WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic layer graphene

  1. Graphene oxide monolayers as atomically thin seeding layers for atomic layer deposition of metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbakhsh, Amirhasan; Adelmann, Christoph; Song, Yi; Lee, Chang Seung; Asselberghs, Inge; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Brizzi, Simone; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter; Van Elshocht, Sven; Heyns, Marc; Kong, Jing; Palacios, Tomás; De Gendt, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) was explored as an atomically-thin transferable seed layer for the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of dielectric materials on any substrate of choice. This approach does not require specific chemical groups on the target surface to initiate ALD. This establishes GO as a unique interface which enables the growth of dielectric materials on a wide range of substrate materials and opens up numerous prospects for applications. In this work, a mild oxygen plasma treatment was used to oxidize graphene monolayers with well-controlled and tunable density of epoxide functional groups. This was confirmed by synchrotron-radiation photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, density functional theory calculations were carried out on representative epoxidized graphene monolayer models to correlate the capacitive properties of GO with its electronic structure. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed that the capacitive behavior of Al2O3/GO depends on the oxidation level of GO. Finally, GO was successfully used as an ALD seed layer for the deposition of Al2O3 on chemically inert single layer graphene, resulting in high performance top-gated field-effect transistors.

  2. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  3. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  4. Comparative study of thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, I.; Miakonkikh, A.; Kononenko, O.; Matveev, V.; Rudenko, K.

    2017-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition of alumina on graphene was studied in thermal and plasma enhanced process. Deposition was controlled by in situ ellipsometry every half cycle, which allows measuring of Al2O3 thickness and graphene equivalent thickness during the process. Properties of graphene were measured by Raman spectroscopy prior and after deposition of dielectric layer. It was shown that plasma enhanced deposition leads to decrease of effective graphene thickness, while thermal deposition does not affect graphene layer. No substantial nucleation lag was observed in both types of deposition.

  5. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  6. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  7. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Chunxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xi Xiang; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi- and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM. PMID:23378926

  8. Graphene devices with bottom-up contacts by area-selective atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, Nick F. W.; Vervuurt, René H. J.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; Mulders, Johannes J. L.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2017-06-01

    Graphene field-effect transistor devices were fabricated using a bottom-up and resist-free method, avoiding common compatibility issues such as contamination by resist residues. Large-area CVD graphene sheets were structured into device channels by patterning with a focused ion beam. Platinum contacts were then deposited by direct-write atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a combination between electron beam induced deposition (EBID) and bottom-up area-selective ALD. This is a unique approach that enables nucleation of Pt ALD on graphene, and therefore these devices are the first reported graphene devices with contacts deposited by ALD. Electrical characterization of the devices confirms ambipolar transistor behaviour with typical field-effect mobilities in the range of 1000-1800 cm2 V-1 s-1. We observe clear signs of strong Pt-graphene coupling and contact induced hole doping, implying good contact properties in contrast to the conventionally weak bonding between Pt and graphene. We attribute these observations to the reduced amount of resist residue under the contacts, the improved wettability of the Pt due to the use of ALD, and the formation of a graphitic interlayer that bonds the Pt more strongly to the graphene. We conclude that direct-write ALD is a very suitable technique for metallization of graphene devices and to study the intrinsic properties of metal-graphene contacts in more detail. In addition, it offers unique opportunities to control the metal-graphene coupling strength.

  9. Mode Locking of Lasers with Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Then, the Ni catalyst was activated at 700 C in 100 sccm H2 gas flow. The samples were heated up to 900 - 1000 C inside a quartz tube under the...optical bleaching . Four types of graphene derivatives were studied. These are the graphene-oxide (GO), GO non-covalently bonded with poly(p

  10. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Friction Characteristics of Single-Layer MoS2 and Graphene Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khac, Bien-cuong tran; Chung, Koo-hyun

    2016-05-01

    Atomically thin layered materials such as MoS2 and graphene have attracted a lot of interest as protective coating layers for micro- and nano-electromechanical devices based on their superior mechanical properties and chemical inertness. In this work, the frictional characteristics of single layer MoS2 and graphene prepared by the mechanical exfoliation method were quantitatively investigated using atomic force microscopy. The results showed that both MoS2 and graphene exhibited relatively low friction forces of 1-3 nN under normal forces ranging from 1 to 30 nN. However, a higher increase in the friction force as the normal force increased was observed in the case of MoS2. The differences in the adhesion characteristics and mechanical properties of atomically thin layered materials may influence the puckering of the layer, which in turn influences the frictional behavior.

  12. Property transformation of graphene with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited directly by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Li; Cao, Duo; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Dashen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2014-01-13

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are deposited directly onto graphene by H{sub 2}O-based atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the films are pinhole-free and continuously cover the graphene surface. The growth process of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films does not introduce any detective defects in graphene, suppresses the hysteresis effect and tunes the graphene doping to n-type. The self-cleaning of ALD growth process, together with the physically absorbed H{sub 2}O and oxygen-deficient ALD environment consumes OH{sup −} bonds, suppresses the p-doping of graphene, shifts Dirac point to negative gate bias and enhances the electron mobility.

  13. Monolithic Laser Scribed Graphene Scaffold with Atomic Layer Deposited Platinum for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pranati

    2017-09-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures as scaffolds for conformal deposition of catalysts is an emerging research area with significant potential for electrocatalytic applications. In this study, we report the fabrication of monolithic, self-standing, 3D graphitic carbon scaffold with conformally deposited Pt by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst. Laser scribing is employed to transform polyimide into 3D porous graphitic carbon, which possesses good electronic conductivity and numerous edge plane sites. This laser scribed graphene (LSG) architecture makes it possible to fabricate monolithic electrocatalyst support without any binders or conductive additives. The synergistic effect between ALD of Pt on 3D network of LSG provides an avenue for minimal yet effective Pt usage, leading to an enhanced HER activity. This strategy establish a general approach for inexpensive and large scale HER device fabrication with minimum catalyst cost.

  14. Wafer-scale single-domain-like graphene by defect-selective atomic layer deposition of hexagonal ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Sun; Kim, Sejoon; Kim, Hongbum; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Min, Sung-Wook; Im, Seongil; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Lim, Seulky; Shin, Hyunjung; Koo, Sang Man; Sung, Myung Mo

    2015-10-01

    Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also demonstrate how ZnO-stitched CVD graphene can be successfully integrated into wafer-scale arrays of top-gated field-effect transistors on 4-inch Si and polymer substrates, revealing remarkable device-to-device uniformity.Large-area graphene films produced by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are polycrystalline and thus contain numerous grain boundaries that can greatly degrade their performance and produce inhomogeneous properties. A better grain boundary engineering in CVD graphene is essential to realize the full potential of graphene in large-scale applications. Here, we report a defect-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) for stitching grain boundaries of CVD graphene with ZnO so as to increase the connectivity between grains. In the present ALD process, ZnO with a hexagonal wurtzite structure was selectively grown mainly on the defect-rich grain boundaries to produce ZnO-stitched CVD graphene with well-connected grains. For the CVD graphene film after ZnO stitching, the inter-grain mobility is notably improved with only a little change in the free carrier density. We also

  15. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... the Pt(100) surface will lift the reconstruction, a single graphene layer is observed to act as an effective coating, protecting the reactive surface from O2 exposure and thus preserving the reconstruction underneath the graphene layer in O2 pressures as high as 104 mbar. A similar protective effect...

  16. Dispersion C3 coefficients for the alkali-metal atoms interacting with a graphene layer and with a carbon nanotube

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate separation dependent van der Waal dispersion ($C_3$) coefficients for the interactions of the Li, Na, K and Rb alkali atoms with a graphene layer and with a single walled carbon nanotube (CNT) using the hydrodynamic and Dirac models. The results from both the models are evaluated using accurate values of the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atoms. Accountability of these accurate values of dynamical polarizabilities of the alkali atoms in determination of the above $C_3$ coefficients are accentuated by comparing them with the coefficients evaluated using the dynamic dipole polarizabilities estimated from the single oscillator approximation which are typically employed in the earlier calculations. For practical description of the atom-surface interaction potentials the radial dependent $C_3$ coefficients are given for a wide range of separation distances between the ground states of the considered atoms and the wall surfaces and also for different values of nanotube radii. The coefficients for...

  17. Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Königsallee 9-21, 37081 Göttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-11-14

    The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300 nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2 nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

  18. Growth of Atomic Hexagonal Boron Nitride Layers and Graphene/Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructures by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongguang

    dielectric properties of h-BN film. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of 2.5-3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicated that the epitaxial h-BN film is of good insulating nature. Following with the lateral growth of graphene on in situ epitaxial h-BN flakes by plasma-assisted MBE is discussed in Chapter 4. Single-crystal h-BN domains were grown on Co film substrates at a substrate temperature of 850 900 oC using plasma-assisted MBE. Three-point star shape h-BN domains were observed by SEM, and confirmed by Raman and XPS. The h-BN on Co template was used for in situ growth of multilayer graphene, leading to an h-BN/graphene heterostructure. Carbon atoms preferentially nucleate on Co substrate and edges of h-BN and then grow laterally to form continuous graphene. Further introduction of carbon atoms results in layer-by-layer growth of graphene on graphene and lateral growth of graphene on h-BN until it may cover entire h-BN flakes. The final part (Chapter 5) is related to the growth of large-area and multi-layer hexagonal boron nitride film on polished Co foils by plasma-assisted MBE. The coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled by growth time under appropriate growth conditions. A large-area, multi-layer h-BN film is confirmed by various characterizations. Dielectric property of as-grown h-BN film is evaluated by characterization of Co(foil)/h-BN/Co(contact) capacitor devices. Breakdown electric field is in the range of 3.0-3.3 MV/cm, which indicates that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics. In addition, the effect of substrate morphology on h-BN growth is discussed regarding different domain density, lateral size, and thickness of the h-BN films grown on unpolished and polished Co foils.

  19. Anomalous Insulator-Metal Transition in Boron Nitride-Graphene Hybrid Atomic Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    hexagonal boron nitride (h-BNC) constitute a new kind of disordered 2D electronic system. Magnetoelectric transport measurements performed at low...Magnetoelectric transport measurements performed at low temperature in vapor phase synthesized h-BNC atomic layers show a clear and anomalous transition from...Tallahassee, Florida 32310, USA 3Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group and ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Fı́sica de Materiales , Centro de Fı́sica

  20. Thickness scaling of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 films and their application to wafer-scale graphene tunnelling transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Gu, Yeahyun; Heo, Jinseong; Yang, Jaehyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Hyun; Lee, Yunseong; Kim, Hyoungsub; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2016-02-10

    The downscaling of the capacitance equivalent oxide thickness (CET) of a gate dielectric film with a high dielectric constant, such as atomic layer deposited (ALD) HfO2, is a fundamental challenge in achieving high-performance graphene-based transistors with a low gate leakage current. Here, we assess the application of various surface modification methods on monolayer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapour deposition to obtain a uniform and pinhole-free ALD HfO2 film with a substantially small CET at a wafer scale. The effects of various surface modifications, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone treatment and introduction of sputtered ZnO and e-beam-evaporated Hf seed layers on monolayer graphene, and the subsequent HfO2 film formation under identical ALD process parameters were systematically evaluated. The nucleation layer provided by the Hf seed layer (which transforms to the HfO2 layer during ALD) resulted in the uniform and conformal deposition of the HfO2 film without damaging the graphene, which is suitable for downscaling the CET. After verifying the feasibility of scaling down the HfO2 thickness to achieve a CET of ~1.5 nm from an array of top-gated metal-oxide-graphene field-effect transistors, we fabricated graphene heterojunction tunnelling transistors with a record-low subthreshold swing value of <60 mV/dec on an 8" glass wafer.

  1. First-principles study on silicon atom doped monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Hussain, Nayyar

    2018-01-01

    This paper illustrates the structural, electronic and optical properties of individual silicon (Si) atom-doped single layer graphene using density functional theory method. Si atom forms tight bonding with graphene layer. The effect of doping has been investigated by varying the concentration of Si atoms from 3.125% to 9.37% (i.e. From one to three Si atoms in 4 × 4 pure graphene supercell containing 32 carbon atoms), respectively. Electronic structure, partial density of states (PDOS) and optical properties of pure and Si atom-doped graphene sheet were calculated using VASP (Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package). The calculated results for pure graphene sheet were then compared with Si atom doped graphene. It is revealed that upon Si doping in graphene, a finite band gap appears at the high symmetric K-point, thereby making graphene a direct band gap semiconductor. Moreover, the band gap value is directly proportional to the concentration of impurity Si atoms present in graphene lattice. Upon analyzing the optical properties of Si atom-doped graphene structures, it is found that, there is significant change in the refractive index of the graphene after Si atom substitution in graphene. In addition, the overall absorption spectrum of graphene is decreased after Si atom doping. Although a significant red shift in absorption is found to occur towards visible range of radiation when Si atom is substituted in its lattice. The reflectivity of graphene improves in low energy region after Si atom substitution in graphene. These results can be useful for tuning the electronic structure and to manipulate the optical properties of graphene layer in the visible region.

  2. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  3. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hao, Haixia [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Hui, Longfei [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Zhao, Fengqi [Science and Technology on Combustion and Explosion Laboratory, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); Feng, Hao, E-mail: fenghao98@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Material Surface Engineering and Nanofabrication, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China); State Key Laboratory of Fluorine and Nitrogen Chemicals, Xi’an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Energetic rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}nanocompositeswerefabricatedbyatomiclayerdepositionapproach. • A novel Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} unit featuring core-shell structure was decorated on the graphene nanosheet. • RGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite exhibits superior energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard. - Abstract: Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  4. Iron oxide/aluminum/graphene energetic nanocomposites synthesized by atomic layer deposition: Enhanced energy release and reduced electrostatic ignition hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Qin, Lijun; Hao, Haixia; Hui, Longfei; Zhao, Fengqi; Feng, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (Fe2O3) and nano-sized aluminum (Al), possessing outstanding exothermic redox reaction characteristics, are highly promising nanothermite materials. However, the reactant diffusion inhibited in the solid state system makes the fast and complete energy release very challenging. In this work, Al nanoparticles anchored on graphene oxide (GO/Al) was initially prepared by a solution assembly approach. Fe2O3 was deposited on GO/Al substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Simultaneously thermal reduction of GO occurs, resulting in rGO/Al@Fe2O3 energetic composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite containing 4.8 wt% of rGO exhibits a 50% increase of the energy release compared to the Al@Fe2O3 nanothermite synthesized by ALD, and an increase of about 130% compared to a random mixture of rGO/Al/Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The enhanced energy release of rGO/Al@Fe2O3 is attributed to the improved spatial distribution as well as the increased interfacial intimacy between the oxidizer and the fuel. Moreover, the rGO/Al@Fe2O3 composite with an rGO content of 9.6 wt% exhibits significantly reduced electrostatic discharge sensitivity. These findings may inspire potential pathways for engineering energetic nanocomposites with enhanced energy release and improved safety characteristics.

  5. Charge Transfer Properties Through Graphene Layers in Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thuiner, P.; Jackman, R.B.; Müller, H.; Nguyen, T.T.; Oliveri, E.; Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Smith, J.A.; van Stenis, M.; Veenhof, R.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice with remarkable mechanical, electrical and optical properties. For the first time graphene layers suspended on copper meshes were installed into a gas detector equipped with a gaseous electron multiplier. Measurements of low energy electron and ion transfer through graphene were conducted. In this paper we describe the sample preparation for suspended graphene layers, the testing procedures and we discuss the preliminary results followed by a prospect of further applications.

  6. Dual-protection of a graphene-sulfur composite by a compact graphene skin and an atomic layer deposited oxide coating for a lithium-sulfur battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingpeng; Wang, Aiji; Tian, Fuyang; Song, Hongquan; Wang, Yinshu; Li, Chun; Hong, Jong-Dal; Shi, Gaoquan

    2015-03-01

    A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A high capacity of 846 mA h g-1 was achieved after charging/discharging for 100 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of over 92%. In the case of using LiNO3 as a shuttle inhibitor, this electrode showed an initial discharge capacity of 796 mA h g-1 and a capacity retention of 81% after 250 cycles at a current density of 1 C with an average coulombic efficiency higher than 99.7%.A reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-sulfur composite aerogel with a compact self-assembled rGO skin was further modified by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO or MgO layer, and used as a free-standing electrode material of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The rGO skin and ALD-oxide coating worked as natural and artificial barriers to constrain the polysulfides within the cathode region. As a result, the Li-S battery based on this electrode material exhibited superior cycling stability, good rate capability and high coulombic efficiency. Furthermore, ALD-ZnO coating was tested for performance improvement and found to be more effective than ALD-MgO coating. The ZnO modified G-S electrode with 55 wt% sulfur loading delivered a maximum discharge capacity of 998 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.2 C. A

  7. Epitaxial Graphene Surface Preparation for Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    effect transistors ( FETs ), and to meet the challenge of scaling devices to small sizes ( nm). In addition, AlN is a suitable dielectric for...using a Cambridge NanoTech, Inc. Savannah 200 thermal ALD system. The sources were electronic- grade TMA (Sigma-Aldrich) and triply distilled H2O which...most layer of EG grown on the C-face of SiC is doped heav- ily p-type. In addition, Lohmann et al.31 also presented data supporting the mechanism of

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition of Hafnium(IV) Oxide on Graphene Oxide: Probing Interfacial Chemistry and Nucleation by using X-ray Absorption and Photoelectron Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivio, Theodore E G; De Jesus, Luis R; Dennis, Robert V; Jia, Ye; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Singisetti, Uttam; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-07-27

    Interfacing graphene with metal oxides is of considerable technological importance for modulating carrier density through electrostatic gating as well as for the design of earth-abundant electrocatalysts. Herein, we probe the early stages of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 on graphene oxide using a combination of C and O K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dosing with water is observed to promote defunctionalization of graphene oxide as a result of the reaction between water and hydroxyl/epoxide species, which yields carbonyl groups that further react with migratory epoxide species to release CO2 . The carboxylates formed by the reaction of carbonyl and epoxide species facilitate binding of Hf precursors to graphene oxide surfaces. The ALD process is accompanied by recovery of the π-conjugated framework of graphene. The delineation of binding modes provides a means to rationally assemble 2D heterostructures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Tailoring graphene layer-to-layer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Wu, Bin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jingbo; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-06-01

    A layered material grown between a substrate and the upper layer involves complex interactions and a confined reaction space, representing an unusual growth mode. Here, we show multi-layer graphene domains grown on liquid or solid Cu by the chemical vapor deposition method via this ‘double-substrate’ mode. We demonstrate the interlayer-induced coupling effect on the twist angle in bi- and multi-layer graphene. We discover dramatic growth disunity for different graphene layers, which is explained by the ideas of a chemical ‘gate’ and a material transport process within a confined space. These key results lead to a consistent framework for understanding the dynamic evolution of multi-layered graphene flakes and tailoring the layer-to-layer growth for practical applications.

  10. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  11. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  12. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O [Berkeley, CA; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, CA

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  13. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Imaging of few‐layer graphene flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Albrektsen, Ole; Novikov, Sergey M.

    In this work, we successfully demonstrate how imaging ellipsometry can be applied to obtain high‐resolution thickness maps of few‐layer graphene (FLG) samples, with the results being thoroughly validated in a comparative study using several complementary techniques: Optical reflection microscopy...... (ORM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning confocal Raman microscopy. The thickness map, revealing distinct terraces separated by steps corresponding to mono‐ and bilayers of graphene, is extracted from a pixel‐to‐pixel fitting of ellipsometric spectra using optical constants derived by fitting...... slab model calculations to averaged spectra collected in large homogenous sample areas. An analysis of reflection spectra and contrast images acquired by ORM confirm the results by quantifying the number of graphene layers and retrieving the FLG optical constants using a simple Fresnel‐law‐based slab...

  15. Artificially stacked atomic layers: toward new van der Waals solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Wei; Cannuccia, E; Taha-Tijerina, Jaime; Balicas, Luis; Mathkar, Akshay; Narayanan, T N; Liu, Zhen; Gupta, Bipin K; Peng, Juan; Yin, Yansheng; Rubio, Angel; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-07-11

    Strong in-plane bonding and weak van der Waals interplanar interactions characterize a large number of layered materials, as epitomized by graphite. The advent of graphene (G), individual layers from graphite, and atomic layers isolated from a few other van der Waals bonded layered compounds has enabled the ability to pick, place, and stack atomic layers of arbitrary compositions and build unique layered materials, which would be otherwise impossible to synthesize via other known techniques. Here we demonstrate this concept for solids consisting of randomly stacked layers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Dispersions of exfoliated h-BN layers and graphene have been prepared by liquid phase exfoliation methods and mixed, in various concentrations, to create artificially stacked h-BN/G solids. These van der Waals stacked hybrid solid materials show interesting electrical, mechanical, and optical properties distinctly different from their starting parent layers. From extensive first principle calculations we identify (i) a novel approach to control the dipole at the h-BN/G interface by properly sandwiching or sliding layers of h-BN and graphene, and (ii) a way to inject carriers in graphene upon UV excitations of the Frenkell-like excitons of the h-BN layer(s). Our combined approach could be used to create artificial materials, made predominantly from inter planar van der Waals stacking of robust bond saturated atomic layers of different solids with vastly different properties.

  16. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images...... as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  17. Designed nitrogen doping of few-layer graphene functionalized by selective oxygenic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ying; Xie, Bingqiao; Ren, Yingtao; Yu, Mengying; Qu, Yang; Xie, Ting; Yong ZHANG; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    Few-layer nitrogen doped graphene was synthesized originating from graphene oxide functionalized by selective oxygenic functional groups (hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl etc.) under hydrothermal conditions, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation evidenced few-layer feature of the graphene oxide. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed phase structure of the graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide. Nitrogen doping content and bonding...

  18. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  19. Strain Relaxation of Graphene Layers by Cu Surface Roughening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Hyoun; Moon, Joonhee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yooseok; Jo, Insu; Jeon, Cheolho; Lee, Jouhahn; Hong, Byung Hee

    2016-10-03

    The surface morphology of copper (Cu) often changes after the synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a Cu foil, which affects the electrical properties of graphene, as the Cu step bunches induce the periodic ripples on graphene that significantly disturb electrical conduction. However, the origin of the Cu surface reconstruction has not been completely understood yet. Here, we show that the compressive strain on graphene induced by the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficient with Cu surface can be released by forming periodic Cu step bunching that depends on graphene layers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and the Raman analysis show the noticeably longer and higher step bunching of Cu surface under multilayer graphene and the weaker biaxial compressive strain on multilayer graphene compared to monolayer. We found that the surface areas of Cu step bunches under multilayer and monolayer graphene are increased by ∼1.41% and ∼0.77% compared to a flat surface, respectively, indicating that the compressive strain on multilayer graphene can be more effectively released by forming the Cu step bunching with larger area and longer periodicity. We believe that our finding on the strain relaxation of graphene layers by Cu step bunching formation would provide a crucial idea to enhance the electrical performance of graphene electrodes by controlling the ripple density of graphene.

  20. Effect of roughness on the layer-dependent friction of few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Balkanci, Arda; Martini, Ashlie; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2017-09-01

    Friction on few-layer graphene is known to exhibit unique layer dependence where friction measured via atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the nanometer scale is generally observed to decrease with increasing number of layers. However, this trend is not always observed for AFM probe tips with different sizes and for graphene on different substrates. Within this context, the precise role played by the interface, in particular, the size of the contact and substrate roughness, in the layer dependence of friction on graphene is not yet completely understood. Here, we probe the origins of the roughness dependence of layer-dependent friction on graphene by a combination of AFM measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the experiments, friction is observed to monotonically decrease with increasing number of graphene layers for tips with various apex radii, while the roughness of the sample surface is observed to decrease. In the simulations, two opposite layer-dependence trends for friction are observed on few-layer graphene on substrates with different roughness values. The underlying mechanisms are investigated using atomistic details obtained from the simulations, where the different friction trends are found to originate from an interplay between surface roughness, the trajectory of the tip, and the number of atoms in contact. Finally, the effect of topographical correlation length on the layer dependence of friction on graphene is discussed.

  1. Surfactant-free single-layer graphene in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepete, George; Anglaret, Eric; Ortolani, Luca; Morandi, Vittorio; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Drummond, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Dispersing graphite in water to obtain true (single-layer) graphene in bulk quantity in a liquid has been an unreachable goal for materials scientists in the past decade. Similarly, a diagnostic tool to identify solubilized graphene in situ has been long awaited. Here we show that homogeneous stable dispersions of single-layer graphene (SLG) in water can be obtained by mixing graphenide (negatively charged graphene) solutions in tetrahydrofuran with degassed water and evaporating the organic solvent. In situ Raman spectroscopy of these aqueous dispersions shows all the expected characteristics of SLG. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopies on deposits confirm the single-layer character. The resulting additive-free stable water dispersions contain 400 m 2 l -1 of developed graphene surface. Films prepared from these dispersions exhibit a conductivity of up to 32 kS m -1 .

  2. Amorphous Ultrathin SnO2 Films by Atomic Layer Deposition on Graphene Network as Highly Stable Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Sun, Xiang; George, Steven M; Zhou, Changgong; Lian, Jie; Zhou, Yun

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous SnO2 (a-SnO2) thin films were conformally coated onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (G) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrochemical characteristics of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites were then determined using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge curves. Because the SnO2 ALD films were ultrathin and amorphous, the impact of the large volume expansion of SnO2 upon cycling was greatly reduced. With as few as five formation cycles best reported in the literature, a-SnO2/G nanocomposites reached stable capacities of 800 mAh g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 450 mAh g(-1) at 1000 mA g(-1). The capacity from a-SnO2 is higher than the bulk theoretical values. The extra capacity is attributed to additional interfacial charge storage resulting from the high surface area of the a-SnO2/G nanocomposites. These results demonstrate that metal oxide ALD on high surface area conducting carbon substrates can be used to fabricate high power and high capacity electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  3. Backside absorbing layer microscopy: Watching graphene chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campidelli, Stéphane; Abou Khachfe, Refahi; Jaouen, Kevin; Monteiller, Jean; Amra, Claude; Zerrad, Myriam; Cornut, Renaud; Derycke, Vincent; Ausserré, Dominique

    2017-05-01

    The rapid rise of two-dimensional nanomaterials implies the development of new versatile, high-resolution visualization and placement techniques. For example, a single graphene layer becomes observable on Si/SiO2 substrates by reflected light under optical microscopy because of interference effects when the thickness of silicon oxide is optimized. However, differentiating monolayers from bilayers remains challenging, and advanced techniques, such as Raman mapping, atomic force microscopy (AFM), or scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are more suitable to observe graphene monolayers. The first two techniques are slow, and the third is operated in vacuum; hence, in all cases, real-time experiments including notably chemical modifications are not accessible. The development of optical microscopy techniques that combine the speed, large area, and high contrast of SEM with the topological information of AFM is therefore highly desirable. We introduce a new widefield optical microscopy technique based on the use of previously unknown antireflection and absorbing (ARA) layers that yield ultrahigh contrast reflection imaging of monolayers. The BALM (backside absorbing layer microscopy) technique can achieve the subnanometer-scale vertical resolution, large area, and real-time imaging. Moreover, the inverted optical microscope geometry allows its easy implementation and combination with other techniques. We notably demonstrate the potentiality of BALM by in operando imaging chemical modifications of graphene oxide. The technique can be applied to the deposition, observation, and modification of any nanometer-thick materials.

  4. Role of graphene layers on the radiation resistance of copper-graphene nanocomposite: Inhibiting the expansion of thermal spike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2017-09-01

    Metal-graphene nanocomposites are expected to have excellent radiation resistance. The intrinsic role of the graphene layers (GrLs) in their performance has not been fully understood. Five copper-graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems were used to investigate the detailed mechanisms underpinning this behaviour by atomistic simulation. Results showed that GrLs can reduce the formation, growth, and intensity of the thermal spike of CGNC; this effect became more evident with the increasing number of layers of graphene. The role of the GrLs can be explained by three mechanisms: first, the ultra-strength C-C bonds of graphene hindered the penetration of high-energy atoms, second, the number of recoiled atoms decreased with the increasing number of layers of graphene, and third, the energy dissipation along the graphene planes also indirectly weakened the damage caused to the entire system. These mechanisms may provide a pathway to prevent material degradation in extreme radiation environments.

  5. Chirality- and thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of few-layer graphene: a molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Wei-rong; Zhang, Mao-Ping; Ai, Bao-quan; Zheng, Dong-Qin

    2011-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (layer from 1 to 8 atomic planes) is investigated by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. We present that the room-temperature thermal conductivity decays monotonically with the number of the layers in few-layer graphene. The superiority of zigzag graphene in thermal conductivity is only available in high temperature region and disappears in multi-layer case. It is explained that the phonon spectral shrink in high frequency induc...

  6. Graphene oxide as a monoatomic blocking layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter; Hu, Wenping; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Laursen, Bo W

    2012-09-25

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of C(22) fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were covered by a compressed mosaic LB film of mGO flakes. These hybrid LB films were examined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray reflectivity, both with and without the metal top electrodes. While the AFM enabled surface and morphology analysis, the X-ray reflectivity allowed for a detailed structural depth profiling of the organic film and mGO layer below the metal top layers. The structure of the mGO-protected LB films was found to be perfectly preserved; in contrast, it has previously been shown that metal deposition completely destroys the first two LB layers of unprotected films. This study provides clear evidence of the efficient protection offered by a single atomic layer of GO.

  7. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  8. Enhancement of the Stability of Fluorine Atoms on Defective Graphene and at Graphene/Fluorographene Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Zhimin; Jiang, Quanguo; Li, Shuang; Liu, Hao; Peeters, Francois M; Li, Sean; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-09-09

    Fluorinated graphene is one of the most important derivatives of graphene and has been found to have great potential in optoelectronic and photonic nanodevices. However, the stability of F atoms on fluorinated graphene under different conditions, which is essential to maintain the desired properties of fluorinated graphene, is still unclear. In this work, we investigate the diffusion of F atoms on pristine graphene, graphene with defects, and at graphene/fluorographene interfaces by using density functional theory calculations. We find that an isolated F atom diffuses easily on graphene, but those F atoms can be localized by inducing vacancies or absorbates in graphene and by creating graphene/fluorographene interfaces, which would strengthen the binding energy of F atoms on graphene and increase the diffusion energy barrier of F atoms remarkably.

  9. Nanomechanical properties of few-layer graphene membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical properties of few-layer graphene and graphite flakes that are suspended over circular holes. The spatial profile of the flake’s spring constant is measured with an atomic force microscope. The bending rigidity of and the tension in the membranes are extracted by

  10. Shock-wave induced synthesis of few layer graphene nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengwan; Yin, Hao; Xu, Chunxiao; Gao, Xin; Zhou, Qiang; Qu, Liangti

    2017-06-01

    Shock wave action combining shock-induced chemical reaction will cause a series of changes of material physical and chemical properties, which is supposed to be a new method for material synthesis and modification. Using solid CO2 (dry ice) as the carbon source, few layer graphene nanosheets were successful synthesized by reduction of CO2 with calcium hydride under detonation-driven flyer impact loading in this study. Furthermore, by adding ammonium nitrate to the reaction system, nitrogen-doped graphene materials were formed in this one-step shock-wave treatment. Similarly, few layer graphene and nitrogen-doped graphene materials were also prepared through the reaction of calcium carbonate and magnesium induced by shock wave. The shock synthesis of graphene nanosheets requires a balance between the growth rate of graphene materials and the formation rate of carbon atoms. Meanwhile, the pressure and temperature are two important factors affecting the synthesis of few layer graphene nanosheets. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11521062 and 11172043.

  11. Tailoring  graphene layer-to-layer growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Wu, Bin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jingbo; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-06-30

    A layered material grown between a substrate and the upper layer involves complex interactions and a confined reaction space, representing an unusual growth mode. Here, we show multi-layer graphene domains grown on liquid or solid Cu by the chemical vapor deposition method via this 'double-substrate' mode. We demonstrate the interlayer-induced coupling effect on the twist angle in bi- and multi-layer graphene. We discover dramatic growth disunity for different graphene layers, which is explained by the ideas of a chemical 'gate' and a material transport process within a confined space. These key results lead to a consistent framework for understanding the dynamic evolution of multi-layered graphene flakes and tailoring the layer-to-layer growth for practical applications.

  12. Metal-graphene interaction studied via atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Ramasse, Quentin; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2011-03-09

    Distributions and atomic sites of transition metals and gold on suspended graphene were investigated via high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, especially using atomic resolution high angle dark field imaging. All metals, albeit as singular atoms or atom aggregates, reside in the omni-present hydrocarbon surface contamination; they do not form continuous films, but clusters or nanocrystals. No interaction was found between Au atoms and clean single-layer graphene surfaces, i.e., no Au atoms are retained on such surfaces. Au and also Fe atoms do, however, bond to clean few-layer graphene surfaces, where they assume T and B sites, respectively. Cr atoms were found to interact more strongly with clean monolayer graphene, they are possibly incorporated at graphene lattice imperfections and have been observed to catalyze dissociation of C-C bonds. This behavior might explain the observed high frequency of Cr-cluster nucleation, and the usefulness as wetting layer, for depositing electrical contacts on graphene.

  13. Near-field scanning microwave microscopy of few-layer graphene.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalugin, Nikolai G. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro. NM); Gonzales, Edward; Kalichava, Irakli (New Mexico Tech, Socorro. NM); Gin, Aaron V.; Wickey, Lee (New Mexico Tech, Socorro. NM); Del Barga, Christopher (New Mexico Tech, Socorro. NM); Talanov, Vladimir V. (Semilab USA, Billerica, MA); Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2010-08-01

    Near-field microwave microscopy can be used as an alternative to atomic-force microscopy or Raman microscopy in determination of graphene thickness. We evaluated the values of AC impedance for few layer graphene. The impedance of mono and few-layer graphene at 4GHz was found predominantly active. Near-field microwave microscopy allows simultaneous imaging of location, geometry, thickness, and distribution of electrical properties of graphene without device fabrication. Our results may be useful for design of future graphene-based microwave devices.

  14. Lattice Expansion in Seamless Bi layer Graphene Constrictions at High Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Boerrnert, Felix; Barreiro, Amelia; Wolf, Daniel; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Buechner, Bernd; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Ruemmeli, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of sp2 carbon nanostructures is still emerging and is important for the development of high performance all carbon devices. For example, in terms of the structural behavior of graphene or bi-layer graphene at high bias, little to nothing is known. To this end we investigated bi-layer graphene constrictions with closed edges (seamless) at high bias using in situ atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. We directly observe a highly localized anomalously large lattic...

  15. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lejeune, Michaël [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences d' Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30 eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50 eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  16. van der Waals screening by single-layer graphene and molybdenum disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Stanislav; Dev, Pratibha; Friedman, Adam L; Stine, Rory; Robinson, Jeremy T; Reinecke, Thomas L; Sheehan, Paul E

    2014-12-23

    A sharp tip of atomic force microscope is employed to probe van der Waals forces of a silicon oxide substrate with adhered graphene. Experimental results obtained in the range of distances from 3 to 20 nm indicate that single-, double-, and triple-layer graphenes screen the van der Waals forces of the substrate. Fluorination of graphene, which makes it electrically insulating, lifts the screening in the single-layer graphene. The van der Waals force from graphene determined per layer decreases with the number of layers. In addition, increased hole doping of graphene increases the force. Finally, we also demonstrate screening of the van der Waals forces of the silicon oxide substrate by single- and double-layer molybdenum disulfide.

  17. Protecting nickel with graphene spin-filtering membranes: A single layer is enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.-B.; Dlubak, B.; Piquemal-Banci, M.; Collin, S.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Fert, A.; Seneor, P. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau, France and Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.; Robertson, J. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB21PZ (United Kingdom); Yang, H. [IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), Institute for Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Blume, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schloegl, R. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-06

    We report on the demonstration of ferromagnetic spin injectors for spintronics which are protected against oxidation through passivation by a single layer of graphene. The graphene monolayer is directly grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on pre-patterned nickel electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that even with its monoatomic thickness, monolayer graphene still efficiently protects spin sources against oxidation in ambient air. The resulting single layer passivated electrodes are integrated into spin valves and demonstrated to act as spin polarizers. Strikingly, the atom-thick graphene layer is shown to be sufficient to induce a characteristic spin filtering effect evidenced through the sign reversal of the measured magnetoresistance.

  18. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Functional single-layer graphene sheets from aromatic monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Dan G; Weber, Nils-Eike; Kurasch, Simon; Wundrack, Stefan; Woszczyna, Mirosław; Grothe, Miriam; Weimann, Thomas; Ahlers, Franz; Stosch, Rainer; Kaiser, Ute; Turchanin, Andrey

    2013-08-14

    Self-assembled monolayers of aromatic molecules on copper substrates can be converted into high-quality single-layer graphene using low-energy electron irradiation and subsequent annealing. This two-dimensional solid state transformation is characterized on the atomic scale and the physical and chemical properties of the formed graphene sheets are studied by complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and by electrical transport measurements. As substrates, Cu(111) single crystals and the technologically relevant polycrystalline copper foils are successfully used. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Atomic Scale Study on Growth and Heteroepitaxy of ZnO Monolayer on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyo-Ki; Jo, Junhyeon; Hwang, Daeyeon; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Son, Seungwoo; Kim, Jung Hwa; Jin, Mi-Jin; Jun, Young Chul; Erni, Rolf; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Zonghoon

    2017-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconducting oxide on graphene carries a unique combination of wide band gap, high charge carrier mobility, and optical transparency, which can be widely applied for optoelectronics. However, study on the epitaxial formation and properties of oxide monolayer on graphene remains unexplored due to hydrophobic graphene surface and limits of conventional bulk deposition technique. Here, we report atomic scale study of heteroepitaxial growth and relationship of a single-atom-thick ZnO layer on graphene using atomic layer deposition. We demonstrate atom-by-atom growth of zinc and oxygen at the preferential zigzag edge of a ZnO monolayer on graphene through in situ observation. We experimentally determine that the thinnest ZnO monolayer has a wide band gap (up to 4.0 eV), due to quantum confinement and graphene-like structure, and high optical transparency. This study can lead to a new class of atomically thin two-dimensional heterostructures of semiconducting oxides formed by highly controlled epitaxial growth.

  1. Mode-locking of an InAs Quantum Dot Based Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Using Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    and semiconductor materials and to characterize them. I. Transfer of graphene on III-Vs: The state of art in transferring graphene onto various...incorporated into the semiconductor matrix. Thus the emphasis of this research task was to make sure that the graphene size is optimal for the mode profile... semiconductors to mode-lock the laser. B) PMMA stamp technique - The second process that we are currently using for integration of the graphene with

  2. Graphene on Ni(111): Electronic Corrugation and Dynamics from Helium Atom Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamtögl, Anton; Bahn, Emanuel; Zhu, Jianding; Fouquet, Peter; Ellis, John; Allison, William

    2015-11-19

    Using helium atom scattering, we have studied the structure and dynamics of a graphene layer prepared in situ on a Ni(111) surface. Graphene/Ni(111) exhibits a helium reflectivity of ∼20% for a thermal helium atom beam and a particularly small surface electron density corrugation ((0.06 ± 0.02) Å peak to peak height). The Debye-Waller attenuation of the elastic diffraction peaks of graphene/Ni(111) and Ni(111) was measured at surface temperatures between 150 and 740 K. A surface Debye temperature of θD = (784 ± 14) K is determined for the graphene/Ni(111) system and θD = (388 ± 7) K for Ni(111), suggesting that the interlayer interaction between graphene and the Ni substrate is intermediary between those for strongly interacting systems like graphene/Ru(0001) and weakly interacting systems like graphene/Pt(111). In addition we present measurements of low frequency surface phonon modes on graphene/Ni(111) where the phonon modes of the Ni(111) substrate can be clearly observed. The similarity of these findings with the graphene/Ru(0001) system indicates that the bonding of graphene to a metal substrate alters the dynamic properties of the graphene surface strongly and is responsible for the high helium reflectivity of these systems.

  3. Hole-doping of mechanically exfoliated graphene by confined hydration layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, Tjeerd Rogier Johannes; Antipina, L.Y.; Temmen, M.; Reichling, M.; Sorokin, P.B.

    2015-01-01

    By the use of non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), we measure the local surface potential of mechanically exfoliated graphene on the prototypical insulating hydrophilic substrate of CaF2(111). Hydration layers confined between the graphene and the

  4. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Graphene Multilayer Films via Covalent Bonds for Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To maximize the utilization of its single-atom thin nature, a facile scheme to fabricate graphene multilayer films via a layer-by-layer self-assembled process was presented. The structure of multilayer films was constructed by covalently bonding graphene oxide (GO using p-phenylenediamine (PPD as a covalent cross-linking agent. The assembly process was confirmed to be repeatable and the structure was stable. With the π-π conjugated structure and a large number of spaces in the framework, the graphene multi‐ layer films exhibited excellent electrochemical perform‐ ance. The uniform ultrathin electrode exhibited a capacitance of 41.71 μF/cm2 at a discharge current of 0.1 μA/cm2, and displayed excellent stability of 88.9 % after 1000 charge-discharge cycles.

  5. Electronic and phonon bandstructures of pristine few layer and metal doped graphene using first principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K. Gupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the frame work of density functional theoretical calculations, the electronic and lattice dynamical properties of graphene (multilayers and supercell have been systematically investigated and analyzed using the plane wave pseudopotentials within the generalized gradient approximation and local density approximation functional. We have also studied the functionalization of graphene by adsorption and absorption of transition metals like Al and Ag. We find that the electronic properties exhibit large sensitivity to the number of layers and doping. The Al and Ag doped graphene exhibits peak at Fermi level in the density of states arising from the flat bands near Fermi level. The bonding of metal atoms and graphene leads to a charge transfer between them and consequently shift Fermi level with respect to the conical point at K-point. The adsorption of Ag/Al atoms suggests an effective interaction between the adatoms and graphene layers without disturbing the original graphene structure of lower graphene layers. Compared to single layer graphene, the optical phonon E2g mode and out of plane ZA mode at Γ-point splits in the bi-, tri- and four- layer graphene. We observe a shift for highest optical branch at Dirac K- point. We find that the different derivatives of graphene have different phonon dispersion relations. We demonstrate that there is removal of degeneracy of ZO/ZA modes at K- point with transition metal doping. The highest optical phonon branch becomes flat at Dirac point with doping of transition metals. Our study points that the substituted graphene sheets can have potential applications in ordered-disordered separated quantum films with two to four layers of atoms and new nano devices using graphene.

  6. Changes in the reflectivity of a lithium niobate crystal decorated with a graphene layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, O.; Garcés, E.; Castillo, F. L.; Magaña, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate. The simulations were performed at atmospheric pressure and 300K. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/C-atom. Subsequently, the optical absorption of the graphene-(lithium niobate) system was calculated and compared with that of graphene solo and lithium niobate alone, respectively. The calculations were performed using the Quantum Espresso code with the GGA approximation and Vdw-DF2 (which includes long-range correlation effects as Van der Waals interactions).

  7. Green synthesis of well-dispersed single-layer graphene colloids via an electrolytic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yilong; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Shang

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has lots of attractive properties. However, most of its optimal properties are only associated with individual sheets. Producing a colloidal form of graphene can effectively avoid graphene aggregation and thus maintain its original performance. In this paper, an electrolytic method was utilized to prepare graphene colloids. Initially, graphene oxide (GO) was produced from graphite by a pressurized oxidation method. The high concentration of H+ or OH- was found to facilitate the aggregation of GO. Then, GO was reduced by nascent hydrogen, which was generated by reducing hydrogen ions on an iron cathode in the electrolytic method. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermogravimetric analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses indicated that the nascent hydrogen can effectively reduce GO to graphene. Atomic force microscopy analysis and dispersibility evaluation of graphene colloids proved that the novel electrolytic method can prepare well-dispersed single-layer graphene colloids.

  8. Electrochemical preparation of few layer-graphene nanosheets via reduction of oriented exfoliated graphene oxide thin films in acetamide-urea-ammonium nitrate melt under ambient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilimon, V.S.; Sampath, S., E-mail: sampath2562@gmail.co

    2011-01-31

    Electrochemical reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide, prepared from pre-exfoliated graphite, in acetamide-urea-ammonium nitrate ternary eutectic melt results in few layer-graphene thin films. Negatively charged exfoliated graphene oxide is attached to positively charged cystamine monolyer self-assembled on a gold surface. Electrochemical reduction of the oriented graphene oxide film is carried out in a room temperature, ternary molten electrolyte. The reduced film is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), conductive AFM, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Ternary eutectic melt is found to be a suitable medium for the regulated reduction of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide-based sheets on conducting surfaces.

  9. Quantum capacitance of double-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizgar, Fariborz; Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Asgari, Reza

    2017-08-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a double-layer graphene system with the Coulomb interlayer electron-electron interaction modeled within the random-phase approximation. We first obtain an expression of the quantum capacitance of a two-layer system. In addition, we calculate the many-body exchange-correlation energy and quantum capacitance of the hybrid double-layer graphene system at zero temperature. We show an enhancement of the majority density layer thermodynamic density of states owing to an increasing interlayer interaction between two layers near the Dirac point. The quantum capacitance near the neutrality point behaves like a square root of the total density α √{n } where the coefficient α decreases by increasing the charge-density imbalance between two layers. Furthermore, we show that the quantum capacitance changes linearly by the gate voltage. Our results can be verified by current experiments.

  10. Graphene Oxide as a Monoatomic Blocking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; Glyvradal, Magni; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer graphene oxide (mGO) is shown to effectively protect molecular thin films from reorganization and function as an atomically thin barrier for vapor-deposited Ti/Al metal top electrodes. Fragile organic Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) films of C22 fatty acid cadmium salts (cadmium(II) behenate) were...

