 V. By contrast, typical TIPS pentacene shows four times lower mobility of 0.019 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a threshold voltage of 5 V. The graphene/TIPS pentacene hybrids presented in this paper can enhance the electrical characteristics of OTFTs due to their high crystallinity, uniform large-grain distribution, and effective reduction of crystal misorientation of the organic semiconductor layer, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical microscopy studies.

  12. Optical properties of spray coated layers with carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Krzeminski, Jakub; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Salbut, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes as well as graphene are allotropic forms of carbon. Graphene is a two dimensional (2D) form of atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice, while carbon nanotube is a cylindrical nanostructure composed of a rolled sheet of graphene lattice at specific and discrete angles. Both of discussed materials have a high potential for modern engineering, especially in organic and printed electronics. High transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum and low electrical resistance are desirable features in various applications and may be fulfilled with studied carbon nanomaterials. They have chances to become an important technological improvement in customers electronic devices by applying them to electrodes production in flexible screens and light sources. Graphene end carbon nanotubes are conceptually similar. However, characteristic properties of these two substances are different. In the article authors present the results of the transmission in visible electromagnetic spectrum characteristics of different samples. This parameter and the resistance of electrodes are tested, analysed and compared. Characteristics of optical transmittance against resistance with the optimal point of that relationship are presented in paper. Moreover, dependency of graphene nanoplatelets agglomerates arrangement against type of nano-fillers is shown. Two groups of tested inks contain graphene nanoplatelets with different fillers diameters. The third group contains carbon nanotubes. Described parameters are important for production process and results of analysis can be used by technologists working with elastic electronics.

  13. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  14. High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH3 gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007 m(2)  g(-1) ), high electrical conductivity (1532 S m(-1) ), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt %) for electrical double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) , and a capacitance of 261 F g(-1) was retained at 50 A g(-1) , which indicated a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability and preserved 96 % of the initial specific capacitance after 100 000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy results provided evidenced for the recovery of π conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Wrinkled Few-Layer Graphene as Highly Efficient Load Bearer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Androulidakis, Ch.; Koukaras, E. N.; Řáhová, Jaroslava; Sampathkumar, Krishna; Parthenios, J.; Papagelis, K.; Frank, Otakar; Galiotis, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 31 (2017), s. 26593-26601 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * wrinkling * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016

  16. Stepwise Reduction of Immobilized Mono layer Graphene Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; He, Yudong; Lang, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    to the pronounced aggregation that accompanies deoxygenation of GO in solution. Surface immobilization of monolayered graphene oxide (mGO) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated as a method to circumvent this problem. Two types of LB films with different density of mGO flakes were prepared, i.e., diluted...

  17. Electrochemical charging of the single-layer graphene membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 12 (2016), s. 2331-2335 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemical charging * graphene membrane * in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2016

  18. Elastic modulus of Extreme Ultraviolet exposed single-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mund, Baibhav Kumar; Gao, An; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Highly transparent membranes are required for a number of applications, such as protective coatings for components in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, beam splitters (EUV pump-probe experiments), transmission gratings, and reticles. Graphene is an excellent candidate due to its high tensile

  19. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  20. Rebar Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  1. Evolution of the Raman spectra from single-, few-, and many-layer graphene with increasing disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Ferreira, E. H.; Stavale, F.; Moutinho, Marcus V. O.; Lucchese, M. M.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Achete, C. A.; Jorio, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the micro-Raman spectroscopy of monolayer, bilayer, trilayer, and many layers of graphene (graphite) bombarded by low-energy argon ions with different doses. The evolution of peak frequencies, intensities, linewidths, and areas of the main Raman bands of graphene is analyzed as function of the distance between defects and number of layers. We describe the disorder-induced frequency shifts and the increase in the linewidth of the Raman bands by means of a spatial-correlation model. Also, the evolution of the relative areas A D /A G , A D ' /A G , and A G ' /A G is described by a phenomenological model. The present results can be used to fully characterize disorder in graphene systems.

  2. The roles of wetting liquid in the transfer process of single layer graphene onto arbitrary substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Hun; Yi, Junghwa; Jin, Hyeong Ki; Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun

    2013-11-01

    Wet transfer is crucial for most device structures of the proposed applications employing single layer graphene in order to take advantage of the unique physical, chemical, bio-chemical and electrical properties of the graphene. However, transfer methodologies that can be used to obtain continuous film without voids, wrinkles and cracks are limited although film perfectness critically depends on the relative surface tension of wetting liquids on the substrate. We report the importance of wetting liquid in the transfer process with a systematic study on the parameters governing film integrity in single layer graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition. Two different suspension liquids (in terms of polar character) are tested for adequacy of transfer onto SiO2 and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS). We found that the relative surface tension of the wetting liquid on the surfaces of the substrate is related to transfer quality. In addition, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is introduced as a good suspension liquid to HMDS, a mechanically flexible substrate.

  3. Deposition of HgTe by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first instance of HgTe growth by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE). EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD), all of which are based on the growth...

  4. Spin transport in two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Li, Q. C.; Zhang, Y. F.; Schönenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    We study room-temperature spin transport in graphene devices encapsulated between a layer-by-layer-stacked two-layer-thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) tunnel barrier, and a few-layer-thick exfoliated-hBN substrate. We find mobilities and spin-relaxation times comparable to that of SiO2 substrate-based graphene devices, and we obtain a similar order of magnitude of spin relaxation rates for both the Elliott-Yafet and D'Yakonov-Perel' mechanisms. The behavior of ferromagnet/two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN contacts ranges from transparent to tunneling due to inhomogeneities in the CVD-hBN barriers. Surprisingly, we find both positive and negative spin polarizations for high-resistance two-layer-CVD-hBN barrier contacts with respect to the low-resistance contacts. Furthermore, we find that the differential spin-injection polarization of the high-resistance contacts can be modulated by dc bias from -0.3 to +0.3 V with no change in its sign, while its magnitude increases at higher negative bias. These features point to the distinctive spin-injection nature of the two-layer-CVD-hBN compared to the bilayer-exfoliated-hBN tunnel barriers.

  5. Examining the impact of multi-layer graphene using cellular and amphibian models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzi, Laura; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bianco, Alberto; Mouchet, Florence; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury; Janowska, Izabela; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Soula, Brigitte; Galibert, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, graphene has been defined as the revolutionary material showing an incredible expansion in industrial applications. Different graphene forms have been applied in several contexts, spreading from energy technologies and electronics to food and agriculture technologies. Graphene showed promises also in the biomedical field. Hopeful results have been already obtained in diagnostic, drug delivery, tissue regeneration and photothermal cancer ablation. In view of the enormous development of graphene-based technologies, a careful assessment of its impact on health and environment is demanded. It is evident how investigating the graphene toxicity is of fundamental importance in the context of medical purposes. On the other hand, the nanomaterial present in the environment, likely to be generated all along the industrial life-cycle, may have harmful effects on living organisms. In the present work, an important contribution on the impact of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on health and environment is given by using a multifaceted approach. For the first purpose, the effect of the material on two mammalian cell models was assessed. Key cytotoxicity parameters were considered such as cell viability and inflammatory response induction. This was combined with an evaluation of MLG toxicity towards Xenopus laevis, used as both in vivo and environmental model organism. (paper)

  6. Selective self-assembly and light emission tuning of layered hybrid perovskites on patterned graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Valentino L P; Kovaříček, Petr; Valeš, Václav; Drogowska, Karolina; Verhagen, Tim; Vejpravova, Jana; Horák, Lukáš; Listorti, Andrea; Colella, Silvia; Kalbáč, Martin

    2018-02-15

    The emission of light in two-dimensional (2-D) layered hybrid organic lead halide perovskites, namely (R-NH 3 ) 2 PbX 4 , can be effectively tuned using specific building blocks for the perovskite formation. Herein this behaviour is combined with a non-covalent graphene functionalization allowing excellent selectivity and spatial resolution of the perovskite film growth, promoting the formation of hybrid 2-D perovskite : graphene heterostructures with uniform coverage of up to centimeter scale graphene sheets and arbitrary shapes down to 5 μm. Using cryo-Raman microspectroscopy, highly resolved spectra of the perovskite phases were obtained and the Raman mapping served as a convenient spatially resolved technique for monitoring the distribution of the perovskite and graphene constituents on the substrate. In addition, the stability of the perovskite phase with respect to the thermal variation was inspected in situ by X-ray diffraction. Finally, time-resolved photoluminescence characterization demonstrated that the optical properties of the perovskite films grown on graphene are not hampered. Our study thus opens the door to smart fabrication routes for (opto)-electronic devices based on 2-D perovskites in contact with graphene with complex architectures.

  7. A broadband metamaterial absorber based on multi-layer graphene in the terahertz region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Pan; Liu, Fei; Ren, Guang Jun; Su, Fei; Li, Dong; Yao, Jian Quan

    2018-06-01

    A broadband metamaterial absorber, composed of the periodic graphene pattern on SiO2 dielectric with the double layer graphene films inserted in it and all of them backed by metal plan, is proposed and investigated. The simulation results reveal that the wide absorption band can be flexibly tuned between the low-frequency band and the high-frequency band by adjusting graphene's Fermi level. The absorption can achieve 90% in 5.50-7.10 THz, with Fermi level of graphene is 0.3 eV, while in 6.98-9.10 THz with Fermi level 0.6 eV. Furthermore, the proposed structure can be switched from reflection (>81%) to absorption (>90%) over the whole operation band, when the Fermi level of graphene varies from 0 to 0.6 eV. Besides, the proposed absorber is insensitive to the polarization and can work over a wide range of incident angle. Compared with the previous broadband absorber, our graphene based wideband terahertz absorber can enable a wide application of high performance terahertz devices, including sensors, imaging devices and electro-optic switches.

  8. A Simple Road for the Transformation of Few-Layer Graphene into MWNTs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintana, Mildred; Grzelczak, Marek; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Bals, Sara; Kooi, Bart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    We report the direct formation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by ultrasonication of graphite in dimethylformamide (DMF) upon addition of ferrocene aldehyde (Fc-CHO). The tubular structures appear exclusively at the edges of graphene layers and contain Fe clusters. Pc in conjunction with

  9. Issues involved in the atomic layer deposition of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert Kimes

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to study the nucleation and growth of tungsten on aluminum oxide surfaces. Tungsten metal was deposited using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) techniques. ALD uses sequential surface reactions to deposit material with atomic layer control. W ALD is performed using sequential exposures of WF6 and Si2H6. The step-wise nature of W ALD allows nucleation studies to be performed by analyzing the W surface concentration after each ALD reaction. Nucleation and growth regions can be identified by quantifying the AES signal intensities from both the W surface and the Al2O3 substrate. W nucleation occurred in 3 ALD reaction cycles. The AES results yielded a nucleation rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle and a growth rate of ≈3 A/ALD cycle. AES studies also explored the nucleation and growth of Al2O3 on W. Al2O3 nucleated in 1 ALD cycle giving a nucleation rate of 3.5 A/ALD cycle and a subsequent growth rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle. Mass spectrometry was then used to study the ALD reaction chemistry of tungsten deposition. Because of the step-wise nature of the W ALD chemistry, each W ALD reaction could be studied independently. The gaseous mass products were identified from both the WF6 and Si2H6 reactions. H2, HF and SiF4 mass products were observed for the WF6 reaction. The Si2H6 reaction displayed a room temperature reaction and a 200°C reaction. Products from the room temperature Si2H6 reaction were H2 and SiF3H. The reaction at 200°C yielded only H2 as a reaction product. H2 desorption from the surface contributes to the 200°C Si2H6 reaction. AES was used to confirm that the gas phase reaction products are correlated with a change in the surface species. Atomic hydrogen reduction of metal halides and oganometallic compounds provides another method for depositing metals with atomic layer control. The quantity of atomic hydrogen necessary to perform this chemistry is critical to the metal ALD process. A thermocouple probe was constructed to

  10. Atomic-Scale Characterization and Manipulation of Freestanding Graphene Using Adapted Capabilities of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Steven

    Graphene was the first two-dimensional material ever discovered, and it exhibits many unusual phenomena important to both pure and applied physics. To ensure the purest electronic structure, or to study graphene's elastic properties, it is often suspended over holes or trenches in a substrate. The aim of the research presented in this dissertation was to develop methods for characterizing and manipulating freestanding graphene on the atomic scale using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Conventional microscopy and spectroscopy techniques must be carefully reconsidered to account for movement of the extremely flexible sample. First, the acquisition of atomic-scale images of freestanding graphene using the STM and the ability to pull the graphene perpendicular to its plane by applying an electrostatic force with the STM tip are demonstrated. The atomic-scale images contained surprisingly large corrugations due to the electrostatic attractive force varying in registry with the local density of states. Meanwhile, a large range of control over the graphene height at a point was obtained by varying the tip bias voltage, and the application to strain engineering of graphene's so-called pseudomagnetic field is examined. Next, the effect of the tunneling current was investigated. With increasing current, the graphene sample moves away from the tip rather than toward it. It was determined that this must be due to local heating by the electric current, causing the graphene to contract because it has a negative coefficient of thermal expansion. Finally, by imaging a very small area, the STM can monitor the height of one location over long time intervals. Results sometimes exhibit periodic behavior, with a frequency and amplitude that depend on the tunneling current. These fluctuations are interpreted as low-frequency flexural phonon modes within elasticity theory. All of these findings set the foundation for employing a STM in the study of freestanding graphene.

  11. Investigation of ZPE and temperature effects on the Eley-Rideal recombination of hydrogen atoms on graphene using a multidimensional graphene-H-H potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizun, M.; Bachellerie, D.; Aguillon, F.; Sidis, V.

