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Sample records for atomic fluorescence spectrometric

  1. Atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of trace amounts of arsenic and antimony in drinking water by continuous hydride generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadri, F; Morales-Rubio, A; de la Guardia, M

    2000-07-31

    A highly sensitive and simple method has been developed for the determination of As(III), total As, Sb(III) and total Sb in drinking water samples by continuous hydride generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). For As determination, water samples aspirated in a carrier of 2 mol l(-1) HCl were merged with a reducing NaBH(4) 3%(m/v) solution, with sample and NaBH(4) flow rates of 12.5 and 1.5 ml min(-1) respectively. The hydride generated in a 170 cm reaction coil was transported to the detector with an Ar flow of 400 ml min(-1), and a limit of detection between 5 and 20 ng l(-1) was obtained. For Sb determination, 2.5 mol l(-1) HCl and 2%(m/v) NaBH(4) were employed, with respective flow rates of 9.7 and 2 ml min(-1). The hydride generated in a 50 cm reaction coil was transported to the detector with an Ar flow rate of 300 ml min(-1), and a limit of detection between 6 and 14 ng l(-1) was obtained. Determination of the total concentration of these elements was obtained after a previous reduction with KI. Recovery studies of different added concentrations of these species in natural water samples were between 93 and 104% for As(III), 96-103% for As(V), 93-101% for Sb(III) and 90-119% for Sb(V).

  2. [Butanol extraction combined with dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution-atomic fluorescence spectrometric method for indirect determination of molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping; Geng, Guo-Xing; Tang, Yan-Kui; Lu, Zhi-Yong

    2012-12-01

    A method for indirectly determining the molybdenum in Chinese herbal medicine by butanol extraction and dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution was established for atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The molybdoarsenate heteropoly acid, formed in the presence of As(V) and ammonium molybdate in 0.3 mol x L(-1) sulphuric acid medium, was separated and enriched in the organic solvent, then the evaporation of organic reagent was implemented and the left residue was dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid in which the arsenic content was determined on behalf of molybdenum. In the optimum experimental conditions, molybdenum content in 0-15 microg x L(-1) range depicts a good linear relationship, the detection limit and relative standard deviation of 0.44 microg x L(-1) and 1.1% were obtained, respectively. Spiked Chinese herbal medicine samples were determined with the proposed method, and recoveries of 95.6%-101.3% were achieved.

  3. Hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter using multivariate optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscoso-Perez, Carmen [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: jmoreda@udc.es; Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Fernandez-Fernandez, Esther [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)

    2004-11-22

    A highly sensitive and simple method, based on hydride generation and atomic fluorescence detection, has been developed for the determination of As, Bi, Sb, Se(IV) and Te(IV) in aqua regia extracts from atmospheric particulate matter samples. Atmospheric particulates matter was collected on glass fiber filters using a medium volume sampler (PM1 particulate matter). Two-level factorial designs have been used to optimise the hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) procedure. The effects of several parameters affecting the hydride generation efficiency (hydrochloric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and potassium iodide concentrations and flow rates) have been evaluated using a Plackett-Burman experimental design. In addition, parameters affecting the hydride measurement (delay, analysis and memory times) have been also investigated. The significant parameters obtained (sodium tetrahydroborate concentration, sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate and analysis time for As; hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Se(IV); and sodium tetrahydroborate concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate for Te(IV)) have been optimized by using 2{sup n} + star central composite design. Hydrochloric acid concentration and sodium tetrahydroborate flow rate were the significant parameters obtained for Sb and Bi determination, respectively. Using a univariate approach these parameters were optimized. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using several certified reference materials: SRM 1648 (urban particulate matter) and SRM 1649a (urban dust). Detection limits in the range of 6 x 10{sup -3} to 0.2 ng m{sup -3} have been achieved. The developed methods were applied to several atmospheric particulate matter samples corresponding to A Coruna city (NW Spain)

  4. Laser-excited fluorescence spectrometric system for tissue diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Polivanov, Yu. N.; Pykhov, R. L.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1994-12-01

    A compact experimental spectrometric system designed for experimental and clinical fluorescence diagnostic observations of tumors is described. Methods of tumor diagnostics using fluorescence spectra of photosensitizers employed for photodynamic therapy has been developed. The system has been tested in P.A. Hertzen Moscow Research Oncology Institute for direct and endoscopic fluorescence diagnostics of tumors in the course of clinical trials of new domestically produced drugs.

  5. Ultraviolet vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury in natural water with enrichment by on-line solid phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Deyuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Liqian; Liu, Jixin; Ye, Jianping; Li, Junwei; Zheng, Fengxi

    2013-10-01

    A novel method, which coupled an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) enrichment with ultraviolet vapor generation (UVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), was developed to improve the sensitivity of mercury determination and to remove the interference of some anion and organics to UVG of mercury. A high mercury retention efficiency and maximum exclusion of inorganic and organic matrix in water samples were achieved by using C18 SPE mini cartridge modified with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Fast and efficient elution from the cartridge was found by using L-cysteine mixing solution. Furthermore, through the investigation of different UV reactor designs, the most important factor was the structure of the reactor (which corresponded roughly to the photon flux) wherein the tubing was sintered into the UV lamp to give the highest UV generation efficiency. The second factor was the materials of the tubing (which roughly corresponded to the working wavelength). Synthetic quartz, characterized by the highest transparency at 185 nm, attained the highest UVG efficiency, suggesting that the most favorable wavelength for UVG was 185 nm. Under optimum conditions, the achievable detection limit (3σ) with sample loadings of 10.0 mL was 0.03 ng L- 1 and 0.08 ng L- 1 with different manifolds, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in tap water, river water and lake water samples.

  6. Ultraviolet vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of mercury in natural water with enrichment by on-line solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Deyuan [Beijing Titan Instruments Co., Ltd., Beijing 100015 (China); Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zhaohui [Beijing Entry–Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Beijing 100026 (China); Zhao, Liqian [Beijing Titan Instruments Co., Ltd., Beijing 100015 (China); Liu, Jixin, E-mail: ljx2117@gmail.com [Beijing Titan Instruments Co., Ltd., Beijing 100015 (China); Ye, Jianping; Li, Junwei; Zheng, Fengxi [Beijing Titan Instruments Co., Ltd., Beijing 100015 (China)

    2013-10-01

    A novel method, which coupled an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) enrichment with ultraviolet vapor generation (UVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), was developed to improve the sensitivity of mercury determination and to remove the interference of some anion and organics to UVG of mercury. A high mercury retention efficiency and maximum exclusion of inorganic and organic matrix in water samples were achieved by using C{sub 18} SPE mini cartridge modified with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC). Fast and efficient elution from the cartridge was found by using L-cysteine mixing solution. Furthermore, through the investigation of different UV reactor designs, the most important factor was the structure of the reactor (which corresponded roughly to the photon flux) wherein the tubing was sintered into the UV lamp to give the highest UV generation efficiency. The second factor was the materials of the tubing (which roughly corresponded to the working wavelength). Synthetic quartz, characterized by the highest transparency at 185 nm, attained the highest UVG efficiency, suggesting that the most favorable wavelength for UVG was 185 nm. Under optimum conditions, the achievable detection limit (3σ) with sample loadings of 10.0 mL was 0.03 ng L{sup −1} and 0.08 ng L{sup −1} with different manifolds, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of Hg in tap water, river water and lake water samples. - Graphical abstract: An interference free ultraviolet vapor generation based method was applied to determine ultratrace mercury in water sample. - Highlights: • Hg was enriched by on-line solid phase extraction. • Hg was detected by ultraviolet vapor generation AFS. • The interference of some anion and some organics was removed. • The effects of details of UV set were systemically discussed.

  7. Coprecipitation Technique for Preconcentration of Some Metal Ions prior to Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination

    OpenAIRE

    上田, 穣一

    1998-01-01

    Summary-for the preconcentration of trace ions in the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination (GFAAS), a rapid and simple coprecipitation method which does not need the filtration

  8. Speciation and detection of arsenic in aqueous samples: A review of recent progress in non-atomic spectrometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Sengupta, Mrinal K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Thermo Fisher Scientific, Dionex Products, 445 Lakeside Drive, Sunnyvale, CA, 94085 (United States); Yuan, Dongxing [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Compilation of principal official documents and major review articles, including the toxicology and chemistry of As. • Review of non-atomic spectrometric methods for speciation and detection of arsenic in aqueous samples (2005–2013) of the performance of field-usable methods. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (As) displays extreme toxicity and is a class A human carcinogen. It is of interest to both analytical chemists and environmental scientists. Facile and sensitive determination of As and knowledge of the speciation of forms of As in aqueous samples are vitally important. Nearly every nation has relevant official regulations on permissible limits of drinking water As content. The size of the literature on As is therefore formidable. The heart of this review consists of two tables: one is a compilation of principal official documents and major review articles, including the toxicology and chemistry of As. This includes comprehensive official compendia on As speciation, sample treatment, recommended procedures for the determination of As in specific sample matrices with specific analytical instrument(s), procedures for multi-element (including As) speciation and analysis, and prior comprehensive reviews on arsenic analysis. The second table focuses on the recent literature (2005–2013, the coverage for 2013 is incomplete) on As measurement in aqueous matrices. Recent As speciation and analysis methods based on spectrometric and electrochemical methods, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis and biosensors are summarized. We have deliberately excluded atomic optical spectrometric techniques (atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry) not because they are not important (in fact the majority of arsenic determinations are possibly carried out by one of these techniques) but because these methods are sufficiently mature and little meaningful innovation has been

  9. [Determination of trace cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L X; Ding, B M; Jiang, D; Liu, D Y; Yu, B; Zhu, B L; Ding, L

    2016-05-20

    To establish a method to determine cobalt in human urine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Urine with 2% nitric acid diluted two-fold, to quantify the curve, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Co was linear within 2.5~40.0 ng/ml with r>0.999. Spike experiment showed that Co received good recovery rate, which was 90.8%~94.8%. Intra-assay precisions were 3.2%~5.1% for Co, inter-assay precisions were 4.4%~5.2% for Co. The method by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometr to determine urine Co was fast, accurate and with low matrix effect. It could meet the requirement in GBZ/T 210.5-2008.

  10. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  11. Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometric study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ca, Mn, Ti, Cu, Mo, Fe, Zn, Ni, Re, Eu and Pb using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry, following standard procedures. The results showed varying amounts of the studied elements in the samples from the two ...

  12. Novel atomic absorption spectrometric and rapid spectrophotometric methods for the quantitation of paracetamol in saliva: application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, M M; Nejem, R M; El-Abadla, N S; Al-Kholy, M; Saleh, Akila A

    2008-01-01

    A novel atomic absorption spectrometric method and two highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of paracetamol. These techniques based on the oxidation of paracetamol by iron (III) (method I); oxidation of p-aminophenol after the hydrolysis of paracetamol (method II). Iron (II) then reacts with potassium ferricyanide to form Prussian blue color with a maximum absorbance at 700 nm. The atomic absorption method was accomplished by extracting the excess iron (III) in method II and aspirates the aqueous layer into air-acetylene flame to measure the absorbance of iron (II) at 302.1 nm. The reactions have been spectrometrically evaluated to attain optimum experimental conditions. Linear responses were exhibited over the ranges 1.0-10, 0.2-2.0 and 0.1-1.0 mug/ml for method I, method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method, respectively. A high sensitivity is recorded for the proposed methods I and II and atomic absorption spectrometric method value indicate: 0.05, 0.022 and 0.012 mug/ml, respectively. The limit of quantitation of paracetamol by method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method were 0.20 and 0.10 mug/ml. Method II and the atomic absorption spectrometric method were applied to demonstrate a pharmacokinetic study by means of salivary samples in normal volunteers who received 1.0 g paracetamol. Intra and inter-day precision did not exceed 6.9%.

  13. A spectrometric approach in radiography for detection of materials by their effective atomic number

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhikov, V D; Onyshchenko, G M; Lecoq, P; Smith, C F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report a spectrometric approach to dual-energy digital radiography that has been developed and applied to identify specific organic substances and discern small differences in their effective atomic number. An experimental setup has been designed, and a theoretical description proposed based on the experimental results obtained. The proposed method is based on the application of special reference samples made of materials with different effective atomic number and thickness parameters known to affect X-ray attenuation in the low-energy range. The results obtained can be used in the development of a new generation of multi-energy customs or medical X-ray scanners.

  14. Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination of Bismuth(III) after Coprecipitation with Hafnium Hydroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Joichi; Takagi, Midori

    1990-01-01

    A method for the coprecipitation of bismuth(III) with hafnium hydroxide followed by a graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination is described. Hafnium hydroxide coprecipitates quantitatively 0.05–3 μg of bismuth(III) from 50–400 cm3 of sample solution at pH 5.8–11.2. The presence of 2.5–50 mg of hafnium in 25 cm3 does not affect the atomic absorbance of bismuth(III). The calibration curve is linear for 0.05–3 μg of bismuth(III) in 25 cm3 and passes through the origin. Inte...

  15. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  16. Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Red Fluorescent Protein in Breast Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Post, Harm; Winnard, Paul T.; Greenwood, Tiffany R.; Raman, Venu; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Glunde, Kristine

    2013-05-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in combination with electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a powerful technique for visualization and identification of a variety of different biomolecules directly from thin tissue sections. As commonly used tools for molecular reporting, fluorescent proteins are molecular reporter tools that have enabled the elucidation of a multitude of biological pathways and processes. To combine these two approaches, we have performed targeted MS analysis and MALDI-MSI visualization of a tandem dimer (td)Tomato red fluorescent protein, which was expressed exclusively in the hypoxic regions of a breast tumor xenograft model. For the first time, a fluorescent protein has been visualized by both optical microscopy and MALDI-MSI. Visualization of tdTomato by MALDI-MSI directly from breast tumor tissue sections will allow us to simultaneously detect and subsequently identify novel molecules present in hypoxic regions of the tumor. MS and MALDI-MSI of fluorescent proteins, as exemplified in our study, is useful for studies in which the advantages of MS and MSI will benefit from the combination with molecular approaches that use fluorescent proteins as reporters.

  17. Vapor generation – atomic spectrometric techniques. Expanding frontiers through specific-species preconcentration. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Raúl A.; Pacheco, Pablo H.; Cerutti, Soledad [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Martinez, Luis D., E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar [Área de Química Analítica, Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina); Instituto de Química de San Luis, INQUISAL, Centro Científico-Tecnológico de San Luis (CCT-San Luis), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Ciudad de San Luis 5700 (Argentina)

    2015-05-22

    This article reviews 120 articles found in SCOPUS and specific Journal cites corresponding to the terms ‘preconcentration’; ‘speciation’; ‘vapor generation techniques’ and ‘atomic spectrometry techniques’ in the last 5 years. - Highlights: • Recent advances in vapor generation and atomic spectrometry were reviewed. • Species-specific preconcentration strategies after and before VG were discussed. • New preconcentration and speciation analysis were evaluated within this framework. - Abstract: We review recent progress in preconcentration strategies associated to vapor generation techniques coupled to atomic spectrometric (VGT-AS) for specific chemical species detection. This discussion focuses on the central role of different preconcentration approaches, both before and after VG process. The former was based on the classical solid phase and liquid–liquid extraction procedures which, aided by automation and miniaturization strategies, have strengthened the role of VGT-AS in several research fields including environmental, clinical, and others. We then examine some of the new vapor trapping strategies (atom-trapping, hydride trapping, cryotrapping) that entail improvements in selectivity through interference elimination, but also they allow reaching ultra-low detection limits for a large number of chemical species generated in conventional VG systems, including complete separation of several species of the same element. This review covers more than 100 bibliographic references from 2009 up to date, found in SCOPUS database and in individual searches in specific journals. We finally conclude by giving some outlook on future directions of this field.

  18. Column preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of rhodium in some food and standard samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Mohammad Ali; Pourmohammad, Fatemeh; Fazelirad, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric method has been developed for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of rhodium after adsorption of its 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol/tetraphenylborate ion associated complex at the surface of alumina. Several factors affecting the extraction efficiency such as the pH, type of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, sorption capacity of alumina and sample volume were investigated and optimized. The relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.1 ng/mL of rhodium was ±6.3%. In this method, the detection limit was 0.003 ng/mL in the original solution. The sorption capacity of alumina and the linear range for Rh(III) were evaluated as 0.8 mg/g and 0.015-0.45 ng/mL in the original solution, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of rhodium content in some food and standard samples with high recovery values. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction sorbents prior to atomic spectrometric determination of metal species: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero Latorre, C., E-mail: carlos.herrero@usc.es [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alvarez Mendez, J.; Barciela Garcia, J.; Garcia Martin, S.; Pena Crecente, R.M. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Alfonso X el Sabio s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs as sorbent for metal species in solid phase extraction has been described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and chemical strategies for functionalization of carbon nanotubes have been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Published analytical methods concerning solid phase extraction and atomic spectrometric determination have been reviewed. - Abstract: New materials have significant impact on the development of new methods and instrumentation for chemical analysis. From the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes - due to their high adsorption and desorption capacities - have been employed as sorption substrates in solid-phase extraction for the preconcentration of metal species from diverse matrices. Looking for successive improvements in sensitivity and selectivity, in the past few years, carbon nanotubes have been utilized as sorbents for solid phase extraction in three different ways: like as-grown, oxidized and functionalized nanotubes. In the present paper, an overview of the recent trends in the use of carbon nanotubes for solid phase extraction of metal species in environmental, biological and food samples is presented. The determination procedures involved the adsorption of metals on the nanotube surface, their quantitative desorption and subsequent measurement by means of atomic spectrometric techniques such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry/mass spectrometry, among others. Synthesis, purification and types of carbon nanotubes, as well as the diverse chemical and physical strategies for their functionalization are described. Based on 140 references, the performance and general properties of the applications of solid phase extraction based on carbon nanotubes for metal species atomic spectrometric determination are discussed.

  20. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometric and tandem mass spectrometric studies of some functionalized tetrapyrroles derived from chlorophylls a and b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keely, B.J.; Maxwell, J.R. (Univ. of Bristol (England))

    Fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra of a number of functionalized tetrapyrroles derived from chlorophylls a and b have been obtained and MS/MS studies used to investigate aspects of the fragmentation behavior of some of them. The application of this approach is demonstrated by the assignment of pheophytin b isolated from a lake sediment where the amount and purity were insufficient for {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies.

  1. Nondestructive fluorescent state detection of single neutral atom qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael J; Hamley, Christopher D; Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nondestructive (lossless) fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with a 95% accuracy and an atom loss rate of 1%. Individual atoms are initialized and detected over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a 100-fold improvement in data collection rates over previous experiments. Microwave Rabi oscillations are observed with repeated measurements of one and the same single atom. © 2011 American Physical Society

  2. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional

  3. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Toyli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  4. Simultaneous single molecule atomic force and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Olaf; Koberling, Felix; Walters, Deron; Koenig, Marcelle; Viani, Jacob; Ros, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-molecule-sensitive confocal fluorescence microscopy enables a fascinating investigation into the structure, dynamics and interactions of single biomolecules or their assemblies. AFM reveals the structure of macromolecular complexes with nanometer resolution, while fluorescence can facilitate the identification of their constituent parts. In addition, nanophotonic effects, such as fluorescence quenching or enhancement due to the AFM tip, can be used to increase the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, thus enabling the identification of different fluorescence labels within a macromolecular complex. We present a novel setup consisting of two commercial, state-of-the-art microscopes. A sample scanning atomic force microscope is mounted onto an objective scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime microscope. The ability to move the sample and objective independently allows for precise alignment of AFM probe and laser focus with an accuracy down to a few nanometers. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) gives us the opportunity to measure single-molecule fluorescence lifetimes. We will be able to study molecular complexes in the vicinity of an AFM probe on a level that has yet to be achieved. With this setup we simultaneously obtained single molecule sensitivity in the AFM topography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of YOYO-1 stained lambda-DNA samples and we showed silicon tip induced single molecule quenching on organic fluorophores.

  5. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  6. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  7. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Würfel, Hendryk; Habenicht, Stefanie H; Lembke, Christine; Richter, Phillipp; Birckner, Eckhard; Beckert, Rainer; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I)-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS) detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC-MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  8. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  9. An indirect atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium in pharmaceutical formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMOUD MOHAMED ISSA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive indirect atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS method has been developed for the determination of very low concentrations of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium. The method is based on the oxidation of these drugs with iron(III. The excess of iron(III was extracted into diethyl ether and then the iron(II in the aqueous layer was aspirated into an air–acetylene flame and determined by AAS. The linear concentration ranges were 25–400, 50–500 and 60–600 ng ml-1 for ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium, respectively. The results were statistically compared with the official method using t- and f-test at p < 0.05. There were insignificant interferences from most of the excipients present. The intra- and inter-day assay coefficients of variation were less than 6.1 % and the recoveries ranged from 95 to 103 %. The method was applied for the analysis of these drug substances in their commercial pharmaceutical formulations.

  10. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium after solid-liquid extraction with dithizone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Nezhadali

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of trace amount of cadmium ion after preconcentration by extracting its dithizone complex into molten naphthalene was developed. Several experimental conditions such as pH of the solution, stirring time, the amounts of naphthalene, standing time and volume of the solution were optimized. Trace amount of cadmium ion in aqueous solution of sample was chelated with 5 mL of 0.001 M dithizone at pH 8. After addition of 0.15 g naphthalene, the solution was heated to about 85 oC and stirred (800 rpm for 2 min to reproduce the microcrystalline naphthalene. Cadmium ion was determined by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The interfering effects of diverse concomitant ions (cations and anions were investigated. Artificial sea water and a standard reference material (SRM were analyzed by this method. The sensitivity and detection limit of 1.2 ngL-1 and 1.5 ng L-1 were found, respectively.

  11. Sorption of As(V) from waters using chitosan and chitosan-immobilized sodium silicate prior to atomic spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyaci, Ezel; Eroğlu, Ahmet E; Shahwan, Talal

    2010-01-15

    A natural biosorbent containing amine functional groups, chitosan, and a novel sorbent, chitosan-immobilized sodium silicate, were prepared and utilized for the selective sorption of As(V) from waters prior to its determination by atomic spectrometric techniques, namely, hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Chitosan was synthesized from chitin and sodium silicate was used as the immobilization matrix due to its straightforward synthesis. Through sequential sorption studies, it was shown that chitosan-immobilized sodium silicate has exhibited a better chemical stability than the chitosan itself which demonstrates the advantage of immobilization method. Both chitosan and chitosan-immobilized sodium silicate were shown to selectively adsorb As(V), arsenate, from waters at pH 3.0 at which neither chitin nor sodium silicate displayed any sorption towards As(V). The sorption of arsenate by chitosan is supposed to have electrostatic nature since pH of 3.0 is both the point at which the amino groups in chitosan are protonated and also the predominant form of As(V) is H(2)AsO(4)(-). A pre-oxidation step is required if both As(III) and As(V) are to be determined. Desorption from the sorbents was realized with 1.0% (w/v) l-cysteine prepared in a pH 3.0 solution adjusted with HCl. Among the possible interfering species tested, only Te(IV) and Sb(III) were shown to cause a decrease in the sorption capacity especially at high interferant concentrations. High concentrations of Sb(III) also resulted in gas phase interference during hydride generation. The validity of the method was checked both via spike recovery experiments and also through the analysis of a standard reference material. Spike recovery tests were carried out with four different types of water; namely, ultra-pure, bottled drinking, tap, and sea water; and percent recovery values were found to be 114 (+/-4), 112 (+/-2), 43 (+/-4), and 0

  12. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on W- and Ba atoms eroded from fluorescent lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlbeck, J.; Rackow, K.; Sigeneger, F.; Uhrlandt, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Hadrath, S.; Lieder, G.

    2010-05-01

    The method of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is applied to fluorescent lamps (FL) in order to investigate processes of electrode erosion in the vicinity of the electrodes. The life time of FLs which are ignited by instant start is mainly limited by sputtering of the coil electrodes and in final breaking. This sputtering of tungsten mainly occurs during the ignition in the glow discharge phase. Therefore, the density of W atoms is measured in the electrode region during ignition. Temporal and spatial resolved profiles were measured by LIF which has been combined with fast imaging. The life time of FLs which are started with preheated coils is also caused mainly by electrode failures. But the reason differs from the instant start case because here the loss is caused mainly by evaporation. End-of-lamp life is reached if the emitter material which is deposited at the coil to reduce the work function of the coil is lost completely. LIF is used to measure the density of the eroded emitter material, namely Barium atoms. First result of phase resolved absolute Ba atoms densities are presented.

  13. Redox speciation analysis of antimony in soil extracts by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Gregori, Ida de E-mail: idegrego@ucv.cl; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2003-07-18

    A sensitive atomic spectrometric method for the redox speciation analysis of antimony in soils is described. The method is based on the selective generation of stibine from Sb(III) in a continuous flow system using atomic fluorescence spectrometry for detection. Sb(V) is masked by citric or oxalic acid in HCl medium. The procedure was optimized with synthetic solutions of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The effect of carboxylic acid and HCl concentration on the recovery of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species from standard solutions, and on the fluorescence signal were studied. Both species were extracted from soil with H{sub 2}O, 0.05 mol l{sup -1} EDTA and 0.25 mol l{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Since the soil samples were collected from sites impacted by copper mining activities, the effect of Cu{sup 2+} on the determination of antimony in synthetic solutions and soil extracts was studied. Cu{sup 2+} decreased the Sb(III) signal, but had no effect on the total antimony determination. Therefore, the selective determination of Sb(III) was carried out in citric acid-HCl medium, using the analyte addition technique. Total antimony in soil extracts was determined using the standard calibration technique after reducing Sb(V) to Sb(III) at room temperature with KI-ascorbic acid. The Sb(V) concentration was calculated from the difference between total antimony and Sb(III). The limits of detection (PS Analytical, Excalibur Millennium model) were 17 and 10 ng l{sup -1} for Sb(III) and total antimony, respectively, and the R.S.D. at the 0.5-{mu}g l{sup -1} level were 2.5 and 2.4%, respectively. The total antimony concentration of soils is in the mg kg{sup -1} range; the Sb recovery from the different soils by the extracting solutions was between less than 0.02% and approximately 10%. Similar recoveries were obtained using EDTA and sulfuric acid solutions. Sb(V) was found to be the main antimony species extracted from soils.

  14. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Atomic Fluorescence in Cool, Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ken G.; Nielsen, Krister E.; Kober, Gladys V.; Rau, Gioia

    2018-01-01

    The "Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project: Cool Stars" (PI = T. Ayres) collected a definitive set of representative, high-resolution (R~46,000 in the FUV up to ~1700 Å, R~30,000 for 1700-2150 Å, and R~114,000 >2150 Å) and high signal/noise (S/N>100) UV spectra of eight F-M evolved cool stars. These extremely high-quality STIS UV echelle spectra are available from the HST archive and from the Univ. of Colorado (http://casa.colorado.edu/~ayres/ASTRAL/) and will enable investigations of a broad range of problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years. In this paper, we extend our study of the very rich emission-line spectra of the four evolved K-M stars in the sample, Beta Gem (K0 IIIb), Gamma Dra (K5 III), Gamma Cru (M3.4 III), and Alpha Ori (M2 Iab), to study the atomic fluorescence processes operating in their outer atmospheres. We summarize the pumping transitions and fluorescent line products known on the basis of previous work (e.g. Carpenter 1988, etc.) and newly identified in our current, on-going analysis of these extraordinary ASTRAL STIS spectra.