  11. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ~mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m-1 K-1, 359 W m-1 K-1, 273 W m-1 K-1 and 33.5 W m-1 K-1, respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp2 domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the other three. This

  12. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ∼mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m(-1) K(-1), 359 W m(-1) K(-1), 273 W m(-1) K(-1) and 33.5 W m(-1) K(-1), respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp(2) domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the

  13. Atomic-scale investigation of graphene grown on Cu foil and the effects of thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongweon; Gao, Li; Tian, Jifa; Cao, Helin; Wu, Wei; Yu, Qingkai; Yitamben, Esmeralda N; Fisher, Brandon; Guest, Jeffrey R; Chen, Yong P; Guisinger, Nathan P

    2011-05-24

    We have investigated the effects of thermal annealing on ex-situ chemically vapor deposited submonolayer graphene islands on polycrystalline Cu foil at the atomic-scale using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy. Low-temperature annealed graphene islands on Cu foil (at ∼430 °C) exhibit predominantly striped Moiré patterns, indicating a relatively weak interaction between graphene and the underlying polycrystalline Cu foil. Rapid high-temperature annealing of the sample (at 700-800 °C) gives rise to the removal of Cu oxide and the recovery of crystallographic features of the copper that surrounds the intact graphene. These experimental observations of continuous crystalline features between the underlying copper (beneath the graphene islands) and the surrounding exposed copper areas revealed by high-temperature annealing demonstrates the impenetrable nature of graphene and its potential application as a protective layer against corrosion.

  14. One-Atom-Thick IR Metamaterials and Transformation Optics Using Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Vakil, Ashkan

    2011-01-01

    Here we theoretically show, by designing and manipulating spatially inhomogeneous, non-uniform conductivity patterns across a single flake of graphene, that this single-atom-layered material can serve as a "one-atom-thick" platform for infrared metamaterials and transformation optical devices. It is known that by varying the chemical potential using gate electric and/or magnetic fields, the graphene conductivity in the THz and IR frequencies can be changed. This versatility provides the possibility that different "patches" on a single flake of graphene possess different conductivities, suggesting a mechanism to construct "single-atom-thick" IR metamaterials and transformation optical structures. Our computer simulation results pave the way for envisioning numerous IR photonic functions and metamaterial concepts-all on a "one-atom-thick" platform-of such we list a few here: edge waveguides, bent ribbon-like paths guiding light, photonic splitters and combiners, "one-atom-thick" IR scattering elements as buildi...

  15. Graphene and graphene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides in energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Feng, Hongbin; Li, Jinghong

    2014-06-12

    Being confronted with the energy crisis and environmental problems, the exploration of clean and renewable energy materials as well as their devices are urgently demanded. Two-dimensional (2D) atomically-thick materials, graphene and grpahene-like layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have showed vast potential as novel energy materials due to their unique physicochemical properties. In this Review, we outline the typical application of graphene and grpahene-like TMDs in energy conversion and storage fields, and hope to promote the development of 2D TMDs in this field through the analysis and comparisons with the relatively natural graphene. First, a brief introduction of electronic structures and basic properties of graphene and TMDs are presented. Then, we summarize the exciting progress of these materials made in both energy conversion and storage field including solar cells, electrocatalysis, supercapacitors and lithium ions batteries. Finally, the prospects and further developments in these exciting fields of graphene and graphene-like TMDs materials are also suggested. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, O.; Garcés, E.; Castillo, F. L.; Magaña, L. F.

    2017-01-01

    We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom). Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  17. Science and Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-09

    Plasmons in Metal- Semiconductor Bilayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Heterostructure - Atoms and Molecules in Cavities: From Weak to Strong...reporting documents for AOARD project 144088, “2D Materials and Devices Beyond Graphene Science & Emerging Technology of 2D Atomic Layered Materials and...Emergent elemental two-dimensional materials beyond graphene Yuanbo Zhang,Angel Rubio, Guy Le Lay Journal Of Physics D-Applied Physics 50, 053004 (11pp

  18. Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, V. A.; Karpunin, V. V.; Mironova, K. I.

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic moment of single layer graphene rings is investigated. An analytical expression for the magnetic moment as a function of the magnetic field flux through the one-dimensional quantum rings is obtained. This expression has the oscillation character. The oscillation period is equal to one flux quanta.

  19. Large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold: a hybrid plasmonic nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R Swathi; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Payne, Scott; Bradley, Michael; Borondics, Ferenc

    2014-06-24

    Graphene-based plasmonic devices have recently drawn great attention. However, practical limitations in fabrication and device architectures prevent studies from being carried out on the intrinsic properties of graphene and their change by plasmonic structures. The influence of a quasi-infinite object (i.e., the substrate) on graphene, being a single sheet of carbon atoms, and the plasmonic device is overwhelming. To address this and put the intrinsic properties of the graphene-plasmonic nanostructures in focus, we fabricate large-area, freestanding, single-layer graphene-gold (LFG-Au) sandwich structures and Au nanoparticle decorated graphene (formed via thermal treatment) hybrid plasmonic nanostructures. We observed two distinct plasmonic enhancement routes of graphene unique to each structure via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The localized electronic structure variation in the LFG due to graphene-Au interaction at the nanoscale is mapped using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. The measurements show an optical density of ∼0.007, which is the smallest experimentally determined for single-layer graphene thus far. Our results on freestanding graphene-Au plasmonic structures provide great insight for the rational design and future fabrication of graphene plasmonic hybrid nanostructures.

  20. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  1. Atomic Structures of Graphene, Benzene and Methane with Bond Lengths as Sums of the Single, Double and Resonance Bond Radii of Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    Two dimensional layers of graphene are currently drawing a great attention in fundamental and applied nanoscience. Graphene consists of interconnected hexagons of carbon atoms as in graphite. This article presents for the first time the structures of graphene at the atomic level and shows how it differs from that of benzene, due to the difference in the double bond and resonance bond based radii of carbon. The carbon atom of an aliphatic compound such as methane has a longer covalent single b...

  2. Tuning metamaterial properties by a single-layer of graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Papasimakis, N.; Nikolaenko, A.E.; Luo, Z.; Shen, Z.X.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Boden, S.A.; Uchino, T.; Zheludev, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the observation of strong, nontrivial interactions between a plasmonic metamaterial and a graphene single-layer. We argue that these result from the periodic physical deformation of the graphene by the structured metamaterial substrate.

  3. Highly Stable Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Substrates Using Few-Layer Graphene on Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene can be effectively applied as an ultrathin barrier for fluids, gases, and atoms based on its excellent impermeability. In this work, few-layer graphene was encapsulated on silver (Ag nanoparticles for the fabrication of highly stable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS substrates, which has strong resistance to oxidation of the Ag nanoparticles. The few-layer graphene can be successfully grown on the surface of the Ag nanoparticles through a simple heating process. To prevent the agglomeration of the Ag nanoparticles in the fabrication process, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA layers were used as a solid carbon source instead of methane (CH4 gas generally used as a carbon source for the synthesis of graphene. X-ray diffraction (XRD spectra of the few-layer graphene-encapsulated Ag nanoparticles indicate that the few-layer graphene can protect the Ag nanoparticles from surface oxidation after intensive annealing processes in ambient conditions, giving the highly stable SERS substrates. The Raman spectra of Rhodamine 6G (R6G deposited on the stable SERS substrates exhibit maintenance of the Raman signal intensity despite the annealing process in air. The facile approach to fabricate the few-layer graphene-encapsulated Ag nanoparticles can be effectively useful for various applications in chemical and biological sensors by providing the highly stable SERS substrates.

  4. Dynamics of single Fe atoms in graphene vacancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Montanari, Barbara; He, Kuang; Kim, Judy; Allen, Christopher S; Wu, Yimin A; Olivier, Jaco; Neethling, Jan; Harrison, Nicholas; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2013-04-10

    Focused electron beam irradiation has been used to create mono and divacancies in graphene within a defined area, which then act as trap sites for mobile Fe atoms initially resident on the graphene surface. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy at 80 kV has been used to study the real time dynamics of Fe atoms filling the vacancy sites in graphene with atomic resolution. We find that the incorporation of a dopant atom results in pronounced displacements of the surrounding carbon atoms of up to 0.5 Å, which is in good agreement with density functional theory calculations. Once incorporated into the graphene lattice, Fe atoms can transition to adjacent lattice positions and reversibly switch their bonding between four and three nearest neighbors. The C atoms adjacent to the Fe atoms are found to be more susceptible to Stone-Wales type bond rotations with these bond rotations associated with changes in the dopant bonding configuration. These results demonstrate the use of controlled electron beam irradiation to incorporate dopants into the graphene lattice with nanoscale spatial control.

  5. Experimental study on thermal conductivity of free-standing fluorinated single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasaki, Masahiro; Wang, Haidong; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of free-standing fluorinated single-layer graphene (FSLG) using a precise T-type method. Pristine graphene was fluorinated and suspended above the substrate using xenon difluoride gas. Compared with the thermal conductivity of pristine single-layer graphene (SLG) (˜2000 W/mK) previously measured by the same T-type method for the same original SLG, the FSLG exhibited a much lower thermal conductivity (˜80 W/mK) and a weak dependence of the thermal conductivity on nanohole defects. The experimental results suggest that the fluorine atoms and sp3 bonding in the FSLG strongly contributed to phonon scattering. The phonon scattering by the fluorine atoms and sp3 bonding has a dominant effect on the thermal conductivity decrease over the phonon scattering by nanohole defects. This study lays a foundation for the thermal measurement of 2D fluorinated materials and benefits future applications of fluorinated graphene.

  6. Frictional behavior of atomically thin sheets: hexagonal-shaped graphene islands grown on copper by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Liu, Xin Z; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-05-27

    Single asperity friction experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been conducted on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene grown on polycrystalline copper foils. Graphene substantially lowers the friction force experienced by the sliding asperity of a silicon AFM tip compared to the surrounding oxidized copper surface by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 7 over loads from the adhesive minimum up to 80 nN. No damage to the graphene was observed over this range, showing that friction force microscopy serves as a facile, high contrast probe for identifying the presence of graphene on Cu. Consistent with studies of epitaxially grown, thermally grown, and mechanically exfoliated graphene films, the friction force measured between the tip and these CVD-prepared films depends on the number of layers of graphene present on the surface and reduces friction in comparison to the substrate. Friction results on graphene indicate that the layer-dependent friction properties result from puckering of the graphene sheet around the sliding tip. Substantial hysteresis in the normal force dependence of friction is observed with repeated scanning without breaking contact with a graphene-covered region. Because of the hysteresis, friction measured on graphene changes with time and maximum applied force, unless the tip slides over the edge of the graphene island or contact with the surface is broken. These results also indicate that relatively weak binding forces exist between the copper foil and these CVD-grown graphene sheets.

  7. Tuneable pressure effects in graphene oxide layers

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Yusuke; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaaki; Koinuma, Michio; Lindoy, Leonard F.; Hayami, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    Tuneable pressure effects associated with changing interlayer distances in two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO)/reduced GO (rGO) layers are demonstrated through monitoring the changes in the spin-crossover (SCO) temperature (T 1/2) of [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)](BF4) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated in the interlayer spaces of the GO/rGO layers. The interlayer separation along the GO to GO/rGO-NP composites to rGO series decreases smoothly from 9.00 Å (for GO) to 3.50 Å (for rGO) as the temperature emplo...

  8. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effect of insulator layer in graphene plasmonic metamaterials for infrared detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Shimatani, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    Graphene is an atomically thin carbon layer with a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice structure and has rich optoelectronic properties well suited to a wide range of applications. Graphene is considered to be a promising material for photodetectors because it exhibits excellent properties such as broadband absorption covering at least the ultraviolet to terahertz frequencies. However, the low optical absorption of graphene, at ca. 2.3%, still remains an important problem. Plasmonic metamaterial structures are good candidates to address this challenge. Metal-insulator-metal-based plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MIM-PMAs) are highly suitable for the introduction and application of graphene. MIM-PMAs have a multilayer structure that includes plasmonic micropatches, an insulator, and a metal reflector layer. MIM-PMAs exhibit wavelength-selective absorption according to the micropatch size. Our previous research has demonstrated that the optical absorption of graphene is enhanced only by the main plasmonic resonance mode, and the plasmonic resonance modes in MIM-MPAs are strongly influenced by the insulator material. Therefore, the insulator layer plays an important role in graphene-coated MIM-PMAs. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the insulator layer in graphene-covered MIM-PMAs. The graphene was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition and transferred onto MIM-PMAs with different insulator thicknesses. Reflectance measurements demonstrated that varying the insulator thickness had a significant effect on the absorbance of graphene and resulted in modulation of the absorption wavelength. These results indicate that the plasmonic resonance localized at graphene near the plasmonic micropatches is modulated by the waveguide mode in the insulator layer. We believe that the present study will lead to significant improvements in graphene-based infrared detectors.

  10. Single-layer graphene cathodes for organic photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Marshall P.; Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Kim, Bumjung; Kim, Keun Soo; Jia, Zhang; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    A laminated single-layer graphene is demonstrated as a cathode for organic photovoltaicdevices. The measured properties indicate that graphene offers two potential advantages over conventional photovoltaic electrode materials; work function matching via contact doping, and increased power conversion efficiency due to transparency. These findings indicate that flexible, light-weight all carbon solar cells can be constructed using graphene as the cathode material.

  11. Enhancement of absorption in vertically-oriented graphene sheets growing on a thin copper layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozouvan, Tamara; Poperenko, Leonid [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Department of Physics 4, Prospect Glushkova, Kyiv, 03187 (Ukraine); Kravets, Vasyl, E-mail: vasyl_kravets@yahoo.com [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Shaykevich, Igor [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Department of Physics 4, Prospect Glushkova, Kyiv, 03187 (Ukraine)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films. • Chemical vapour deposition method. • Scanning tunneling microscopy revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of graphene layer. • We report a significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets. - Abstract: The optical properties and surface structure of graphene films grown on thin copper Cu (1 μm) layer using chemical vapour deposition method were investigated via spectroscopic ellipsometry and nanoscopic measurements. Angle variable ellipsometry measurements were performed to analyze the features of dispersion of the complex refractive index and optical conductivity. It was observed significant enhancement of the absorption band in the vertically-oriented graphene sheets layer with respect to the bulk graphite due to interaction between excited localized surface plasmon at surface of thin Cu layer and graphene’s electrons. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements with atomic spatial resolution revealed vertical crystal lattice structure of the deposited graphene layer. The obtained results provide direct evidence of the strong influence of the growing condition and morphology of nanostructure on electronic and optical behaviours of graphene film.

  12. First principles calculations of phenol adsorption on pristine and group III (B, Al, Ga) doped graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Yuliana; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Romero, María Teresa

    2014-02-01

    We studied the doping effects on the electronic and structural properties of graphene upon interaction with phenol. Calculations were performed within the periodic density functional theory as implemented in PWscf code of the Quantum Espresso package. Graphene layers were modeled using 3 × 3 and 4 × 4 periodic supercells. Doping was explored considering boron (B), aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) atoms. The results showed that pristine graphene and graphene doped with B atoms interacting with phenol display similar structural and electronic properties, exhibiting weak physical interactions. However, when the doping is with Al or Ga , the results are quite different. Al and Ga doping induces a stronger interaction between the phenol molecule and the doped layer, yielding chemical adsorption. In all cases, the zero gap energy characteristic is unchanged. The Dirac lineal dispersion relation is preserved in both pristine graphene and B-doped graphene.

  13. Synthesis of few layer single crystal graphene grains on platinum by chemical vapour deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karamat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present competition of graphene electronics demands an efficient route which produces high quality and large area graphene. Chemical vapour deposition technique, where hydrocarbons dissociate in to active carbon species and form graphene layer on the desired metal catalyst via nucleation is considered as the most suitable method. In this study, single layer graphene with the presence of few layer single crystal graphene grains were grown on Pt foil via chemical vapour deposition. The higher growth temperature changes the surface morphology of the Pt foil so a delicate process of hydrogen bubbling was used to peel off graphene from Pt foil samples with the mechanical support of photoresist and further transferred to SiO2/Si substrates for analysis. Optical microscopy of the graphene transferred samples showed the regions of single layer along with different oriented graphene domains. Two type of interlayer stacking sequences, Bernal and twisted, were observed in the graphene grains. The presence of different stacking sequences in the graphene layers influence the electronic and optical properties; in Bernal stacking the band gap can be tunable and in twisted stacking the overall sheet resistance can be reduced. Grain boundaries of Pt provides low energy sites to the carbon species, therefore the nucleation of grains are more at the boundaries. The stacking order and the number of layers in grains were seen more clearly with scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy showed high quality graphene samples due to very small D peak. 2D Raman peak for single layer graphene showed full width half maximum (FWHM value of 30 cm−1. At points A, B and C, Bernal stacked grain showed FWHM values of 51.22, 58.45 and 64.72 cm−1, while twisted stacked grain showed the FWHM values of 27.26, 28.83 and 20.99 cm−1, respectively. FWHM values of 2D peak of Bernal stacked grain showed an increase of 20–30 cm−1 as compare to single layer graphene

  14. Developmental refinement of synaptic transmission on micropatterned single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavan, Sandeep; Naskar, Shovan; Diaspro, Alberto; Cancedda, Laura; Dante, Silvia

    2017-11-06

    Interfacing neurons with graphene, a single atomic layer of sp(2) hybridized C-atoms, is a key paradigm in understanding how to exploit the unique properties of such a two-dimensional system for neural prosthetics and biosensors development. In order to fabricate graphene-based circuitry, a reliable large area patterning method is a requirement. Following a previously developed protocol, we monitored the in vitro neuronal development of geometrically ordered neural network growing onto patterned Single Layer Graphene (SLG) coated with poly-D-lysine. The microscale patterns were fabricated via laser micromachining and consisted of SLG stripes separated by micrometric ablated stripes. A comprehensive analysis of the biointerface was carried out combining the surface characterization of SLG transferred on the glass substrates and Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of the developing neural network. Neuronal and glial cells proliferation, as well as cell viability, were compared on glass, SLG and SLG-patterned surfaces. Further, we present a comparative developmental study on the efficacy of synaptic transmission on control glass, on transferred SLG, and on the micropatterned SLG substrates by recording miniature post synaptic currents (mPSCs). The mPSC frequencies and amplitudes obtained on SLG-stripes, SLG only and on glass were compared. Our results indicate a very similar developmental trend in the three groups, indicating that both SLG and patterned SLG preserve synaptic efficacy and can be potentially exploited for the fabrication of large area devices for neuron sensing or stimulation. This paper compares the morphological and functional development of neural networks forming on glass, on Single Layer Graphene (SLG) and on microsized patterned SLG substrates after neuron spontaneous migration. Neurons developing on SLG are viable after two weeks in vitro, and, on SLG, glial cell proliferation is enhanced. The functionality of the neural networks is demonstrated

  15. Atomic structure of graphene supported heterogeneous model catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Dirk

    2017-04-15

    , whereupon the Ir clusters show equal ratio of ABC and ACB stacking. Pt/Rh clusters show mainly (∝75 %) ABC stacking and Ir/Pd clusters show exclusively ABC stacking - note the Ir(111) substrate stacking is chosen to be ABC-like. During gas exposure the clusters gain in height, while simultaneously the ordering of the cluster lattice decreases. The order of ACB stacked Pt/Rh clusters decreases more rapidly, so that a weakening of the cluster binding due to ACB stacking is proposed. In addition a size reduction of the lowest cluster layer to a hexagonal arrangement of 19 atoms was observed, which seems to be the energetically favoured interface area between graphene/Ir(111) and the investigated metal clusters. Platinum clusters containing fewer than 40 atoms have been investigated with surface sensitive X-ray diffraction. The cluster height could be determined and a reduced atom distance among the cluster was observed. CO exposure decreased the in-plane atom distance even more. This effect could be reverted by a subsequent oxygen exposure (2CO + O{sub 2} → 2 CO{sub 2}). For Pt/Rh clusters with fewer than 60 atoms the element distribution was investigated and revealed an enrichment of Rh at the two topmost cluster layers. This element distribution was found for co-deposition and sequential deposition of the material and is therefore independent of the order of deposition. Oxygen exposure led to the formation of a rhodium surface oxide, which could be prevented by preceding CO exposure. In case of Ir/Pd clusters containing ∝60 atoms we found preferences for a core/shell structure with iridium atoms at core sites. Exposure to p(H{sub 2})=1 bar did not result in the formation of the palladium β-phase, so that a reduced hydrogen solubility of graphene/Ir(111) supported palladium clusters is assumed. The reduced hydrogen solubility is probably a consequence of substrate induced strain among the cluster atoms.

  16. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  17. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  19. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition has been instrumental in providing a deposition method for multiple space flight applications. It is well known that ALD is a cost effective nanoadditive-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases, thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates from flat surfaces to those with significant topography. By providing atomic layer control, where single layers of atoms can be deposited, the fabrication of metal transparent films, precise nano-laminates, and coatings of nano-channels, pores and particles is achievable. The feasibility of this technology for NASA line of business applications range from thermal systems, optics, sensors, to environmental protection. An overview of this technology will be presented.

  20. Critical Dispersion Distance of Silicon Nanoparticles Intercalated between Graphene Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuze Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs dispersed in between graphene layers emerge as potential anode materials of high-charge capacity for lithium-ion batteries. A key design requirement is to keep Si NPs dispersed without aggregation. Experimental design of the Si NP dispersion in graphene layers has remained largely empirical. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we determine a critical NP dispersion distance as the function of NP size, below which Si NPs in between graphene layers evolve to bundle together. These results offer crucial and quantitative guidance for designing NP-graphene nanocomposite anode materials with high charge capacity.

  1. One-atom-thick 2D copper oxide clusters on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Sakai, Seiji; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Sorokin, Pavel B; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2017-03-17

    The successful isolation and remarkable properties of graphene have recently triggered investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials from layered compounds; however, one-atom-thick 2D materials without bulk layered counterparts are scarcely reported. Here we report the structure and properties of novel 2D copper oxide studied by experimental and theoretical methods. Electron microscopy observations reveal that copper oxide can form monoatomic layers with an unusual square lattice on graphene. Density functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen atoms at the centre of the square lattice stabilizes the 2D Cu structure, and that the 2D copper oxide sheets have unusual electronic and magnetic properties different from 3D bulk copper oxide.

  2. Beyond van der Waals Interaction: The Case of MoSe2Epitaxially Grown on Few-Layer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, Minh Tuan; Gay, Maxime; Di Felice, Daniela; Vergnaud, Céline; Marty, Alain; Beigné, Cyrille; Renaud, Gilles; Renault, Olivier; Mallet, Pierre; Le Quang, Toai; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Huder, Loïc; Renard, Vincent T; Chapelier, Claude; Zamborlini, Giovanni; Jugovac, Matteo; Feyer, Vitaliy; Dappe, Yannick J; Pochet, Pascal; Jamet, Matthieu

    2018-02-06

    Van der Waals heterojunctions composed of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides have gain much attention because of the possibility to control and tailor band structure, promising applications in two-dimensional optoelectronics and electronics. In this report, we characterized the van der Waals heterojunction MoSe 2 /few-layer graphene with a high-quality interface using cutting-edge surface techniques scaling from atomic to microscopic range. These surface analyses gave us a complete picture of the atomic structure and electronic properties of the heterojunction. In particular, we found two important results: the commensurability between the MoSe 2 and few-layer graphene lattices and a band-gap opening in the few-layer graphene. The band gap is as large as 250 meV, and we ascribed it to an interface charge transfer that results in an electronic depletion in the few-layer graphene. This conclusion is well supported by electron spectroscopy data and density functional theory calculations. The commensurability between the MoSe 2 and graphene lattices as well as the band-gap opening clearly show that the interlayer interaction goes beyond the simple van der Waals interaction. Hence, stacking two-dimensional materials in van der Waals heterojunctions enables us to tailor the atomic and electronic properties of individual layers. It also permits the introduction of a band gap in few-layer graphene by interface charge transfer.

  3. Ab initio calculations for structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of nitrogenized monolayer graphene decorated with 5d transition metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Guohua; Guo, Yanming

    2017-09-01

    Graphene-based magnetic materials have revealed great potential for developing high-performance electronic units at sub-nanometer such as spintronic data storage devices. However, a significant ferromagnetism behavior and ample band gap in the electronic structure of graphene is required before it can be used for actual engineering applications. Based on first-principles calculations, here we demonstrate the structural, electronic and magnetic behaviors of 5d transition metal (TM) atom-substituted nitrogenized monolayer graphene. We find that, during TMN(3)4 cluster-substitution, tight bonding occurs between impurity atoms and graphene with significant binding energies. Charge transfer occurs from graphene layer to the TMN(3)4 clusters. Interestingly, PtN3, TaN4 and ReN4 cluster-doped graphene structures exhibit dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 1.00 μB, 1.04 μB and 1.05 μB magnetic moments, respectively. While, OsN4 and PtN4 cluster-doped structures display nonmagnetic direct band gap semiconductor behavior. Remaining, TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes exhibit half metal properties. Detailed analysis of density of states (DOS) plots indicate that d orbitals of TM atoms should be responsible for arising magnetic moments in graphene. Given results pave a new route for potential applications of dilute magnetic semiconductors and half-metals in spintronic devices by employing TMN(3)4 cluster-doped graphene complexes.

  4. Electroburning of few-layer graphene flakes, epitaxial graphene, and turbostratic graphene discs in air and under vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Candini; Nils Richter; Domenica Convertino; Camilla Coletti; Franck Balestro; Wolfgang Wernsdorfer; Mathias Kläui; Marco Affronte

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based electrodes are very promising for molecular electronics and spintronics. Here we report a systematic characterization of the electroburning (EB) process, leading to the formation of nanometer-spaced gaps, on different types of few-layer graphene (namely mechanically exfoliated graphene on SiO2, graphene epitaxially grown on the C-face of SiC and turbostratic graphene discs deposited on SiO2) under air and vacuum conditions. The EB process is found to depend on both the graphene...

  5. Partial Dislocations in Graphene and Their Atomic Level Migration Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Fan, Ye; Allen, Christopher S; Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Heeyeon; Yoon, Euijoon; Zheng, Haimei; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-09-09

    We demonstrate the formation of partial dislocations in graphene at elevated temperatures of ≥500 °C with single atom resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The partial dislocations spatially redistribute strain in the lattice, providing an energetically more favorable configuration to the perfect dislocation. Low-energy migration paths mediated by partial dislocation formation have been observed, providing insights into the atomistic dynamics of graphene during annealing. These results are important for understanding the high temperature plasticity of graphene and partial dislocation behavior in related crystal systems, such as diamond cubic materials.

  6. High quality reduced graphene oxide through repairing with multi-layered graphene ball nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoung Hwan Kim; MinHo Yang; Kyeong Min Cho; Young-Si Jun; Sang Bok Lee; Hee-Tae Jung

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple and up-scalable method to produce highly repaired graphene oxide with a large surface area, by introducing spherical multi-layered graphene balls with empty interiors. These graphene balls are prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ni particles on the surface of the graphene oxides (GO). Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy results reveal that defects in the GO surfaces are well repaired during the CVD process, with the help of nickel nanopartic...

  7. Electroburning of few-layer graphene flakes, epitaxial graphene, and turbostratic graphene discs in air and under vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candini, Andrea; Richter, Nils; Convertino, Domenica; Coletti, Camilla; Balestro, Franck; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Kläui, Mathias; Affronte, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based electrodes are very promising for molecular electronics and spintronics. Here we report a systematic characterization of the electroburning (EB) process, leading to the formation of nanometer-spaced gaps, on different types of few-layer graphene (namely mechanically exfoliated graphene on SiO2, graphene epitaxially grown on the C-face of SiC and turbostratic graphene discs deposited on SiO2) under air and vacuum conditions. The EB process is found to depend on both the graphene type and on the ambient conditions. For the mechanically exfoliated graphene, performing EB under vacuum leads to a higher yield of nanometer-gap formation than working in air. Conversely, for graphene on SiC the EB process is not successful under vacuum. Finally, the EB is possible with turbostratic graphene discs only after the creation of a constriction in the sample using lithographic patterning.

  8. Electroburning of few-layer graphene flakes, epitaxial graphene, and turbostratic graphene discs in air and under vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Candini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based electrodes are very promising for molecular electronics and spintronics. Here we report a systematic characterization of the electroburning (EB process, leading to the formation of nanometer-spaced gaps, on different types of few-layer graphene (namely mechanically exfoliated graphene on SiO2, graphene epitaxially grown on the C-face of SiC and turbostratic graphene discs deposited on SiO2 under air and vacuum conditions. The EB process is found to depend on both the graphene type and on the ambient conditions. For the mechanically exfoliated graphene, performing EB under vacuum leads to a higher yield of nanometer-gap formation than working in air. Conversely, for graphene on SiC the EB process is not successful under vacuum. Finally, the EB is possible with turbostratic graphene discs only after the creation of a constriction in the sample using lithographic patterning.

  9. Atomic resolution electrostatic potential mapping of graphene sheets by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, David, E-mail: david.cooper@cea.fr [University Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054, Grenoble (France); Pan, Cheng-Ta; Haigh, Sarah [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21

    Off-axis electron holography has been performed at atomic resolution with the microscope operated at 80 kV to provide electrostatic potential maps from single, double, and triple layer graphene. These electron holograms have been reconstructed in order to obtain information about atomically resolved and mean inner potentials. We propose that off-axis electron holography can now be used to measure the electrical properties in a range of two-dimensional semiconductor materials and three dimensional devices comprising stacked layers of films to provide important information about their electrical properties.

  10. Selective growth of graphene in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehyun; An, Hyosub; Choi, Dong-Chul; Hussain, Sajjad; Song, Wooseok; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Wan-Gyu; Jung, Jongwan

    2016-07-01

    Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene on a specific position. The key idea is to deposit a thin Cu layer (~40 nm thick) on pre-grown monolayer graphene and to apply additional growth. The thin Cu atop the graphene/Cu substrate acts as a catalyst to decompose methane (CH4) gas during the additional growth. The adlayer is grown selectively on the pre-grown graphene, and the thin Cu is removed through evaporation during CVD, eventually forming large-area and uniform double layer graphene. With this technology, highly uniform graphene films with precise thicknesses of 1 to 5 layers and graphene check patterns with 1 to 3 layers were successfully demonstrated. This method provides precise LBL growth for a uniform graphene film and a technique for the design of new graphene devices.Selective and precise control of the layer number of graphene remains a critical issue for the practical applications of graphene. First, it is highly challenging to grow a continuous and uniform few-layer graphene since once the monolayer graphene fully covers a copper (Cu) surface, the growth of the second layer stops, resulting in mostly nonhomogeneous films. Second, from the selective adlayer growth point of view, there is no clear pathway for achieving this. We have developed the selective growth of a graphene adlayer in layer-by-layer via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) which makes it possible to stack graphene

  11. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  12. Deposition of thin silicon layers on transferred large area graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupina, Grzegorz, E-mail: lupina@ihp-microelectronics.com; Kitzmann, Julia; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Dabrowski, Jarek; Wolff, Andre; Mehr, Wolfgang [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2013-12-23

    Physical vapor deposition of Si onto transferred graphene is investigated. At elevated temperatures, Si nucleates preferably on wrinkles and multilayer graphene islands. In some cases, however, Si can be quasi-selectively grown only on the monolayer graphene regions while the multilayer islands remain uncovered. Experimental insights and ab initio calculations show that variations in the removal efficiency of carbon residuals after the transfer process can be responsible for this behavior. Low-temperature Si seed layer results in improved wetting and enables homogeneous growth. This is an important step towards realization of electronic devices in which graphene is embedded between two Si layers.

  13. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil

    2014-01-01

    for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling...... of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new...... experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene....

  14. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  15. A first principles study on the CVD graphene growth on copper surfaces: A carbon atom incorporation to graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Nobuo; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nara, Jun; Ohno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    Carbon atom reactions in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for graphene production on copper surfaces have been studied by first principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a typical CVD growth temperature. This study focuses on the processes of a carbon atom incorporation to graphene edges. The energy barriers of these carbon atom incorporation reactions have been calculated as ~ 1 eV, which are comparable or slightly larger than the barriers of carbon atom dimerization. We have also found that the surface copper atoms form step like structures to terminate the carbon dangling bonds at graphene edges, which are markedly different from the graphene-copper interactions observed in static calculations.

  16. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  17. ssDNA Binding Reveals the Atomic Structure of Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Husale S; Sahoo S; Radenovic A; Traversi F; Annibale P; Kis A

    2010-01-01

    We used AFM to investigate the interaction of polyelectrolytes such as ssDNA and dsDNA molecules with graphene as a substrate. Graphene is an appropriate substrate due to its planarity, relatively large surfaces that are detectable via an optical microscope, and straightforward identification of the number of layers. We observe that in the absence of the screening ions deposited ssDNA will bind only to the graphene and not to the SiO2 substrate, confirming that the binding energy is mainly du...

  18. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  19. Wear Resistance Limited by Step Edge Failure: The Rise and Fall of Graphene as an Atomically Thin Lubricating Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yizhou; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji; Dong, Yalin; Li, Qunyang

    2017-01-11

    Owing to its intrinsically lubricious property, graphene has a high potential to be an atomically thin solid lubricant for sliding interfaces. Despite its ultrahigh breaking strength at the nanoscale, graphene often fails to maintain its integrity when subjected to macroscale tribological tests. To reveal the true wear characteristics of graphene, a nanoscale diamond tip was used to scratch monolayer graphene mechanically exfoliated to SiO2 substrates. Our experimental results show that while graphene exhibited extraordinary wear resistance in the interior region, it could be easily damaged at the step edge under a much lower normal load (∼2 orders of magnitude smaller). Similar behavior with substantially reduced wear resistance at the edge was also observed for monatomic graphene layer on graphite surface. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we attributed this markedly weak wear resistance at the step edge to two primary mechanisms, i.e., atom-by-atom adhesive wear and peel induced rupture. Our findings shed light on the paradox that graphene is nanoscopically strong yet macroscopically weak. As step edge is ubiquitous for two-dimensional materials at the macroscale, our study also provides a guiding direction for maximizing the mechanical and tribological performance of these atomically thin materials.

  20. Single-layer graphene cathodes for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Marshall; Gorodetsky, Alon; Kim, Bumjung; Kim, Keun Soo; Jia, Zhang; Kim, Philip; Nuckolls, Colin; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2011-03-01

    A laminated single-layer graphene is demonstrated as a cathode for organic photovoltaic devices. The measured properties indicate that graphene offers two potential advantages over conventional photovoltaic electrode materials; work function matching via contact doping, and increased power conversion efficiency due to transparency. These findings indicate that flexible, light-weight all carbon solar cells can be constructed using graphene as the cathode material.

  1. Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Recent- ly subcritical Coulomb behavior (i.e., where Z < Zc and atomic collapse resonances are absent) was observed for charged impurities in graphene...impurities. Here we report the observation of supercritical Coulomb behavior in atomically-fabricated “artificial nuclei” assembled on the surface...an STM, thus al- lowing creation of supercritical Coulomb potentials from subcritical charge elements. STM spectroscopy was used to observe the

  2. Tuneable pressure effects in graphene oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Yusuke; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaaki; Koinuma, Michio; Lindoy, Leonard F; Hayami, Shinya

    2017-09-22

    Tuneable pressure effects associated with changing interlayer distances in two-dimensional graphene oxide (GO)/reduced GO (rGO) layers are demonstrated through monitoring the changes in the spin-crossover (SCO) temperature (T 1/2) of [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)](BF4) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated in the interlayer spaces of the GO/rGO layers. The interlayer separation along the GO to GO/rGO-NP composites to rGO series decreases smoothly from 9.00 Å (for GO) to 3.50 Å (for rGO) as the temperature employed for the thermal reduction treatments of the GO-NP composites is increased. At the same time, T 1/2 increases from 351 K to 362 K along the series. This T 1/2 increment of 11 K corresponds to that observed for pristine [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)](BF4) NPs under a hydrostatic pressure of 38 MPa. The influence of the stacked layer structures on the pseudo-pressure effects has been further probed by investigating the differences in T 1/2 for [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)](BF4) that is present in the composite as larger bulk particles rather than as NPs.

  3. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  4. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    Since ancient times, pure carbon materials have been familiar in human society—not only diamonds in jewellery and graphite in pencils, but also charcoal and coal which have been used for centuries as fuel for living and industry. Carbon fibers are stronger, tougher and lighter than steel and increase material efficiency because of their lower weight. Today, carbon fibers and related composite materials are used to make the frames of bicycles, cars and even airplane parts. The two-dimensional allotrope, now called graphene, is just a single layer of carbon atoms, locked together in a strongly bonded honeycomb lattice. In plane, graphene is stiffer than diamond, but out-of-plane it is soft, like rubber. It is virtually invisible, may conduct electricity (heat) better than copper and weighs next to nothing. Carbon compounds with two carbon atoms as a base, such as graphene, graphite or diamond, have isoelectronic sister compounds made of boron-nitrogen pairs: hexagonal and cubic boron nitride, with almost the same lattice constant. Although the two 2D sisters, graphene and h-BN, have the same number of valence electrons, their electronic properties are very different: freestanding h-BN is an insulator, while charge carriers in graphene are highly mobile. The past ten years have seen a great expansion in studies of single-layer and few-layer graphene. This activity has been concerned with the π electron transport in graphene, in electric and magnetic fields. More than 30 years ago, however, single-layer graphene and h-BN on solid surfaces were widely investigated. It was noted that they drastically changed the chemical reactivity of surfaces, and they were known to 'poison' heterogeneous catalysts, to passivate surfaces, to prevent oxidation of surfaces and to act as surfactants. Also, it was realized that the controlled growth of h-BN and graphene on substrates yields the formation of mismatch driven superstructures with peculiar template functionality on the

  5. Atomically Sharp Interface in an h-BN-epitaxial graphene van der Waals Heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediri, Haikel; Pierucci, Debora; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Henck, Hugo; Patriarche, Gilles; Dappe, Yannick J.; Yuan, Sheng; Toury, Bérangère; Belkhou, Rachid; Silly, Mathieu G.; Sirotti, Fausto; Boutchich, Mohamed; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2015-01-01

    Stacking various two-dimensional atomic crystals is a feasible approach to creating unique multilayered van der Waals heterostructures with tailored properties. Herein for the first time, we present a controlled preparation of large-area h-BN/graphene heterostructures via a simple chemical deposition of h-BN layers on epitaxial graphene/SiC(0001). Van der Waals forces, which are responsible for the cohesion of the multilayer system, give rise to an abrupt interface without interdiffusion between graphene and h-BN, as shown by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) and direct observation using scanning and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM/HRTEM). The electronic properties of graphene, such as the Dirac cone, remain intact and no significant charge transfer i.e. doping, is observed. These results are supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. We demonstrate that the h-BN capped graphene allows the fabrication of vdW heterostructures without altering the electronic properties of graphene. PMID:26585245

  6. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  7. Length-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangfan; Pereira, Luiz F C; Wang, Yu; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Kaiwen; Zhao, Xiangming; Bae, Sukang; Tinh Bui, Cong; Xie, Rongguo; Thong, John T L; Hong, Byung Hee; Loh, Kian Ping; Donadio, Davide; Li, Baowen; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-04-16

    Graphene exhibits extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties, and extremely high thermal conductivity. Being a very stable atomically thick membrane that can be suspended between two leads, graphene provides a perfect test platform for studying thermal conductivity in two-dimensional systems, which is of primary importance for phonon transport in low-dimensional materials. Here we report experimental measurements and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conduction in suspended single-layer graphene as a function of both temperature and sample length. Interestingly and in contrast to bulk materials, at 300 K, thermal conductivity keeps increasing and remains logarithmically divergent with sample length even for sample lengths much larger than the average phonon mean free path. This result is a consequence of the two-dimensional nature of phonons in graphene, and provides fundamental understanding of thermal transport in two-dimensional materials.

  8. Visualizing Klein tunneling in graphene at the atomic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward B.; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Shen, Kyle M.; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    Graphene has attracted much attention from both the solid-state and high-energy scientific communities because its elementary excitations mimic relativistic chiral fermions. This has allowed graphene to act as a table-top testbed for verifying certain longstanding theoretical predictions dating back to the very first formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics. One such prediction is Klein tunneling, the ability of chiral electrons to transmit perfectly through arbitrarily high potential barriers. Previous transport and point-spectroscopic studies confirmed Klein behavior of graphene electrons but lacked real-space resolution. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements to present the first real-space atomic images of Klein tunneling in graphene. In these CVD-grown samples, quasi-circular regions of the copper substrate underneath graphene act as potential barriers that can scatter and transmit electrons. At certain energies, the relativistic chiral fermions that Klein scatter from these barriers are shown to fulfill resonance conditions such that the transmitted electrons become trapped and form standing waves. These resonant modes are visualized with detailed spectroscopic images with atomic resolution that agree well with theoretical calculations. The trapping time is shown to depend critically on both the angular momenta quantum number of the resonant state and the radius of the trapping potential.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of isotopically labeled two-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbac, Martin [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Chemistry, Palacky University, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kong, Jing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Kavan, Ladislav [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Dresselhaus, Mildred S. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    A detailed understanding of graphene properties both in its neutral and doped states is an important prerequisite for applications of this new material in electronic devices. We used electrochemical doping to study the influence of charge on isotopically labeled two-layer graphene. No change of the G mode intensity was observed at electrode potentials between -1.5 and 1 V. At high positive electrode potentials (>1 V) we observed enhancement of the G mode intensity due to partial removal of interfering resonant transitions. Hence, we confirmed that in case of absence of the enhancement due to a specific orientation between the two layers the Raman spectroelectrochemistry of non-stacked two-layer graphene mimics that of one-layer graphene. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. One-step electrodeposition to layer-by-layer graphene-conducting-polymer hybrid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanhong; Wu, Na; Luo, Shenglian; Liu, Chengbin; Wang, Ke; Chen, Liuyun

    2012-10-26

    One-step fabrication of graphene-polyaniline (graphene-PANI) hybrid film was facilely achieved by cyclic voltammetric electrolysis of a bath containing both graphene oxide (GO) and aniline, where graphene is obtained by electrochemical reduction of GO and PANI is simultaneously obtained by aniline electropolymerization. As there is no strong attraction between aniline and GO under the electrodeposition conditions, the independent depositions of PANI and reduced GO nanosheets at their greatly differed potentials led to alternate layered graphene-PANI films, with the topmost layer being PANI particles or graphene sheets just by changing the initial scan directions. The two kinds of graphene-PANI hybrid films present excellent but different electrical and electrochemical behaviors. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  12. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  13. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Tang, Wencheng; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; JinYu; Du, Yanhui; Zhang, Yajun

    2015-11-01

    Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  14. Antiferro quadrupolar ordering in Fe intercalated few layers graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Jahid Akhtar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The π electron cloud above and below the honeycomb structure of graphene causes each carbon atom to carry a permanent electric quadrupole moment which can attach any cation to impart interesting physical properties. We have synthesized Fe intercalated graphene structures to investigate tunable magnetic properties as a result of this chemical modification. An interesting antiferro quadrupolar ordering is observed which arises due to a coupling between magnetic dipole moment of Fe and electric quadrupole moment on graphene surface. In contrast to antiferromagnetic Neel temperature (TN, here the ordering temperature (TQ increases from 35.5 K to 47.5 K as the magnetic field is raised upto 1 Tesla.

  15. Nanoscale Mechanical Characterization of Graphene/Polymer Nanocomposites using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minzhen

    Graphene materials, exhibiting outstanding mechanical properties, are excellent candidates as reinforcement in high-performance polymer nanocomposites. In this dissertation, advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques are applied to study the nanomechanics of graphene/polymer nanocomposites, specifically the graphene/polymer interfacial strength and the stress transfer at the interface. Two novel methods to directly characterize the interfacial strength between individual graphene sheets and polymers using AFM are presented and applied to a series of polymers and graphene sheets. The interfacial strength of graphene/polymer varies greatly for different combinations. The strongest interaction is found between graphene oxide (GO) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a strongly polar, water-based polymer. On the other hand, polystyrene, a non polar polymer, has the weakest interaction with GO. The interfacial bond strength is attributed to hydrogen bonding and physical adsorption. Further, the stress transfer in GO/PVA nanocomposites is studied quantitatively by monitoring the strain in individual GO sheet inside the polymer via AFM and Raman spectroscopy. For the first time, the strains of individual GO sheets in nanocomposites are imaged and quantified as a function of the applied external strains. The matrix strain is directly transferred to GO sheets for strains up to 8%. At higher strain levels, the onset of the nanocomposite failure and a stick-slip behavior is observed. This study reveals that GO is superior to pure graphene as reinforcement in nanocomposites. These results also imply the potential to make a new generation of nanocomposites with exceptional high strength and toughness. In the second part of this dissertation, AFM is used to study the structure of silk proteins and the morphology of spider silks. For the first time, shear-induced self-assembly of native silk fibroin is observed. The morphology of the Brown Recluse spider silk is investigated and a

  16. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, C.B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Moreno, M.S. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, 8400 – San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Duchamp, M.; Kovács, A. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Monge, N.; Morales, G.M.; Barbero, C.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, X5804BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+}. In our experiments, which are carried out at 80 kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400 °C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800 °C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide modified with Ba{sup 2+} was imaged using TEM and STEM at 80 kV. • High-resolution images and spectra were obtained only by heating above 400 °C. • Elemental maps show the distribution of C, Ba, O and Ca on the graphene oxide. • Single Ba atoms were identified in STEM HAADF and HRTEM images.

  17. Layer-by-layer graphene/TCNQ stacked films as conducting anodes for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2012-06-26

    Large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for transparent conducting electrode applications in flexible optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer photovoltaic devices using a pristine CVD graphene anode is still not appealing due to its much lower conductivity than that of conventional indium tin oxide. We report a layer-by-layer molecular doping process on graphene for forming sandwiched graphene/tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)/graphene stacked films for polymer solar cell anodes, where the TCNQ molecules (as p-dopants) were securely embedded between two graphene layers. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on these multilayered graphene/TCNQ anodes are fabricated and characterized. The P3HT/PCBM device with an anode structure composed of two TCNQ layers sandwiched by three CVD graphene layers shows optimum PCE (∼2.58%), which makes the proposed anode film quite attractive for next-generation flexible devices demanding high conductivity and transparency.

  18. Simulation of Graphene Mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412769646

    2017-01-01

    Graphene is a one atom thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in hexagonal lattice in two-dimensions. The discovery of graphene has provoked a revolution in nanotechnology, as the structural, thermal, and electronic properties of graphene make it a very useful component for a large variety of devices.