    2010-09-01

    We study the Eley-Rideal recombination of H atoms on graphene under the physical conditions of the interstellar medium. Effects of the ZPE motions of the chemisorbed H atom and of the graphene thermal motions are investigated. Classical molecular dynamics calculations undertaken with the multidimensional potential of Bachellerie et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11 (2009) 2715] are reported. The ZPE effects are the strongest. The closer the collision energy is to the classical reaction threshold the more sizeable the effects. The quantum reaction cross section is also estimated below and above the classical threshold using a capture model.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of a MoS₂ film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Liu, Bo; Teng, Jing Hua; Guo, Shifeng; Low, Hong Yee; Tan, Hui Ru; Chong, Christy Yuen Tung; Yang, Ren Bin; Loh, Kian Ping

    2014-09-21

    A mono- to multilayer thick MoS₂ film has been grown by using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique at 300 °C on a sapphire wafer. ALD provides precise control of the MoS₂ film thickness due to pulsed introduction of the reactants and self-limiting reactions of MoCl₅ and H₂S. A post-deposition annealing of the ALD-deposited monolayer film improves the crystallinity of the film, which is evident from the presence of triangle-shaped crystals that exhibit strong photoluminescence in the visible range.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W. [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, Massachusetts 01507 (United States); Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  14. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  15. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-01-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO 2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO 2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices

  16. Calculation of the number of atoms displaced during the irradiation of monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel Codorniu Pujals; Yuri Aguilera Corrales; Francesco Baldassarre

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of monolayer graphene, combined with chemical functionalization, could be an effective method for modifying its electronic structure and for achieving specific physical properties adjusted to different applications. A difficulty arising during planning and studying the irradiation in this system is that many of the models of interaction of the radiation with the substance cannot be applied to the two-dimensional structure of graphene. In particular, the mathematical expressions available to calculate the number of atoms displaced during the bombardment with particles can be applied only to 3D isotropic solids. In the present work, an alternative analytic expression is presented for the irradiation of graphene with heavy ions or with protons and other light charged particles. The expression was obtained on the basis of the classic theory of dispersion, using a Coulomb potential for the light charged particles and one of Inverse Square for heavy ions. For medium values of the energy of the incident particle a decreasing dependence of the number of displaced atoms with energy is obtained. This behavior, related with the two-dimensional structure of the target, had been observed in other authors' works using computational simulation. (author)

  17. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Jackson, Bret; Hughes, Keith H; Burghardt, Irene; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  18. Comment on "Theoretical study of the dynamics of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on graphene multilayers"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Matteo; Martinazzo, Rocco

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that the theoretical prediction of a transient magnetization in bilayer and multilayer graphene (M. Moaied et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 155419 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.155419) relies on an incorrect physical scenario for adsorption, namely, one in which H atoms adsorb barrierless on graphitic substrates and form a random adsorption pattern of monomers. Rather, according to experimental evidence, H atom sticking is an activated process, and adsorption is under kinetic control, largely ruled by a preferential sticking mechanism that leads to stable, nonmagnetic dimers at all but the smallest coverages (Theory and experiments are reconciled by reconsidering the hydrogen atom adsorption energetics with the help of van der Waals-inclusive density functional calculations that properly account for the basis set superposition error. It is shown that today van der Waals-density functional theory predicts a shallow physisorption well that nicely agrees with available experimental data and suggests that the hydrogen atom adsorption barrier in graphene is 180 meV high, within ˜5 meV accuracy.

  19. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  20. Mechanical properties and electronic structure of edge-doped graphene nanoribbons with F, O, and Cl atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, Sebastián; Fernández-Werner, Luciana; Pardo, Helena; Jasen, Paula; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Álvaro W

    2017-08-16

    In this study, we present the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of edge-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) doped with fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine atoms. To the best of our knowledge, to date, no experimental results concerning the mechanical properties of graphene-derived nanoribbons have been reported in the literature. Simulations indicate that Cl- and F-doped ZGNRs present an equivalent 2-dimensional Young's modulus E 2D , which seems to be higher than those of graphene and H-doped ZGNRs. This is a consequence of the electronic structure of the system, particularly originating from strong interactions between the dopant atoms localized at the edges. The interaction between dopant atoms located at the edges is higher for Cl and lower for F and O atoms. This is the origin of the observed trend, in which E > E > E for all the analyzed ZGNRs.

  1. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of GaN at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgit, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Alevli, Mustafa; Biyikli, Necmi [UNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-01-15

    The authors report on the self-limiting growth of GaN thin films at low temperatures. Films were deposited on Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the group-III and -V precursors, respectively. GaN deposition rate saturated at 185 deg. C for NH{sub 3} doses starting from 90 s. Atomic layer deposition temperature window was observed from 185 to {approx}385 deg. C. Deposition rate, which is constant at {approx}0.51 A/cycle within the temperature range of 250 - 350 deg. C, increased slightly as the temperature decreased to 185 deg. C. In the bulk film, concentrations of Ga, N, and O were constant at {approx}36.6, {approx}43.9, and {approx}19.5 at. %, respectively. C was detected only at the surface and no C impurities were found in the bulk film. High oxygen concentration in films was attributed to the oxygen impurities present in group-V precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a microstructure consisting of small crystallites dispersed in an amorphous matrix.

  3. Titanium dioxide thin films by atomic layer deposition: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Marin, Giovanni; Karppinen, Maarit

    2017-09-01

    Within its rich phase diagram titanium dioxide is a truly multifunctional material with a property palette that has been shown to span from dielectric to transparent-conducting characteristics, in addition to the well-known catalytic properties. At the same time down-scaling of microelectronic devices has led to an explosive growth in research on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a wide variety of frontier thin-film materials, among which TiO2 is one of the most popular ones. In this topical review we summarize the advances in research of ALD of titanium dioxide starting from the chemistries of the over 50 different deposition routes developed for TiO2 and the resultant structural characteristics of the films. We then continue with the doped ALD-TiO2 thin films from the perspective of dielectric, transparent-conductor and photocatalytic applications. Moreover, in order to cover the latest trends in the research field, both the variously constructed TiO2 nanostructures enabled by ALD and the Ti-based hybrid inorganic-organic films grown by the emerging ALD/MLD (combined atomic/molecular layer deposition) technique are discussed.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-01-01

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe 3 O 4 thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H 2 /Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe 2 O 3 sample is reduced to Fe 3 O 4 phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications

  5. Linear and circular polarized tunable slow light in Bragg-spaced graphene layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao, E-mail: jtliu@semi.ac.cn [Nanoscale Science and Technology Laboratory, Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Nian-Hua [Nanoscale Science and Technology Laboratory, Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Hai [Department of Physics, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100037 (China); Wang, Tong-Biao [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Li, Xiao-Jing [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-11-01

    The light pulse delay in Bragg-spaced graphene layers (BSGs) combined with a magnetic field is investigated theoretically. BSGs can slow down the group velocity of light more effectively than traditional Bragg-spaced quantum wells due to the large binding energy and strong dipole oscillator strength of the magnetic-exciton of graphene. The group velocity can be tuned by varying the pulse frequency, the Bragg frequency, and the magnetic field. Especially, by tuning the occupation number of the Landau level the group velocity in BSGs shows strong tunable circular dichroism. Our findings could have applications in photonic integrated circuits and quantum computation.

  6. Laser sintered thin layer graphene and cubic boron nitride reinforced nickel matrix nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zengrong; Tong, Guoquan

    2015-10-01

    Laser sintered thin layer graphene (Gr)-cubic boron nitride (CBN)-Ni nanocomposites were fabricated on AISI 4140 plate substrate. The composites fabricating process, composites microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to study the micro structures and composition of the composites. XRD and Raman tests proved that graphene and CBN were dispersed in the nanocomposites. Nanoindentation test results indicate the significant improvements were achieved in the composites mechanical properties.

  7. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  8. Interface and interaction of graphene layers on SiC(0001[combining macron]) covered with TiC(111) intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Huang, Jianmei; Li, Wei-Qi; Chen, Guang-Hui; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-10-11

    It is important to understand the interface and interaction between the graphene layer, titanium carbide [TiC(111)] interlayer, and silicon carbide [SiC(0001[combining macron])] substrates in epitaxial growth of graphene on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. In this study, the fully relaxed interfaces which consist of up to three layers of TiC(111) coatings on the SiC(0001[combining macron]) as well as the graphene layers interactions with these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) were systematically studied using the density functional theory-D2 (DFT-D2) method. The results showed that the two layers of TiC(111) coating with the C/C-terminated interfaces were thermodynamically more favorable than one or three layers of TiC(111) on the SiC(0001[combining macron]). Furthermore, the bonding of the Ti-hollow-site stacked interfaces would be a stronger link than that of the Ti-Fcc-site stacked interfaces. However, the formation of the C/Ti/C and Ti/C interfaces implied that the first upper carbon layer can be formed on TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) using the decomposition of the weaker Ti-C and C-Si interfacial bonds. When growing graphene layers on these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates, the results showed that the interaction energy depended not only on the thickness of the TiC(111) interlayer, but also on the number of graphene layers. Bilayer graphene on the two layer thick TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) was thermodynamically more favorable than a monolayer or trilayer graphene on these TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates. The adsorption energies of the bottom graphene layers with the TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) substrates increased with the decrease of the interface vertical distance. The interaction energies between the bottom, second and third layers of graphene on the TiC(111)/SiC(0001[combining macron]) were significantly higher than that of the freestanding graphene layers. All of these findings provided

  9. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  10. Constructing oxide interfaces and heterostructures by atomic layer-by-layer laser molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Qingyu; Golalikhani, Maryam; Davidson, Bruce A.; Liu, Guozhen; Schlom, D. G.; Qiao, Qiao; Zhu, Yimei; Chandrasena, Ravini U.; Yang, Weibing; Gray, Alexander X.; Arenholz, Elke; Farrar, Andrew K.; Tenne, Dmitri A.; Hu, Minhui; Guo, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale engineering of oxide interfaces and heterostructures have led to discoveries of emergent phenomena and new artificial materials. Combining the strengths of reactive molecular-beam epitaxy and pulsed-laser deposition, we show here, with examples of Sr1+xTi1-xO3+delta, Ruddlesden-Popper phase Lan+1NinO3n+1 (n = 4), and LaAl1+yO3(1+0.5y)/SrTiO3 interfaces, that atomic layer-by-layer laser molecular-beam epitaxy (ALL-Laser MBE) significantly advances the state of the art...

  11. Reducing the layer number of AB stacked multilayer graphene grown on nickel by annealing at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, J Marquez; Giamini, S A; Kelaidis, N; Tsipas, P; Tsoutsou, D; Kordas, G; Raptis, Y S; Boukos, N; Dimoulas, A

    2015-10-09

    Controlling the number of layers of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is crucial for large scale graphene application. We propose here an etching process of graphene which can be applied immediately after growth to control the number of layers. We use nickel (Ni) foil at high temperature (T = 900 °C) to produce multilayer-AB-stacked-graphene (MLG). The etching process is based on annealing the samples in a hydrogen/argon atmosphere at a relatively low temperature (T = 450 °C) inside the growth chamber. The extent of etching is mainly controlled by the annealing process duration. Using Raman spectroscopy we demonstrate that the number of layers was reduced, changing from MLG to few-layer-AB-stacked-graphene and in some cases to randomly oriented few layer graphene near the substrate. Furthermore, our method offers the significant advantage that it does not introduce defects in the samples, maintaining their original high quality. This fact and the low temperature our method uses make it a good candidate for controlling the layer number of already grown graphene in processes with a low thermal budget.

  12. First row transition metal atoms embedded in multivacancies in a rippled graphene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2018-03-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to study systems where a first row transition metal atom is embedded in a rippled graphene due to the existence of an 8-order multivacancy. In addition to these cases, also the inclusion of a zinc atom, with a 3d10 electron configuration, was also studied. Structural distortions and magnetic response for each system were studied. A correlation was found for the magnitude of the rippling and the distortion in the vacancy. Variation in the trends was found for Cu and Zn cases, which were explained on the basis of the filling of the 3dx2-y2 orbital. All the systems exhibit lower magnetic moment in comparison to the metal-less system. The quenching of the magnetic moment due to the carbon atoms in the vacancy is observed for Sc and Cu.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of W - based layers on SiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Holleman, J.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.

    2003-01-01

    W and W1-xNx , where x= 15- 22 at%, thin films were grown using the ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition) principle. Growth rate of W films is about 4- 5 monolayers/ cycle at 300- 350 ºC. Growth rate of W1-xNx is 0.5 monolayer/cycle at 325- 350 ºC. Standard Deviation (STDV) of thickness is about 2%

  14. Reusable urine glucose sensor based on functionalized graphene oxide conjugated Au electrode with protective layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical based system with multiple layers coated on a functionalized graphene oxide Au electrode was developed to measure glucose concentration in urine in a more stable way. Two types of gold printed circuit boards were fabricated and graphene oxide was immobilized on their surface by chemical adsorption. Multiple layers, composed of a couple of polymers, were uniformly coated on the surface electrode. This device exhibited higher electrochemical responses against glucose, a greater resistivity in the presence of interferential substances in urine, and durable stabilities for longer periods of time than conventional units. The efficiency in current level according to the order and ratio of solution was evaluated during the immobilization of the layer. The fabricated electrodes were then also evaluated using hyperglycemic clinical samples and compared with the patterns of blood glucose measured with commercially available glucose meters. Our findings show that not only was their pattern similar but this similarity is well correlated.

  15. Large Current Modulation and Spin-Dependent Tunneling of Vertical Graphene/MoS$_{2}$ Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Myoung, Nojoon; Seo, Kyungchul; Lee, Seung Joo; Ihm, Gukhyung

    2013-01-01

    Vertical graphene heterostructures have been introduced as an alternative architecture for electronic devices by using quantum tunneling. Here, we present that the current on/off ratio of vertical graphene field-effect transistors is enhanced by using an armchair graphene nanoribbon as an electrode. Moreover, we report spin-dependent tunneling current of the graphene/MoS2 heterostructures. When an atomically thin MoS2 layer sandwiched between graphene electrodes becomes magnetic, Dirac fermio...

  16. Graphene electric double layer capacitor with ultra-high-power performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, John R.; Outlaw, R.A.; Holloway, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated, for the first time, efficient 120 Hz filtering by an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). The key to this ultra-high-power performance is electrodes made from vertically oriented graphene nanosheets grown directly on metal current collectors. This design minimized both electronic and ionic resistance and produced capacitors having RC time-constants of less than 200 μs. Significantly, graphene nanosheets have a preponderance of exposed edge planes that greatly increase stored charge over designs relying on basal plane surfaces. Collectively these factors make vertically oriented graphene nanosheet electrodes ideally suited for producing high-frequency EDLCs. Capacitors constructed with these electrodes are predicted to be significantly smaller than aluminum electrolyte capacitors that they could functionally replace plus be manufactured using standard semiconductor process equipment, creating interesting commercial opportunities.

  17. Ultrathin Graphene Membranes as Flexible Electrodes for Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talapatra, Saikat; Kar, Swastik; Shah, Rakesh; Ghosh, Sujoy; An, Xiaohong; Simmons, Trevor; Washington, Morris; Nayak, Saroj

    2010-03-01

    We will present the results of our investigations of electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) or supercapacitors (SC) fabricated using graphene based ultra thin membranes. These EDLC's show far superior performance compared to other carbon nanomaterials based EDLC's devices. We found that the graphene based devices possess specific capacitance values as high as 120 F/g, with impressive power densities (˜105 kW/kg) and energy densities (˜9.2 Wh/kg). Further, these devices indicated rapid charge transfer response even without the use of any binders or specially prepared current collectors. Our ultracapacitors reflect a significant improvement over previously reported graphene-based ultracapacitors and are substantially better than those obtained with carbon nanotubes.