  15. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  16. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  17. Rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. H.; Huang, J. Q.; Gu, Y.; Liu, S. Q.; Dong, T. Q.; Lu, Z. H.

    2011-02-01

    A compact, portable rubidium atomic beam clock based on lamp-pumping and fluorescence-detection scheme is proposed. The expected short-term frequency stability can be at least two orders of magnitude better than previous experimental results. The usages of lamp pumping, fluorescence detection and microwave slow-wave resonance structures make this design robust and compact.

  18. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as chlorine, bromine, iodine, and sulfur. Preliminary investigations into this area are reported, including documentation

  19. Relationship between Ba atom emission and electrode temperature in a low-pressure fluorescent lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagata, Yukihiko, E-mail: yamagata@ence.kyushu-u.ac.j [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kai, Makoto [Lighting Company, Panasonic Corporation, 1-1 Saiwaicho, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1193 (Japan); Naito, Sho; Tomita, Kentaro; Uchino, Kiichiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Manabe, Yoshio [Lighting Company, Panasonic Corporation, 1-1 Saiwaicho, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1193 (Japan)

    2010-04-30

    A relationship between emission characteristics of Ba atom as an emitter material and temperature distributions of an electrode in a fluorescent lamp is described, which is measured by using laser-induced fluorescence and black-body radiation method, respectively. In a virgin lamp, a hot spot observed at the electrode edge connected to the power supply is the main source of Ba atom emission. In a long-term-used lamp, it is shown that Ba atom emission, thermionic electron emission in cathode half-cycle and electron collection in anode half-cycle are most active on the hot spot appearing on the center of the electrode.

  20. Development of off-line layer chromatographic and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods for arsenic speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihucz, Victor G. [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Moricz, Agnes M. [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kroepfl, Krisztina [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Szikora, Szilvia [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Tatar, Eniko [Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Parra, Lue Meru Marco [Universidad Centro-occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Decanato de Agronomia, Departamento de Quimica y Suelos Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Apartado Postal 4076, Cabudare 3023 (Venezuela); Zaray, Gyula [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: zaray@ludens.elte.hu

    2006-11-15

    Rapid and low cost off-line thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods have been developed for separation of 25 ng of each As(III), As(V), monomethyl arsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid applying a PEI cellulose stationary phase on plastic sheets and a mixture of acetone/acetic acid/water = 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as eluent system. The type of eluent systems, the amounts (25-1000 ng) of As species applied to PEI cellulose plates, injection volume, development distance, and flow rate (in case of overpressured thin layer chromatography) were taken into consideration for the development of the chromatographic separation. Moreover, a microdigestion method employing nitric acid for the As spots containing PEI cellulose scratched from the developed plates divided into segments was developed for the subsequent total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis. The method was applied for analysis of root extracts of cucumber plants grown in As(III) containing modified Hoagland nutrient solution. Both As(III) and As(V) were detected by applying the proposed thin layer chromatography/overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods.

  1. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud...

  2. Ultimate Statistical Physics: fluorescence of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeau, Yves; Ginibre, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the statistics of emission of photons by a single atom or ion illuminated by a laser beam at the frequency of quasi-resonance between two energy levels, a situation that corresponds to real experiments. We extend this to the case of two laser beams resonant with the energy differences between two excited levels and the ground state (three level atom in V-configuration). We use a novel approach of this type of problem by considering Kolmogorov equation for the probability distribution of the atomic state which takes into account first the deterministic evolution of this state under the effect of the incoming laser beam and the random emission of photons during the spontaneous decay of the excited state(s) to the ground state. This approach yields solvable equations in the two level atom case. For the three level atom case we set the problem and define clearly its frame. The results obtained are valid both in the opposite limits of rare and of frequent spontaneous decay, compared to the period of the...

  3. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Separation and enrichment of gold(III) from environmental samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2007-10-22

    A simple and accurate method was developed for separation and enrichment of trace levels of gold in environmental samples. The method is based on the adsorption of Au(III)-diethyldithiocarbamate complex on Amberlite XAD-2000 resin prior to the analysis of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after elution with 1 molL(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Some parameters including nitric acid concentration, eluent type, matrix ions, sample volume, sample flow rate and adsorption capacity were investigated on the recovery of gold(III). The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit of gold were greater than 95% and 16.6 microgL(-1), respectively. The preconcentration factor was 200. The relative standard deviation of the method was gold in some environmental samples.

  5. [Determination of trace lead in water and milk tea powder samples with organic coprecipitation-flame atomic absorption spectrometric].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Mei; Yao, Jun-Xue; Zhao, Wen-Yan

    2013-05-01

    A method was proposed for the determination of trace lead with flame atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration of lead by rapid coprecipitation technique with PAR-Fe (III) at pH 6.0. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of iron (III), amount of reagent, the standing time of the precipitate, etc., were examined. The detection limits (DL) were found to be 18.7 microg x L(-1) for Pb (II). In analysis of lake water and the milk tea powder samples, RSD's and the standard addition recovery of this method were in the ranges of 1.03%-2.24% and 94.2%-98.3% respectively. The effect of matrix can be overcome by the method and the results are satisfyiog. The method shows good application prospect in the determination of trace lead owing to its rapidness and reproducibility.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of 27 trace elements in table salts after coprecipitation with indium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Tohda, Koji

    2009-07-15

    The coprecipitation method using indium phosphate as a new coprecipitant has been developed for the separation of trace elements in table salts prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Indium phosphate could quantitatively coprecipitate 27 trace elements, namely, Be, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, in a table salt solution at pH 10. The rapid coprecipitation technique, in which complete recovery of the precipitate was not required in the precipitate-separation process, was completely applicable, and, therefore, the operation for the coprecipitation was quite simple. The coprecipitated elements could be determined accurately and precisely by ICP-AES using indium as an internal standard element after dissolution of the precipitate with 5 mL of 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid. The detection limits (three times the standard deviation of the blank values, n=10) ranged from 0.001 microg (Lu) to 0.11 microg (Zn) in 300 mL of a 10% (w/v) table salt solution. The method proposed here could be applied to the analyses of commercially available table salts.

  7. Standard test method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium extracted from ceramic foodware

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) to quantitatively determine lead and cadmium extracted by acetic acid at room temperature from the food-contact surface of foodware. The method is applicable to food-contact surfaces composed of silicate-based materials (earthenware, glazed ceramicware, decorated ceramicware, decorated glass, and lead crystal glass) and is capable of determining lead concentrations greater than 0.005 to 0.020 g/mL and cadmium concentrations greater than 0.0005 to 0.002 g/mL, depending on instrument design. 1.2 This test method also describes quality control procedures to check for contamination and matrix interference during GFAAS analyses and a specific sequence of analytical measurements that demonstrates proper instrument operation during the time period in which sample solutions are analyzed. 1.3 Cleaning and other contamination control procedures are described in this test method. Users may modify contamination cont...

  8. Study on the Interference of Iron, Aluminium and Silicon on the Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination of Mangan in Laterite Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyo Saputro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Interference of iron, aluminum and silicon on the determination of mangan in laterite mineral by atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Dissolution of laterite mineral into solution have been carried out by wet method destruction using combination of 7 mL of aquaregia, 7.5 mL of concentrated perchloric acid and 9 mL of fluoride acid 48% In sealed teflon flask heated at temperature of about 110 °C for 3 hours to determine the content of Mn element in laterite mineral directly. Interference of these three metals were carried out by evaluating the differences of Mn absorbance at wavelength 279.50 nm and slit width 0.2 nm between the solutions containing mangan only and those containing the some amount of mangan together with the interfering elements at those concentration range in laterite mineral. The result showed that both iron at concentration of 100 ppm until 500 ppm and aluminum at concentration at 3 ppm until 15 ppm caused significant and non-linear interference on the determination of Mn 2 ppm. Interference of iron was effectively eliminated by releasing action of aluminum. The signal depression reductional decrease due to 234 ppm of silicon on the determination of Mn 2 ppm can be eliminated by adding 2.30 mL of CaCl2 0.2% (m/v into these solution. The content of Mn in the laterite mineral after and before adding of CaCl2 into solution were 2407.04 ± 59.26 μg g-1 and 2311.76 ± 23.61 μg g-1, respectively. This result was significantly different at confidence level 95% as shown by the value of tcalculated=4.91 that was higher than ttable=4.30.

  9. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filik, Hayati, E-mail: filik@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey); Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Resat [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L{sup -1} with an preconcentration factor of {approx}25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C{sub Mo(VI)} = 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD = 3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  10. Cloud Point Extraction and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometric Determination of Lead, Cadmium and Palladium in Some Food and Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soylak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed method is based on the complexation of the Pb2+, Cd2+ and Pd2+ ions with 3-(1-(1-H-Indol-3-Yl-3-phenylallyl-1H-indole (IPAI at pH 8.0 in the presence of Triton X-114. The phase separation occured when micellar solution was heated at 55 ◦C. The surfactant-rich phase, diluted to 0.5 mL via 1.0 mol L−1 nitric acid in methanol was directly introduced into the nebulizer of the flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Influence of variables such as pH, amount of ligand and Triton X-114, heating time and temperature were evaluated and optimized. The optimized enhancement factors for Pb2+, Cd2+ and Pd2+ ions were 22, 33 and 23, respectively and the detection limit (DLs was between of 1.6–2.6 µgL−1. The relative standard deviation (RSD of each ion was found to be less than 4.6% at 100 µgL−1. In addition, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.01-0.22 μg mL−1 for Cd2+ ion, 0.018-0.26 μg mL−1 for Pb2+ ion and 0.02-0.27 μg mL−1 for Pd2+ ion with the correlation coefficients in the range of 0.995–0.999.

  11. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements for Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzuchowski, Kristen; Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new highly selective detector to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Our primary interest is the 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg reaction, which is a primary source of neutrons for the s-process. Our proposed detector, in conjunction with a recoil separator, captures the recoil products resulting from the reaction in a cryogenically frozen thin film of solid neon. The fluorescence spectra of the captured atoms is shifted from the absorption spectra by hundreds of nanometers. This allows for the optical detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light. We will describe our initial studies of laser-induced fluorescence of Yb and Mg in solid Ne. Neon is an attractive medium because it is optically transparent and provides efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Yb is used as a test atom because of its similar atomic structure to Mg and much brighter fluorescence signal. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  13. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  14. On-line sample processing involving microextraction techniques as a front-end to atomic spectrometric detection for trace metal assays: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miró, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.miro@uib.es [FI-TRACE Group, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain); Hansen, Elo Harald [Granåsen 93, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-06-11

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Role of flow injection in automation of microextraction techniques for metal assays. •On-line coupling of liquid phase microextraction (LPME) to atomic spectrometry. •Critical evaluation of on-line single drop and dispersive LPME. •On-line coupling of micro-solid phase extraction (μSPE) to atomic spectrometry. •Critical appraisal of magnetic/carbon nanoparticles and biomass for on-line μSPE. -- Abstract: Within the last decade, liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) and micro-solid phase extraction (μSPE) approaches have emerged as substitutes for conventional sample processing procedures for trace metal assays within the framework of green chemistry. This review surveys the progress of the state of the art in simplification and automation of microextraction approaches by harnessing to the various generations of flow injection (FI) as a front end to atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) or inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS). It highlights the evolution of flow injection analysis and related techniques as vehicles for appropriate sample presentation to the detector and expedient on-line matrix separation and pre-concentration of trace levels of metals in troublesome matrices. Rather than being comprehensive this review is aimed at outlining the pros and cons via representative examples of recent attempts in automating green sample preparation procedures in an FI or sequential injection (SI) mode capitalizing on single-drop microextraction, dispersive liquid-phase microextraction and advanced sorptive materials including carbon and metal oxide nanoparticles, ion imprinted polymers, superparamagnetic nanomaterials and biological/biomass sorbents. Current challenges in the field are identified and the synergetic combination of flow analysis, nanotechnology and metal-tagged biomolecule detection is envisaged.

  15. Laser Induced Fluorescence for Singly Ionized Atomic Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Thomas; Scime, Earl

    2017-10-01

    While xenon is the standard propellant for a wide range of plasma thrusters, xenon is expensive and xenon propellant systems require heavy compressed gas tanks, pressure regulators, and other bulky hardware. Iodine has similar mass and is much easier to acquire than xenon. Iodines natural state of matter at room temperature is solid and is easily sublimated to gas with a simple heating element. This advantage for iodine is also a significant challenge when developing gas handling systems for iodine. Another challenge for iodine thrusters is a lack of well-defined spectroscopic diagnostics for single ionized iodine, specifically, a lack of a demonstrated laser induced fluorescence (LIF) scheme. We present emission spectroscopy measurements of iodine ion emission from the 6p5P3 - 5d5D4o transition at 695.878 nm and the 6p5P3 - 6s5S2o transition at 516.12 nm as a function of pressure and microwave power for a microwave excited iodine plasma in a sealed quartz cell at a pressure of 1 mTorr. The 5d5D4o state is metastable and was identified by Hargus et al. [48th AIAA Joint Propulsion, 2012] as a strong candidate for an iodine ion LIF scheme. We will also present preliminary LIF measurements using a tunable dye laser operating at 695.878 nm. Special thanks to Dr. William Hargus Jr. and Air Force Research Laboratory at Edwards AFB.

  16. Molecular and atomic ultra trace analysis by laser induced fluorescence with OPO system and ICCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, L; Giamarchi, P; Stephan, L; Lijour, Y; Le Bihan, A

    2003-06-13

    This paper presents a synthesis of some analytical potentialities of an equipment designed for both laser induced molecular and atomic fluorescence in the field of ultra-trace analysis (ng l(-1)). Excitation of fluorescence was performed with a pulsed Nd:Yag laser coupled to an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Fluorescence spectra were recorded with a spectrograph and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). The high energy and the tunability of the excitation combined with the sensitivity of the ICCD and the time-resolution provide better limit of detection (LOD) and selectivity. By molecular fluorescence, some major organic contaminants in the environment were studied, i.e. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (benzo[a]pyrene and hydroxypyrene) and a pesticide (carbaryl). The LODs achieved by direct analysis were far below the restricted European values for tap water. Analysis was performed in water containing humic acids using time resolution to avoid the matrix fluorescence. By electro thermal atomisation-laser excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF), we detected traces of aluminium and lead in seawater. Some general considerations about the signal to noise ratio optimisation are reported. LODs reached the femtogram level.

  17. Measurements of amplitude and frequencies of subwavelength oscillations of atoms using resonance fluorescence of three levels atom in two standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaki, Nicolae; Bazgan, Sergiu; Mihailescu, Ion

    2015-02-01

    The resonance fluorescence of an atomic (or ion) system implanted in the materials driving two standing waves of the optical cavity is studied taking into consideration the delocalization of the atom. It is demonstrated that the resonance fluorescence depends on the position of atoms (or ions) relative the nodes or antinodes of standing waves. This situation gives us the possibility to measure the amplitude of mechanical oscillations of these radiators implanted in organic or inorganic materials. It is proposed to measure the amplitude of the mechanical oscillations relative to the equilibrium position using the time changes in the positions of the five peaks of the resonance fluorescence spectrum. In this case, the small oscillation amplitude relative to the standing wave length can drastically change the spectrum of resonance fluorescence of such atoms. The proposed method can be used in the measurements of the nanostructure temperature (or bio-molecule temperature deformation).

  18. Atomic fluorescence method for determination of concentration of alkali metal vapor using a laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budkin, L.A.; Okhotnikov, O.G.; Pak, G.T.; Pikhtelev, A.I.; Puzanov, S.L.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation into the temperature dependence of the cesium vapor concentration has been carried out within the 20-80 deg C temperature range on the base of the atomic fluorescence method with the use of a semiconductor laser. The relation allowing one to study the alkali metal atomic concentration as a function of the vapor temperature and also the method sensitivity as a function of the laser intensity has been derived using the balance equations. A good agreement of the experimental results with estimated ones has been obtained. The method sensitivity has been found to grow with the laser intensity.

  19. The determination of major and some minor constituents in lead zirconate-titanate compositions by x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Willigen, J.H.H.G.; Kruidhof, H.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of lead, zirconium and titanium in lead zirconate-titanate ceramics. Careful matching of samples and standards by a borax fusion method resulted in a relative standard deviation of about 0.2% for the major

  20. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, S. A.; Evans, D. E.; Griffith, J. A. R.; Eastham, D. A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J. R. H.; Tolfree, D. W. L.; Warner, D. D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I. S.; Walker, P. M.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes 120-124Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g7/25/2[413] neutron and g9/29/2[404] proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction.

  1. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D.; Naumova, Elena N.; Kaplan, David L.; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglio...

  2. Effect of Glow-to-Arc Transition on Loss Mechanism of Ba Atoms from Electrode of Fluorescent Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Takashi; Samir, Ahmed; Egashira, Yuichi; Yamashita, Go; Shimada, Shozaburo; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Uchino, Kiichiro; Manabe, Yoshio

    2007-10-01

    The loss of Ba atoms from the electrode of a fluorescent lamp was measured while the lamp was operated in the glow and arc discharge modes at 60 Hz. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was applied to the measurements of the temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms in the vicinity of the electrode. Ground-state (61S0) Ba atoms were excited to a 51P1 level by a frequency-doubled dye laser beam (350.1 nm), and the subsequent fluorescence (51P1-51D2, 582.6 nm) was detected. The temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms were found to be completely different in the two discharge modes. Temporally; in the arc discharge mode, the density of the Ba atoms was found to have two peaks, and the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was about twofold larger than that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. In the glow discharge mode, the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was found to be negligible compared with that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. Spatially; in the arc discharge mode, Ba atoms were found to be emitted mainly from the hot spot of the filament electrode. In the glow discharge mode, Ba atoms were found to be emitted from all parts of the filament electrodes homogeneously. The mechanism of Ba atom loss in both modes was discussed.

  3. Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy of extremely neutron-deficient barium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, S.A.; Evans, D.E.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Eastham, D.A.; Groves, J.; Smith, J.R.H.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; Warner, D.D.; Billowes, J.; Grant, I.S.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorescent atom coincidence spectroscopy (FACS) has been used to measure the nuclear mean square radii and moments of the extremely neutron-deficient isotopes /sup 120-124/Ba. At N=65 an abrupt change in nuclear mean square charge radii is observed which can be understood in terms of the occupation of the spin-orbit partner g/sub 7/2/ 5/2(413) neutron and g/sub 9/2/ 9/2(404) proton orbitals and the consequent enhancement of the n-p interaction.

  4. Ultrastable combined atomic force and total internal reflection fluorescence microscope [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpp, H; Stahl, S W; Strackharn, M; Puchner, E M; Gaub, H E

    2009-06-01

    Combining atomic force microscope (AFM) with other microscopy techniques has expanded the range of potential applications for single molecule investigations dramatically. Particularly hybrid instruments with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) excitation have opened new routes in life sciences. Here we present a novel design for such a hybrid microscope, which overcomes the limitations of conventional combinations caused by their limited mechanical stability. A thorough analysis of the noise spectra and a comparison of the different designs and the different operation modes are given. With this instrument we demonstrate single molecule manipulation by AFM and simultaneous TIRF imaging.

  5. Antimony determination and speciation by multisyringe flow injection analysis with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenova, N.V. [Department of Geography, Lomonosov State University, Moscow 119899 (Russian Federation); Leal, L.O. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Forteza, R. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Cerda, V. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)]. E-mail: vcerda@p01.uib.es

    2005-02-07

    A new analytical procedure for determination of inorganic antimony and speciation of antimony(III) and antimony(V) is presented. For this purpose, a software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system, which contains a multisyringe burette provided with a multi-port selection valve, was developed. Hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry was used as a detection technique. A 0.3% (w/v) reducing sodium tetrahydroborate solution, hydrochloric acid (2 M), an antimony solution and a pre-reducing solution of 10% (w/v) KI and 0.3% (w/v) ascorbic acid are dispensed simultaneously into a gas-liquid separation cell with further propulsion of the reaction product into the flame of an atomic fluorescence spectrometer using argon flow. A hydrogen flow was employed to support the flame. The linear range and the detection limit (3s{sub b}/S) of the proposed technique were 0.2-5.6 {mu}g l{sup -1} and 0.08 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. A sample throughput of 18 samples per hour (corresponding to 80 injections per hour) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 18 independent measurements was 4.6%. This technique was validated by means of reference solid and water materials with good agreement with the certified values. Satisfactory results for speciation of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by means of the developed technique were obtained.

  6. Backward-emitted sub-Doppler fluorescence from an optically thick atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, João Carlos de Aquino; Laliotis, Athanasios; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; Bloch, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Literature mentions only incidentally a sub-Doppler contribution in the excitation spectrum of the backward fluorescence of a dense vapor. This contribution is here investigated on Cs vapor, both on the first resonance line (894 nm) and on the weaker second resonance line (459 nm). We show that in a strongly absorbing medium, the quenching of excited atoms moving towards a window irradiated under near normal incidence reduces the fluorescence on the red side of the excitation spectrum. Atoms moving slowly towards the window produce a sub-Doppler velocity-selective contribution, whose visibility is here improved by applying a frequency-modulation technique. This sub-Doppler feature, induced by a surface quenching combined with a short absorption length for the incident irradiation, exhibits close analogies with the narrow spectra appearing with thin vapor cells. We also show that a normal incidence irradiation is essential for the sub-Doppler feature to be observed, while it should be independent of the detection geometry.

  7. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  8. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlated Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of the Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis in SKMEL Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steve; Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorescent fusion proteins (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin-antibody and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. Results from our work are compared against dynamical polarized total internal fluorescence (TIRF), super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to draw conclusions regarding the prominent model of vesicle formation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT award # 1206908.

  10. Atomic fluorescence emitted from a corona discharge in helium above and below saturated vapour pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltagh, Nagham M.; Mendoza Luna, Luis G.; Watkins, Mark J.; Thornton, Stuart C.; von Haeften, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    A new apparatus was constructed to investigate the visible and near infrared fluorescence spectroscopy of electronically excited helium over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, covering both the gaseous and liquid phases. To achieve sufficient throughput, increased sensitivity was established by employing a micro-discharge cell and a high performance lens system that allows for a large collection solid angle. With this set-up, several thousand spectra were recorded. The atomic 3 s 1 S → 2 p 1 P and 3 s 3 S → 2 p 3 P atomic transitions showed line shifts, spectral broadening and intensity changes that were dependent in magnitude on pressure, temperature and thermodynamic phase. While in the gas phase the lines showed little dependency on the discharge cell temperature, the opposite was observed for the liquid phase, suggesting that a significant number of atoms were solvated. Triplet lines were up to a factor of 50 times stronger in intensity than the singlet lines, depending on pressure. When taking the particle density into account, this effect was stronger in the gas phase than in the liquid phase of helium. This was attributed to the recombination of He2 +, He3 + and He4 + with electrons, which is facilitated in the gas phase because of the significantly higher mobility.

  11. Study on Temporal and Spatial Distributions of Ba Atoms in Fluorescent Lamp Discharge Using Laser-Induced Florescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlyHendy, Ahmed Samir; Yamashita, Go; Yamagata, Yukihiko; Uchino, Kiichiro; Ueda, Takashi; Manabe, Yoshio

    2006-10-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique was applied to the measurements of the temporal and spatial distributions of Ba atoms in the vicinity of the electrode of a fluorescent lamp operated at 60 Hz. Ground-state (61S0) Ba atoms were excited to a 51P1 level (350.1 nm) by a frequency-doubled dye laser beam, and the subsequent fluorescence (51P1-51D2, 582.6 nm) was detected. Over a whole periodic time (16.67 ms), the density of the Ba atoms was found to have two peaks, and the number of Ba atoms emitted in the anode half-cycle was about twofold larger than that emitted in the cathode half-cycle. This difference between the Ba atoms emitted during the anode half-cycle and those emitted during the cathode half-cycle was studied for lamps with different gas pressures. Ba atoms were found to be emitted mainly from the hot spot of the filament electrode. It is suggested that the main factor for Ba atom emission from the electrode is not sputtering by ion bombardment but thermal evaporation.

  12. Data correlation in on-line solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-atomic emission/mass spectrometric detection of unknown microcontaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankemeier, Th.; Rozenbrand, J.; Abhadur, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure is described for the (non-target) screening of hetero-atom-containing compounds in tap and waste water by correlating data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) using atomic emission (AED) and mass selective (MS) detection. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was coupled on-line to both GC

  13. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM∕TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  14. Characterization of early-stage amyloid aggregates by incorporating extrinsic fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Moonjee; Lee, Hwiin; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung

    2014-11-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are nanosized bio-assemblies that cause Alzheimer's disease. Characterizing early-stage Aβ aggregates becomes an important issue because it is a prerequisite in exploring small molecule inhibitors that bind to Aβ oligomers. Of special interest are efficient screening systems that characterize the Aβ oligomer size with respect to the aging time. In this work, highly sensitive fluorescence techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to investigate the size determination of Aβ and screening of small molecule inhibitors. A solvatochromic dye, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS), was used as an extrinsic fluorophore to monitor the growth mechanism of the Aβ aggregates. Then, the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy method was employed to estimate the hydrodynamic size of Aβ oligomers. Finally, AFM was used to characterize the Aβ oligomer size in the absence and presence of potential inhibitors. We present that the combination of such three experimental techniques is an excellent way to detect the early stage of Aβ aggregation and to screen small molecule inhibitors.

  15. Tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence on Al and Ti atoms in low pressure magnetron discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitelaru, C; Minea, T M; Boisse-Laporte, C; Bretagne, J [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, UMR 8578 CNRS, Universite Paris Sud-XI, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Aniculaesei, C; Popa, G [Physics Department, Faculty of Physics Al I Cuza University, Bd. Carol No 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); De Poucques, L, E-mail: catalin.vitelaru@u-psud.f [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS - UHP Nancy, UPV-Metz, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, boulevard des aiguillettes, BP 70239 - 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2010-03-31

    Two different blue light laser diodes were used to investigate two types of atoms, namely Ti with resonance transition centred at {lambda}{sub 0}(Ti) = 398.289 nm and Al with {lambda}{sub 0}(Al) = 394.512 nm. Tunable diode-laser induced fluorescence offers local information on two groups of sputtered particles-non-thermalized and thermalized. The anisotropic velocity distribution functions (vdfs) are characterized probing the plasma along two directions: parallel to the target, v{sub r}, and perpendicular to it, v{sub z}. Measurements were performed in two plasma reactors both having planar magnetron cathodes with circular symmetry but with Ti and Al targets of different magnet strengths and diameters. The similar results of the vdf space dependence for these magnetron systems confirm the general behaviour of sputtered species transport. These similarities are related to the circular geometry and fundamentals of sputtering whereas differences are due to each specific sputtered element. The experimental results also show the effect of current density on the shape of vdf for Ti and Al. An increase in the current intensity implies a linear increase in the relative density of energetic sputtered atoms while the group of thermalized ones appears unaffected in the high current density regime.