  19. Graphene as a flexible template for controlling magnetic interactions between metal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Kim, Dongwook; Robertson, Alex W; Yoon, Euijoon; Hong, Suklyun; Ihm, Jisoon; Yu, Jaejun; Warner, Jamie H; Lee, Gun-Do

    2017-03-01

    Metal-doped graphene produces magnetic moments that have potential application in spintronics. Here we use density function theory computational methods to show how the magnetic interaction between metal atoms doped in graphene can be controlled by the degree of flexure in a graphene membrane. Bending graphene by flexing causes the distance between two substitutional Fe atoms covalently bonded in graphene to gradually increase and these results in the magnetic moment disappearing at a critical strain value. At the critical strain, a carbon atom can enter between the two Fe atoms and blocks the interaction between relevant orbitals of Fe atoms to quench the magnetic moment. The control of interactions between doped atoms by exploiting the mechanical flexibility of graphene is a unique approach to manipulating the magnetic properties and opens up new opportunities for mechanical-magnetic 2D device systems.

  20. First-principles study on interlayer state in alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-11-01

    Energetics and electronic structures of alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and alkaline earth metal (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) atoms intercalated bilayer graphene are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Formation of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene is exothermic except for Be and Mg. The interlayer state between two graphene layers is occupied for K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, and Ba. We find that the energetic position of the interlayer states between bilayer graphene monotonically shifts downward with increasing of interlayer distance. The interlayer distances of more than 4.5 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively, are necessary for the occupation of the interlayer state in bilayer graphene for alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms, which is almost independent of the intercalant metal species. We discuss the relevance to occurrence of superconductivity for the metal intercalated bilayer graphene in terms of the occupation of the interlayer state and the phonon frequency of metal ions.

  1. Organometallic complexes of graphene: toward atomic spintronics using a graphene web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdoshenko, Stas M; Ioffe, Ilya N; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Dunsch, Lothar; Popov, Alexey A

    2011-12-27

    Graphene|metal|ligand systems open a new realm in surface magnetochemistry. We show that by trapping metal atoms in the two-dimensional potential lattice of a graphene-ligand interface it is possible to build a chemical analogue of an optical lattice, a key setup in quantum information and strongly correlated systems. Employing sophisticated first-principles calculations, we studied electronic and dynamic properties of graphene|metal|ligand assemblies and showed that there is a general principle--spin-charge separation in π-d systems--that underlies the possibility of synthesizing and controlling such systems. We find that ligands can work as a local gate to control the properties of trapped metal atoms and can impose bosonic or fermionic character on such atomic nets, depending on the ligand's nature. Remarkably, the magnetization energy in such systems reaches record-high values of ca. 400 meV, which makes the respective magnetic phenomena utilizable at room temperature. Accompanied by spin polarization of the graphene π-conjugated system it leads to spin-valve materials and brings the realization of quantum computing one step closer.

  2. Elastic Buckling Behaviour of General Multi-Layered Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ming Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Elastic buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets is rigorously investigated. Van der Waals forces are modelled, to a first order approximation, as linear physical springs which connect the nodes between the layers. Critical buckling loads and their associated modes are established and analyzed under different boundary conditions, aspect ratios and compressive loading ratios in the case of graphene sheets compressed in two perpendicular directions. Various practically possible loading configurations are examined and their effect on buckling characteristics is assessed. To model more accurately the buckling behaviour of multi-layered graphene sheets, a physically more representative and realistic mixed boundary support concept is proposed and applied. For the fundamental buckling mode under mixed boundary support, the layers with different boundary supports deform similarly but non-identically, leading to resultant van der Waals bonding forces between the layers which in turn affect critical buckling load. Results are compared with existing known solutions to illustrate the excellent numerical accuracy of the proposed modelling approach. The buckling characteristics of graphene sheets presented in this paper form a comprehensive and wholesome study which can be used as potential structural design guideline when graphene sheets are employed for nano-scale sensing and actuation applications such as nano-electro-mechanical systems.

  3. Atomically resolved imaging of highly ordered alternating fluorinated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtiban, Reza J.; Dyson, M. Adam; Nair, Rahul R.; Zan, Recep; Wong, Swee L.; Ramasse, Quentin; Geim, Andre K.; Bangert, Ursel; Sloan, Jeremy

    2014-09-01

    One of the most desirable goals of graphene research is to produce ordered two-dimensional (2D) chemical derivatives of suitable quality for monolayer device fabrication. Here we reveal, by focal series exit wave reconstruction (EWR), that C2F chair is a stable graphene derivative and demonstrates pristine long-range order limited only by the size of a functionalized domain. Focal series of images of graphene and C2F chair formed by reaction with XeF2 were obtained at 80 kV in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. EWR images reveal that single carbon atoms and carbon-fluorine pairs in C2F chair alternate strictly over domain sizes of at least 150 nm2 with electron diffraction indicating ordered domains ≥0.16 μm2. Our results also indicate that, within an ordered domain, functionalization occurs on one side only as theory predicts. In addition, we show that electron diffraction provides a quick and easy method for distinguishing between graphene, C2F chair and fully fluorinated stoichiometric CF 2D phases.

  4. Crystallographic growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes on few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Aram; Hunley, Patrick D.; Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias J.; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Hudak, Bethany M.; Guiton, Beth S.; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid carbon nanotube and graphene structures are emerging as an exciting material system built from a common sp2 carbon backbone. Such hybrid systems have promise for use in improving the performance of energy storage and high-speed electronic applications. Towards the attainment of such hybrid materials, the catalytic growth and crystallographic alignment of these integrated structures are investigated along with the atomic-scale features of their interfaces. The catalytic activity of nanoparticles to form carbon nanotubes on the surface of few-layer graphene is tuned through precise feedstock application. Through careful materials synthesis, the interfaces of these hybrid carbon nanotube - graphene systems are investigated through ultra-high resolution electron microscopy.

  5. Fabrication of graphene thin films based on layer-by-layer self-assembly of functionalized graphene nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Je Seob; Cho, Sung Min; Kim, Woo-Jae; Park, Juhyun; Yoo, Pil J

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we present a facile means of fabricating graphene thin films via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of charged graphene nanosheets (GS) based on electrostatic interactions. To this end, graphite oxide (GO) obtained from graphite powder using Hummers method is chemically reduced to carboxylic acid-functionalized GS and amine-functionalized GS to perform an alternate LbL deposition between oppositely charged GSs. Specifically, for successful preparation of positively charged GS, GOs are treated with an intermediate acyl-chlorination reaction by thionyl chloride and a subsequent amidation reaction in pyridine, whereby a stable GO dispersibility can be maintained within the polar reaction solvent. As a result, without the aid of additional hybridization with charged nanomaterials or polyelectrolytes, the oppositely charged graphene nanosheets can be electrostatically assembled to form graphene thin films in an aqueous environment, while obtaining controllability over film thickness and transparency. Finally, the electrical property of the assembled graphene thin films can be enhanced through a thermal treatment process. Notably, the introduction of chloride functions during the acyl-chlorination reaction provides the p-doping effect for the assembled graphene thin films, yielding a sheet resistance of 1.4 kΩ/sq with a light transmittance of 80% after thermal treatment. Since the proposed method allows for large-scale production as well as elaborate manipulation of the physical properties of the graphene thin films, it can be potentially utilized in various applications, such as transparent electrodes, flexible displays and highly sensitive biosensors.

  6. Synthesis graphene layer at different waste cooking palm oil temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaiah, M.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.; khusaimi, Z.; Azhan, H.; Asli, N. A.

    2017-09-01

    Graphene is one of the most recent carbon nanomaterials that has attracted attention because of its superior properties. The formation of the graphene on the Ni surface appears due to segregation and precipitation of a high amount of carbon from the source material during the cooling process. The growth of graphene at different waste cooking palm oil (WCPO) temperatures using double thermal chemical vapour deposition method (DTCVD) was investigated. The samples were prepared at various vaporization temperatures of WCPO is range from 250 °C to 450 °C by increment 50 °C and the temperature of Ni substrate constant at 900 °C. The structural of the graphene were characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) Spectroscopy, UV-Visible and Raman's spectroscopy. FESEM images at optimum temperature (350 °C) display hexagonal shapes since the graphene layers were formed after precipitation of the carbon. It the meantime, UV-Visible spectra shows the sharp peak at 250 nm whereupon the highest of reflectivity value. This peak is an indication the presence of the graphene layers on Ni substrate. The position and half width 2D peak of the Raman spectra were subjected to detail analyses in order to determine the quantity and quality of the graphene layer. At the temperature 350°C, the Raman's spectroscopy result shown the multilayer of the graphene based on I2D/IG ratio is approximately constant (equal to˜0.43).

  7. Dynamic Negative Compressibility of Few-Layer Graphene, h-BN, and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Bernardo; Barboza, Ana Paula; Chacham, Helio; Oliveira, Camilla; Fernandes, Thales; Martins Ferreira, Erlon; Archanjo, Braulio; Batista, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Alan

    2013-03-01

    We report a novel mechanical response of few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 to the simultaneous compression and shear by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The response is characterized by the vertical expansion of these two-dimensional (2D) layered materials upon compression. Such effect is proportional to the applied load, leading to vertical strain values (opposite to the applied force) of up to 150%. The effect is null in the absence of shear, increases with tip velocity, and is anisotropic. It also has similar magnitudes in these solid lubricant materials (few-layer graphene, h-BN, and MoS2), but it is absent in single-layer graphene and in few-layer mica and Bi2Se3. We propose a physical mechanism for the effect where the combined compressive and shear stresses from the tip induce dynamical wrinkling on the upper material layers, leading to the observed flake thickening. The new effect (and, therefore, the proposed wrinkling) is reversible in the three materials where it is observed.[2] Financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono

  8. Density functional theory calculations on transition metal atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-11-01

    Transition metal atom adsorption on graphene monolayers has been elucidated using periodic density functional theory under hybrid and generalized gradient approximation functionals. More specifically, we examined the adsorption of Cu, Fe, Zn, Ru, and Os on graphene monolayers by calculating, among others, the electronic density-of-states spectra of the adatom-graphene system and the overlap populations of the adatom with the nearest adsorbing graphene carbon atoms. These calculations reveal that Cu form primarily covalent bonds with graphene atoms via strong hybridization between the adatom orbitals and the sp band of the graphene substrate, whereas the interaction of the Ru and Os with graphene also contain ionic parts. Although the interaction of Fe with graphene atoms is mostly covalent, some charge transfer to graphene is also observed. The interaction of Zn with graphene is weak. Mulliken population analysis and charge contour maps are used to elucidate charge transfers between the adatom and the substrate. The adsorption strength is correlated with the metal adsorption energy and the height of the metal adatom from the graphene plane for the geometrically optimized adatom-graphene system. Our analysis shows that show that metal adsorption strength follows the adatom trend Ru ≈ Os > Fe > Cu > Zn, as verified by corresponding changes in the adsorption energies. The increased metal-carbon orbital overlap for the Ru relative to Os adatom is attributed to hybridization defects.

  9. Short-channel field-effect transistors with 9-atom and 13-atom wide graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, Juan Pablo; Fairbrother, Andrew; Borin Barin, Gabriela; Shi, Wu; Lee, Kyunghoon; Wu, Shuang; Yong Choi, Byung; Braganza, Rohit; Lear, Jordan; Kau, Nicholas; Choi, Wonwoo; Chen, Chen; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Dumslaff, Tim; Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fischer, Felix; Zettl, Alex; Ruffieux, Pascal; Yablonovitch, Eli; Crommie, Michael; Fasel, Roman; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-09-21

    Bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons and graphene nanoribbon heterostructures have promising electronic properties for high-performance field-effect transistors and ultra-low power devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors. However, the short length and wide band gap of these graphene nanoribbons have prevented the fabrication of devices with the desired performance and switching behavior. Here, by fabricating short channel (L ch ~ 20 nm) devices with a thin, high-κ gate dielectric and a 9-atom wide (0.95 nm) armchair graphene nanoribbon as the channel material, we demonstrate field-effect transistors with high on-current (I on > 1 μA at V d = -1 V) and high I on /I off ~ 10(5) at room temperature. We find that the performance of these devices is limited by tunneling through the Schottky barrier at the contacts and we observe an increase in the transparency of the barrier by increasing the gate field near the contacts. Our results thus demonstrate successful fabrication of high-performance short-channel field-effect transistors with bottom-up synthesized armchair graphene nanoribbons.Graphene nanoribbons show promise for high-performance field-effect transistors, however they often suffer from short lengths and wide band gaps. Here, the authors use a bottom-up synthesis approach to fabricate 9- and 13-atom wide ribbons, enabling short-channel transistors with 10(5) on-off current ratio.

  10. Tribological characteristics of few-layer graphene over Ni grain and interface boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Manoj; Awaja, Firas; Paolicelli, Guido; Bartali, Ruben; Iacob, Erica; Valeri, Sergio; Ryu, Seunghwa; Signetti, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Pugno, Nicola Maria

    2016-03-01

    The tribological properties of metal-supported few-layered graphene depend strongly on the grain topology of the metal substrate. Inhomogeneous distribution of graphene layers at such regions led to variable landscapes with distinguishable roughness. This discrepancy in morphology significantly affects the frictional and wetting characteristics of the FLG system. We discretely measured friction characteristics of FLG covering grains and interfacial grain boundaries of polycrystalline Ni metal substrate via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The friction coefficient of FLG covered at interfacial grain boundaries is found to be lower than that on grains in vacuum (at 10-5 Torr pressure) and similar results were obtained in air condition. Sliding history with AFM cantilever, static and dynamic pull-in and pull-off adhesion forces were addressed in the course of friction measurements to explain the role of the out-of-plane deformation of graphene layer(s). Finite element simulations showed good agreement with experiments and led to a rationalization of the observations. Thus, with interfacial grain boundaries the FLG tribology can be effectively tuned.The tribological properties of metal-supported few-layered graphene depend strongly on the grain topology of the metal substrate. Inhomogeneous distribution of graphene layers at such regions led to variable landscapes with distinguishable roughness. This discrepancy in morphology significantly affects the frictional and wetting characteristics of the FLG system. We discretely measured friction characteristics of FLG covering grains and interfacial grain boundaries of polycrystalline Ni metal substrate via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. The friction coefficient of FLG covered at interfacial grain boundaries is found to be lower than that on grains in vacuum (at 10-5 Torr pressure) and similar results were obtained in air condition. Sliding history with AFM cantilever, static and dynamic pull-in and pull

  11. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  12. Layered quantum Hall insulators with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, A. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Szirmai, G. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Lewenstein, M. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Passeig Lluis Companys 23, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    We consider a generalization of the two-dimensional (2D) quantum Hall insulator to a noncompact, non-Abelian gauge group, the Heisenberg-Weyl group. We show that this kind of insulator is actually a layered three-dimensional (3D) insulator with nontrivial topology. We further show that nontrivial combinations of quantized transverse conductivities can be engineered with the help of a staggered potential. We investigate the robustness and topological nature of this conductivity and connect it to the surface modes of the system. We also propose a simple experimental realization with ultracold atoms in 3D confined to a 2D square lattice with the third dimension being mapped to a gauge coordinate.

  13. Efficient Nitrogen Doping of Single-Layer Graphene Accompanied by Negligible Defect Generation for Integration into Hybrid Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarau, George; Heilmann, Martin; Bashouti, Muhammad; Latzel, Michael; Tessarek, Christian; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-03-22

    While doping enables application-specific tailoring of graphene properties, it can also produce high defect densities that degrade the beneficial features. In this work, we report efficient nitrogen doping of ∼11 atom % without virtually inducing new structural defects in the initial, large-area, low defect, and transferred single-layer graphene. To shed light on this remarkable high-doping-low-disorder relationship, a unique experimental strategy consisting of analyzing the changes in doping, strain, and defect density after each important step during the doping procedure was employed. Complementary micro-Raman mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical microscopy revealed that effective cleaning of the graphene surface assists efficient nitrogen incorporation accompanied by mild compressive strain resulting in negligible defect formation in the doped graphene lattice. These original results are achieved by separating the growth of graphene from its doping. Moreover, the high doping level occurred simultaneously with the epitaxial growth of n-GaN micro- and nanorods on top of graphene, leading to the flow of higher currents through the graphene/n-GaN rod interface. Our approach can be extended toward integrating graphene into other technologically relevant hybrid semiconductor heterostructures and obtaining an ohmic contact at their interfaces by adjusting the doping level in graphene.

  14. Uniform growth of high-quality oxide thin films on graphene using a CdSe quantum dot array seeding layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Yong Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2014-08-13

    Graphene displays outstanding properties as an electrode and a semiconducting channel material for transistors; however, the weak interfacial bond between graphene and an inorganic oxide material-based insulator presents a major constraint on these applications. Here, we report a new approach to improving the interface between the two materials using a CdSe quantum dot (QD)-based seeding layer in an inorganic material-graphene junction. CdSe QDs were electrochemically grown on graphene without degrading the properties of the graphene layer. The graphene structure was then used as the electrode in an oxide semiconductor by depositing a zinc oxide thin film onto the graphene coated with a QD seed layer (QD/G). The zinc oxide film adhered strongly to the graphene layer and provided a low contact resistance. A high-k dielectric layer in the form of an HfO2 film, which is an essential element in the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based field effect transistors, was also uniformly formed on the QD/G sheet using atomic layer deposition. The resulting transistors provided a relatively good performance, yielding hole and electron mobilities of 2600 and 2000 cm(2)/V·s.

  15. Plasmon resonance in single- and double-layer CVD graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Di; Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting Fung

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015.......Dynamic tunability of the plasmonic resonance in graphene nanoribbons is desirable in the near-infrared. We demonstrated a constant blue shift of plasmonic resonances in double-layer graphene nanoribbons with respect to single-layer graphene nanoribbons. © OSA 2015....

  16. Electronic properties of impurity-infected few-layer graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mehran [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Spurred by achievements in devising different multilayered graphene-based nano-systems, based on the random tight-binding Hamiltonian model and within the coherent potential approximation, the influence of varying the number of layers and the effect of doping by the boron and nitrogen impurities on the density of states of a mono- and few-layer armchair- and zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons are theoretically investigated. When the nanoribbons are pristine, with increasing the number of layers the band gap of the armchair nanoribbons is decreased, yet the zigzag ribbons remain metallic and depending on the number of the layers few peaks are appeared around the zero-energy level. Moreover, in the presence of impurities, the band gap of the armchair nanoribbons is decreased for each number of layers. The Van-Hove singularities are steadily broadened and the density of states move to a higher (lower) value of the energy as a result of doping with boron (nitrogen) atoms. This study could provide with us to explore and devise new optoelectronic devices based on the impurity-infected graphene nanoribbons with tunable widths and edges.

  17. Two-band induced superconductivity in single-layer graphene and topological insulator bismuth selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talantsev, E. F.; Crump, W. P.; Tallon, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    Proximity-induced superconductivity in single-layer graphene (SLG) and in topological insulators represent almost ideal examples of superconductivity in two dimensions. Fundamental mechanisms governing superconductivity in the 2D limit are of central interest for modern condensed-matter physics. To deduce fundamental parameters of superconductor/graphene/superconductor and superconductor/bismuth selenide/superconductor junctions we investigate the self-field critical currents in these devices using the formalism of the Ambegaokar–Baratoff model. Our central finding is that the induced superconducting state in SLG and bismuth selenide each exhibits gapping on two superconducting bands. Based on recent results obtained on ultra-thin films of natural superconductors, including single-atomic layer of iron selenide, double and triple atomic layers of gallium, and several atomic layer tantalum disulphide, we conclude that a two-band induced superconducting state in SLG and bismuth selenide is part of a wider, more general multiple-band phenomenology of currently unknown origin.

  18. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  19. A graphene superficial layer for the advanced electroforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Hokyun; Park, Mina; Lee, Seungmin; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Tae-Wook; Ha, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Advances in electroplating technology facilitate the progress of modern electronic devices, including computers, microprocessors and other microelectronic devices. Metal layers with high electrical and thermal conductivities are essential for high speed and high power devices. In this paper, we report an effective route to fabricate free-standing metal films using graphene as a superficial layer in the electroforming process. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on a Cu foil was used as a template, which provides high electrical conductivity and low adhesive force with the template, thus enabling an effective electroforming process. The required force for delamination of the electroplated Cu layer from graphene is more than one order smaller than the force required for removing graphene from the Cu foil. We also demonstrated that the electroformed free-standing Cu thin films could be utilized for patterning microstructures and incorporated onto a flexible substrate for LEDs. This innovative process could be beneficial for the advancement of flexible electronics and optoelectronics, which require a wide range of mechanical and physical properties.Advances in electroplating technology facilitate the progress of modern electronic devices, including computers, microprocessors and other microelectronic devices. Metal layers with high electrical and thermal conductivities are essential for high speed and high power devices. In this paper, we report an effective route to fabricate free-standing metal films using graphene as a superficial layer in the electroforming process. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on a Cu foil was used as a template, which provides high electrical conductivity and low adhesive force with the template, thus enabling an effective electroforming process. The required force for delamination of the electroplated Cu layer from graphene is more than one order smaller than the force required for removing graphene from the Cu foil

  20. Energetics of a Li Atom adsorbed on B/N doped graphene with monovacancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Babita, E-mail: babitabaghla15@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala 147002 (India); Jindal, V.K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Dharamvir, Keya, E-mail: keya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2016-08-15

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption properties and diffusion of Li atom across B/N-pyridinic graphene. Regardless of the dopant type, B atoms of B-pyridinic graphene lose electron density. On the other hand, N atoms (p-type dopants) have tendency to gain electron density in N-pyridinic graphene. Higher chemical reactivity and electronic conductivity of B/N-pyridinic graphene are responsible for stronger binding of Li with the substrates as compared to pristine graphene. The binding energy of Li with B/N-pyridinic graphene exceeds the cohesive energy of bulk Li, making it energetically unfavourable for Li to form clusters on these substrates. Li atom gets better adsorbed on N-pyridinic graphene due to an additional p-p hybridization of the orbitals while Li on B-pyridinic prefers the ionic bonding. Also, significant distortion of N-pyridinic graphene upon Li adsorption is a consequence of the change in bonding mechanism between Li atom and the substrate. Our results show that bonding character and hence binding energies between Li and graphene can be tuned with the help of B/N doping of monovacancy defects. Further, the sites for most stable adsorption are different for the two types of doped and defective graphene, leading to greater Li uptake capacity of B-pyridinic graphene near the defect. In addition, B-pyridinic graphene offering lower diffusion barrier, ensures better Li kinetics. Thus, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for LIBs as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption and diffusion of Li atom across the B/N doped monovacancy graphene is studied using ab-initio DFT calculations. Our results show that bonding mechanism and binding of Li with graphene can be tuned with the help of N/B doping of defects. Also, B-pyridinic graphene presents itself as a better anode material for lithium ion batteries as compared to N-pyridinic graphene. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Density

  1. Tunable properties of few-layer graphene-N-methylpyrrolidone hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Irina V; Kotin, Igor A; Soots, Regina A; Volodin, Vladimir A; Prinz, Victor Ya

    2012-08-10

    A few-layer graphene-based hybrid material with high thermal and chemical stability and reproducible and tunable electronic properties was fabricated by intercalation of N-methylpyrrolidone into a few-layer graphene combined with heat treatment. Depending on the process temperature, the obtained material could be produced with the following properties: a broad range of resistivity values (six to seven orders of magnitude) in combination with a high carrier mobility, a tunable band-gap (from 0 up to 3-4 eV) and sp² or sp³ hybridization of carbon atoms. The extremely strong step-like temperature dependence (within 10 °C) of its properties observed in the vicinity of two temperatures, 90 and 200 °C, seems to be important for various applications. The hybrid material opens viable routes to progress in the design of three-dimensional nanostructures.

  2. Ultrathin-layer chromatography nanostructures modified by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, S R; Foroughi-Abari, A; Krause, K M; Li, P; Kupsta, M; Taschuk, M T; Cadien, K C; Brett, M J

    2013-07-19

    Stationary phase morphology and surface chemistry dictate the properties of ultrathin-layer chromatography (UTLC) media and interactions with analytes in sample mixtures. In this paper, we combined two powerful thin film deposition techniques to create composite chromatography nanomaterials. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) produces high surface area columnar microstructures with aligned macropores well-suited for UTLC. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables precise fabrication of conformal, nanometer-scale coatings that can tune surfaces of these UTLC films. We coated ∼5μm thick GLAD SiO2 UTLC media with effects of ALD coatings on GLAD UTLC media were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), gas adsorption porosimetry, and lipophilic dye separations. The results collectively show that the most significant changes occur over the first few nanometers of ALD coating. They further demonstrate independent control of film microstructure and surface characteristics. ALD coatings can enhance complex GLAD microstructures to engineer new composite nanomaterials potentially useful in analytical chromatography. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  4. Magnetic field dependence of the atomic collapse state in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, D.; Ramezani Masir, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts that heavy atoms (Z > Zc ≈ 170 ) will undergo the process of atomic collapse where electrons sink into the positron continuum and a new family of so-called collapsing states emerges. The relativistic electrons in graphene exhibit the same physics but at a much lower critical charge (Zc ≈ 1 ) which has made it possible to confirm this phenomenon experimentally. However, there exist conflicting predictions on the effect of a magnetic field on atomic collapse. These theoretical predictions are based on the continuum Dirac–Weyl equation, which does not have an exact analytical solution for the interplay of a supercritical Coulomb potential and the magnetic field. Approximative solutions have been proposed, but because the two effects compete on similar energy scales, the theoretical treatment varies depending on the regime which is being considered. These limitations are overcome here by starting from a tight-binding approach and computing exact numerical results. By avoiding special limit cases, we found a smooth evolution between the different regimes. We predict that the atomic collapse effect persists even after the magnetic field is activated and that the critical charge remains unchanged. We show that the atomic collapse regime is characterized: (1) by a series of Landau level anticrossings and (2) by the absence of \\sqrt{B} scaling of the Landau levels with regard to magnetic field strength.

  5. Lattice-layer entanglement in Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Bernardini, Alex E.

    2017-05-01

    The complete lattice-layer entanglement structure of Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene is obtained for the quantum system described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian which includes mass and bias voltage terms. Through a suitable correspondence with the parity-spin S U (2 )⊗S U (2 ) structure of a Dirac Hamiltonian, when it brings up tensor and pseudovector external field interactions, the lattice-layer degrees of freedom can be mapped into such a parity-spin two-qubit basis which supports the interpretation of the bilayer graphene eigenstates as entangled ones in a lattice-layer basis. The Dirac Hamiltonian mapping structure simply provides the tools for the manipulation of the corresponding eigenstates and eigenenergies of the Bernal-stacked graphene quantum system. The quantum correlational content is then quantified by means of quantum concurrence, in order to have the influence of mass and bias voltage terms quantified, and in order to identify the role of the trigonal warping of energy in the intrinsic entanglement. Our results show that while the mass term actively suppresses the intrinsic quantum entanglement of bilayer eigenstates, the bias voltage term spreads the entanglement in the Brillouin zone around the Dirac points. In addition, the interlayer coupling modifies the symmetry of the lattice-layer quantum concurrence around a given Dirac point. It produces some distortion on the quantum entanglement profile which follows the same pattern of the isoenergy line distortion in the Bernal-stacked bilayer graphene.

  6. Graphene crystal growth by thermal precipitation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon precursor via patterned-iron thin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rius Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, relevant advances on graphene as a building block of integrated circuits (ICs have been demonstrated. Graphene growth and device fabrication related processing has been steadily and intensively powered due to commercial interest; however, there are many challenges associated with the incorporation of graphene into commercial applications which includes challenges associated with the synthesis of this material. Specifically, the controlled deposition of single layer large single crystal graphene on arbitrary supports, is particularly challenging. Previously, we have reported the first demonstration of the transformation of focused ion beam induced deposition of carbon (FIBID-C into patterned graphitic layers by metal-assisted thermal treatment (Ni foils. In this present work, we continue exploiting the FIBID-C approach as a route for graphene deposition. Here, thin patterned Fe layers are used for the catalysis of graphenization and graphitization. We demonstrate the formation of high quality single and few layer graphene, which evidences, the possibility of using Fe as a catalyst for graphene deposition. The mechanism is understood as the minute precipitation of atomic carbon after supersaturation of some iron carbides formed under a high temperature treatment. As a consequence of the complete wetting of FIBID-C and patterned Fe layers, which enable graphene growth, the as-deposited patterns do not preserve their original shape after the thermal treatment

  7. Production of High-quality Few-layer Graphene Flakes by Intercalation and Exfoliation

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Areej A.

    2017-11-30

    Graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial, has been given much attention since it was first isolated in 2004. Driving this intensive research effort are the unique properties of this one atom thick sheet of carbon, in particular its electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. While the technological applications proposed for graphene abound, its low-cost production in large scales is still a matter of interrogation. Simple methods to obtain few-layered graphene flakes of high structural quality are being investigated with the exfoliation of graphite taking a prominent place in this arena. From the many suggested approaches, the most promising involve the use of liquid media assisted by intercalants and shear forces acting on the basal layers of graphite. In this thesis, it is discussed how a novel method was developed to produce flakes with consistent lateral dimensions that are also few-layered and retain the expected structural and chemical characteristics of graphene. Here, the source material was a commercially available graphiteintercalated compound, also known as expandable graphite. Several exfoliation-inducing tools were investigated including the use of blenders, homogenizers, and ultrasonic processors. To aid in this process, various solvents and intercalants were explored under different reactive conditions. The more efficient approach in yielding defect-free thin flakes was the use of thermally expanded graphite in boiling dimethylformamide followed by ultrasonic processing and centrifugation. In parallel, a method to fraction the flakes as a function of their lateral size was developed. Ultimately, it was possible to obtain samples of graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of a few micrometers (<5 μm) and thickness of 1-3 nm (i.e. <10 layers).

  8. Effective NaCl and dye rejection of hybrid graphene oxide/graphene layered membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Araki, Takumi; Fukuyo, Tomoyuki; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are robust and possess fascinating properties useful for separation technology applications, but their scalability and high salt rejection when in a strong cross flow for long periods of time remain challenging. Here, we present a graphene-based membrane that is prepared using a simple and environmentally friendly method by spray coating an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide/few-layered graphene/deoxycholate. The membranes were robust enough to withstand strong cross-flow shear for a prolonged period (120 h) while maintaining NaCl rejection near 85% and 96% for an anionic dye. Experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that the presence of deoxycholate enhances NaCl rejection in these graphene-based membranes. In addition, these novel hybrid-layered membranes exhibit better chlorine resistance than pure graphene oxide membranes. The desalination performance and aggressive shear and chlorine resistance of these scalable graphene-based membranes are promising for use in practical water separation applications.

  9. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  10. Laser modification of graphene oxide layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinský Petr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of linearly polarized laser irradiation with various energy densities was successfully used for reduction of graphene oxide (GO. The ion beam analytical methods (RBS, ERDA were used to follow the elemental composition which is expected as the consequence of GO reduction. The chemical composition analysis was accompanied by structural study showing changed functionalities in the irradiated GO foils using spectroscopy techniques including XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The AFM was employed to identify the surface morphology and electric properties evolution were subsequently studied using standard two point method measurement. The used analytical methods report on reduction of irradiated graphene oxide on the surface and the decrease of surface resistivity as a growing function of the laser beam energy density.

  11. Laser modification of graphene oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Siegel, Jakub; Bohačová, Marie; Klímova, Kateřina; Švorčík, Václav; Sofer, Zdenĕk

    2018-01-01

    The effect of linearly polarized laser irradiation with various energy densities was successfully used for reduction of graphene oxide (GO). The ion beam analytical methods (RBS, ERDA) were used to follow the elemental composition which is expected as the consequence of GO reduction. The chemical composition analysis was accompanied by structural study showing changed functionalities in the irradiated GO foils using spectroscopy techniques including XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The AFM was employed to identify the surface morphology and electric properties evolution were subsequently studied using standard two point method measurement. The used analytical methods report on reduction of irradiated graphene oxide on the surface and the decrease of surface resistivity as a growing function of the laser beam energy density.

  12. Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-22

    Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

  13. Laser modification of graphene oxide layers

    OpenAIRE

    Malinský Petr; Macková Anna; Cutroneo Mariapompea; Siegel Jakub; Bohačová Marie; Klímova Kateřina; Švorčík Václav; Sofer Zdenĕk

    2018-01-01

    The effect of linearly polarized laser irradiation with various energy densities was successfully used for reduction of graphene oxide (GO). The ion beam analytical methods (RBS, ERDA) were used to follow the elemental composition which is expected as the consequence of GO reduction. The chemical composition analysis was accompanied by structural study showing changed functionalities in the irradiated GO foils using spectroscopy techniques including XPS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The AFM w...

  14. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrinsic structure and friction properties of graphene and graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, atomic structure of single-layered graphene oxide (GO) and chemically reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) nanosheets was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunnelingmicroscopy (AFM and STM). Furthermore, friction properties of the graphene and GO nanosheets were studied by ...

  16. Atomic-scale characterization of the interfacial phonon in graphene/SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Emi; Arafune, Ryuichi; Frederiksen, Thomas; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Shahed, Syed Mohammad Fakruddin; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Norifumi; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Komeda, Tadahiro

    2017-10-01

    Epitaxial graphene on SiC that provides wafer-scale and high-quality graphene sheets on an insulating substrate is a promising material to realize graphene-based nanodevices. The presence of the insulating substrate changes the physical properties of free-standing graphene through the interfacial phonon, e.g., limiting the mobility. Despite such known impacts on the material properties, a complete and microscopic picture is missing. Here, we report on atomically resolved inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) with a scanning tunneling microscope for epitaxial graphene grown on 4 H -SiC(0001). Our data reveal a strong spatial dependence in the IETS spectrum, which cannot be explained by intrinsic graphene properties. We show that this variation in the IETS spectrum originates from a localized low-energy vibration of the interfacial Si atom with a dangling bond via ab initio electronic and phononic state calculations. This insight may help advancing graphene device performance through interfacial control.

  17. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  18. Superconductivity in potassium-doped few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqi; Chen, Genfu; Yang, Huaixin; Zhu, Yuanhua; Wang, Duming; He, Junbao; Cao, Tingbing

    2012-04-18

    Here we report the successful synthesis of superconducting potassium-doped few-layer graphene (K-doped FLG) with a transition temperature of 4.5 K, which is 1 order of magnitude higher than that observed in the bulk potassium graphite intercalation compound (GIC) KC(8) (T(c) = 0.39 K). The realization of superconductivity in K-doped FLG shows the potential for the development of new superconducting electronic devices using two-dimensional (2D) graphene as a basis material. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. Single-atom spectroscopy of phosphorus dopants implanted into graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Hardcastle, Trevor P.; Hofsäss, Hans; Mittelberger, Andreas; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Drummond-Brydson, Rik; Scott, Andrew J.; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-06-01

    One of the keys behind the success of modern semiconductor technology has been the ion implantation of silicon, which allows its electronic properties to be tailored. For similar purposes, heteroatoms have been introduced into carbon nanomaterials both during growth and using post-growth methods. However, due to the nature of the samples, it has been challenging to determine whether the heteroatoms have been incorporated into the lattice as intended. Direct observations have so far been limited to N and B dopants, and incidental Si impurities. Furthermore, ion implantation of these materials is challenging due to the requirement of very low ion energies and atomically clean surfaces. Here, we provide the first atomic-resolution imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) evidence of phosphorus atoms in the graphene lattice, implanted by low-energy ion irradiation. The measured P L 2,3-edge shows excellent agreement with an ab initio spectrum simulation, conclusively identifying the P in a buckled substitutional configuration. While advancing the use of EELS for single-atom spectroscopy, our results demonstrate the viability of phosphorus as a lattice dopant in sp 2-bonded carbon structures and provide its unmistakable fingerprint for further studies.

  20. One-step transfer and integration of multifunctionality in CVD graphene by TiO₂/graphene oxide hybrid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee Jin; Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Hyun; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2014-05-28

    We present a straightforward method for simultaneously enhancing the electrical conductivity, environmental stability, and photocatalytic properties of graphene films through one-step transfer of CVD graphene and integration by introducing TiO2/graphene oxide layer. A highly durable and flexible TiO2 layer is successfully used as a supporting layer for graphene transfer instead of the commonly used PMMA. Transferred graphene/TiO2 film is directly used for measuring the carrier transport and optoelectronic properties without an extra TiO2 removal and following deposition steps for multifunctional integration into devices because the thin TiO2 layer is optically transparent and electrically semiconducting. Moreover, the TiO2 layer induces charge screening by electrostatically interacting with the residual oxygen moieties on graphene, which are charge scattering centers, resulting in a reduced current hysteresis. Adsorption of water and other chemical molecules onto the graphene surface is also prevented by the passivating TiO2 layer, resulting in the long term environmental stability of the graphene under high temperature and humidity. In addition, the graphene/TiO2 film shows effectively enhanced photocatalytic properties because of the increase in the transport efficiency of the photogenerated electrons due to the decrease in the injection barrier formed at the interface between the F-doped tin oxide and TiO2 layers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  2. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  3. Simultaneous electrochemical synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes on both electrodes in protic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Min; Wang, Mengmeng; Hu, Junyan; Lei, Gang; Chen, Shuzhen; Liu, Hongtao

    2013-06-11

    Here we illustrate a simple and moderate electrochemical strategy to simultaneously harvest high-quality few-layer graphene flakes (graphene flakes detached from cathodic graphite receive a defect healing.

  4. Atomic Layer Etching Mechanism of MoS2 for Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Seok; Kim, Ki Hyun; Nam, Yeonsig; Jeon, Jaeho; Yim, Soonmin; Singh, Eric; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Sung Joo; Jung, Yeon Sik; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Dong Woo

    2017-04-05

    Among the layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) that can form stable two-dimensional crystal structures, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been intensively investigated because of its unique properties in various electronic and optoelectronic applications with different band gap energies from 1.29 to 1.9 eV as the number of layers decreases. To control the MoS2 layers, atomic layer etching (ALE) (which is a cyclic etching consisting of a radical-adsorption step such as Cl adsorption and a reacted-compound-desorption step via a low-energy Ar(+)-ion exposure) can be a highly effective technique to avoid inducing damage and contamination that occur during the reactive steps. Whereas graphene is composed of one-atom-thick layers, MoS2 is composed of three-atom-thick S(top)-Mo(mid)-S(bottom) layers; therefore, the ALE mechanisms of the two structures are significantly different. In this study, for MoS2 ALE, the Cl radical is used as the adsorption species and a low-energy Ar(+) ion is used as the desorption species. A MoS2 ALE mechanism (by which the S(top), Mo(mid), and S(bottom) atoms are sequentially removed from the MoS2 crystal structure due to the trapped Cl atoms between the S(top) layer and the Mo(mid) layer) is reported according to the results of an experiment and a simulation. In addition, the ALE technique shows that a monolayer MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) fabricated after one cycle of ALE is undamaged and exhibits electrical characteristics similar to those of a pristine monolayer MoS2 FET. This technique is also applicable to all layered TMD materials, such as tungsten disulfide (WS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2).

  5. Direct Writing of Graphene-based Nanoelectronics via Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    fluoride ( rGO /F) which exhibits electric properties close to those of pristine graphene. These nanoribbons can be used to fabricate nanoscale...thermal dip pen nanolithography uses a heated AFM tip dipped in polymer which leaves a layer of masking material on the surface of pristine graphene. When...the 2 graphene sheet is functionalized through fluorination and thereby rendered insulating, the narrow layer of polymer locally protects the

  6. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  7. Effects of torsion on the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Chao; Lu, Gui; Cao, Bing-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Fan, Zhen; Feng, Zhi-Hai

    2017-05-01

    This work employs the equilibrium molecular dynamics method to study the effects of torsion on the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene. Thermal conductivities of twisted 10-layer 433.91 × 99.68 Å2 graphene with torsion angles of 0°, 11.25°, 22.5°, 33.75°, 45°, 67.5°, 90°, 112.5°, and 135° are calculated. The corresponding radial distribution functions and nearest atomic distances are calculated to reveal the effects of torsion on lattice structures. The spectral energy density (SED) method is utilized to analyze the phonon transport properties. It is very interesting that the thermal conductivity of multi-layer graphene decreases slightly at first and then increases with the increasing torsion angle, and the valley is located at θG = 22.5° with the lowest thermal conductivity of 4692.40 W m-1 K-1. The torsion effect can be considered as a combination of the compression effect and the dislocation effect. Further SED analysis confirms that the effect of dislocation on thermal conductivities can be negligible, while the compression effect decreases the phonon lifetimes of flexural out-of-plane acoustic (ZA) branches and increases the ZA group velocities and the phonon specific heat. The decrease becomes dominated when the torsion angle is small, whereas the increase becomes more and more dominated when the torsion angle becomes larger, which are responsible for the reported variation of thermal conductivities.

  8. Durable Corrosion Resistance of Copper Due to Multi-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Tiwari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin graphene coating has been reported to provide considerable resistance against corrosion during short-term exposures, however, there is great variability in the corrosion resistance due to graphene coating in different studies. It may be possible to overcome the problem of hampered corrosion protection ability of graphene that is caused due to defective single layer graphene by applying multilayer graphene. Systematic electrochemical characterization showed that the multilayer graphene coating developed in the study provided significant corrosion resistance in a chloride solution and the corrosion resistance was sustained for long durations (~400 h, which is attributed to the multilayer graphene.

  9. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mehran; Bahrami, Mousa

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  10. Plasmons in spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Mehran, E-mail: mh-bagheri@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahrami, Mousa [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-05-07

    Motivated by innovative progresses in designing multi-layer graphene nanostructured materials in the laboratory, we theoretically investigate the Dirac plasmon modes of a spatially separated double-layer graphene nanoribbon system, made up of a vertically offset armchair and metallic graphene nanoribbon pair. We find striking features of the collective excitations in this novel Coulomb correlated system, where both nanoribbons are supposed to be either intrinsic (undoped/ungated) or extrinsic (doped/gated). In the former, it is shown the low-energy acoustical and the high-energy optical plasmon modes are tunable only by the inter-ribbon charge separation. In the later, the aforementioned plasmon branches are modified by the added doping factor. As a result, our model could be useful to examine the existence of a linear Landau-undamped low-energy acoustical plasmon mode tuned via the inter-ribbon charge separation as well as doping. This study might also be utilized for devising novel quantum optical waveguides based on the Coulomb coupled graphene nanoribbons.

  11. Graphene intermediate layer in tandem organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Shi Wun; Wang, Yu.; Zheng, Yi; Loh, Kian Ping [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ng, Man-Fai [Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-12-06

    One strategy to harvest wide spectral solar energy is to stack different bandgap materials together in a tandem solar cell. Here, it is demonstrated that CVD grown graphene film can be employed as intermediate layer (IML) in tandem solar cells. Using MoO{sub 3}-modified graphene IML, a high open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 1 V and a high short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 11.6 mA cm{sup -2} could be obtained in series and parallel connection, respectively, in contrast to a V{sub oc} of 0.58 V and J{sub sc} of 7.6 mA cm{sup -2} in single PV cell. The value of V{sub oc} (J{sub sc}) in the tandem cell is very close to the sum of V{sub oc} (J{sub sc}) attained from two single subcells in series (parallel), which confirms good ohmic contact at the photoactive layer/MoO{sub 3}-modified graphene interface. Work function engineering of the graphene IML with metal oxide is essential to ensure good charge collection from both subcells. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Structure and field emission of graphene layers on top of silicon nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Chan, Hui-Wen [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Jou, Shyankay, E-mail: sjou@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Guan-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsiu-An; Song, Wan-Jhen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared graphene on top of silicon nanowires by transfer-print technique. • Graphene changed from discrete flakes to a continuous by repeated transfer-print. • The triple-layer graphene had high electron field emission due to large edge ratio. - Abstract: Monolayer graphene was grown on copper foils and then transferred on planar silicon substrates and on top of silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays to form single- to quadruple-layer graphene films. The morphology, structure, and electron field emission (FE) of these graphene films were investigated. The graphene films on the planar silicon substrates were continuous. The single- to triple-layer graphene films on the SiNW arrays were discontinuous and while the quadruple-layer graphene film featured a mostly continuous area. The Raman spectra of the graphene films on the SiNW arrays showed G and G′ bands with a singular-Lorentzian shape together with a weak D band. The D band intensity decreased as the number of graphene layers increased. The FE efficiency of the graphene films on the planar silicon substrates and the SiNW arrays varied with the number of graphene layers. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on planar silicon substrates were 4.3, 3.7, 3.5 and 3.4 V/μm, respectively. The turn-on field for the single- to quadruple-layer graphene films on SiNW arrays decreased to 3.9, 3.3, 3.0 and 3.3 V/μm, respectively. Correlation of the FE with structure and morphology of the graphene films is discussed.

  13. Fabrication of patterned flexible graphene devices via facile direct transfer of as-grown bi-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Heun; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Yoon, Jangyeol [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kuk Ki; Park, Seung Min [Department of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jeong Sook, E-mail: jeongsha@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Patterned bi-layer graphene was directly transferred onto various polymer substrates by using micro-contact printing technique. • Coating of dimethylformamide onto the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp enhanced the adhesion between the bi-layer graphene and the PDMS stamp. • Patterned graphene devices showed mechanically stable electrical properties upon repeated bending cycles. - Abstract: We report on the fabrication of patterned flexible graphene devices via a facile direct transfer of bi-layer graphene grown on alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrate, and the use of Ag nanowire stickers as flexible electrodes. Patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps coated with vaporized dimethylformamide (DMF) are utilized to transfer as-grown graphene directly onto a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The facile direct transfer is attributed to the enhanced adhesion of the bi-layer graphene to PDMS, due to DMF-coating, as well as the weak adhesion between the bi-layer graphene and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. In this way, flexible patterned graphene devices have been fabricated with Ag nanowire stickers as electrodes. Stable electrical conduction characteristics were measured over repetitive bending with a bending radius down to 5 mm.