  18. Effect of humid-thermal environment on wave dispersion characteristics of single-layered graphene sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dabbagh, Ali

    2018-04-01

    In the present article, the hygro-thermal wave propagation properties of single-layered graphene sheets (SLGSs) are investigated for the first time employing a nonlocal strain gradient theory. A refined higher-order two-variable plate theory is utilized to derive the kinematic relations of graphene sheets. Here, nonlocal strain gradient theory is used to achieve a more precise analysis of small-scale plates. In the framework of the Hamilton's principle, the final governing equations are developed. Moreover, these obtained equations are deemed to be solved analytically and the wave frequency values are achieved. Some parametric studies are organized to investigate the influence of different variants such as nonlocal parameter, length scale parameter, wave number, temperature gradient and moisture concentration on the wave frequency of graphene sheets.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of isotopically labeled two-layer graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kong, J.; Kavan, Ladislav; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 249, č. 12 (2012), s. 2500-2502 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1062 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemical doping * isotope labeling * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.489, year: 2012

  20. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  1. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  2. Metal-etching-free direct delamination and transfer of single-layer graphene with a high degree of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sang Yoon; Oh, Joong Gun; Jung, Dae Yool; Choi, HongKyw; Yu, Chan Hak; Shin, Jongwoo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-01-14

    A method of graphene transfer without metal etching is developed to minimize the contamination of graphene in the transfer process and to endow the transfer process with a greater degree of freedom. The method involves direct delamination of single-layer graphene from a growth substrate, resulting in transferred graphene with nearly zero Dirac voltage due to the absence of residues that would originate from metal etching. Several demonstrations are also presented to show the high degree of freedom and the resulting versatility of this transfer method. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Coulomb Oscillations in a Gate-Controlled Few-Layer Graphene Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yipu; Xiong, Haonan; Jiang, Wentao; Zhang, Hongyi; Xue, Xiao; Ma, Cheng; Ma, Yulin; Sun, Luyan; Wang, Haiyan; Duan, Luming

    2016-10-12

    Graphene quantum dots could be an ideal host for spin qubits and thus have been extensively investigated based on graphene nanoribbons and etched nanostructures; however, edge and substrate-induced disorders severely limit device functionality. Here, we report the confinement of quantum dots in few-layer graphene with tunable barriers, defined by local strain and electrostatic gating. Transport measurements unambiguously reveal that confinement barriers are formed by inducing a band gap via the electrostatic gating together with local strain induced constriction. Numerical simulations according to the local top-gate geometry confirm the band gap opening by a perpendicular electric field. We investigate the magnetic field dependence of the energy-level spectra in these graphene quantum dots. Experimental results reveal a complex evolution of Coulomb oscillations with the magnetic field, featuring kinks at level crossings. The simulation of energy spectrum shows that the kink features and the magnetic field dependence are consistent with experimental observations, implying the hybridized nature of energy-level spectrum of these graphene quantum dots.

  4. Atomic and electronic structure of a copper/graphene interface as prepared and 1.5 years after

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Bazylewski, P. F.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Ponosov, Yu. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Cholakh, S. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Chang, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of X-ray spectroscopy and Raman measurements of as-prepared graphene on a high quality copper surface and the same materials after 1.5 years under different conditions (ambient and low humidity). The obtained results were compared with density functional theory calculations of the formation energies and electronic structures of various structural defects in graphene/Cu interfaces. For evaluation of the stability of the carbon cover, we propose a two-step model. The first step is oxidation of the graphene, and the second is perforation of graphene with the removal of carbon atoms as part of the carbon dioxide molecule. Results of the modeling and experimental measurements provide evidence that graphene grown on high-quality copper substrate becomes robust and stable in time (1.5 years). However, the stability of this interface depends on the quality of the graphene and the number of native defects in the graphene and substrate. The effect of the presence of a metallic substrate with defects on the stability and electronic structure of graphene is also discussed

  5. How lithium atoms affect the first hyperpolarizability of BN edge-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yao-Dong; Wu, Li-Ming; Chen, Qiao-Ling; Liu, Fa-Kun; Tang, Xiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    How do lithium atoms affect the first hyperpolarizability (β0) of boron-nitrogen (BN) edge-doped graphene. In this work, using pentacene as graphene model, Lin@BN-1 edge-doped pentacene and Lin@BN-2 edge-doped pentacene (n = 1, 5) were designed to study this problem. First, two models (BN-1 edge-doped pentacene, and BN-2 edge-doped pentacene ) were formed by doping the BN into the pentacene with different order, and then Li@BN-1 edge-doped pentacene and Li@ BN-2 edge-doped pentacene were obtained by substituting the H atom in BN edge-doped pentacene with a Li atom. The results show that the first hyperpolarizabilities of BN-1 edge-doped pentacene and Li@BN-1 edge-doped pentacene were 4059 a.u. and 6249 a.u., respectively; the first hyperpolarizabilities of BN-2 edge-doped pentacene and Li@BN-2 edge-doped pentacene were 2491 a.u. and 4265 a.u., respectively. The results indicate that the effect of Li substitution is to greatly increase the β0 value. To further enhance the first hyperpolarizability, Li5@ BN-1 edge-doped pentacene and Li5@BN-2 edge-doped pentacene were designed, and were found to exhibit considerably larger first hyperpolarizabilities (β0) (12,112 a.u. and 7921a.u., respectively). This work may inspire further study of the nonlinear properties of BN edge-doped graphene.

  6. Graphene based quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H G; Hu, H; Pan, Y; Mao, J H; Gao, M; Guo, H M; Du, S X; Greber, T; Gao, H-J

    2010-08-04

    Laterally localized electronic states are identified on a single layer of graphene on ruthenium by low temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The individual states are separated by 3 nm and comprise regions of about 90 carbon atoms. This constitutes a highly regular quantum dot-array with molecular precision. It is evidenced by quantum well resonances (QWRs) with energies that relate to the corrugation of the graphene layer. The dI/dV conductance spectra are modeled by a layer height dependent potential-well with a delta-function potential that describes the barrier for electron penetration into graphene. The resulting QWRs are strongest and lowest in energy on the isolated 'hill' regions with a diameter of 2 nm, where the graphene is decoupled from the surface.

  7. Electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with nitrogen atoms: a theoretical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A E; Fomine, S

    2015-04-28

    The electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with a graphitic type of nitrogen atoms has been studied using B3LYP, B2PLYP and CAS methods. In all but one case the restricted B3LYP solutions were unstable and the CAS calculations provided evidence for the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state with contributions from two dominant configurations. The relative stability of the doped nanoribbons depends mostly on the mutual position of the dopant atoms and notably less on the position of nitrogen atoms within the nanoribbon. N-graphitic doping affects cationic states much more than anionic ones due the participation of the nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge, resulting in a drop in ionization energies (IPs) for N-graphitic doped systems. Nitrogen atoms do not participate in the negative charge stabilization of anionic species and, therefore, the doping does not affect the electron affinities (EAs). The unrestricted B3LYP method is the method of choice for the calculation of IPs and EAs. Restricted B3LYP and B2PLYP produces unreliable results for both IPs and EAs while CAS strongly underestimates the electron affinities. This is also true for the reorganization energies where restricted B3LYP produces qualitatively incorrect results. Doping changes the reorganization energy of the nanoribbons; the hole reorganization energy is generally higher than the corresponding electron reorganization energy due to the participation of nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge.

  8. Theoretical study on the photocatalytic properties of graphene oxide with single Au atom adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lin; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Li, Mengmeng; Jin, Cui; Huang, Baibiao

    2018-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of graphene oxide (GO) with single Au atom adsorption are studied via the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. The present study addresses the origin of enhancement in photocatalytic efficiency of GO derived from single Au atom depositing. Compared with the clean one, the work function of the single Au atom adsorbed GO is lowered due to the charge transfer from Au to GO, indicating enhanced surface activity. The Au atom plays as an electron trapping center and a mediating role in charge transfer from photon excited GO to target species. The photogenerated electron-hole pairs can be separated effectively. For the GO configuration with atomic Au dispersion, there are some states introduced in the band gap, which are predominantly composed of Au 6s states. Through the in-gap state, the photo-generated electron transfer from the valence band of clean GO to the conductive band more easily. In addition, the reduction of the gap in the system is also presented in the current work, which indicates that the single Au atom adsorption improves light absorption for the GO based photocatalyst. These theoretical results are valuable for the future applications of GO materials as photocatalyst for water splitting.

  9. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  10. Raman excitation profiles of hybrid systems constituted by single-layer graphene and free base phthalocyanine: Manifestations of two mechanisms of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, T.; Mojzeš, P.; Melníková Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin; Sutrová, Veronika; Šloufová, I.; Vlčková, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 10 (2017), s. 1270-1281 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphene-enhanced Raman scattering * single-layer graphene * free base phthalocyanine * Raman excitation profiles * photoinduced charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Polymer science (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  11. Successful Fabrication of GaN Epitaxial Layer on Non-Catalytically grown Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Won [Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk-Ho [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Sapphire is widely used as a substrate for the growth of GaN epitaxial layer (EPI), but has several drawbacks such as high cost, large lattice mismatch, non-flexibility, and so on. Here, we first employ graphene directly grown on Si or sapphire substrate as a platform for the growth and lift-off of GaN-light-emitting diode (LED) EPI, useful for not only recycling the substrate but also transferring the GaN-LED EPI to other flexible substrates. Sequential standard processes of nucleation/recrystallization of GaN seeds and deposition of undoped (u-) GaN/AlN buffer layer were done on graphene/substrate before the growth of GaN-LED EPI, accompanied by taping and lift-off of u-GaN/AlN or GaN-LED EPI. This approach can overcome the limitations by the catalytic growth and transfer of graphene, and make the oxygen-plasma treatment of graphene for the growth of GaN EPI unnecessary.

  12. Interlayer catalytic exfoliation realizing scalable production of large-size pristine few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiumei; Guo, Yufen; Li, Dongfang; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Chao; Wei, Xiangfei; Chen, Mingliang; Gao, Song; Qiu, Shengqiang; Gong, Youpin; Wu, Liqiong; Long, Mingsheng; Sun, Mengtao; Pan, Gebo; Liu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of reduced graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets has recently been achieved. However, a great challenge still remains in realizing large-quantity and high-quality production of large-size thin few-layer graphene (FLG). Here, we create a novel route to solve the issue by employing one-time-only interlayer catalytic exfoliation (ICE) of salt-intercalated graphite. The typical FLG with a large lateral size of tens of microns and a thickness less than 2 nm have been obtained by a mild and durative ICE. The high-quality graphene layers preserve intact basal crystal planes owing to avoidance of the degradation reaction during both intercalation and ICE. Furthermore, we reveal that the high-quality FLG ensures a remarkable lithium-storage stability (>1,000 cycles) and a large reversible specific capacity (>600 mAh g-1). This simple and scalable technique acquiring high-quality FLG offers considerable potential for future realistic applications.

  13. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Wang, Y.H.; Zang, J.B.; Li, Y.N.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH 4 ). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH 4 saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability

  14. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Wang, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Zang, J.B. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China) and College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China)]. E-mail: diamondzjb@163.com; Li, Y.N. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China)

    2007-01-30

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH{sub 4}). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH{sub 4} saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability.

  15. Atomic layer deposition overcoating: tuning catalyst selectivity for biomass conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Gu, Xiang-Kui; Canlas, Christian; Kropf, A Jeremy; Aich, Payoli; Greeley, Jeffrey P; Elam, Jeffrey W; Meyers, Randall J; Dumesic, James A; Stair, Peter C; Marshall, Christopher L

    2014-11-03

    The terraces, edges, and facets of nanoparticles are all active sites for heterogeneous catalysis. These different active sites may cause the formation of various products during the catalytic reaction. Here we report that the step sites of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) can be covered precisely by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, whereas the terrace sites remain as active component for the hydrogenation of furfural. Increasing the thickness of the ALD-generated overcoats restricts the adsorption of furfural onto the step sites of Pd NPs and increases the selectivity to furan. Furan selectivities and furfural conversions are linearly correlated for samples with or without an overcoating, though the slopes differ. The ALD technique can tune the selectivity of furfural hydrogenation over Pd NPs and has improved our understanding of the reaction mechanism. The above conclusions are further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  17. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  18. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Rodríguez, Jorge; Knez, Mato

    2015-01-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur

  19. Improvement of oxidation resistance of copper by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, M.L.; Cheng, T.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, M.C. [Research Center for Biomedical Devices and Prototyping Production, Taipei Medical University, No. 250, Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Lin, H.C., E-mail: hclinntu@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, M.J., E-mail: mjchen@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Results of glancing incident angle diffraction (GIXD) show the bare-Cu specimen was attacked by oxidation, whereas the coated-Cu specimens prevented from this problem. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on pure copper by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of properties of the films coated at various substrate temperatures using the ALD technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the improvement of oxidation resistance of pure copper by the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of the durability of the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films by adhesion strength. - Abstract: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique onto pure copper at temperatures in the range 100-200 Degree-Sign C. The chemical composition, microstructure, and mechanic properties of the ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were systematically analyzed. The variations in the film characteristics with substrate temperature were observed. Oxidation trials revealed that 20-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited at a substrate temperature as low as 100 Degree-Sign C suppress oxidative attack on pure copper. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films also showed excellent durability of adhesion strength, according to predictions using the Coffin-Manson model based on the results of accelerated temperature cycling tests. These features indicate that ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is a very promising candidate to be a protective coating for pure copper.

  20. CO2 electroreduction performance of a single transition metal atom supported on porphyrin-like graphene: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxu; Zhao, Jingxiang; Cai, Qinghai

    2017-08-30

    Searching for low-cost, efficient, and stable electrocatalysts for CO 2 electroreduction (CO 2 ER) reactions is highly desirable for the reduction of CO 2 emission and its conversion into useful products, but remains a great challenge. In this work, single transition metal atoms supported on porphyrin-like graphene catalysts, i.e., TMN 4 /graphene, acting as electrocatalysts for CO 2 reduction were explored by means of comprehensive density functional theory (DFT) computations. Our results revealed that these anchored TM atoms possess high stability due to their strong hybridization with the unsaturated N atoms of the substrate and function as the active sites. On the basis of the calculated adsorption strength of CO 2 ER intermediates, we have identified that single Co, Rh, and Ir atoms exhibit superior catalytic activity towards CO 2 reduction. In particular, CH 3 OH is the preferred product of CO 2 ER on the CoN 4 /graphene catalyst with an overpotential of 0.59 V, while the RhN 4 /graphene and IrN 4 /graphene catalysts prefer to reduce CO 2 to CH 2 O with an overpotential of 0.35 and 0.29 V, respectively. Our work may open a new avenue for the development of catalytic materials with high efficiency for CO 2 electroreduction.

  1. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  2. Cyclododecane as support material for clean and facile transfer of large-area few-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capasso, A.; Leoni, E.; Dikonimos, T.; Buonocore, F.; Lisi, N.; De Francesco, M.; Lancellotti, L.; Bobeico, E.; Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A.; De Bellis, G.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene is a crucial process, which can affect the quality of the transferred films and compromise their application in devices. Finding a robust and intrinsically clean material capable of easing the transfer of graphene without interfering with its properties remains a challenge. We here propose the use of an organic compound, cyclododecane, as a transfer material. This material can be easily spin coated on graphene and assist the transfer, leaving no residues and requiring no further removal processes. The effectiveness of this transfer method for few-layer graphene on a large area was evaluated and confirmed by microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and four-point probe measurements. Schottky-barrier solar cells with few-layer graphene were fabricated on silicon wafers by using the cyclododecane transfer method and outperformed reference cells made by standard methods.