  16. Spectrometric techniques 4

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume IV discusses three widely diversified areas of spectrometric techniques. The book focuses on three spectrometric methods. Chapter 1 discusses the phenomenology and applications of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), the most commonly used optical technique that exploit the Raman effect. The second chapter is concerned with diffraction gratings and mountings for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectral Region. Chapter 3 accounts the uses of mass spectrometry, detectors, types of spectrometers, and ion sources. Physicists and chemists will find the book a go

  17. Photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a plasmonic nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, Vladimir M.; Vladimirova, Yulia V.; Zadkov, Victor N.

    2014-12-01

    The photon-number statistics from resonance fluorescence of a two-level atom near a metal nanosphere driven by a laser field with finite bandwidth is studied theoretically. Our analysis shows that all interesting physics here takes place in a small area around the nanosphere where the near field and the atom-nanosphere coupling essentially affect the radiative properties of the atom. Computer modeling estimates this area roughly as r ≤2 a (r is the distance from the center of the nanosphere to the atom), with a being the radius of the nanosphere. At the larger distances, the influence of the nanoparticle vanishes and the atom tends to behave similarly to that in free space. It is shown that the distribution function p (n ,T ) of the emission probability of n photons in a given time interval T in steady-state resonance fluorescence drastically depends on the atom location around the nanosphere for r ≤2 a , featuring a characteristic twist in the ridgelike dependence and a convergence time of up to 9 μ s, two orders of magnitude slower than for the atom in free space. At large distances, the distribution converges to a Gaussian one, as for the atom in free space. The typical convergence time scale at large distances r >2 a tends to the convergence time of the atom in free space. There are also two areas symmetrical around the nanosphere in which Ω ˜γ and the convergence time goes to zero. This behavior is determined by the interplay of the radiative and nonradiative decay rates of the atom due to the coupling with the metal nanosphere and by the near-field intensity. Additional parameters are the normalized laser frequency detuning from the atomic resonance and the bandwidth of the incoming laser field.

  18. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J. C.; Blahins, J.; Gross, U.; Ingham, T.; Goddard, A.; Mahajan, A. S.; Ubelis, A.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1-350 pptv range.

  19. Semiconductor Nanomaterials-Based Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI Mass Spectrometric Approaches to Proteome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Kailasa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs or nanoparticles (NPs exhibit very unusual physico-chemcial and optical properties. This review article introduces the applications of semiconductor nanomaterials (NMs in fluorescence spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS for biomolecule analysis. Due to their unique physico-chemical and optical properties, semiconductors NMs have created many new platforms for investigating biomolecular structures and information in modern biology. These semiconductor NMs served as effective fluorescent probes for sensing proteins and cells and acted as affinity or concentrating probes for enriching peptides, proteins and bacteria proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis.

  20. Characterization of national food agency shrimp and plaice reference materials for trace elements and arsenic species by atomic and mass spectrometric techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; McLaren, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    , drying, milling and sieving to collect the fraction of particles less than 150 mu m in sizer In this fraction the trace elements were homogeneously distributed using a 400 mg sample intake for analysis, The total track element concentrations were determined by graphite furnace and cold vapour atomic...

  1. Applicability of multisyringe chromatography coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for mercury speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Mar, J.L.; Hinojosa-Reyes, L. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Serra, A.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hernandez-Ramirez, A. [Department of Chemistry Sciences, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Cd. Universitaria, Pedro de Alba s/n, C.P. 66451 San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Cerda, V., E-mail: victor.cerda@uib.es [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-12-05

    Graphical abstract: An automatic system, based on the applicability of multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) detection is developed for mercury speciation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The on-line coupling of MSC to CV/AFS was developed for mercury speciation analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The speciation of MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +} was achieved on a RP C18 monolithic column. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hyphenated system provided higher sample throughput compared to HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection for mercury species were comparable or better than those reported by HPLC-CV/AFS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The developed method also provided low instrumental and operational costs. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel automatic approach for the speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury (EtHg{sup +}) using multisyringe chromatography (MSC) coupled to cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV/AFS) was developed. For the first time, the separation of mercury species was accomplished on a RP C18 monolithic column using a multi-isocratic elution program. The elution protocol involved the use of 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (99:1, v/v), followed by 0.005% 2-mercapthoethanol in 240 mM ammonium acetate (pH 6)-acetonitrile (90:10, v/v). The eluted mercury species were then oxidized under post-column UV radiation and reduced using tin(II) chloride in an acidic medium. Subsequently, the generated mercury metal were separated from the reaction mixture and further atomized in the flame atomizer and detected by AFS. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limits of detection (3{sigma}) were found to be 0.03, 0.11 and 0.09 {mu}g L{sup -1} for MeHg{sup +}, Hg{sup 2+} and EtHg{sup +}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 6) of the

  2. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  3. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  4. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy studies of the clathrin mediated endocytosis in SKMEL cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam; Smith, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. Currently, there are two models describing membrane bending during the formation of clathrin cages: the first involves the deposition of all clathrin molecules to the plasma membrane, forming a flat lattice prior to membrane bending, whereas in the second model, membrane bending happens simultaneously as the clathrin arrives to the site to form a clathrin-coated cage. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorophores (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. An extensive statistical survey of many hundreds of CME events, at various stages of progression, are observed via this method, allowing inferences about the dominant mechanisms active in CME in SKMEL cells. Results indicate a mixed model incorporating aspects of both the aforementioned mechanisms for CME.

  6. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  7. Spectrometric techniques 3

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume III presents the applications of spectrometric techniques to atmospheric and space studies. This book reviews the spectral data processing and analysis techniques that are of broad applicability.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the instrumentation used for obtaining field data. This text then reviews the contribution that space-borne spectroscopy in the thermal IR has made to the understanding of the planets. Other chapters consider the instruments that have recorded the planetary emission spectra. This book discusses as well

  8. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siampour, Hajar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  9. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of trace quantities of cadmium in water samples after cloud point extraction in Triton X-114 without added chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Siampour, Hajar

    2006-11-16

    A new micell-mediated phase separation method for preconcentration of ultra-trace quantities of cadmium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. The method is based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) of cadmium in iodide media with Triton X-114 in the absence of any chelating agent. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g., acid concentration, iodide concentration, effect of time) were studied, and the analytical characteristics of the method (e.g., limit of detection, linear range, preconcentration, and improvement factors) were obtained. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 3-300 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The detection limit of the method is 1.0 ng mL(-1) of cadmium. The interference effect of some anions and cations was also tested. The method was applied to the determination of cadmium in tap water, waste water, and sea water samples.

  10. On-line preconcentration of cobalt in drinking water using a minicolumn packed with activated carbon coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerutti, Soledad; Moyano, Susana; Gasquez, Jose A.; Stripeikis, Jorge; Olsina, Roberto A.; Martinez, Luis D. E-mail: ldm@unsl.edu.ar

    2003-11-21

    An on-line flow injection preconcentration-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method is developed for trace determination of cobalt in drinking water samples by sorption on a conical minicolumn packed with activated carbon at pH 9.5. The cobalt was eluted from the minicolumn with 10% (v/v) nitric acid. An enrichment factor of 190-fold for a sample volume of 10 ml was obtained. The detection limit (DL) value for the preconcentration method proposed was 5 ng l{sup -1}. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 50 ng l{sup -1} Co level was 4.7% relative standard deviation. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for cobalt was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993 at levels near the DLs up to at least 0.35 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The method was successfully applied to the determination of cobalt in drinking water samples.

  11. Selective cloud point extraction and preconcentration of trace amounts of silver as a dithizone complex prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Karim-Nezhad, Ghasem

    2003-05-19

    Dithizone (diphenylthiocarbazone) was used as a complexing agent in cloud point extraction for the first time and applied for selective preconcentration of trace amounts of silver. The analyte in the initial aqueous solution was acidified with sulfuric acid (pH<1) and Triton X-114 was added as a surfactant. After phase separation, based on the cloud point separation of the mixture, the surfactant rich phase was diluted with tetrahydrofuran (THF) and the analyte determined in the enriched solution by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, a preconcentration factor of 43 was obtained for only 10 ml of sample. The analytical curve was linear in the range of 3-200 ng ml{sup -1} and the limit of detection was 0.56 ng ml{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied to the determination of silver in water samples.

  12. The interaction between atoms of Au and Cu with clean Si(111) surface: a study combining synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Hudson W P; Batista, Ana P L; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Pérez, Carlos A; Gobbi, Angelo Luiz

    2009-09-15

    In order to evaluate the interactions between Au/Cu atoms and clean Si(111) surface, we used synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis and theoretical calculations. Optimized geometries and energies on different adsorption sites indicate that the binding energies at different adsorption sites are high, suggesting a strong interaction between metal atom and silicon surface. The Au atom showed higher interaction than Cu atom. The theoretical and experimental data showed good agreement.

  13. Potential of two-line atomic fluorescence for temperature imaging in turbulent indium-oxide-producing flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Münsterjohann, Bettina; Huber, Franz J. T.; Klima, Tobias C.; Holfelder, Sandra; Engel, Sascha R. [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany); Miller, Joseph D. [Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory (United States); Meyer, Terrence R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT) (Germany); Will, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.will@fau.de [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Lehrstuhl für Technische Thermodynamik (LTT) (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The applicability of two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) for temperature imaging in an indium-based flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) process is demonstrated using a single tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to generate the required excitation wavelengths consecutively. Single-shot images of the detected fluorescence signals demonstrate that the signal levels in the flame are suitable for evaluation of temperature and verify the capability and potential of the measurement technique directly during particle formation without additional indium seeding. Qualitative averaged two-dimensional temperature distributions in the FSP flame are presented, showing the influence of varying sheath gas flow rates on the resulting temperature distribution. With the addition of a second OPO and detection system, the two fluorescence signals acquired consecutively in this work could be obtained simultaneously and enable spatio-temporally resolved single-shot temperature measurements in flame synthesis processes of indium-containing nanoparticles.

  14. High sensitivity detection of protein molecules picked up on a probe of atomic force microscope based on the fluorescence detection by a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takafumi; Afrin, Rehana; Arakawa, Hideo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2004-07-02

    We developed a method to detect and identify proteins on a probe of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high sensitivity. Due to a low background noise of the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope employed as a detecting system, we were able to achieve a high enough sensitivity to detect zeptomole orders of protein molecules immobilized on the tip. Several different methods to immobilize protein molecules to AFM-probes were tested, meant for a wide range of applications of this method. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different proteins were clearly distinguished by immunofluorescence microscopy on the probe using their specific antibodies.

  15. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection of vanadium in water and food samples after solid phase extraction on multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Tuzen, Mustafa; Gul Kazi, Tasneem; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-11-15

    Vanadium(V) ions as 8-hydroxyquinoline chelates were loaded on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in a mini chromatographic column. Vanadium was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Various analytical parameters including pH of the working solutions, amounts of 8-hydroxyquinoline, eluent type, sample volume, and flow rates were investigated. The effects of matrix ions and some transition metals were also studied. The column can be reused 250 times without any loss in its sorption properties. The preconcentration factor was found as 100. Detection limit (3 s) and limit of quantification (10 s) for the vanadium in the optimal conditions were observed to be 0.012 µg L(-1) and 0.040 μg L(-1), respectively. The capacity of adsorption was 9.6 mg g(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 5%. The validation of the method was confirmed by using NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves, NIST SRM 1570a Spinach leaves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was applied to the determination of vanadium in tap water and bottled drinking water samples. The procedure was also successfully applied to microwave digested food samples including black tea, coffee, tomato, cabbage, zucchini, apple and chicken samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous coprecipitation of lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel in food samples with zirconium(IV) hydroxide prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-01

    A simple and new coprecipitation procedure is developed for the determination of trace quantities of heavy metals (lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel) in natural water and food samples. Analyte ions were coprecipitated by using zirconium(IV) hydroxide. The determination of metal levels was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influences of analytical parameters including pH, amount of zirconium(IV), sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recoveries of analyte ions. The effects of possible matrix ions were also examined. The recoveries of the analyte ions were in the range of 95-100%. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The detection limits for the analyte ions based on 3 sigma (n=21) were in the range of 0.27-2.50 microgL(-1). Relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 8%. The validation of the presented coprecipitation procedure was performed by the analysis certified reference materials (GBW 07605 Tea and LGC 6010 Hard drinking water). The procedure was successfully applied to natural waters and food samples like coffee, fish, tobacco, black and green tea.

  17. Ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric for selenium speciation in foods and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Pekiner, Ozlem Zeynep

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and environmentally friendly ultrasound assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (USA-IL-DLLME) was developed for the speciation of inorganic selenium in beverages and total selenium in food samples by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Some analytical parameters including pH, amount of complexing agent, extraction time, volume of ionic liquid, sample volume, etc. were optimized. Matrix effects were also investigated. Enhancement factor (EF) and limit of detection (LOD) for Se(IV) were found to be 150 and 12 ng L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found 4.2%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with analysis of LGC 6010 Hard drinking water and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves standard reference materials. Optimized method was applied to ice tea, soda and mineral water for the speciation of Se(IV) and Se(VI) and some food samples including beer, cow's milk, red wine, mixed fruit juice, date, apple, orange, grapefruit, egg and honey for the determination of total selenium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of heavy metals in aqueous solution and surface water preceded by co-precipitation procedure with copper(II) 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Ayoade, Abisayo Ruth

    2017-12-01

    Co-precipitation procedure has widely been employed for preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrices of environmental samples. This is simply due to its simplicity, low consumption of separating solvent and short duration for analysis. Various organic ligands have been used for this purpose. However, there is dearth of information on the application of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element. The use of Cu(II) is desirable because there is no contamination and background adsorption interference. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use 8-HQ in the presence of Cu(II) for coprecipitation of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from standard solutions and surface water prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of pH, sample volume, amount of 8-HQ and Cu(II) and interfering ions on the recoveries of metal ions from standard solutions were monitored using FAAS. The water samples were treated with 8-HQ under the optimum experimental conditions and metal concentrations were determined by FAAS. The metal concentrations in water samples not treated with 8-HQ were also determined. The optimum recovery values for metal ions were higher than 85.0%. The concentrations (mg/L) of Co(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), and Pb(II) in water samples treated with 8-HQ were 0.014 ± 0.002, 0.03 ± 0.01, 0.04 ± 0.02 and 0.05 ± 0.02, respectively. These concentrations and those obtained without coprecipitation technique were significantly different. Coprecipitation procedure using 8-HQ as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element enhanced the preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrix of water sample.

  19. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of heavy metals in aqueous solution and surface water preceded by co-precipitation procedure with copper(II) 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipeaiyeda, Ayodele Rotimi; Ayoade, Abisayo Ruth

    2017-07-01

    Co-precipitation procedure has widely been employed for preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrices of environmental samples. This is simply due to its simplicity, low consumption of separating solvent and short duration for analysis. Various organic ligands have been used for this purpose. However, there is dearth of information on the application of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element. The use of Cu(II) is desirable because there is no contamination and background adsorption interference. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use 8-HQ in the presence of Cu(II) for coprecipitation of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from standard solutions and surface water prior to their determinations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effects of pH, sample volume, amount of 8-HQ and Cu(II) and interfering ions on the recoveries of metal ions from standard solutions were monitored using FAAS. The water samples were treated with 8-HQ under the optimum experimental conditions and metal concentrations were determined by FAAS. The metal concentrations in water samples not treated with 8-HQ were also determined. The optimum recovery values for metal ions were higher than 85.0%. The concentrations (mg/L) of Co(II), Ni(II), Cr(III), and Pb(II) in water samples treated with 8-HQ were 0.014 ± 0.002, 0.03 ± 0.01, 0.04 ± 0.02 and 0.05 ± 0.02, respectively. These concentrations and those obtained without coprecipitation technique were significantly different. Coprecipitation procedure using 8-HQ as ligand and Cu(II) as carrier element enhanced the preconcentration and separation of metal ions from the matrix of water sample.

  20. Separation and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of total chromium and chromium (III) in phosphate rock used for production of fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Amjad H; Al-Degs, Yahya S; Sweileh, Jamal A; Said, Adi J

    2013-11-15

    Due to the commercial value of phosphate rock (PR) as a fertilizer precursor, it is necessary to investigate its heavy metals content. Chromium (Cr) may present as Cr(III) or Cr(VI) in PR; but quantitative differentiation between them is not an easy task. This is due to possible interconversion of Cr species during the digestion/leaching process. In this work, ultrasound digestion (USD) of PR was optimized (300 mg PR, 4.0 mL of 4.0 mol L(-1) nitric acid, 15 min sonication) for the sake of leaching Cr species prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as adsorbent, solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to separate Cr(III) from the digestate at pH 9, while total Cr was estimated after reducing Cr(VI) into Cr(III). The optimum USD/SPE method gave LOQ and LOD of Cr(III) of 0.96 mg kg(-1) and 0.288 mg kg(-1), respectively. The method sensitivity was 1.44×10(-3) AU kg mg(-1) within the studied Cr concentration range (5-400 mg kg(-1)). The USD/SPE method was validated by analyzing lake sediments LKSD-4 certified reference material, and by comparison with classical digestion method (CD). Application of USD/SPE on Jordanian PR samples gave total Cr rang 29.1-122.0 mg kg(-1) (±1.4-6.3), while Cr(III) ranged between 23.8 and 101.7 mg kg(-1) (±1.3-5.5). AFPC Rock Check Program samples gave total Cr range 238.9-394.7 mg kg(-1) (±11.5-24.1), while Cr(III) ranged between 202.4 and 335.8 mg kg(-1) (±11.4-18.3). These results were very close to the results obtained by the CD method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide by rationally altering the susceptible H-atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Nguyen, Khac Hong; Zhang, Yintang; Zhang, Guan; Fan, Shengnan; Li, Fen; Guo, Chao; Lu, Yuanyuan; Song, Xiaoqing; Qu, Peng; Liu, You-Nian; Xu, Maotian

    2018-01-01

    A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide was rationally designed and synthesized. The probe comprises a fluorophore unit of naphthalimide and a CN- acceptor of methylated trifluoroacetamide group. For these previous reported trifluoroacetamide derivative-based cyanide chemosensors, the H-atom of amide adjacent to trifluoroacetyl group is susceptible to be attacked by various anions (CN- itself, F-, AcO-, et al.) and even the solvent molecule, which resulted in the bewildered reaction mechanism and poor selectivity of the assay. In this work, the susceptible H-atom of trifluoroacetamide was artfully substituted by alkyl group. Thus a highly specific fluorescent probe was developed for cyanide sensing. Upon the nucleophilic addition of cyanide anion to the carbonyl of trifluoroacetamide moiety of the probe, the ICT process of the probe was significantly enhanced and leading to a remarkable red shift in both absorption and emission spectra of the probe. This fluorescent assay showed a linear range of 1.0-80.0µM and a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.23µM. All the investigated interference have no influence on the sensing behavior of the probe toward cyanide. Moreover, by coating on TLC plate, the probe can be utilized for practical detection of trace cyanide in water samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  3. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  4. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  5. Single-lane single-fluor sequencing using dideoxy-labeled, heavy-atom-modified near-IR fluorescent dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daryl C.; Flanagan, James H., Jr.; Legendre, Benjamin L., Jr.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.

    1995-04-01

    Using a near-IR (NIR) fluorescence detection system and labels synthesized in our laboratories, electropherograms of oligonucleotides separated by capillary gel electrophoresis and detected using NIR fluorescence will be presented. The sequence of nucleotide bases was determined using a single-lane, single-dye technique. The molar concentrations of the ddNTP's used during extension reactions were varied in order to achieve a ratio of 4:2:1:0 (A:C:G:T) which allowed the identification of each terminal base via fluorescence intensity measurements. Sequencing ladders were prepared from the template, M13mp18, using standard Sanger dideoxy chain termination techniques, the modified T7 DNA polymerase, and a NIR-labeled M13 primer. The data indicated reliable sequence determination up to 300 bases with a base-calling accuracy of 90%. In order to eliminate the need for dye-labeled primers and the T7 DNA polymerase enzyme, we have developed a sequencing strategy which utilizes dye-labeled dideoxy nucleotides in a single-lane, single-fluor approach. Base-calling is accomplished by measuring the fluorescence lifetime of intramolecular heavy-atom modified dyes.

  6. Laser excited analytical atomic and ionic fluorescence in flames, furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas—I. General considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenetto, N.; Human, H. G. C.

    Several important parameters for the analytical use of laser excited fluorescence spectrometry in flames, graphite furnaces and inductively coupled plasmas are discussed in some detail. These parameters include the laser characteristics such as peak power, pulse duration, spectral bandwidth and repetition rate, the choice of the excitation line, the optical arrangement and the detection system, this last one centred on the widespread use of the boxcar averager. It is shown that, if the ultimate sensitivity is the goal to be achieved, then the choice must be the electrothermal atomization. However, even for flames and inductively coupled plasmas, excellent results are possible provided that: (i) the laser system allows complete spectral coverage in the ultraviolet: (ii) saturation of the fluorescence signal can be approached over a large sample volume; and (iii) the gated detection parameters and the laser repetition frequency are optimized with respect to each other so as to reach the maximum signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent; Puech, Pierre-Henri

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A new technique for ultrafast velocity distribution measurements of atomic species by post-ionization laser induced fluorescent (PILIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.

    1992-07-01

    A new method for single shot velocity distribution measurement of metallic impurities of relevance for studies involving continuous sources, such as limiter experiments in fusion devices or sputtering experiments, based in the combination of Resonant Enhanced Multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is proposed. High ionization yield and good time resolution are expected according to the numerical simulation of the experiment that has been run for several atomic species. Other possible applications of REMPI to plasma edge physics and to conventional techniques for velocity distribution measurements are briefly addressed. (Author) 8 refs.

  9. Verification of cell viability at progressively higher scanning forces using a hybrid atomic force and fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C A; O'Hagan, B M G; Howard, C V; McKerr, G

    2007-11-01

    The prudent use of the atomic force microscope as a supra-vital live cell imaging tool requires that cell viability must be determined before and after scanning. Complementary optical techniques in conjunction with the fluorescent dyes rhodamine-123 and ethidium homodimer have been used within this study to determine cell viability after increasing loads are applied in contact mode. Guideline force ranges for five commonly cultured cell lines, human squamous carcinoma (A431), fibroblast, HeLa, Potorous tridactylis (PtK2) and rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells are given.

  10. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... that 20nm thickness of Al2O3 layer is favorable to observe a large photoluminescence enhancement (25.9%) and long carrier lifetime (0.86ms). This is a strong indication for an interface hydrogenation that takes place during post-thermal annealing. These results show that an Al2O3 layer could serve...

  11. The generation of volatile organo-metallics compounds for on-line detection by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.J.; Ebdon, L.; Goodall, P. [Univ. of Plymouth (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Previously we have described the use of sodium tetraethylborate (NaTEB) to derivatise cadmium, in aqueous solution, to yield an efficient vapour generation system which can be interfaced to both atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry (AAS, AFS). This approach has now been extended to the vapour generation of lead via the tetra-ethyl lead species. The efficient generation of lead requires the use of an auxiliary oxidising agent such as hydrogen peroxide and is therefore analogous to the lead (IV) hybride system. Conventional continuous flow methods were applied to lead alkyl generation with detection via AAS using a flame heated quartz furnace as an atom cell. A rigorous comparison of the lead alkyl and conventional hydride methods was undertaken after optimization of the two chemisties using simplex procedures.

  12. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for the determination of trace amount of cadmium ion after preconcentration by extracting its dithizone complex into molten naphthalene was developed. Several experimental conditions such as pH of the solution, stirring time, the amounts of naphthalene, standing time and volume of the solution were optimized.

  13. Metal-binding proteins scanning and determination by combining gel electrophoresis, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbi, F M; Arruda, S C C; Rodriguez, A P M; Pérez, C A; Arruda, M A Z

    2005-02-28

    In the present work, protein bands from in vitro embriogenic callus (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) were investigated using micro-synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (muSR-XRF) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation. Metal-binding protein quantification was done after microwave oven decomposition of gel by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and flame atomic emission spectrometry (FAES). According to the analysis of the protein bands, it is possible to observe that both 81 and ca. 14 kDa proteins present different Fe signal intensity at different positions. The analysis of 53 kDa protein, showed even more interesting results. Besides Fe, the muSR-XRF experiments indicate the presence of Ca, Cu, K and Zn. Chemical elements such as Cu, K, Fe and Zn were determined by SR-TXRF, Mg by FAAS and Na by FAES. Ca was determined by SR-TXRF and FAAS only for accuracy check. In the mineralised protein bands of 81 and around 14 kDa band, only Fe was determined (105 and 21.8 microg g(-1)). For those protein bands (86-ca. 14 kDa) were determined, Ca, K, Cu and Zn in a wide concentration range (42.4-283, 2.47-96.8, 0.91-15.9 and 3.39-29.7 microg g(-1), respectively).

  14. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  15. [Determination of trace selenium in plants by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with program temperature-controlled graphite digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Ru-Hai; Gong, Hua; Han, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Discussed several methods of pretreatment for the determination of selenium were discussed, and a program temperature-controlled graphite digestion method was developed to digest 5 kinds of representative standard plant samples of citrus leaves, tea, cabbage leaves, shrubs and rice. The effect of the pretreatment method of digestion solution, digestion temperature and digestion time on the extraction of selenium was investigated in detail. The instrumental working parameters were optimized. For the reaction conditions of hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS), the effect of the concentration of KBH4 and HCl on the determination of selenium was emphasized. Not only the effect of the concentration of carrier flow HCl was considered, but also the effect of the concentration of sample HCl on the determination of selenium was studied. The best method for determination of trace selenium in plant samples by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with program temperature-controlled graphite digestion was established. Results indicated that the recovery of the method of selenium was 87.1% - 106.2%, the detection limit was 0.018 microg x L(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 6.0%. In the range of 0-10 microg x L(-1) (low standard) and 0-100 microg x L(-1) (high standard) fluorescence was linearly related to the concentration of selenium, the coefficient of r was 0.9999 and r was 0.9997. Therefore, this method has wide linear range, high sensitivity, low detection limit and good stability, which was very suitable for the determination of trace selenium of plant. And the method was of easy and safe operation, strong practicability, low cost, and low toxicity of chemicals used, so it can be used as a routine analysis method in general laboratory.

  16. Spectrometric techniques 2

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume II provides information pertinent to vacuum ultraviolet techniques to complete the demonstration of the diversity of methods available to the spectroscopist interested in the ultraviolet visible and infrared spectral regions. This book discusses the specific aspects of the technique of Fourier transform spectroscopy.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the large number of systematic effects in the recording of an interferogram. This text then examines the design approach for a Fourier transform spectrometer with focus on optics.