  14. Placing single atoms in graphene with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Ondrej; Kim, Songkil; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    We employ the sub-atomically focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to introduce and controllably manipulate individual dopant atoms in a 2D graphene lattice. The electron beam is used to create defects and subsequently sputter adsorbed source materials into the graphene lattice such that individual vacancy defects are controllably passivated by Si substitutional atoms. We further document that Si point defects may be directed through the lattice via e-beam control or modified (as yet, uncontrollably) to form new defects which can incorporate new atoms into the graphene lattice. These studies demonstrate the potential of STEM for atom-by-atom nanofabrication and fundamental studies of chemical reactions in 2D materials on the atomic level.

  15. Fabrication and applications of multi-layer graphene stack on transparent polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska, Aleksandra; Pasternak, Iwona; Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Przewloka, Aleksandra; Ciuk, Tymoteusz; Sobieski, Jan; Grzonka, Justyna; Abramski, Krzysztof M.; Strupinski, Wlodek

    2017-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate the preparation method of a multi-layer stack with a pre-defined number of graphene layers, which was obtained using chemical vapor deposition graphene deposited on a copper substrate and subsequently transferred onto a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. The prepared multi-layer stack can also be transferred onto an arbitrary substrate and in the end, the polymer can be removed, which in consequence significantly increases the range of possible graphene applications. The multi-layer character was confirmed by optical transmittance measurements and Raman spectroscopy, whereas the microstructure of the multi-layer graphene stack was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The electrical properties in the function of the number of graphene layers were assessed with standard Hall Effect measurements. Finally, we showed the practical application of the multi-layer graphene stack as a saturable absorber of a mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser.

  16. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  17. Anisotropy of Conductivity in Bilayer Graphene with Relatively Shifted Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Litovchenko, V. G.; Kurchak, A. I.; Strikha, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    A transformation of the band structure in bilayer graphene (BLG) with relatively shifted layers has been studied in the framework of the tight-binding model. BLG is demonstrated to remain a zero-gap material in the whole range of experimentally attainable shifts, but the positions of contact points between the conduction and valence bands depend substantially on the shift direction. The shift results in a considerable anisotropy of the band spectrum, which is, in turn, responsible for a subst...

  18. Giant amplification of terahertz plasmons in a double-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, M. Yu; Moiseenko, I. M.; Popov, V. V.

    2018-02-01

    The amplification of terahertz plasmons in a pair of parallel active graphene monolayers is studied theoretically. The plasmon wave in a symmetric double-layer graphene structure splits into two branches with a symmetric and an antisymmetric distribution of tangential to graphene component of the electric field across the plane of symmetry of the structure. It is shown that, normalized to the wavelength, the terahertz plasmon amplification factor of the symmetric mode in the double-layer graphene structure could be greater than that in a single graphene layer by four orders of magnitude.

  19. Chemical etching of copper foils for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Naoki; Noda, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    Chemical etching on copper surface is essential as a pre-treatment for single-layer graphene growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Here, we investigated the effect of chemical etching treatment on copper foils for single-layer graphene CVD growth. The chemical etching conditions, such as the type of chemical etchants and the treatment time, were found to strongly influence the graphene domain size. Moreover, a drastic change in the layer structure of graphene sheets, which was attributed to the surface morphology of the etched copper foil, was confirmed by graphene transmittance and Raman mapping measurements.

  20. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  1. Self-organized arrays of graphene and few-layer graphene quantum dots in fluorographene matrix: Charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, Irina V., E-mail: antonova@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Lavrentiev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov st. 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Nebogatikova, Nadezhda A.; Prinz, Victor Ya. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Lavrentiev Avenue 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-12

    Arrays of graphene or few-layer graphene quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a partially fluorinated graphene matrix were created by chemical functionalization of layers. Charge transient spectroscopy employed for investigation of obtained QD systems (size 20–70 nm) has allowed us to examine the QD energy spectra and the time of carrier emission (or charge relaxation) from QDs as a function of film thickness. It was found that the characteristic time of carrier emission from QDs decreased markedly (by about four orders of magnitude) on increasing the QD thickness from one graphene monolayer to 3 nm. Daylight-assisted measurements also demonstrate a strong decrease of the carrier emission time.

  2. Atomic-Scale Topographic and Electronic Structure of Graphene Films on Ultraflat Insulating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Zhao, Liuyan; Ghahari, Fereshte; Dean, Cory; Rim, Kwang; Hone, James; Flynn, George; Kim, Philip; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2011-03-01

    Graphene, a unique two-dimensional material, has attracted much attention for its exotic electronic properties. But owing to its nature as a single monolayer, many of these interesting properties depend heavily on the substrate on which the graphene rests. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments offer the unique ability to investigate the effect of the substrate on the surface roughness (via topography maps) as well as the local electronic properties (via spectroscopy maps) of graphene. In this talk we will present such experimental results of graphene on atomically flat insulating substrates such as mica and boron nitride, as well as suspended graphene sheets. We will describe experiments performed both on exfoliated graphene flakes as well as large-area graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD).

  3. Double graphene-layer structures for adaptive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, V.; Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Among different carbon materials (diamond, graphite, fullerene, carbon nanotubes), graphene and more complex graphene-based structures attracted a considerable attention. The gapless energy spectrum of graphene implies that graphene can absorb and emit photons with rather low energies corresponding to terahertz (THz) and infrared (IR) ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this presentation, the discussion is focused on the double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures. In these structures, GLs are separated by a barrier layer (Boron Nitride, Silicon Carbide, and so on). Applying voltage between GLs, one can realize the situation when one GL is filled with electrons while the other is filled with holes. The variation of the applied voltage leads to the variations of the Fermi energies and, hence, to the change of the interband and intraband absorption of electromagnetic radiation and to the variation of the tunneling current. The plasma oscillations in double-GL structures exhibit interesting features. This is mainly because each GL serves as the gate for the other GL. The spectrum of the plasma oscillations in the double-GL structures falls into the terahertz range (THz) of frequencies and can be effectively controlled by the bias voltage. In this paper, we discuss the effects of the excitation of the plasma oscillations by incoming THz radiation and by optical radiation of two lasers with close frequencies as well as negative differential conductivity of the N-type and Z-type. These effects can be used in resonant THz detectors and THz photomixers. The models of devices based on double-GL structures as well as their characteristics are discussed.

  4. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  5. Anisotropic behavior and inhomogeneity of atomic local densities of states in graphene with vacancy groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Eremenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The electron local density of states (LDOS are calculated for graphene with isolated vacancies, divacancies and vacancy group of four nearest-neighbor vacancies. A strong anisotropy of behavior of LDOS near Fermi level is demonstrated for atoms near defect. Effect of next-to-nearest neighbor interaction on the properties of graphene with vacancies is established.

  6. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimakis, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.dimakis@utrgv.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade [Department of Physics, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX (United States); Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin [Robert Vela High School, Edinburg, TX (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Li, K, Na, and Ca graphene interaction is primarily ionic, whereas small covalent interactions also co-exist in these cases. • Van der Waals interactions are revealed by comparing adatom-graphene geometries between 1.4% and 3% adatom coverages and using Grimme corrections. • The Li, K, Na graphene interactions are accurately described by both PBE0 and PBE functionals. For Ca/graphene, the PBE0 functional should not be used. • For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, adatom-graphene interaction weakens as the adatom coverages increases. • The Ca-graphene interaction strength, which is stronger at high coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca–4s orbital population. - Abstract: The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic

  7. Magnetic properties of a graphene with alternate layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabar, A.; Masrour, R.

    2017-12-01

    The magnetic properties of spins σ = 3/2 and S = 2 Ising model on superlattice with alternate graphene layers have been investigated using the Monte Carlo Simulation. Firstly, we have study analytically the ground-state phase diagrams. The stable phases have been discussed in the present work. Then, we have also investigated the thermal behavior of the magnetizations and the magnetic susceptibilities of such a system for different physical parameters. To complete this work, we have also discussed the hysteresis cycle loops for different number of layers, temperatures and exchanges interactions. This system has a several application in spintronic device applications.

  8. Thermal conduction and rectification in few-layer graphene Y junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Haishuo

    2011-11-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied heat flux in graphene Y junctions with lengths of 16.7 nm. It is found that the heat flux runs preferentially from the branches to the stem, which demonstrates an obvious thermal rectification effect in these asymmetric graphene ribbons. More interesting, compared to single-layer graphene Y junctions, a larger rectification ratio can be achieved in double-layer structures, due to the presence of layer-layer interactions. Combined with the availability of high quality few-layer graphene materials, our results shed light on heat conduction in graphene nanoribbons and may open up few-layer graphene applications in thermal management of nano electronics.

  9. Modeling hydrogen storage in boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokarev, A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms was considered as a novel material for hydrogen storage. Density functional theory calculations were used to model key properties of the material, such as geometry, hydrogen packing...

  10. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  11. h-BN-layer-induced chiral decomposition in the electronic properties of multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, I.; Maślanka, P.; Molenda, A.; Łuczak, K.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the chiral decomposition of non-symmetric stacking structures. It is shown that the low-energy electronic structure of a Bernal stacked graphene multilayer deposited on h-BN consists of chiral pseudospin doublets. N-layer graphene stacks on the h-BN layer have N/2 effective bilayer graphene systems and one effective h-BN layer if N is even or (N-1)/2 effective graphene bilayers plus one graphene monolayer modified by an h-BN layer if N is odd. We present the decomposition procedure and derive the recurrence relations for the effective parameters characterizing the chiral subsystems. In this case, the effective parameters consist of interlayer couplings and on-site potentials in contrast to pure graphene multilayer systems where only interlayer couplings are modified. We apply this procedure to discuss the Klein tunnelling phenomena and quantitatively compare the results with pure graphene multilayer systems.

  12. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  13. Fabrication of bi-layer graphene and theoretical simulation for its possible application in thin film solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Sanjay K; Mahala, Pramila; Nayak, Sasmita; Yang, Qiaoqin; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit; Janil, Omkar

    2014-04-01

    High quality graphene film is fabricated using mechanical exfoliation of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite. The graphene films on glass substrates are characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A very high intensity ratio of 2D to G-band (to approximately 1.67) and narrow 2D-band full-width at half maximum (to approximately 40 cm(-1)) correspond to the bi-layer graphene formation. The bi-layer graphene/p-GaN/n-InGaN/n-GaN/GaN/sAl2O3 system is studied theoretically using TCAD Silvaco software, in which the properties of exfoliated bi-layer graphene are used as transparent and conductive film, and the device exhibits an efficiency of 15.24% compared to 13.63% for ITO/p-GaN/n-InGaN/n-GaN/GaN/Al2O3 system.

  14. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  15. Layered Chalcogenides beyond Graphene: from Electronic Structure Evolution to the Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    Recent efforts on graphene-like atomic layer materials, aiming at novel electronic properties and quantum phenomena beyond graphene, have attracted much attention for potential electronics/spintronics applications. Compared to the weak spin-orbit-interaction (SOI) in graphene, metal chalcogenides MX2 have heavy 4d/5d elements with strong atomic SOI, providing a unique way for generating spin polarization based on valleytronics physics. Indeed, such a spin-polarized band structure has been demonstrated theoretically and supported by optical investigations. However, despite these exciting progresses, following two important issues in MX2 community remain elusive: 1. the quantitative band structure of MX2 compounds (where are the valleys -band maxima/minima- locating in the BZ) have not been experimentally confirmed. Especially for those cleaved ultrathin mono- and bi-layer flakes hosting most of recently-reported exotic phenomena at the 2D limit, the direct detection for band dispersion becomes of great importance for valleytronics. 2. Spin transports have seldom been reported even though such a strong SOI system can serve as an ideal platform for the spin polarization and spin transport. In this work, we started from the basic electronic structures of representative MX2, obtained by ARPES, and investigated both the band variation between these compounds and their band evolution from bulk to the monolayer limit. After having a systematic understanding on band structures, we reported a giant Zeeman-type spin-polarization generated and modulated by an external electric field in WSe2 electric-double-layer transistors. The non-magnetic approach for realizing such an intriguing spin splitting not only keeps the system time-reversally invariant but also suggests a new paradigm for manipulating the spin-degrees of freedom of electrons. Acknowledge the support from DoE, BES, Division of MSE under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  16. Atomic Layer Epitaxial Growth of Gaas on Porous Silicon Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Lajnef; Afrah Bardaoui; Isabelle Sagne; Radwan Chtouroua; Hatem Ezzaouia

    2008-01-01

    GaAs thin film has been grown on porous silicon by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) for different growth temperatures using atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) technique. The morphology of GaAs layer was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of growth temperature is studied using photoluminescence measurements (PL).The photoluminescence spectra revealed a dissymmetry form toward high energies attributed to strain effect resulting from the lattice mismatch between Ga...

  17. Low temperature synthesis and field emission characteristics of single to few layered graphene grown using PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Khan, Sunny; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by PECVD system at a low temperature of 600 °C. • From different characterization techniques, the presence of single and few layered graphene was confirmed. • X-ray diffraction pattern of the graphene showed single crystalline nature of the film. • The as-grown graphene films were observed extremely good field emitters with long term emission current stability. - Abstract: In this work, high-quality graphene has successfully been synthesized on copper (Cu) coated Silicon (Si) substrate at very large-area by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. This method is low cost and highly effective for synthesizing graphene relatively at low temperature of 600 °C. Electron microscopy images have shown that surface morphology of the grown samples is quite uniform consisting of single layered graphene (SLG) to few layered graphene (FLG). Raman spectra reveal that graphene has been grown with high-quality having negligible defects and the observation of G and G' peaks is also an indicative of stokes phonon energy shift caused due to laser excitation. Scanning probe microscopy image also depicts the synthesis of single to few layered graphene. The field emission characteristics of as-grown graphene samples were studied in a planar diode configuration at room temperature. The graphene samples were observed to be a good field emitter having low turn-on field, higher field amplification factor and long term emission current stability.

  18. Density functional theory calculations on alkali and the alkaline Ca atoms adsorbed on graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Valdez, Danielle; Flor, Fernando Antonio; Salgado, Andres; Adjibi, Kolade; Vargas, Sarah; Saenz, Justin

    2017-08-01

    The adsorption of the alkali Li, K, and Na and the alkaline Ca on graphene is studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) under various adatom coverages. The charge transfers between the adatom and the graphene sheet and the almost unchanged densities-of-states spectra in the energy region near and below the Fermi level support an ionic bond pattern between the adatom and the graphene atoms. However, the presence of small orbital overlap between the metal and the nearest graphene atom is indicative of small covalent bonding. Van der Waals interactions are examined through a semiempirical correction in the DFT functional and by comparing adatom-graphene calculations between 3% and 1.4% adatom coverages. Optimized adatom-graphene geometries identify the preferred adatom sites, whereas the adatom-graphene strength is correlated with the adsorption energy and the adatom distance from the graphene plane. Calculated electronic properties and structural parameters are obtained using hybrid functionals and a generalized gradient approximation functional paired with basis sets of various sizes. We found that due to long range electrostatic forces between the alkali/alkaline adatoms and the graphene monolayer, the adatom-graphene structural and electronic properties could be well-described by specific DFT functionals paired with high-quality adatom basis sets. For Li, K, and Na adsorbed on graphene, increased adatom surface coverage weakens the adatom-graphene interaction. However, this statement does not apply for Ca adsorbed on graphene. In this case, the Ca adsorption strength, which is stronger at higher coverages, is opposite to increases in the Ca-4s orbital population.

  19. Facile electrochemical synthesis of few layered graphene from discharged battery electrode and its

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santosh K. Tiwari; Andrzej Huczko; Ramesh Oraon; Amrita De Adhikari; G.C. Nayak

    2017-01-01

    ...) electrodes via electrochemical expansion (ECE) has been reported. In this synthesis, we have electrochemically exfoliated the graphene layers, by intercalating sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS...

  20. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  1. Large energy storage efficiency of the dielectric layer of graphene nanocapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, A.; Belkin, A.; Ilin, E.; Pak, M.; Colla, Eugene V.; Hubler, A.

    2017-12-01

    Electric capacitors are commonly used in electronic circuits for the short-term storage of small amounts of energy. It is desirable however to use capacitors to store much larger energy amounts to replace rechargeable batteries. Unfortunately existing capacitors cannot store sufficient energy to be able to replace common electrochemical energy storage systems. Here we examine the energy storage capabilities of graphene nanocapacitors, which are tri-layer devices involving an Al film, Al2O3 dielectric layer, and a single layer of carbon atoms, i.e., graphene. This is a purely electronic capacitor and therefore it can function in a wide temperature interval. The capacitor shows a high dielectric breakdown electric field strength, of the order of 1000 kV mm‑1 (i.e., 1 GV m‑1), which is much larger than the table value of the Al2O3 dielectric strength. The corresponding energy density is 10–100 times larger than the energy density of a common electrolytic capacitor. Moreover, we discover that the amount of charge stored in the dielectric layer can be equal or can even exceed the amount of charge stored on the capacitor plates. The dielectric discharge current follows a power-law time dependence. We suggest a model to explain this behavior.

  2. Large energy storage efficiency of the dielectric layer of graphene nanocapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, A; Belkin, A; Ilin, E; Pak, M; Colla, Eugene V; Hubler, A

    2017-12-08

    Electric capacitors are commonly used in electronic circuits for the short-term storage of small amounts of energy. It is desirable however to use capacitors to store much larger energy amounts to replace rechargeable batteries. Unfortunately existing capacitors cannot store sufficient energy to be able to replace common electrochemical energy storage systems. Here we examine the energy storage capabilities of graphene nanocapacitors, which are tri-layer devices involving an Al film, Al2O3 dielectric layer, and a single layer of carbon atoms, i.e., graphene. This is a purely electronic capacitor and therefore it can function in a wide temperature interval. The capacitor shows a high dielectric breakdown electric field strength, of the order of 1000 kV mm(-1) (i.e., 1 GV m(-1)), which is much larger than the table value of the Al2O3 dielectric strength. The corresponding energy density is 10-100 times larger than the energy density of a common electrolytic capacitor. Moreover, we discover that the amount of charge stored in the dielectric layer can be equal or can even exceed the amount of charge stored on the capacitor plates. The dielectric discharge current follows a power-law time dependence. We suggest a model to explain this behavior.

  3. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2007-12-01

    Reaction pathways are presented for hydrogen-mediated isomerization of a five and six member carbon ring complex on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction sequence that reverses orientation of the ring complex, or 'flips' it, was identified. Competition between the flip reaction and 'ring separation' was examined. Ring separation is the reverse of the five and six member ring complex formation reaction, previously reported as 'ring collision'. The elementary steps of the pathways were analyzed using density-functional theory (DFT). Rate coefficients were obtained by solution of the energy master equation and classical transition state theory utilizing the DFT energies, frequencies, and geometries. The results indicate that the flip reaction pathway dominates the separation reaction and should be competitive with other pathways important to the graphene zigzag edge growth in high temperature environments.

  4. High stability of few layer graphene nanoplatelets in various solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, X

    2017-04-25

    Dispersion of few-layer graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) in liquid media is a crucial step for various applications. Here, we highlight a simple, nondestructive method for preparing stable aqueous colloidal solutions with GNP powder quickly dispersed in 5 wt.% sodium–hypochlorite- (NaClO) and sodium-bromide- (NaBr) salted solvent by bath sonication. This method makes it possible to easily prepare a highly concentrated colloidal solution (1 mgcenterdotml−1) of GNPs that can easily be re-dispersed in water (treated GNPs). The aqueous suspension we prepared remained stable for longer than a few weeks. We made similar tests with various solvents and dispersibility appeared to decrease with decreasing polarity. High-concentration suspensions using our facile dispersion method could be of particular interest to the large community using graphene for a diversity of applications.

  5. Laterally extended atomically precise graphene nanoribbons with improved electrical conductivity for efficient gas sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Pour, Mohammad; Lashkov, Andrey; Radocea, Adrian; Liu, Ximeng; Sun, Tao; Lipatov, Alexey; Korlacki, Rafal A; Shekhirev, Mikhail; Aluru, Narayana R; Lyding, Joseph W; Sysoev, Victor; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2017-10-10

    Narrow atomically precise graphene nanoribbons hold great promise for electronic and optoelectronic applications, but the previously demonstrated nanoribbon-based devices typically suffer from low currents and mobilities. In this study, we explored the idea of lateral extension of graphene nanoribbons for improving their electrical conductivity. We started with a conventional chevron graphene nanoribbon, and designed its laterally extended variant. We synthesized these new graphene nanoribbons in solution and found that the lateral extension results in decrease of their electronic bandgap and improvement in the electrical conductivity of nanoribbon-based thin films. These films were employed in gas sensors and an electronic nose system, which showed improved responsivities to low molecular weight alcohols compared to similar sensors based on benchmark graphitic materials, such as graphene and reduced graphene oxide, and a reliable analyte recognition. This study shows the methodology for designing new atomically precise graphene nanoribbons with improved properties, their bottom-up synthesis, characterization, processing and implementation in electronic devices.Atomically precise graphene nanoribbons are a promising platform for tailored electron transport, yet they suffer from low conductivity. Here, the authors devise a strategy to laterally extend conventional chevron nanoribbons, thus achieving increased electrical conductivity and improved chemical sensing capabilities.

  6. Detecting single graphene layer by using fluorescence from high-speed Ar^7+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    A highly-charged-ion interacting with graphite causes structural change in nano-scales [1]. While when the ion's kinetic energy reaches few MeVs, the induced is not the structural change but electronic excitation. An experiment [2] showed fluorescence from Ar^7+ ions penetrating through carbon foil with kinetic energy of 2 MeV. Motivated by this experiment, we tested interaction between an Ar^7+ ion and a graphene sheet by the time-dependent density functional approach, and found that the electronic excitation in the Ar^ 7+ ion is also the case even when the incident kinetic energy is 500 KeV and the target thickness is only mono-atomic layer. This simulation suggests the possibility of detecting a suspended mono-atomic layer of graphene [3] by monitoring fluorescence from the penetrated Ar^7+ ions. We will discuss its importance for analyzing bombardment of solids by highly charged, high-speed ions and possible experiments according to the present result. References: [1] T. Meguro, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 79, 3866 (2001). [2] S. Bashkin, H. Oona, E. Veje, Phys, Rev. A25, 417 (1982). [3] J. Mayer et al., Nature (London), 446, 60 (2007).

  7. Nature of the surface states at the single-layer graphene/Cu(111) and graphene/polycrystalline-Cu interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliara, S.; Tognolini, S.; Bignardi, L.; Galimberti, G.; Achilli, S.; Trioni, M. I.; van Dorp, W. F.; Ocelik, V.; Rudolf, P.; Parmigiani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-layer graphene supported on a metal surface has shown remarkable properties relevant for novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the nature of the electronic states derived from unoccupied surface states and quantum well states, lying in the real-space gap between the graphene

  8. Two-dimensional layered semiconductor/graphene heterostructures for solar photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Mariyappan; Jacobs-Gedrim, Robin; Song, Eui Sang; Yu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Schottky barriers formed by graphene (monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer) on 2D layered semiconductor tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets are explored for solar energy harvesting. The characteristics of the graphene-WS2 Schottky junction vary significantly with the number of graphene layers on WS2, resulting in differences in solar cell performance. Compared with monolayer or stacked bilayer graphene, multilayer graphene helps in achieving improved solar cell performance due to superior electrical conductivity. The all-layered-material Schottky barrier solar cell employing WS2 as a photoactive semiconductor exhibits efficient photon absorption in the visible spectral range, yielding 3.3% photoelectric conversion efficiency with multilayer graphene as the Schottky contact. Carrier transport at the graphene/WS2 interface and the interfacial recombination process in the Schottky barrier solar cells are examined.

  9. Layer-dependent supercapacitance of graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-03-01

    High-quality, large-area graphene films with few layers are synthesized on commercial nickel foams under optimal chemical vapor deposition conditions. The number of graphene layers is adjusted by varying the rate of the cooling process. It is found that the capacitive properties of graphene films are related to the number of graphene layers. Owing to the close attachment of graphene films on the nickel substrate and the low charge-transfer resistance, the specific capacitance of thinner graphene films is almost twice that of the thicker ones and remains stable up to 1000 cycles. These results illustrate the potential for developing high-performance graphene-based electrical energy storage devices. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum Dots and Andreev Reflections in Graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.L.

    2010-01-01

    Graphene is an exceptionally thin semiconductor that consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms. The electrons in graphene live in a strictly two-dimensional (2D) world. In addition to this remarkable 2Dness, it is also peculiar that the behavior of the electrons in graphene is governed by

  11. An Atomistic Tomographic Study of Oxygen and Hydrogen Atoms and their Molecules in CVD Grown Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Sung-Il; Ma, Lulu; Kim, Yoon-Jun; Li, Bo; Liu, Mingjie; Isheim, Dieter; Yakobson, Boris I; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Seidman, David N

    2015-11-25

    The properties and growth processes of graphene are greatly influenced by the elemental distributions of impurity atoms and their functional groups within or on the hexagonal carbon lattice. Oxygen and hydrogen atoms and their functional molecules (OH, CO, and CO2 ) positions' and chemical identities are tomographically mapped in three dimensions in a graphene monolayer film grown on a copper substrate, at the atomic part-per-million (atomic ppm) detection level, employing laser assisted atom-probe tomography. The atomistic plan and cross-sectional views of graphene indicate that oxygen, hydrogen, and their co-functionalities, OH, CO, and CO2 , which are locally clustered under or within the graphene lattice. The experimental 3D atomistic portrait of the chemistry is combined with computational density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to enhance the understanding of the surface state of graphene, the positions of the chemical functional groups, their interactions with the underlying Cu substrate, and their influences on the growth of graphene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Strong interaction between graphene layer and Fano resonance in terahertz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Yan, Xicheng; Cheng, Le; Wang, Boyun; Xu, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Graphene has emerged as a promising building block in modern optics and optoelectronics due to its novel optical and electrical properties. In the mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) regime, graphene behaves like metals and supports surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). Moreover, the continuously tunable conductivity of graphene enables active SPRs and gives rise to a range of active applications. However, the interaction between graphene and metal-based resonant metamaterials has not been fully understood. In this work, a simulation investigation on the interaction between the graphene layer and THz resonances supported by the two-gap split ring metamaterials is systematically conducted. The simulation results show that the graphene layer can substantially reduce the Fano resonance and even switch it off, while leaving the dipole resonance nearly unaffected, which is well explained with the high conductivity of graphene. With the manipulation of graphene conductivity via altering its Fermi energy or layer number, the amplitude of the Fano resonance can be modulated. The tunable Fano resonance here together with the underlying physical mechanism can be strategically important in designing active metal-graphene hybrid metamaterials. In addition, the ‘sensitivity’ to the graphene layer of the Fano resonance is also highly appreciated in the field of ultrasensitive sensing, where the novel physical mechanism can be employed in sensing other graphene-like two-dimensional materials or biomolecules with the high conductivity.

  13. Electrochemistry at the edge of a single graphene layer in a nanopore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Sutanuka; Shim, Jeong; Rivera, J.

    2013-01-01

    edge structure which, along with the atomically thin nature of the embedded graphene electrode, demonstrates electrochemical current densities as high as 1.2 × 10 A/cm. The graphene edge embedded structure offers a unique capability to study the electrochemical exchange at an individual graphene edge......, isolated from the basal plane electrochemical activity. We also report ionic current modulation in the nanopore by biasing the embedded graphene terminal with respect to the electrodes in the fluid. The high electrochemical specific current density for a graphene nanopore-based device can have many...

  14. Terahertz wavefront manipulating by double-layer graphene ribbons metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Chen, Zhihong; Su, Fei; Ren, Guangjun; Liu, Fei; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-11-01

    It was recently presented that the phase gradient metasurface can focus the reflection in terahertz range. However, narrow bandwidth and complex tuning method are still challenges. For instance, the size is difficult to be changed once the device is built. We propose a tunable double-layer graphene ribbons array (DLGRA) metasurface which has great potentials for applications in terahertz wavefront control. By changing the Fermi level of each graphene ribbon independently, the DLGRA separated by a bonding agent and a thin dielectric spacer can achieve nearly 2 π phase shift with high reflection efficiency. A reflector which can focus terahertz waves over a broad frequency range is demonstrated numerically by the DLGRA. Intriguingly, through a lateral shift between the nearby graphene ribbons, the variation of coupling induces a shift of focusing frequency. Hence, this approach increases the frequency range to a higher degree than the fixed state. The proposed metasurface provides an effective way for manipulating terahertz waves in a broad frequency range.

  15. Long Spin Diffusion Length in Few-Layer Graphene Flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W.; Phillips, L. C.; Barbone, M.; Hämäläinen, S. J.; Lombardo, A.; Ghidini, M.; Moya, X.; Maccherozzi, F.; van Dijken, S.; Dhesi, S. S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Mathur, N. D.

    2016-09-01

    We report a spin valve with a few-layer graphene flake bridging highly spin-polarized La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes, whose surfaces are kept clean during lithographic definition. Sharp magnetic switching is verified using photoemission electron microscopy with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast. A naturally occurring high interfacial resistance ˜12 M Ω facilitates spin injection, and a large resistive switching (0.8 M Ω at 10 K) implies a 70 - 130 μ m spin diffusion length that exceeds previous values obtained with sharp-switching electrodes.

  16. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are

  17. Synergistic effect of temperature and point defect on the mechanical properties of single layer and bi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debroy, Sanghamitra; Pavan Kumar, V.; Vijaya Sekhar, K.; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh; Acharyya, Amit

    2017-10-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of the effect of a) temperature (300-1073 K at intervals of every 100 K) and b) point defect on the mechanical behaviour of single (armchair and zigzag direction) and bilayer layer graphene (AA and AB stacking). Adaptive intermolecular reactive bond order (AIREBO) potential function was used to describe the many-body short-range interatomic interactions for the single layer graphene sheet. Moreover, Lennard Jones model was considered for bilayer graphene to incorporate the van der Waals interactions among the interlayers of graphene. The effect of temperature on the strain energy of single layer and bilayer graphene was studied in order to understand the difference in mechanical behaviour of the two systems. The strength of the pristine single layer graphene was found to be higher as compared to bilayer AA stacked graphene at all temperatures. It was observed at 1073 K and in the presence of vacancy defect the strength for single layer armchair sheet falls by 30% and for bilayer armchair sheet by 33% as compared to the pristine sheets at 300 K. The AB stacked graphene sheet was found to have a two-step rupture process. The strength of pristine AB sheet was found to decrease by 22% on increase of temperature from 300 K to 1073 K.

  18. Photoluminescence investigation about zinc oxide with graphene oxide & reduced graphene oxide buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jijun; Wang, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhi; Song, Xiaohui; Ran, Chenxin

    2014-02-15

    ZnO with graphene oxide (GO-ZnO) & reduced graphene oxide (rGO-ZnO) buffer layers were fabricated. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of GO-ZnO and rGO-ZnO compositions induced by oxygen vacancies defects were investigated using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results showed that blue emission is quenched while yellow-orange emissions from GO-ZnO and rGO-ZnO compositions are significantly increased as compared to that of ZnO films. In stark contrast to enhanced yellow-orange emissions, PL spectra show three sharp, discrete emissions that characterize the dominant optical active defect, which is the oxygen vacancies and extended oxygen vacancies. Our results highlight the ability of GO & rGO buffer layers to modulate defect concentrations in ZnO and contribute to understanding the optical properties of deep-level defects, which is significant for development of long-wavelength photoelectric devices related with graphene materials. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of Edge Inactive Layer in Micro Patterned Graphene Monolayer (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0374 IMAGING OF EDGE INACTIVE LAYER IN MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) K. Brockdorf, Z.Jia, N...MICRO- PATTERNED GRAPHENE MONOLAYER (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5801-0013 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F...electrically inactive layer (EIL) near the edge of micro-patterned graphene lines was investigated using both scanning microwave microscopy (SMM

  20. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Institute Center for Microsystems–iMicro, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Cimen, Furkan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Alkis, Sabri [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4 V) at low operating voltage (6/−6 V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E ≥ 5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  1. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  2. Controlled Synthesis of Atomically Layered Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN is an attractive material for many applications including electronics as a complement to graphene, anti-oxidation coatings, light emitters, etc. However, the synthesis of high-quality h-BN is still a great challenge. In this work, via controlled chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN films with a controlled thickness down to atomic layers. The quality of as-grown h-BN is confirmed by complementary characterizations including high-resolution transition electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. This work will pave the way for production of large-scale and high-quality h-BN and its applications as well.

  3. Atomically Thin Interfacial Suboxide Key to Hydrogen Storage Performance Enhancements of Magnesium Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Liwen F; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Cho, Eun Seon; Forster, Jason D; Jeong, Sohee; Wang, Hsiao-Tsu; Urban, Jeffrey J; Guo, Jinghua; Prendergast, David

    2017-09-13

    As a model system for hydrogen storage, magnesium hydride exhibits high hydrogen storage density, yet its practical usage is hindered by necessarily high temperatures and slow kinetics for hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycling. Decreasing particle size has been proposed to simultaneously improve the kinetics and decrease the sorption enthalpies. However, the associated increase in surface reactivity due to increased active surface area makes the material more susceptible to surface oxidation or other side reactions, which would hinder the overall hydrogenation-dehydrogenation process and diminish the capacity. Previous work has shown that the chemical stability of Mg nanoparticles can be greatly enhanced by using reduced graphene oxide as a protecting agent. Although no bulklike crystalline MgO layer has been clearly identified in this graphene-encapsulated/Mg nanocomposite, we propose that an atomically thin layer of honeycomb suboxide exists, based on first-principles interpretation of Mg K-edge X-ray absorption spectra. Density functional theory calculations reveal that in contrast to conventional expectations for thick oxides this interfacial oxidation layer permits H2 dissociation to the same degree as pristine Mg metal with the added benefit of enhancing the binding between reduced graphene oxide and the Mg nanoparticle, contributing to improved mechanical and chemical stability of the functioning nanocomposite.

  4. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    ' interaction with graphene, and applied to address the challenge of dispersing bare-surfaced GNPs for efficient liquid-phase catalysis. We also revisited the functionalization of graphene and present a non-invasive surface introduction of interfaceable moieties. Isostructural to graphene, ultrathin BN sheet is another atomic-thick nanomaterial possessing a highly diverse set of properties inconceivable from graphene. Exfoliating UTBNSs has been challenging due to their exceptional intersheet-bonding and chemical-inertness. To develop applications of BN monolayers and evolve research, a facile lab-scale approach was desired that can produce processable dispersions of BN monolayers. We demonstrated a novel chlorosulfonic acid based treatment that resulted in protonation assisted layer-by-layer exfoliation of BN monolayers with highest reported yields till date. Further, the BN monolayers exhibited extensively protonated N centers, which are utilized for chemically interfacing GNPs, demonstrating their ability to act as excellent nano-templates. The scientific details obtained from the research shown here will significantly support current research activities and greatly impact their future applications. Our research findings have been published in ACS Nano, Small, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, MRS Proceedings and have gathered >45 citations.

  5. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  6. High performance CNT point emitter with graphene interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Taewoo; Kim, Seul-Gi; Cho, Myung Rae; Seo, Dong Kyun; Lee, Minwoo; Kim, Seontae; Kim, Dae Weon; Park, Gun-Sik; Jeong, Dae Hong; Park, Yun Daniel; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kang, Tae June; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2014-11-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in the development of high-power electron beam sources. However, for such a high-performance electronic device, the electric and thermal contact problem between the metal and CNTs must be improved. Here, we report graphene as an interfacial layer between the metal and CNTs to improve the interfacial contact. The interfacial graphene layer results in a dramatic decrease of the electrical contact resistance by an order of 2 and an increase of the interfacial thermal conductivity by 16%. Such a high improvement in the electrical and thermal interface leads to superior field emission performance with a very low turn-on field of 1.49 V μm(-1) at 10 μA cm(-2) and a threshold field of 2.00 V μm(-1) at 10 mA cm(-2), as well as the maximum current of 16 mA (current density of 2300 A cm(-2)).

  7. Kapitza Resistance between Few-Layer Graphene and Water: Liquid Layering Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Dmitry; Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore

    2015-01-01

    The Kapitza resistance (RK) between few-layer graphene (FLG) and water was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The RK was found to depend on the number of the layers in the FLG though, surprisingly, not on the water blockthickness. This distinct size dependence is attributed to the large...... difference in the phonon mean free path between the FLG and water. Remarkably, RK is strongly dependent on the layering of water adjacent to the FLG, exhibiting an inverse proportionality relationship to the peak density of the first water layer, which is consistent with better acoustic phonon matching...... between FLG and water. These findings suggest novel ways to engineer the thermal transport properties of solid−liquidinterfaces by controlling and regulating the liquid layering at the interface....

  8. Selective-area heteroepitaxial growth of h-BN micropatterns on graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jiyoung; Oh, Hongseok; Jo, Janghyun; Lee, Hyun Hwi; Kim, Miyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2018-01-01

    We report the selective-area heteroepitaxial growth of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) on graphene layers using catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. For both catalyst-free and selective-area growth, exfoliated graphene layers were irradiated with a focused ion beam to generate nucleation sites on the inert graphene surface. A high-quality, ultrathin h-BN micropattern array was selectively grown only on the patterned region of graphene using borazine, ammonia, and nitrogen without any metal catalyst. The crystal structure and microstructural properties of h-BN grown on graphene were investigated using synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The catalyst-free growth mechanism and heteroepitaxial relationship between h-BN and graphene layers are discussed.

  9. Few-layer graphene shells and nonmagnetic encapsulates: a versatile and nontoxic carbon nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Mendes, Rafael G; Hirsch, Cordula; Jähne, Carsten; Lohe, Martin R; Grothe, Julia; Kaskel, Stefan; Fu, Lei; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Eckert, Jürgen; Wick, Peter; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2013-12-23

    In this work a simple and scalable approach to coat nonmagnetic nanoparticles with few-layer graphene is presented. In addition, the easy processing of such nanoparticles to remove their core, leaving only the 3D graphene nanoshell, is demonstrated. The samples are comprehensively characterized, as are their versatility in terms of functionalization and as a material for electrochemical storage. Indeed, these 3D graphene nanostructures are easily functionalized much as is found with carbon nanotubes and planar graphene. Electrochemical investigations indicate these nanostructures are promising for stable long-life battery applications. Finally, initial toxicological investigations suggest no acute health risk from these 3D graphene nanostructures.

  10. Graphene-based and graphene-like materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L.

    2012-07-01

    The review generalizes information on methods for modification of graphene-based carbon materials through creation of structural defects, introduction of substitutional impurities, adsorption of impurity atoms and mechanical deformations. Graphene ribbons and nano-flakes, graphene allotropes, as well as multi-layer graphenes and graphene-containing hybrid carbon structures are considered. Methods of synthesis and the results of studies on the properties and simulation of graphene derivatives (graphane, graphone and fluorographene) are discussed. The results obtained in studies of related non-carbon graphene-like materials including silicon-, germanium- and tin-based structural analogues of graphene, graphene-like binary phases SiC, GeC, SiGe, SiSn, etc., as well as compounds AIIIBV (white graphene, etc.) and AIIBVI (BeO, ZnO, ZnS) are generalized. Other graphene-like materials including metal dichalcogenides, oxides and carbides are briefly outlined. The bibliography includes 605 references.

  11. Graphene-like two-dimensional layered nanomaterials: applications in biosensors and nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guohai; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Zhu, Junjie; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology provides promising opportunities for various important applications. The recent discovery of atomically-thick two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials can offer manifold perspectives to construct versatile devices with high-performance to satisfy multiple requirements. Many studies directed at graphene have stimulated renewed interest on graphene-like 2D layered nanomaterials (GLNs). GLNs including boron nitride nanosheets, graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2 and WS2) have attracted significant interest in numerous research fields from physics and chemistry to biology and engineering, which has led to numerous interdisciplinary advances in nano science. Benefiting from the unique physical and chemical properties (e.g. strong mechanical strength, high surface area, unparalleled thermal conductivity, remarkable biocompatibility and ease of functionalization), these 2D layered nanomaterials have shown great potential in biochemistry and biomedicine. This review summarizes recent advances of GLNs in applications of biosensors and nanomedicine, including electrochemical biosensors, optical biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and cancer therapy. Current challenges and future perspectives in these rapidly developing areas are also outlined. It is expected that they will have great practical foundation in biomedical applications with future efforts.

  12. Electronic and thermoelectric transport in graphene double layer structures with boron nitride spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiuning; Wu, Tailung; Tian, Jifa; Chen, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been devoted to electrically isolated graphene-graphene double layers in which interaction-driven novel physics such as exciton condensation are predicted. We have used polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based carrier films and a micro-manipulator to transfer mechanically exfoliated flakes onto desired locations with accuracy of ~1 μm. We have fabricated graphene/boron nitride (BN)/graphene stacking structures on BN substrates to study their electronic and thermoelectric transport properties. We observed the low temperature mobility of graphene as high as 75000 cm2/V-s. We have performed Coulomb drag measurements and observed the sign and magnitude dependence of the drag resistivity on the carrier types and densities of both graphene layers, consistent with the previous reports. We also performed thermoelectric transport measurements in such graphene double layer structures, especially in the complementary doped regime (so called excitonic regime) with one layer of electrons and the other layer of holes. Our approach may be useful to probe exciton condensation and other novel physics driven by electron-electron interactions in graphene double layers.

  13. Electrical Double Layer Capacitance in a Graphene-embedded Al2O3 Gate Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki Min, Bok; Kim, Seong K.; Jun Kim, Seong; Ho Kim, Sung; Kang, Min-A.; Park, Chong-Yun; Song, Wooseok; Myung, Sung; Lim, Jongsun; An, Ki-Seok

    2015-11-01

    Graphene heterostructures are of considerable interest as a new class of electronic devices with exceptional performance in a broad range of applications has been realized. Here, we propose a graphene-embedded Al2O3 gate dielectric with a relatively high dielectric constant of 15.5, which is about 2 times that of Al2O3, having a low leakage current with insertion of tri-layer graphene. In this system, the enhanced capacitance of the hybrid structure can be understood by the formation of a space charge layer at the graphene/Al2O3 interface. The electrical properties of the interface can be further explained by the electrical double layer (EDL) model dominated by the diffuse layer.

  14. Electronic transport properties of graphene doped by gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J.; Procházka, P.; Bartošík, M.; Nezval, D.; Piastek, J.; Hulva, J.; Švarc, V.; Konečný, M.; Kormoš, L.; Šikola, T.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we present the effect of low dose gallium (Ga) deposition (graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. In situ graphene transport measurements performed with a graphene field-effect transistor structure show that at low Ga coverages a graphene layer tends to be strongly n-doped with an efficiency of 0.64 electrons per one Ga atom, while the further deposition and Ga cluster formation results in removing electrons from graphene (less n-doping). The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory calculations and explained as a consequence of distinct interaction between graphene and Ga atoms in case of individual atoms, layers, or clusters.

  15. Graphene oxide/metal nanocrystal multilaminates as the atomic limit for safe and selective hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seon; Ruminski, Anne M; Aloni, Shaul; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2016-02-23

    Interest in hydrogen fuel is growing for automotive applications; however, safe, dense, solid-state hydrogen storage remains a formidable scientific challenge. Metal hydrides offer ample storage capacity and do not require cryogens or exceedingly high pressures for operation. However, hydrides have largely been abandoned because of oxidative instability and sluggish kinetics. We report a new, environmentally stable hydrogen storage material constructed of Mg nanocrystals encapsulated by atomically thin and gas-selective reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. This material, protected from oxygen and moisture by the rGO layers, exhibits exceptionally dense hydrogen storage (6.5 wt% and 0.105 kg H2 per litre in the total composite). As rGO is atomically thin, this approach minimizes inactive mass in the composite, while also providing a kinetic enhancement to hydrogen sorption performance. These multilaminates of rGO-Mg are able to deliver exceptionally dense hydrogen storage and provide a material platform for harnessing the attributes of sensitive nanomaterials in demanding environments.

  16. Spin superconductors in double-layer ferromagnetic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Sun, Qingfeng; Xie, X. C.

    2015-03-01

    We study double-layer ferromagnetic graphene with asymmetric gate voltage applied on top and bottom layers. By employing general random phase approximation (GRPA), the interaction dressed susceptibility shows that the leading instability is of Stoner type: the Hubbard interaction drives the electron-hole (e-h) pairs condense and leads to the coherence between top and bottom layers. These e-h excitons are charge neutral but spin polarized, and their condensation can be viewed as a spin superconductor. The Goldstone mode associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking is revealed by calculating the dynamical susceptibility. An in-plane magnetic field couples the intra-spin component to the Goldstone mode and induces a zero bias voltage tunneling peak, realizing an analogue of tunneling current in bilayer quantum Hall systems. The inter-layer tunneling current is calculated by following linear response theory, which recovers the results of Fermi's golden rule. As a complementary of susceptibility calculation, mean field approximation, which ignores fluctuations, is also applied. It precisely recovers the critical Coulomb interaction as predicted by GRPA results and comfirms the existence of symmetry breaking ground states as a saddle point solution.

  17. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization and Manipulation of Two-Dimensional Layered Materials beyond Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chen; Wang, Chaolun; Wu, Xing; Zhang, Jian; Chu, Junhao

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultra-thin materials beyond graphene with rich physical properties and unique layered structures are promising for applications in electronics, chemistry, energy, and bioscience, etc. The interaction mechanisms among the structures, chemical compositions and physical properties of 2D layered materials are critical for fundamental nanosciences and the practical fabrication of next-generation nanodevices. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with its high spatial resolution and versatile external fields, is undoubtedly a powerful tool for the static characterization and dynamic manipulation of nanomaterials and nanodevices at the atomic scale. The rapid development of thin-film and precision microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques allows 2D layered materials and nanodevices to be probed and engineered inside TEM under external stimuli such as thermal, electrical, mechanical, liquid/gas environmental, optical, and magnetic fields at the nanoscale. Such advanced technologies leverage the traditional static TEM characterization into an in situ and interactive manipulation of 2D layered materials without sacrificing the resolution or the high vacuum chamber environment, facilitating exploration of the intrinsic structure-property relationship of 2D layered materials. In this Review, the dynamic properties tailored and observed by the most advanced and unprecedented in situ TEM technology are introduced. The challenges in spatial, time and energy resolution are discussed also. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Spin and valley resolved Landau level crossing in tri-layer ABA stacked graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Biswajit; Gupta, Vishakha; Borah, Abhinandan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Deshmukh, Mandar

    We present quantum Hall measurements on a high quality encapsulated tri-layer graphene device. Low temperature field effect mobility of this device is around 500,000 cm2/Vs and we see SdH oscillations at a magnetic field as low as 0.3 T. Quantum Hall measurements confirm that the chosen tri layer graphene is Bernal (ABA) stacked. Due to the presence of both mass-less monolayer like Dirac fermions and massive bi-layer like Dirac fermions in Bernal stacked tri-layer graphene, there are Landau level crossings between monolayer and bi-layer bands in quantum Hall regime. Although most of the Landau Level crossings are predominantly present on the electron sides, we also observe signatures of the crossings on the hole side. This behaviour is consistent with the asymmetry of electron and hole in ABA tri-layer graphene. We observe a series of crossings of the spin and valley resolved Landau Levels.