  3. Three-dimensional graphene-polyaniline hybrid hollow spheres by layer-by-layer assembly for application in supercapacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Jing; Ma, Qiang; Gu, Huahao; Zheng, Yuan; Liu, Xiaoya

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •A graphene-polyaniline (GR-PANI) hybrid hollow sphere is fabricated by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. •The GR-PANI hollow sphere has higher specific capacitance than stacked GR-PANI LBL film. •64% of its initial capacitance is maintained with the current density increased from 0.5 to 20 A g −1 . •A high capacity retention rate of 83% after 1000 cycles can be achieved. -- Abstract: A novel kind of three-dimensional graphene-polyaniline hybrid hollow sphere (RGO-PANI HS) has been prepared via layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of negatively-charged reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and positively charged polyaniline (PANI) on polystyrene (PS) microsphere, followed by the removal of the PS template. The hollow structure of the obtained RGO-PANI HS is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When used as the electrode materials for supercapacitor, the specific capacitance of the RGO-PANI HS reaches 381 F/g at a current density of 4.0 A/g, which is much higher than 251 F/g of the stacked RGO-PANI LBL film. The higher specific capacitance of RGO-PANI HS should be attributed to its unique hollow structure which provides a larger accessible surface area and facilitate the charge and ion transport. In addition, its specific capacitance can be facilely tailored by changing the assembly cycle number. Furthermore, good cycling stability is also demonstrated with 83% of the original capacitance value maintained after 1000 charging/discharging cycles

  4. Correlation between (in)commensurate domains of multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0 0 0 1-bar ) and single layer electronic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes-de-Sa, T G; Goncalves, A M B; Matos, M J S; Coelho, P M; Magalhaes-Paniago, R; Lacerda, R G

    2012-01-01

    A systematic study of the evolution of the electronic behavior and atomic structure of multilayer epitaxial graphene (MEG) as a function of growth time was performed. MEG was obtained by sublimation of a 4H-SiC(0 0 0 1-bar ) substrate in an argon atmosphere. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were carried out in samples grown for different times. For 30 min of growth the sample Raman signal is similar to that of graphite, while for 60 min the spectrum becomes equivalent to that of exfoliated graphene. Conventional x-ray diffraction reveals that all the samples have two different (0001) lattice spacings. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction shows that thin films are composed of rotated (commensurate) structures formed by adjacent graphene layers. Thick films are almost completely disordered. This result can be directly correlated to the single layer electronic behavior of the films as observed by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, to understand the change in lattice spacings as a result of layer rotation, we have carried out first principles calculations (using density functional theory) of the observed commensurate structures. (paper)

  5. Highly efficient computer algorithm for identifying layer thickness of atomically thin 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jekwan; Cho, Seungwan; Park, Soohyun; Bae, Hyemin; Noh, Minji; Kim, Beom; In, Chihun; Yang, Seunghoon; Lee, Sooun; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Jehyun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shim, Woo-Young; Jo, Moon-Ho; Kim, Dohun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2018-03-01

    The fields of layered material research, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have demonstrated that the optical, electrical and mechanical properties strongly depend on the layer number N. Thus, efficient and accurate determination of N is the most crucial step before the associated device fabrication. An existing experimental technique using an optical microscope is the most widely used one to identify N. However, a critical drawback of this approach is that it relies on extensive laboratory experiences to estimate N; it requires a very time-consuming image-searching task assisted by human eyes and secondary measurements such as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which are necessary to ensure N. In this work, we introduce a computer algorithm based on the image analysis of a quantized optical contrast. We show that our algorithm can apply to a wide variety of layered materials, including graphene, MoS2, and WS2 regardless of substrates. The algorithm largely consists of two parts. First, it sets up an appropriate boundary between target flakes and substrate. Second, to compute N, it automatically calculates the optical contrast using an adaptive RGB estimation process between each target, which results in a matrix with different integer Ns and returns a matrix map of Ns onto the target flake position. Using a conventional desktop computational power, the time taken to display the final N matrix was 1.8 s on average for the image size of 1280 pixels by 960 pixels and obtained a high accuracy of 90% (six estimation errors among 62 samples) when compared to the other methods. To show the effectiveness of our algorithm, we also apply it to TMD flakes transferred on optically transparent c-axis sapphire substrates and obtain a similar result of the accuracy of 94% (two estimation errors among 34 samples).

  6. Scalable synthesis of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinhua; Lyon, Lauren B.; Jiang Yingbing; Weimer, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to produce Pd/Al 2 O 3 catalysts using sequential exposures of Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate and formalin at 200 °C in a fluidized bed reactor. The ALD-prepared Pd/alumina catalysts were characterized by various methods including hydrogen chemisorption, XPS, and TEM, and compared with a commercially available 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst, which was also characterized. The content of Pd on alumina support and the size of Pd nanoparticles can be controlled by the number of ALD-coating cycles and the dose time of the Pd precursor. One layer of organic component from the Pd precursor remained on the Pd particle surface. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina had greater active metal surface area and percent metal dispersion than the commercial 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst. The ALD and commercial catalysts were subjected to catalytic testing to determine their relative activities for glucose oxidation to gluconic acid in aqueous solution. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst had comparable activity as compared to the commercial 1 wt% Pd catalyst. No noticeable amount of Pd leaching was observed for the ALD-prepared catalysts during the vigorously stirred reaction.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, Massimo; Dessmann, Nils; Staedter, Matthias; Friedrich, Daniel; Michling, Marcel; Schmeisser, Dieter [BTU-Cottbus, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present a study of the initial growth of TiO{sub 2} on Si(111) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The Si substrate was etched with NH{sub 4}F before ALD to remove the native oxide film and to produce a Si-H termination. In-situ experiments by means of photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were conducted with synchrotron radiation on Ti-oxide films produced using Ti-tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP) and water as precursors. O 1s, Ti 2p, C 1s, and S i2p core level, and O 1s and Ti 2p absorption edges show the transition of the Ti-oxide properties during the first layers. The growth starts with a very small growth rate (0.03 nm/cycle) due to the growth inhibition of the Si-H termination and proceeds with higher growth rate (0.1 nm/cycle) after 1.5 nm Ti-oxide has been deposited.

  8. Engineering Particle Surface Chemistry and Electrochemistry with Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David Hyman Kentaro

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase thin film coating technique that relies on sequential pulsing of precursors that undergo self-limited surface reactions. The self- limiting reactions and gas phase diffusion of the precursors together enable the conformal coating of microstructured particles with a high degree of thickness and compositional control. ALD may be used to deposit thin films that introduce new functionalities to a particle surface. Examples of new functionalities include: chemical reactivity, a mechanically strong protective coating, and an electrically resistive layer. The coatings properties are often dependent on the bulk properties and microstructure of the particle substrate, though they usually do not affect its bulk properties or microstructure. Particle ALD finds utility in the ability to synthesize well controlled, model systems, though it is expensive due to the need for costly metal precursors that are dangerous and require special handling. Enhanced properties due to ALD coating of particles in various applications are frequently described empirically, while the details of their enhancement mechanisms often remain the focus of ongoing research in the field. This study covers the various types of particle ALD and attempts to describe them from the unifying perspective of surface science.

  9. Giant inelastic tunneling in epitaxial graphene mediated by localized states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervenka, J.; Ruit, van de K.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Local electronic structures of nanometer-sized patches of epitaxial graphene and its interface layer with SiC(0001) have been studied by atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Localized states belonging to the interface layer of a graphene/SiC system show to have

  10. Graphene plasmonics: physics and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shenyang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon in graphene possesses many unique properties. It originates from the collective motion of massless Dirac fermions, and the carrier density dependence is distinctively different from conventional plasmons. In addition, graphene plasmon is highly tunable and shows strong energy confinement capability. Most intriguingly, as an atom-thin layer, graphene and its plasmon are very sensitive to the immediate environment. Graphene plasmons strongly couple to polar phonons of the substrate, molecular vibrations of the adsorbates, and lattice vibrations of other atomically thin layers. In this review, we present the most important advances in graphene plasmonics field. The topics include terahertz plasmons, mid-infrared plasmons, plasmon-phonon interactions, and potential applications. Graphene plasmonics opens an avenue for reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces; it is an exciting and promising new subject in the nanophotonics and plasmonics research field.

  11. Excitation of hybridized Dirac plasmon polaritons and transition radiation in multi-layer graphene traversed by a fast charged particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Kamran; Mišković, Zoran L.; Segui, Silvina; Gervasoni, Juana L.; Arista, Néstor R.

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the energy loss channels for a fast charged particle traversing a multi-layer graphene (MLG) structure with N layers under normal incidence. Focusing on a terahertz (THz) range of frequencies, and assuming equally doped graphene layers with a large enough separation d between them to neglect interlayer electron hopping, we use the Drude model for two-dimensional conductivity of each layer to describe hybridization of graphene’s Dirac plasmon polaritons (DPPs). Performing a layer decomposition of ohmic energy losses, which include excitation of hybridized DPPs (HDPPs), we have found for N = 3 that the middle HDPP eigenfrequency is not excited in the middle layer due to symmetry constraint, whereas the excitation of the lowest HDPP eigenfrequency produces a Fano resonance in the graphene layer that is first traversed by the charged particle. While the angular distribution of transition radiation emitted in the far field region also shows asymmetry with respect to the traversal order by the incident charged particle at supra-THz frequencies, the integrated radiative energy loss is surprisingly independent of both d and N for N ≤ 5, which is explained by a dominant role of the outer graphene layers in transition radiation. We have further found that the integrated ohmic energy loss in optically thin MLG scales as ∝1/N at sub-THz frequencies, which is explained by exposing the role of dissipative processes in graphene at low frequencies. Finally, prominent peaks are observed at supra-THz frequencies in the integrated ohmic energy loss for MLG structures that are not optically thin. The magnitude of those peaks is found to scale with N for N ≥ 2, while their shape and position replicate the peak in a double-layer graphene (N = 2), which is explained by arguing that plasmon hybridization in such MLG structures is dominated by electromagnetic interaction between the nearest-neighbor graphene layers.

  12. Layer-by-Layer Hybrids of MoS2 and Reduced Graphene Oxide for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Yu; Ortiz-Quiles, Edwin O.; Cabrera, Carlos R.; Chen, Zhongfang; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Layer-by-layer MoS 2 /rGO hybrids were prepared by rGO involved lithiation-exfoliation method. • This hybrid exhibited enhanced electrochemical performances due to the existence of rGO. • The roles of rGO in different charging/discharging processes were interpreted by computations. - Abstract: Two-dimensional MoS 2 shows great potential for effective Li storage due to its good thermal and chemical stability, high theoretical capacity, and experimental accessibility. However, the poor electrical conductivity and the restacking tendency significantly restrict its applications to lithium ion batteries (LIBs). To overcome these problems, we introduced reduced graphene oxides (rGO) to the intercalation-exfoliation preparation process of few-layered MoS 2 and obtained layer-by-layer MoS 2 /rGO hybrids. With the addition of rGO, the restacking of MoS 2 layers was apparently inhibited, and MoS 2 with 1 ∼ 3 layers was obtained in the composite. Due to the positive role of rGO, MoS 2 /rGO hybrids exhibited highly enhanced cyclic stability and high-rate performances as LIB anodes in comparison with bare MoS 2 layers or bulk MoS 2 . Moreover, the experimental results were well interpreted through density functional theory computations

  13. Graphene Synthesis & Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ken-Hsuan

    free standing TRG. This indicates TRG is mono-layer-dispersed in the matrix polymer. How graphene/polymer nanocomposite glass transition temperatures ( Tg) vary was investigated in this study. We measured Tg in PMMA. We used isotactic PMMA (i-PMMA) and syndiotactic-rich atactic PMMA (a-PMMA) to make TRG/PMMA nanocomposites using solvent blending and in situ polymerization in order to investigate the stereo-regularity and processing effects on the Tg. A T g increase was found in i-PMMA and in situ PMMA but not in a-PMMA. The results can be explained by the thin film confinement effect of polymer. We attribute the Tg increase to both a higher interaction density and a stronger hydrogen bonding at the interfaces. We have studied the elastic modulus of graphene oxide with various oxygen content. We used in situ AFM nano-indentation to measure the influence of oxygen on the elastic modulus of graphene oxide with various carbon/oxygen (C/O) ratios. The results show that chemical reduction (lower oxygen contents) decreases the elastic modulus of graphene oxide. We speculate that chemical reduction of oxygen atoms of epoxy groups on graphene oxide surface removes the bridging effect between carbon atoms, which leads to more flexible sheets. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  14. Graphene as current spreading layer on AlGaInP light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Feng, Yajie; Liu, Qiaoli; Hu, Anqi; He, Xiaoying; Hu, Zonghai

    2018-05-01

    Due to high transmittance and high mobility, graphene is one of the promising candidates for a current spreading layer, which is crucial to light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this paper, improved AlGaInP LED performance was reported after graphene was applied on the GaP surface. Due to its lowered work function difference than with the GaN material, the electrical properties remain the same without additional voltage bias. The light output power is enhanced by about 40% under the current injection of 5 mA at room temperature, which was confirmed by the light emission profile analysis in this study. Such results indicate that raphene is a promising candidate as a current spreading layer under low current injection.

  15. 11-GHz waveguide Nd:YAG laser CW mode-locked with single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimchuk, Andrey G; Obraztsov, Petr A

    2015-06-08

    We report stable, passive, continuous-wave (CW) mode-locking of a compact diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser with a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The depressed cladding waveguide in the Nd:YAG crystal is fabricated with an ultrafast laser inscription method. The saturable absorber is formed by direct deposition of CVD single-layer graphene on the output coupler. The few millimeter-long cavity provides generation of 16-ps pulses with repetition rates in the GHz range (up to 11.3 GHz) and 12 mW average power. Stable CW mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with a Gires-Tournois interferometer.

  16. Suppression of Quasiparticle Scattering Signals in Bilayer Graphene Due to Layer Polarization and Destructive Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolie, Wouter; Lux, Jonathan; Pörtner, Mathias; Dombrowski, Daniela; Herbig, Charlotte; Knispel, Timo; Simon, Sabina; Michely, Thomas; Rosch, Achim; Busse, Carsten

    2018-03-09

    We study chemically gated bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy complemented by tight-binding calculations. Gating is achieved by intercalating Cs between bilayer graphene and Ir(111), thereby shifting the conduction band minima below the chemical potential. Scattering between electronic states (both intraband and interband) is detected via quasiparticle interference. However, not all expected processes are visible in our experiment. We uncover two general effects causing this suppression: first, intercalation leads to an asymmetrical distribution of the states within the two layers, which significantly reduces the scanning tunneling spectroscopy signal of standing waves mainly present in the lower layer; second, forward scattering processes, connecting points on the constant energy contours with parallel velocities, do not produce pronounced standing waves due to destructive interference. We present a theory to describe the interference signal for a general n-band material.