  17. Two-Photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence O and N Atoms for the Study of Heterogeneous Catalysis in a Diffusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallix, Joan B.; Copeland, Richard A.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Advanced laser-based diagnostics have been developed to examine catalytic effects and atom/surface interactions on thermal protection materials. This study establishes the feasibility of using laser-induced fluorescence for detection of O and N atom loss in a diffusion tube to measure surface catalytic activity. The experimental apparatus is versatile in that it allows fluorescence detection to be used for measuring species selective recombination coefficients as well as diffusion tube and microwave discharge diagnostics. Many of the potential sources of error in measuring atom recombination coefficients by this method have been identified and taken into account. These include scattered light, detector saturation, sample surface cleanliness, reactor design, gas pressure and composition, and selectivity of the laser probe. Recombination coefficients and their associated errors are reported for N and O atoms on a quartz surface at room temperature.

  18. Determination of mercury by electrochemical cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using polyaniline modified graphite electrode as cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Xianjuan [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gan Wuer, E-mail: wgan@ustc.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wan Lingzhong; Zhang Hanchang; He Youzhao [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-02-15

    An electrochemical cold vapor generation system with polyaniline modified graphite electrode as cathode material was developed for Hg (II) determination by coupling with atomic fluorescence spectrometry. This electrochemical cold vapor generation system with polyaniline/graphite electrode exhibited higher sensitivity; excellent stability and lower memory effect compared with graphite electrode electrochemical cold vapor generation system. The relative standard deviation was 2.7% for eleven consecutive measurements of 2 ng mL{sup -1} Hg (II) standard solution and the mercury limit of detection for the sample blank solution was 1.3 rg mL{sup -1} (3sigma). The accuracy of the method was evaluated through analysis of the reference materials (GBW09101) (Human hair) and GBW (08517) (Laminaria Japonica Aresch) and the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of human hairs.

  19. Ultra-trace determination of methylmercuy in seafood by atomic fluorescence spectrometry coupled with electrochemical cold vapor generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Wenchuan, E-mail: zuhongshuai@126.com [Beijing Institute of Technology, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100081 (China); Beijing Center for Physical & Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China); Wang, Zhenghao [Beijing Normal University, College of Chemistry, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • Methylmercury detection by ECVG-AFS without pre-separation by HPLC is proposed. • Methylmercury is atomized by direct electrochemical reduction with no reductant. • Remarkably better sensitivity is obtained than the traditional HPLC-UV-AFS method. • Glassy carbon is the best cathode material to generate Hg vapor from methylmercury. - Abstract: A homemade electrochemical flow cell was adopted for the determination of methylmercury. The cold vapor of mercury atoms was generated from the surface of glassycarbon cathode through the method of electrolytic reduction and detected by atomic fluorescence spectroscopy subsequently. The operating conditions were optimized with 2 ng mL{sup −1} methylmercury standard solution. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of standard HgCH{sub 3}{sup +} solutions were in the range of 0.2–5 ng mL{sup −1}(as Hg). Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for methylmercury was 1.88 × 10{sup −3} ng mL{sup −1} and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 2.0% for six times 2 ng mL{sup −1} standard solution replicates. The terminal analytical results of seafood samples, available from local market, showed that the methylmercury content ranged within 3.7–45.8 ng g{sup −1}. The recoveries for methylmercury spiked samples were found to be in the range of 87.6–103.6% and the relative standard deviations below 5% (n = 6)were acquired, which showed this method was feasible for real sample analysis.

  20. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  1. Ambient-temperature trap/release of arsenic by dielectric barrier discharge and its application to ultratrace arsenic determination in surface water followed by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel dielectric barrier discharge reactor (DBDR) was utilized to trap/release arsenic coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). On the DBD principle, the precise and accurate control of trap/release procedures was fulfilled at ambient temperature, and an analytical m...

  2. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and

  3. Development of the spectrometric imaging apparatus of laser induced fluorescence from plants and estimation of chlorophyll contents of rice leaves; Laser reiki keiko sokutei sochi no kaihatsu to inehanai no chlorophyll ganryo no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, K.; Shoji, K.; Hanyu, H.

    1999-05-01

    Photosynthetic activity of plants is an important factor to assess the micrometeorological effect of plant canopy or to estimate the influence of circumstances such as water stress. Light illumination induces fluorescence from a leaf or suspension of chloroplasts. The red chlorophyll fluorescence had been used to determine the process of the electron transportation in photosynthetic reaction. The fluorescence source other than chlorophyll is not announced sufficiently, but is supposed to be useful to determine the contents of the substance corresponding to physiological response of plants. We developed a fluorescence imaging apparatus to observe spectrum and distribution of laser induced fluorescence from a leaf. Pulsed UV-laser (Nd:YAG) induced blue-green fluorescence and red chlorophyll fluorescence from a green leaf. The pulse modulated measuring light and CCD with image-intensifier (ICCD) enable to detect the fluorescence from plants under illumination. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra were investigated to estimate the chlorophyll contents in leaves of rice. During the greening course of dark grown etiolated rice leaves, chlorophyll contents were determined using the extraction of leaves and steady state LIF spectra were measured. As a result, the ratio of fluorescent intensity between blue-green and red peaks (F460/F740 and F510/F740) decreased in proportion to alteration of chlorophyll contents respectively. These fluorescence intensity ratios perform more precise estimation of higher chlorophyll contents of leaves than reported red chlorophyll fluorescence intensity ratio (F690/E740). (author)

  4. Speciation analysis of arsenic compounds in seafood by ion chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tingting; Ji, Hongwei; Li, Huixin; Cui, He; Song, Tian; Duan, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Qianlin; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ion chromatography-ultra violet-hydride generation-Atomic Florescence Spectrometry was applied to detect 5 arsenic species in seafoods. The arsenic species studied include arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenite (As(III)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and arsenate (As(V)), which were extracted from samples using 2% formic acid. Gradient elution using 33 mmol L-1 CH3COONH4 and 15 mmol L-1 Na2CO3 with 10 mL CH3CH2OH at pH 8.4 allowed the chromatographic separation of all the species on a Hamilton PRP-X100 anion-exchange column in less than 8 min. In this study, an ultrasound extraction method was used to extract arsenic species from seafood. The extraction efficiency was good and the recoveries from spiked samples were in the range of 72.6%-109%; the precision between sample replicates was higher than 3.6% for all determinations. The detection limits were 3.543 μg L-1 for AsB, 0.426 μg L-1 for As(III), 0.216 μg L-1 for DMA, 0.211 μg L-1 for MMA, and 0.709 μg L-1 for As(V), and the linear coefficients were greater than 0.999. We also developed an application of this method for the determination of arsenic species in bonito, Euphausia superba, and Enteromorpha with satisfactory results. Therefore, it was confirmed that this method was appropriate for the detection of arsenic species in seafood.

  5. Relationship between cell stiffness and stress fiber amount, assessed by simultaneous atomic force microscopy and live-cell fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Actomyosin stress fibers, one of the main components of the cell's cytoskeleton, provide mechanical stability to adherent cells by applying and transmitting tensile forces onto the extracellular matrix (ECM) at the sites of cell-ECM adhesion. While it is widely accepted that changes in spatial and temporal distribution of stress fibers affect the cell's mechanical properties, there is no quantitative knowledge on how stress fiber amount and organization directly modulate cell stiffness. We address this key open question by combining atomic force microscopy with simultaneous fluorescence imaging of living cells, and combine for the first time reliable quantitative parameters obtained from both techniques. We show that the amount of myosin and (to a lesser extent) actin assembled in stress fibers directly modulates cell stiffness in adherent mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3). In addition, the spatial distribution of stress fibers has a second-order modulatory effect. In particular, the presence of either fibers located in the cell periphery, aligned fibers or thicker fibers gives rise to reinforced cell stiffness. Our results provide basic and significant information that will help design optimal protocols to regulate the mechanical properties of adherent cells via pharmacological interventions that alter stress fiber assembly or via micropatterning techniques that restrict stress fiber spatial organization.

  6. Antimony speciation analysis in sediment reference materials using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potin-Gautier, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Pannier, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France)]. E-mail: Florence.pannier@univ-pau.fr; Quiroz, W. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, BioInorganique et Environnement LCABIE (UMR CNRS 3054), Universite de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, 64000 Pau (France); Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile); Pinochet, H. [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile); Gregori, I. de [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica y Ambiental, Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad catolica de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2005-11-30

    This work presents the development of suitable methodologies for determination of the speciation of antimony in sediment reference samples. Liquid chromatography with a post-column photo-oxidation step and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry as detection system is applied to the separation and determination of Sb(III), Sb(V) and trimethylantimony species. Post-column decomposition and hydride generation steps were studied for sensitive detection with the AFS detector. This method was applied to investigate the conditions under which speciation analysis of antimony in sediment samples can be carried out. Stability studies of Sb species during the extraction processes of solid matrices, using different reagents solutions, were performed. Results demonstrate that for the extraction yield and the stability of Sb species in different marine sediment extracts, citric acid in ascorbic acid medium was the best extracting solution for antimony speciation analysis in this matrix (between 55% and 65% of total Sb was recovered from CRMs, Sb(III) being the predominant species). The developed method allows the separation of the three compounds within 6 min with detection limits of 30 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(III) and TMSbCl2 and 40 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(V) in sediment samples.

  7. Determination of selenium in nutritional supplements and shampoos by flow injection-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz-Gracia, L; Luque de Castro, M D

    1999-11-15

    A method for the determination of Se in pharmaceutical samples (nutritional supplements and shampoos) is proposed. The method involves two steps: (1) digestion of the samples and reduction of all forms of Se to Se(IV), which is complete in only 10 min by the use of a focused microwave digestor; and (2) continuous derivatisation (hydride formation) and spectrometry detection by atomic fluorescence. The method can be applied over a wide range of concentrations (0.3-1300 ng ml(-1) of Se) with good repeatability (RSD values lower than 4.6%). The method has been applied successfully to a reference material, and two different types of pharmaceuticals (namely, five different nutritional supplements-with Se present as sodium selenite and Se-methionine-and two shampoos, with selenium sulphide), in agreements with the certified and nominal values, respectively. Yields ranged between 86.5 and 104.8%, and good precision (RSD values lower than 4.2%) were obtained in all instances.

  8. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump.

  9. Automated system for on-line determination of dimethylarsinic and inorganic arsenic by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaparro, L.L.; Leal, L.O. [Renewable Energy and Environmental Protection Department, Advanced Materials Research Center (CIMAV), Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ferrer, L.; Cerda, V. [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    A multisyringe flow-injection approach has been coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) with UV photo-oxidation for dimethylarsinic (DMA), inorganic As and total As determination, depending on the pre-treatment given to the sample (extraction or digestion). The implementation of a UV lamp allows on-line photo-oxidation of DMA and the following arsenic detection, whereas a bypass leads the flow directly to the HG-AFS system, performing inorganic arsenic determination. DMA concentration is calculated by the difference of total inorganic arsenic and measurement of the photo-oxidation step. The detection limits for DMA and inorganic arsenic were 0.09 and 0.47 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The repeatability values accomplished were of 2.4 and 1.8 %, whereas the injection frequencies were 24 and 28 injections per hour for DMA and inorganic arsenic, respectively. This method was validated by means of a solid reference material BCR-627 (muscle of tuna) with good agreement with the certified values. Satisfactory results for DMA and inorganic arsenic determination were obtained in several water matrices. The proposed method offers several advantages, such as increasing the sampling frequency, low detection limits and decreasing reagents and sample consumption, which leads to lower waste generation. (orig.)

  10. Determination of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid in cereals by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos Reyes, M.N. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cervera, M.L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es; Campos, R.C. [Department of Chemistry, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22453-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Guardia, M. de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    A fast, sensitive and simple non-chromatographic analytical method was developed for the speciation analysis of toxic arsenic species in cereal samples, namely rice and wheat semolina. An ultrasound-assisted extraction of the toxic arsenic species was performed with 1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and 0.1% (m/v) Triton XT-114. After extraction, As(III), As(V), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) concentrations were determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry using a series of proportional equations corresponding to four different experimental reduction conditions. The detection limits of the method were 1.3, 0.9, 1.5 and 0.6 ng g{sup -1} for As(III), As(V), DMA and MMA, respectively, expressed in terms of sample dry weight. Recoveries were always greater than 90%, and no species interconversion occurred. The speciation analysis of a rice flour reference material certified for total arsenic led to coherent results, which were also in agreement with other speciation studies made on the same certified reference material.

  11. Quenching of the OH and nitrogen molecular emission by methane addition in an Ar capacitively coupled plasma to remove spectral interference in lead determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, T.; Ponta, M.; Mihaltan, A. I.; Darvasi, E.; Frentiu, M.; Cordos, E.

    2010-07-01

    A new method is proposed to remove the spectral interference on elements in atomic fluorescence spectrometry by quenching of the molecular emission of the OH radical (A 2Σ + → X 2Π) and N 2 second positive system (C 3Π u → B 3Σ g) in the background spectrum of medium power Ar plasmas. The experiments were carried out in a radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W, 27.12 MHz) by CH 4 addition. The quenching is the result of the high affinity of OH radical for a hydrogen atom from the CH 4 molecule and the collisions of the second kind between nitrogen excited molecules and CH 4, respectively. The decrease of the emission of N 2 second positive system in the presence of CH 4 is also the result of the deactivation of the metastable argon atoms that could excite the nitrogen molecules. For flow rates of 0.7 l min - 1 Ar with addition of 7.5 ml min - 1 CH 4, the molecular emission of OH and N 2 was completely removed from the plasma jet spectrum at viewing heights above 60 mm. The molecular emission associated to CH and CH 2 species was not observed in the emission spectrum of Ar/CH 4 plasma in the ultraviolet range. The method was experimented for the determination of Pb at 283.31 nm by atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrodeless discharge lamp and a multichannel microspectrometer. The detection limit was 35 ng ml - 1 , 2-3 times better than in atomic emission spectrometry using the same plasma source, and similar to that in hollow cathode lamp microwave plasma torch atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  12. Cloud point extraction for trace inorganic arsenic speciation analysis in water samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shan, E-mail: ls_tuzi@163.com; Wang, Mei, E-mail: wmei02@163.com; Zhong, Yizhou, E-mail: yizhz@21cn.com; Zhang, Zehua, E-mail: kazuki.0101@aliyun.com; Yang, Bingyi, E-mail: e_yby@163.com

    2015-09-01

    A new cloud point extraction technique was established and used for the determination of trace inorganic arsenic species in water samples combined with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS). As(III) and As(V) were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and molybdate, respectively. The complexes were quantitatively extracted with the non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-114) by centrifugation. After addition of antifoam, the surfactant-rich phase containing As(III) was diluted with 5% HCl for HGAFS determination. For As(V) determination, 50% HCl was added to the surfactant-rich phase, and the mixture was placed in an ultrasonic bath at 70 °C for 30 min. As(V) was reduced to As(III) with thiourea–ascorbic acid solution, followed by HGAFS. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detection of 0.009 and 0.012 μg/L were obtained for As(III) and As(V), respectively. Concentration factors of 9.3 and 7.9, respectively, were obtained for a 50 mL sample. The precisions were 2.1% for As(III) and 2.3% for As(V). The proposed method was successfully used for the determination of trace As(III) and As(V) in water samples, with satisfactory recoveries. - Highlights: • Cloud point extraction was firstly established to determine trace inorganic arsenic(As) species combining with HGAFS. • Separate As(III) and As(V) determinations improve the accuracy. • Ultrasonic release of complexed As(V) enables complete As(V) reduction to As(III). • Direct HGAFS analysis can be performed.

  13. Decoding distinct membrane interactions of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors using a combined atomic force and fluorescence microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquelim, Henri G; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, A Salomé; Santos, Nuno C; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2013-08-01

    Enfuvirtide and T-1249 are two potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitor peptides. Recent studies indicate that lipids play an important role in the mode of action of those bioactive molecules. Using a combined tandem atomic force microscopy (AFM)-epifluorescence microscopy approach, we studied the interaction of both enfuvirtide and T-1249 with supported lipid bilayers. Fluid (ld)-gel (so) and ld-liquid ordered (lo) phase-separated membrane systems were tested. Results, especially for T-1249, show significant lipid membrane activity at a 15μM peptide concentration. T-1249, in opposition to enfuvirtide, induces an increase in membrane surface roughness, decrease in membrane fluidity, bilayer thinning at ld domains and disruption of the so domain borders. In terms of structural properties, both enfuvirtide and T-1249 possess distinct functional hydrophobic and amphipathic domains of HIV gp41. While enfuvirtide only yields the tryptophan-rich domain (TRD), T-1249 possesses both TRD and pocket-binding domain (PBD). TRD increases the hydrophobicity of the peptide while PBD enhances the amphipathic characteristics. As such, the enhanced membrane activity of T-1249 may be explained by a synergism between its amphipathic N-terminal segment and its hydrophophic C-terminal. Our findings provide valuable insights on the molecular-level mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors, unraveling the correlation between their structural properties and membrane interactions as a factor influencing their antiviral activity. Ultimately, this work validates the applicability of a combined AFM and fluorescence approach to evaluate the mechanic and structural properties of supported lipid bilayers upon interaction with membrane-active peptides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New considerations about the separation and quantification of antimony species by ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravet, R; López-Sánchez, J F; Rubio, R

    2004-10-15

    A new method for the speciation of inorganic [Sb(III) and Sb(V)] and organic (Me3SbCl2) antimony species by using a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based anion-exchange HPLC column (Hamilton PRP-X100) coupled to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) is presented. Several mobile phases were tested for the baseline separation of these three antimony species, investigating in detail experimental parameters such as concentration and pH. The best efficiency and resolution was achieved by using a gradient elution between diammonium tartrate 250 mmol l(-1) pH 5.5 (A) and KOH 20 mmol l(-1) pH 12 (B). The gradient programme used was 100% B for 1.5 min, decreasing to 0% B in 0.1 min and maintained the elution with 100% A for 5.5 min. Analysis time was less than 7 min. Equilibration of the column with the complexing mobile phase was found to be critical in order to avoid Sb(III) double peak formation. Dilution in diammonium tartrate medium was necessary in order to avoid Sb(III) oxidation at microg l(-1) concentration level. Detection limits of 0.06 microg l(-1) for Sb(V), 0.09 microg l(-1) for Me3SbCl2 and 0.04 microg l(-1) for Sb(III) as well as repeatability and reproducibility better than 5% R.S.D. (n = 10) and 9% R.S.D. (n = 30) (for 1 and 5 microg l(-1) of Sb(V) and Sb(III) and 5 and 10 microg l(-1) of Me3SbCl2) were obtained. Accuracy and recovery studies were carried out by analysing one river freshwater sample and two water certified reference materials. The proposed methodology can be considered reliable and straightforward for antimony speciation in fresh water samples.

  15. Correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis of hardened concrete for chlorides vs. Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis in accordance with AASHTO T- 260; sampling and testing for chloride ion in concrete and concrete raw mater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    A correlation between Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence(WDXRF) analysis of Hardened : Concrete for Chlorides and Atomic Absorption (AA) analysis (current method AASHTO T-260, procedure B) has been : found and a new method of analysis has been ...

  16. Development of a MSFIA system for sequential determination of antimony, arsenic and selenium using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Fernanda A; Portugal, Lindomar A; Serra, Antonio M; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-08-15

    This paper proposed a multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system for antimony, arsenic and selenium determination in peanut samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The optimization step of the hydride generation was performed using a two-level full factorial design involving the parameters: hydrochloric acid, sodium tetrahydroborate and potassium iodide concentrations. So, using the chemical conditions optimized, this method allows the determination of these elements employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 0.04 and 0.14µgL(-1) for antimony, 0.04 and 0.14µgL(-1) for arsenic and 0.14 and 0.37µgL(-1) for selenium, respectively. Additionally, the effect of vanadium, chromium, cobalt, nickel, zinc, copper, iron and molybdenum on the generation of chemical vapour was also studied. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation varied from 1.2 to 3.6% for antimony, 1.8-3.9% for arsenic and 1.8-2% for selenium. The accuracy for arsenic and selenium was confirmed using the certified peach leaves reference material SRM 1547 produced by National Institute of Standard and Technology. The proposed method showed 45 injection throughput (h(-1)) using 1.6mL sample volume for each element, 0.8mL NaBH4 0.5% (w/v) containing NaOH 0.05% (w/v), 0.8mL HCl 5M and 0.4mL KI 14% (w/v) containing L-ascorbic acid 2.5% (w/v). The method was applied to the determination of antimony, arsenic and selenium in peanut samples, which were firstly lyophilized and afterward digested using microwave assisted radiation. Six samples were analyzed and the contents of the elements found were: 28.7-41.3µgkg(-1) for arsenic, 86.4-480.1µgkg(-1) for selenium and 32.6-52.4µgkg(-1) for antimony. Addition/recovery tests were also performed to confirm the method accuracy for the three elements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and nano-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometric characterization of 1-cyano-2-substituted-benz[f]isoindole derivatives of peptides for fluorescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnemayr, K; Brückner, A; Körner, R

    1999-01-01

    A series of hexa- to decapeptides (molecular mass range 800-1200) were labeled with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde, which preferentially reacts with the primary amino groups of a peptide. A highly stable peptide conjugate is formed, which allows selective analysis by fluorescence at excitation...... with a quadrupole ion trap. Fragmentation is dominated in both cases by series of a-, b- and y-type ions and [M + H - HCN]+ ions. Peptide bonds adjacent to the fluorescence label were less susceptible to cleavage than the bonds of the non-derivatized peptide ions. In general, the resulting fragment ion patterns...

  18. Highly selective micro-sequential injection lab-on-valve (μSI-LOV) method for determination of ultra trace concentrations of nickel in saline matrices using detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Jensen, Rikard

    2006-01-01

    by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Based on the dimethylglyoxime (DMG) gravimetric procedure used for nickel analysis, the sample, as contained in pH 9.0 buffer, is, after on-line merging with the chelating reagent, transported to a reaction coil attached to one of the external ports...

  19. [Direct determination of water-soluble antimony(III) and antimony(V) in soil by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhao-Shui; Zhang, Qin

    2009-12-01

    A simple, rapid and useful method for the determination of water-soluble antimony(III) and antimony(V) in soil was established using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The method was based on the different chemical reaction efficiency between Sb(III) and Sb(V) with KBH4 in the media of HCl. The amounts of Sb(III) and Sb(V) can be obtained through measuring antimony fluorescence intensities before and after reduction with reductant. The effects of HCl and KBH4 on the sensitivities of Sb(III) and Sb(V) were investigated, and the interferences from coexistent elements were studied. The reduction efficiencies of both reductants were compared. The detection limits of the method were 1.11 ng x g(-1) for Sb(III) and 1.57 ng x g(-1) for Sb(V). The accuracy of the method was verified by recovery experiments on spiked real soil samples.

  20. Removal of Chromophore-Proximal Polar Atoms Decreases Water Content and Increases Fluorescence in a Near Infrared Phytofluor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtivuori, Heli; Bhattacharya, Shyamosree; Angenent-Mari, Nicolaas M; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Forest, Katrina T

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded fluorescent markers have revolutionized cell and molecular biology due to their biological compatibility, controllable spatiotemporal expression, and photostability. To achieve in vivo imaging in whole animals, longer excitation wavelength probes are needed due to the superior ability of near infrared light to penetrate tissues unimpeded by absorbance from biomolecules or autofluorescence of water. Derived from near infrared-absorbing bacteriophytochromes, phytofluors are engineered to fluoresce in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum, although high quantum yield remains an elusive goal. An invariant aspartate residue is of utmost importance for photoconversion in native phytochromes, presumably due to the proximity of its backbone carbonyl to the pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore as well as the size and charge of the side chain. We hypothesized that the polar interaction network formed by the charged side chain may contribute to the decay of the excited state via proton transfer. Thus, we chose to further probe the role of this amino acid by removing all possibility for polar interactions with its carboxylate side chain by incorporating leucine instead. The resultant fluorescent protein, WiPhy2, maintains BV binding, monomeric status, and long maximum excitation wavelength while minimizing undesirable protoporphyrin IXα binding in cells. A crystal structure and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that water near the BV chromophore is excluded and thus validate our hypothesis that removal of polar interactions leads to enhanced fluorescence by increasing the lifetime of the excited state. This new phytofluor maintains its fluorescent properties over a broad pH range and does not suffer from photobleaching. WiPhy2 achieves the best compromise to date between high fluorescence quantum yield and long illumination wavelength in this class of fluorescent proteins.

  1. Removal of Chromophore-proximal Polar Atoms Decreases Water Content and Increases Fluorescence in a Near Infrared Phytofluor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli eLehtivuori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetically encoded fluorescent markers have revolutionized cell and molecular biology due to their biological compatibility, controllable spatiotemporal expression, and photostability. To achieve in vivo imaging in whole animals, longer excitation wavelength probes are needed due to the superior ability of near infrared light to penetrate tissues unimpeded by absorbance from biomolecules or autofluorescence of water. Derived from near infrared-absorbing bacteriophytochromes, phytofluors are engineered to fluoresce in this region of the electromagnetic spectrum, although high quantum yield remains an elusive goal. An invariant aspartate residue is of utmost importance for photoconversion in native phytochromes, presumably due to the proximity of its backbone carbonyl to the pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin (BV chromophore as well as the size and charge of the side chain. We hypothesized that the polar interaction network formed by the charged side chain may contribute to the decay of the excited state via proton transfer. Thus, we chose to further probe the role of this amino acid by removing all possibility for polar interactions with its carboxylate side chain by incorporating leucine instead. The resultant fluorescent protein, WiPhy2, maintains BV binding, monomeric status, and long maximum excitation wavelength while minimizing undesirable protoporphyrin IXα binding in cells. A crystal structure and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy reveal that water near the BV chromophore is excluded and thus validate our hypothesis that removal of polar interactions leads to enhanced fluorescence by increasing the lifetime of the excited state. This new phytofluor maintains its fluorescent properties over a broad pH range and does not suffer from photobleaching. WiPhy2 achieves the best compromise to date between high fluorescence quantum yield and long illumination wavelength in this class of fluorescent proteins.

  2. Large time-asymmetric quantum fluctuations in amplitude–intensity correlation measurements of V-type three-level atom resonance fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Castro-Beltrán, H. M.; Román-Ancheyta, R.; Horvath, L.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we show that the scattered field of a bichromatically driven V-type three-level atom exhibit asymmetry and large violation of classical bounds in amplitude-intensity correlations. These features result from the noncommutativity of amplitude and intensity field operators, and the strong non-Gaussian fluctuations in this system. The amplitude-intensity correlations of resonance fluorescence, with its large third-order fluctuations, describe the nonclassical features of the emitted field more accurately than the second-order measure related to squeezing. Spectra and variances of these correlations, along intensity-intensity correlations, provide a wealth of supporting information.