  19. Layer-by-layer assembly of functionalized reduced graphene oxide for direct electrochemistry and glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Daniela Branco Tavares; Miyazaki, Celina Massumi; da Cruz, Nilson Cristino; de Moraes, Marli Leite; Riul, Antonio; Ferreira, Marystela

    2016-11-01

    We report an electrochemical glucose biosensor made with layer-by-layer (LbL) films of functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and glucose oxidase (GOx). The LbL assembly using positively and negatively charged rGO multilayers represents a simple approach to develop enzymatic biosensors. The electron transport properties of graphene were combined with the specificity provided by the enzyme. rGO was obtained and functionalized using chemical methods, being positively charged with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) to form GPDDA, and negatively charged with poly(styrene sulfonate) to form GPSS. Stable aqueous dispersions of GPDDA and GPSS are easily obtained, enabling the growth of LbL films on various solid supports. The use of graphene in the immobilization of GOx promoted Direct Electron Transfer, which was evaluated by Cyclic Voltammetry. Amperometric measurements indicated a detection limit of 13.4μmol·L(-1) and sensitivity of 2.47μA·cm(-2)·mmol(-1)·L for glucose with the (GPDDA/GPSS)1/(GPDDA/GOx)2 architecture, whose thickness was 19.80±0.28nm, as determined by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The sensor may be useful for clinical analysis since glucose could be detected even in the presence of typical interfering agents and in real samples of a lactose-free milk and an electrolyte solution to prevent dehydration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure stability and magnetism in graphene impurity complexes with embedded V and Nb atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Jyoti [Department of Physics, University College, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Kashyap, Manish K., E-mail: manishdft@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Taya, Ankur; Rani, Priti [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119, Haryana (India); Saini, Hardev S. [Department of Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001, Haryana (India); Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • V/Nb embedding in graphene containing monovacancies/divacancies is presented. • Spin polarization near/equal to 100% ensures use of studied nanosystems in spin filter devices. • Bandstructures are analyzed to identify shifting of Dirac cone of graphene. - Abstract: The appearance of vacancy defects could produce appropriate magnetic moment in graphene and the sensitivity to absorb atoms/molecules also increases with this. In this direction, a DFT study of embedding V and Nb atom in graphene containing monovacancies (MV) and divacancies (DV) is reported. Complete/almost complete spin polarization is detected for V/Nb embedding. The origin of magnetism has been identified via interaction of 3d-states of embedded atom with C-p states present in the vicinity of embedded site. The band structures have been analyzed to counter the observed semiconducting nature of graphene in minority spin on embedding V/Nb atom. The isosurface analysis also confirms the induced magnetism of present nanosystems. The present results reveal that these nanosystems have the potential for futuristic applications like spintronics and energy resources.

  1. Spatial atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide thin films have been deposited at high growth rates (up to ~1 nm/s) by spatial atomic layer deposition technique at atmospheric pressure. Water has been used as oxidant for diethylzinc (DEZ) at deposition temperatures between 75 and 250 °C. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and

  2. Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition of transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and indium doped ZnO films have been grown by Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition at atmospheric pressure. The electrical properties of ZnO films are controlled by varying the indium content in the range from 0 to 15 %. A minimum resistivity value of 3 mΩ•cm is measured in 180 nm thick films for

  3. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...

  4. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    Mar 6, 2014 ... Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. ANU PHILIP, SUBIN THOMAS and K RAJEEV KUMAR*. Department of Instrumentation, Cochin University of Science and Technology,. Cochin 682 022, India.

  5. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 3. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. Anu Philip Subin Thomas K Rajeev Kumar. Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 563-569 ...

  6. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of alxzn1-xo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Wu, Y.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of growing multicomponent oxides by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition has been investigated. To this end, Al xZn1-xO films have been deposited using diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and water as Zn, Al, and O precursors, respectively. When the metal precursors

  7. Atomic layer deposition for nanostructured Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, H. C. M.; Donders, M. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Notten, P. H. L.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring is targeted as a solution to achieve the improvements required for implementing Li-ion batteries in a wide range of applications. These applications range in size from electrical vehicles down to microsystems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) could be an enabling technology for

  8. Method and system for continuous atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.

    2017-03-21

    A system and method for continuous atomic layer deposition. The system and method includes a housing, a moving bed which passes through the housing, a plurality of precursor gases and associated input ports and the amount of precursor gases, position of the input ports, and relative velocity of the moving bed and carrier gases enabling exhaustion of the precursor gases at available reaction sites.

  9. Unconventional layer-by-layer assembly of graphene multilayer films for enzyme-based glucose and maltose biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Xing, Yibo; Gao, Jian; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2010-09-21

    We have developed an unconventional method for the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of graphene multilayer films. Unconventional LbL assembly was achieved by the following two-step process. Graphene sheets were modified by pyrene-grafted poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in aqueous solution, and then the modified graphene sheets were used for layer-by-layer alternating deposition with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI). The graphene-multilayer-film-modified electrode shows enhanced electron transfer for the redox reactions of Fe(CN)(6)(3-) and excellent electrocatalytic activity of H(2)O(2). On the basis of this property, a bienzyme biosensing system for the detection of maltose was fabricated by successive LbL assembly of graphene, glucose oxidase (GOx), and glucoamylase (GA). LbL assembly of graphene combines the excellent electrochemical properties of graphene and the versatility of LbL assembly, showing great promise in highly efficient sensors and advanced biosensing systems.

  10. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  11. Strain engineering of Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10(-10) m(2)K/W at a thickness about 16 nm. Uniaxial cross-plane strain is found to increase the Kapitza resistance in FLG monotonically, when the applied strain varies from compressive to tensile. Moreover, uniaxial strain couples the in-plane and out-of-plane strain/stress when the surface of FLG is buckled. We find that with a compressive cross-plane stress of 2 GPa, the Kapitza resistance is reduced by about 50%. On the other hand it is almost tripled with a tensile cross-plane stress of 1 GPa. Remarkably, compressive in-plane strain can either increase or reduce the Kapitza resistance, depending on the specific way it is applied. Our study suggests that graphene can be exploited for both heat dissipation and insulation through strain engineering.

  12. Robust adhesion of flower-like few-layer graphene nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shibing; Li, Lin; Sun, Wangning; Xia, Xiaoxiang; Han, Dong; Li, Junjie; Gu, Changzhi

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured surface possessing ultrahigh adhesion like ``gecko foot'' or ``rose petal'' can offer more opportunities for bionic application. We grow flower-like few-layer graphene on silicon nanocone arrays to form graphene nanoclusters, showing robust adhesion. Their contact angle (CA) is 164° with a hysteresis CA of 155° and adhesive force for a 5 μL water droplet is about 254 μN that is far larger than present reported results. We bring experimental evidences that this great adhesion depends on large-area plentiful edges of graphene nanosheets tuned by conical nanostructure and intrinsic wetting features of graphene. Such new hierarchical few-layer graphene nanostructure provides a feasible strategy to understand the ultra-adhesive mechanism of the ``gecko effect'' or ``rose effect'' and enhance the wettability of graphene for many practical applications.

  13. Inter-Layer Coupling Effects on Vertical Electron Transport in Multilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, F.; Mori, N.

    2017-10-01

    We have performed nonequilibrium Green function simulations on the vertical transport characteristics in multilayer graphene nanoribbons sandwiched between two graphene contact layers with varying the inter-layer coupling strength β. We find that the integrated transmission function thorough the top (or bottom) layer is hardly affected by β when the incident energy is close to the Dirac point. The β-insensitive energy window becomes narrower as the channel length increases.

  14. Carrier mobility and scattering lifetime in electric double-layer gated few-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatti, E.; Galasso, S.; Tortello, M.; Nair, J.R.; Gerbaldi, C. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruna, M.; Borini, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), 10135 Torino (Italy); Daghero, D. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Gonnelli, R.S., E-mail: renato.gonnelli@polito.it [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We fabricated few-layer graphene FETs by mechanical exfoliation and standard microfabrication techniques. • We employed a Li-TFSI based ion gel to induce carrier densities as high as ≈6e14 e{sup −}/cm{sup 2} in the devices' channel. • We found a strong asymmetry in the sheet conductance and mobility doping dependences between electron and hole doping. • We combined the experimental results with ab initio DFT calculations to obtain the average scattering lifetime of the charge carriers. • We found that the increase in the carrier density and an unexpected increase in the density of charged scattering centers compete in determining the scattering lifetime. - Abstract: We fabricate electric double-layer field-effect transistor (EDL-FET) devices on mechanically exfoliated few-layer graphene. We exploit the large capacitance of a polymeric electrolyte to study the transport properties of three, four and five-layer samples under a large induced surface charge density both above and below the glass transition temperature of the polymer. We find that the carrier mobility shows a strong asymmetry between the hole and electron doping regime. We then employ ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations to determine the average scattering lifetime from the experimental data. We explain its peculiar dependence on the carrier density in terms of the specific properties of the electrolyte we used in our experiments.

  15. Prominent Electron Penetration through Ultrathin Graphene Layer from FeNi Alloy for Efficient Reduction of CO2 to CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Qingyuan; Wang, Xin; Gu, Feng; Du, Xianlong; Bao, Hongliang; Yin, Guoheng; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Fuqiang

    2017-08-10

    The chemical transformation of CO2 is an efficient approach in low-carbon energy system. The development of nonprecious metal catalysts with sufficient activity, selectivity, and stability for the generation of CO by CO2 reduction under mild conditions remains a major challenge. A hierarchical architecture catalyst composed of ultrathin graphene shells (2-4 layers) encapsulating homogeneous FeNi alloy nanoparticles shows enhance catalytic performance. Electron transfer from the encapsulated alloy can extend from the inner to the outer shell, resulting in an increased charge density on graphene. Nitrogen atom dopants can synergistically increase the electron density on the catalyst surface and modulate the adsorption capability for acidic CO2 molecules. The optimized FeNi3 @NG (NG=N-doped graphene) catalyst, with significant electron penetration through the graphene layer, effects exceptional CO2 conversion of 20.2 % with a CO selectivity of nearly 100 %, as well as excellent thermal stability at 523 K. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Preservation of the Pt(100) surface reconstruction after growth of a continuous layer of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Bjerre, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that a layer of graphene can be grown on the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface and that the reconstruction is preserved after growth. A continuous sheet of graphene can be grown across domain boundaries and step edges without loss of periodicity or change...... to accommodation of edge dislocations. The defect formation energy and the induced buckling of the graphene have been characterized by DFT calculations....

  17. Support effects on adsorption and catalytic activation of O2in single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng-Yang; Yang, Wei-Jie; Ding, Xun-Lei; Lv, Gang; Yan, Wei-Ping

    2018-02-27

    The adsorption and catalytic activation of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates were investigated systematically by density functional theory calculation. It is found that the support effects of graphene-based substrates have a significant influence on the stability of the single atom catalysts, the adsorption configuration, the electron transfer mechanism, the adsorption energy and the energy barrier. The differences in the stable adsorption configuration of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with different graphene-based substrates can be well understood by the symmetrical matching principle based on frontier molecular orbital analysis. There are two different mechanisms of electron transfer, in which the Fe atom acts as the electron donor in single vacancy graphene-based substrates while the Fe atom mainly acts as the bridge for electron transfer in double vacancy graphene-based substrates. The Fermi softness and work function are good descriptors of the adsorption energy and they can well reveal the relationship between electronic structure and adsorption energy. This single atom iron catalyst with single vacancy graphene modified by three nitrogen atoms is a promising non-noble metal single atom catalyst in the adsorption and catalytic oxidation of O 2 . Furthermore, the findings can lay the foundation for the further study of graphene-based support effects and provide a guideline for the development and design of new non-noble-metal single atom catalysts.

  18. Layer-selective synthesis of bilayer graphene via chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Choi, Kyoungjun; Robertson, John; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-09-01

    A controlled synthesis of high-quality AB-stacked bilayer graphene by chemical vapor deposition demands a detailed understanding of the mechanism and kinetics. By decoupling the growth of the two layers via a growth-and-regrowth scheme, we report the kinetics and termination mechanisms of the bilayer graphene growth on copper. We observe, for the first time, that the secondary layer growth follows Gompertzian kinetics. Our observations affirm the postulate of a time-variant transition from a mass-transport-limited to a reaction-limited regimes and identify the mechanistic disparity between the monolayer growth and the secondary-layer expansion underneath the monolayer cover. It is the continuous carbon supply that drives the expansion of the graphene secondary layer, rather than the initially captured carbon amount, suggesting an essential role of the surface diffusion of reactant adsorbates in the interspace between the top graphene layer and the underneath copper surface. We anticipate that the layer selectivity of the growth relies on the entrance energetics of the adsorbed reactants to the graphene-copper interspace across the primary-layer edge, which could be engineered by tailoring the edge termination state. The temperature-reliant saturation area of the secondary-layer expansion is understood as a result of competitive attachment of carbon and hydrogen adatoms to the secondary-layer graphene edge.

  19. Self-damping cementitious composites with multi-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yanfeng; Zhou, Daocheng; Sun, Shengwei; Wu, Xinyi; Yu, Xun; Hou, Jilin; Dong, Xufeng; Han, Baoguo

    2017-07-01

    Cementitious composites are quasi-brittle and susceptible to damage under dynamic loads. The addition of nanoscale fillers into cementitious composites is an effective approach to address this issue. In this paper, multi-layer graphenes (MLGs) are incorporated into cementitious composites to enhance its damping property. The underlying modification mechanism of MLGs to cementitous composites is also investigated. Experimental results showed that the addition of MLGs can effectively modify the damping property of cementitious composites. Compared with cementitious composites without MLGs, the damping ratio of cementitious composites filled with 1% and 5% of MLGs increases by 16.22% and 45.73%, respectively. The improvement of MLGs to damping property of cementitious composites can be attributed to the interlayer slip of MLGs, viscous friction between MLGs and matrix, and excellent thermal conductivity of MLGs. Moreover, the damping ratio measured by time-domain exponential decay method and frequency-domain half-power bandwidth method is consistent.

  20. Reduced graphene oxide as a protection layer for Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Haneul; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kang, Heon; Bae, Donghyun; Chang, Hyejung; Choi, Hyunjoo

    2017-06-01

    This study proposes a facile solution process to generate a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) protection layer on Al, in which polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used to enhance interfacial bonding between Al and rGO. A multi-level analysis indicated that PVA-aided coating induced numerous conjugations between Al and rGO by producing a large number of hydroxyl groups on the Al surface. The Al plate directly coated by rGO showed good corrosion resistance compared with the pristine Al, implying that rGO may act as an effective corrosion barrier for Al. Moreover, the Al coated by the PVA-aided process exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the directly coated Al as well as the pristine Al due to the enhanced adhesion between Al and rGO.

  1. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  2. Nickel hydroxide nanoparticles-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets film: layer-by-layer electrochemical preparation, characterization and rifampicin sensory application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgar, Shokoufeh; Shahrokhian, Saeed

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical deposition, as a well-controlled synthesis procedure, has been used for subsequently layer-by-layer preparation of nickel hydroxide nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (Ni(OH)2-RGO) on a graphene oxide (GO) film pre-cast on a glassy carbon electrode surface. The surface morphology and nature of the nano-hybrid film (Ni(OH)2-RGO) was thoroughly characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. The modified electrode appeared as an effective electro-catalytic model for analysis of rifampicin (RIF) by using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The prepared modified electrode exhibited a distinctly higher activity for electro-oxidation of RIF than either GO, RGO nanosheets or Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles. Enhancement of peak currents is ascribed to the fast heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics that arise from the synergistic coupling between the excellent properties of RGO nanosheets (such as high density of edge plane sites, subtle electronic characteristics and attractive π-π interaction) and unique properties of metal nanoparticles. Under the optimized analysis conditions, the modified electrode showed two oxidation processes for rifampicin at potentials about 0.08 V (peak I) and 0.69 V (peak II) in buffer solution of pH 7.0 with a wide linear dynamic range of 0.006-10.0 µmol L(-1) and 0.04-10 µmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 4.16 nmol L(-1) and 2.34 nmol L(-1) considering peaks I and II as an analytical signal, respectively. The results proved the efficacy of the fabricated modified electrode for simple, low cost and highly sensitive medicine sensor well suited for the accurate determinations of trace amounts of rifampicin in the pharmaceutical and clinical preparations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Monir; Zakaria, Azmi; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdul Wahab, Zaidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  4. Environmental Synthesis of Few Layers Graphene Sheets Using Ultrasonic Exfoliation with Enhanced Electrical and Thermal Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report how few layers graphene that can be produced in large quantity with low defect ratio from exfoliation of graphite by using a high intensity probe sonication in water containing liquid hand soap and PVP. It was founded that the graphene powder obtained by this simple exfoliation method after the heat treatment had an excellent exfoliation into a single or layered graphene sheets. The UV-visible spectroscopy, FESEM, TEM, X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy was used to analyse the graphene product. The thermal diffusivity of the samples was analysed using a highly accurate thermal-wave cavity photothermal technique. The data obtained showed excellent enhancement in the thermal diffusivity of the graphene dispersion. This well-dispersed graphene was then used to fabricate an electrically conductive polymer-graphene film composite. The results demonstrated that this low cost and environmental friendly technique allowed to the production of high quality layered graphene sheets, improved the thermal and electrical properties. This may find use in the wide range of applications based on graphene.

  5. Registry Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Few-Layer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2014-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the registry effect on the thermal conductivity of few-layer graphene. The interlayer interaction is described by either the Lennard-Jones potential or the registry-dependent potential. Our calculations show that the thermal conductivity in few-layer graphene from both potentials are close to each other, i.e the registry effect is essentially not important. It is because the thermal transport in few-layer graphene is mainly limited by the int...

  6. Thinning and functionalization of few-layer graphene sheets by CF4 plasma treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2012-05-24

    Structural changes of few-layer graphene sheets induced by CF4 plasma treatment are studied by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, together with theoretical simulation. Experimental results suggest a thickness reduction of few-layer graphene sheets subjected to prolonged CF4 plasma treatment while plasma treatment with short time only leads to fluorine functionalization on the surface layer by formation of covalent bonds. Raman spectra reveal an increase in disorder by physical disruption of the graphene lattice as well as functionalization during the plasma treatment. The F/CF3 adsorption and the lattice distortion produced are proved by theoretical simulation using density functional theory, which also predicts p-type doping and Dirac cone splitting in CF4 plasma-treated graphene sheets that may have potential in future graphene-based micro/nanodevices.

  7. Low frequency Raman spectroscopy of few-atomic-layer thick hBN crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, I.; Schué, L.; Boukhicha, M.; Berini, B.; Plaçais, B.; Loiseau, A.; Barjon, J.

    2017-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has recently gained a strong interest as a strategic component in engineering van der Waals heterostructures built with 2D crystals such as graphene. This work reports micro-Raman measurements on hBN flakes made of a few atomic layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation. The temperature dependence of the Raman scattering in hBN is investigated first such as to define appropriate measurements conditions suitable for thin layers avoiding undesirable heating induced effects. We further focus on the low frequency Raman mode corresponding to the rigid shearing oscillation between adjacent layers, found to be equal to 52.5 cm-1 in bulk hBN. For hBN sheets with thicknesses below typically 4 nm, the frequency of this mode presents discrete values, which are found to decrease down to 46.0(5) cm-1 for a three-layer hBN, in good agreement with the linear-chain model. This makes Raman spectroscopy a relevant tool to quantitatively determine in a non destructive way the number of layers in ultra thin hBN sheets, below 8 L, prior to their integration in van der Waals heterostructures.

  8. Thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene by a modified T-bridge method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, W.; Bao, W.; Jing, L.; Lau, C. N.; Dames, C.

    2013-09-01

    We measured the in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer graphene flakes by a modified T-bridge technique from 300 K to below 100 K. The thermal conductivities at room temperature are 389, 344, 302, and 596 W/m K for 2-, 3-, 4-, and 8-layer graphene, respectively. The thinner (2-, 3-, 4-layer) graphene samples did not show any clear thickness dependence, while the thicker (8-layer) sample clearly has higher thermal conductivity. In situ current annealing was used to remove polymer residues from the central portion of the 3- and 8-layer graphene samples, as confirmed by electrical transport measurements and post-experiment characterization by Raman and scanning electron microscopy, although some residues still remained near both ends (heater and heat sink). Comparing the 2, 3, and 4-layer samples suggests the annealing had little effect near room temperature but leads to increased thermal conductivity at low temperature. These results also show that the thermal conductivities of suspended few-layer graphene are higher than those of encased few-layer graphene of similar thickness measured previously [Jang et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3909 (2010)].

  9. Anomalous diffusion of single metal atoms on a graphene oxide support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnival, Tom; Leary, Rowan K.; Tyo, Eric C.; Vajda, Stefan; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Thomas, John Meurig; Bristowe, Paul D.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies of single-atom catalysts open up the prospect of designing exceptionally active and environmentally efficient chemical processes. The stability and durability of such catalysts is governed by the strength with which the atoms are bound to their support and their diffusive behaviour. Here we use aberration-corrected STEM to image the diffusion of single copper adatoms on graphene oxide. We discover that individual atoms exhibit anomalous diffusion as a result of spatial and energetic disorder inherent in the support, and interpret the origins of this behaviour to develop a physical picture for the surface diffusion of single metal atoms.

  10. Nanotribological properties of water films adsorbing atop, and absorbing below, graphene layers supported by metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Curtis, C. K.; Stine, R.; Sheehan, P.; Krim, J.

    The tribological properties of graphite, a common lubricant with known sensitivity to the presence of water, have been studied extensively at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. Although far less attention has been devoted to the tribological properties of graphene, it has been established that the tribological response to the presence of water is dissimilar from that of graphite. We report here a quartz crystal microbalance study of the nanotribological properties of water films adsorbed/absorbed on graphene layers prepared by either chemical decomposition on nickel(111) substrates or transfer of freestanding graphene layers to aluminum substrates. Sliding friction levels of the water films were also measured for metal surfaces in the absence of a graphene layer. We observe very high friction levels for water adsorbed atop graphene on Ni(111) and very low levels for water on aluminum. For the case of graphene/aluminum, the data indicate that the water is absorbing between the graphene layer and the aluminum. Dissipation levels moreover indicate the presence of an interstitial water increases sliding friction between the graphene and the aluminum substrate Work supported by NSF and NRL.

  11. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic

  12. Synthesis of few layer graphene by non-transferred arc plasma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong-Jun; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Dong-Wha

    2013-11-01

    Graphene has recently been the focus of a great deal of attention owing to its outstanding properties, which include high mobility, high thermal conductivity and high structural stability. In this study, a few layer graphene was successfully synthesized from methane gas using a non-transferred direct current arc plasma system. Non-transferred thermal plasma offers high temperature, steep temperature gradient and high enthalpy to enhance the reaction kinetics of graphene synthesis. In order to prepare high quality few layer graphene, graphene products synthesized under several conditions was analyzed comparatively. Effects of gap distance between the plasma torch and graphite substrate, the flow rate of additional reactant gas, and different types of plasma forming gas on the synthesis of few layer graphene were investigated. Methane gas was injected into the plasma jet as a carbon source for the synthesis of graphene and a thermal plasma jet was generated by pure argon or a mixture of argon-hydrogen. The results revealed that hydrogen gas improved the quality of few layer graphene by inducing surface etching and increasing plasma power.

  13. Systematic study on the sensitivity enhancement in graphene plasmonic sensors based on layer-by-layer self-assembled graphene oxide multilayers and their reduced analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyungwha; Rani, Adila; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yonghwi; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Sang Ouk; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-01-14

    The use of graphene in conventional plasmonic devices was suggested by several theoretic research studies. However, the existing theoretic studies are not consistent with one another and the experimental studies are still at the initial stage. To reveal the role of graphenes on the plasmonic sensors, we deposited graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films on Au films and their refractive index (RI) sensitivity was compared for the first time in SPR-based sensors. The deposition of GO bilayers with number of deposition L from 1 to 5 was carried out by alternative dipping of Au substrate in positively- and negatively charged GO solutions. The fabrication of layer-by-layer self-assembly of the graphene films was monitored in terms of the SPR angle shift. GO-deposited Au film was treated with hydrazine to reduce the GO. For the rGO-Au sample, 1 bilayer sample showed a higher RI sensitivity than bare Au film, whereas increasing the rGO film from 2 to 5 layers reduced the RI sensitivity. In the case of GO-deposited Au film, the 3 bilayer sample showed the highest sensitivity. The biomolecular sensing was also performed for the graphene multilayer systems using BSA and anti-BSA antibody.

  14. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  15. Relativistic Dynamics of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenoff, Gordon

    2011-10-01

    Graphene is a one-atom thick layer of carbon atoms where electrons obey an emergent Dirac equation. Only seven years after it first became available in the laboratory, graphene has captured the attention of a wide spectrum of scientists: from particle physicists interested in using graphene's emergent relativistic dynamics to study quantum field theory phenomena to condensed matter physicists fascinated by its unusual electronic propertied and technologists searching for materials for the nest generation of electronic devices. This presentation will review the basics of graphene and some questions, such as the possibility of chiral symmetry breaking, which have overlap with similar ones in strong interaction particle physics.

  16. Quantum transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostinga, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    After the experimental discovery of graphene -a single atomic layer of graphite- a scientific rush started to explore graphene’s electronic behaviour. Graphene is a fascinating two-dimensional electronic system, because its electrons behave as relativistic particles. Moreover, it is a promising

  17. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Hybrid platforms of graphane-graphene 2D structures: prototypes for atomically precise nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F de B; Rivelino, R; Medeiros, P V C; Mascarenhas, A J S; de Castilho, C M C

    2014-11-21

    First-principles calculations demonstrate that line/ribbon defects, resulting from a controlled dehydrogenation in graphane, lead to the formation of low-dimensional electron-rich tracks in a monolayer. The present simulations point out that hybrid graphane-graphene nanostructures exhibit important elements, greatly required for the fabrication of efficient electronic circuits at the atomic level.

  19. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, E. [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Lichtenstein, M.P.; Suñol, C. [Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques de Barcelona (IIBB-CSIC), Institut d' Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), c/Rosselló 161, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Casañ-Pastor, N., E-mail: nieves@icmab.es [Institut Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx–graphene hybrid (IrOx–eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx–graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx–eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1–2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10 nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx–eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes. - Highlights: • Pristine Graphene is incorporated in coatings as nanostructured IrOx–eG hybrid. • IrOx-nanoparticles drive the electrodeposition of graphene. • Hybrid CSC is one order of magnitude the charge capacity of IrOx. • Per carbon atom, the CSC increase is 35 times larger than for graphene oxide. • Neurons are fully functional on the coating.

  20. Graphene Growth on Pre-patterned Copper Film with Nickel as a Buffer Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Deng, Wu-Zhu; Wang, Dong-Zhao; Chen, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Wen-Li

    2015-11-01

    Selective graphene growth has been simultaneously achieved on oxidized silicon substrate with three kinds of pre-patterned rectangular metal films, i.e., Cu/Ni double layer, and Ni and Cu single layer film, by atmospheric chemical vapor deposition at 1020°C. The top graphene maintains the micron-scale patterning of the metal film underneath. It was found that single layer graphene growth is more favorable on the Cu/Ni double layer film than on either single layer. The morphology and structure study of the pre-patterned metal substrates before and after graphene growth indicated that Ni functions as a buffer layer to significantly weaken the lattice mismatch between the copper and silicon substrate, resulting in a smoother and larger grain-sized Cu surface. It is also suggested that Ni diffuses to the Cu surface and participates in the graphene growth during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Defect-free single layer graphene growth can be obtained when the ratio of Cu/Ni is appropriate with respect to their thickness and the feature size of rectangular patterning.

  1. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, E; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx-graphene hybrid (IrOx-eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx-graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx-eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1-2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx-eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Charge transferred doping of single layer graphene by mono-dispersed manganese-oxide nanoparticles adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh Luan; Kang, Myunggoo; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, You Joong; Jung, Hyun; Yoon, Im Taek; Yang, Woochul

    2017-10-01

    We report an efficient and controllable method to introduce p-type doping in graphene by decoration with Mn3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) on mechanically exfoliated single layer graphene. A monolayer of Mn3O4 NPs, with a diameter in the range of 5-10 nm, was decorated on a graphene film using an ex-situ method, whereas by controlling the coverage of the NPs on the graphene surface, the carrier concentration could be continually adjusted. The p-type of the NP-decorated single layer graphene was confirmed by the Raman G-band. It was found that the carrier concentration could be gradually adjusted up to 26.09 × 1012 cm-2, with 90% coverage of Mn3O4 NPs. The Dirac point of the pristine graphene at the gate bias of 27 V shifted to 150 V for Mn3O4 NP decorated graphene. The p-type graphene doped with Mn3O4 NPs demonstrated significant high air-stability, even under an oxygen atmosphere for 60 days. This approach allows for the opportunity for simple, scalable, and highly stable doping of graphene for future high-performance electronic device applications.

  3. Triggering the atomic layers control of hexagonal boron nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yangxi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, Changrui, E-mail: crzhang12@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Li, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibers and Composites, College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Jiang, Da; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Haomin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmxie@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Thickness of h-BN films can be controlled from double atomic layers to over ten atomic layers by adjusting the CVD parameters, quite different from the reported thickness control of up to tens of nanometers. (The interlayer distance of h-BN is 0.333 nm.) • Growth mechanisms of h-BN are discussed, especially for bilayer h-BN films. • Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful synthesis of large scale hexagonal boron nitride films with controllable atomic layers. The films are grown on thin nickel foils via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition with borazine as the precursor. The atomic layers of h-BN films can be controlled in a narrow range by adjusting growth time and the cooling rates. Transmission electron microscope results shows the h-BN films exhibit high uniformity and good crystalline. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the B/N elemental ratio is about 1.01. The h-BN films exhibit a pronounced deep ultraviolet absorption at 203.0 nm with a large optical band gap of 6.02 ± 0.03 eV. The results suggest potential applications of h-BN films in deep ultraviolet and dielectric materials. Growth mechanisms of h-BN films with thickness control are discussed, especially when the synthesized h-BN films after a higher cooling rate show an in-plane rotation angle between bilayers. Both epitaxial growth and diffusion-segregation process are involved in the synthesis of bilayer h-BN films.

  4. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., R knockout ≈ R accumulation ). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  5. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J., E-mail: keren.kanarik@lamresearch.com; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, California 94538 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices.

  6. Graphene Substrate for van der Waals Epitaxy of Layer-Structured Bismuth Antimony Telluride Thermoelectric Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Ohta, Hiromichi; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Sung Wng

    2017-02-01

    Graphene as a substrate for the van der Waals epitaxy of 2D layered materials is utilized for the epitaxial growth of a layer-structured thermoelectric film. Van der Waals epitaxial Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 film on graphene synthesized via a simple and scalable fabrication method exhibits good crystallinity and high thermoelectric transport properties comparable to single crystals. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Excitation spectrum and high energy plasmons in single- and multi-layer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Shengjun; Roldán, Rafael; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the excitation spectrum of single- and multi-layer graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation. The dynamical polarizability of graphene is computed using a full $\\pi$-band tight-binding model, considering the possibility of inter-layer hopping in the calculation. The effect of electron-electron interaction is considered within the random phase approximation. We further discuss the effect of disorder in the spectrum, which leads to a smearing of the absorption peaks. O...

  8. Coal Char Derived Few-Layer Graphene Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Few-layer graphene films were synthesized through chemical vapor deposition technique using coal char as solid carbon source. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction were used to characterize the graphene films. The electrochemical performance of the coal char derived few layer graphene anodes for lithium ion batteries was investigated by charge/discharge curves  and  discharge  capacity  at  different  current  densities.  The  graphene  anode maintained the reversible capacity at ~0.025, 0.013, and 0.007 mAh/cm2  at a current density of 10, 30, and 50 µA/cm2, respectively. The coal char derived graphene anodes show potential applications in thin film batteries for nanoelectronics.

  9. Comparison of graphene oxide with reduced graphene oxide as hole extraction layer in organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Soon; Park, Yensil; Kim, Soo Young

    2013-05-01

    A comparison was performed between the use of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as a hole extraction layer (HEL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with poly(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Hydrazine hydrate (HYD) and the thermal method (Thermal) were adopted to change the GO to rGO. The GO HEL was deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode by spin coating, followed by the reduction process to form the rGO HELs. The success of the reduction processes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmittance, and 2-point probe method. The OPV cell with the GO (-3 nm) HEL exhibits an increased power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 2.5% under 100 mW/cm2 illumination under air mass conditions, which is higher than that of the OPV cell without HEL, viz. 1.78%. However, the PCE of the OPV cell with rGO HEL is not high as the values of 1.8% for the HYD-rGO and 1.9% for the Thermal-rGO. The ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy results showed that the work function of GO was 4.7 eV, but those of HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO were 4.2 eV and 4.5 eV, respectively. Therefore, it is considered that GO is adequate to extract the holes from the active layer, but HYD-rGO and Thermal-rGO are not appropriate to use as HELs in OPV cells from the viewpoint of the energy alignment.

  10. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  11. Role of humidity in reducing the friction of graphene layers on textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-yang; Yang, Wen-jing; Wu, Yan-ping; Wu, Song-bo; Cai, Zhen-bing

    2017-05-01

    A multiple-layer graphene was prepared on steel surface to reduce friction and wear. A graphene-containing ethanol solution was dripped on the steel surface, and several layers of graphene flakes were deposited on the surface after ethanol evaporated. Tribological performance of graphene-contained surface (GCS) was induced by reciprocating ball against plate contact in different RH (0% (dry nitrogen), 30%, 60%, and 90%). Morphology and wear scar were analyzed by OM, 2D profile, SEM, Raman spectroscopy, and XPS. Results show that GCS can substantially reduce the wear and coefficient of friction (COF) in 60% relative humidity (RH). Low COF occurs due to graphene layer providing a small shear stress on the friction interface. Meanwhile, conditions of high RH and textured surface could make the low COF persist for a longer time. High moisture content can stabilize and protect the graphene C-network from damage due to water dissociative chemisorption with carbon dangling bonds, and the textured surface was attributed to release graphene layer stored in the dimple.

  12. N2O + CO reaction over single Ga or Ge atom embedded graphene: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Vessally, Esmail

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of using a single Ga or Ge atom embedded graphene as an efficient catalyst for the reduction of N2O molecule by CO is examined. We perform density functional theory calculations to calculate adsorption energies as well as analysis of the structural and electronic properties of different species involved in the N2O + CO reaction. The large activation energy for the diffusion of the single Ga or Ge atom on the C vacancy site of graphene shows the high stability of both Ga- and Ge-embedded graphene sheets in the N2O reduction. The activation energy needed for the decomposition of N2O is calculated to be 18.4 and 14.1 kcal/mol over Ga- and Ge-embedded graphene, respectively. The results indicate that the Ge-embedded graphene may serve as an effective catalyst for the N2O reduction. Moreover, the activation energy for the disproportionation of N2O molecules that generates N2 and O2 is relatively high; so, the generation of these side products may be hindered by decreasing the temperature.

  13. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  14. Phase imaging and nanoscale energy dissipation of supported graphene using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasić, Borislav; Matković, Aleksandar; Gajić, Radoš

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the phase imaging of supported graphene using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM), the so-called tapping mode. The phase contrast between graphene and the neighboring substrate grows in hard tapping conditions and the contrast is enhanced compared to the topographic one. Therefore, phase measurements could enable the high-contrast imaging of graphene and related two-dimensional materials and heterostructures, which is not achievable with conventional AFM based topographic measurements. Obtained phase maps are then transformed into energy dissipation maps, which are important for graphene applications in various nano-mechanical systems. From a fundamental point of view, energy dissipation gives further insight into mechanical properties. Reliable measurements, obtained in the repulsive regime, show that the energy dissipation on a graphene-covered substrate is lower than that on a bare one, so graphene provides certain shielding in tip–substrate interaction. Based on the obtained phase curves and their derivatives, as well as on correlation measurements based on AFM nanoindentation and force modulation microscopy, we conclude that the main dissipation channels in graphene–substrate systems are short-range hysteresis and long-range interfacial forces.

  15. Ultrahigh-throughput exfoliation of graphite into pristine 'single-layer' graphene using microwaves and molecularly engineered ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Saito, Yusuke; Park, Chiyoung; Fukushima, Takanori; Aida, Takuzo

    2015-09-01

    Graphene has shown much promise as an organic electronic material but, despite recent achievements in the production of few-layer graphene, the quantitative exfoliation of graphite into pristine single-layer graphene has remained one of the main challenges in developing practical devices. Recently, reduced graphene oxide has been recognized as a non-feasible alternative to graphene owing to variable defect types and levels, and attention is turning towards reliable methods for the high-throughput exfoliation of graphite. Here we report that microwave irradiation of graphite suspended in molecularly engineered oligomeric ionic liquids allows for ultrahigh-efficiency exfoliation (93% yield) with a high selectivity (95%) towards 'single-layer' graphene (that is, with thicknesses graphene sheets show negligible structural deterioration. They are also readily redispersible in oligomeric ionic liquids up to ~100 mg ml(-1), and form physical gels in which an anisotropic orientation of graphene sheets, once induced by a magnetic field, is maintained.

  16. Photoluminescence of phosphorus atomic layer doped Ge grown on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Nien, Li-Wei; Capellini, Giovanni; Virgilio, Michele; Costina, Ioan; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Seifert, Winfried; Srinivasan, Ashwyn; Loo, Roger; Scappucci, Giordano; Sabbagh, Diego; Hesse, Anne; Murota, Junichi; Schroeder, Thomas; Tillack, Bernd

    2017-10-01

    Improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) of Phosphorus (P) doped Ge by P atomic layer doping (ALD) is investigated. Fifty P delta layers of 8 × 1013 cm-2 separated by 4 nm Ge spacer are selectively deposited at 300 °C on a 700 nm thick P-doped Ge buffer layer of 1.4 × 1019 cm-3 on SiO2 structured Si (100) substrate. A high P concentration region of 1.6 × 1020 cm-3 with abrupt P delta profiles is formed by the P-ALD process. Compared to the P-doped Ge buffer layer, a reduced PL intensity is observed, which might be caused by a higher density of point defects in the P delta doped Ge layer. The peak position is shifted by ˜0.1 eV towards lower energy, indicating an increased active carrier concentration in the P-delta doped Ge layer. By introducing annealing at 400 °C to 500 °C after each Ge spacer deposition, P desorption and diffusion is observed resulting in relatively uniform P profiles of ˜2 × 1019 cm-3. Increased PL intensity and red shift of the PL peak are observed due to improved crystallinity and higher active P concentration.

  17. Vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene: generic model and epitaxial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, A Mazid; Dheeraj, Dasa L; Fauske, Vidar T; Kim, Dong-Chul; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Fimland, Bjørn-Ove; Weman, Helge

    2012-09-12

    By utilizing the reduced contact area of nanowires, we show that epitaxial growth of a broad range of semiconductors on graphene can in principle be achieved. A generic atomic model is presented which describes the epitaxial growth configurations applicable to all conventional semiconductor materials. The model is experimentally verified by demonstrating the growth of vertically aligned GaAs nanowires on graphite and few-layer graphene by the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid technique using molecular beam epitaxy. A two-temperature growth strategy was used to increase the nanowire density. Due to the self-catalyzed growth technique used, the nanowires were found to have a regular hexagonal cross-sectional shape, and are uniform in length and diameter. Electron microscopy studies reveal an epitaxial relationship of the grown nanowires with the underlying graphitic substrates. Two relative orientations of the nanowire side-facets were observed, which is well explained by the proposed atomic model. A prototype of a single GaAs nanowire photodetector demonstrates a high-quality material. With GaAs being a model system, as well as a very useful material for various optoelectronic applications, we anticipate this particular GaAs nanowire/graphene hybrid to be promising for flexible and low-cost solar cells.

  18. Failure of multi-layer graphene coatings in acidic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Feng; Stoot, Adam Carsten; Bøggild, Peter

    2016-01-01

    evolution, can also occur spontaneously on a range of other technologically important metals and alloys based on iron, zinc, aluminum and manganese; this makes these findings relevant for practical applications of graphene-based coatings.Being impermeable to all gases, graphene has been proposed...... technologically important metals and alloys based on iron, zinc, aluminum and manganese; this makes these findings relevant for practical applications of graphene-based coatings....

  19. Double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111): Atomic arrangement and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalyuk, Alexey N.; Bondarenko, Leonid V.; Tupchaya, Alexandra Y.; Gruznev, Dimitry V.; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Wei, Ching-Ming; Zotov, Andrey V.; Saranin, Alexander A.

    2018-02-01

    Metastable double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111) has recently been found to display interesting electric properties, namely superconductivity below 0.96 K and magnetic-field-induced transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state. In the present work, using a set of experimental techniques, including low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, in a combination with density-functional-theory calculations, we have characterized atomic and electronic properties of the Tl double layer on Si(111). The double Tl layer has been concluded to contain ∼ 2.4 monolayer of Tl. A top Tl layer has a '1 × 1' basic structure and displays 6 × 6 moiré pattern which originates from various residence sites of Tl atoms. Upon cooling below ∼ 140 K, the 6 × 6 moiré pattern changes to that having a 6√{ 3} × 6√{ 3} periodicity. However, the experimentally determined electron band dispersions show a 1 × 1 periodicity. The calculated band structure unfolded into the 1 × 1 surface Brillouin zone reproduces well the main features of the photoelectron spectra.

  20. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Controlling dynamical thermal transport of biased bilayer graphene by impurity atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezania, Hamed, E-mail: rezania.hamed@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yarmohammadi, Mohsen [Young Researchers and Elit Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    We address the dynamical thermal conductivity of biased bilayer graphene doped with acceptor impurity atoms for AA-stacking in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. The effect of scattering by dilute charged impurities is discussed in terms of the self-consistent Born approximation. Green’s function approach has been exploited to find the behavior of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene within the linear response theory. We have found the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity for different values of concentration and scattering strength of dopant impurity. Also the dependence of thermal conductivity on the impurity concentration and bias voltage has been investigated in details.

  2. Morphology and properties of the graphene layer on the copper substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak Katarzyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work presented in the article was to clarify controversial comments about anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of graphene coatings, deposited on copper substrates. It was designed special experimental cycle comprising: preparation of graphene forms and copper, the observation of layers Cu / GO (rGO after the thermal reduction processes and oxidative test in air at 150°C temperature and 350 h in time. The resulting coatings and graphene layers were subjected to tribological test for hardness. The observed differences in the continuity of the coverage copper surface by graphene forms, allowed to understand the macroscopic effect of increased hardness and wear resistance layers rGO/Cu.

  3. Single-layer CVD-grown graphene decorated with metal nanoparticles as a promising biosensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutés, Albert; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2012-03-15

    A new approach to the development of a single-layer graphene sensor decorated with metal nanoparticles is presented. Chemical vapor deposition is used to grow single layer graphene on copper. Decoration of the single-layer graphene is achieved by electroless deposition of Au nanoparticles using the copper substrate as a source of electrons. Transfer of the decorated single-layer graphene on glassy carbon electrodes offers a sensitive platform for biosensor development. As a proof of concept, 10 units of glucose oxidase were deposited on the surface in a Nafion matrix to stabilize the enzyme as well as to prevent interference from ascorbic acid and uric acid. Amperometric linear response calibration in the μmoll(-1) is obtained. The presented methodology enables highly sensitive platforms for biosensor development, providing a scalable roll-to-roll production with a much more reproducible scheme when compared to the graphene biosensors reported previously based on drop-cast of multi-layer graphene suspensions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. PEDOT:PSS/Graphene Nanocomposite Hole-Injection Layer in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsuan Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on effects of doping graphene in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene: poly(styrene sulfonate, PEDOT:PSS, as a PEDOT:PSS/graphene nanocomposite hole injection layer on the performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs. Graphene oxides were first synthesized and then mixed in the PEDOT:PSS solution with specifically various amounts. Graphenes were reduced in the PEDOT:PSS matrix through thermal reduction. PLED devices with hole-injection nanocomposite layer containing particular doping concentration were fabricated, and the influence of doping concentration on device performance was examined by systematically characterizations of various device properties. Through the graphene doping, the resistance in the hole-injection layer and the turn-on voltage could be effectively reduced that benefited the injection and transport of holes and resulted in a higher overall efficiency. The conductivity of the hole-injection layer was monotonically increased with the increase of doping concentration, performance indices from various aspects, however, did not show the same dependence because faster injected holes might alter not only the balance of holes and electrons but also their combination locations in the light-emitting layer. Results show that optimal doping concentration was the case with 0.03 wt% of graphene oxide.

  5. Strain Engineering of Kapitza Resistance in Few-Layer Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-01-01

    /W at a thickness about 16 nm. Uniaxial cross-plane strain is found to increase the Kapitza resistance in FLG monotonically, when the applied strain varies from compressive to tensile. Moreover, uniaxial strain couples the in-plane and out-of-plane strain/stress when the surface of FLG is buckled. We find...... that with a compressive cross-plane stress of 2 GPa, the Kapitza resistance is reduced by about 50%. On the other hand it is almost tripled with a tensile cross-plane stress of 1 GPa. Remarkably, compressive in-plane strain can either increase or reduce the Kapitza resistance, depending on the specific way it is applied......We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10–10 m2K...