  17. Single layered flexible photo-detector based on perylene/graphene composite through printed technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shawkat; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a single layered passive photo sensor based on perylene/graphene composite is proposed, which is deposited in comb type silver electrodes separated as 50 μm spacing. To increase an electrical conductivity of the proposed sensor, perylene and graphene are blended. Photo sensing layer (120nm thick) and Silver electrodes (50 μm width, 350 nm thick) are deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate through electro-hydrodynamic (EHD) system. The proposed photo sensor detects a terminal resistance inversely varied by an incident light in the range between 78 GΩ in dark and 25 GΩ at light intensity of 400lux. The device response is maximum at 465 nm ~ 535 nm wavelength range at blue light. The device exhibited bendability up to 4mm diameter for 1000 endurance cycles. The surface morphology analysis is carried out with FE-SEM and microscope.

  18. Carrier Lifetime in Exfoliated Few-Layer Graphene Determined from Intersubband Optical Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  19. Carrier lifetime in exfoliated few-layer graphene determined from intersubband optical transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Thomas; Feldmann, Jochen; Da Como, Enrico

    2013-05-24

    We report a femtosecond transient spectroscopy study in the near to middle infrared range, 0.8-0.35 eV photon energy, on graphene and few layer graphene single flakes. The spectra show an evolving structure of photoinduced absorption bands superimposed on the bleaching caused by Pauli blocking of the interband optically coupled states. Supported by tight-binding model calculations, we assign the photoinduced absorption features to intersubband transitions as the number of layers is increased. Interestingly, the intersubband photoinduced resonances show a longer dynamics than the interband bleaching, because of their independence from the absolute energy of the carriers with respect to the Dirac point. The dynamic of these intersubband transitions reflects the lifetime of the hot carriers and provides an elegant method to access it in this important class of semimetals.

  20. Suppression of Quasiparticle Scattering Signals in Bilayer Graphene Due to Layer Polarization and Destructive Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolie, Wouter; Lux, Jonathan; Pörtner, Mathias; Dombrowski, Daniela; Herbig, Charlotte; Knispel, Timo; Simon, Sabina; Michely, Thomas; Rosch, Achim; Busse, Carsten

    2018-03-01

    We study chemically gated bilayer graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy complemented by tight-binding calculations. Gating is achieved by intercalating Cs between bilayer graphene and Ir(111), thereby shifting the conduction band minima below the chemical potential. Scattering between electronic states (both intraband and interband) is detected via quasiparticle interference. However, not all expected processes are visible in our experiment. We uncover two general effects causing this suppression: first, intercalation leads to an asymmetrical distribution of the states within the two layers, which significantly reduces the scanning tunneling spectroscopy signal of standing waves mainly present in the lower layer; second, forward scattering processes, connecting points on the constant energy contours with parallel velocities, do not produce pronounced standing waves due to destructive interference. We present a theory to describe the interference signal for a general n -band material.

  1. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  3. Layer-by-layer fabrication of chemical-bonded graphene coating for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2011-10-01

    A new fabrication strategy of the graphene-coated solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber is developed. Graphite oxide was first used as starting coating material that covalently bonded to the fused-silica substrate using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as cross-linking agent and subsequently deoxidized by hydrazine to give the graphene coating in situ. The chemical bonding between graphene and the silica fiber improve its chemical stability, and the obtained fiber was stable enough for more than 150 replicate extraction cycles. The graphene coating was wrinkled and folded, like the morphology of the rough tree bark. Its performance is tested by headspace (HS) SPME of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) followed by GC/MS analysis. The results showed that the graphene-coated fiber exhibited higher enrichment factors (EFs) from 2-fold for naphthalene to 17-fold for B(b)FL as compared to the commercial polydimethylsioxane (PDMS) fiber, and the EFs increased with the number of condensed rings of PAHs. The strong adsorption affinity was believed to be mostly due to the dominant role of π-π stacking interaction and hydrophobic effect, according to the results of selectivity study for a variety of organic compounds including PAHs, the aromatic compounds with different substituent groups, and some aliphatic hydrocarbons. For PAHs analysis, the graphene-coated fiber showed good precision (<11%), low detection limits (1.52-2.72 ng/L), and wide linearity (5-500 ng/L) under the optimized conditions. The repeatability of fiber-to-fiber was 4.0-10.8%. The method was applied to simultaneous analysis of eight PAHs with satisfactory recoveries, which were 84-102% for water samples and 72-95% for soil samples, respectively.

  4. Fabrication of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugawara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have succeeded in fabricating Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on silicon carbide. The low-energy electron diffraction from Li-deposited bilayer graphene shows a sharp 3×3R30° pattern in contrast to Li-deposited monolayer graphene. This indicates that Li atoms are intercalated between two adjacent graphene layers and take the same well-ordered superstructure as in bulk C6Li. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed that Li atoms are fully ionized and the π bands of graphene are systematically folded by the superstructure of intercalated Li atoms, producing a snowflake-like Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. The present result suggests a high potential of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene for application to a nano-scale Li-ion battery.

  5. Characterization of hafnium oxide resistive memory layers deposited on copper by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, B.D.; Bishop, S.M. [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Leedy, K.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Cady, N.C., E-mail: ncady@albany.edu [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hafnium oxide-based resistive memory devices have been fabricated on copper bottom electrodes. The HfO{sub x} active layers in these devices were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 °C with tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) as the metal precursor and an O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. Depth profiles of the HfO{sub x} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a copper concentration on the order of five atomic percent throughout the HfO{sub x} film. In addition to the Cu doped HfO{sub x}, a thin layer (20 nm) of Cu{sub x}O is present at the surface. This surface layer is believed to have formed during the ALD process, and greatly complicates the analysis of the switching mechanism. The resistive memory structures fabricated from the ALD HfO{sub x} exhibited non-polar resistive switching, independent of the top metal electrode (Ni, Pt, Al, Au). Resistive switching current voltage (I–V) curves were analyzed using Schottky emission and ionic hopping models to gain insight into the physical mechanisms underpinning the device behavior. During the forming process it was determined that, at voltages in excess of 2.5 V, an ionic hopping model is in good agreement with the I–V data. The extracted ion hopping distance ∼ 4 Å was within the range of interatomic spacing of HfO{sub 2} during the forming process consistent with ionic motion of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Lastly the on state I–V data was dominated at larger voltages by Schottky emission with an estimated barrier height of ∼ 0.5 eV and a refractive index of 2.59. The consequence of the Schottky emission analysis indicates the on state resistance to be a product of a Pt/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu filament(s)/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu structure. - Highlights: • HfO{sub 2} was grown via atomic layer deposition at 250 and 100 °C on Cu substrates. • A Cu{sub 2}O surface layer and Cu doping were observed in post-deposition of HfO{sub 2}. • Resistive memory devices were fabricated and

  6. Tailoring atomic structure to control the electronic transport in zigzag graphene nanoribbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Hui; Zhao, Jun; Wei, Jianwei; Zeng, Xianliang; Xu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculation to study the electronic transport properties of the tailored zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with particular electronic transport channels. Our results demonstrated that tailoring the atomic structure had significantly influenced the electronic transport of the defective nanostructures, and could lead to the metal-semiconducting transition when sufficient atoms are tailored. The asymmetric I–V characteristics as a result of symmetry breaking have been exhibited, which indicates the route to utilize GNR as a basic component for novel nanoelectronics. -- Highlights: ► M–S transition induced by tailoring nanostructure. ► Asymmetric I–V curve due to symmetry breaking. ► Controllable electron transport by designing nanofiguration.

  7. Tailoring atomic structure to control the electronic transport in zigzag graphene nanoribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zhao, Jun, E-mail: zhaojun@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Zeng, Xianliang [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Xu, Yang [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2012-10-01

    We have performed ab initio density functional theory calculation to study the electronic transport properties of the tailored zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) with particular electronic transport channels. Our results demonstrated that tailoring the atomic structure had significantly influenced the electronic transport of the defective nanostructures, and could lead to the metal-semiconducting transition when sufficient atoms are tailored. The asymmetric I–V characteristics as a result of symmetry breaking have been exhibited, which indicates the route to utilize GNR as a basic component for novel nanoelectronics. -- Highlights: ► M–S transition induced by tailoring nanostructure. ► Asymmetric I–V curve due to symmetry breaking. ► Controllable electron transport by designing nanofiguration.

  8. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  9. Highly atom-economic synthesis of graphene/Mn3O4 hybrid composites for electrochemical supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiangying, Qu; Feng, Gao; Quan, Zhou; Zhiyu, Wang; Han, Hu; Beibei, Li; Wubo, Wan; Xuzhen, Wang; Jieshan, Qiu

    2013-03-01

    A highly atom-economic procedure for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide/Mn3O4 (rGO/Mn3O4) composites is reported. Pristine graphene oxide/manganese sulfate (GO/MnSO4) suspension produced by modified Hummers method is utilized with high efficiency, which has been in situ converted into GO/Mn3O4 hybrid composite by air oxidation, then into rGO/Mn3O4 composite by means of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma-assisted deoxygenation. The Mn3O4 content of the rGO/Mn3O4 composites can be readily tailored. It is observed that Mn3O4 nanoparticles of 15-24 nm are well-dispersed on graphene sheets with Mn3O4 loading as high as 90%. The specific capacitance of the as-prepared rGO/Mn3O4 hybrids with 90% Mn3O4 reaches 193 F g-1 when employed as the electrode material in neutral Na2SO4 electrolyte solutions (76 F g-1 for pristine graphene and 95 F g-1 for pure Mn3O4), which indicates the positive synergetic effects from both graphene and attached Mn3O4. The method developed in this study should offer a new technique for the large scale and highly atom-economic production of graphene/MnOx composites for many applications.

  10. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. Frictional Magneto-Coulomb Drag in Graphene Double-Layer Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Lei; Fong, Kin Chung; Gao, Yuanda; Maher, Patrick; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Dean, Cory; Kim, Philip

    2017-08-04

    Coulomb interaction between two closely spaced parallel layers of conductors can generate the frictional drag effect by interlayer Coulomb scattering. Employing graphene double layers separated by few-layer hexagonal boron nitride, we investigate density tunable magneto- and Hall drag under strong magnetic fields. The observed large magnetodrag and Hall-drag signals can be related with Laudau level filling status of the drive and drag layers. We find that the sign and magnitude of the drag resistivity tensor can be quantitatively correlated to the variation of magnetoresistivity tensors in the drive and drag layers, confirming a theoretical formula for magnetodrag in the quantum Hall regime. The observed weak temperature dependence and ∼B^{2} dependence of the magnetodrag are qualitatively explained by Coulomb scattering phase-space argument.

  12. Calculation of inter-plane thermal resistance of few-layer graphene from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Y; Chalopin, Y; Volz, S

    2012-01-01

    Inter-plane thermal resistance in 5-layer graphene is calculated from equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) by calculating the autocorrelation function of temperature difference. Our simulated inter-plane resistance for 5-layer graphene is 4.83 × 10 −9 m 2 K/W. This data is in the same order of magnitude with the reported values from NEMD simulations and Debye model calculations, and the possible reasons for the slight differences are discussed in details. The inter-plane resistance is not dependent on temperature, according to the results of the EMD simulation. Phonon density of states (DOSs) were plotted to better understand the mechanism behind the obtained values. These results provide a better insight in the heat transfer across a few layer graphene and yield useful information on the design of graphene based thermal materials.

  13. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  14. Hydrogen intercalation of single and multiple layer graphene synthesized on Si-terminated SiC(0001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sołtys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek; Ptasinska, Maria; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to investigate the influence of hydrogen intercalation on the electronic properties of single and multiple graphene layers deposited on the SiC(0001) surface (Si-face). It is shown that single carbon layer, known as a buffer layer, covalently bound to the SiC substrate, is liberated after hydrogen intercalation, showing characteristic Dirac cones in the band structure. This is in agreement with the results of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen intercalation of SiC-graphene samples. In contrast to that hydrogen intercalation has limited impact on the multiple sheet graphene, deposited on Si-terminated SiC surface. The covalently bound buffer layer is liberated attaining its graphene like structure and dispersion relation typical for multilayer graphene. Nevertheless, before and after intercalation, the four layer graphene preserved the following dispersion relations in the vicinity of K point: linear for (AAAA) stacking, direct parabolic for Bernal (ABAB) stacking and “wizard hat” parabolic for rhombohedral (ABCA) stacking

  15. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar + bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10 11 to ∼10 14 Ar + /cm −2 and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy

  16. Quantifying defects in N-layer graphene via a phenomenological model of Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giro, Ronaldo, E-mail: rgiro@br.ibm.com [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Archanjo, Braulio S.; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Capaz, Rodrigo B. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Jorio, Ado [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Achete, Carlos A. [Divisão de Metrologia de Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (Inmetro), Duque de Caxias, RJ 25250-020 (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    We construct a model to obtain the density of point defects in N-layer graphene by combining Raman spectroscopy and the TRIM (Transport Range of Ions in Matter) simulation package. The model relates the intensity (or area) ratio of graphene’s D and G bands to the defect density on each layer due to Ar{sup +} bombardment. Our method is effective for ion fluences ranging from 10{sup 11} to ∼10{sup 14} Ar{sup +}/cm{sup −2} and it should be in principle extendable to any kind of ion and energy.

  17. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Graphene and Hexagonal Boron Nitride Two-Dimensional Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Renjing

    multilayer h-BN were achieved. The mismatch angle between graphene and h-BN is below 1º. The third project (Chapter 4) is about graphene growth on Fe by MBE at low temperature. Temperature-dependent growth of graphene on Fe using MBE is studied. Two-dimensional (2D), large-area graphene samples were grown on Fe thin films, and characterized by Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Graphene is achieved on Fe at a wide growth temperature range and as low as 400 °C. The growth mechanism is studied and shows graphene growth is associated with formation and decomposition of iron carbide. The forth part is about a convenient way to produce vdW heterostructures: graphene growth of exfoliated h-BN on Co. We demonstrated graphene/h-BN heterostructures by growing graphene onto the substrates which consist of exfoliated h-BN on Co thin film using MBE. The heterostructure samples grown at different temperatures and growth durations were characterized by Raman, optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, microwave impedance microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. It is found that the graphene/h-BN heterostructures were formed by the formation of graphene underneath rather than on top of the h-BN flakes. The growth mechanism is discussed. In summary, we develop and optimize growth of vdW materials (h-BN and graphene), and vdW heterostructures by MBE. Various characterization has been carried out to evaluate properties of the films in structural, optical and electrical aspects. Our results reveal that MBE can provide an excellent alternative way for reliable growth of high-quality and large-size vdW materials and related heterostructures, which will attract more attention for the utilization of MBE in vdW materials research.