  3. Spectrometric mixture analysis: An unexpected wrinkle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectrometric analysis of a mixture of two chemically and spectroscopically similar compounds is illustrated for the simultaneous spectrometric determination of caffeine and theobromine, the primary stimulants in coffee and tea, based on their ultraviolet absorbances. Their analysis indicates that such measurements ...

  4. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal 700098 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  5. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    reflectance increases with TiO2 thickness due to increased surface diffuse reflection. The passivation effect of ALD TiO2 thin film on the nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC sample was also investigated and a PL intensity improvement of 8.05% was obtained due to the surface passivation....

  6. Comparison of serum copper determination by colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods in seven different laboratories. The S.F.B.C. (Société Française de Biologie Clinique) Trace Element Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, J; Chappuis, P; Zawislak, R; Houot, O; Jaudon, M C; Bienvenu, F; Bureau, F

    1993-02-01

    An interlaboratory collaborative trial was conducted on the determination of serum copper using two different methods, based on colorimetry (test combination Copper, Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The general performance of the colorimetric method was below that of FAAS, except for sensitivity and linear range, as assessed by detection limit (0.44 versus 1.32 mumol/L) and upper limit of linearity (150 versus 50 mumol/L). The range of the between-run CVs and the recovery of standard additions were, respectively, 2.3-11.9% and 92-127% for the colorimetric method and 1.1-6.0% and 93-101% for the FAAS method. Interferences were minimal with both methods. The two techniques correlated satisfactorily (the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.945-0.970 among laboratories) but the colorimetric assay exhibited slightly higher results than the FAAS method. Each method was transferable among laboratories.

  7. Determination of trace metal ions via on-line separation and preconcentration by means of chelating Sepharose beads in a sequential injection lab-on-valve (SI-LOV) system coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Hansen, Elo Harald; Miró, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The analytical performance of an on-line sequential injection lab-on-valve (SI-LOV) system using chelating Sepharose beads as sorbent material for the determination of ultra trace levels of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Ni(II) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is described and discussed....... The samples are adjusted to pH 5.0 on-line in the system for optimum operation. The target ions are adsorbed by chelation on the surface of the beads, contained in a 20 mul microcolumn within the LOV, and following elution by 50 mul 2M nitric acid, the eluate is, as sandwiched by air segments, introduced...

  8. Atomic force microscopy study of the antigen-antibody binding force on patient cancer cells based on ROR1 fluorescence recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of drug-target interaction is critical to our understanding of drug action and can help design better drugs. Due to the lack of adequate single-molecule techniques, the information of individual interactions between ligand-receptors is scarce until the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) that can be used to directly measure the individual ligand-receptor forces under near-physiological conditions by linking ligands onto the surface of the AFM tip and then obtaining force curves on cells. Most of the current AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments were performed on cells grown in vitro (cell lines) that are quite different from the human cells in vivo. From the view of clinical practice, investigating the drug-target interactions directly on the patient cancer cells will bring more valuable knowledge that may potentially serve as an important parameter in personalized treatment. Here, we demonstrate the capability of AFM to measure the binding force between target (CD20) and drug (rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted drug) directly on lymphoma patient cancer cells under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition. ROR1 is a receptor expressed on some B-cell lymphomas but not on normal cells. First, B-cell lymphoma Raji cells (a cell line) were used for ROR1 fluorescence labeling and subsequent measurement of CD20-rituximab binding force. The results showed that Raji cells expressed ROR1, and the labeling of ROR1 did not influence the measurement of CD20-rituximab binding force. Then the established experimental procedures were performed on the pathological samples prepared from the bone marrow of a follicular lymphoma patient. Cancer cells were recognized by ROR1 fluorescence. Under the guidance of fluorescence, with the use of a rituximab-conjugated tip, the cellular topography was visualized by using AFM imaging and the CD20-Rituximab binding force was measured by single-molecule force spectroscopy. Copyright © 2013

  9. COMPARISON OF FEMTOSECOND AND NANOSECOND TWO PHOTON ABSORPTION LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE (TALIF) OF ATOMIC OXYGEN IN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Division (AFRL/RQQE) Combustion Branch, Turbine Engine Division (AFRL/RQTC) Jacob B. Schmidt and Sukesh Roy Spectral Energies LLC Brian Sands ...quenching coefficient, kqi. The effective quenching coefficient is measured by directly monitoring the fluorescence decay in both the plasma jet and...gas added directly to the unpowered helium jet for signal calibration [Van Gessel et al. 2013]. In this method, effective branching ratios aXe were

  10. [Study on the Reliability Assessment Method of Heavy Vehicle Gearbox Based on Spectrometric Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ke; Zhang, Zhong; Cao, Yuan-fu; Chen, Yi-jie

    2015-04-01

    Spectrometric oil analysis is of great importance for wear condition monitoring of gearbox. In this context, the contents of main elements compositions in the bench test of heavy vehicle gearbox are obtained by atomic emission spectrometric oil analysis first. Then correlation analysis of the test data and wearing mechanism analysis are carried out to get the metal element which could be used to describe the wearing and failure of the gearbox. The spectrometric data after filling/changing oil are corrected, and the laws of the contents of main elements compositions during tests are expressed as linear functions. After that, the reliability assessment is executed with considering the degradation law and discreteness of test data, in which the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution of spectrometric oil data at each time point are adopted. Finally, the influences of the threshold are discussed. It has been proved that the contents of metal element Cu, which is got by spectrometric oil analysis of different samples, could be used to assess the reliability of heavy vehicle gearbox. The reason is that the metal element Cu is closely related to the general wear state of gearbox, and is easy to be measured. When the threshold of Cu content is treated as a constant, bigger threshold means higher reliability at the same time, and the mean value of threshold has significant impact on the reliability assessment results as R > 0.9. When the threshold is treated as a random variable, bigger dispersion of threshold means smaller slope of reliability against time, and also means lower reliability of gearbox as R > 0.9 at the same time. In this study, the spectrometric oil analysis and probability statistics are used together for the reliability assessment of gear box, which extends the application range of spectrometric analysis.

  11. Determination of butyl- and phenyltin compounds in human urine by HS-SPME after derivatization with tetraethylborate and subsequent determination by capillary GC with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, G A; Rosenberg, E

    2009-04-30

    A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) method was developed and optimized for gas chromatographic separation and determination of commonly found organotin compounds in human urine after potential exposure. Butyl- and phenyltin compounds were in situ derivatized to ethylated derivatives by sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt(4)) directly in the urine matrix. The relevant parameters affecting the yield of the SPME procedure were examined using tetrabutyltin as internal standard. The method was optimized for direct use in the analysis of undiluted human urine samples and mono-, di- and tri-substituted butyl- and phenyltin compounds could be determined after a 15-min headspace extraction time at room temperature. The selectivity of the microwave-induced plasma atomic emission detector (MIP-AED) as an element specific detector in combination with the relatively selective sample preparation technique of HS-SPME allowed the interference-free detection of the organotin compounds in all cases. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used in parallel experiments as a detector for the confirmation of the identity molecular structure of the eluted compounds. The performance characteristics of the developed method are given for the determination of mixtures of these compounds. Finally the proposed method was applied to the analysis of several human urine samples.

  12. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  13. Single-Laboratory Validation of a High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic-Diode Array Detector-Fluorescence Detector/Mass Spectrometric Method for Simultaneous Determination of Water-Soluble Vitamins in Multivitamin Dietary Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei; Atkinson, Renata; Wolf, Wayne R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a single-laboratory validated (SLV) method using high-performance liquid chromatography with different detectors [diode array detector (DAD); fluorescence detector (FLD); and mass spectrometry (MS)] for determination of 7 B-complex vitamins (B1-thiamin, B2-riboflavin, B3-nicotinamide, B6-pyridoxine, B9-folic acid, pantothenic acid, and biotin) and vitamin C in multivitamin/multimineral dietary supplements. The method involves the use of a reversed-phase octadecylsilyl column (4 µm, 250 × 2.0 mm id) and a gradient mobile phase profile. Gradient elution was performed at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min. After a 5 min isocratic elution at 100% A (0.1% formic acid in water), a linear gradient to 50% A and 50% B (0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile) at 15 min was employed. Detection was performed with a DAD as well as either an FLD or a triple-quadrupole MS detector in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. SLV was performed using Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3280 Multivitamin/Multimineral Tablets, being developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, with support by the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health. Phosphate buffer (10 mM, pH 2.0) extracts of the NIST SRM 3280 were analyzed by the liquid chromatographic (LC)-DAD-FLD/MS method. Following extraction, the method does not require any sample cleanup/preconcentration steps except centrifugation and filtration. PMID:19485230

  14. Speciation analysis of organoarsenical compounds in biological matrices by coupling ion chromatography to atomic fluorescence spectrometry with on-line photooxidation and hydride generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, S.; Lobos, G.; Pannier, F.; De Gregori, I.; Pinochet, H.; Potin-gautier, M

    2004-09-06

    The optimisation of an on-line decomposition based on UV photooxidation for the analysis of organoarsenic species by coupling cation-exchange chromatography and atomic fluorescence spectrometry with hydride generation, is described. In this study, special consideration is given to the compatibility of mobile phases with post-column treatments. Results show that the most commonly used mobile phase, aqueous pyridine solutions, decreases species conversion efficiency, leading to a significant loss of sensitivity. New fully-compatible chromatographic conditions are proposed to separate arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, trimethylarsine oxide and tetramethylarsonium ion within 20 min. The very low absolute limits of detection, 4-12 pg(As), allow speciation at trace levels. Analysis of a certified reference fish tissue (DORM-2) and other seafood samples (French and Chilean oysters and mussel) highlights the robustness and the accuracy of the optimised system.

  15. Impact of fluorescence emission from gold atoms on surrounding biological tissue-implications for nanoparticle radio-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, H L; Gholami, Y; Kuncic, Z

    2017-04-21

    The addition of gold nanoparticles within target tissue (i.e. a tumour) to enhance the delivered radiation dose is a well studied radiotherapy treatment strategy, despite not yet having been translated into standard clinical practice. While several studies have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate radiation dose enhancement by Auger electrons emitted from irradiated gold nanoparticles, none have yet considered the effects due to escaping fluorescence photons. Geant4 was used to simulate a water phantom containing 10 mg ml -1 uniformly dispersed gold (1% by mass) at 5 cm depth. Incident monoenergetic photons with energies either side of the gold K-edge at 73 keV and 139.5 keV were chosen to give the same attenuation contrast against water, where water is used as a surrogate for biological tissue. For 73 keV incident photons, adding 1% gold into the water phantom enhances the energy deposited in the phantom by a factor of  ≈1.9 while 139.5 keV incident photons give a lower enhancement ratio of  ≈1.5. This difference in enhancement ratio, despite the equivalent attenuation ratios, can be attributed to energy carried from the target into the surrounding volume by fluorescence photons for the higher incident photon energy. The energy de-localisation is maximal just above the K-edge with 36% of the initial energy deposit in the phantom lost to escaping fluorescence photons. Conversely we find that the absorption of more photons by gold in the phantom reduces the number of scattered photons and hence energy deposited in the surrounding volume by up to 6% for incident photons below the K-edge. For incident photons above the K-edge this is somewhat offset by fluorescence. Our results give new insight into the previously unstudied centimetre scale energy deposition outside a target, which will be valuable for the future development of treatment plans using gold nanoparticles. From these results, we can conclude that gold nanoparticles delivered

  16. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Erkan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ocsoy, Ismail [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Nanotechnology Research Center (ERNAM), Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Ozdemir, Nalan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Erciyes University, Kayseri 38039 (Turkey)

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L{sup −1} and 8.8 μg L{sup −1}, respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. - Highlights: • The synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers is reported. • The nanoflowers were utilized for solid phase microextraction of

  17. Bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers: An effective adsorbent for solid phase extraction and slurry sampling flame atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of cadmium and lead in water, hair, food and cigarette samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Ocsoy, Ismail; Ozdemir, Nalan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-02-04

    Herein, the synthesis of bovine serum albumin-Cu(II) hybrid nanoflowers (BSA-NFs) through the building blocks of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and copper(II) ions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and their use as adsorbent for cadmium and lead ions are reported. The BSA-NFs, for the first time, were efficiently utilized as novel adsorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of cadmium and lead ions in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. The method is based on the separation and pre-concentration of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by BSA-NFs prior to determination by slurry analysis via flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The analytes were adsorbed on BSA-NFs under the vortex mixing and then the ion-loaded slurry was separated and directly introduced into the flame AAS nebulizer by using a hand-made micro sample introduction system to eliminate a number of drawbacks. The effects of analytical key parameters, such as pH, amount of BSA-NFs, vortexing time, sample volume, and matrix effect of foreign ions on adsorbing of Cd(II) and Pb(II) were systematically investigated and optimized. The limits of detection (LODs) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were calculated as 0.37 μg L(-)(1) and 8.8 μg L(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviation percentages (RSDs) (N = 5) for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were 7.2%, and 5.0%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified Water, TMDA-70 Fortified Water, SPS-WW2 Waste Water, NCSDC-73349 Bush Branches and Leaves) and by addition/recovery analysis. The quantitative recoveries were obtained for the analysis of certified reference materials and addition/recovery tests. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of cadmium and lead in water, food, cigarette and hair samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intracellular concentration map of magnesium in whole cells by combined use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lagomarsino@cnr.it [IPCF-CNR -UOS Roma c/o Dip Fisica Universita' ' Sapienza' , P.le A. Moro, 2 Rome (Italy); Physics Department, Universita' Sapienza, P.le A. Moro, 2 Rome (Italy); Iotti, Stefano [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, dell' Invecchiamento e Malattie Nefrologiche Universita di Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9 40138 Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Biostrutture e Biosistemi - Rome (Italy); Farruggia, Giovanna [Dipartimento di Biochimica ' G. Moruzzi' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 48 40126 Bologna (Italy); Cedola, Alessia [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Trapani, Valentina [Istituto di Patologia Generale - Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Facolta di Medicina ' A. Gemelli' L.go F. Vito, 1 00168 Rome (Italy); Fratini, Michela [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Bukreeva, Inna [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Leninskii prospekt 59, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation); Notargiacomo, Andrea [IFN-CNR - V. Cineto Romano, 42 00156 Rome (Italy); Mastrototaro, Lucia [Istituto di Patologia Generale - Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore - Facolta di Medicina ' A. Gemelli' L.go F. Vito, 1 00168 Rome (Italy); Marraccini, Chiara [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, dell' Invecchiamento e Malattie Nefrologiche Universita di Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9 40138 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2011-11-15

    We report a novel experimental approach to derive quantitative concentration map of light elements in whole cells by combining two complementary nano-probe methods: X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRFM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The concentration is derived by normalizing point-by-point the elemental (here Mg) spatial distribution obtained by XRFM, by the thickness measured using AFM. The considerable difference between the elemental distribution and the concentration maps indicates that this procedure is essential to obtain reliable information on the role and function of elements in whole cells. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray fluorescence and AFM have been measured on the same de-hydrated whole cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element distribution has been normalized point-by-point by the cell thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element (Mg) concentration map has been obtained on a whole cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The element concentration map is quite different from the distribution map. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher Mg concentration is found in the cell periphery.

  19. Assessment of homogeneity and minimum sample mass for cadmium analysis in powdered certified reference materials and real rice samples by solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuefei; Liu, Jixin; Huang, Yatao; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jian; Qian, Yongzhong; Wang, Min

    2013-01-30

    To optimize analytical quality controls of solid sampling electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SS-ETV-AFS), the homogeneity (H(E)) of rice samples and their minimum sample mass (M) for cadmium analysis were evaluated using three certified reference materials (CRMs) and real rice samples. The effects of different grinding degrees (particle sizes 1 mm) on H(E) and M of real rice samples were also investigated. The calculated M values of three CRMs by the Pauwels equation were 2.19, 19.76, and 3.79 mg. The well-ground real rice samples (particle size method were compared with the results by microwave digestion graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with a 0.5 g sample mass. There was no significant difference between these two methods, which meant that SS-ETV-AFS could be used to accurately detect Cd in rice with several milligrams of samples instead of the certified value (200 mg) or the recommended mass (200-500 mg) of the methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  20. Spatial dynamics of laser-induced fluorescence in an intense laser beam: experiment and theory in alkali metal atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Ferber, Ruvin; Gahbauer, Florian; Kalnins, Uldis

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that it is possible to model accurately optical phenomena in intense laser fields by taking into account the intensity distribution over the laser beam. We developed a theoretical model that divided an intense laser beam into concentric regions, each with a Rabi frequency that corresponds to the intensity in that region, and solved a set of coupled optical Bloch equations for the density matrix in each region. Experimentally obtained magneto-optical resonance curves for the $F_g=2\\longrightarrow F_e=1$ transition of the $D_1$ line of $^{87}$Rb agreed very well with the theoretical model up to a laser intensity of around 200 mW/cm$^2$ for a transition whose saturation intensity is around 4.5 mW/cm$^2$. We have studied the spatial dependence of the fluorescence intensity in an intense laser beam experimentally and theoretically. An experiment was conducted whereby a broad, intense pump laser excited the $F_g=4\\longrightarrow F_e=3$ transition of the $D_2$ line of cesium while a weak, narrow probe ...

  1. Immobilisation of oligo-peptidic probes for microarray implementation: characterisation by FTIR, atomic force microscopy and 2D fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soultani-Vigneron, S; Dugas, V; Rouillat, M H; Fédollière, J; Duclos, M C; Vnuk, E; Phaner-Goutorbe, M; Bulone, V; Martin, J R; Wallach, J; Cloarec, J P

    2005-08-05

    Proteomic microarrays show a wide range of applications for the investigation of DNA-protein, enzyme-substrate as well as protein-protein interactions. Among many challenges to build a viable "protein microarray", the surface chemistry that will allow to immobilised various proteins to retain their biological activity is of paramount importance. Here we report a chemical functionalisation method allowing immobilisation of oligo-peptides onto silica surface (porous silica, glass, thermal silicon dioxide). Substrates were first derivatised with a monofunctional silane allowing the elaboration of dense and uniform monolayers in highly reproducible way. Prior to the oligo-peptides grafting, this organic layer was functionalised with an amino-polyethyleneglycol. The coupling step of oligo-peptides onto functionalised supports is achieved through activation of the C-terminal function of the oligo-peptides. Chemical surface modifications were followed by FTIR spectroscopy, AFM measurements and fluorescence scanning microscopy. A systematic study of the oligo-peptide grafting conditions (time, concentration, solvent) was carried out to optimise this step. The oligo-peptides grafting strategy implemented in this work ensure a covalent and oriented grafting of the oligo-peptides. This orientation is ensured through the use of fully protected peptide except the terminal primary amine. The immobilized peptides will be then deprotected before biological recognition. This strategy is crucial to retain the biological activity of thousands of oligo-probes assessed on a microarray.

  2. Experimental determination of the x-ray atomic fundamental parameters of nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménesguen, Y.; Lépy, M.-C.; Hönicke, P.; Müller, M.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B.; Hoszowska, J.; Dousse, J.-Cl; Błachucki, W.; Ito, Y.; Yamashita, M.; Fukushima, S.

    2018-02-01

    The x-ray atomic properties of nickel (Ni) were investigated in a unique approach combining different experimental techniques to obtain new, useful and reliable values of atomic fundamental parameters for x-ray spectrometric purposes and for comparison with theoretical predictions. We determined the mass attenuation coefficients in an energy range covering the L- and K-absorption edges, the K-shell fluorescence yield and the Kβ/Kα and Kβ1, 3/Kα1, 2 transition probability ratios. The obtained line profiles and linewidths of the Kα and Kβ transitions in Ni can be considered as the contribution of the satellite lines arising from the [KM] shake processes suggested by Deutsch et al (1995 Phys. Rev. A 51 283) and Ito et al (2016 Phys. Rev. A 94 042506). Comparison of the new data with several databases showed good agreement, but also discrepancies were found with existing tabulated values.

  3. Experimental evidence of resonant energy collisional transfers between argon 1s and 2p states and ground state H atoms by laser collisional induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Emile; van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, laser collisional induced fluorescence (LCIF) is used to probe resonant excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma resulting from heavy particle collisions. Different radiative transitions between the 1s and 2p states (in Paschen's notation) of argon are optically pumped by a nanosecond laser pulse. The spontaneous fluorescence and collisional responses of the argon and hydrogen systems are monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. A surfatron plasma source is used to generate an argon plasma with a few per cent hydrogen addition at pressures between 0.65 and 20 mbar. The electron density is measured independently by means of Thomson scattering. The overall response of the plasma due to optical pumping of argon is briefly discussed and an overview of the known heteronuclear excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma is given. The propagation of the shortcut in the Ar(1s) to H(n = 2) excitation transfer due to the optical pumping of the Ar(1s) states is seen in the atomic hydrogen LCIF responses. For the first time, we give direct experimental evidence of the existence of an efficient excitation transfer: Additionally, measurements are performed in order to estimate the resonant energy transfer between the resonant argon 1s states and hydrogen atoms: for which no previously measured cross sections could be found in the literature. These are extra quenching channels of argon 1s and 2p states that should be included in collisional-radiative modeling of argon-hydrogen discharges. The high repetition rate of the dye laser allows us to obtain a high sensitivity in the measurements. LCIF is shown to be a powerful tool for unraveling electron and also heavy particle excitation channels in situ in the plasma phase. The technique was previously developed for measuring electron or species densities locally in the plasma, but we show that it can be advantageously used to probe collisional transfers between very short-lived species which exist

  4. Arsenic speciation in edible alga samples by microwave-assisted extraction and high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Salgado, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Quijano, M.A., E-mail: marian.quijano@upm.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain); Bonilla, M.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Civil: Tecnologia Hidraulica y Energetica, Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica de Obras Publicas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Alfonso XII 3 y 5, 28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Total As and As species were analyzed in edible marine algae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A microwave-assisted extraction method with deionized water was applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As compounds identified comprised DMA, As(V) and four arsenosugars Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerably high As(V) concentrations were found in the most of the algae studied. - Abstract: Twelve commercially available edible marine algae from France, Japan and Spain and the certified reference material (CRM) NIES No. 9 Sargassum fulvellum were analyzed for total arsenic and arsenic species. Total arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after microwave digestion and ranged from 23 to 126 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Arsenic species in alga samples were extracted with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction and showed extraction efficiencies from 49 to 98%, in terms of total arsenic. The presence of eleven arsenic species was studied by high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet photo-oxidation-hydride generation atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-(UV)-HG-AFS) developed methods, using both anion and cation exchange chromatography. Glycerol and phosphate sugars were found in all alga samples analyzed, at concentrations between 0.11 and 22 {mu}g g{sup -1}, whereas sulfonate and sulfate sugars were only detected in three of them (0.6-7.2 {mu}g g{sup -1}). Regarding arsenic toxic species, low concentration levels of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) (<0.9 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and generally high arsenate (As(V)) concentrations (up to 77 {mu}g g{sup -1}) were found in most of the algae studied. The results obtained are of interest to highlight the need to perform speciation analysis and to introduce appropriate legislation to limit toxic arsenic species content in these food products.

  5. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometric Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-06-11

    Jun 11, 2017 ... significant (texps < tcrits) at 95% confidence interval. Keywords: trace elements, daily requirements, M. oleifera, ED-XRF spectrometry, Mgbabor, Okposi-Okwu. INTRODUCTION .... *values as reported according to US Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine and National Academies. (2001). Fig. 2.

  6. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  7. On-line continuous generation of zinc chelates in the vapor phase by reaction with sodium dithiocarbamates and determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuchuan; Sun, Rui; Fang, Jinliang

    2017-02-01

    The present study shows for the first time that a volatile zinc chelate species can be generated by the on-line continuous merging of an acidified sample solution with an aqueous sodium diethyldithiocarbamate solution followed by rapid separation using a frit-based bubble gas-liquid separator at room temperature. The operating conditions for the generation of the vaporous zinc chelate were preliminarily investigated by non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The possible mechanism of zinc vapor generation is discussed. The study shows that the volatile species is an intermediate species with very similar properties to diethyldithiocarbamic acid and a very short half-life in the acidic solution. Moreover, this species can only be generated by on-line mixing and rapid separation. The efficiency of generation was 33-85% depending on acidity. Under optimal conditions, the flow rates of the sample and Na-DDTC solution were 1.3 ml min- 1, the carrier argon flow rate was 225 ml min- 1, the acid concentration of the sample solution and the concentration of Na-DDTC were 0.05 M and 0.4% (m/v), respectively, the detection limit of zinc was 0.33 (3σ) ng ml- 1, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.3%. The accuracy of the method was verified by the determination of zinc in the plant reference materials GBW10015 (spinach) and GBW10045 (rice). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  8. Solid Phase Extraction of Inorganic Mercury Using 5-Phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Natural Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Daye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ was chosen as a powerful ligand for Hg solid phase extraction. Among several chelating resins based on 8-HQ, 5-phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline (5Ph8HQ is used for mercury extraction in which the adsorption dynamics were fully studied. It has been shown that Hg(II is totally absorbed by 5Ph8HQ within the first 30 minutes of contact time with t1/2 5 minutes, following Langmuir adsorption model. At pH 4, the affinity of mercury is unchallenged by other metals except, for Cu(II, which have shown higher Kd value. With these latter characteristics, 5Ph8HQ was examined for the preconcentration of trace levels of Hg(II. The developed method showed quantitative recoveries of Hg(II with LOD = 0.21 pg mL−1 and RSD = 3–6% using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS with a preconcentration factor greater than 250.

  9. A Geant4-based Simulation to Evaluate the Feasibility of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) in Determining Atomic Compositions of Body Tissue in Cancer Diagnostics and Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbo, Yekaterina; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Liyanage, Nilanga

    2017-01-01

    Customarily applied in homeland security for identifying concealed explosives and chemical weapons, NRF (Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence) may have high potential in determining atomic compositions of body tissue. High energy photons incident on a target excite the target nuclei causing characteristic re-emission of resonance photons. As the nuclei of each isotope have well-defined excitation energies, NRF uniquely indicates the isotopic content of the target. NRF radiation corresponding to nuclear isotopes present in the human body is emitted during radiotherapy based on Bremsstrahlung photons generated in a linear electron accelerator. We have developed a Geant4 simulation in order to help assess NRF capabilities in detecting, mapping, and characterizing tumors. We have imported a digital phantom into the simulation using anatomical data linked to known chemical compositions of various tissues. Work is ongoing to implement the University of Virginia's cancer center treatment setup and patient geometry, and to collect and analyze the simulation's physics quantities to evaluate the potential of NRF for medical imaging applications. Preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca G. Beltrán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydride generation (HG of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe. Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS. The linearity of calibration curves (1–10 μg Pb L−1 was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4, because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L−1.