  6. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoOx interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoOx/CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  7. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 – 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  8. Mesoporous Few-Layer Graphene Platform for Affinity Biosensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Azahar; Singh, Chandan; Mondal, Kunal; Srivastava, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashutosh; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2016-03-01

    A label-free, highly reproducible, sensitive, and selective biosensor is proposed using antiapolipoprotein B 100 (AAB) functionalized mesoporous few-layer reduced graphene oxide and nickel oxide (rGO-NiO) nanocomposite for detection of low density lipoprotein (LDL) molecules. The formation of mesoporous rGO-NiO composite on indium tin oxide conductive electrode has been accomplished via electrophoretic technique using colloidal suspension of rGO sheets and NiO nanoparticles. This biosensor shows good stability obtained by surface conjugation of antibody AAB molecules with rGO-NiO matrix by EDC-NHS coupling chemistry. The defect-less few layer rGO sheets, NiO nanoparticles (nNiO) and formation of nanocomposite has been confirmed by Raman mapping, electron microscopic studies, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical techniques. The synthesized rGO-NiO composite is mesoporous dominated with a small percentage of micro and macroporous structure as is evident by the results of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller experiment. Further, the bioconjugation of AAB with rGO-NiO has been investigated by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies. The kinetic studies for binding of antigen-antibody (LDL-AAB) and analytical performance of this biosensor have been evaluated by the impedance spectroscopic method. This biosensor exhibits an excellent sensitivity of 510 Ω (mg/dL)(-1) cm(-2) for detection of LDL molecules and is sensitive to 5 mg/dL concentration of LDL in a wide range of 0-130 mg/dL. Thus, this fabricated biosensor is an efficient and highly sensitive platform for the analysis of other antigen-antibody interactions and biomolecules detection.

  9. An important atomic process in the CVD growth of graphene: Sinking and up-floating of carbon atom on copper surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Su Zhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Gu, TianSheng [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Bai, Fan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Yu, Yue; Trevor, Mwenya [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, 102206 (China); Yu, Yangxin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2013-11-01

    By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the early stages of the growth of graphene on copper (1 1 1) surface are investigated. At the very first time of graphene growth, the carbon atom sinks into subsurface. As more carbon atoms are adsorbed nearby the site, the sunken carbon atom will spontaneously form a dimer with one of the newly adsorbed carbon atoms, and the formed dimer will up-float on the top of the surface. We emphasize the role of the co-operative relaxation of the co-adsorbed carbon atoms in facilitating the sinking and up-floating of carbon atoms. In detail: when two carbon atoms are co-adsorbed, their co-operative relaxation will result in different carbon–copper interactions for the co-adsorbed carbon atoms. This difference facilitates the sinking of a single carbon atom into the subsurface. As a third carbon atom is co-adsorbed nearby, it draws the sunken carbon atom on top of the surface, forming a dimer. Co-operative relaxations of the surface involving all adsorbed carbon atoms and their copper neighbors facilitate these sinking and up-floating processes. This investigation is helpful for the deeper understanding of graphene synthesis and the choosing of optimal carbon sources or process.

  10. Atomically thin two-dimensional materials as hole extraction layers in organolead halide perovskite photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Geun; Kwon, Ki Chang; Le, Quyet Van; Hong, Kootak; Jang, Ho Won; Kim, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Atomically thin two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and graphene oxide (GO) are used as hole extraction layers (HEL) in organolead halide perovskites solar cells (PSCs) instead of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HEL. MoS2 and WS2 layers with a polycrystalline structure were synthesized by a chemical deposition method using a uniformly spin-coated (NH4)MoS4 and (NH4)WS4 precursor solution. GO was synthesized by the oxidation of natural graphite powder using Hummers' method. The work functions of MoS2, WS2, and GO are measured to be 5.0, 4.95, and 5.1 eV, respectively. The X-ray diffraction spectrum indicated that the synthesized perovskite material is CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. The PSCs with the p-n junction structure were fabricated based on the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite layer. The power conversion efficiencies of the MoS2, WS2, and GO-based PSCs were 9.53%, 8.02%, and 9.62%, respectively, which are comparable to those obtained from PEDOT:PSS-based devices (9.93%). These results suggest that two-dimensional materials such as MoS2, WS2, and GO can be promising candidates for the formation of HELs in the PSCs.

  11. Analysis of atomic Moiré patterns on graphene/Rh(1 1 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtsch, Anne; Euwens, Tobias; Uder, Bernd; Grandthyll, Samuel; Müller, Frank; Hartmann, Uwe

    2018-02-01

    In scanning tunneling microscopy the lattice mismatch between graphene and Rh(1 1 1) is observed as an additional superstructure. This superstructure is called Moiré pattern. Various symmetry sites occur in a Moiré pattern. These are distinguished by the arrangement of the graphene lattice over the Rh(1 1 1) lattice. The symmetry sites of the Moiré unit cell are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The observed additional corrugation of the graphene sheet within a Moiré cell is the consequence of strain and electronic interactions between graphene and the Rh(1 1 1) substrate. The lattice period of the Moiré pattern depends on the in-plane rotation angle of the graphene layer with respect to the Rh(1 1 1) substrate. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals a dependency of the local density of states on the hybridization of the π orbitals of the graphene with the d band of Rh(1 1 1). This results in a characteristic spectroscopic fingerprints of the individual symmetry sites of the Moiré pattern.

  12. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55 mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  13. Atomically Thin-Layered Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eric; Kim, Ki Seok; Yeom, Geun Young; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2017-02-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are becoming significant because of their interesting semiconducting and photonic properties. In particular, TMDs such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten diselenide (WSe2), titanium disulfide (TiS2), tantalum sulfide (TaS2), and niobium selenide (NbSe2) are increasingly attracting attention for their applications in solar cell devices. In this review, we give a brief introduction to TMDs with a focus on MoS2; and thereafter, emphasize the role of atomically thin MoS2 layers in fabricating solar cell devices, including bulk-heterojunction, organic, and perovskites-based solar cells. Layered MoS2 has been used as the hole-transport layer (HTL), electron-transport layer (ETL), interfacial layer, and protective layer in fabricating heterojunction solar cells. The trilayer graphene/MoS2/n-Si solar cell devices exhibit a power-conversion efficiency of 11.1%. The effects of plasma and chemical doping on the photovoltaic performance of MoS2 solar cells have been analyzed. After doping and electrical gating, a power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.03% has been observed for the MoS2/h-BN/GaAs heterostructure solar cells. The MoS2-containing perovskites-based solar cells show a PCE as high as 13.3%. The PCE of MoS2-based organic solar cells exceeds 8.40%. The stability of MoS2 solar cells measured under ambient conditions and light illumination has been discussed. The MoS2-based materials show a great potential for solar cell devices along with high PCE; however, in this connection, their long-term environmental stability is also of equal importance for commercial applications.

  14. Search for magnetism in transition metal atoms doped tetragonal graphene: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Suman; Majumdar, Arnab; Jana, Debnarayan

    2017-11-01

    The discovery of different two-dimensional (2D) materials both theoretically and experimentally, can change the scenario of the current electronic industry because of their intriguing properties. Among the 2D materials, the first one which was discovered experimentally was graphene. In this work we have studied the electronic and magnetic properties of a new allotrope of disordered graphene, which is not hexagonal, rather possesses tetragonal symmetry known as T-graphene (TG). Density functional theory (DFT) has been thoroughly employed to study the relevant electronic properties. In previous works, it has been reported that pristine TG is non-magnetic. It is also known that, introducing transition metal (TM) atoms is a feasible way to control the electronic and magnetic properties. Here we have reported the relevant properties of four TM atoms i.e. Sc, V, Cr and Mn doped TG. From the defect formation energy study, it has been noticed that all the structures are endothermic in nature. For each case, we have found appreciable amount of magnetic moment. With increasing atomic weight of the dopant atom, the magnitude of the magnetic moment also increases. We have tried to explain this magnetic ordering with the help of spin-polarized partial density of states (PDOS). Controlling spin degrees of freedom is important for building spintronic devices. From that point of view, we hope this study will be useful to build TG based spintronic devices.

  15. Chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl groups on stretched graphene: A coupled QM/QM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katin, Konstantin P.; Prudkovskiy, Vladimir S.; Maslov, Mikhail M.

    2017-09-01

    Using the density functional theory coupled with the nonorthogonal tight-binding model, we analyze the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl groups on the unstrained and stretched graphene sheets. Drawback of finite cluster model of graphene for the chemisorption energy calculation in comparison with the QM/QM approach applied is discussed. It is shown that the chemisorption energy for the hydroxyl group is sufficiently lower than for hydrogen at stretching up to 7.5%. The simultaneous paired chemisorption of hydrogen and hydroxyl groups on the same hexagon has also been examined. Adsorption of two radicals in ortho and para positions is found to be more energetically favorable than those in meta position at any stretching considered. In addition the energy difference between adsorbent pairs in ortho and para positions decreases as the stretching rises. It could be concluded that the graphene stretching leads to the loss of preferred mutual arrangement of two radicals on its surface.

  16. A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from a Highly Oriented Pyrolyzed Graphite Block.

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2009-07-12

    This paper describes an experimental study on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers were prepared by mechanical exfoliation from a highly oriented pyrolyzed graphite block and placed on an insulating substrate, with the resulting field emission behavior investigated using a nanomanipulator operating inside a scanning electron microscope. A pair of tungsten tips controlled by the nanomanipulator enabled electric connection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted current from the graphene layers was 170 nA and the turn-on voltage was 12.1 V.

  17. Charge Versus Energy Transfer in Atomically Thin Graphene-Transition Metal Dichalcogenide van der Waals Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlicher, Guillaume; Lorchat, Etienne; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    Made from stacks of two-dimensional materials, van der Waals heterostructures exhibit unique light-matter interactions and are promising for novel optoelectronic devices. The performance of such devices is governed by near-field coupling through, e.g., interlayer charge and/or energy transfer. New concepts and experimental methodologies are needed to properly describe two-dimensional heterointerfaces. Here, we report an original study of interlayer charge and energy transfer in atomically thin metal-semiconductor [i.e., graphene-transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD, here molybdenum diselenide, MoSe2 )] heterostructures using a combination of microphotoluminescence and Raman scattering spectroscopies. The photoluminescence intensity in graphene /MoSe2 is quenched by more than 2 orders of magnitude and rises linearly with the incident photon flux, demonstrating a drastically shortened (about 1 ps) room-temperature MoSe2 exciton lifetime. Key complementary insights are provided from a comprehensive analysis of the graphene and MoSe2 Raman modes, which reveals net photoinduced electron transfer from MoSe2 to graphene and hole accumulation in MoSe2 . Remarkably, the steady-state Fermi energy of graphene saturates at 290 ±15 meV above the Dirac point. This reproducible behavior is observed both in ambient air and in vacuum and is discussed in terms of intrinsic factors (i.e., band offsets) and environmental effects. In this saturation regime, balanced photoinduced flows of electrons and holes may transfer to graphene, a mechanism that effectively leads to energy transfer. Using a broad range of incident photon fluxes and diverse environmental conditions, we find that the presence of net photoinduced charge transfer has no measurable impact on the near-unity photoluminescence quenching efficiency in graphene /MoSe2 . This absence of correlation strongly suggests that energy transfer to graphene (either in the form of electron exchange or dipole-dipole interaction) is the

  18. Charge Versus Energy Transfer in Atomically Thin Graphene-Transition Metal Dichalcogenide van der Waals Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Froehlicher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Made from stacks of two-dimensional materials, van der Waals heterostructures exhibit unique light-matter interactions and are promising for novel optoelectronic devices. The performance of such devices is governed by near-field coupling through, e.g., interlayer charge and/or energy transfer. New concepts and experimental methodologies are needed to properly describe two-dimensional heterointerfaces. Here, we report an original study of interlayer charge and energy transfer in atomically thin metal-semiconductor [i.e., graphene-transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD, here molybdenum diselenide, MoSe_{2}] heterostructures using a combination of microphotoluminescence and Raman scattering spectroscopies. The photoluminescence intensity in graphene/MoSe_{2} is quenched by more than 2 orders of magnitude and rises linearly with the incident photon flux, demonstrating a drastically shortened (about 1 ps room-temperature MoSe_{2} exciton lifetime. Key complementary insights are provided from a comprehensive analysis of the graphene and MoSe_{2} Raman modes, which reveals net photoinduced electron transfer from MoSe_{2} to graphene and hole accumulation in MoSe_{2}. Remarkably, the steady-state Fermi energy of graphene saturates at 290±15  meV above the Dirac point. This reproducible behavior is observed both in ambient air and in vacuum and is discussed in terms of intrinsic factors (i.e., band offsets and environmental effects. In this saturation regime, balanced photoinduced flows of electrons and holes may transfer to graphene, a mechanism that effectively leads to energy transfer. Using a broad range of incident photon fluxes and diverse environmental conditions, we find that the presence of net photoinduced charge transfer has no measurable impact on the near-unity photoluminescence quenching efficiency in graphene/MoSe_{2}. This absence of correlation strongly suggests that energy transfer to graphene (either in the form of electron

  19. Flexible gigahertz transistors derived from solution-based single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sire, Cédric; Ardiaca, Florence; Lepilliet, Sylvie; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Hersam, Mark C; Dambrine, Gilles; Happy, Henri; Derycke, Vincent

    2012-03-14

    Flexible electronics mostly relies on organic semiconductors but the limited carrier velocity in polymers and molecular films prevents their use at frequencies above a few megahertz. Conversely, the high potential of graphene for high-frequency electronics on rigid substrates was recently demonstrated. We conducted the first study of solution-based graphene transistors at gigahertz frequencies, and we show that solution-based single-layer graphene ideally combines the required properties to achieve high speed flexible electronics on plastic substrates. Our graphene flexible transistors have current gain cutoff frequencies of 2.2 GHz and power gain cutoff frequencies of 550 MHz. Radio frequency measurements directly performed on bent samples show remarkable mechanical stability of these devices and demonstrate the advantages of solution-based graphene field-effect transistors over other types of flexible transistors based on organic materials. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Graphene as a Buffer Layer for Silicon Carbide-on-Insulator Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Budi; Tanikawa, Masahiro; Rahman, Shaharin Fadzli Abd; Yasui, Kanji; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2012-01-01

    We report an innovative technique for growing the silicon carbide-on-insulator (SiCOI) structure by utilizing polycrystalline single layer graphene (SLG) as a buffer layer. The epitaxial growth was carried out using a hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (HM-CVD) technique. Cubic SiC (3C-SiC) thin film in (111) domain was realized at relatively low substrate temperature of 750 °C. 3C-SiC energy bandgap of 2.2 eV was confirmed. The Si-O absorption band observed in the grown film can be caused by the out-diffusion of the oxygen atom from SiO2 substrate or oxygen doping during the cleaning process. Further experimental works by optimizing the cleaning process, growth parameters of the present growth method, or by using other growth methods, as well, are expected to realize a high quality SiCOI structure, thereby opening up the way for a breakthrough in the development of advanced ULSIs with multifunctionalities.

  1. Raman scattering from high-frequency phonons in supported n-graphene layer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Chen, G; Joshi, P; Tadigadapa, S; Eklund, P C

    2006-12-01

    Results of room-temperature Raman scattering studies of ultrathin graphitic films supported on Si (100)/SiO2 substrates are reported. The results are significantly different from those known for graphite. Spectra were collected using 514.5 nm radiation on films containing from n = 1 to 20 graphene layers, as determined by atomic force microscopy. Both the first- and second-order Raman spectra show unique signatures of the number of layers in the film. The nGL film analogue of the Raman G-band in graphite exhibits a Lorentzian line shape whose center frequency shifts linearly relative to graphite as approximately 1/n (for n = 1 omegaG approximately 1587 cm-1). Three weak bands, identified with disorder-induced first-order scattering, are observed at approximately 1350, 1450, and 1500 cm-1. The approximately 1500 cm-1 band is weak but relatively sharp and exhibits an interesting n-dependence. In general, the intensity of these D-bands decreases dramatically with increasing n. Three second-order bands are also observed (approximately 2450, approximately 2700, and 3248 cm-1). They are analogues to those observed in graphite. However, the approximately 2700 cm-1 band exhibits an interesting and dramatic change of shape with n. Interestingly, for n < 5 this second-order band is more intense than the G-band.

  2. Van Der Waals heterogeneous layer-layer carbon nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on graphene and graphane sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Zhao, Rui-Sheng; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zheng, Hong; Nagase, Shigeru; Zhao, Sheng-Dun; Liu, Yan-Zhi; Zhao, Xiang

    2017-04-15

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings, such as π···π stacking, CH···π are very essential for supramolecular carbon nanostructures. Graphite is a typical homogenous carbon matter based on π···π stacking of graphene sheets. Even in systems not involving aromatic groups, the stability of diamondoid dimer and layer-layer graphane dimer originates from C - H···H - C noncovalent interaction. In this article, the structures and properties of novel heterogeneous layer-layer carbon-nanostructures involving π···H-C-C-H···π···H-C-C-H stacking based on [n]-graphane and [n]-graphene and their derivatives are theoretically investigated for n = 16-54 using dispersion corrected density functional theory B3LYP-D3 method. Energy decomposition analysis shows that dispersion interaction is the most important for the stabilization of both double- and multi-layer-layer [n]-graphane@graphene. Binding energy between graphane and graphene sheets shows that there is a distinct additive nature of CH···π interaction. For comparison and simplicity, the concept of H-H bond energy equivalent number of carbon atoms (noted as NHEQ), is used to describe the strength of these noncovalent interactions. The NHEQ of the graphene dimers, graphane dimers, and double-layered graphane@graphene are 103, 143, and 110, indicating that the strength of C-H···π interaction is close to that of π···π and much stronger than that of C-H···H-C in large size systems. Additionally, frontier molecular orbital, electron density difference and visualized noncovalent interaction regions are discussed for deeply understanding the nature of the C-H···π stacking interaction in construction of heterogeneous layer-layer graphane@graphene structures. We hope that the present study would be helpful for creations of new functional supramolecular materials based on graphane and graphene carbon nano-structures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley

  3. Few layers isolated graphene domains grown on copper foils by microwave surface wave plasma CVD using camphor as a precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Aryal, Hare; Adhikari, Sudip; Uchida, Hideo; Wakita, Koichi; Umeno, Masayoshi

    2016-03-01

    Few layers isolated graphene domains were grown by microwave surface wave plasma CVD technique using camphor at low temperature. Graphene nucleation centers were suppressed on pre-annealed copper foils by supplying low dissociation energy. Scanning electron microscopy study of time dependent growth reveals that graphene nucleation centers were preciously suppressed, which indicates the possibility of controlled growth of large area single crystal graphene domains by plasma processing. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the graphene domains are few layered which consist of relatively low defects.

  4. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  5. Adsorption of metal atoms at a buckled graphene grain boundary using model potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit E. Helgee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two model potentials have been evaluated with regard to their ability to model adsorption of single metal atoms on a buckled graphene grain boundary. One of the potentials is a Lennard-Jones potential parametrized for gold and carbon, while the other is a bond-order potential parametrized for the interaction between carbon and platinum. Metals are expected to adsorb more strongly to grain boundaries than to pristine graphene due to their enhanced adsorption at point defects resembling those that constitute the grain boundary. Of the two potentials considered here, only the bond-order potential reproduces this behavior and predicts the energy of the adsorbate to be about 0.8 eV lower at the grain boundary than on pristine graphene. The Lennard-Jones potential predicts no significant difference in energy between adsorbates at the boundary and on pristine graphene. These results indicate that the Lennard-Jones potential is not suitable for studies of metal adsorption on defects in graphene, and that bond-order potentials are preferable.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Aileen, E-mail: aom@incomusa.com; Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W. [Incom, Inc., 294 Southbridge Road, Charlton, Massachusetts 01507 (United States); Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  7. Energy transfer rate in double-layer graphene systems: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, B., E-mail: b_bahrami@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vazifehshenas, T., E-mail: t-vazifeh@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    We theoretically investigate the energy transfer phenomenon in a double-layer graphene (DLG) system. We use the balance equation approach in linear regime and random phase approximation screening function to obtain energy transfer rates at different electron temperatures, densities and interlayer spacings. We find that the rate of energy transfer in the DLG is qualitatively similar to that obtained in the double-layer two-dimensional electron gas but its values are an order of magnitude greater. Also, at large electron temperature differences between two graphene layers, the electron density dependence of energy transfer is significantly different, particularly in case of unequal electron densities.

  8. Cobalt intercalation at the graphene/iridium(111) interface: Influence of rotational domains, wrinkles, and atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaic, S.; Kimouche, A.; Coraux, J.; Rougemaille, N. [CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Santos, B.; Locatelli, A. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S: 14 km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2014-03-10

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we study Co intercalation under graphene grown on Ir(111). Depending on the rotational domain of graphene on which it is deposited, Co is found intercalated at different locations. While intercalated Co is observed preferentially at the substrate step edges below certain rotational domains, it is mostly found close to wrinkles below other domains. These results indicate that curved regions (near substrate atomic steps and wrinkles) of the graphene sheet facilitate Co intercalation and suggest that the strength of the graphene/Ir interaction determines which pathway is energetically more favorable.

  9. Simulation and analysis of plasmonic sensor in NIR with fluoride glass and graphene layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ankit Kumar; Sharma, Anuj K.

    2018-02-01

    A calcium fluoride (CaF2) prism based plasmonic biosensor with graphene layer is proposed in near infrared region (NIR) of operation. The stacking of multilayer graphene is considered with dielectric interlayer sandwiched between two graphene layers. Excellent optical properties of CaF2 glass and enhanced field at the graphene-analyte interface are intended to be exploited for proposed sensor structure in NIR spectral region. Performance parameters in terms of field enhancement at interface and figure of merit (FOM) are analyzed and compared with those of conventional SPR based sensor. It is demonstrated that the same sensor probe can also be used for gas sensing with nearly 3.5-4 times enhancement in FOM, compared with conventional sensor. The results show that CaF2 based SPR sensor provides much better sensitivity than that based on other glasses.

  10. Excitation spectrum and high-energy plasmons in single-layer and multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shengjun; Roldán, Rafael; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we study the excitation spectrum of single-layer and multilayer graphene beyond the Dirac cone approximation. The dynamical polarizability of graphene is computed using a full π-band tight-binding model, considering the possibility of interlayer hopping in the calculation. The effect of electron-electron interaction is considered within the random phase approximation. We further discuss the effect of disorder in the spectrum, which leads to a smearing of the absorption peaks. Our results show a redshift of the π-plasmon dispersion of single-layer graphene with respect to graphite, in agreement with experimental results. The inclusion of interlayer hopping in the kinetic Hamiltonian of multilayer graphene is found to be very important to properly capture the low energy region of the excitation spectrum.

  11. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  12. Electrical conductivity of graphene films with a poly(allylamine hydrochloride) supporting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Byung-Seon; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2009-09-15

    The electrical conductivity of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) films with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) supporting layers is investigated. Graphene-PAH hybrid films were produced in a two-step procedure that consisted of vacuum filtration for GO (or RGO) dispersion to fabricate the graphene thin films on quartz substrates, followed by the deposition of PAH onto the graphene films via solution casting. Highly selective deposition of the PAH layer on the graphene sheets was confirmed through the detection of the fluorescence signals of hybridized Cy3-DNA onto the PAH-coated graphene surfaces. In this case, electrostatic interaction plays an important role in the selective deposition process. Interestingly, it was found that the electrical conductivity of RGO films was significantly enhanced by 120% after PAH treatment, whereas that of the GO films was reduced by 98% of its initial conductivity. This finding was interpreted in terms of the molecular structure and oxygen functionalities of GO and RGO films combined with the ionic conduction characteristics of hydrated PAH on the RGO film.

  13. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Titanium dioxide thin films by atomic layer deposition: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Marin, Giovanni; Karppinen, Maarit

    2017-09-01

    Within its rich phase diagram titanium dioxide is a truly multifunctional material with a property palette that has been shown to span from dielectric to transparent-conducting characteristics, in addition to the well-known catalytic properties. At the same time down-scaling of microelectronic devices has led to an explosive growth in research on atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a wide variety of frontier thin-film materials, among which TiO2 is one of the most popular ones. In this topical review we summarize the advances in research of ALD of titanium dioxide starting from the chemistries of the over 50 different deposition routes developed for TiO2 and the resultant structural characteristics of the films. We then continue with the doped ALD-TiO2 thin films from the perspective of dielectric, transparent-conductor and photocatalytic applications. Moreover, in order to cover the latest trends in the research field, both the variously constructed TiO2 nanostructures enabled by ALD and the Ti-based hybrid inorganic-organic films grown by the emerging ALD/MLD (combined atomic/molecular layer deposition) technique are discussed.

  15. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon nitride using neopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Weeks@intermolecular.com; Nowling, Greg; Fuchigami, Nobi; Bowes, Michael; Littau, Karl [Intermolecular, 3011 North 1st Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Progress in transistor scaling has increased the demands on the material properties of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) thin films used in device fabrication and at the same time placed stringent restrictions on the deposition conditions employed. Recently, low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition has emerged as a viable technique for depositing these films with a thermal budget compatible with semiconductor processing at sub-32 nm technology nodes. For these depositions, it is desirable to use precursors that are free from carbon and halogens that can incorporate into the film. Beyond this, it is necessary to develop processing schemes that minimize the wet etch rate of the film as it will be subjected to wet chemical processing in subsequent fabrication steps. In this work, the authors introduce low temperature deposition of SiN{sub x} using neopentasilane [NPS, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 4}Si] in a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process with a direct N{sub 2} plasma. The growth with NPS is compared to a more common precursor, trisilylamine [TSA, (SiH{sub 3}){sub 3 }N] at identical process conditions. The wet etch rates of the films deposited with NPS are characterized at different plasma conditions and the impact of ion energy is discussed.

  16. Electrical characterization of graphene oxide and organic dielectric layers based on thin film transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karteri, İbrahim, E-mail: ibrahimkarteri@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science And Engineering, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaraş 4610 (Turkey); Karataş, Şükrü [Department of Physics, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaraş 4610 (Turkey); Yakuphanoğlu, Fahrettin [Department of Physics, Fırat University, Elazıg 2310 (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • We report the synthesis of graphene oxide nanosheets and electrical characterization of graphene oxide based thin film transistor. • Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared by using modified Hummers method. • We used insulator layers which are polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl phenol (PVP) for graphene oxide based thin flim transistor. - Abstract: We have studied the electrical characteristics of graphene oxide based thin flim transistor with the polymer insulators such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP). Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared by using modified Hummers method. The structural properties of GO nanosheets were characterized with Ultraviolet Visible (UV–vis), FT-IR spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction (XRD). Graphene oxide based thin flim transistor (GO-TFT) was prepared by a spin-coating and thermal evaporation technique. The electrical characterization of GO-TFT was analyzed by output and transfer characteristics by using Keithley-4200 semiconductor characterization system (SCS). The graphene oxide based thin flim transistor devices show p-type semiconducting behavior. The mobility, threshold voltage, sub-threshold swing value and I{sub on}/I{sub off} of GO-TFT were found to be 0.105 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, −8.7 V, 4.03 V/decade and 10, respectively.

  17. Large-area few-layered graphene film determination by multispectral imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Huang, Shih-Wei; Yang, Jhe-Ming; Wu, Guan-Huang; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Feng, Shih-Wei; Lee, Min Kai; Kuo, Chie-Tong

    2015-05-01

    A multispectral imaging method for the rapid and accurate identification of few-layered graphene using optical images is proposed. Commonly rapid identification relies on optical interference effects which limits the choice of substrates and light sources. Our method is based on the comparison of spectral characteristics with principle components from a database which is populated by correlation of micro-Raman registration, spectral characteristics, and optical microscopy. Using this approach the thickness and extent of different graphene layers can be distinguished without the contribution of the optical interference effects and allows characterization of graphene on glass substrates. The high achievable resolution, easy implementation and large scale make this approach suitable for the in-line metrology of industrial graphene production.A multispectral imaging method for the rapid and accurate identification of few-layered graphene using optical images is proposed. Commonly rapid identification relies on optical interference effects which limits the choice of substrates and light sources. Our method is based on the comparison of spectral characteristics with principle components from a database which is populated by correlation of micro-Raman registration, spectral characteristics, and optical microscopy. Using this approach the thickness and extent of different graphene layers can be distinguished without the contribution of the optical interference effects and allows characterization of graphene on glass substrates. The high achievable resolution, easy implementation and large scale make this approach suitable for the in-line metrology of industrial graphene production. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: MSIM processes, results at high magnification, and validating with the Fresnel equation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01544h

  18. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S

    2014-06-21

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  19. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S.

    2014-05-01

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  20. Optical reflectivity and Raman scattering in few-layer-thick graphene highly doped by K and Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kim, Bumjung; Crowther, Andrew C; Kim, Namdong; Nuckolls, Colin; Brus, Louis

    2011-07-26

    We report the optical reflectivity and Raman scattering of few layer (L) graphene exposed to K and Rb vapors. Samples many tens of layers thick show the reflectivity and Raman spectra of the stage 1 bulk alkali intercalation compounds (GICs) KC(8) and RbC(8). However, these bulk optical and Raman properties only begin to appear in samples more than about 15 graphene layers thick. The 1 L to 4 L alkali exposed graphene Raman spectra are profoundly different than the Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) spectra of the bulk stage 1 compounds. Samples less than 10 layers thick show Drude-like plasma edge reflectivity dip in the visible; alkali exposed few layer graphenes are significantly more transparent than intrinsic graphene. Simulations show the in-plane free electron density is lower than in the bulk stage 1 GICs. In few layer graphenes, alkalis both intercalate between layers and adsorb on the graphene surfaces. Charge transfer electrically dopes the graphene sheets to densities near and above 10(+14) electrons/cm(2). New intrinsic Raman modes at 1128 and 1264 cm(-1) are activated by in-plane graphene zone folding caused by strongly interacting, locally crystalline alkali adlayers. The K Raman spectra are independent of thickness for L = 1-4, indicating that charge transfer from adsorbed and intercalated K layers are similar. The Raman G mode is downshifted and significantly broadened from intrinsic graphene. In contrast, the Rb spectra vary strongly with L and show increased doping by intercalated alkali as L increases. Rb adlayers appear to be disordered liquids, while intercalated layers are locally crystalline solids. A significant intramolecular G mode electronic resonance Raman enhancement is observed in K exposed graphene, as compared with intrinsic graphene.

  1. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, BongSoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-09-07

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and electron mobility of 0.17 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.

  2. Self-limiting layer-by-layer oxidation of atomically thin WSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mahito; Dutta, Sudipta; Aikawa, Shinya; Nakaharai, Shu; Wakabayashi, Katsunori; Fuhrer, Michael S; Ueno, Keiji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2015-03-11

    Growth of a uniform oxide film with a tunable thickness on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides is of great importance for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we demonstrate homogeneous surface oxidation of atomically thin WSe2 with a self-limiting thickness from single- to trilayers. Exposure to ozone (O3) below 100 °C leads to the lateral growth of tungsten oxide selectively along selenium zigzag-edge orientations on WSe2. With further O3 exposure, the oxide regions coalesce and oxidation terminates leaving a uniform thickness oxide film on top of unoxidized WSe2. At higher temperatures, oxidation evolves in the layer-by-layer regime up to trilayers. The oxide films formed on WSe2 are nearly atomically flat. Using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy, we find that the underlying single-layer WSe2 is decoupled from the top oxide but hole-doped. Our findings offer a new strategy for creating atomically thin heterostructures of semiconductors and insulating oxides with potential for applications in electronic devices.

  3. Facile electrochemical synthesis of few layered graphene from discharged battery electrode and its

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Tiwari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A cost-effective, simple and non-hazardous route for synthesis of few-layered graphene from waste zinc carbon battery (ZCB electrodes via electrochemical expansion (ECE has been reported. In this synthesis, we have electrochemically exfoliated the graphene layers, by intercalating sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS surfactant into graphitic layers at different D.C. voltages with a constant SDBS concentration. The graphene sheets were isolated, purified and characterized by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectrometry, Ultraviolet absorption (UV, Selected area electron diffraction (SAED and Cyclic voltammetry. Best result was obtained at 4.5 V of D.C. A possible mechanism for the intercalation process has been proposed. A promising application of the produced material for supercapacitor application has also been explored in combination with polyaniline.

  4. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Graphene as Charge Storage Layer in Flash Memory Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a flash memory device with chemical-vapor-deposited graphene as a charge trapping layer. It was found that the average RMS roughness of block oxide on graphene storage layer can be significantly reduced from 5.9 nm to 0.5 nm by inserting a seed metal layer, which was verified by AFM measurements. The memory window is 5.6 V for a dual sweep of ±12 V at room temperature. Moreover, a reduced hysteresis at the low temperature was observed, indicative of water molecules or −OH groups between graphene and dielectric playing an important role in memory windows.

  5. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance. PMID:28169306

  6. Graphene-copper composite with micro-layered grains and ultrahigh strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Ziyue; Cui, Ye; Wei, Bing; Xu, Shichong; Sheng, Jie; Wang, Miao; Zhu, Yunpeng; Fei, Weidong

    2017-02-01

    Graphene with ultrahigh intrinsic strength and excellent thermal physical properties has the potential to be used as the reinforcement of many kinds of composites. Here, we show that very high tensile strength can be obtained in the copper matrix composite reinforced by reduced graphene oxide (RGO) when micro-layered structure is achieved. RGO-Cu powder with micro-layered structure is fabricated from the reduction of the micro-layered graphene oxide (GO) and Cu(OH)2 composite sheets, and RGO-Cu composites are sintered by spark plasma sintering process. The tensile strength of the 5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 608 MPa, which is more than three times higher than that of the Cu matrix. The apparent strengthening efficiency of RGO in the 2.5 vol.% RGO-Cu composite is as high as 110, even higher than that of carbon nanotube, multilayer graphene, carbon nano fiber and RGO in the copper matrix composites produced by conventional MLM method. The excellent tensile and compressive strengths, high hardness and good electrical conductivity are obtained simultaneously in the RGO-Cu composites. The results shown in the present study provide an effective method to design graphene based composites with layered structure and high performance.

  7. Flexible bactericidal graphene oxide–chitosan layers for stem cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaheri, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, O., E-mail: oakhavan@sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11155-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Simchi, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 14588-89694, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of flexible graphene oxide–chitosan nanocomposite layers was reported. • The flexibility of the chitosan layers were improved by adding graphene oxide sheets. • The nanocomposite layers with 1.5 wt% graphene oxide content showed yielded flexible and antibacterial surfaces for stem cell proliferation. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO)–chitosan composite layers with stacked layer structures were synthesized using chemically exfoliated GO sheets (with lateral dimensions of ∼1 μm and thickness of ∼1 nm), and applied as antibacterial and flexible nanostructured templates for stem cell proliferation. By increasing the GO content from zero to 6 wt%, the strength and elastic modulus of the layers increased ∼80% and 45%, respectively. Similar to the chitosan layer, the GO–chitosan composite layers showed significant antibacterial activity (>77% inactivation after only 3 h) against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Surface density of the actin cytoskeleton fibers of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on the chitosan and GO(1.5 wt%)–chitosan composite layers was found nearly the same, while it significantly decreased by increasing the GO content to 3 and 6 wt%. Our results indicated that although a high concentration of GO in the chitosan layer (here, 6 wt%) could decelerate the proliferation of the hMSCs on the flexible layer, a low concentration of GO (i.e., 1.5 wt%) not only resulted in biocompatibility but also kept the mechanical flexibility of the self-sterilized layers for high proliferation of hMSCs.

  8. Optical Band Gap and Thermal Diffusivity of Polypyrrole-Nanoparticles Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Suraya Abdul Rashid; A. S. M. Noor; Alireza Kharazmi; H N Lim; Mohd Adzir Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    A polypyrrole-nanoparticles reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite layer was prepared using electrochemical method. The prepared samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The band gap of nanocomposite layers was calculated from UV-visible spectra and the thermal diffusivity of layers was measured using a photoacoustic technique. As experimental results, the optical band gap was in the range...

  9. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana, E-mail: a.zuzuarregui@nanogune.eu; Gregorczyk, Keith E. [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Coto, Borja; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier [IK4-Tekniker, Iñaki Goenaga 5, 20600 Eibar (Spain); Rodríguez, Jorge [Torresol Energy (SENER Group), Avda. de Zugazarte 61, 48930 Las Arenas (Spain); Knez, Mato [CIC Nanogune Consolider, de Tolosa Hiribidea 76, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-10

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  10. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  11. Nanoscale chemical imaging of single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Johannes; Schmid, Thomas; Zenobi, Renato

    2011-10-25

    Electronic properties in different graphene materials are influenced by the presence of defects and their relative position with respect to the edges. Their localization is crucial for the reliable development of graphene-based electronic devices. Graphene samples produced by standard CVD on copper and by the scotch-tape method on gold were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). A resolution of graphene due to their different spectroscopic signatures, and of performing chemical imaging. TERS allows the detection of smaller defects than visible by confocal Raman microscopy and a far more precise localization. Consecutive scans on the same sample area show the reproducibility of the measurements, as well as the ability to zoom in from an overview scan onto specific sample features. TERS images can be acquired in as few as 5 min with 32 × 32 pixels. Compared to confocal Raman microscopy, a high sensitivity for defects, edges, hydrogen-terminated areas or contaminated areas (in general for deviations from the two-dimensional structure of pristine graphene) is obtained due to selective enhancement as a consequence of the orientation in the electromagnetic field.

  12. Ultraviolet photosensor based on few layered reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Nitin T.; Karche, B. R.

    2017-10-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO), a two-dimensional (2D) system, has attracted much interest in photonic applications owing to its ability to absorb light over a broad wavelength. This leads to several studies on RGO-based photosensors. In this paper, chemical oxidation of graphite was carried out at room temperature for the preparation of large area reduced graphene oxide using a modified Hummer's method. The as-prepared reduced graphene oxide was characterized by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FESEM, and TEM to confirm the absence of impurities and to ascertain their morphology. In addition, the as-prepared reduced graphene oxide for its possible application as UV photosensor is reported. The electric and optoelectronic properties of RGO based UV photosensor shows a fast response and recovery time of 1 s and 3 s; high photoresponsitivity (3.74 AW-1) and quantum efficiency (1274%) indicating that the graphene oxide is an important material for high performance photosensor. This work demonstrates the ultrafast photoresponse with high photoresponsivity, proving its potential as a promising material for optoelectronic devices.

  13. The Tribological Properties of Multi-Layered Graphene as Additives of PAO2 Oil in Steel–Steel Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Bao Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layered graphene was prepared by supercritical CO2 exfoliation of graphite. As the additives of polyalphaolefin-2 (PAO2 oil, its tribological properties were investigated using four-ball test method. The friction reduction and anti-wear ability of pure lubricant was improved by the addition of graphene. With a favorable concentration, the graphene was dispersive. The PAO2 oil with 0.05 wt % graphene showed better tribological properties than that for the other concentration of graphene additives. It could be used as a good lubricant additive for its excellent tribological characteristics, and the multi-layered graphene can bear the load of the steel ball and prevent direct contact of the mating metal surfaces. However, a higher concentration would cause the agglomeration of graphene and weaken the improvement of tribological properties.

  14. High-yield synthesis of few-layer graphene flakes through electrochemical expansion of graphite in propylene carbonate electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junzhong; Manga, Kiran Kumar; Bao, Qiaoliang; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-06-15

    High-yield production of few-layer graphene flakes from graphite is important for the scalable synthesis and industrial application of graphene. However, high-yield exfoliation of graphite to form graphene sheets without using any oxidation process or super-strong acid is challenging. Here we demonstrate a solution route inspired by the lithium rechargeable battery for the high-yield (>70%) exfoliation of graphite into highly conductive few-layer graphene flakes (average thickness graphene sheets with the aid of sonication. The dispersible graphene can be ink-brushed to form highly conformal coatings of conductive films (15 ohm/square at a graphene loading of <1 mg/cm(2)) on commercial paper. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Investigating change of properties in gallium ion irradiation patterned single-layer graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quan, E-mail: wangq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Dong, Jinyao; Bai, Bing [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Xie, Guoxin [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-14

    Besides its excellent physical properties, graphene promises to play a significant role in electronics with superior properties, which requires patterning of graphene for device integration. Here, we presented the changes in properties of single-layer graphene before and after patterning using gallium ion beam. Combined with Raman spectra of graphene, the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) image confirmed that a metal–insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. The changes in work function and Raman spectra of graphene indicated that the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. The patterning width of graphene presented an increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate. - Highlights: • The scanning capacitance microscopy image confirmed a metal–insulator transition occurred after large doses of gallium ion irradiation. • The changes indicated the defect density increased as increasing the dose and a structural transition occurred during gallium ion irradiation. • The patterning width of graphene presented a increasing trend due to the scattering influence of the impurities and the substrate.

  16. Towards wafer-size graphene layers by atmospheric pressure graphitization of silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emtsev, Konstantin V; Bostwick, Aaron; Horn, Karsten; Jobst, Johannes; Kellogg, Gary L; Ley, Lothar; McChesney, Jessica L; Ohta, Taisuke; Reshanov, Sergey A; Röhrl, Jonas; Rotenberg, Eli; Schmid, Andreas K; Waldmann, Daniel; Weber, Heiko B; Seyller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Graphene, a single monolayer of graphite, has recently attracted considerable interest owing to its novel magneto-transport properties, high carrier mobility and ballistic transport up to room temperature. It has the potential for technological applications as a successor of silicon in the post Moore's law era, as a single-molecule gas sensor, in spintronics, in quantum computing or as a terahertz oscillator. For such applications, uniform ordered growth of graphene on an insulating substrate is necessary. The growth of graphene on insulating silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces by high-temperature annealing in vacuum was previously proposed to open a route for large-scale production of graphene-based devices. However, vacuum decomposition of SiC yields graphene layers with small grains (30-200 nm; refs 14-16). Here, we show that the ex situ graphitization of Si-terminated SiC(0001) in an argon atmosphere of about 1 bar produces monolayer graphene films with much larger domain sizes than previously attainable. Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurements confirm the improved quality of the films thus obtained. High electronic mobilities were found, which reach mu=2,000 cm (2) V(-1) s(-1) at T=27 K. The new growth process introduced here establishes a method for the synthesis of graphene films on a technologically viable basis.

  17. Superconductivity at 7.4 K in few layer graphene by Li-intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anand P.; Shin, Soohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Jung, Soon-Gil; Park, Tuson; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-11-01

    Superconductivity in graphene has been highly sought after for its promise in various device applications and for general scientific interest. Ironically, the simple electronic structure of graphene, which is responsible for novel quantum phenomena, hinders the emergence of superconductivity. Theory predicts that doping the surface of the graphene effectively alters the electronic structure, thus promoting propensity towards Cooper pair instability (Profeta et al (2012) Nat. Phys. 8 131–4 Nandkishore et al (2012) Nat. Phys. 8 158–63) [1, 2]. Here we report the emergence of superconductivity at 7.4 K in Li-intercalated few-layer-graphene (FLG). The absence of superconductivity in 3D Li-doped graphite underlines that superconductivity in Li-FLG arises from the novel electronic properties of the 2D graphene layer. These results are expected to guide future research on graphene-based superconductivity, both in theory and experiments. In addition, easy control of the Li-doping process holds promise for various device applications.

  18. Microstructures of GaN thin films grown on graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyobin; Chung, Kunook; Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Chan Soon; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Kim, Miyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2012-01-24

    Plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images show the microstructural properties of GaN thin films grown on graphene layers, including dislocation types and density, crystalline orientation and grain boundaries. The roles of ZnO nanowalls and GaN intermediate layers in the heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on graphene, revealed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. 3-D vertically aligned few layer graphene – partially reduced graphene oxide/sulfur electrodes for high performance lithium–sulfur batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, D. P.; Soin, N.; Sharma, S.; Basak, S.; Sachdeva, S.; Roy, S. S.; Zanderbergen, H. W.; McLaughlin, J. A.; Huijben, M.; Wagemaker, M.

    2017-01-01

    3-D vertically aligned few-layered graphene (FLGs) nanoflakes synthesised using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition are melt-impregnated with partially reduced graphene oxide-sulfur (PrGO-S) nanocomposites for use in lithium–sulfur batteries. The aligned structure and the presence

  20. Atomically precise semiconductor--graphene and hBN interfaces by Ge intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskiy, N I; Fedorov, A V; Profeta, G; Stroppa, A; Petaccia, L; Senkovskiy, B; Nefedov, A; Wöll, C; Usachov, D Yu; Vyalikh, D V; Yashina, L V; Eliseev, A A; Pichler, T; Grüneis, A

    2015-12-07

    The full exploration of the potential, which graphene offers to nanoelectronics requires its integration into semiconductor technology. So far the real-world applications are limited by the ability to concomitantly achieve large single-crystalline domains on dielectrics and semiconductors and to tailor the interfaces between them. Here we show a new direct bottom-up method for the fabrication of high-quality atomically precise interfaces between 2D materials, like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and classical semiconductor via Ge intercalation. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and complementary DFT modelling we observed for the first time that epitaxially grown graphene with the Ge monolayer underneath demonstrates Dirac Fermions unaffected by the substrate as well as an unperturbed electronic band structure of hBN. This approach provides the intrinsic relativistic 2D electron gas towards integration in semiconductor technology. Hence, these new interfaces are a promising path for the integration of graphene and hBN into state-of-the-art semiconductor technology.