  18. Fabrication of graphene-nanoflake/poly(4-vinylphenol) polymer nanocomposite thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization and its application as flexible resistive switching device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Ali, Junaid [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Kyoung-Hoan, E-mail: khna@dankook.ac.kr [College of Engineering, Dankook University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes synthesis of graphene/poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) nanocomposite and deposition of thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) for fabrication flexible resistive switching device. EHDA technique proved its viability for thin film deposition after surface morphology analyses by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and non-destructive 3D Nano-profilometry, as the deposited films were, devoid of abnormalities. The commercially available graphene micro-flakes were exfoliated and broken down to ultra-small (20 nm–200 nm) nano-flakes by ultra-sonication in presence of N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). These graphene nanoflakes with PVP nanocomposite, were successfully deposited as thin films (thickness ~140±7 nm, R{sub a}=2.59 nm) on indium–tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Transmittance data revealed that thin films are up to ~87% transparent in visible and NIR region. Resistive switching behaviour of graphene/PVP nanocomposite thin film was studied by using the nanocomposite as active layer in Ag/active layer/ITO sandwich structure. The resistive switching devices thus fabricated, showed characteristic OFF to ON (high resistance to low resistance) transition at low voltages, when operated between ±3 V, characterized at 10 nA compliance currents. The devices fabricated by this approach exhibited a stable room temperature, low power current–voltage hysteresis and well over 1 h retentivity, and R{sub OFF}/R{sub ON}≈35:1. The device showed stable flexibility up to a minimum bending diameter of 1.8 cm.

  19. Carbon Papers and Aerogels Based on Graphene Layers and Chitosan: Direct Preparation from High Surface Area Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Vincenzina; Guerra, Silvia; Brambilla, Luigi; Maggio, Mario; Serafini, Andrea; Conzatti, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandra; Galimberti, Maurizio

    2017-12-11

    In this work, carbon papers and aerogels based on graphene layers and chitosan were prepared. They were obtained by mixing chitosan (CS) and a high surface area nanosized graphite (HSAG) in water in the presence of acetic acid. HSAG/CS water dispersions were stable for months. High resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of few graphene layers in water suspensions. Casting or lyophilization of such suspensions led to the preparation of carbon paper and aerogel, respectively. In X-ray spectra of both aerogels and carbon paper, peaks due to regular stacks of graphene layers were not detected: graphene with unaltered sp 2 structure was obtained directly from graphite without the use of any chemical reaction. The composites were demonstrated to be electrically conductive thanks to the graphene. Chitosan thus makes it possible to obtain monolithic carbon aerogels and flexible and free-standing graphene papers directly from a nanosized graphite by avoiding oxidation to graphite oxide and successive reduction. Strong interaction between polycationic chitosan and the aromatic substrate appears to be at the origin of the stability of HSAG/CS adducts. Cation-π interaction is hypothesized, also on the basis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy findings. This work paves the way for the easy large-scale preparation of carbon papers through a method that has a low environmental impact and is based on a biosourced polymer, graphene, and water.

  20. One-pot Synthesis of Bio-inspired Layered Materials of 3D Graphene Network/Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; FU Zhengyi; YAO Bin; PING Hang; YU Hongjian; ZHANG Fan; ZHANG Jinyong; WANG Yucheng; WANG Hao; WANG Weimin

    2017-01-01

    A bio-inspired layered material of reduced graphene oxide (RGOs) and calcium carbonate was synthesized via a one-pot strategy in DMF/H2O mixed solvent. The experimental results show that the product is a layered material of wrinkled RGOs networks and micron-sized calcium carbonate particles with uniform granular diameter and homogeneous morphology, which are distributed between the layered gallery of the graphene scaffold. The polymorph and the morphology of the in-situ produced calcium carbonate particles can be manipulated by simply changing the temperature scheme. Besides, the graphene oxide was reduced to a certain extent, and the hierarchical wrinkles were generated in the RGOs layer by the in-situ formation of the calcium carbonate particles. This work provides a facile and controllable strategy for synthesizing layered material of RGOs and carbonates, and also presents a platform for making three-dimensional porous wrinkled RGOs networks.

  1. Electron scattering in graphene by defects in underlying h-BN layer: First-principles transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Ohno, Takahisa

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the electronic structure and the transport properties of graphene adsorbed onto h-BN with carbon impurities or atomic vacancies using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. We find that the transport properties are degraded due to carrier doping and scattering off of localized defect states in h-BN. When graphene is doped by introducing defects in h-BN, the transmission spectra become asymmetric owing to the reduction of the electronic density of states, which contributes significantly to the degradation of graphene transport properties as compared with the effect of defect levels.

  2. Recent progress of atomic layer deposition on polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hong Chen; Ye, Enyi [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Li, Zibiao, E-mail: lizb@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Han, Ming-Yong [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Loh, Xian Jun, E-mail: lohxj@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Singapore Eye Research Institute, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856 (Singapore)

    2017-01-01

    As a very promising surface coating technology, atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to modify the surfaces of polymeric materials for improving their functions and expanding their application areas. Polymeric materials vary in surface functional groups (number and type), surface morphology and internal structure, and thus ALD deposition conditions that typically work on a normal solid surface, usually do not work on a polymeric material surface. To date, a large variety of research has been carried out to investigate ALD deposition on various polymeric materials. This paper aims to provide an in-depth review of ALD deposition on polymeric materials and its applications. Through this review, we will provide a better understanding of surface chemistry and reaction mechanism for controlled surface modification of polymeric materials by ALD. The integrated knowledge can aid in devising an improved way in the reaction between reactant precursors and polymer functional groups/polymer backbones, which will in turn open new opportunities in processing ALD materials for better inorganic/organic film integration and potential applications. - Highlights: • ALD deposition on different natural and synthetic polymer materials • Reaction mechanism based on the surface functional groups of polymers • Application of ALD-modified polymers in different fields.

  3. Continuous production of nanostructured particles using spatial atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ommen, J. Ruud van; Kooijman, Dirkjan; Niet, Mark de; Talebi, Mojgan; Goulas, Aristeidis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a novel spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) process based on pneumatic transport of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoclusters of platinum (Pt) of ∼1 nm diameter are deposited onto titania (TiO 2 ) P25 nanoparticles resulting to a continuous production of an active photocatalyst (0.12–0.31 wt. % of Pt) at a rate of about 1 g min −1 . Tuning the precursor injection velocity (10–40 m s −1 ) enhances the contact between the precursor and the pneumatically transported support flows. Decreasing the chemisorption temperature (from 250 to 100 °C) results in more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoclusters as it decreases the reaction rate as compared to the rate of diffusion into the nanoparticle agglomerates. Utilizing this photocatalyst in the oxidation reaction of Acid Blue 9 showed a factor of five increase of the photocatalytic activity compared to the native P25 nanoparticles. The use of spatial particle ALD can be further expanded to deposition of nanoclusters on porous, micron-sized particles and to the production of core–shell nanoparticles enabling the robust and scalable manufacturing of nanostructured powders for catalysis and other applications

  4. Inductively coupled plasma nanoetching of atomic layer deposition alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Chang, Bingdong; Todeschini, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    such as silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, and diamond. In this report, we systematically study nanoscale plasma etching of Al2O3 with electron beam lithography and deep UV resist masks. The gas composition and pressure were tuned for optimal etching, and redeposition conditions were mapped. With a BCl3 and Ar...... the resist profile angle. For Al2O3 patterned with deep UV lithography, the smallest structures were 220 nm. For electron beam lithography patterns, the smallest gratings were 18-nm-wide with 50-nm-pitch. Using alumina as a hard mask, we show aspect ratio of 7-10 for subsequent silicon plasma etching, and we......Al2O3 thin-film deposited by atomic layer deposition is an attractive plasma etch mask for Micro and Nano Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS and NEMS). 20-nm-thick Al2O3 mask enables through silicon wafer plasma etching. Al2O3 is also an excellent etch mask for other important MEMS materials...

  5. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L.; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H.; Bustamante, Jr., J.; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm² V-1 s-1. Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  6. Deposition of yttrium oxysulfide thin films by atomic layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, K.; University of Tartu, Tartu,; Johansson, L-S.; Nykaenen, E.; Peussa, M.; Ninistoe, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Yttrium oxysulfide is a highly interesting material for optoelectronic applications. It is industrially exploited in the form of doped powder in catholuminescent phosphors, e.g. Y 2 O 2 S: Eu 3+ for colour TV. Attempts to grow thin films of Y 2 O 2 S have not been frequent and only partially successful due to the difficulties in obtaining crystalline films at a reasonable temperature. Furthermore, sputtering easily leads to a sulphur deficiency. Evaporation of the elements from a multi-source offers a better control of the stoichiometry resulting in hexagonal (0002) oriented films at 580 deg C. In this paper we present the first successful thin film growth experiments using a chemical process with molecular precursors. Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) allows the use of a relatively low deposition temperature and thus compatibility with other technologies. Already at 425 deg C the reaction between H 2 S and Y(thd) 3 (thd = 2,2,6,6 - tetramethyl-heptane-3,5- dione) yields a crystalline Y 2 O 2 S thin film which was characterized by XRD, XRF and XPS

  7. Atomic Layer Deposition in Bio-Nanotechnology: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishal, Arghya K; Butt, Arman; Selvaraj, Sathees K; Joshi, Bela; Patel, Sweetu B; Huang, Su; Yang, Bin; Shukohfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos G

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique increasingly used in nanotechnology and ultrathin film deposition; it is ideal for films in the nanometer and Angstrom length scales. ALD can effectively be used to modify the surface chemistry and functionalization of engineering-related and biologically important surfaces. It can also be used to alter the mechanical, electrical, chemical, and other properties of materials that are increasingly used in biomedical engineering and biological sciences. ALD is a relatively new technique for optimizing materials for use in bio-nanotechnology. Here, after a brief review of the more widely used modes of ALD and a few of its applications in biotechnology, selected results that show the potential of ALD in bio-nanotechnology are presented. ALD seems to be a promising means for tuning the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity characteristics of biomedical surfaces, forming conformal ultrathin coatings with desirable properties on biomedical substrates with a high aspect ratio, tuning the antibacterial properties of substrate surfaces of interest, and yielding multifunctional biomaterials for medical implants and other devices.

  8. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing, between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection

  9. An electrochemical aptasensor for chiral peptide detection using layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte-methylene blue/polyelectrolyte-graphene multilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Haixia; Liu Jiyang; Chen Chaogui; Wang Jiahi; Wang Erkang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An electrochemical aptasensor for selective detection of peptide is constructed. ► This aptasensor is based on grapheme multilayer via layer-by-layer assembly. ► Such multilayer facilitates electron transfer and provides more adsorption sites. - Abstract: Here we demonstrate for the first time that by physically adsorbing aptamer onto conductive film assembled via alternate adsorption of graphene/polyelectrolyte and methylene blue/polyelectrolyte, a label-free electrochemical aptasensor with high sensitivity and selectivity for peptide detection is constructed. Graphene multilayer derived from layer-by-layer assembly has played significant roles in this sensing strategy: allowing accumulation of methylene blue, facilitating electron transfer and providing much more adsorption site. As compared to previous electrochemical aptasensors, the current sensor based on graphene multilayer alternated with electroactive molecule layer offers extremely high capability for sensitive detection of target without interference of environmental surrounding. This electroactive probe-confined graphene multilayer confers great flexibility to combine with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) together. In the presence of target D entiomer of arginine vasopressin (D-VP), the binding of peptide to aptamer block the electron transfer process of MB, leading to decreased current peak of DPV. By this way, this electrochemical aptasensor based on electroactive molecule-intercalated graphene multilayer provide highly sensitive and specific detection of D-VP with the lowest detectable concentration of 1 ng mL −1 and a wide detection range from 1 to 265 ng mL −1 .

  10. Multi-layered zinc oxide-graphene composite thin films for selective nitrogen dioxide sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Bhowmick, T.; Majumder, S. B.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, selective nitrogen dioxide (NO2) sensing characteristics of multi-layered graphene-zinc oxide (G-ZnO) thin films have been demonstrated at 150 °C. The response% of 5 ppm NO2 was measured to be 894% with response and recovery times estimated to be 150 s and 315 s, respectively. In these composite films, the interaction between graphene and zinc oxide is established through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with the analyses of photoluminescence spectra. Superior NO2 sensing of these films is due to simultaneous chemiadsorption of molecular oxygen and NO2 gases onto graphene and ZnO surfaces, resulting in an appreciable increase in the depletion layer width and thereby the sensor resistance. The sensor responses for other reducing gases (viz., CO, H2, and i-C4H10) are postulated to be due to their catalytic oxidation on the sensor surface, resulting in a decrease in the sensor resistance upon gas exposure. At lower operating temperature, due to the molecular nature of the chemiadsorbed oxygen, poor catalytic oxidation leads to a far lower sensor response for reducing gases as compared to NO2. For mixed NO2 and reducing gas sensing, we have reported that fast Fourier transformation of the resistance transients of all these gases in conjunction with principal component analyses forms a reasonably distinct cluster and, therefore, could easily be differentiated.

  11. Oscillatory motion in layered materials: graphene, boron nitride, and molybdenum disulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R

    2015-01-01

    Offset-driven self-retraction and oscillatory motion of bilayer graphene has been observed experimentally and is potentially relevant for nanoscale technological applications. In a previous article, we showed that friction between laterally offset graphene layers is controlled by roughness and proposed a simple reduced-order model based on density-functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) data, with which predictions on the experimental size-scale could be made. In this article, we extend our study to other layered materials, with emphasis on boron nitride (BN) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ). Using MD and DFT simulations of these systems and a generalized version of the reduced-order model, we predict that BN will exhibit behavior similar to graphene (heavily-damped oscillation with a decay rate that increases with roughness) and that MoS 2 shows no oscillatory behavior even in the absence of roughness. This is attributed to the higher energy barrier for sliding in MoS 2 as well as the surface structure. Our generalized reduced-order model provides a guide to predicting and tuning experimental oscillation behavior using a few parameters that can be derived from simulation data. (paper)

  12. Atomic adsorption on pristine graphene along the Periodic Table of Elements - From PBE to non-local functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Jovanović, Aleksandar; Dobrota, Ana S.; Mentus, Slavko V.; Johansson, Börje; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2018-04-01

    The understanding of atomic adsorption on graphene is of high importance for many advanced technologies. Here we present a complete database of the atomic adsorption energies for the elements of the Periodic Table up to the atomic number 86 (excluding lanthanides) on pristine graphene. The energies have been calculated using the projector augmented wave (PAW) method with PBE, long-range dispersion interaction corrected PBE (PBE+D2, PBE+D3) as well as non-local vdW-DF2 approach. The inclusion of dispersion interactions leads to an exothermic adsorption for all the investigated elements. Dispersion interactions are found to be of particular importance for the adsorption of low atomic weight earth alkaline metals, coinage and s-metals (11th and 12th groups), high atomic weight p-elements and noble gases. We discuss the observed adsorption trends along the groups and rows of the Periodic Table as well some computational aspects of modelling atomic adsorption on graphene.