  11. Design and application of a novel integrated electrochemical hydride generation cell for the determination of arsenic in seaweeds by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xian-Juan; Gan, Wu-Er; Han, Su-Ping; Zi, Hong-Jing; He, You-Zhao

    2009-07-15

    An integrated electrochemical hydride generation cell, mainly composed of three components (a gas liquid separator, a graphite tube cathode and a reticulate Pt wire anode), was laboratory constructed and employed for the detection of arsenic by coupling to atomic fluorescence spectrometry. This integrated cell was free of ion-exchange membrane and individual anolyte, with the virtues of low-cost, easy assembly and environmental-friendly. Using flow injection mode, the sample throughput could come to 120 h(-1) attributed to the small dimension of the cathode chamber. The operating conditions for the electrochemical hydride generation of arsenic were investigated in detail and the potential interferences from oxygen or various ions were also evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, no obvious oxygen quenching effects were observed. The limit of detection of As (III) for the sample blank solution was 0.2 ng mL(-1) (3sigma) and the relative standard deviation was 3.1% for nine consecutive measurements of 5 ng mL(-1) As (III) standard solution. The calibration curve was linear up to 100 ng mL(-1). The accuracy of the method was verified by the determination of arsenic in the reference materials GBW08517 (Laminaria Japonica Aresch) and GBW10023 (Porphyra crispata) and the developed method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of arsenic in edible seaweeds.

  12. Quantitative analysis of drug-induced complement-mediated cytotoxic effect on single tumor cells using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    In the antibody-based targeted therapies of B-cell lymphomas, complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) is an important mechanism. CMC is activated after the binding of drugs (monoclonal antibodies) to tumor cells. The activation of CMC ultimately leads to the lysis of tumor cells. However, it remains poorly understood how CMC alters the morphology and mechanics of single tumor cells at the nanoscale. In recent years, nanoscopic observations of cellular behaviors with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have contributed much to the field of cell biology. In this work, by combining AFM with fluorescence microscopy, the detailed changes in cellular ultra-microstructures and mechanical properties during the process of CMC were quantitatively investigated on single tumor cells. AFM imaging distinctly showed that the CMC effect could lead to the formation of nano holes on the tumor cells. Quantitative analysis of AFM images indicated that cell surface became lower and rougher after the CMC process. The cellular mechanics measurements showed that during the process of CMC cells firstly softened and finally stiffened, which was validated by dynamically monitoring the mechanical changes of single living cells during CMC. The experimental results provide novel insights into the antibody-dependent CMC.

  13. Automated dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high performance liquid chromatography - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of mercury species in natural water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao-Min; Zhang, Feng-Ping; Jiao, Bao-Yu; Rao, Jin-Yu; Leng, Geng

    2017-04-14

    An automated, home-constructed, and low cost dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) device that directly coupled to a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) - cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS) system was designed and developed for the determination of trace concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in natural waters. With a simple, miniaturized and efficient automated DLLME system, nanogram amounts of these mercury species were extracted from natural water samples and injected into a hyphenated HPLC-CVAFS for quantification. The complete analytical procedure, including chelation, extraction, phase separation, collection and injection of the extracts, as well as HPLC-CVAFS quantification, was automated. Key parameters, such as the type and volume of the chelation, extraction and dispersive solvent, aspiration speed, sample pH, salt effect and matrix effect, were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linear range was 10-1200ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 5-450ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Limits of detection were 3.0ngL(-1) for EtHg(+) and 1.5ngL(-1) for MeHg(+) and Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by spiking three natural water samples with different Hg concentrations, giving recoveries from 88.4-96.1%, and relative standard deviations <5.1%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Slurry sampling-microwave assisted leaching prior to hydride generation-pervaporation-atomic fluorescence detection for the determination of extractable arsenic in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballo-López, A; Luque De Castro, M D

    2003-05-01

    A flow injection-pervaporation method, where the sample was introduced as slurry, has been developed for the continuous derivatization and determination of arsenic in soil by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The removal of arsenic is achieved with the help of a microwave digestor, which facilitates an on-line leaching in the flow injection manifold. Slurries, prepared by mixing the soil (particle size <65 microm) with 6 mol L(-)(1) HCl, were magnetically stirred for 3 min, and while stirring, the pump aspirated the aliquot and filled the loop (500 microL) of the injection valve. An industrial soil and five types of soil (sandy, clayey, slimy, limy, organic) were selected for the optimization of the leaching and determination steps of arsenic, respectively. The results obtained from three certified reference materials [stream sediment GBW 07311 (188 microg/mL As), river sediment CRM 320 (76.7 microg/mL As), and soil GBW 07405 (412 microg/mL As)] using direct calibration against aqueous standards demonstrate the reliability of the method. The relative standard deviation for within-laboratory reproducibility was 4.5%.

  15. Multivariate optimization of a method for antimony determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in hair samples of patients undergoing chemotherapy against Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Manuelle C; Cavalcante, Dannuza D; Silva, Daniel L F; Santos, Walter N L Dos; Bezerra, Marcos A

    2016-09-01

    A method was developed for determination of total antimony in hair samples from patients undergoing chemotherapy against Leishmaniasis based on the administration of pentavalent antimonial drugs. The method is based on microwave assisted digestion of the samples in a pressurized system, reduction of Sb5+ to Sb3+ with KI solution (10% w/v) in ascorbic acid (2%, w/v) and its subsequent determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The proportions of each component (HCl, HNO3 and water) used in the digestion were studied applying a constrained mixtures design. The optimal proportions found were 50% water, 25% HNO3 and 25% HCl. Variables involved in the generation of antimony hydride were optimized using a Doehlert design revealing that good sensitivity is found when using 2.0% w/v NaBH4 and 4.4 mol L-1 HCl. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the method allows the determination of antimony in hair samples with detection and quantification limits of 1.4 and 4.6 ng g-1, respectively, and precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.8% (n = 10 to 10.0 mg L-1). The developed method was applied in the analysis of hair samples from patients who take medication against Leishmaniasis.

  16. Multivariate optimization of a method for antimony determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in hair samples of patients undergoing chemotherapy against Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANUELLE C. CARDOZO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A method was developed for determination of total antimony in hair samples from patients undergoing chemotherapy against Leishmaniasis based on the administration of pentavalent antimonial drugs. The method is based on microwave assisted digestion of the samples in a pressurized system, reduction of Sb5+ to Sb3+ with KI solution (10% w/v in ascorbic acid (2%, w/v and its subsequent determination by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS. The proportions of each component (HCl, HNO3 and water used in the digestion were studied applying a constrained mixtures design. The optimal proportions found were 50% water, 25% HNO3 and 25% HCl. Variables involved in the generation of antimony hydride were optimized using a Doehlert design revealing that good sensitivity is found when using 2.0% w/v NaBH4 and 4.4 mol L-1 HCl. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the method allows the determination of antimony in hair samples with detection and quantification limits of 1.4 and 4.6 ng g-1, respectively, and precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD of 2.8% (n = 10 to 10.0 mg L-1. The developed method was applied in the analysis of hair samples from patients who take medication against Leishmaniasis.

  17. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  18. Determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Jianbo; Tang Zhiyong; Jin Zexiang; Chi Quan; He Bin; Jiang Guibin

    2003-01-27

    An analytical procedure for determination of As(III) and As(V) in soils using sequential extraction combined with flow injection (FI) hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was presented. The soils were sequentially extracted by water, 0.6 mol l{sup -1} KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution, 1% (v/v) HCl solution and 1% (w/v) NaOH solution. The arsenite (As(III)) in extract was analyzed by HG-AFS in the medium of 0.1 mol l{sup -1} citric acid solution, then the total arsenic in extract was determined by HG-AFS using on-line reduction of arsenate with L-cysteine. The concentration of arsenate (As(V)) was calculated by the difference. The optimum conditions of extraction and determination were studied in detail. The detection limit (3{sigma}) for As(III) and As(V) were 0.11 and 0.07 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.43% (n=11) at the 10 {mu}g l{sup -1} As level. The method was applied in the determination of As(III) and As(V) of real soils and the recoveries of As(III) and As(V) were in the range of 89.3-118 and 80.4-111%, respectively.

  19. Distribution of heavy metals in Lumbricus terrestris, Aporrectodea longa and A. rosea measured by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, C.; Laursen, J. (Kongelige Veterinaer- og Landbohoejskole, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1982-01-01

    Distribution of Ca, Pb, Cd, Zn, Fe and Mn has been investigated in the earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris, Aporectodea longa and A. rosea by atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry measurements. The material of L. terrestris originated from the garden of the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University in central Copenhagen. Material of the other two species was sampled in sewage sludge treated plots. It was found that lead and cadmium are accumulated in the gut wall and from here transferred to waste nodules (brown bodies). In L. terrestris more lead was transferred to waste nodules than cadmium. Also large amounts of zinc were accumulated in the gut wall. Analyses of L. terrestris calciferous glands showed that these take part in regulation and excretion of a number of heavy metals. Lead and cadmium content was low in the ventral nerve chord and seminal vesicles. A. longa with poorly developed calciferous glands seems to rely more on waste nodule formation in the ultimate immobilization of lead.

  20. Speciation of inorganic- and methyl-mercury in biological matrixes by electrochemical vapor generation from an L-cysteine modified graphite electrode with atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang-Bing; Yang, Xin-An; Dong, Yong-Ping; Xue, Jing-Jing

    2012-11-06

    A novel nonchromatographic speciation technique for ultratrace inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and methylmercury (CH(3)Hg(+)) in biological materials is developed and validated by electrolytic vapor generation (EVG) coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The studies show that CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) can be converted to Hg vapor efficiently on an l-cysteine modified graphite cathode, which has never been reported before. We observe that only Hg(2+) can be converted efficiently to Hg vapor at low current mode (0.2 A). While at high current mode (2.2 A), both CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+) can be reduced efficiently. As a result, we successfully establish an exact and sensitive method based on the current control to detect mercury speciation for the first time. The factors of electrolytic conditions have been optimized, and the potential mechanism is discussed. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limits (3s) of Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) in aqueous solutions are 0.098 and 0.073 μg L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations for 6 replicate determinations of 2 μg L(-1) Hg are determined as 3.2% and 4.7% for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+). The accuracy of the method is verified through the analysis of certified reference materials (CRM, NRC-DORM-2), and the proposed method has been applied satisfactorily to the determination of mercury speciation in several seafood samples by calibration curve mode.

  1. Determination of total Sb,Se Te, and Bi and evaluation of their inorganic species in garlic by hydride-generation-atomic-fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos Reyes, M.N.; Cervera, M.L.; Guardia, M. de la [University of Valencia, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    A sensitive and simple analytical method has been developed for determination of Sb(III), Sb(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Te(IV), Te(VI), and Bi(III) in garlic samples by using hydride-generation-atomic-fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The method is based on a single extraction of the inorganic species by sonication at room temperature with 1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and washing of the solid phase with 0.1% (w/v) EDTA, followed by measurement of the corresponding hydrides generated under two different experimental conditions directly and after a pre-reduction step. The limit of detection of the method was 0.7 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(III), 1.0 ng g{sup -1} for Sb(V), 1.3 ng g{sup -1} for Se(IV), 1.0 ng g{sup -1} for Se(VI), 1.1 ng g{sup -1} for Te(IV), 0.5 ng g{sup -1} for Te(VI), and 0.9 ng g{sup -1} for Bi(III), in all cases expressed in terms of sample dry weight. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of a portable micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the ancient ceramics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, D.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zachariadis, G.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Anthemidis, A.N. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsirliganis, N.C. [Archaeometry Laboratory, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100, Xanthi (Greece); Stratis, J.A. [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: jstratis@chem.auth.gr

    2004-12-01

    Two multielement instrumental methods of analysis, micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) were applied for the analysis of 7th and 5th century B.C. ancient ceramic sherds in order to evaluate the above two methods and to assess the potential to use the current compact and portable micro-XRF instrument for the in situ analysis of ancient ceramics. The distinguishing factor of interest is that micro-XRF spectrometry offers the possibility of a nondestructive analysis, an aspect of primary importance in the compositional analysis of cultural objects. Micro-XRF measurements were performed firstly directly on the ceramic sherds with no special pretreatment apart from surface cleaning (micro-XRF on sherds) and secondly on pressed pellet disks which were prepared for each ceramic sherd (micro-XRF on pellet). For the ICP-AES determination of elements, test solutions were prepared by the application of a microwave-assisted decomposition procedure in closed high-pressure PFA vessels. Also, the standard reference material SARM 69 was used for the efficiency calibration of the micro-XRF instrument and was analysed by both methods. In order to verify the calibration, the standard reference materials NCS DC 73332 and SRM620 as well as the reference materials AWI-1 and PRI-1 were analysed by micro-XRF. Elemental concentrations determined by the three analytical procedures (ICP-AES, micro-XRF on sherds and micro-XRF on pellets) were statistically treated by correlation analysis and Student's t-test (at the 95% confidence level)

  3. Determination of inorganic arsenic in algae using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction followed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihong; Qi, Yuehan; Qin, Deyuan; Liu, Jixin; Mao, Xuefei; Chen, Guoying; Wei, Chao; Qian, Yongzhong

    2017-08-01

    Accurate, stable and fast analysis of toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in complicated and arsenosugar-rich algae matrix is always a challenge. Herein, a novel analytical method for iAs in algae was reported, using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The separation of iAs from algae was first performed by nonpolar SPE sorbent using Br - for arsenic halogenation. Algae samples were extracted with 1% perchloric acid. Then, 1.5mL extract was reduced by 1% thiourea, and simultaneously reacted (for 30min) with 50μL of 10% KBr for converting iAs to AsBr 3 after adding 3.5mL of 70% HCl to 5mL. A polystyrene (PS) resin cartridge was employed to retain arsenicals, which were hydrolyzed, eluted from the PS resin with H 2 O, and categorized as iAs. The total iAs was quantified by HG-AFS. Under optimum conditions, the spiked recoveries of iAs in real algae samples were in the 82-96% range, and the method achieved a desirable limit of detection of 3μgkg -1 . The inter-day relative standard deviations were 4.5% and 4.1% for spiked 100 and 500μgkg -1 respectively, which proved acceptable for this method. For real algae samples analysis, the highest presence of iAs was found in sargassum fusiforme, followed by kelp, seaweed and laver. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Arsenic speciation based on ion exchange high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated with hydride generation atomic fluorescence and on-line UV photo oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin He; Jiang Gui-bin; Xu Xiao-bai [Chinese Academy of Scinces, Beijing (China). Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences

    2000-12-01

    An on-line method capable of the separation of arsenic species was developed for the speciation of arsenite As(III), arsenate As(V), monomethylarsenic (MMA) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) in biological samples. The method is based on the combination of high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) for separation, UV photo oxidation for sample digestion and hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HGAFS) for sensitive detection. The best separation results were obtained with an anion-exchange AS11 column protected by an AG11 guard column, and gradient elution with NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and water as mobile phase. The on-line UV photo oxidation with 1.5% K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} in 0.2 mol L{sup -1} NaOH in an 8 m PTFE coil for 40 s ensures the digestion of organoarsenic compounds. Detection limits for the four species were in the range of 0.11-0.15 ng (20 {mu}L injected). Procedures were validated by analysis of the certified reference materials GBW09103 freeze-dried human urine and the results were in good agreement with the certified values of total arsenic concentration. The method has been successfully applied to speciation studies of blood arsenic species with no need of sample pretreatment. Speciation of arsenic in blood samples collected from two patients after the ingestion of realgar-containing drug reveals slight increase of arsenite and DMA, resulting from the digestion of realgar. (orig.)

  6. Spectrometric characteristics of polystyrene scintillation films

    CERN Document Server

    Astvatsaturov, A R; Gavalyan, V B; Gavalyan, V G

    1999-01-01

    The spectrometric characteristics of five types of polystyrene scintillation films with thicknesses of 10, 30, 50 and 80 mu m and of analogous 250 mu m thick plates irradiated with sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 Pu and sup 2 sup 2 sup 6 Ra sources of alpha-particles have been studied. The prospects of utilization of scintillation films as radiators for detection of heavy charged particles and measurement of their energy was experimentally shown.

  7. Speciation analysis of mercury in sediments using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Geng; Yin, Hui; Li, Shaobo; Chen, Yong; Dan, Dezhong

    2012-09-15

    A simple and fast solvent microextraction method termed vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CVAFS) has been developed for the trace analysis of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in sediment samples. Carbon tetrachloride was used as collecting solvent for the extraction of mercury species from sediment by a vortex-assisted extraction. In VALLME, 100 μL 1% (m/v) l-Cysteine were used as extraction solvent and were injected into 4 mL carbon tetrachloride. The extraction solvent dispersed into carbon tetrachloride under vigorously shaking by a vortex agitator. The fine droplets could extract mercury species within few minutes because of the shorter diffusion distance and larger specific surface area. After centrifugation, the floating extractant phase restored its initial single microdrop shape and was used for HPLC-CVAFS analysis. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed VALLME such as extraction solvent, vortex time, volumes of extraction solvent and salt addition etc. were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linearity was found in the concentration range from 0.1 to 25 ng g(-1) for MeHg(+), 0.2 to 65 ng g(-1) for EtHg(+), and 0.1 to 30 ng g(-1) for Hg(2+). Coefficients of determination (R(2)) ranged from 0.9938 to 0.9972. The limits of detection (LODs, signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)=3) were 0.028 ng g(-1) for MeHg(+), 0.057 ng g(-1) for EtHg(+), and 0.029 ng g(-1) for Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by testing a series of 6 sediment samples, which were spiked with different concentration levels. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in analyses of real nature sediment samples. In this work, VALLME was applied to the extraction of mercury species in sediment samples for the first time. Using l-Cys as extraction solvent, the

  8. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas-Castor, J.M. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico); Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Portugal, L.; Ferrer, L. [Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Guzmán-Mar, J.L.; Hernández-Ramírez, A. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico); Cerdà, V. [Group of Analytical Chemistry, Automation and Environment, University of Balearic Islands, Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hinojosa-Reyes, L., E-mail: laura.hinojosary@uanl.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, C.P. 66451 Nuevo León (Mexico)

    2015-05-18

    Highlights: • A fully automated flow-based modified-BCR extraction method was developed to evaluate the extractable As of soil. • The MSFIA–HG-AFS system included an UV photo-oxidation step for organic species degradation. • The accuracy and precision of the proposed method were found satisfactory. • The time analysis can be reduced up to eight times by using the proposed flow-based BCR method. • The labile As (F1 + F2) was <50% of total As in soil samples from As-contaminated-mining zones. - Abstract: A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L{sup −1} for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013–0.800, 0.011–0.900 and 0.079–1.400 mg L{sup −1} for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA–HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L{sup −1} As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural

  9. Determination of hydrogen sulfide and volatile thiols in air samples by mercury probe derivatization coupled with liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Emilia; D'Ulivo, Lucia; Lomonte, Cristina; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto; Raspi, Giorgio; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2006-10-02

    A new procedure is proposed for the sampling and storage of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and volatile thiols (methanethiol or methyl mercaptan, ethanethiol and propanethiol) for their determination by liquid chromatography. The sampling procedure is based on the trapping/pre-concentration of the analytes in alkaline aqueous solution containing an organic mercurial probe p-hydroxymercurybenzoate, HO-Hg-C6H4-COO- (PHMB), where they are derivatized to stable PHMB complexes based on mercury-sulfur covalent bonds. PHMB complexes are separated on a C18 reverse phase column, allowing their determination by liquid chromatography coupled with sequential non-selective UV-vis (DAD) and mercury specific (chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry, CVGAFS) on-line detectors. PHMB complexes, S(PHMB)2CH3S-PHMB, C2H5S-PHMB and C3H7S-PHMB, are stable alt least for 12 h at room temperature and for 3 months if stored frozen (-20 degrees C). The best analytical figures of merits in the optimized conditions were obtained by CVGAFS detection, with detection limits (LODc) of 9.7 microg L(-1) for H2S, 13.7 microg L(-1) for CH(3)SH, 17.7 microg L(-1) for C2H5SH and 21.7 microg L(-1) for C3H7SH in the trapping solution in form of RS-PHMB complexes, the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) ranging between 1.0 and 1.5%, and a linear dynamic range (LDR) between 10 and 9700 microg L(-1). Conventional UV absorbance detectors tuned at 254 nm can be employed as well with comparable R.S.D. and LDR, but with LODc one order of magnitude higher than AFS detector and lower specificity. The sampling procedure followed by LC-DAD-CVGAFS analysis has been validated, as example, for H2S determination by a certified gas permeation tube as a source of 3.071+/-0.154 microg min(-1) of H2S, giving a recovery of 99.8+/-7% and it has been applied to the determination of sulfur compounds in real gas samples (biogas and the air of a plant for fractional distillation of crude oil).

  10. Investigation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier film properties made by atomic layer deposition onto fluorescent tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium molecular films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maindron, Tony; Aventurier, Bernard [LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ghazouani, Ahlem; Jullien, Tony [LETI/DTSI/SDEP/Laboratoire Dépôt Equipe 2, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rochat, Névine [LETI/DTSI/Service de Caractérisation des Matériaux et Composants, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Simon, Jean-Yves; Viasnoff, Emilie [LETI/DOPT/SCOOP/Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation, CEA-LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-02

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films have been deposited at 85 °C by atomic layer deposition onto single 100 nm thick tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (AlQ{sub 3}) films made onto silicon wafers. It has been found that a thick ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (> 11 nm) greatly prevents the photo-oxidation of AlQ{sub 3} films when exposed to continuous UV irradiation (350 mW/cm{sup 2}). Thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thicknesses (< 11 nm) on the contrary yield lower barrier performances. Defects in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer have been easily observed as non-fluorescent AlQ{sub 3} singularities, or black spots, under UV light on the system Si/AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stored into laboratory conditions (22 °C/50% Relative Humidity (RH)) for long time scale (∼ 2000 h). Accelerated aging conditions in a climatic chamber (85 °C/85% RH) also allow faster visualization of the same defects (168 h). The black spot density grows upon time and the black spot density occurrence rates have been calculated to be 0.024 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} and 0.243 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} respectively for the two testing conditions. A detailed investigation of these defects did show that they cannot be ascribed to the presence of a detectable particle. In that sense they are presumably the consequence of the existence of nanometre-scaled defects which cannot be detected onto fresh samples. Interestingly, an additional overcoating of ebeam-deposited SiO{sub 2} onto the Si/AlQ{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample helps to decrease drastically the black spot density occurrence rates down to 0.004 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} and 0.04 h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} respectively for 22 °C/50% RH and 85 °C/85% RH testing conditions. These observations highlight the moisture sensitivity of low temperature ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and confirm the general idea that a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD film performs as an ultra-high barrier but needs to be overprotected from water condensation by an

  11. Optical diagnostics of radio-frequency plasmas containing CHF3 and CHF3/O2: Laser-induced fluorescence of CF2, CF, and O atoms, and optical emission from H, F, and O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G.; Sucksmith, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) has been used to measure absolute concentrations of CF2, CF, and O atoms in a parallel-plate capacitatively coupled radio-frequency-driven plasma containing CHF3 and its mixtures with Ar and O2 at pressures between 50 and 500 mTorr. In CHF3 the spatial distribution of CF2 peaks at the driven electrode, and shows the importance of surface processes for its production. Time-resolved studies show evidence for its homogeneous chemical removal. CF concentrations are an order of magnitude lower than those of CF2, and removal by reaction with H atoms is consistent with time-resolved data taken on plasma extinction. For both radicals the absolute concentrations are higher than those found for similar plasmas in CF4. In the presence of O2 the fluorinated radical concentrations drop to below the detection limit, and the influence of surface removal processes is again invoked to explain the increase in O atom concentration observed when a small amount of CHF3 is added to a dominantly O2 gas flow. Optical emission from excited F, H, and O atoms is observed, and even when corrected by actinometry, is shown to be an unreliable indicator of the relative concentration of the ground-state species because of contributions from dissociative excitation of stable species in the discharge. Excited H atoms are found to be translationally hot from measurements of their linewidths, and are clearly not all formed from excitation of H atoms. Time-resolved actinometry (TRA) can be used in some cases to remove the contribution to the emission from dissociative excitation, but in the case of O atoms where both LIF and TRA were compared, the influence of a time-dependent dissociative excitation step complicates the analysis and is attributed to the presence of other species such as O2(a1Δg) in the discharge.

  12. Methodology using a portable X-ray fluorescence device for on-site and rapid evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in wounds: a model study for application to plutonium contamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshii

    Full Text Available Workers decommissioning the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant damaged from the Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami are at risk of injury with possible contamination from radioactive heavy atoms including actinides, such as plutonium. We propose a new methodology for on-site and rapid evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in wounds using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF device. In the present study, stable lead was used as the model contaminant substitute for radioactive heavy atoms. First, the wound model was developed by placing a liquid blood phantom on an epoxy resin wound phantom contaminated with lead. Next, the correlation between the concentration of contaminant and the XRF peak intensity was formulated considering the thickness of blood exiting the wound. Methods to determine the minimum detection limit (MDL of contaminants at any maximal equivalent dose to the wound by XRF measurement were also established. For example, in this system, at a maximal equivalent dose of 16.5 mSv to the wound and blood thickness of 0.5 mm, the MDL value for lead was 1.2 ppm (3.1 nmol. The radioactivity of 239Pu corresponding to 3.1 nmol is 1.7 kBq, which is lower than the radioactivity of 239Pu contaminating puncture wounds in previous severe accidents. In conclusion, the established methodology could be beneficial for future development of a method to evaluate plutonium contamination in wounds. Highlights: Methodology for evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in a wound was established. A portable X-ray fluorescence device enables on-site, rapid and direct evaluation. This method is expected to be used for evaluation of plutonium contamination in wounds.

  13. Methodology using a portable X-ray fluorescence device for on-site and rapid evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in wounds: a model study for application to plutonium contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Kouta; Imaseki, Hitoshi; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Inagaki, Masayo; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Kurihara, Osamu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Workers decommissioning the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant damaged from the Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami are at risk of injury with possible contamination from radioactive heavy atoms including actinides, such as plutonium. We propose a new methodology for on-site and rapid evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in wounds using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. In the present study, stable lead was used as the model contaminant substitute for radioactive heavy atoms. First, the wound model was developed by placing a liquid blood phantom on an epoxy resin wound phantom contaminated with lead. Next, the correlation between the concentration of contaminant and the XRF peak intensity was formulated considering the thickness of blood exiting the wound. Methods to determine the minimum detection limit (MDL) of contaminants at any maximal equivalent dose to the wound by XRF measurement were also established. For example, in this system, at a maximal equivalent dose of 16.5 mSv to the wound and blood thickness of 0.5 mm, the MDL value for lead was 1.2 ppm (3.1 nmol). The radioactivity of 239Pu corresponding to 3.1 nmol is 1.7 kBq, which is lower than the radioactivity of 239Pu contaminating puncture wounds in previous severe accidents. In conclusion, the established methodology could be beneficial for future development of a method to evaluate plutonium contamination in wounds. Highlights: Methodology for evaluation of heavy-atom contamination in a wound was established. A portable X-ray fluorescence device enables on-site, rapid and direct evaluation. This method is expected to be used for evaluation of plutonium contamination in wounds.

  14. Evaluation of mass spectrometric techniques for characterization of engineered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, P; Schram, K H; Andersen, Jens S.