  1. Atomically precise semiconductor—graphene and hBN interfaces by Ge intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Stroppa, A.; Petaccia, L.; Senkovskiy, B.; Nefedov, A.; Wöll, C.; Usachov, D. Yu.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Yashina, L. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Pichler, T.; Grüneis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The full exploration of the potential, which graphene offers to nanoelectronics requires its integration into semiconductor technology. So far the real-world applications are limited by the ability to concomitantly achieve large single-crystalline domains on dielectrics and semiconductors and to tailor the interfaces between them. Here we show a new direct bottom-up method for the fabrication of high-quality atomically precise interfaces between 2D materials, like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and classical semiconductor via Ge intercalation. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and complementary DFT modelling we observed for the first time that epitaxially grown graphene with the Ge monolayer underneath demonstrates Dirac Fermions unaffected by the substrate as well as an unperturbed electronic band structure of hBN. This approach provides the intrinsic relativistic 2D electron gas towards integration in semiconductor technology. Hence, these new interfaces are a promising path for the integration of graphene and hBN into state-of-the-art semiconductor technology. PMID:26639608

  2. Ferromagnetism and Half-Metallicity in Atomically Thin Holey Nitrogenated Graphene Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2017-09-06

    Metal-free half-metallicity has been the subject of immense research focus in the field of spintronic devices. By using density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, atomically thin holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based systems are studied for possible spintronic applications. Ferromagnetism is observed in all the C-doped holey nitrogenated graphene. Interestingly, the holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based system shows strong half-metallicity with a Curie temperature of approximately 297 K when a particular C-doping concentration is reached. It shows a strong half-metallicity compared with any metal-free systems studied to date. Thus, such carbon nitride based systems can be used for a 100 % spin polarized current. Furthermore, such C-doped systems show excellent dynamical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Thus, we predict a metal-free planar ferromagnetic half-metallic holey nitrogenated graphene based system for room-temperature spintronic devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  4. Tunable spin-orbit interaction in trilayer graphene exemplified in electric-double-layer transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoyu; Yuan, Hongtao; Zhang, Yanfeng; Nomura, Kentaro; Gao, Teng; Gao, Yabo; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Liu, Zhongfan; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-09

    Taking advantage of ultrahigh electric field generated in electric-double-layer transistors (EDLTs), we investigated spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and its modulation in epitaxial trilayer graphene. It was found in magnetotransport that the dephasing length L(φ) and spin relaxation length L(so) of carriers can be effectively modulated with gate bias. As a direct result, SOI-induced weak antilocalization (WAL), together with a crossover from WAL to weak localization (WL), was observed at near-zero magnetic field. Interestingly, among existing localization models, only the Iordanskii-Lyanda-Geller-Pikus theory can successfully reproduce the obtained magnetoconductance well, serving as evidence for gate tuning of the weak but distinct SOI in graphene. Realization of SOI and its large tunability in the trilayer graphene EDLTs provides us with a possibility to electrically manipulate spin precession in graphene systems without ferromagnetics.

  5. Hybrid Doping of Few-Layer Graphene via a Combination of Intercalation and Surface Doping

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed

    2017-05-23

    Surface molecular doping of graphene has been shown to modify its work function and increase its conductivity. However, the associated shifts in work function and increases in carrier concentration are highly coupled and limited by the surface coverage of dopant molecules on graphene. Here we show that few-layer graphene (FLG) can be doped using a hybrid approach, effectively combining surface doping by larger (metal-)organic molecules, while smaller molecules, such as Br2 and FeCl3, intercalate into the bulk. Intercalation tunes the carrier concentration more effectively, whereas surface doping of intercalated FLG can be used to tune its work function without reducing the carrier mobility. This multi-modal doping approach yields a very high carrier density and tunable work function for FLG, demonstrating a new versatile platform for fabricating graphene-based contacts for electronic, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

  6. High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH3 gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007 m(2)  g(-1) ), high electrical conductivity (1532 S m(-1) ), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt %) for electrical double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) , and a capacitance of 261 F g(-1) was retained at 50 A g(-1) , which indicated a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability and preserved 96 % of the initial specific capacitance after 100 000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy results provided evidenced for the recovery of π conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mechanical properties and electronic structure of edge-doped graphene nanoribbons with F, O, and Cl atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, Sebastián; Fernández-Werner, Luciana; Pardo, Helena; Jasen, Paula; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Álvaro W

    2017-08-16

    In this study, we present the structural, electronic, and mechanical properties of edge-doped zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) doped with fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine atoms. To the best of our knowledge, to date, no experimental results concerning the mechanical properties of graphene-derived nanoribbons have been reported in the literature. Simulations indicate that Cl- and F-doped ZGNRs present an equivalent 2-dimensional Young's modulus E 2D , which seems to be higher than those of graphene and H-doped ZGNRs. This is a consequence of the electronic structure of the system, particularly originating from strong interactions between the dopant atoms localized at the edges. The interaction between dopant atoms located at the edges is higher for Cl and lower for F and O atoms. This is the origin of the observed trend, in which E > E > E for all the analyzed ZGNRs.

  8. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  9. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Jun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  10. Hexagonal boron nitride intercalated multi-layer graphene: a possible ultimate solution to ultra-scaled interconnect technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Jun; Sun, Qing-Qing; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Peng-Fei; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2012-03-01

    We proposed intercalation of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in multilayer graphene to improve its performance in ultra-scaled interconnects for integrated circuit. The effect of intercalated hBN layer in bilayer graphene is investigated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. We find the hBN intercalated bilayer graphene exhibit enhanced transport properties compared with pristine bilayer ones, and the improvement is attributed to suppression of interlayer scattering and good planar bonding condition of inbetween hBN layer. Based on these results, we proposed a via structure that not only benefits from suppressed interlayer scattering between multilayer graphene, but also sustains the unique electrical properties of graphene when many graphene layers are stacking together. The ideal current density across the structure can be as high as 4.6×109 A/cm2 at 1V, which is very promising for the future high-performance interconnect.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  12. Atomic mechanism for the growth of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene: theoretical perspective and scanning tunneling microscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianchao; Zhang, Jialin; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most promising approach for producing low-cost, high-quality, and large area graphene. Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for realizing single crystal graphene (SCG) over wafer scale. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations are playing an increasingly important role in revealing the structure of the most stable carbon species, understanding the evolution processes, and disclosing the active sites. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful surface characterization tool to illustrate the real space distribution and atomic structures of growth intermediates during the CVD process. Combining them together can provide valuable information to improve the atomically controlled growth of SCG. Starting from a basic concept of the substrate effect on realizing SCG, this review covers the progress made in theoretical investigations on various carbon species during graphene growth on different transition metal substrates, in the STM study of the structural intermediates on transition metal surfaces, and in synthesizing graphene nanoribbons with atomic-precise width and edge structure, ending with a perspective on the future development of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  13. Graphene-Tapered ZnO Nanorods Array as a Flexible Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseup Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible solar cells have drawn a great deal of attention due to their various advantages including deformable and wearable characteristics. In the solar cells, the antireflection layer plays an important role in the improvement in the conversion efficiency by increasing the light transmission and suppressing the Fresnel refraction. For the successful implantation of the antireflection layer into the flexible solar cells, the flexible mechanical property of the antireflection layer is also necessary. However, the study on flexible antireflection layer for the flexible solar cells or optoelectronics is still lacking. In this study, we report the graphene-tapered ZnO nanorods array as a flexible antireflection layer for the application in flexible solar cells. Flexible two-dimensional graphene sheet and the tapered morphology of ZnO nanorods enable conformal coverage on the flexible substrate with curved surface and significant improvements in antireflection properties, respectively.

  14. Measurements of electrostatic double layer potentials with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Jason

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a thorough description of the development of theory and experiment pertaining to the electrostatic double layer (EDL) in aqueous electrolytic systems. The EDL is an important physical element of many systems and its behavior has been of interest to scientists for many decades. Because many areas of science and engineering move to test, build, and understand systems at smaller and smaller scales, this work focuses on nanoscopic experimental investigations of the EDL. In that vein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be introduced and discussed as a tool for making high spatial resolution measurements of the solid-liquid interface, culminating in a description of the development of a method for completely characterizing the EDL. This thesis first explores, in a semi-historical fashion, the development of the various models and theories that are used to describe the electrostatic double layer. Later, various experimental techniques and ideas are addressed as ways to make measurements of interesting characteristics of the EDL. Finally, a newly developed approach to measuring the EDL system with AFM is introduced. This approach relies on both implementation of existing theoretical models with slight modifications as well as a unique experimental measurement scheme. The model proposed clears up previous ambiguities in definitions of various parameters pertaining to measurements of the EDL and also can be used to fully characterize the system in a way not yet demonstrated.

  15. Engineering Particle Surface Chemistry and Electrochemistry with Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David Hyman Kentaro

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase thin film coating technique that relies on sequential pulsing of precursors that undergo self-limited surface reactions. The self- limiting reactions and gas phase diffusion of the precursors together enable the conformal coating of microstructured particles with a high degree of thickness and compositional control. ALD may be used to deposit thin films that introduce new functionalities to a particle surface. Examples of new functionalities include: chemical reactivity, a mechanically strong protective coating, and an electrically resistive layer. The coatings properties are often dependent on the bulk properties and microstructure of the particle substrate, though they usually do not affect its bulk properties or microstructure. Particle ALD finds utility in the ability to synthesize well controlled, model systems, though it is expensive due to the need for costly metal precursors that are dangerous and require special handling. Enhanced properties due to ALD coating of particles in various applications are frequently described empirically, while the details of their enhancement mechanisms often remain the focus of ongoing research in the field. This study covers the various types of particle ALD and attempts to describe them from the unifying perspective of surface science.

  16. Photocatalytic Nanostructuring of Graphene Guided by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhongli; Li, Tao; Schulte, Lars

    2016-01-01

    graphene nanomesh was fabricated by photocatalysis of single-layer graphene suspended on top of TiO2-covered nanopillars, which were produced by combining block copolymer nanolithography with atomic layer deposition. Graphene nanoribbons were also prepared by the same method applied to a line-forming block...

  17. Observation on the thermal stability of multi-layer graphene with metal nanoparticles with 0D structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Sun Woo; Shin, Jin Ha; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seok Hun; Song, Young Il; Suh, Su Jeong

    2017-10-01

    We studied the effect of rapid thermal treatment on multi-layer graphene with metal particles in an oxygen gas atmosphere. The multi-layer graphene-coated copper nanoparticles (MGCNs) were produced via electrical explosion in an isopropyl alcohol liquid medium. The MGCNs usually consist of multi-layer graphene shells that tightly surround the core copper nanoparticles without obvious voids. A fracture is induced by tearing the multi-layer graphene structure and the oxidized copper metal particles of the MGCNs after thermal treatment in oxygen gas at a low temperatures, including 25, 100, 200, and 300 °C. The MGCNs were characterized via Raman spectroscopy to obtain the graphene peak and its variation according to the oxygen gas temperature. Transmission electron microscopy was conducted to confirm the effect of the oxygen on the multi-layer graphene and copper nanoparticles phase using oxygen gas. The structure of the copper nanoparticles was observed via x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the chemical bonding on the multi-layer graphene surfaces treated with oxygen gas. We can show systematically optical images of changes in multi-layer graphene morphology like the 0D structure and existence of functional groups through various analyses after rapid thermal treatment in oxygen.

  18. Ultrathin ultra-broadband electro-absorption modulator based on few-layer graphene based anisotropic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayem, Ayed Al; Mahdy, M. R. C.; Jahangir, Ifat; Rahman, Md. Saifur

    2017-02-01

    In this article, a few-layered graphene-dielectric multilayer (metamaterial) electro-optic modulator has been proposed in the mid and far infrared range that works on electro-absorption mechanism. Graphene, both mono layer and few layer, is an actively tunable optical material that allows control of inter-band and intra-band transition by tuning its chemical potential. Utilizing this unique feature of graphene, we propose a multilayer graphene dielectric stack where few layer graphene is preferred over mono layer graphene. Although the total thickness of the stack still remains in the nanometer range, this device can exhibit superior performances in terms of (i) high modulation depth, (ii) ultra-broadband performance, (iii) ultra-low insertion loss due to inherent metamaterial properties, (iv)nano-scale footprint, (v) polarization independence and (vi) capability of being integrated to a silicon waveguide. Interestingly, these superior performances, achievable by using few layer graphene with carefully designed metamaterial, may not be possible with mono layer graphene. Our proposals have been validated by both the effective medium theory and general transfer matrix method.

  19. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  20. Highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction using crystalline layered three-dimensional molybdenum disulfides grown on graphene film.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behranginia, Amirhossein; Asadi, Mohammad; Liu, Cong; Yasaei, Poya; Kumar, Bijandra; Phillips, Patrick; Foroozan, Tara; Waranius, Joseph C.; Kim, Kibum; Abiade, Jeremiah; Klie, Robert F.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2016-01-26

    Electrochemistry is central to applications in the field of energy storage and generation. However, it has advanced far more slowly over the last two decades, mainly because of a lack of suitable and affordable catalysts. Here, we report the synthesis of highly crystalline layered three-dimensional (3D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalysts with bare Mo-edge atoms and demonstrate their remarkable performance for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We found that Mo-edge-terminated 3D MoS2 directly grown on graphene film exhibits a remarkable exchange current density (18.2 mu A cm(-2)) and turnover frequency (>4 S-1) for HER. The obtained exchange current density is 15.2 and 2.3 times higher than that of MoS2/graphene and MoS2/Au catalysts, respectively, both with sulfided Mo-edge atoms. An easily scalable and robust growth process on a wide variety of substrates, along with prolonged stability, suggests that this material is a promising catalyst in energy-related applications.

  1. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  2. Layer Control of Tubular Graphene for Corrosion Inhibition of Nickel Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An T; Lai, Wei-Cheng; To, Bao Dong; Nguyen, Duc Dung; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Kan, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2017-07-12

    Corrosion protection of complex surface is an active area of research due to its importance to commercial applications such as electrochemical fabrication. However, conventional coatings exhibit limited conductivity, thermal stability, and durability and are thus not suitable. Recent work has shown the potential of graphene, a two-dimensional carbon allotrope, for corrosion protection. The studies, however, limited themselves to simple planar geometries that provide limited insight in the applicability to relevant morphologies such as mesh electrodes and roughened surfaces. We here study the corrosion protection ability of tubular graphene (TG) on Ni-wires as a model system for such complex geometries. TG-covered Ni wires of approximately 50 μm diameters were produced by the annealing of cellulose acetate (CA) on Ni. The high quality of the TG coating was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electrical measurements. We show that the graphene layer number could be controlled by adjusting the CA membrane quantity. We found a direct relation between the degree of corrosion inhibition with the variation of graphene layer number. The increase of graphene layers on a Ni surface could enhance its corrosion inhibition in acidic, basic, and marine environments, which shows the potential of our approach for future applications.

  3. Technology ready use of single layer graphene as a transparent electrode for hybrid photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibing; Puls, Conor P.; Staley, Neal E.; Zhang, Yu; Todd, Aaron; Xu, Jian; Howsare, Casey A.; Hollander, Matthew J.; Robinson, Joshua A.; Liu, Ying

    2011-11-01

    Graphene has been used recently as a replacement for indium tin oxide (ITO) for the transparent electrode of an organic photovoltaic device. Due to its limited supply, ITO is considered as a limiting factor for the commercialization of organic solar cells. We explored the use of large-area graphene grown on copper by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and then transferred to a glass substrate as an alternative transparent electrode. The transferred film was shown by scanning Raman spectroscopy measurements to consist of >90% single layer graphene. Optical spectroscopy measurements showed that the layer-transferred graphene has an optical absorbance of 1.23% at a wavelength of 532 nm. We fabricated organic hybrid solar cells utilizing this material as an electrode and compared their performance with those of ITO devices fabricated using the same procedure. We demonstrated power conversion efficiency up to 3.98%, higher than that of the ITO device (3.86%), showing that layer-transferred graphene promises to be a high quality, low-cost, flexible material for transparent electrodes in solar cell technology.

  4. Section 1Tunable broadband terahertz absorbers based on multiple layers of graphene ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dingbo; Yang, Junbo; Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Zhaojian

    2017-11-20

    A novel metamaterial structure consisting of multiple graphene/dielectric layers and metallic substrate is proposed to achieve the broadband absorption response at terahertz (THz) frequencies. Utilizing the phase modulation effect generated by graphene ribbons, the bright-dark field is formed to suppress the reflection based on interference theory in a wide period. By irregularly stacking four graphene ribbons of varying widths on four dielectric layers with unequal thickness in a period, we merge successive absorption peaks into a broadband absorption spectrum successfully. The absorption decreases with fluctuations as the incident angle increases. The position of the absorption spectrum can be dynamically tuned by a small change in the Fermi level of graphene instead of re-optimizing and re-fabricating the device. In addition, the bandwidth of the absorber can be further improved by means of increasing the graphene/dielectric layers. The structure proposed in this paper has potential applications in tunable terahertz photonic devices such as dynamic broadband filters, modulators and sensors.

  5. Growth and optical characteristics of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk In Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of high-quality, smooth, and flat ZnO thin films on graphene layers and their photoluminescence (PL characteristics. For the growth of high-quality ZnO thin films on graphene layers, ZnO nanowalls were grown using metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on oxygen-plasma treated graphene layers as an intermediate layer. PL measurements were conducted at low temperatures to examine strong near-band-edge emission peaks. The full-width-at-half-maximum value of the dominant PL emission peak was as narrow as 4 meV at T = 11 K, comparable to that of the best-quality films reported previously. Furthermore, the stimulated emission of ZnO thin films on the graphene layers was observed at the low excitation energy of 180 kW/cm2 at room temperature. Their structural and optical characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and PL spectroscopy.

  6. Graphene and the universality of the quantum Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzalenchuk, A.; Janssen, T. J.B.M.; Kazakova, O.

    2013-01-01

    that graphene - a single layer of carbon atoms - beats these well-established semiconductor materials as the system of choice for the realisation of the quantum resistance standard. Here we shall briefly describe graphene technology, discuss the structure and electronic properties of graphene, including...

  7. First row transition metal atoms embedded in multivacancies in a rippled graphene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2018-03-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to study systems where a first row transition metal atom is embedded in a rippled graphene due to the existence of an 8-order multivacancy. In addition to these cases, also the inclusion of a zinc atom, with a 3d10 electron configuration, was also studied. Structural distortions and magnetic response for each system were studied. A correlation was found for the magnitude of the rippling and the distortion in the vacancy. Variation in the trends was found for Cu and Zn cases, which were explained on the basis of the filling of the 3dx2-y2 orbital. All the systems exhibit lower magnetic moment in comparison to the metal-less system. The quenching of the magnetic moment due to the carbon atoms in the vacancy is observed for Sc and Cu.

  8. Elastic modulus of Extreme Ultraviolet exposed single-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mund, Baibhav Kumar; Gao, An; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Highly transparent membranes are required for a number of applications, such as protective coatings for components in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, beam splitters (EUV pump-probe experiments), transmission gratings, and reticles. Graphene is an excellent candidate due to its high tensile

  9. Wrinkled Few-Layer Graphene as Highly Efficient Load Bearer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Androulidakis, Ch.; Koukaras, E. N.; Řáhová, Jaroslava; Sampathkumar, Krishna; Parthenios, J.; Papagelis, K.; Frank, Otakar; Galiotis, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 31 (2017), s. 26593-26601 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-15357S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * wrinkling * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 7.504, year: 2016

  10. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  11. Graphene and Graphene Nanomesh Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Haruyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spintronics, which manipulate spins but not electron charge, are highly valued as energy and thermal dissipationless systems. A variety of materials are challenging the realization of spintronic devices. Among those, graphene, a carbon mono-atomic layer, is very promising for efficient spin manipulation and the creation of a full spectrum of beyond-CMOS spin-based nano-devices. In the present article, the recent advancements in graphene spintronics are reviewed, introducing the observation of spin coherence and the spin Hall effect. Some research has reported the strong spin coherence of graphene. Avoiding undesirable influences from the substrate are crucial. Magnetism and spintronics arising from graphene edges are reviewed based on my previous results. In spite of carbon-based material with only sp2 bonds, the zigzag-type atomic structure of graphene edges theoretically produces spontaneous spin polarization of electrons due to mutual Coulomb interaction of extremely high electron density of states (edge states localizing at the flat energy band. We fabricate honeycomb-like arrays of low-defect hexagonal nanopores (graphene nanomeshes; GNMs on graphenes, which produce a large amount of zigzag pore edges, by using a nonlithographic method (nanoporous alumina templates and critical temperature annealing under high vacuum and hydrogen atmosphere. We observe large-magnitude ferromagnetism, which arises from polarized spins localizing at the hydrogen-terminated zigzag-nanopore edges of the GNMs, even at room temperature. Moreover, spin pumping effects are found for magnetic fields applied in parallel with the few-layer GNM planes. Strong spin coherence and spontaneously polarized edge spins of graphene can be expected to lead to novel spintronics with invisible, flexible, and ultra-light (wearable features.

  12. Alginate affects agglomeration state and uptake of 14C-labeled few-layer graphene by freshwater snails: Implications for the environmental fate of graphene in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Huang, Chi; Lu, Fenxiao; Tong, Xin; Niu, Junfeng; Mao, Liang

    2017-12-04

    Understanding of the interaction of graphene with natural polysaccharides (e.g., alginate) is crucial to elucidate its environmental fate. We investigated the impact of alginate on the agglomeration and stability of 14C-labeled few-layer graphene (FLG) in varying concentrations of monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl2) electrolytes. Enhanced agglomeration occurred at high CaCl2 concentrations (≥5 mM) due to the alginate gel networks formation in the presence of Ca2+. FLG enmeshed within extended alginate gel networks was observed under transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. However, background Na+ competition for binding sites with Ca2+ at the alginate surfaces shielded the gelation of alginate. FLG was readily dispersed by alginate under environmentally relevant ionic strength conditions (i.e., <200 mM Na+ and <5 mM Ca2+). In comparison with the bare FLG, the slow sedimentation of the alginate-stabilized FLG (158 μg/L) caused continuous exposure of this nanomaterial to freshwater snails, which ingested 1.9 times more FLG through filter-feeding within 72 h. Moreover, surface modification of FLG by alginate significantly increased the whole-body and intestinal levels of FLG, but reduced the internalization of FLG to the intestinal epithelial cells. These findings indicate that alginate will act as a stabilizing agent controlling the transport of FLG in aqueous systems. This study also provides the first evidence that interaction of graphene with natural polysaccharides affected the uptake of FLG in the snails, which may alter the fate of FLG in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Near-unity absorption of graphene monolayer with a triple-layer waveguide coupled grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haojing; Zheng, Gaige; Xian, Fenglin; Zou, Xiujuan; Wang, Jicheng

    2017-10-01

    In order to achieve the enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene monolayer within the visible (Vis) and near infrared (NIR) regions, a design of absorber inspired by contact coupled gratings with an absentee layer is demonstrated. It is proved that the absorptance of monolayer graphene can be greatly enhanced to near unity through rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) numerical calculation. The thickness of grating and homogeneous absentee layers can significantly change the linewidth and resonant mode position in absorption spectrum. Furthermore, the lateral shift of the contact coupled gratings changes the magnetic field distributions in the grating cavity and the surface-confined mode at the cover/grating interface, thus facilitating the dynamic control of the spectral bandwidth of the graphene absorber. The proposed devices could be efficiently exploited as tunable and selective absorbers, allowing to realize other two-dimensional (2D) materials-based selective photo-detectors.

  14. Exploring electronic structure of one-atom thick polycrystalline graphene films: A nano angle resolved photoemission study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, José; Razado, Ivy; Lorcy, Stéphane; Fleurier, Romain; Pichonat, Emmanuelle; Vignaud, Dominique; Wallart, Xavier; Asensio, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce large, continuous and defect free films of graphene is presently a major challenge for multiple applications. Even though the scalability of graphene films is closely associated to a manifest polycrystalline character, only a few numbers of experiments have explored so far the electronic structure down to single graphene grains. Here we report a high resolution angle and lateral resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (nano-ARPES) study of one-atom thick graphene films on thin copper foils synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Our results show the robustness of the Dirac relativistic-like electronic spectrum as a function of the size, shape and orientation of the single-crystal pristine grains in the graphene films investigated. Moreover, by mapping grain by grain the electronic dynamics of this unique Dirac system, we show that the single-grain gap-size is 80% smaller than the multi-grain gap recently reported by classical ARPES. PMID:23942471

  15. Spin transport in two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Li, Q. C.; Zhang, Y. F.; Schönenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    We study room-temperature spin transport in graphene devices encapsulated between a layer-by-layer-stacked two-layer-thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) tunnel barrier, and a few-layer-thick exfoliated-hBN substrate. We find mobilities and spin-relaxation times comparable to that of SiO2 substrate-based graphene devices, and we obtain a similar order of magnitude of spin relaxation rates for both the Elliott-Yafet and D'Yakonov-Perel' mechanisms. The behavior of ferromagnet/two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN contacts ranges from transparent to tunneling due to inhomogeneities in the CVD-hBN barriers. Surprisingly, we find both positive and negative spin polarizations for high-resistance two-layer-CVD-hBN barrier contacts with respect to the low-resistance contacts. Furthermore, we find that the differential spin-injection polarization of the high-resistance contacts can be modulated by dc bias from -0.3 to +0.3 V with no change in its sign, while its magnitude increases at higher negative bias. These features point to the distinctive spin-injection nature of the two-layer-CVD-hBN compared to the bilayer-exfoliated-hBN tunnel barriers.

  16. Effect of vertically oriented few-layer graphene on the wettability and interfacial reactions of the AgCuTi-SiO2f/SiO2 system

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Sun; L. X. Zhang; J. L. Qi; Z. H. Zhang; T. D. Hao; J. C. Feng

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of expanding their applications, particularly when joining metals, a simple but effective method is reported whereby the surface chemical reactivity of SiO2f/SiO2 (SiO2f/SiO2 stands for silica fibre reinforced silica based composite materials and f is short for fibre) composites with vertically oriented few-layer graphene (VFG, 3?10 atomic layers of graphene vertically oriented to the substrate) can be tailored. VFG was uniformly grown on the surface of a SiO2f/SiO2 composite by ...

  17. Theoretical study on the photocatalytic properties of graphene oxide with single Au atom adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lin; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Li, Mengmeng; Jin, Cui; Huang, Baibiao

    2018-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of graphene oxide (GO) with single Au atom adsorption are studied via the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. The present study addresses the origin of enhancement in photocatalytic efficiency of GO derived from single Au atom depositing. Compared with the clean one, the work function of the single Au atom adsorbed GO is lowered due to the charge transfer from Au to GO, indicating enhanced surface activity. The Au atom plays as an electron trapping center and a mediating role in charge transfer from photon excited GO to target species. The photogenerated electron-hole pairs can be separated effectively. For the GO configuration with atomic Au dispersion, there are some states introduced in the band gap, which are predominantly composed of Au 6s states. Through the in-gap state, the photo-generated electron transfer from the valence band of clean GO to the conductive band more easily. In addition, the reduction of the gap in the system is also presented in the current work, which indicates that the single Au atom adsorption improves light absorption for the GO based photocatalyst. These theoretical results are valuable for the future applications of GO materials as photocatalyst for water splitting.

  18. Electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with nitrogen atoms: a theoretical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A E; Fomine, S

    2015-04-28

    The electronic structure of graphene nanoribbons doped with a graphitic type of nitrogen atoms has been studied using B3LYP, B2PLYP and CAS methods. In all but one case the restricted B3LYP solutions were unstable and the CAS calculations provided evidence for the multiconfigurational nature of the ground state with contributions from two dominant configurations. The relative stability of the doped nanoribbons depends mostly on the mutual position of the dopant atoms and notably less on the position of nitrogen atoms within the nanoribbon. N-graphitic doping affects cationic states much more than anionic ones due the participation of the nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge, resulting in a drop in ionization energies (IPs) for N-graphitic doped systems. Nitrogen atoms do not participate in the negative charge stabilization of anionic species and, therefore, the doping does not affect the electron affinities (EAs). The unrestricted B3LYP method is the method of choice for the calculation of IPs and EAs. Restricted B3LYP and B2PLYP produces unreliable results for both IPs and EAs while CAS strongly underestimates the electron affinities. This is also true for the reorganization energies where restricted B3LYP produces qualitatively incorrect results. Doping changes the reorganization energy of the nanoribbons; the hole reorganization energy is generally higher than the corresponding electron reorganization energy due to the participation of nitrogen atoms in the stabilization of the positive charge.

  19. Rebar Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As the cylindrical sp2-bonded carbon allotrope, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely used to reinforce bulk materials such as polymers, ceramics, and metals. However, both the concept demonstration and the fundamental understanding on how 1D CNTs reinforce atomically thin 2D layered materials, such as graphene, are still absent. Here, we demonstrate the successful synthesis of CNT-toughened graphene by simply annealing functionalized CNTs on Cu foils without needing to introduce extraneous carbon sources. The CNTs act as reinforcing bar (rebar), toughening the graphene through both π–π stacking domains and covalent bonding where the CNTs partially unzip and form a seamless 2D conjoined hybrid as revealed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis. This is termed rebar graphene. Rebar graphene can be free-standing on water and transferred onto target substrates without needing a polymer-coating due to the rebar effects of the CNTs. The utility of rebar graphene sheets as flexible all-carbon transparent electrodes is demonstrated. The in-plane marriage of 1D nanotubes and 2D layered materials might herald an electrical and mechanical union that extends beyond carbon chemistry. PMID:24694285

  20. Atomic and molecular layer activation of dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, John Joseph

    Strong interaction between the material deposit and substrate is critical to stable deposits and interfaces. The work presented here focuses on the surface activation of dielectric surfaces and oxidized metal surfaces to promote the chemisorption of palladium (II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (PdII (hfac)2). The goal is to develop reliable, robust metallization protocols, which enable strong interactions between the metal and substrate. SiO2, air exposed Ta, Trikon, and SiLK were activated with sulfur or phosphorus. Two types of activations were developed; one based on self-assembled chemistry, and the other a plasma-assisted process. Activation of the surface using self-assembly techniques was carried out using mercaptan-terminated silane and tetrasulfide silane. The resulting films were characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tetrasulfide silane sources films exhibit self-limiting behavior, even in the presence of water vapor; whereas mercaptan-terminated silane sourced films tend to be thicker. The surface activations using atomic layers of sulfur and phosphorus were carried out in a rf plasma chamber using hydrogen sulfide and phosphine sources, respectively. The activations were studied as functions of rf power, system pressure, and substrate material. Results show that higher rf powers and lower system pressures promote greater surface coverages by sulfur with a reduced oxidation state. The activated dielectrics show evidence of PdII(hfac)2 chemisorption, in contrast to non-activated surfaces. The binding energy shift of the Pd3d 5/2 XPS peak towards elemental Pd provides evidence for the dissociative chemisorption of PdII(hfac)2. The extent of dissociation depends on the substrate temperature and the activation method used. The conclusions of the work presented here have implications for metallization using highly polarizable transition metals. Specifically, it can be applied to

  1. Quantifying the growth of individual graphene layers by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2016-01-01

    on nickel using acetylene as carbon precursor gas is studied in the electron microscope at various gas pressures. By following the growth of individual graphene layers on the Ni surface, local growth rates are determined as a function of precursor pressure. Two growth regimes are identified, an initial...

  2. A Simple Road for the Transformation of Few-Layer Graphene into MWNTs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintana, Mildred; Grzelczak, Marek; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Calvaresi, Matteo; Bals, Sara; Kooi, Bart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, Francesco; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    We report the direct formation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by ultrasonication of graphite in dimethylformamide (DMF) upon addition of ferrocene aldehyde (Fc-CHO). The tubular structures appear exclusively at the edges of graphene layers and contain Fe clusters. Pc in conjunction with

  3. Chemically modified graphene oxides as a hole transport layer in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong; Zhou, Lingyu; Chen, Lingcheng; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Jian; Li, Can

    2012-08-21

    We demonstrate O(2) plasma treated graphene oxides with a work function of 5.2 eV as a high performance hole transport layer in organic solar cells. The high transparency and high work function simultaneously increase short circuit current, threshold voltage and fill factor, resulting in a 30% increase in cell efficiency.

  4. Self-exothermic reaction prompted synthesis of single-layered graphene quantum dots at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin Bin; Li, Rong Sheng; Liu, Meng Li; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-05-02

    The easy fabrication of single-layered graphene quantum dots (s-GQDs) still faces challenge. Herein, we report an efficient route to fabricate s-GQDs within 5 min at room temperature by introducing a simple self-exothermic reaction. The as-prepared s-GQDs can specifically bind with aluminium ions to produce an aggregation-induced emission enhancement effect.

  5. Layer-enriched optical spectra of AB-stacked multilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chih-Wei; Ho, Yen-Hung; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2014-11-01

    The band structures and optical properties of AB-stacked multilayer graphene are calculated using the tight-binding model and gradient approximation. For nL-layer AB-stacked graphene, there are n\\text{L}2 excitation channels at both the low and middle frequencies. However, in the excitation spectra, nL (nL - 1) peaks exist at the low frequency for even-layer (odd-layer) systems, and one-shoulder and nL peaks at the middle frequency. With increasing nL, the differences in the spectra between the odd and even layers are reduced. When nL increases to 30 (50), the spectra of 2D and 3D systems are almost identical at the middle (low) frequency.

  6. Surface-Engineered Graphene Quantum Dots Incorporated into Polymer Layers for High Performance Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Kyu; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Myung Jin; Bae, Sukang; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Du, Qing Guo; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Jong Hyeok; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-09-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs), a newly emerging 0-dimensional graphene based material, have been widely exploited in optoelectronic devices due to their tunable optical and electronic properties depending on their functional groups. Moreover, the dispersibility of GQDs in common solvents depending on hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity can be controlled by chemical functionalization, which is particularly important for homogeneous incorporation into various polymer layers. Here we report that a surface-engineered GQD-incorporated polymer photovoltaic device shows enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE), where the oxygen-related functionalization of GQDs enabled good dispersity in a PEDOT:PSS hole extraction layer, leading to significantly improved short circuit current density (Jsc) value. To maximize the PCE of the device, hydrophobic GQDs that are hydrothermally reduced (rGQD) were additionally incorporated in a bulk-heterojunction layer, which is found to promote a synergistic effect with the GQD-incorporated hole extraction layer.

  7. Surface-Engineered Graphene Quantum Dots Incorporated into Polymer Layers for High Performance Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Kyu; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Myung Jin; Bae, Sukang; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Du, Qing Guo; Wang, Dong Hwan; Park, Jong Hyeok; Hong, Byung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs), a newly emerging 0-dimensional graphene based material, have been widely exploited in optoelectronic devices due to their tunable optical and electronic properties depending on their functional groups. Moreover, the dispersibility of GQDs in common solvents depending on hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity can be controlled by chemical functionalization, which is particularly important for homogeneous incorporation into various polymer layers. Here we report that a surface-engineered GQD-incorporated polymer photovoltaic device shows enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE), where the oxygen-related functionalization of GQDs enabled good dispersity in a PEDOT:PSS hole extraction layer, leading to significantly improved short circuit current density (Jsc) value. To maximize the PCE of the device, hydrophobic GQDs that are hydrothermally reduced (rGQD) were additionally incorporated in a bulk-heterojunction layer, which is found to promote a synergistic effect with the GQD-incorporated hole extraction layer. PMID:26392211

  8. The over-step coalescence of carbon atoms on copper surface in the CVD growth of graphene: density functional calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingfeng Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ways in which carbon atoms coalesce over the steps on copper (111 surface are ascertained by density functional theory (DFT calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD growth of graphene. Two strategies, (1 by putting carbon atoms on and under the steps separately and (2 by importing additional carbon atoms between the ones separated by the steps, have been attempted to investigate if an over-step coalescence of carbon atoms could take place. Based on analyses about the optimized configurations and adsorption energies of carbon atoms nearby the steps, as well as the energy evolution curve of the system throughout the geometry optimizations process, we determined the main way in which graphene grows over the steps continuously: the carbon atoms, adsorbed additionally on the locations between the already existing ones which are separated by the steps, link them (these carbon atoms separated by the steps together. The direct over-step coalescence of the carbon atoms separated by the steps is very difficult, although the energy barrier preventing their coalescence can be weakened by importing carbon atoms on and under the steps gradually. Our results imply potential applications in directing the fabrication of graphene with particular structure by controlling the surface topography of copper substrate.

  9. Ultra-compact injection terahertz laser using the resonant inter-layer radiative transitions in multi-graphene-layer structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinov, Alexander A; Aleshkin, Vladimir Ya; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi; Svintsov, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of laser resonators represents a crucial issue for the design of terahertz semiconductor lasers with high gain and low absorption loss. In this paper, we put forward and optimize the surface plasmonic metal waveguide geometry for the recently proposed terahertz injection laser based on resonant radiative transitions between tunnel-coupled grapheme layers. We find an optimal number of active graphene layer pairs corresponding to the maximum net modal gain. The maximum gain increases with frequency and can be as large as ~ 500 cm-1 at 8 THz, while the threshold length of laser resonator can be as small as ~ 50 mkm. Our findings substantiate the possibility of ultra-compact voltage-tunable graphene-based lasers operating at room temperature.

  10. Examining the impact of multi-layer graphene using cellular and amphibian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Mouchet, Florence; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Janowska, Izabela; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Soula, Brigitte; Galibert, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, graphene has been defined as the revolutionary material showing an incredible expansion in industrial applications. Different graphene forms have been applied in several contexts, spreading from energy technologies and electronics to food and agriculture technologies. Graphene showed promises also in the biomedical field. Hopeful results have been already obtained in diagnostic, drug delivery, tissue regeneration and photothermal cancer ablation. In view of the enormous development of graphene-based technologies, a careful assessment of its impact on health and environment is demanded. It is evident how investigating the graphene toxicity is of fundamental importance in the context of medical purposes. On the other hand, the nanomaterial present in the environment, likely to be generated all along the industrial life-cycle, may have harmful effects on living organisms. In the present work, an important contribution on the impact of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on health and environment is given by using a multifaceted approach. For the first purpose, the effect of the material on two mammalian cell models was assessed. Key cytotoxicity parameters were considered such as cell viability and inflammatory response induction. This was combined with an evaluation of MLG toxicity towards Xenopus laevis, used as both in vivo and environmental model organism.

  11. Atomic level cleaning of poly-methyl-methacrylate residues from the graphene surface using radiolized water at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ahmad Ehteshamul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Carpena-NuÅez, Jennifer; Hsiao, Ming-Siao; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Stach, Eric A.; Maruyama, Benji

    2017-09-01

    Large-scale application of graphene requires its clean transfer from thin metal films, where it is grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD), to any other substrates of interest. All the existing transfer methodologies, however, leave residues at different degrees on graphene surfaces and can only provide atomically clean graphene surfaces in areas as large as ˜10-4 μm2. Here, we transfer CVD-grown graphene using Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and present a method that can atomically clean the PMMA residues from a larger surface area of graphene using radiolized water obtained via electron-water interaction at high temperatures. The cleaning process was monitored in-situ using an environmental-mode transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These showed the effectiveness of PMMA removal over areas as large as ˜0.02 μm2, whose size was only limited by the size of the electron beam and the presence of inorganic residues after the transfer process. By overcoming these limitations, we may achieve atomically clean graphene transfer to even larger areas—enabling more challenging device applications.

  12. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  13. Layer and size dependence of thermal conductivity in multilayer graphene nanoribbons

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Hai-Yuan; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Xiang, Hongjun; Gong, Xin-Gao

    2011-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method(NEMD), we have found that the thermal conductivity of multilayer graphene nanoribbons monotonously decreases with the increase of the number of layers, such behavior can be attributed to the phonon resonance effect of out-of-plane phonon modes. The reduction of thermal conductivity is found to be proportional to the layer size, which is caused by the increase of phonon resonance. Our results are in agreement with recent experiment on dimensional...

  14. Stepwise Reduction of Immobilized Mono layer Graphene Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren; He, Yudong; Lang, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    to the pronounced aggregation that accompanies deoxygenation of GO in solution. Surface immobilization of monolayered graphene oxide (mGO) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated as a method to circumvent this problem. Two types of LB films with different density of mGO flakes were prepared, i.e., diluted...... spectroscopy (XPS) along with electrical characterization. XPS measurements confirmed a full conversion into virtually oxygen-free chemically converted graphene. The electrical characterization revealed large variations in the conductivity for single sheets in the diluted LB films, with an average conductivity...... of 100 S/cm. A similar conductivity was found for macroscopic devices made from the coherent LB films with overlapping mGO sheets. The large variation in single sheets conductance is assigned to overoxidation of the GO leading to formation of holes, which cannot be recovered in the chemical reduction...

  15. Effect of intermediate layers on atomic layer deposition-aluminum oxide protected silver mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryauf, David M.; Diaz Leon, Juan J.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2017-07-01

    This work investigates intermediate materials deposited between silver (Ag) thin-film mirrors and an aluminum oxide (AlOx) barrier overlayer and compares the effects on mirror durability to environmental stresses. Physical vapor deposition of various fluorides, oxides, and nitrides in combination with AlOx by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used to develop several coating recipes. Ag-AlOx samples with different intermediate materials undergo aggressive high-temperature (80°C), high-humidity (80%) (HTHH) testing for 10 days. Reflectivity of mirror samples is measured before and after HTHH testing, and image processing techniques are used to analyze the specular surface of the samples after HTHH testing. Among the seven intermediate materials used in this work, TiN, MgAl2O4, NiO, and Al2O3 intermediate layers offer more robust protection against chemical corrosion and moisture when compared with samples with no intermediate layer. In addition, results show that the performance of the ALD-AlOx barrier overlayer depends significantly on the ALD-growth process temperature. Because higher durability is observed in samples with less transparent TiN and NiO layers, we propose a figure of merit based on post-HTHH testing reflectivity change and specular reflective mirror surface area remaining after HTHH testing to judge overall barrier performance.

  16. Fabrication of sensitive bioelectrode based on atomically thin CVD grown graphene for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Sumit Kumar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Mishra, Monu; Gupta, Govind; Malhotra, B D; Tiwari, R S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2018-05-15

    Motivation behind the present work is to fabricate a cost effective and scalable biosensing platform for an easy and reliable detection of cancer biomarker Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Here, we report the sensitive and selective detection of CEA using graphene based bio-sensing platform. Large sized (~ 2.5 × 1.0cm 2 ), uniform, continuous, single and few layers graphene films have been grown on copper (Cu) substrate employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using hexane as a liquid precursor. Functional group has been created over Graphene/Cu substrate through π-π stacking of 1- pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester (PBSE). Further, to make the sensor specific to CEA, antibody of CEA (anti-CEA) has been covalently immobilized onto PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode. Selective and sensitive detection of CEA is achieved by anti-CEA/PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Under optimal condition, the fabricated sensor shows linear response in the physiological range 1.0-25.0ngmL -1 (normal value ~ 5.0ngmL -1 ), revealing sensitivity 563.4Ωng -1 mLcm -2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.996 and limit of detection (LOD) 0.23ngmL -1 . In this way, one step electrode fabrication with high specific surface area provides a light weight, low cost, reliable and scalable novel biosensing platform for sensitive and selective detection of CEA. We believe that this bioelectrode equipped with specific recognition elements could be utilized for detection of other biomolecules too. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport spectroscopy in bilayer graphene using double layer heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayoung; Jung, Jeil; Fallahazad, Babak; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2017-09-01

    We provide a comprehensive study of the chemical potential of bilayer graphene in a wide range of carrier density, at zero and high magnetic (B)-fields, and at different transverse electric (E)-fields, using high quality double bilayer graphene heterostructures. Using a direct thermodynamic transport spectroscopic technique, we probe the chemical potential as a function of carrier density in six samples. The data clearly reveal the non-parabolicity and electron-hole asymmetry of energy-momentum dispersion in bilayer graphene. The tight-binding hopping amplitudes, t 0, t 1, and t 4, renormalized by electron-electron interaction are extracted from the chemical potential versus density dependence. A diverse set of electron-electron interaction driven phenomena were also clearly discerned at zero and high B-fields. We measure the gaps at integer fillings with orbital index N  =  0, 1, and discuss about the dependence of the N  =  0, 1 quantum Hall phases on the carrier density (or filling factor), E-field, and B-field.

  18. Enhanced adhesion of atomic layer deposited titania on polycarbonate substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latella, B.A. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: bal@ansto.gov.au; Triani, G. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Zhang, Z. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Short, K.T. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Bartlett, J.R. [Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Ignat, M. [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et de Physico-Chimie Metallurgique, associe au CNRS, E.N.S.E.E.G., BP 75, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2007-01-22

    Interfacial adhesion of atomic layer deposited titania films on polycarbonate substrates with and without a water-plasma treatment has been studied using in situ observation during microtensile testing. Specific attention is paid to multiple tension-generated transverse cracks in the titania films when subjected to externally applied uniaxial tensile stresses. The strength, fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion of the titania film on polycarbonate were deduced from theoretical models based on experimentally determined parameters. The tensile tests were conducted in a micromechanical tester positioned under an optical microscope allowing in situ viewing of cracking damage. The strain to initiate first cracking and the crack density as a function of strain were obtained. The in situ observations indicated different interfacial behaviour between water-plasma-treated and non-treated samples. It is shown that the water plasma treatment drastically improves the adhesion of the titania film to polycarbonate. Calculations show that the fracture energy required for film debonding in the plasma-treated polycarbonate is 5.9 J/m{sup 2} compared to 2.5 J/m{sup 2} for the untreated sample. A simple chemical structure model was used to explain the observed differences.