  13. Simultaneous determination of dopamine and uric acid using layer-by-layer graphene and chitosan assembled multilayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xuexiang; Cao, Qingxue; Liang, Lixin; Chen, Jianrong; You, Chunping; Ruan, Yongmin; Lin, Hongjun; Wu, Lanju

    2013-12-15

    Multilayer films containing graphene (Gr) and chitosan (CS) were prepared on glassy carbon electrodes with layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. After being characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the electrochemical sensor based on the resulted films was developed to simultaneously determine dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The LBL assembled electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of DA and UA. In addition, the self-assembly electrode possessed an excellent sensing performance for detection of DA and UA with a linear range from 0.1 μM to 140 µM and from 1.0 µM to 125 µM with the detection limit as low as 0.05 µM and 0.1 µM based on S/N=3, respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flexible bactericidal graphene oxide-chitosan layers for stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, M.; Akhavan, O.; Simchi, A.

    2014-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-chitosan composite layers with stacked layer structures were synthesized using chemically exfoliated GO sheets (with lateral dimensions of ˜1 μm and thickness of ˜1 nm), and applied as antibacterial and flexible nanostructured templates for stem cell proliferation. By increasing the GO content from zero to 6 wt%, the strength and elastic modulus of the layers increased ˜80% and 45%, respectively. Similar to the chitosan layer, the GO-chitosan composite layers showed significant antibacterial activity (>77% inactivation after only 3 h) against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surface density of the actin cytoskeleton fibers of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on the chitosan and GO(1.5 wt%)-chitosan composite layers was found nearly the same, while it significantly decreased by increasing the GO content to 3 and 6 wt%. Our results indicated that although a high concentration of GO in the chitosan layer (here, 6 wt%) could decelerate the proliferation of the hMSCs on the flexible layer, a low concentration of GO (i.e., 1.5 wt%) not only resulted in biocompatibility but also kept the mechanical flexibility of the self-sterilized layers for high proliferation of hMSCs.

  15. A 130 GHz Electro-Optic Ring Modulator with Double-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The optical absorption coefficient of graphene will change after injecting carriers. Based on this principle, a high-speed double-layer graphene electro-optic modulator with a ring resonator structure was designed in this paper. From the numerical simulations, we designed a modulator. Its optical bandwidth is larger than 130 GHz, the switching energy is 0.358 fJ per bit, and the driven voltage is less than 1.2 V. At the same time, the footprint of the proposed modulator is less than 10 microns squared, which makes the process compatible with the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS process. This will provide the possibility for the on-chip integration of the photoelectric device.

  16. Polarized dependence of nonlinear susceptibility in a single layer graphene system in infrared region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solookinejad, G., E-mail: ghsolooki@gmail.com

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of a single-layer graphene nanostructure driven by a weak probe light and an elliptical polarized coupling field is discussed theoretically. The Landau levels of graphene can be separated in infrared or terahertz regions under the strong magnetic field. Therefore, by using the density matrix formalism in quantum optic, the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of the medium can be derived. It is demonstrated that by adjusting the elliptical parameter, one can manipulate the linear and nonlinear absorption as well as Kerr nonlinearity of the medium. It is realized that the enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be possible with zero linear absorption and nonlinear amplification at some values of elliptical parameter. Our results may be having potential applications in quantum information science based on Nano scales devices.

  17. Performance of Liquid Phase Exfoliated Graphene As Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitors Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffstutler, Jacob; Wasala, Milinda; Richie, Julianna; Winchester, Andrew; Ghosh, Sujoy; Kar, Swastik; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-03-01

    We will present the results of our investigations of electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) or supercapacitors (SC) fabricated using liquid-phase exfoliated graphene. Several electrolytes, such as aqueous potassium hydroxide KOH (6M), ionic 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6], and ionic 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate[BMP][FAP] were used. These EDLC's show good performance compared to other carbon nanomaterials based EDLC's devices. We found that the liquid phase exfoliated graphene based devices possess specific capacitance values as high as 262 F/g, when used with ionic liquid electrolyte[BMP][FAP], with power densities (~ 454 W/kg) and energy densities (~ 0.38Wh/kg). Further, these devices indicated rapid charge transfer response even without the use of any binders or specially prepared current collectors. A detailed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis in order to understand the phenomenon of charge storage in these materials will be presented.

  18. Graphene double-layer capacitor with ac line-filtering performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John R; Outlaw, R A; Holloway, B C

    2010-09-24

    Electric double-layer capacitors (DLCs) can have high storage capacity, but their porous electrodes cause them to perform like resistors in filter circuits that remove ripple from rectified direct current. We have demonstrated efficient filtering of 120-hertz current with DLCs with electrodes made from vertically oriented graphene nanosheets grown directly on metal current collectors. This design minimized electronic and ionic resistances and produced capacitors with RC time constants of less than 200 microseconds, in contrast with ~1 second for typical DLCs. Graphene nanosheets have a preponderance of exposed edge planes that greatly increases charge storage as compared with that of designs that rely on basal plane surfaces. Capacitors constructed with these electrodes could be smaller than the low-voltage aluminum electrolyte capacitors that are typically used in electronic devices.

  19. Graphene Double-Layer Capacitor with ac Line-Filtering Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John R.; Outlaw, R. A.; Holloway, B. C.

    2010-09-01

    Electric double-layer capacitors (DLCs) can have high storage capacity, but their porous electrodes cause them to perform like resistors in filter circuits that remove ripple from rectified direct current. We have demonstrated efficient filtering of 120-hertz current with DLCs with electrodes made from vertically oriented graphene nanosheets grown directly on metal current collectors. This design minimized electronic and ionic resistances and produced capacitors with RC time constants of less than 200 microseconds, in contrast with ~1 second for typical DLCs. Graphene nanosheets have a preponderance of exposed edge planes that greatly increases charge storage as compared with that of designs that rely on basal plane surfaces. Capacitors constructed with these electrodes could be smaller than the low-voltage aluminum electrolyte capacitors that are typically used in electronic devices.

  20. Understanding the role of pore size homogeneity in the water transport through graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Zhao, Yunzhen; Fang, Chang

    2018-06-01

    Graphene is a versatile 2D material and attracts an increasing amount of attention from a broad scientific community, including novel nanofluidic devices. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the pressure driven water transport through graphene layers, focusing on the pore size homogeneity, realized by the arrangement of two pore sizes. For a given layer number, we find that water flux exhibits an excellent linear behavior with pressure, in agreement with the prediction of the Hagen–Poiseuille equation. Interestingly, the flux for concentrated pore size distribution is around two times larger than that of a uniform distribution. More surprisingly, under a given pressure, the water flux changes in an opposite way for these two distributions, where the flux ratio almost increases linearly with the layer number. For the largest layer number, more distributions suggest the same conclusion that higher water flux can be attained for more concentrated pore size distributions. Similar differences for the water translocation time and occupancy are also identified. The major reason for these results should clearly be due to the hydrogen bond and density profile distributions. Our results are helpful to delineate the exquisite role of pore size homogeneity, and should have great implications for the design of high flux nanofluidic devices and inversely the detection of pore structures.

  1. Semitransparent Flexible Organic Solar Cells Employing Doped-Graphene Layers as Anode and Cathode Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hee; Jang, Chan Wook; Lee, Ha Seung; Seo, Sang Woo; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2018-01-31

    Semitransparent flexible photovoltaic cells are advantageous for effective use of solar energy in many areas such as building-integrated solar-power generation and portable photovoltaic chargers. We report semitransparent and flexible organic solar cells (FOSCs) with high aperture, composed of doped graphene layers, ZnO, P3HT:PCBM, and PEDOT:PSS as anode/cathode transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs), electron transport layer, photoactive layer, and hole transport layer, respectively, fabricated based on simple solution processing. The FOSCs do not only harvest solar energy from ultraviolet-visible region but are also less sensitive to near-infrared photons, indicating semitransparency. For the anode/cathode TCEs, graphene is doped with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)-amide or triethylene tetramine, respectively. Power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.12% is obtained from the fundamental FOSC structure, and the PCE is further enhanced to 4.23% by adding an Al reflective mirror on the top or bottom side of the FOSCs. The FOSCs also exhibit remarkable mechanical flexibilities through bending tests for various curvature radii.

  2. Hollow Few-Layer Graphene-Based Structures from Parafilm Waste for Flexible Transparent Supercapacitors and Oil Spill Cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Tsai, Meng-Ting; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; To, Bao Dong; Vu, Duc Tu; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2017-11-22

    We report a versatile strategy to exploit parafilm waste as a carbon precursor for fabrication of freestanding, hollow few-layer graphene fiber mesh (HFGM) structures without use of any gaseous carriers/promoters via an annealing route. The freestanding HFGMs possess good mechanical flexibility, tailorable transparency, and high electrical conductivity, consequently qualifying them as promising electrochemical electrodes. Because of the hollow spaces, electrolyte ions can easily access into and contact with interior surfaces of the graphene fibers, accordingly increasing electrode/electrolyte interfacial area. As expected, solid-state supercapacitors based on the HFGMs exhibit a considerable enhancement in specific capacitance (20-30 fold) as compared to those employing chemical vapor deposition compact graphene films. Moreover, the parafilm waste is found to be beneficial for one-step fabrication of nanocarbon/few-layer graphene composite meshes with superior electrochemical performance, outstanding superhydrophobic property, good self-cleaning ability, and great promise for oil spill cleanup.

  3. Spatial variation of the number of graphene layers formed on the scratched 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osaklung, J. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Euaruksakul, C. [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Meevasana, W., E-mail: worawat@g.sut.ac.th [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, P. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties of graphene can vary greatly depending on the number of graphene layers; therefore, spatial control of graphene thickness is desired to fully exploit these properties in promising new devices. Using low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we investigate how scratches on the surface of 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) affect the epitaxial growth of graphene. Oscillations in the LEEM-image intensity as a function of electron energy (I-V LEEM analysis) show that the number of graphene layers clearly differs between regions of scratched and smooth substrate. The extent of the thicker graphene layers formed above scratches is found to be significantly larger than the width of the scratch itself. This finding can be implemented as an additional technique for spatially modulating graphene thickness.

  4. Methanol wetting enthalpy on few-layer graphene decorated hierarchical carbon foam for cooling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, R., E-mail: paul24@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnolgy Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Zemlyanov, D. [Birck Nanotechnolgy Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Voevodin, A.A.; Roy, A.K. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States); Fisher, T.S. [Birck Nanotechnolgy Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Vertical few-layer thick graphene petals are grown on macro-porous carbon foam surfaces having an intrinsic open porosity of 75%. This provides a hierarchical porous structure with a potential for surface adsorption/desorption or wetting/dewetting based thermal energy storage applications. Carbon foams have a combined advantage of large surface area and high thermal conductivity critical for thermal energy storage, but they are prone to oxidation and exhibit low adsorption enthalpies for lightweight hydrocarbons. Here we report graphene petal decoration of carbon foam surfaces and subsequent chemical modification through boron nitride incorporation in hexagonal carbon planes of both carbon foams and graphene petals. This chemically reactive hierarchical structure is characterized with FESEM, Raman, XRD, and XPS measurements. Methanol wetting enthalpy of this three-dimensional hierarchical material was measured with a solution calorimeter, and had shown a six fold increase (from 78 to 522 J/g of foam) as compared to the carbon foam prior to the surface modification. Influences of petal decoration on the surface morphology of carbon foam, BN chemical modification, structure and stoichiometry of the hierarchical material surface, and methanol wetting enthalpy improvement are discussed in detail. The applicability of this hierarchical porous material for thermal energy applications is established. - Highlights: • 500 nm thick few layer graphene petals decoration vertically on macroporous carbon foam surface. • Microwave heating assisted chemical treatment for boron-nitride modification. • Defective petals edges due to boron nitride domain formation. • 20 at. % boron and nitrogen incorporation. • Six fold increase in methanol wetting enthalpy on boron-nitride modification.

  5. Methanol wetting enthalpy on few-layer graphene decorated hierarchical carbon foam for cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, R.; Zemlyanov, D.; Voevodin, A.A.; Roy, A.K.; Fisher, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Vertical few-layer thick graphene petals are grown on macro-porous carbon foam surfaces having an intrinsic open porosity of 75%. This provides a hierarchical porous structure with a potential for surface adsorption/desorption or wetting/dewetting based thermal energy storage applications. Carbon foams have a combined advantage of large surface area and high thermal conductivity critical for thermal energy storage, but they are prone to oxidation and exhibit low adsorption enthalpies for lightweight hydrocarbons. Here we report graphene petal decoration of carbon foam surfaces and subsequent chemical modification through boron nitride incorporation in hexagonal carbon planes of both carbon foams and graphene petals. This chemically reactive hierarchical structure is characterized with FESEM, Raman, XRD, and XPS measurements. Methanol wetting enthalpy of this three-dimensional hierarchical material was measured with a solution calorimeter, and had shown a six fold increase (from 78 to 522 J/g of foam) as compared to the carbon foam prior to the surface modification. Influences of petal decoration on the surface morphology of carbon foam, BN chemical modification, structure and stoichiometry of the hierarchical material surface, and methanol wetting enthalpy improvement are discussed in detail. The applicability of this hierarchical porous material for thermal energy applications is established. - Highlights: • 500 nm thick few layer graphene petals decoration vertically on macroporous carbon foam surface. • Microwave heating assisted chemical treatment for boron-nitride modification. • Defective petals edges due to boron nitride domain formation. • 20 at. % boron and nitrogen incorporation. • Six fold increase in methanol wetting enthalpy on boron-nitride modification

  6. Chemically-modified graphene sheets as an active layer for eco-friendly metal electroplating on plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Joon-Suk; Hwang, Taeseon; Nam, Gi-Yong; Hong, Jung-Pyo; Bae, Ah-Hyun; Son, Sang-Ik; Lee, Geun-Ho; Sung, Hak kyung; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon; Nam, Jae-Do

    2012-01-01

    Eco-friendly nickel (Ni) electroplating was carried out on a plastic substrate using chemically modified graphene sheets as an active and conductive layer to initiate electroplating without using conventional pre-treatment or electroless metal-seeding processes. A graphene oxide (GO) solution was self-assembled on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film followed by evaporation to give GO layers (thickness around 6.5 μm) on PET (GO/PET) film. Then, the GO/PET film was chemically and thermally reduced to convert the GO layers to reduced graphene oxide (RGO) layers on the PET substrate. The RGO-coated PET (RGO/PET) film showed the sheet resistance of 100 Ω per square. On RGO/PET film, Ni electroplating was conducted under the constant-current condition and the entire surface of the PET film was completely metalized with Ni without any voids.