    1995-01-01

    Mass spectrometric characterization of engineered proteins has been examined using bovine recombinant Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein (rACBP), [15N]-labeled rACBP, and a number of sequence variants of ACBP produced by site-directed mutagenesis. The mass spectrometric techniques include ESIMS and MALDIMS...

  15. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil of Aerial Parts of Glycosmis parviflora (Sims) Little (Rutaceae) ... Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analysis (HP-5MS column) of the essential oil was performed and the toxicity of the oil determined by contact test. Results: A total of 37 ...

  16. Mercury speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography atomic fluorescence spectrometry using an integrated microwave/UV interface. Optimization of a single step procedure for the simultaneous photo-oxidation of mercury species and photo-generation of Hg0

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quadros, Daiane P. C.; Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Bramanti, Emilia; Borges, Daniel L. G.; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    We described the hyphenation of photo-induced chemical vapor generation with high performance liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-AFS) for the quantification of inorganic mercury, methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg). In the developed procedure, formic acid in mobile phase was used for the photodecomposition of organomercury compounds and reduction of Hg2 + to mercury vapor under microwave/ultraviolet (MW/UV) irradiation. We optimized the proposed method studying the influence of several operating parameters, including the type of organic acid and its concentration, MW power, composition of HPLC mobile phase and catalytic action of TiO2 nanoparticles. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.15, 0.15 and 0.35 μg L- 1 for inorganic mercury, MeHg and EtHg, respectively. The developed method was validated by determination of the main analytical figures of merit and applied to the analysis of three certified reference materials. The online interfacing of liquid chromatography with photochemical-vapor generation-atomic fluorescence for mercury determination is simple, environmentally friendly, and represents an attractive alternative to the conventional tetrahydroborate (THB) system.

  17. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  18. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  19. Liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric assay for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric assay for simultaneous quantitation of tofacitinib, cabozantinib and afatinib in human plasma and urine. Adnan A. Kadi, Ali S. Abdelhameed, Hany W. Darwish, Mohamed W. Attwa, Ahmed H. Bakheit ...

  20. Structure determination of adipokinetic hormones using fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry; An unknown adipokinetic hormone (AKH-III) from Locusta migratoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heerma, W.; Versluis, C.; Lankhof, H. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Molecular Spectrometry); Oudejans, R.C.H.M.; Kooiman, F.P.; Beenakkers, A.M.T. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Department of Experimental Zoology)

    1991-08-01

    Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry combined with various tandem mass spectrometric techniques and accurate mass measurement were used to elucidate the structure of an unknown biologically active peptide isolated from Locusa migratoria. (author). 23 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 schemes.

  1. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  2. Proposal for Testing and Validation of Vacuum Ultra-Violet Atomic Laser-Induced Fluorescence as a Method to Analyze Carbon Grid Erosion in Ion Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previous investigation under award NAG3-25 10 sought to determine the best method of LIF to determine the carbon density in a thruster plume. Initial reports from other groups were ambiguous as to the number of carbon clusters that might be present in the plume of a thruster. Carbon clusters would certainly affect the ability to LIF; if they were the dominant species, then perhaps the LIF method should target clusters. The results of quadrupole mass spectroscopy on sputtered carbon determined that minimal numbers of clusters were sputtered from graphite under impact from keV Krypton. There were some investigations in the keV range by other groups that hinted at clusters, but at the time the proposal was presented to NASA, there was no data from low-energy sputtering available. Thus, the proposal sought to develop a method to characterize the population only of atoms sputtered from a graphite target in a test cell. Most of the ground work had been established by the previous two years of investigation. The proposal covering 2003 sought to develop an anti-Stokes Raman shifting cell to generate VUW light and test this cell on two different laser systems, ArF and YAG- pumped dye. The second goal was to measure the lowest detectable amounts of carbon atoms by 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm LIF. If equipment was functioning properly, it was expected that these goals would be met easily during the timeframe of the proposal, and that is the reason only modest funding was requested. The PI was only funded at half- time by Glenn during the summer months. All other work time was paid for by Whitworth College. The college also funded a student, Charles Shawley, who worked on the project during the spring.

  3. Determination of the electromagnetic dipole strength distribution in medium-heavy atomic nuclei by means of nuclear resonance fluorescence; Bestimmung der elektromagnetischen Dipolstaerkeverteilung in mittelschweren Atomkernen mittels Kernresonanzfluoreszenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massarczyk, Ralph Jens

    2011-01-17

    During the last hundred years several models were developed to describe the configuration of nuclei. These models have to make predictions, which should be comparable with experiments. As a standard type of experiment the nuclear resonance fluorescence was established. A nucleus is excited by irradiation with photons. By emitting one or more photons the nucleus decays back to the ground state. With this method it is possible to measure energy levels and to determine the strength of their excitation. A continuum of unresolved peaks gives additional strength. The existing setup at the linear electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf uses bremsstrahlung, produced as a secondary beam in a thin Niobium foil. During the years 2008/09 experiments on the nuclei of {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Ba took place there. In this work they will be analyzed. Photon flux and efficiency determination have been done as well as simulations on detector response and non-nuclear scattered background events. For this purpose the GEANT4 package was used. Finally the resulting cross sections were corrected for branching and feeding.

  4. Advanced mass spectrometric characterization of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Gale, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Mass spectrometric characterization of DNA has progressed rapidly due to the development in electrospray ionization (ESI) and MALDI methods. ESI is especially gentle, producing multiply charged ions with high efficiency. The authors have applied ESI-MS to different aspects of DNA research. Precise molecular weight determination aids in confirming the sequence and the structure of oligonucleotides. Non-covalent associations involving DNA are essential for cellular and genomic processes. The advantages of MS in such studies include speed, sensitivity and the ability to obtain structural detail. The authors have studied interactions between duplex-DNA and minor grove binding drugs and observed distamycin-A/oligonucleotide duplex complexes with stoichiometry consistent with NMR results. A number of guanine-rich DNA sequences assemble into quadruplex structures in vitro and have been localized in several key regions in chromosomal DNA. The authors have prepared oligonucleotides designed to test the specificity of cation inclusion and observed ions with quadruplex stoichiometry. The nature and extent of cation association were determined using high resolution MS. With ESI, the high efficiency and the use of liquid samples holds significant promises for rapid DNA sequencing. In developing a method for MS sizing of sequencing mixtures, the authors have attempted to address the problem of multiple-charging by charge-state reduction of oligonucleotide ions. The authors are also investigating a more ambitious approach based on the ability to follow the reactions of individual ions. In progress to date the authors have shown that very large DNA molecules can be ionized intact and measured, potentially opening the door to rapid sequencing by gas-phase DNA degradation.

  5. Fractionation and redox speciation of antimony in agricultural soils by hydride generation--atomic fluorescence spectrometry and stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) during extraction with different extractant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Edwar; Pinochet, Hugo; Potin-Gautier, Martine; De Graegori, Ida

    2004-01-01

    This stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) species was studied during single extraction from soils by water. EDTA, diluted H2SO4 and H3PO4, and oxalic acid/oxalate solutions, with and without ascorbic acid, were used as stabilizing reagent of both Sb species. Antimony redox speciation in soil extracts was performed by selective hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Simulated extraction procedures (without soil) showed that, except in oxalate medium, Sb(III) was oxidized to Sb(V), and this reaction was avoided with ascorbic acid. Recovery studies from a spiked agricultural soil showed that no oxidation but sorption of Sb(III) occurred during the extraction process in water and H2SO4 medium, and quantitative oxidation in EDTA and oxalate medium. With ascorbic acid, this oxidation was totally avoided in EDTA and partially avoided in oxalate solution. A new sequential extraction procedure was proposed and applied to the fractionation and redox speciation of antimony in agricultural soils, using EDTA + ascorbic acid, pH 7 (available under complexing and moderately reducible conditions); oxalic acid/oxalate + ascorbic acid (extractable in reducible conditions) and HNO3 + HCl + HF (residual fraction). The proposed extraction scheme can provide information about the availability and mobility of antimony redox species in agricultural soils.

  6. Spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen with quinol in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quinol is proposed as a reagent for the spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4+-N) in aqueous medium. Quinol forms a pink complex with ammonium salt in aqueous medium. Hydrogen peroxide is needed for colour accentuation. The quinol/ammonium charge transfer complex has absorption maximum ...

  7. A new type of a spectrometric microtitration set up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Natasa

    2005-02-28

    A spectrometric microtitrator was developed from a spectrometer with a microreaction chamber and a tri-colour light-emitting diode (LED) as the light source. A novel, vertical, optical geometry of the spectrometric microtitration chamber was introduced and tested. This novel geometry also required a new method for mixing the titrated solution. A laboratory-made 50mul syringe pump was used for the addition of the titration reagent. The 10-channel module for light effects, which makes possible a low-cost hardware approach to changing the titration protocols, was used for coordinating the operation of the microtitration set up. The system, with 10 channels and a regulated speed of operation, is flexible enough to allow an operator to generate different titration protocols. The performance test showed that the speed of titration-reagent addition can be regulated in the range from 0.87 to 21.8mulmin(-1). The smallest achievable volume addition is equal to 35nl. The mixing rate can be continuously regulated by an electrical pulse that initiates the mixing cycle. The quickest rate is every 1.6s, and the slowest rate is every 4.8s. The spectrometric microtitration set up was successfully tested for several different real-life spectrometric titrations, including an iodometric titration, a determination of CO(2) in deionised water, and EDTA titrations of copper(II) ions with no indicator. The volume of the examined solution can be as small as 220mul. The titration-reagent consumption is usually between 10 and 35mul. Coefficients of variation of the end point volume determination (n = 5) at different experimental conditions and different average volumes of consumed reagents (7.06, 12.17 and 22.88mul) were 2.4, 1.3 and 1.2%, respectively. The novel geometry of the spectrometric microtitration chamber proved to be useful for real-life applications.

  8. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An apertureless near-field microscope for fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, T. J.; Lessard, Guillaume A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an apertureless near field microscope for imaging fluorescent samples. Optical contrast is generated by exploiting fluorescent quenching near a metallized atomic force microscope tip. This microscope has been used to image fluorescent latex beads with subdiffraction limit resolution. The use of fluorescence allows us to prove that the contrast mechanism is indeed spectroscopic in origin.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...... the foundations of the fluorescence phenomenon, introduces some general methodologies and provides selected examples on applications focused to disentangle structural and dynamical aspects of biological processes....

  11. A direct interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and the hERG voltage-gated K+ channel revealed by atomic force microscopy and homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; D'Sa, Lauren; Talker, Ronel; Dupuis, Elodie; Maurin, Fabrice; Martin, Patrick; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier; Edwardson, J Michael

    2014-11-14

    The sigma-1 receptor is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein, widely expressed in central and peripheral tissues, which can translocate to the plasma membrane and modulate the function of various ion channels. The human ether-à-go-go-related gene encodes hERG, a cardiac voltage-gated K(+) channel that is abnormally expressed in many human cancers and is known to interact functionally with the sigma-1 receptor. Our aim was to investigate the nature of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG. We show that the two proteins can be co-isolated from a detergent extract of stably transfected HEK-293 cells, consistent with a direct interaction between them. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the isolated protein confirmed the direct binding of the sigma-1 receptor to hERG monomers, dimers, and tetramers. hERG dimers and tetramers became both singly and doubly decorated by sigma-1 receptors; however, hERG monomers were only singly decorated. The distribution of angles between pairs of sigma-1 receptors bound to hERG tetramers had two peaks, at ∼90 and ∼180° in a ratio of ∼2:1, indicating that the sigma-1 receptor interacts with hERG with 4-fold symmetry. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®) allowed the detection of the interaction between the sigma-1 receptor and hERG within the plane of the plasma membrane. This interaction was resistant to sigma ligands, but was decreased in response to cholesterol depletion of the membrane. We suggest that the sigma-1 receptor may bind to hERG in the endoplasmic reticulum, aiding its assembly and trafficking to the plasma membrane. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Clinical fluorescence diagnostics in the course of photodynamic therapy of cancer with the photosensitizer PHOTOGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    The results are described of the first clinical fluorescence diagnostic observations of tumors, carried out in P. A. Hertzen Moscow Research Oncology Institute in the course of clinical trials of a new HpD-type photosensitizer Photogem, developed for cancer treatment by photodynamic therapy. The method of tumor diagnostics using fluorescence spectra of photogem has been developed and a designed spectrometric system has been tested.

  13. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  14. Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  15. Rate of reaction of dimethylmercury with oxygen atoms in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen (O(3P)) with dimethylmercury has been measured at room temperature at a pressure of about 1 Torr using a fast flow system with electron paramagnetic resonance and mass spectrometric detection. Some reaction products were identified. The rate...

  16. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  17. Enhanced ALA-induced fluorescence in hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schroeter, Lioba; Gahlen, Johannes

    2005-04-04

    Intraoperative localization of parathyroid glands can be challenging especially in minimally invasive surgery. Fluorescence diagnosis using the photosensitizer aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has been described to identify normal parathyroid glands during experimental bilateral neck exploration. The present study evaluated fluorescence differences between hyperplastic and normal parathyroid glands as a precondition for a clinical application of the technique. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) rats with hyperparathyroidism due to hyperplastic parathyroid glands and Wistar rats with normal parathyroid glands were photosensitized by peritoneal lavage with ALA solution. After surgical exposure of thyroid and parathyroid glands the operative site was observed under blue light conditions using the d-light system to assess fluorescence characteristics of each tissue. Fluorescence intensities of parathyroid glands and surrounding thyroid tissue were measured by spectrometry. Parathyroid hormone in serum of the rats was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Observation of the exposed thyroid site showed a subjectively stronger red fluorescence of the parathyroid glands in the PKD rats in comparison to the Wistar rats, whereas thyroid tissue appeared equally fluorescent. In the PKD animals, spectrometric fluorescence intensity was 10 times higher in the parathyroid glands than in the thyroid gland, whereas in the Wistar rats the ratio was 3.2:1. Fluorescence intensity in the parathyroid glands was more than twice in the PKD rats than in the Wistar rats, however slightly lower in the thyroid tissue. ELISA confirmed the pathophysiological change of a hyperparathyroidism with significantly increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone in the PKD rats. Hyperparathyroidism enhances ALA-induced fluorescence of the parathyroid glands. A combined surgical fluorescence strategy may justify a unilateral, minimally invasive approach in selected patients and serve to improve

  18. Liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry determination of arsenic species in dog plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of Realgar and Niu Huang Jie Du Pian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunjing; Qiang, Shuping; Sun, Jing; Song, Min; Hang, Taijun

    2013-02-15

    A high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-HG-AFS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of four arsenic species (As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and arsenate As(V)) in dog plasma. Good separation of the four arsenic species was achieved within 15min on an anion-exchange column with isocratic elution using 15mmol/L KH(2)PO(4) (pH 5.9) as eluent at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The assay was linear over the range of 1.25-200, 1.56-200, 1.34-172, and 2.50-200ng/mL with the detection limits of 0.80, 1.00, 0.86 and 2.00ng/mL for As(III), DMA, MMA and As(V), respectively. The method was validated for selectivity, precision, accuracy and recovery and then applied to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of the arsenic species in beagle dogs after a single oral administration of Realgar (24.32mg/kg, equivalent to 11.31mgAs/kg) alone or Niu Huang Jie Du Pian (a patent traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), 380mg/kg, equivalent to 28.45mgAs/kg), respectively. DMA was found to be the predominant species in the dog plasma after dosing, with As(V) appeared as the quickly eliminating one. No traces of MMA and As(III) were detected at any sampling time points. The main pharmacokinetic parameters found for DMA p.o. administration of Realgar and Niu Huang Jie Du Pian were as follows: C(max) (14.7±4.2) and (57.0±32.0)ng/mL, T(max) (2.4±0.5) and (2.5±0.5)h, AUC(0-36) (151.1±12.9) and (635.9±418.2)ngh/mL, AUC(0-∞) (206.0±44.5) and (687.2±425.1)ngh/mL, t(1/2) (16.2±7.9) and (9.4±2.2)h, respectively. The influence of compounding in Niu Huang Jie Du Pian on the pharmacokinetics of arsenics was shown with increased transformation of DMA and its faster elimination rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  20. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  1. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  2. Combined Application of RGB Marking and Mass Spectrometric Imaging Facilitates Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, Pierre; Kraus, Olga; Rohn, Sascha; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-cell heterogeneity dramatically influences treatment success, but escapes detection by classical histology. Mass-spectrometric imaging (MSI) represents a powerful method for visualizing the spatial distribution of proteins in tissue sections. Herein we asked whether MSI also facilitates detection of tumor heterogeneity. We first transduced the human neuroendocrine-carcinoma BON cell line following the red-green-blue (RGB) marking principle. RGB marking allows for specific color-coding of individual clones. Mice transplanted with RGB-marked BON cells developed liver tumors. We identified 16 primary tumors clearly distinguishable by histology and fluorescence imaging, but also based on a common tumor-specific signal pattern detected by MSI. Importantly, this pattern was clearly confined to tumor tissue while was absent from surrounding liver tissue. At the same time, we observed protein signals differentially present in a few or even single tumors. Since these signals were independent of RGB marking, they apparently reflected unique intrinsic protein-signal patterns of individual tumors. Thus, our data propose MSI as a tool for identifying divergent tissue by 'fingerprints' of protein signals, allowing not only for differentiation of tumor from healthy tissue but also detection of tumor heterogeneity. In conclusion, by visualizing tumor heterogeneity, MSI ideally complements microscopy-based methods. This might help to better understand tumor biology and develop future treatment strategies. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning selective: Elimination des corrections necessaires a la determination du rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letarte, Sylvain

    Dans le but d'ameliorer la precision avec laquelle le rapport isotopique de l'hydrogene peut etre determine, un spectrometre de masse a ionisation Penning a ete construit pour provoquer l'ionisation selective de l'hydrogene moleculaire et de l'hydrure de deuterium a partir d'un melange gazeux. L'utilisation d'atomes dans des etats d'excitation metastable s'est averee une solution adequate pour reponde a cette attente. L'emploi de l'helium, a l'interieur d'une source d'atomes metastables construit specifiquement pour ce travail, ne permet pas d'obtenir un spectre de masse compose uniquement des deux molecules d'interet. L'ionisation de ces dernieres provient de deux processus distincts, soient l'ionisation Penning et l'ionisation par bombardement electronique. Contrairement a l'helium, il a ete demontre que le neon metastable est un candidat ideal pour produire l'ionisation selective de type Penning. Le nombre d'ions produits est directement proportionnel au courant de la decharge electrique et de la pression d'operation de la source d'atomes metastables. Ces resultats demontrent le potentiel d'un tel spectrometre de masse pour ameliorer la precision a laquelle le rapport isotopique peut etre determine comparativement aux autres techniques existantes.

  4. Application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in rainwater are, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), atomic absorption spectrom- etry (AAS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), neu- tron activation analysis (NAA), electroanalytical techniques, etc.

  5. Microwave Spectroscopy of Cold Rubidium Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the resonance fluorescence of a cloud of cold $^{85}Rb$ atoms in a magnetooptical trap is studied. The radiation frequency was tuned near the hyperfine splitting frequency of rubidium atoms in the 5S ground state. The microwave field induced magnetic dipole transitions between the magnetic sublevels of the 5S(F=2) and 5S(F=3) states, resulting in a change in the fluorescence signal. The resonance fluorescence spectra were recorded by tuning the microwave r...

  6. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Cr(VI) during ferrochrome production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandiwana, Khakhathi L. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X31, Rosslyn 0200 (South Africa)]. E-mail: MandiwanaKL@tut.ac.za; Panichev, Nikolay [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X31, Rosslyn 0200 (South Africa); Ngobeni, Prince [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X31, Rosslyn 0200 (South Africa)

    2007-07-16

    The level of the generation of hexavalent chromium during ferrochrome production was checked. The concentration of Cr(VI) increases with each stage of ferrochrome production, 7070 {mu}g g{sup -1} being the highest concentration encountered in the last stage of production (dust). This concentration exceeds the maximum acceptable total Cr concentration per 8 h by a factor of more than 1000. It was further observed that there is a higher contamination of soil by this pollutant closer to the plant than further away. The highest concentrations of Cr(VI) in soil and grass were found to be 12.7 and 4.2 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. The results of the investigation indicate that the consumption of such grass by animals do not pose any health hazard, for concentrations of the toxic Cr species are very low. Therefore, the release of emissions, including dust, during ferrochrome production, is a major contributor to occupational diseases and death to people working in ferrochrome production plant or mine.

  7. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  8. Photometric and emission-spectrometric determination of boron in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierig, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the photometric determination of boron in unalloyed and alloyed steels is described, in which Curcumine is used as reagent. A separation of boron is not necessary. Limit of detection: 0.0003% B. The decomposition of boron nitride in the steel is achieved by heating the whole sample in fuming sulphuric acid/phosphoric acid. For the emission spectrometric investigation of solid steel samples and for the spectrochemical analysis of solutions with plasma excitation working parameters are given and possibilities of interferences are demonstrated.

  9. Preparation and tandem mass spectrometric analyses of deuterium-labeled cysteine-containing leukotrienes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, M J; Thorne, G C; Orkiszewski, R S; Gaskell, S J

    1990-08-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) C4, E4 and N-acetyl-E4, their respective monomethyl esters and 14,15-2H2 analogs have been synthesized. The collisionally activated decompositions of the [M + H]+ and [M - H]- ions formed by fast atom bombardment (FAB) have been studied by tandem mass spectrometry using a hybrid sector/quadrupole instrument. Structurally informative product ion spectra were obtained for each analyte; the fragmentation pathways proposed are consistent with the parallel data obtained for labeled and derivatized species. Fragmentation of [M + H]+ ions occurs prominently via cleavage of the thioether linkage with charge retention on the cysteine-containing (predominant for LTC4) or lipid-derived (predominant for LTE4) moieties. More pronounced differences were observed between the fragmentations of [M - H]- ions derived from LTC4 and LTE4; the preference for charge retention, however, parallels that observed for the fragmentation of [M + H]+ ions. Selected ion monitoring during continuous-flow FAB mass spectrometric analysis of authentic LTC4 indicated a low-picogram detection limit.

  10. Mass spectrometric approaches to study protein structure and interactions in lyophilized powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Iyer, Lavanya K; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-14

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (ssHDX-MS) and side-chain photolytic labeling (ssPL-MS) followed by mass spectrometric analysis can be valuable for characterizing lyophilized formulations of protein therapeutics. Labeling followed by suitable proteolytic digestion allows the protein structure and interactions to be mapped with peptide-level resolution. Since the protein structural elements are stabilized by a network of chemical bonds from the main-chains and side-chains of amino acids, specific labeling of atoms in the amino acid residues provides insight into the structure and conformation of the protein. In contrast to routine methods used to study proteins in lyophilized solids (e.g., FTIR), ssHDX-MS and ssPL-MS provide quantitative and site-specific information. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters can be related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (N fast, N slow) and directly reflects the degree of protein folding and structure in lyophilized formulations. Stable photolytic labeling does not undergo back-exchange, an advantage over ssHDX-MS. Here, we provide detailed protocols for both ssHDX-MS and ssPL-MS, using myoglobin (Mb) as a model protein in lyophilized formulations containing either trehalose or sorbitol.

  11. Laser stabilisation for velocity-selective atomic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, H.A.J.; Meulen, H.P. van der; Ditewig, F.; Wisman, C.J.; Morgenstern, R.

    1987-01-01

    A relatively simple method is described for stabilising a dye laser at a frequency ν = ν0 + νc in the vicinity of an atomic resonance frequency ν0. The Doppler effect is exploited by looking for atomic fluorescence when a laser beam is crossed with an atomic beam at certain angles αi. Absolute

  12. Non-destructive state measurement of individual neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Michael; Shih, Chung-Yu; Hamley, Chris; Chapman, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Non-destructive state detection of individual neutral atoms is essential for scalable neutral atom quantum information processing. We have demonstrated non-destructive fluorescent state detection of individual neutral atom qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The hyperfine state of the atom is measured with 95% accuracy and the atom loss rate of 1%. State detection is performed on individual atoms over 100 times before being lost from the trap, representing a significant increase in the data collection rates. Using this technique, we have observed microwave Rabi oscillations with measurements done on one-and-the-same atom.

  13. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  15. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  16. Characterization of used lubricating oil by spectrometric techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Andressa Moreira de, E-mail: andressa@ctaa.embrapa.br [Embrapa Agroindustria de Alimentos, Guaratiba, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Correa, Sergio Machado [Faculdade de Engenharia. Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Resende, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Glauco Correa da [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The engine lubricating oil drags all kinds of impurities generated by wear of internal components. Thus, it is necessary to monitor the physical and chemical properties and concentration of metals in lubricants used to determine the appropriate time to replace them. Moreover, one can monitor the wear of the engines through the levels of metals in oils. To achieve these goals, some detection techniques such as Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF), have been widely used to determine metals in lubricating oils and also in other oil derivatives. Thus, some of these techniques were used in this study. Also the technique used was Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC / MS) for characterization of chromatographic profile of the engine lubricating oil after use. Through the technique of ICP-OES for method of United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) METHOD 6010B - Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was performed to characterize metals in lubricating oil motor, using equipment from ICP-OES Perkin-Elmer{sup R} OPTIMA 3000 ICP-Winlab and software, obtaining the following identification of metals: barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), Chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo) and zinc (Zn). Using the XRF technique, through the equipment EDFRX Shimadzu{sup R} model 800HS EDX, Rh tube, applied voltage of 50kV, amperage 100{mu}A, detector Si (Li) cooled with liquid nitrogen and collimator 10mm, we analyzed all the components comprised in the range of Ti to U and Na to SC, identified the following metals: calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo) and nickel (Ni). The characterization was performed by chromatographic methods: USEPA METHOD 5021A - Volatile organic compounds in various sample matrices using equilibrium headspace analysis, USEPA METHOD 8015B - Nonhalogenated Organics

  17. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of ... method of producing radioactive isotopes, which are materials .... the sealing and the pressure balancing, all can be carried out ...

  18. Enrichment/isolation of phosphorylated peptides on hafnium oxide prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José G; Choi, Yong Seok; Vujcic, Stefan; Wood, Troy D; Colón, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (hafnia) exhibits unique enrichment properties towards phosphorylated peptides that are complementary to those of titanium oxide (titania) and zirconium oxide (zirconia) for use with mass spectrometric analysis in the field of proteomics.

  19. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post-translational...