  19. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO 2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Parsons, Gregory [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, Philip [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Oldham, Christopher [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Mundy, Zach [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Dolgashev, Valery [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  1. Recent progress of atomic layer deposition on polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong Chen; Ye, Enyi; Li, Zibiao; Han, Ming-Yong; Loh, Xian Jun

    2017-01-01

    As a very promising surface coating technology, atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to modify the surfaces of polymeric materials for improving their functions and expanding their application areas. Polymeric materials vary in surface functional groups (number and type), surface morphology and internal structure, and thus ALD deposition conditions that typically work on a normal solid surface, usually do not work on a polymeric material surface. To date, a large variety of research has been carried out to investigate ALD deposition on various polymeric materials. This paper aims to provide an in-depth review of ALD deposition on polymeric materials and its applications. Through this review, we will provide a better understanding of surface chemistry and reaction mechanism for controlled surface modification of polymeric materials by ALD. The integrated knowledge can aid in devising an improved way in the reaction between reactant precursors and polymer functional groups/polymer backbones, which will in turn open new opportunities in processing ALD materials for better inorganic/organic film integration and potential applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  3. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical - simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 - 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  4. Synthesis of platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubers, Alia Marie

    Demand for energy continues to increase, and without alternatives to fossil fuel combustion the effects on our environment will become increasingly severe. Fuel cells offer a promising improvement on current methods of energy generation; they are able to convert hydrogen fuel into electricity with a theoretical efficiency of up to 83% and interface smoothly with renewable hydrogen production. Fuel cells can replace internal combustion engines in vehicles and are used in stationary applications to power homes and businesses. The efficiency of a fuel cell is maximized by its catalyst, which is often composed of platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon. Economical production of fuel cell catalysts will promote adoption of this technology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a possible method for producing catalysts at a large scale when employed in a fluidized bed. ALD relies on sequential dosing of gas-phase precursors to grow a material layer by layer. We have synthesized platinum nanoparticles on a carbon particle support (Pt/C) by ALD for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and electrochemical hydrogen pumps. Platinum nanoparticles with different characteristics were deposited by changing two chemistries: the carbon substrate through functionalization; and the deposition process by use of either oxygen or hydrogen as ligand removing reactants. The metal depositing reactant was trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV). Functionalizing the carbon substrate increased nucleation during deposition resulting in smaller and more dispersed nanoparticles. Use of hydrogen produced smaller nanoparticles than oxygen, due to a gentler hydrogenation reaction compared to using oxygen's destructive combustion reaction. Synthesized Pt/C materials were used as catalysts in an electrochemical hydrogen pump, a device used to separate hydrogen fuel from contaminants. Catalysts deposited by ALD on functionalized carbon using a hydrogen chemistry were the most

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of a copper/graphene interface as prepared and 1.5 years after

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Bazylewski, P. F.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Ponosov, Yu. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Cholakh, S. O.; Lee, Y. H.; Chang, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report the results of X-ray spectroscopy and Raman measurements of as-prepared graphene on a high quality copper surface and the same materials after 1.5 years under different conditions (ambient and low humidity). The obtained results were compared with density functional theory calculations of the formation energies and electronic structures of various structural defects in graphene/Cu interfaces. For evaluation of the stability of the carbon cover, we propose a two-step model. The first step is oxidation of the graphene, and the second is perforation of graphene with the removal of carbon atoms as part of the carbon dioxide molecule. Results of the modeling and experimental measurements provide evidence that graphene grown on high-quality copper substrate becomes robust and stable in time (1.5 years). However, the stability of this interface depends on the quality of the graphene and the number of native defects in the graphene and substrate. The effect of the presence of a metallic substrate with defects on the stability and electronic structure of graphene is also discussed

  6. Inverted perovskite solar cells based on lithium-functionalized graphene oxide as an electron-transporting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Esmaiel; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-04

    Perovskite solar cells with an inverted p-i-n architecture were constructed under ambient conditions by employing materials of lower cost than standard cells. Thus, graphene oxide was used as a hole transporting material and Li-modified graphene oxide as an electron transporting material, while Al was used as a counter electrode. A maximum solar conversion efficiency of 10.2% was achieved by adding a Ti-based sol on the top of the Li-modified graphene oxide layer.

  7. Magnetism in intercalated graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sajid [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Nanda, B. R. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Using density functional calculations we explore the possibilities of inducing spin moments in otherwise non-magnetic electronic structure of graphene. Through intercalation of H, N, O and F atoms between two hexagonal stacked graphene layers, we show that unpaired electrons can be generated when the planar coordinates of the functional atoms coincide with the center of the graphene hexagon. The spin-half states are realized at the functional sites for certain values of interlayer separations. For oxygen and fluorine these interlayer separations represent the natural stable phases and for hydrogen and nitrogen they induce instability which can be overcome by applying external pressure. We attribute the formation of spin-half states to the one dimensional confinement potential exerted by the graphene layers on the valence electrons of the functional elements.

  8. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm2 V-1 s-1 and electron mobility of 0.17 cm2 V-1 s-1 in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically

  9. Thermal buckling of double-layered graphene system in humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, Mohammed; Zenkour, Ashraf M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of humidity conditions on thermal buckling analysis of graphene system contained two layers under different boundary conditions is investigated. The two-variable shear deformation plate theory is employed with the nonlocal continuum theory to deduce the governing stability equations. These equations are solved analytically to obtain the thermal buckling of the nanoplate system with simply supported, clamped and free boundary conditions. The present system of double-layered graphene sheets is composed from two sheets of graphene joined together by an elastic medium and hedged by two-parameter foundations. The external foundations are modeled as Winkler–Pasternak model. Two characteristic types of thermal buckling are considered: synchronous and asynchronous modes of buckling. The temperature rise and moisture concentration are assumed as a fixed, linear or nonlinear function of z (along the thickness direction). For the validation of the formulations, the present results are compared with those published in the references. Furthermore, the influences of the nonlocal parameter, humidity and other parameters on thermal buckling of double-layered graphene system are all discussed.

  10. An atomic charge model for graphene oxide for exploring its bioadhesive properties in explicit water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, D.; Dragneva, N.; Floriano, W. B.; Rubel, O. [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, 290 Munro St, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 7T1 (Canada); Mawhinney, R. C. [Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 7T1 (Canada); Fanchini, G. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); French, S. [University of Calgary, South Health Campus, 4448 Front St. SE, Calgary, Alberta T3M 1M4 (Canada)

    2014-07-28

    Graphene Oxide (GO) has been shown to exhibit properties that are useful in applications such as biomedical imaging, biological sensors, and drug delivery. The binding properties of biomolecules at the surface of GO can provide insight into the potential biocompatibility of GO. Here we assess the intrinsic affinity of amino acids to GO by simulating their adsorption onto a GO surface. The simulation is done using Amber03 force-field molecular dynamics in explicit water. The emphasis is placed on developing an atomic charge model for GO. The adsorption energies are computed using atomic charges obtained from an ab initio electrostatic potential based method. The charges reported here are suitable for simulating peptide adsorption to GO.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of single- and few-layer graphene by the deposition of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisook; Shim, Sangdeok; Kim, Bongsoo; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2011-02-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of graphene on a SiO(2)(300 nm)/Si substrate was investigated by depositing Au nanoparticles using thermal evaporation. This provided a maximum enhancement of 120 times for single-layer graphene at 633 nm excitation. SERS spectra and scan images of single-layer and few-layer graphene were acquired. Single-layer graphene provides much larger SERS enhancement compared to few-layer graphene, while in single-layer graphene the enhancement of the G band was larger than that of the 2D band. Furthermore, the D bands were identified in the SERS spectra; these bands were not observed in a normal Raman spectrum without Au deposition. Appearance of the D band is ascribed to the considerable SERS enhancement and not to an Au deposition-induced defect. Lastly, SERS enhancement of graphene on a transparent glass substrate was compared with that on the SiO(2)(300 nm)/Si substrate to exclude enhancement by multiple reflections between the Si substrate and deposited Au nanoparticles. The contribution of multiple reflections to total enhancement on the SiO(2)(300 nm)/Si substrate was 1.6 times out of average SERS enhancement factor, 71 times. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Three-fold diffraction symmetry in epitaxial graphene and the SiC substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, D A; Zhou, S Y; El Gabaly, F; Schmid, A K; McCarty, K F; Lanzara, A

    2009-12-10

    The crystallographic symmetries and spatial distribution of stacking domains in graphene films on 6H-SiC(0001) have been studied by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and dark field imaging in a low energy electron microscope (LEEM). We find that the graphene diffraction spots from 2 and 3 atomic layers of graphene have 3-fold symmetry consistent with AB (Bernal or rhombohedral) stacking of the layers. On the contrary, graphene diffraction spots from the buffer layer and monolayer graphene have apparent 6-fold symmetry, although the 3-fold nature of the satellite spots indicates a more complex periodicity in the graphene sheets.

  13. Reusable urine glucose sensor based on functionalized graphene oxide conjugated Au electrode with protective layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical based system with multiple layers coated on a functionalized graphene oxide Au electrode was developed to measure glucose concentration in urine in a more stable way. Two types of gold printed circuit boards were fabricated and graphene oxide was immobilized on their surface by chemical adsorption. Multiple layers, composed of a couple of polymers, were uniformly coated on the surface electrode. This device exhibited higher electrochemical responses against glucose, a greater resistivity in the presence of interferential substances in urine, and durable stabilities for longer periods of time than conventional units. The efficiency in current level according to the order and ratio of solution was evaluated during the immobilization of the layer. The fabricated electrodes were then also evaluated using hyperglycemic clinical samples and compared with the patterns of blood glucose measured with commercially available glucose meters. Our findings show that not only was their pattern similar but this similarity is well correlated.

  14. Characteristics of layered tin disulfide deposited by atomic layer deposition with H2S annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjin Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tin disulfide (SnS2 has attracted much attention as a two-dimensional (2D material. A high-quality, low-temperature process for producing 2D materials is required for future electronic devices. Here, we investigate tin disulfide (SnS2 layers deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD using tetrakis(dimethylaminotin (TDMASn as a Sn precursor and H2S gas as a sulfur source at low temperature (150° C. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved by H2S gas annealing. We carried out H2S gas annealing at various conditions (250° C, 300° C, 350° C, and using a three-step method. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS results revealed the valence state corresponding to Sn4+ and S2- in the SnS2 annealed with H2S gas. The SnS2 annealed with H2S gas had a hexagonal structure, as measured via X-ray diffraction (XRD and the clearly out-of-plane (A1g mode in Raman spectroscopy. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved after H2S annealing and was confirmed using the XRD full-width at half-maximum (FWHM. In addition, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM images indicated a clear layered structure.

  15. Spontaneous and strong multi-layer graphene n-doping on soda-lime glass and its application in graphene-semiconductor junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, D M N M; Ashraf, A; Dwyer, D; Kisslinger, K; Zhang, L; Pang, Y; Efstathiadis, H; Eisaman, M D

    2016-02-12

    Scalable and low-cost doping of graphene could improve technologies in a wide range of fields such as microelectronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage. While achieving strong p-doping is relatively straightforward, non-electrostatic approaches to n-dope graphene, such as chemical doping, have yielded electron densities of 9.5 × 10(12) e/cm(2) or below. Furthermore, chemical doping is susceptible to degradation and can adversely affect intrinsic graphene's properties. Here we demonstrate strong (1.33 × 10(13) e/cm(2)), robust, and spontaneous graphene n-doping on a soda-lime-glass substrate via surface-transfer doping from Na without any external chemical, high-temperature, or vacuum processes. Remarkably, the n-doping reaches 2.11 × 10(13) e/cm(2) when graphene is transferred onto a p-type copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) semiconductor that itself has been deposited onto soda-lime-glass, via surface-transfer doping from Na atoms that diffuse to the CIGS surface. Using this effect, we demonstrate an n-graphene/p-semiconductor Schottky junction with ideality factor of 1.21 and strong photo-response. The ability to achieve strong and persistent graphene n-doping on low-cost, industry-standard materials paves the way toward an entirely new class of graphene-based devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaics, sensors, batteries, and supercapacitors.

  16. Direct growth of graphene-dielectric bi-layer structure on device substrates from Si-based polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Kyunghun; Min, Sung-Yong; Lee, Yeongjun; Eon Park, Chan; Raj, Rishi; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2017-06-01

    To facilitate the utilization of graphene films in conventional semiconducting devices (e.g. transistors and memories) which includes an insulating layer such as gate dielectric, facile synthesis of bi-layers composed of a graphene film and an insulating layer by one-step thermal conversion will be very important. We demonstrate a simple, inexpensive, scalable and patternable process to synthesize graphene-dielectric bi-layer films from solution-processed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) under a Ni capping layer. This method fabricates graphene-dielectric bi-layer structure simultaneously directly on substrate by thermal conversion of PDMS without using additional graphene transfer and patterning process or formation of an expensive dielectric layer, which makes the device fabrication process much easier. The graphene-dielectric bi-layer on a conducting substrate was used in bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors that showed ohmic contact and small hysteresis. Our new method will provide a way to fabricate flexible electronic devices simply and inexpensively.

  17. High-quality multilayer graphene on an insulator formed by diffusion controlled Ni-induced layer exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, H.; Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.; Toko, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Ni-induced layer-exchange growth of amorphous carbon is a unique method used to fabricate uniform multilayer graphene (MLG) directly on an insulator. To improve the crystal quality of MLG, we prepare AlOx or SiO2 interlayers between amorphous C and Ni layers, which control the extent of diffusion of C atoms into the Ni layer. The growth morphology and Raman spectra observed from MLG formed by layer exchange strongly depend on the material type and thickness of the interlayers; a 1-nm-thick AlOx interlayer is found to be ideal for use in experiments. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectra reveal that the crystal quality of the resulting MLG is much higher than that of a sample without an interlayer. The grain size reaches a few μm, leading to an electrical conductivity of 1290 S/cm. The grain size and the electrical conductivity are the highest among MLG synthesized using a solid-phase reaction including metal-induced crystallization. The direct synthesis of uniform, high-quality MLG on arbitrary substrates will pave the way for advanced electronic devices integrated with carbon materials.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of scandium-based oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyns, Laura; Lisoni, Judit G.; Bosch, Geert van den; Elshocht, Sven van; Houdt, Jan van [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} have been investigated as potential high-k intergate dielectric (IGD) in planar NAND flash technology, such as hybrid floating gate (HFG). We have examined the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on Si using Sc(MeCp){sub 3}, Gd({sup i}PrCp){sub 3}, TMA, and H{sub 2}O as precursors. The composition of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} and Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} ranged from 4% to 76% Gd and from 7% to 66% Al, respectively. All compositions show linear growth behavior. While pure Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} is crystalline as-deposited, the layer becomes amorphous once ∝20% of Al is added. The (222) reflection of the cubic phase is also seen for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with less than 9% Gd. The bandgap of as-deposited Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} decreases with increasing Gd content while the opposite trend is observed for Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}. A k-value of ∝21 can be obtained for Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} with approximately 26-52% Gd, irrespective of the Gd content. For Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} on the other hand, a maximum k-value of ∝19 is achieved with ∝48% Al. Although the k-value of Al{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} is lower than that of Gd{sub x}Sc{sub 2-x}O{sub 3}, its large breakdown field makes this material more suitable for HFG flash applications. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Applications of atomic layer deposition in nanoelectronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Damon Brooks

    2007-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a promising deposition technique for nanoelectronic applications. Reasons for this include low temperature processing, self-limiting growth, and sub-nanometer thickness precision. ALD can be used as a complementary technique to coat preexisting nanostructures, or as a technique to directly fabricate nanostructures. In this dissertation, applications of ALD in two nanoelectronic systems are investigated: carbon nanotubes and nanocrystals. Conformal ALD on as-grown suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is not possible due to the inertness of ALD precursor molecules to the SWNT surface. A covalent functionalization technique is presented that makes SWNTs reactive with ALD precursor molecules. Precursor reactivity with the functionalized nanotubes is shown to be due to -NO2 functional groups attached to the nanotube sidewalls. The effect of this functionalization technique on nanotube conductance is shown to be reversible, and doping caused by the deposited oxides is discussed. To improve upon the covalent functionalization method, alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited functional layer. These functionalized nanotubes are shown to be susceptible to ALD of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. This functionalization technique involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. As a fabrication technique, ALD is used to fabricate arrays of Ru nanocrystals 1--4 nm in diameter. The nanocrystal density is found to depend sensitively on the nucleating surface. A maximum density of 7 x 1012 cm -2--8 x 1012 cm-2 is achieved on Al2O3. Incorporation of these nanocrystals in

  20. Large area, continuous, few-layered graphene as anodes in organic photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Yulin; Zhu, Furong; Loh, Kian Ping

    2009-08-01

    Large-area, continuous, transparent, and highly conducting few-layered graphene films produced by chemical vapor deposition method were used as anode for application in photovoltaic devices. The noncovalent modification of the graphene films with pyrene buanoic acid succidymidyl ester improved the power conversion efficiency (PCE) to 1.71%. This performance corresponds to ˜55.2% of the PCE of a control device based on indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly(3-hexyl)thiophene: phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester/LiF/Al electrodes (PCE=3.1%). This finding paves the way for the substitution of ITO in photovoltaic and electroluminescent devices with low cost graphene films.

  1. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stebunov, Yury V.; Aftenieva, Olga A.; Arsenin, Aleksey V.

    2015-01-01

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sen......, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing....... sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover...

  2. Highly Sensitive and Selective Sensor Chips with Graphene-Oxide Linking Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebunov, Yury V; Aftenieva, Olga A; Arsenin, Aleksey V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2015-10-07

    The development of sensing interfaces can significantly improve the performance of biological sensors. Graphene oxide provides a remarkable immobilization platform for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors due to its excellent optical and biochemical properties. Here, we describe a novel sensor chip for SPR biosensors based on graphene-oxide linking layers. The biosensing assay model was based on a graphene oxide film containing streptavidin. The proposed sensor chip has three times higher sensitivity than the carboxymethylated dextran surface of a commercial sensor chip. Moreover, the demonstrated sensor chips are bioselective with more than 25 times reduced binding for nonspecific interaction and can be used multiple times. We consider the results presented here of importance for any future applications of highly sensitive SPR biosensing.

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic properties of graphene modified few-layered WSe2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Zheng, Binjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Qi, Fei; He, Jiarui; Zhang, Wanli; Chen, Yuanfu

    2017-04-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) modified few-layered WSe2 nanosheets have been synthesized through a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction. Compared with bare WSe2 nanosheets with relatively poor photocatalytic activity, WSe2/RGO composite demonstrates significant enhancement in photocatalytic degradation of organic dye RhB under visible light irradiation. The k value of WSe2/RGO is ∼1.9 times larger than that of bare WSe2 nanosheets, which is attributed to the excellent charge separation feature and electronic transport ability of graphene nanosheets, leading to highly reduced electron-hole pair recombination of graphene on WSe2 nanosheets thus strongly enhancing the photocatalytic performance. The WSe2/RGO composite is a promising catalyst for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants by solar energy.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 and Al2O3 on nanographite films: structure and field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Ismagilov, Rinat R.; Smolnikova, Elena A.; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A.; Tuyakova, Feruza; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metal oxides (MO) was used to modify the properties of nanographite (NG) films produced by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. NG films consist of a few layers of graphene flakes (nanowalls) and nanoscrolls homogeneously distributed over a silicon substrate with a predominantly vertical orientation of graphene sheets to the substrate surface. TiO2 and Al2O3 layers, with thicknesses in the range of 50 to 250 nm, were deposited on NG films by ALD. The obtained NG-MO composite materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that ALD forms a uniform coating on graphene flakes, while on the surface of needle-like nanoscrolls it forms spherical nanoparticles. Field emission properties of the films were measured in a flat vacuum diode configuration. Analysis based on obtained current-voltage characteristics and electrostatic calculations show that emission from NG-TiO2 films is determined by the nanoscrolls protruding from the TiO2 coverage. The TiO2 layers with thicknesses of stabilize the NG films' surface and can lead to an improvement of the NG cold cathode performance in vacuum electronics.

  5. Facile synthesis of 3D MnNi-layered double hydroxides (LDH)/graphene composites from directly graphites for pseudocapacitor and their electrochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ilbok; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; An, Soyeon; Kim, Sang-Wook; Yoon, Songhun

    2018-01-01

    Herein, MnNi-layered double hydroxides (LDH) were imbibed within the interlayers of graphene nanosheets. The anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate played a role of graphite exfoliator adding interaction with metal cations. Using this process, layered MnNi-LDH-graphene nanocomposite was prepared without formation of graphene oxide. When applied into pseudocapacitor electrode, LDH-graphene with optimal ratio between Mn and Ni exhibited very stable cycle with 90% at 1400 cycles and high energy 47.29 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 7473 W kg-1, which was attributed to highly stable layered LDH structure within conductive graphene layers.

  6. Metals on graphene and carbon nanotube surfaces: From mobile atoms to atomtronics to bulk metals to clusters and catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Santanu C.

    2014-01-14

    In this Perspective, we present an overview of recent fundamental studies on the nature of the interaction between individual metal atoms and metal clusters and the conjugated surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotube with a particular focus on the electronic structure and chemical bonding at the metal-graphene interface. We discuss the relevance of organometallic complexes of graphitic materials to the development of a fundamental understanding of these interactions and their application in atomtronics as atomic interconnects, high mobility organometallic transistor devices, high-frequency electronic devices, organometallic catalysis (hydrogen fuel generation by photocatalytic water splitting, fuel cells, hydrogenation), spintronics, memory devices, and the next generation energy devices. We touch on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on metals, the reactivity of its surface, and its use as a template for asymmetric graphene functionalization chemistry (ultrathin Janus discs). We highlight some of the latest advances in understanding the nature of interactions between metals and graphene surfaces from the standpoint of metal overlayers deposited on graphene and SWNT thin films. Finally, we comment on the major challenges facing the field and the opportunities for technological applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Polarized Raman spectroscopy with differing angles of laser incidence on single-layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Gaeun; Kim, Yong Seung; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Seong, Maeng-Je

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown single-layer graphene samples, transferred onto a transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid and onto a quartz plate, were studied using polarized Raman spectroscopy with differing angles of laser incidence (θ). Two different polarization configurations are used. In an in-plane configuration, the polarization direction of both incident and scattered light is parallel to the graphene plane. In an out-of-plane configuration, the angle between the polarization vector and the graphene plane is the same as the angle of laser incidence (θ). The normalized Raman intensity of the G-band measured in the out-of-plane configuration, with respect to that in the in-plane configuration, was analyzed as a function of θ. The normalized Raman intensity showed approximately cos(2) θ-dependence up to θ = 70°, which can be explained by the fact that only the electric field component of the incident and the scattered photon in the out-of-plane configuration projected onto the graphene plane can contribute to the Raman scattering process because of the perfect confinement of the electrons to the graphene plane.

  8. Metal-etching-free direct delamination and transfer of single-layer graphene with a high degree of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sang Yoon; Oh, Joong Gun; Jung, Dae Yool; Choi, HongKyw; Yu, Chan Hak; Shin, Jongwoo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Cho, Byung Jin; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-01-14

    A method of graphene transfer without metal etching is developed to minimize the contamination of graphene in the transfer process and to endow the transfer process with a greater degree of freedom. The method involves direct delamination of single-layer graphene from a growth substrate, resulting in transferred graphene with nearly zero Dirac voltage due to the absence of residues that would originate from metal etching. Several demonstrations are also presented to show the high degree of freedom and the resulting versatility of this transfer method. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The application of highly doped single-layer graphene as the top electrodes of semitransparent organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhike; Li, Jinhua; Sun, Zhen-Hua; Tai, Guoan; Lau, Shu-Ping; Yan, Feng

    2012-01-24

    A single-layer graphene film with high conductance and transparency was realized by effective chemical doping. The conductance of single-layer graphene was increased for more than 400% when it was doped with Au nanoparticles and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulfonic acid). Then semitransparent organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were fabricated with single-layer graphene and indium tin oxide (ITO) as the top and bottom electrodes, respectively. The performance of the devices was optimized by tuning the active layer thickness and doping the single-layer graphene electrodes. The maximum efficiency of 2.7% was observed in the devices with the area of 20 mm(2) illuminated from graphene electrode under the AM1.5 solar simulator. It is notable that all of the devices showed higher efficiency from the graphene than ITO side, which was attributed to the better transmittance of the graphene electrodes. In addition, the influence of the active area of the organic solar cell on its photovoltaic performance was studied. We found that, when the active areas increased from 6 to 50 mm(2), the power conversion efficiencies decreased from 3% to 2.3% because of the increased series resistances and the decreased edge effect of the devices. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide as a passivation layer on germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrovic, I. Z., E-mail: ivona@liverpool.ac.uk; Hall, S.; Weerakkody, A. D.; Sedghi, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Althobaiti, M.; Hesp, D.; Dhanak, V. R. [Department of Physics and Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZF (United Kingdom); Santoni, A. [ENEA, Frascati Research Centre, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Chalker, P. R. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Henkel, C.; Dentoni Litta, E.; Hellström, P.-E.; Östling, M. [School of ICT, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Isafjordsgatan 22, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Tan, H.; Schamm-Chardon, S. [CEMES-CNRS and Université de Toulouse, nMat group, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2015-06-07

    A comprehensive study of atomic-layer deposited thulium oxide (Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on germanium has been conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vacuum ultra-violet variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The valence band offset is found to be 3.05 ± 0.2 eV for Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-Ge from the Tm 4d centroid and Ge 3p{sub 3/2} charge-corrected XPS core-level spectra taken at different sputtering times of a single bulk thulium oxide sample. A negligible downward band bending of ∼0.12 eV is observed during progressive differential charging of Tm 4d peaks. The optical band gap is estimated from the absorption edge and found to be 5.77 eV with an apparent Urbach tail signifying band gap tailing at ∼5.3 eV. The latter has been correlated to HRTEM and electron diffraction results corroborating the polycrystalline nature of the Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. The Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interface is found to be rather atomically abrupt with sub-nanometer thickness. In addition, the band line-up of reference GeO{sub 2}/n-Ge stacks obtained by thermal oxidation has been discussed and derived. The observed low reactivity of thulium oxide on germanium as well as the high effective barriers for holes (∼3 eV) and electrons (∼2 eV) identify Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a strong contender for interfacial layer engineering in future generations of scaled high-κ gate stacks on Ge.

  11. Successful Fabrication of GaN Epitaxial Layer on Non-Catalytically grown Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Won [Konkuk University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk-Ho [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Sapphire is widely used as a substrate for the growth of GaN epitaxial layer (EPI), but has several drawbacks such as high cost, large lattice mismatch, non-flexibility, and so on. Here, we first employ graphene directly grown on Si or sapphire substrate as a platform for the growth and lift-off of GaN-light-emitting diode (LED) EPI, useful for not only recycling the substrate but also transferring the GaN-LED EPI to other flexible substrates. Sequential standard processes of nucleation/recrystallization of GaN seeds and deposition of undoped (u-) GaN/AlN buffer layer were done on graphene/substrate before the growth of GaN-LED EPI, accompanied by taping and lift-off of u-GaN/AlN or GaN-LED EPI. This approach can overcome the limitations by the catalytic growth and transfer of graphene, and make the oxygen-plasma treatment of graphene for the growth of GaN EPI unnecessary.

  12. Suppression of intrinsic roughness in encapsulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Joachim Dahl; Gunst, Tue; Gregersen, Søren Schou; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Bøggild, Peter; Booth, Timothy J.

    2017-07-01

    Roughness in graphene is known to contribute to scattering effects which lower carrier mobility. Encapsulating graphene in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) leads to a significant reduction in roughness and has become the de facto standard method for producing high-quality graphene devices. We have fabricated graphene samples encapsulated by hBN that are suspended over apertures in a substrate and used noncontact electron diffraction measurements in a transmission electron microscope to measure the roughness of encapsulated graphene inside such structures. We furthermore compare the roughness of these samples to suspended bare graphene and suspended graphene on hBN. The suspended heterostructures display a root mean square (rms) roughness down to 12 pm, considerably less than that previously reported for both suspended graphene and graphene on any substrate and identical within experimental error to the rms vibrational amplitudes of carbon atoms in bulk graphite. Our first-principles calculations of the phonon bands in graphene/hBN heterostructures show that the flexural acoustic phonon mode is localized predominantly in the hBN layer. Consequently, the flexural displacement of the atoms in the graphene layer is strongly suppressed when it is supported by hBN, and this effect increases when graphene is fully encapsulated.

  13. Enhanced Photocathodes for Astrophysics using Atomic Layer Deposition Techniques Deposition Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    The objective of this program is to exploit the recent availability of atomic layer deposition techniques to provide a new generation of high performance photocathodes. We intend to work on the enhancement of photocathodes by atomic layer deposition, and on atomic layer deposited substrate structures, and assess their performance (gain, lifetime, stability, image fidelity) in microchannel plate based detectors. This would enable detection efficiency and bandpass improvements for microchannel plate based spaceflight detectors for imaging and spectroscopic instruments in small and large formats. Applications include the detection of soft X-ray, and UV through NUV. Recent work has achieved considerable success in development of borosilicate substrate microchannel plates functionalized by atomic layer deposited resistive and photoemissive materials. These could provide stable, compatible, substrates for high efficiency photocathodes, although very limited work has been done to date on this aspect. This development addresses detector technologies for SALSO, and impending proposals for a number of other NASA sub-orbital and satellite instruments. Results with borosilicate substrate microchannel plates functionalized by atomic layer deposited surface layers has been impressive, providing economical devices with long term stable gain and low background in formats up to 20 cm. Atomic layer deposition provides a surface layer that is smooth, clean, and chemically compatible with photocathode materials, and withstands high temperatures. The substrates can also be made with larger open area ratios, and the atomic layer deposition nanofabrication processes provides high secondary emission coefficients that will enhance photocathode efficiencies. Photocathodes (GaN, etc) deposited by MOCVD or MBE processes may also be deposited using atomic layer deposition, with potential advantages in layer structuring and selective area coverage and penetration over large areas.

  14. Raman excitation profiles of hybrid systems constituted by single-layer graphene and free base phthalocyanine: Manifestations of two mechanisms of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, T.; Mojzeš, P.; Melníková Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin; Sutrová, Veronika; Šloufová, I.; Vlčková, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 10 (2017), s. 1270-1281 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphene-enhanced Raman scattering * single-layer graphene * free base phthalocyanine * Raman excitation profiles * photoinduced charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  15. Fabrication of graphene-nanoflake/poly(4-vinylphenol) polymer nanocomposite thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization and its application as flexible resistive switching device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung Hyun; Ali, Junaid [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Na, Kyoung-Hoan, E-mail: khna@dankook.ac.kr [College of Engineering, Dankook University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes synthesis of graphene/poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) nanocomposite and deposition of thin film by electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) for fabrication flexible resistive switching device. EHDA technique proved its viability for thin film deposition after surface morphology analyses by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and non-destructive 3D Nano-profilometry, as the deposited films were, devoid of abnormalities. The commercially available graphene micro-flakes were exfoliated and broken down to ultra-small (20 nm–200 nm) nano-flakes by ultra-sonication in presence of N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). These graphene nanoflakes with PVP nanocomposite, were successfully deposited as thin films (thickness ~140±7 nm, R{sub a}=2.59 nm) on indium–tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Transmittance data revealed that thin films are up to ~87% transparent in visible and NIR region. Resistive switching behaviour of graphene/PVP nanocomposite thin film was studied by using the nanocomposite as active layer in Ag/active layer/ITO sandwich structure. The resistive switching devices thus fabricated, showed characteristic OFF to ON (high resistance to low resistance) transition at low voltages, when operated between ±3 V, characterized at 10 nA compliance currents. The devices fabricated by this approach exhibited a stable room temperature, low power current–voltage hysteresis and well over 1 h retentivity, and R{sub OFF}/R{sub ON}≈35:1. The device showed stable flexibility up to a minimum bending diameter of 1.8 cm.

  16. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  17. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  18. Graphene plasmonics: physics and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shenyang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmon in graphene possesses many unique properties. It originates from the collective motion of massless Dirac fermions, and the carrier density dependence is distinctively different from conventional plasmons. In addition, graphene plasmon is highly tunable and shows strong energy confinement capability. Most intriguingly, as an atom-thin layer, graphene and its plasmon are very sensitive to the immediate environment. Graphene plasmons strongly couple to polar phonons of the substrate, molecular vibrations of the adsorbates, and lattice vibrations of other atomically thin layers. In this review, we present the most important advances in graphene plasmonics field. The topics include terahertz plasmons, mid-infrared plasmons, plasmon-phonon interactions, and potential applications. Graphene plasmonics opens an avenue for reconfigurable metamaterials and metasurfaces; it is an exciting and promising new subject in the nanophotonics and plasmonics research field.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Modification and Creation of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Erinn Christine

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor-phase technique for the conformal deposition of material with sub-nanometer precision, making it an ideal process for modifying and even creating nanomaterials. The focus of this dissertation is the study of how ALD precursors interact with organic materials, namely polymers, to create selectively deposited nano-scale patterns and how ALD coatings modify biological responses to nanomaterials, namely carbon nanotubes (CNT), after inhalation. Nanoscale patterning is vital to the semiconductor industry. With features becoming smaller and more complex with each passing year, new techniques are required to meet the needs of the industry. The ability to selectively pattern a material onto a wafer is of particular interest for the replacement of costly etching steps. In the first half of this dissertation, a method for the selective deposition of nano-scale patterns is presented. Patterned polymers were used as sacrificial sponges to soak up ALD precursors for the creation of metal-oxide features. Meanwhile, deposition in areas without polymer was limited to the monolayer regime. Following infiltration, the saturated polymer was burned away and the precursor oxidized to form a metal oxide reproduction of the polymer pattern. Determining the reaction between the ALD precursor, trimethylaluminum, and polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), helped to achieve patterning by informing the proper selection of reactor temperature as well as exposure and purge times. Using this technique, features from tens of nanometers to tens of microns were patterned uniformly and simultaneously across a 150 mm wafer. Finally, this technique was extended to pattern two different materials using only one patterned polymer layer. ALD was first used to deposit a metal oxide were there was no polymer. By selecting ALD precursors that do not react within or on top of the polymer, selective deposition of the first material was achieved. Following this, the

  20. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  1. Optical measurements of selected properties of nanocomposite layers with graphene and carbon nanotubes fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenc, Zofia; Salbut, Leszek; Pakula, Anna; Sloma, Marcin; Wroblewski, Grzegorz; Jakubowska, Małgorzata

    2014-05-01

    Polymer substrates which are covered with a thin layer of graphene nanoplatelets or carbon nanotubes have a big potential for modern engineering, especially in organic electronics. The main advantage of those materials is transparency in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. This property creates a possibility of using these materials to produce electrodes in flexible screens and light sources. It is necessary to know the transmission characteristics of these materials to assess their usefulness in optoelectronics. In the article authors present the results of the conducted research on the transmittance characteristics of different samples. The samples contained different deposited substances. They had various diameters of the graphene nanoplatelets, one group contained carbon nanotubes. Samples had 50 or 100 layers. The authors examine the influence of these parameters on ink transmittance and ink transmittance uniformity. These analyses are a base for future research on flexible carbon electrodes, especially for applying them in production of flexible organic displays and light sources.

  2. Theoretical analysis of transverse impact response in double layer graphene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Natsuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing future nanoscale devices or nanostructures as new element in structural mechanics, it is very important to predict the responses for these elements against various mechanical loading conditions. In this letter, an analytical solution of the impact response in double layer graphene sheets (DLGSs is presented using a continuum mechanics theory. In this analytical model, the DLGSs are considered as a layer stack of two individual graphene sheet (GS bound together by van der Waals (vdW forces. The influence of impact velocity and mass on the impact response are predicted by using numerical simulation. The result shows that impact response of GSs subjected to nanomass has exceedingly short times with picoseconds order.

  3. Room-temperature gating of molecular junctions using few-layer graphene nanogap electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Amelia; Prins, Ferry; Ruitenberg, Justus; Seldenthuis, Johannes; Aliaga-Alcalde, Nuria; Vandersypen, Lieven; van der Zant, Herre

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new method based on feedback controlled electroburning to controllably form nanogaps in few-layer graphene [1]. The gaps have separations on the order of 1-2 nm as estimated from a Simmons model for tunneling. Furthermore, molecules are deposited in the nanogaps. These molecular junctions display gateable IV-characteristics at room temperature. Gateable transport through molecules contacted between the electrodes demonstrates the potential of room-temperature operation of our molecular devices. Combined with the observed stability in time, our study shows that few-layer graphene nanogaps are an interesting alternative to metal electrodes. [1] Ferry Prins, Amelia Barreiro, Justus Ruitenberg, Johannes Seldenthuis, N'uria Aliaga-Alcalde, Lieven Vandersypen, Herre van der Zant, Nanoletters 11 (2011) 4607 - 4611

  4. Electrostatically transparent graphene quantum-dot trap layers for efficient nonvolatile memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Rae; Jo, Yong Eun; Sung, Yeo Hyun; Won, Ui Yeon [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong Seon; Kang, Won Tae; Yu, Woo Jong, E-mail: leeyoung@skku.edu, E-mail: micco21@skku.edu [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hee, E-mail: leeyoung@skku.edu, E-mail: micco21@skku.edu [Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, BK21 Physics Division, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-09

    In this study, we have demonstrated nonvolatile memory devices using graphene quantum-dots (GQDs) trap layers with indium zinc oxide (IZO) semiconductor channel. The Fermi-level of GQD was effectively modulated by tunneling electrons near the Dirac point because of limited density of states and weak electrostatic screening in monolayer graphene. As a result, large gate modulation was driven in IZO channel to achieve a subthreshold swing of 5.21 V/dec (300 nm SiO{sub 2} gate insulator), while Au quantum-dots memory shows 15.52 V/dec because of strong electrostatic screening in metal quantum-dots. Together, discrete charge traps of GQDs enable stable performance in the endurance test beyond 800 cycles of programming and erasing. Our study suggests the exciting potential of GQD trap layers to be used for a highly promising material in non-volatile memory devices.

  5. Fabrication of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugawara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have succeeded in fabricating Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on silicon carbide. The low-energy electron diffraction from Li-deposited bilayer graphene shows a sharp 3×3R30° pattern in contrast to Li-deposited monolayer graphene. This indicates that Li atoms are intercalated between two adjacent graphene layers and take the same well-ordered superstructure as in bulk C6Li. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed that Li atoms are fully ionized and the π bands of graphene are systematically folded by the superstructure of intercalated Li atoms, producing a snowflake-like Fermi surface centered at the Γ point. The present result suggests a high potential of Li-intercalated bilayer graphene for application to a nano-scale Li-ion battery.

  6. Formation of interstitial atoms in surface layers of helium-implanted tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Masilov, A. A.; Sadanov, E. V.

    2013-11-01

    Using a method of field ion microscopy, the atomic structure of surface and near-surface layers of a perfect dislocation-free tungsten irradiated by helium ions with energies below the threshold of displacement was studied. We have found the output of tungsten atoms from the bulk as a result of their displacement from regular lattice positions occupied by implanted helium atoms and the formation of interstitial tungsten atoms. It is shown that high concentrations of helium and the presence of image forces have a considerable effect on the development of these processes. Depleted zones consisting of helium-vacancy complexes are revealed within the irradiated near-surface layer.

  7. Vertically Oriented Graphene Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitor with Very Fast Dynamic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Electrochimica Acta (08 2011) TOTAL: 1 Books Number of Manuscripts: Received Paper TOTAL: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards none Graduate...Graphene Double Layer Capacitor with ac Filtering Performance”, Electrochimica Acta , 56 (1011)10443 9. Pandolfo, G., Hollenkamp, A.F., “Carbon...Power Performance”, Electrochimica Acta (2010) doi 10.1016/j. electacta 2011.05.122 . M. Cai, R.A. Outlaw, S.M. Butler and J.M Miller, ”A high

  8. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometre size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqing; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Baker, Gary A; Veith, Gabriel M; Unocic, Raymond R; Mahurin, Shannon M; Chi, Miaofang; Dai, Sheng

    2010-07-07

    Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95 mg mL(-1)) of non-oxidized few layer graphene (FLG), five or less sheets, with micrometre-long edges were obtained via direct exfoliation of natural graphite flakes in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide ([Bmim]-[Tf(2)N]), by tip ultrasonication.

  9. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO{sub x} buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  10. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  11. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-20

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  12. Highly Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Nanofibrillated Cellulose/Graphene Nanosheets Hybrid Films for Thermal Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Jiao, Dejin; Cui, Siqi; Hou, Xingshuang; Ding, Peng; Shi, Liyi

    2017-01-25

    An anisotropic thermally conductive film with tailorable microstructures and macroproperties is fabricated using a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of graphene oxide (GO) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on a flexible NFC substrate driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, followed by chemical reduction process. The resulting NFC/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) hybrid film reveals an orderly hierarchical structure in which the RGO nanosheets exhibit a high degree of orientation along the in-plane direction. The assembly cycles dramatically increase the in-plane thermal conductivity (λX) of the hybrid film to 12.6 W·m(-1)·K(-1), while the cross-plane thermal conductivity (λZ) shows a lower value of 0.042 W·m(-1)·K(-1) in the hybrid film with 40 assembly cycles. The thermal conductivity anisotropy reaches up to λX/λZ = 279, which is substantially larger than that of similar polymeric nanocomposites, indicating that the LbL assembly on a flexible NFC substrate is an efficient technique for the preparation of polymeric nanocomposites with improved heat conducting property. Moreover, the layered hybrid film composed of 1D NFC and 2D RGO exhibits synergetic mechnical properties with outstanding flexibility and a high tensile strength (107 MPa). The combination of anisotropic thermal conductivity and superior mechanical performance may facilitate the applications in thermal management.

  13. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  14. On-Demand Spin–Orbit Interaction from Which-Layer Tunability in Bilayer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Jun Yong; Morpurgo, Alberto F.; Levitov, Leonid

    2017-11-01

    Spin-orbit interaction (SOI) that is gate-tunable over a broad range is essential to exploiting novel spin phenomena. Achieving this regime has remained elusive because of the weakness of the underlying relativistic coupling and lack of its tunability in solids. Here we outline a general strategy that enables exceptionally high tunability of SOI through creating a which-layer spin-orbit field inhomogeneity in graphene multilayers. An external transverse electric field is applied to shift carriers between the layers with strong and weak SOI. Because graphene layers are separated by sub-nm scales, exceptionally high tunability of SOI can be achieved through a minute carrier displacement. A detailed analysis of the experimentally relevant case of bilayer graphene on a semiconducting transition metal dichalchogenide substrate is presented. In this system, a complete tunability of SOI amounting to its ON/OFF switching can be achieved. New opportunities for spin control are exemplified with electrically driven spin resonance and topological phases with different quantized intrinsic valley Hall conductivities.

  15. Strong enhancement of Faraday rotation using one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystals containing graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2014-12-20

    We propose a one-dimensional conjugated photonic crystal single heterojunction infiltrated with a single graphene layer to achieve large Faraday rotation (FR) angles as well as high transmission simultaneously. The effects of the external magnetic field values, incidence angle, number of unit cells, layer thickness of constituents of the conjugated photonic crystals, chemical potential of graphene, and ambient temperature on the Faraday rotation angle and transmission are investigated. Our results reveal that both the sign reversal and shifting of the FR peak can be obtained by changing the width of layers in the conjugated photonic crystal. In the case of negative FR angle, an increase of magnetic field enhances the FR angle and degrades the transmission. However, in the case of positive FR angle, when the magnetic field increases to a certain value, the FR angle is improved too. Further increase of the magnetic field leads to a decrease of FR angle. With increasing the number of unit cells, the FR angle is enhanced at the cost of decreasing the transmission. It is shown that normal incidence results in higher FR angle and transmission. It is also demonstrated that sign reversal and change of the FR angle is possible by manipulating the chemical potential of graphene and the ambient temperature.

  16. Precise Atomic Structures of Three Novel Nanomaterials in Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Cosmology: Graphene, Boron Nitride and Coronene

    OpenAIRE

    Raji Heyrovska; Lakshmi Atchison; Sara Narayan

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are currently of great importance in science, technology and commercial applications. Since these materials are atomic layer thick and are a few square nanometers of area, a knowledge of their precise atomic structures will help in the exact understanding of the properties at the nanoscale and in the fabrication and design of the nanomaterials for their many uses. Their known inter-atomic distances have been used here to obtain the exact atomic radii of the component atoms and t...

  17. Graphene on graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Søren Schou; Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Power, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Graphene bilayer systems are known to exhibit a band gap when the layer symmetry is broken by applying a perpendicular electric field. The resulting band structure resembles that of a conventional semiconductor with a parabolic dispersion. Here, we introduce a bilayer graphene heterostructure......, where single-layer graphene is placed on top of another layer of graphene with a regular lattice of antidots. We dub this class of graphene systems GOAL: graphene on graphene antidot lattice. By varying the structure geometry, band-structure engineering can be performed to obtain linearly dispersing...

  18. Magnetism in non-metal atoms adsorbed graphene-like gallium nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wencheng; Sun, Minglei; Yu, Jin; Chou, Jyh-Pin

    2018-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of graphene-like gallium nitride (g-GaN) with adsorbed H, B, C, N, O, and F atoms were investigated using spin-polarized first-principles calculations. We found that H, B, C, N, O, and F atoms can be chemisorbed on a g-GaN monolayer. The total magnetic moments of 1.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 1.0 μB are founded in B-, C-, N-, and F-adsorbed g-GaN monolayers, respectively. In addition, a half-metallic state appears in the N- and F-adsorbed g-GaN, while a spin-polarized semiconducting state appears in other g-GaN monolayers after the adsorption of B or C. These findings demonstrate that the magnetic properties of g-GaN can be effectively tuned by the adsorption of non-metal atoms. In particular, the F-adsorbed system that exhibits a half-metallic state and high Curie temperature of 367 K has great potential for application in spintronics.

  19. Heterogeneous fluorescence intermittency in single layer reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jixin; Volkan-Kacso, Sandor; Eltom, Ahmed; Morozov, Yurii; McDonald, Matthew P.; Ruth, Anthony; Kuno, Masaru; Janko, Boldizsar

    Fluorescence intermittency, or blinking, has been observed in a wide range of systems, including quantum dots, nanorods, and nanowires. Striking similarities have been documented in the optical response of these nanoscale emitters. However, the mechanism behind blinking still remains elusive. For the first time, blinking has been observed in a two-dimensional system in recent experiments on reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Here we reveal the power spectral density (PSD) of the blinking in rGO shares the same 1/f-like behavior of previously known blinking systems; meanwhile, the heterogeneous dynamic evolution and spatial correlation make rGO a unique blinking system. To investigate the origin of blinking, we self-consistently explain the evolution of rGO blinking using the phenomenological multiple recombination center (MRC) model that captures common features of nanoscale blinking. Furthermore, tight binding method and ab-initio method calculations of carbon nanodots are utilized to look for the microscopic structure corresponding to the RCs in the MRC model. M. K. thanks the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, the Army Research Office (W911NF-12-1-0578) for support. B.J. was supported in part by the U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38.

  20. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...