  7. Tunable Electrical and Optical Characteristics in Monolayer Graphene and Few-Layer MoS2 Heterostructure Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Servin; Lee, Inyeal; Lim, Dongsuk; Wang, Jianwei; Ochiai, Yuichi; Aoki, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Yu, Young-Jun; Kim, Philip; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-08-12

    Lateral and vertical two-dimensional heterostructure devices, in particular graphene-MoS2, have attracted profound interest as they offer additional functionalities over normal two-dimensional devices. Here, we have carried out electrical and optical characterization of graphene-MoS2 heterostructure. The few-layer MoS2 devices with metal electrode at one end and monolayer graphene electrode at the other end show nonlinearity in drain current with drain voltage sweep due to asymmetrical Schottky barrier height at the contacts and can be modulated with an external gate field. The doping effect of MoS2 on graphene was observed as double Dirac points in the transfer characteristics of the graphene field-effect transistor (FET) with a few-layer MoS2 overlapping the middle part of the channel, whereas the underlapping of graphene have negligible effect on MoS2 FET characteristics, which showed typical n-type behavior. The heterostructure also exhibits a strongest optical response for 520 nm wavelength, which decreases with higher wavelengths. Another distinct feature observed in the heterostructure is the peak in the photocurrent around zero gate voltage. This peak is distinguished from conventional MoS2 FETs, which show a continuous increase in photocurrent with back-gate voltage. These results offer significant insight and further enhance the understanding of the graphene-MoS2 heterostructure.

  8. Charge transfer at junctions of a single layer of graphene and a metallic single walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Geraldine L C; Wang, Qing Hua; Ulissi, Zachary W; McNicholas, Thomas P; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Shih, Chih-Jen; Jin, Zhong; Strano, Michael S

    2013-06-10

    Junctions between a single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and a monolayer of graphene are fabricated and studied for the first time. A single layer graphene (SLG) sheet grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is transferred onto a SiO₂/Si wafer with aligned CVD-grown SWNTs. Raman spectroscopy is used to identify metallic-SWNT/SLG junctions, and a method for spectroscopic deconvolution of the overlapping G peaks of the SWNT and the SLG is reported, making use of the polarization dependence of the SWNT. A comparison of the Raman peak positions and intensities of the individual SWNT and graphene to those of the SWNT-graphene junction indicates an electron transfer of 1.12 × 10¹³ cm⁻² from the SWNT to the graphene. This direction of charge transfer is in agreement with the work functions of the SWNT and graphene. The compression of the SWNT by the graphene increases the broadening of the radial breathing mode (RBM) peak from 3.6 ± 0.3 to 4.6 ± 0.5 cm⁻¹ and of the G peak from 13 ± 1 to 18 ± 1 cm⁻¹, in reasonable agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. However, the RBM and G peak position shifts are primarily due to charge transfer with minimal contributions from strain. With this method, the ability to dope graphene with nanometer resolution is demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Role of electron back action on photons in hybridizing double-layer graphene plasmons with localized photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we deal with the electromagnetic coupling between an incident surface-plasmon-polariton wave and relativistic electrons in two graphene layers. Our previous investigation was limited to single-layer graphene (Iurov et al 2017 Phys. Rev. B 96 081408). However, the present work, is both an expanded and extended version of this previous Phys. Rev. B paper after having included very detailed theoretical formalisms and extensive comparisons of results from either one or two graphene layers embedded in a dielectric medium. The additional retarded Coulomb interaction between two graphene layers will compete with the coupling between the single graphene layer and the surface of a conductor. Consequently, some distinctive features, such as triply-hybridized absorption peaks and a new acoustic-like graphene plasmon mode within the anticrossing region, have been found for the double-layer graphene system. Physically, our theory is self-consistent, in comparison with a commonly adopted perturbative theory, for studying hybrid light-plasmon modes and the electron back action on photons. Instead of usual radiation or grating-deflection field coupling, a surface-plasmon-polariton localized field coupling is introduced with completely different dispersion relations for radiative (small wave numbers) and evanescent (large wave numbers) field modes. Technically, the exactly calculated effective scattering matrix for this theory can be employed to construct an effective-medium theory in order to improve the accuracy of the well-known finite-difference time-domain method for solving Maxwell’s equations numerically. Practically, the predicted triply-hybridized absorption peaks can excite polaritons only, giving rise to a possible polariton-condensation based laser.

  10. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  11. Bombardment of gas molecules on single graphene layer at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Ramki [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyun [Department of Aerospace and System Engineering and Research Center for Aircraft Parts Technology, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Sung [Future Propulsion Center, Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-09

    Graphite is widely used as a material for rocket-nozzle inserts due to its excellent thermo-physical properties as well as low density. During the operation of rockets, the surface of the graphite nozzle is subjected to very high heat fluxes and the undesirable erosion of the surface occurs due to the bombardment of gas molecules with high kinetic energy, which causes a significant reduction of nozzle performance. However, the understanding and quantification of such bombardment is not satisfactory due to its complexity: The bond breaking-forming happens simultaneously for the carbon atoms of graphene, some gas molecules penetrate through the surface, some of them are reflected from the surface, etc. In the present study, we perform extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the bombardment phenomena in high temperature environment (several thousand Kelvin). Advanced from the previous studies that have focused on the bombardment by light molecules (e.g., H{sub 2}), we will concentrate on the impact by realistic molecules (e.g., CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). LAMMPS is employed for the MD simulations with NVE ensemble and AIREBO potential for graphene. The molecular understanding of the interaction between graphene and highly energetic gas molecules will enable us to design an efficient thermo-mechanical protection system.

  12. Towards Lego Snapping; Integration of Carbon Nanotubes and Few-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias; Farrokhi, M. Javad; Strachan, Douglas

    Integration of semiconducting, conducting, and insulating nanomaterials into precisely aligned complicated systems is one of the main challenges to the ultimate size scaling of electronic devices, which is a key goal in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This integration could be made more effective through controlled alignment of the crystallographic lattices of the nanoscale components. Of the vast number of materials of atomically-thin materials, two of the sp2 bonded carbon structures, graphene and carbon nanotubes, are ideal candidates for this type of application since they are built from the same backbone carbon lattice. Here we report carbon nanotube and graphene hybrid nanostructures fabricated through their catalytic synthesis and etching. The growth formations we have investigated through various high-resolution microscopy techniques provide evidence of lego-snapped interfaces between nanotubes and graphene into device-relevant orientations. We will finish with a discussion of the various size and energy regimes relevant to these lego-snapped interfaces and their implications on developing these integrated formations.

  13. The Origin of Improved Electrical Double-Layer Capacitance by Inclusion of Topological Defects and Dopants in Graphene for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiafeng; Han, Yulei; Kong, Xianghua; Deng, Xinzhou; Park, Hyo Ju; Guo, Yali; Jin, Song; Qi, Zhikai; Lee, Zonghoon; Qiao, Zhenhua; Ruoff, Rodney S; Ji, Hengxing

    2016-10-24

    Low-energy density has long been the major limitation to the application of supercapacitors. Introducing topological defects and dopants in carbon-based electrodes in a supercapacitor improves the performance by maximizing the gravimetric capacitance per mass of the electrode. However, the main mechanisms governing this capacitance improvement are still unclear. We fabricated planar electrodes from CVD-derived single-layer graphene with deliberately introduced topological defects and nitrogen dopants in controlled concentrations and of known configurations, to estimate the influence of these defects on the electrical double-layer (EDL) capacitance. Our experimental study and theoretical calculations show that the increase in EDL capacitance due to either the topological defects or the nitrogen dopants has the same origin, yet these two factors improve the EDL capacitance in different ways. Our work provides a better understanding of the correlation between the atomic-scale structure and the EDL capacitance and presents a new strategy for the development of experimental and theoretical models for understanding the EDL capacitance of carbon electrodes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Layer by layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene via Langmuir Blodgett method for efficient light-harvesting in photocatalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, Imran; Ali, Zahid; Kang, Dae Joon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Layer by layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene. • Efficient visible light photocatalysis. • Plasmonic resonances by nanoparticles are utilized for visible light scattering. • Electron scavenging reaction. • Easy handling and recycling. - Abstract: The synthesis of a photocatalyst that is highly active under visible light is one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. Here we report a multilayer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene that offers dual functionality to efficiently harness visible photons. Firstly, plasmonic resonances by gold nanoparticles are utilized for visible light scattering; secondly the electron scavenging reaction is enhanced by the gold nanoparticles trapping the electrons that are injected from the dye into the graphene. Moreover, the structure is in the form of a thin film, which demonstrates the potential for easy handling and recycling. Precise control over light harvesting and the photocatalytic response is achieved by controlling the number of layers

  15. Layer by layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene via Langmuir Blodgett method for efficient light-harvesting in photocatalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakir, Imran, E-mail: shakir@skku.edu [Deanship of scientific research, College of Engineering, King Saud University, PO-BOX 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Zahid [BK 21 Physics Research Division, Department of Energy Science, Institute of Basic Sciences, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); National Institute of Lasers and Optronics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Kang, Dae Joon [BK 21 Physics Research Division, Department of Energy Science, Institute of Basic Sciences, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Layer by layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene. • Efficient visible light photocatalysis. • Plasmonic resonances by nanoparticles are utilized for visible light scattering. • Electron scavenging reaction. • Easy handling and recycling. - Abstract: The synthesis of a photocatalyst that is highly active under visible light is one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. Here we report a multilayer assembly of gold nanoparticles and graphene that offers dual functionality to efficiently harness visible photons. Firstly, plasmonic resonances by gold nanoparticles are utilized for visible light scattering; secondly the electron scavenging reaction is enhanced by the gold nanoparticles trapping the electrons that are injected from the dye into the graphene. Moreover, the structure is in the form of a thin film, which demonstrates the potential for easy handling and recycling. Precise control over light harvesting and the photocatalytic response is achieved by controlling the number of layers.

  16. Atomic layer deposition on nanoparticles in a rotary reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jarod Alan

    Challenges are encountered during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on large quantities of nanoparticles. The particles must be agitated or vigorously mixed to perform the ALD surface reactions in reasonable times and to prevent the particles from being agglomerated by the ALD film. The high surface area of nanoparticles also demands efficient reactant usage because large quantities of reactant are required for the surface reactions to reach completion. To address these challenges, a novel rotary reactor was developed to achieve constant particle agitation during static ALD reactant exposures. In the design of this new reactor, a cylindrical drum with porous metal walls was positioned inside a vacuum chamber. The porous cylindrical drum was rotated by a magnetically coupled rotary feedthrough. By rotating the cylindrical drum to obtain a centrifugal force of less than one gravitational force, the particles were agitated by a continuous "avalanche" of particles. The effectiveness of this rotary reactor was demonstrated by Al 2O3 ALD on ZrO2 particles. A number of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning Auger spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the Al2O3 ALD film conformally coats the ZrO 2 particles. Combining static reactant exposures with a very high surface area sample in the rotary reactor also provides unique opportunities for studying the surface chemistry during ALD. Sequential, subsaturating doses can be used to examine the self-limiting behavior of the ALD reactions in the rotary reactor. This dosing method is the first demonstration of self-limiting ALD on bulk quantities of nanoparticles. By combining these sequential, subsaturating doses with quadrupole mass spectrometry, ALD reactions can be analyzed from the gas phase using full mass spectrum analysis. The reaction products are present in a high enough concentration to discern a gas phase mechanism for reactions

  17. A comparative density functional study on electrical properties of layered penta-graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhi Gen, E-mail: yuzg@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei, E-mail: zhangyw@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-10-28

    We present a comparative study of the influence of the number of layers, the biaxial strain in the range of −3% to 3%, and the stacking misalignments on the electronic properties of a new 2D carbon allotrope, penta-graphene (PG), based on hybrid-functional method within the density functional theory (DFT). In comparison with local exchange-correlation approximation in the DFT, the hybrid-functional provides an accurate description on the degree of p{sub z} orbitals localization and bandgap. Importantly, the predicted bandgap of few-layer PG has a weak layer dependence. The bandgap of monolayer PG is 3.27 eV, approximately equal to those of GaN and ZnO; and the bandgap of few-layer PG decreases slowly with the number of layers (N) and converge to 2.57 eV when N ≥ 4. Our calculations using HSE06 functional on few-layer PG reveal that bandgap engineering by stacking misalignment can further tune the bandgap down to 1.37 eV. Importantly, there is no direct-to-indirect bandgap transition in PG by varying strain, layer number, and stacking misalignment. Owing to its tunable, robustly direct, and wide bandgap characteristics, few-layer PG is promising for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  18. The novel synthesis of highly water-soluble few-layer graphene nanosheets by a simple one-pot chemical route and without any modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh, E-mail: tajarodi@iust.ac.ir; Ferdowsi, Somayeh Moazen

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a simple one-pot and scalable process including mild oxidation of graphite in mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/KMnO{sub 4} at 60 °C was developed to synthesize water-soluble graphene. In this process, effects of the oxidant amount and reaction time on oxidation and exfoliation degree of graphite were explored. At this temperature, most oxygen-containing functional groups were introduced at the edges of graphite by preserving the pristine sp{sup 2}carbon-bonded structure. These functional groups were responsible for exfoliation of edge-functionalized graphite (EFG) sheets to edge-graphene oxide (EGO). Various techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and direct-current measurements proved that resulting EGO was formed from few-layer graphene nanosheets (GNS) with sub-2 nm thickness, low-defect sites in basal plane owing good solubility in water from pH 6 to 11 through electrostatic stabilization, as determined by zeta-potentiometry. This low-cost and high-efficiency solution processing techniques has enabled to produce aqueous graphene dispersions without need to use polymeric or surfactant stabilizers for many technological applications. - Highlights: • Water-soluble graphene was synthesized by a simple one-pot and scalable process. • This process did not utilize any reduction agents, stabilizer and ultrasonication. • The effects of oxidant amount and reaction time on process were explored.

  19. Imaging atomic-level random walk of a point defect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotakoski, Jani; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2014-05-01

    Deviations from the perfect atomic arrangements in crystals play an important role in affecting their properties. Similarly, diffusion of such deviations is behind many microstructural changes in solids. However, observation of point defect diffusion is hindered both by the difficulties related to direct imaging of non-periodic structures and by the timescales involved in the diffusion process. Here, instead of imaging thermal diffusion, we stimulate and follow the migration of a divacancy through graphene lattice using a scanning transmission electron microscope operated at 60 kV. The beam-activated process happens on a timescale that allows us to capture a significant part of the structural transformations and trajectory of the defect. The low voltage combined with ultra-high vacuum conditions ensure that the defect remains stable over long image sequences, which allows us for the first time to directly follow the diffusion of a point defect in a crystalline material.

  20. Deposition of an Ultraflat Graphene Oxide Nanosheet on Atomically Flat Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.; Shahed, S. M. F.; Yuta, N.; Komeda, T.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, graphene oxide (GO) sheets produced in the form of stable aqueous dispersions were deposited on Au (111), freshly cleaved mica, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the presence and distinct contact of GO sheets on the substrates. It was revealed from the topography images that high-quality ultraflat GO monolayer sheets formed on the substrates without distinct cracking/wrinkling or folding. GO sheets with apparent height variation observed by microscopy also indicate ultraflat deposition with clear underlying steps. It was observed that ultrasonication and centrifuge steps prior to deposition were very effective for getting oxidation debris (OD)-free ultraflat single monolayer GO nanosheets onto substrates and that the process depends on the concentration of supplied GO solutions.