  20. Atomic arias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  1. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  2. Mass-spectrometric fragmentation of sodium 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylthioacetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Salionov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of physical and chemical characteristics and establishing patterns of mass spectrometric fragmentation are the actual tasks of modern pharmaceutical science, have both scientific interest and practical importance. Aim. The purpose of our experiment was to confirm the identity and study patterns of mass spectrometric decomposition for sodium 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl -4H-1,2,4-triazoles-3-ilthio acetate. Methods and results. The study was carried out on the apparatus LC MS / MS: LTQ Orbitrap. After completing MS scan, it has been established that the maximum peak in the chromatogram corresponds protonated ion 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazoles-3-ylthioacetic acid m/z 256.0208, and empirical formula test compound - C9H9N3O2S2. MS/MS MH+ analysis showed that protonated molecule of the 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl-4H-1,2,4-3-triazole-3-ylthioacetic acid under voltage in contact with molecules of helium in the collision cell was disintegrated from m/z 256.0208 into some fragments. The first time the mass spectrometric investigation sodium 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazoles-3-ylthio acetate has been undertaken. Conclusions. It has been established that the fragmentation of the molecule initially occurs with the dissociation of water molecule from carboxyl group. Under the influence of gas the next to come off may be a carboxyl group. In course of further dissociation the bond between the sulfur atom and acetic residue is destroyed or disruption of a covalent bond between sulfur and carbon of 1,2,4-triazole occurs.

  3. [Determination of lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry with regard to toxicology research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudart, N; Guichard, C; Delage, C

    1976-01-01

    The toxicity of lead in the human environment is acquiring a growing interest which lead us to choose a quick, precise, sensitive and specific method able to perform number of measurements. Thanks to the survey consisting in a dosage of lead by atomic-absorption spectrometric, we are able to confirm the advantages and superiority of such a method and to employ it for the toxicologic research of lead in food, water, industrial atmosphere, and biological liquids.

  4. Mercury speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography atomic fluorescence spectrometry using an integrated microwave/UV interface. Optimization of a single step procedure for the simultaneous photo-oxidation of mercury species and photo-generation of Hg{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadros, Daiane P.C. de [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Bramanti, Emilia [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Instituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici – ICCOM – UOS Pisa, Area della Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-970 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); D' Ulivo, Alessandro, E-mail: dulivo@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Instituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici – ICCOM – UOS Pisa, Area della Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    We described the hyphenation of photo-induced chemical vapor generation with high performance liquid chromatography–atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC–AFS) for the quantification of inorganic mercury, methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg). In the developed procedure, formic acid in mobile phase was used for the photodecomposition of organomercury compounds and reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to mercury vapor under microwave/ultraviolet (MW/UV) irradiation. We optimized the proposed method studying the influence of several operating parameters, including the type of organic acid and its concentration, MW power, composition of HPLC mobile phase and catalytic action of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were 0.15, 0.15 and 0.35 μg L{sup −1} for inorganic mercury, MeHg and EtHg, respectively. The developed method was validated by determination of the main analytical figures of merit and applied to the analysis of three certified reference materials. The online interfacing of liquid chromatography with photochemical-vapor generation–atomic fluorescence for mercury determination is simple, environmentally friendly, and represents an attractive alternative to the conventional tetrahydroborate (THB) system. - Highlights: • Inorganic and organic mercury were determined by photochemical vapor generation using a MW/UV photochemical reactor. • The optimized procedure has been applied to the speciation of Hg(II), MeHg and EtHg coupling HPLC with PVG–AFS. • The proposed method is simple, sensitive, and is established for mercury determination in biological materials.

  5. Basis material decomposition method for material discrimination with a new spectrometric X-ray imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, A.; Gorecki, A.; Potop, A.; Paulus, C.; Verger, L.

    2017-08-01

    Energy sensitive photon counting X-ray detectors provide energy dependent information which can be exploited for material identification. The attenuation of an X-ray beam as a function of energy depends on the effective atomic number Zeff and the density. However, the measured attenuation is degraded by the imperfections of the detector response such as charge sharing or pile-up. These imperfections lead to non-linearities that limit the benefits of energy resolved imaging. This work aims to implement a basis material decomposition method which overcomes these problems. Basis material decomposition is based on the fact that the attenuation of any material or complex object can be accurately reproduced by a combination of equivalent thicknesses of basis materials. Our method is based on a calibration phase to learn the response of the detector for different combinations of thicknesses of the basis materials. The decomposition algorithm finds the thicknesses of basis material whose spectrum is closest to the measurement, using a maximum likelihood criterion assuming a Poisson law distribution of photon counts for each energy bin. The method was used with a ME100 linear array spectrometric X-ray imager to decompose different plastic materials on a Polyethylene and Polyvinyl Chloride base. The resulting equivalent thicknesses were used to estimate the effective atomic number Zeff. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical Zeff, regardless of the plastic sample thickness. The linear behaviour of the equivalent lengths makes it possible to process overlapped materials. Moreover, the method was tested with a 3 materials base by adding gadolinium, whose K-edge is not taken into account by the other two materials. The proposed method has the advantage that it can be used with any number of energy channels, taking full advantage of the high energy resolution of the ME100 detector. Although in principle two channels are sufficient, experimental measurements show

  6. Study of natural diamond detector spectrometric properties under neutron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseyev, A B; Kaschuck, Y; Krasilnikov, A; Portnov, D; Tugarinov, S

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detector (NDD) performance was studied up to a neutron fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 5 neutron/cm sup 2. The variations of the NDD spectrometric response to incident alpha-particles from sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am source after exposure to fast neutron fluences up to 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2 were examined. No significant variations up to the level of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2 were observed. Degradation of charge collection efficiency at higher fluences is reported. No remarkable increase of the NDD leakage current and count rate change had been observed up to a neutron fluence of 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The charge collection efficiency variations of neutron irradiated diamond spectrometer were studied ex situ under gamma-rays, beta-radiation and visible light excitation. Charge collection efficiency restoration up to 75% level and the NDD performance stabilization by extrinsic low-intensity visible light (550 nm

  7. Extraction, chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for lipid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sumitra; Nie, Ben; Arnold, Robert D; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-05-01

    Lipids make up a diverse subset of biomolecules that are responsible for mediating a variety of structural and functional properties as well as modulating cellular functions such as trafficking, regulation of membrane proteins and subcellular compartmentalization. In particular, phospholipids are the main constituents of biological membranes and play major roles in cellular processes like transmembrane signaling and structural dynamics. The chemical and structural variety of lipids makes analysis using a single experimental approach quite challenging. Research in the field relies on the use of multiple techniques to detect and quantify components of cellular lipidomes as well as determine structural features and cellular organization. Understanding these features can allow researchers to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms by which lipid-lipid and/or lipid-protein interactions take place within the conditions of study. Herein, we provide an overview of essential methods for the examination of lipids, including extraction methods, chromatographic techniques and approaches for mass spectrometric analysis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Manometric and mass spectrometric analysis of fluids in geological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Louis, Zimmermann; Albert, Jambon; Gilbert, Guyetand

    1988-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of coupled manometric and mass spectrometric methods enables the analysis of volatile species from rocks with a very good accuracy. A separaton line using cold traps, oxidation (CO to CO/sub 2/) and reduction (H/sub 2/O to H/sub 2/) furnaces permits to separate several fractions. The detection limits are 0.5 to 1.x10/sup -7/ mol H/sub 2/O, 0.3x10/sup -7/ mol CO/sub 2/ and about 0.2x10/sup -7/ mol for H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, CO, CH/sub 4/ and Ar. Conjunction of crushing, stepwise heating and size fraction analysis permit to distinguish between fluid inclusions, dissolved (trapped) gases and adsorbed gases. Analysis of organic matter is very difficult. Light species may be extracted by crushing as exemplified by the quartz analyses. Heavier non volatile species are decomposed when moderately heated, and destroyed when temperature exceeds 500/sup 0/C. H/sub 2/ and CO detected after thermal extraction when organic compounds are present in the sample reflect organic decomposition rather than any thermodynamic equilibrium attained upon rock formation. (4 figs, 3 tabs, 37 refs)

  9. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  10. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  11. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Graeme; Curry, John J.

    2011-05-01

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  12. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  13. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  14. Determination of experimental K-shell fluorescence yield for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for many years and have been compiled by Krause [1], Bambynek et al [2,3] and. Hubbell et al [4,5]. Fluorescence yield, ωK, plays an important role in a variety of fields such as atomic, molecular and radiation physics, X-ray fluorescence analysis, cancer therapy, medical research, health physics, irradiation processes and ...

  15. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  16. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since spontaneous fluorescence of excited atoms is probabilistic, the description of the radiating quantized system evolution along with photon energy transfer in a cold atom medium, should include elements of stochastic dynamics. Finally, the chaotic dynamics of a weakly bound Rydberg electron over a grid of the energy ...

  17. Barium transport in fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigeneger, F.; Rackow, K.; Uhrlandt, D.; Ehlbeck, J.; Lieder, G.

    2008-10-01

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the cathode region of fluorescent lamps driven at 25,Hz is studied experimentally and theoretically. The density of Ba atoms and ions have been measured time-resolved by laserinduced fluorescence at different distances from the spot center. Furthermore, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was approximately determined using an improved band method. The model comprises the solution of the time-dependent particle balance equations of Ba and Ba^+ which include the Ba ionization as gain and loss terms, respectively. The ionization rate coefficient of Ba and the electron density are determined by solving the space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation in spherical geometry using the measured cathode fall voltage and the discharge current as input. Good agreement between the measured and calculated density profiles of barium atoms has been obtained. The results demonstrate the sensitive dependence of the Ba density profiles on the ionization which leads to a strong depletion of the Ba density in the cathode phase of the investigated electrode. The model yields the Ba flux from the cathode which limits the lifetime of the lamp.

  18. Mass spectrometric immunoassays for discovery, screening and quantification of clinically relevant proteoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenchevska, Olgica; Nelson, Randall W; Nedelkov, Dobrin

    2016-08-01

    Human proteins can exist as multiple proteoforms with potential diagnostic or prognostic significance. MS top-down approaches are ideally suited for proteoforms identification because there is no prerequisite for a priori knowledge of the specific proteoform. One such top-down approach, termed mass spectrometric immunoassay utilizes antibody-derivatized microcolumns for rapid and contained proteoforms isolation and detection via MALDI-TOF MS. The mass spectrometric immunoassay can also provide quantitative measurement of the proteoforms through inclusion of an internal reference standard into the analytical sample, serving as normalizer for all sample processing and data acquisition steps. Reviewed here are recent developments and results from the application of mass spectrometric immunoassays for discovery of clinical correlations of specific proteoforms for the protein biomarkers RANTES, retinol binding protein, serum amyloid A and apolipoprotein C-III.

  19. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC.

  20. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  1. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  2. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  3. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  4. Effect of binding and conformation on fluorescence quenching in new 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparano, Brian A; Shahi, Shatrughan P; Koide, Kazunori

    2004-06-10

    [structure: see text] Symmetrical and unsymmetrical 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) derivatives have been synthesized by means of Mannich reactions and an aromatic Claisen rearrangement. NMR and fluorescence spectroscopic studies reveal the correlation between the conformations, the photoinduced electron transfer mechanism, and fluorescent intensities of these DCF derivatives. Two quenching nitrogen atoms cooperatively and reversibly suppress the fluorescence of the chromophore.

  5. Teach us atom structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Suh Yeon

    2006-08-15

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  6. Playing pinball with atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedi, Amirmehdi; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Harold J W

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely controlling the tip current and distance we make two atom pairs behave like the flippers of an atomic-sized pinball machine. This atomic scale mechanical device exhibits six different configurations.

  7. Fast quality screening of vegetable oils by HPLC-thermal lens spectrometric detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luterotti, S.; Franko, M.; Bicanic, D.

    2002-01-01

    Isocratic reversed-phase HPLC with thermal lens spectrometric (TLS) detection enabled identification of linseed, olive, sesame, and wheat germ vegetable oils to control the authenticity of the oils based on characteristic carotenoid/carotene profiles. Four characteristic regions of carotenoids

  8. Retrospective detection of exposure to organophosphorus anti-cholinesterases: Mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated human butyrylcholinesterase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Noort, D.; Ruiter, R. de; Schans, M.J. van der; Benschop, H.P.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a novel and general procedure is presented for detection of organophosphate-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE), which is based on electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated nonapeptides obtained after pepsin digestion of the enzyme. The utility of this

  9. Strategies for the liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of non-polar compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayen, H.; Karst, U.

    2003-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) have evolved recently as very useful tools for the liquid chromatographic–mass spectrometric (LC–MS) analysis of polar substances. Non-polar compounds, however, are difficult to analyze with these atmospheric pressure

  10. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FI...

  11. Verification of exposure to organophosphates: Generic mass spectrometric method for detection of human butyrylcholinesterase adducts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Schans, M.J. van der; Hulst, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    We present a generic mass spectrometric method to verify exposure to organophosphates, based on the chemical conversion of the phosphylated peptides obtained after pepsin digestion of human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE) to a common precursor peptide. After exposure of plasma to various

  12. Ground gamma-ray spectrometric studies of El-Sahu area, southwestern Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrabboh, Ahmad M.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the previous airborne gamma-ray spectrometric study carried out in southwestern Sinai area, El Sahu area was selected for detail ground gamma-ray spectrometric survey. This area is considered as a good target for radioactive mineral exploration. The study area is exposed in a Paleozoic basin covered by different rocks (ranging from Precambrian to Quaternary). The ground gamma-ray spectrometric survey has been conducted along the study area through random survey. The resultant gamma-ray spectrometric maps show different levels of radioactivity over the studied area, which reflect contrasting radioelement contents for the exposed various rock types. The studied area possesses total count ranging from 2.6 to 326 Ur, 0.1 to 2.8% K, 1.7 to 316 ppm eU and 0.9 to 47.5 ppm eTh. The highest uranium concentrations are located in the northern and southern parts of El Sahu area. They are mainly associated with Um Bogma Formation occurrences. Uranium ratio maps (eU/K and eU/eTh) as well as ternary maps show sharp increase of eU content over both potassium and thorium contents associated with the ENE and NNW trends in Um Bogma Formation, indicating an increase in the U-potentiality than the surrounding rocks. This indicates that the mineralization in the study area may be structurally-controlled.

  13. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Control the fear atomic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Gwan [I and Book, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-15

    This book has a lot of explanation of nuclear energy with articles. Their titles are the bad man likes atomic, the secret of atom, nuclear explosion, NPT?, the secret of uranium fuel rod, nuclear power plant vs nuclear bomb, I hate atomic, keep plutonium in control, atomic in peace and find out alternative energy.

  15. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  16. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  17. Interaction of norfloxacin with bovine serum albumin studied by different spectrometric methods; displacement studies, molecular modeling and chemometrics approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naseri, Abdolhossein, E-mail: a_naseri@tabrizu.ac.ir [Departments of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666-16471 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Soheila [Departments of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51666-16471 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zakery, Maryam; Khayamian, Taghi [Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Serum albumins as major target proteins can bind to other ligands leading to alteration of their pharmacological properties. The mechanism of interaction between norfloxacin (NFLX) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated. Fuorescence quenching of serum albumin by this drug was found to be a static quenching process. The binding sites number, n, apparent binding constant, K, and thermodynamic parameters were calculated at different temperatures. The distance, r, between donor, BSA, and acceptor, NFLX, was calculated according to the Forster theory of non-radiation energy transfer. Also binding characteristics of NFLX with BSA together with its displacement from its binding site by kanamycin and effect of common metal ions on binding constant were investigated by the spectroscopic methods. The conformational change in the secondary structure of BSA upon interaction with NFLX was investigated qualitatively from synchronous fluorescence spectra, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometric methods. Molecular docking studies were performed to obtain information on the possible residues involved in the interaction process and changes in accessible surface area of the interacting residues. The results showed that the conformation of BSA changed in the presence of NFLX. For the first time, displacement studies were used for this interaction; displacement studies showed that NFLX was displaced by phenylbutazon and ketoprofen but was not displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of NFLX on albumin was site I. In addition a powerful chemometrics method, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least square, was used for resolution of spectroscopic augmented data obtained in two different titration modes in order to extract spectral information regardless of spectral overlapping of components. - Highlights: • Interaction between norfloxacin and BSA is studied by spectral methods. • Chemometrics methods are used to

  18. New electron spin resonance and mass spectrometric studies of metallofullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, A.; Dunsch, L.; Froehner, J.; Kirbach, U.

    1994-10-01

    The preparation by arc vaporization of graphite rods of metal-containing fullerene samples with metals inside the fullerene molecules is described. The metals lanthanum, scandium, holmium and yttrium were used for this study. Results in mass spectrometry confirm the existence and stability of several Me at C82 species. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic measurements of metallofullerene samples in the solid state and in tetrachloroethane solution favor the existence of endohedral systems. The splitting of the ESR spectra is interpreted by isotropic hyperfine coupling of an unpaired electron with the nuclear magnetic moment of a metal ion inside a fullerene molecule. It is concluded that the metal atoms exist in ionic form in endohedral fullerenes both in solid and liquid state of the fullerene. Furthermore it is shown that there is more than one stable position of the metal ion inside the fullerene molecule.

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxygenations in aromatization of androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione, a suicide substrate of aromatase, by placental microsomes. Isotope effect and stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Takahashi, Madoka; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamashita, Kouwa

    2007-01-01

    Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione (AD) to estrone through three sequential oxygenations of the 19-methyl group. 6-OxoAD (1) is one of the typical suicide substrates of aromatase, which is converted by aromatase to 6-oxoestrone through 19-alcohol (19-ol) and 19-aldehyde (19-al) intermediates 2 and 3. To study the deuterium isotope effect on the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3 as well as the stereochemistry of the 19-hydrogen removal in this conversion, we initially synthesized [19,19-(2)H(2)] and [19S- or 19R-(2)H] 19-ols 2, starting from the corresponding deuterium-labeled 19-hydroxyAD derivatives. In incubation of non-labeled and [19,19-(2)H(2)]-labeled 19-ol 2 or that of their 1:1 mixture with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under air, there was no significant deuterium-isotope effect on the production of the aromatized product 6-oxoestrone or on the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the estrogen product or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LC-MS) analysis of the deuterium contents of the product 19-al 3 and the recovered 19-ol 2. Moreover, in the incubations of [19S-(2)H] 19-ol 2 and its 19R isomer, LC-MS analysis of the product 3 demonstrated that the 19-pro-R hydrogen atom was stereospecifically removed in the conversion of 19-ol 2 to 19-al 3. These findings indicate that the 19-oxygenation of 19-ol 2 would proceed in the same mechanism as that involved in the AD aromatization.

  20. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  1. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element Analysis of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... determination of dissolved, suspended, or total elements in drinking water, surface water, and domestic and... following treatment with hot, dilute mineral acid (Section 9.4). 3.5Instrumental detection limit—The... metal in an acid mixture of 4 mL of (1+1) HCl and 1 mL of conc. HNO3 in a beaker. Warm gently to effect...

  4. Column solid-phase extraction of nickel and silver in environmental samples prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-05-30

    A biosorption procedure for preconcentration-separation of nickel(II) and silver(I) at trace levels on Bacillus sphaericus-loaded Chromosorb 106 (BSLC106) has been presented in this work. The conditions like pH, amounts of microorganism, eluent type, etc. for the quantitative adsorption of the analyte ions on BSCL106 column were investigated. The analyte ions were quantitatively recovered and desorbed at pH range of 6.0-7.0 and 10 mL of 1 M HCl, respectively. The effects of various cationic and anionic interferences on the recoveries of nickel(II) and silver(I) were studied. The detection limits for nickel(II) and silver(I) are 1.42 and 1.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was tested by analyzing NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07310 Stream sediment certified reference materials. The proposed enrichment-separation procedure was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in natural water, black tea, tobacco, soil and sediment samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of elements in water hyacinth from the Lerma River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, S.; Zarazúa, G.; Ávila-Pérez, P.; Carapia-Morales, L.; Martínez, T.

    2010-06-01

    The Lerma River is one of the most polluted body water in Mexico. For this reason, only the highly resistant organisms such as water hyacinth are able to reproduce in this river. The aim of this work was to evaluate the concentration of K, S, Fe, Ca, Mn, Ti, Zn, Sr, Rb, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Br in roots of water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes) from the Lerma River. The samples were collected from five sites in the river and analyzed in triplicate using a TXRF Spectrometer 'TX-2000 Ital Structures' with a Si(Li) detector and a resolution of 140 eV (FWHM) at Mn Kα. A Mo tube (40 kV, 30 mA) with 17.4 KeV excitation energy was used for a counting time of 500 s. Results show that the average metal concentration in the water hyacinth roots decrease in the following order: K (9698.2 µg/g) > S (7593.3 µg/g) > Fe (4406.6 µg/g) > Ca (2601.8 µg/g) > Mn (604.2 µg/g) > Ti (230.7 µg/g) > Zn (51.65 µg/g) > Sr (43.55 µg/g) > Rb (18.61 µg/g) > Cu (12.78 µg/g) > Cr (6.45 µg/g) > Ni (4.68 µg/g) > Pb (4.32 µg/g) > Br (4.31 µg/g) and the bioconcentration factors in the water hyacinth decrease in the sequence: Ti > Fe > Mn > Cu > Ni > Zn > S > Pb > Rb > K > Cr > Sr > Br > Ca. The concentrations in roots of water hyacinth reflect the high pollution level of the river.

  6. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of elements in water hyacinth from the Lerma River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejeda, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Apartado Postal 890, Metepec, C.P. 52149 (Mexico); Zarazua, G., E-mail: graciela.zarazua@inin.gob.m [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Avila-Perez, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Apartado Postal 890, Metepec, C.P. 52149 (Mexico); Carapia-Morales, L. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Martinez, T. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-06-15

    The Lerma River is one of the most polluted body water in Mexico. For this reason, only the highly resistant organisms such as water hyacinth are able to reproduce in this river. The aim of this work was to evaluate the concentration of K, S, Fe, Ca, Mn, Ti, Zn, Sr, Rb, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Br in roots of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) from the Lerma River. The samples were collected from five sites in the river and analyzed in triplicate using a TXRF Spectrometer 'TX-2000 Ital Structures' with a Si(Li) detector and a resolution of 140 eV (FWHM) at Mn K{alpha}. A Mo tube (40 kV, 30 mA) with 17.4 KeV excitation energy was used for a counting time of 500 s. Results show that the average metal concentration in the water hyacinth roots decrease in the following order: K (9698.2 {mu}g/g) > S (7593.3 {mu}g/g) > Fe (4406.6 {mu}g/g) > Ca (2601.8 {mu}g/g) > Mn (604.2 {mu}g/g) > Ti (230.7 {mu}g/g) > Zn (51.65 {mu}g/g) > Sr (43.55 {mu}g/g) > Rb (18.61 {mu}g/g) > Cu (12.78 {mu}g/g) > Cr (6.45 {mu}g/g) > Ni (4.68 {mu}g/g) > Pb (4.32 {mu}g/g) > Br (4.31 {mu}g/g) and the bioconcentration factors in the water hyacinth decrease in the sequence: Ti > Fe > Mn > Cu > Ni > Zn > S > Pb > Rb > K > Cr > Sr > Br > Ca. The concentrations in roots of water hyacinth reflect the high pollution level of the river.

  7. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    C -1 D FLUORESCENT LAMP SPECIFICATION SHEETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -1 E LED WAVES’ LED ...friendly products, advances in efficiency, and lower production costs for lamps . The conversion of fluorescent bulbs to LED technology has many benefits...repeatedly turned on and off. (5) LEDs can be used in existing fluorescent lighting fixtures using LED retrofit kits or replacement lamps . (6

  8. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  9. Simultaneous speciation analysis of Sb(III), Sb(V) and (CH3)3SbCl2 by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection (HPLC-HG-AFS): application to antimony speciation in sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Ida; Quiroz, Waldo; Pinochet, Hugo; Pannier, Florence; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2005-10-14

    This paper presents an improvement for the simultaneous separation of Sb(V), Sb(III) and (CH3)3SbCl2 species by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its detection by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). The separation was performed on an anion exchange column PRP-X100 using a gradient elution program between EDTA/KHP (potasium hydrogen phtalate) as first mobile phase and phosphate solutions solution as the second one. The chromatographic separation and the HG-AFS parameters were optimized by experimental design. The best results were obtained by using an elution program with 20 mmol l(-1) EDTA + 2 mmol(-01) KHP solution at pH 4.5, during 1.15 min, then change to 50 mmol l(-1) (NH4)2HPO4 solution at pH 8.3, switching back after 4.0 min to the first mobile phase, until 5 min, with a constant flow rate of 1.5 ml min(-1). Retention time of Sb(V), Sb(III) and trimethylantimony species were 1.22, 2.31 and 3.45 min and the detection limits were 0.13; 0.07 and 0.13 microg l(-1), respectively. Studies on the stability of this antimony species in sea water samples on the function of the elapsed time of storage in refrigerator at 4 degrees C was performed employing the optimized method. Results revealed that Sb(III) is easily oxidized within some hours to Sb(V) in sea water stored at 4 degrees C. However, when the sea water was immediately mixed with EDTA no oxidation of Sb(III) was observed up to 1 week of storage. The proposed methodology was then applied to the antimony speciation in sea water samples.

  10. Differentiating Organic from Conventional Peppermints Using Chromatographic and Flow-Injection Mass Spectrometric (FIMS) Fingerprints

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Boyan; Lu, Yingjian; Qin, Fang; Chen, Pei; Shi, Haiming; Charles, Denys; Yu, Liangli (Lucy)

    2012-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow-injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FIMS methods. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that both HPLC and FIMS fingerprints could determine the difference in the commercial organic and conventional peppermints. FIMS fingerprint...

  11. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented.

  12. Gamma-spectrometric uranium age-dating using intrinsic efficiency calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, C T; Nguyen, Cong Tam; Zsigrai, Jozsef

    2006-01-01

    A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for uranium age-dating is presented which is applicable to material of any physical form and geometrical shape. It relies on measuring the daughter/parent activity ratio 214Bi/234U by low-background, high-resolution gamma-spectrometry using intrinsic efficiency calibration. The method does not require the use of any reference materials nor the use of an efficiency calibrated geometry.

  13. Thermospray liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the analysis of metribuzin and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, C E; Geeson, A V; Games, D E; Ramsey, E D; Abusteit, E O; Corbin, F T; Tomer, K B

    1988-04-22

    A thermospray liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric (TSP LC-MS) method has been developed for the analysis of the herbicide metribuzin and its three major metabolites in plant tissue. Metribuzin and its metabolites exhibited widely varying sensitivities in positive-ion TSP, with metribuzin being the most sensitive and deaminated diketo metribuzin being the least sensitive. All four compounds of interest were detected in an extract of a soybean plant which had been treated with metribuzin.

  14. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  15. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric determination of hallucinogenic indoles psilocin and psilocybin in "magic mushroom" samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Tooru; Nishikawa, Mayumi; Katagi, Munehiro; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi

    2005-03-01

    Accurate and sensitive analytical methods for psilocin (PC) and psilocybin (PB), tryptamine-type hallucinogens contained in "magic mushrooms," were investigated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The chromatographic separation on an ODS column and mass spectral information gave complete discrimination between PC and PB without derivatization. The mass spectrometric detection had a high sensitivity, and the tandem mass spectrometric detection provided more specificity and accuracy, as well as high sensitivity. The detection limits ranged from 1 to 25 pg by LC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode, and the intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were estimated to be 4.21-5.93% by LC-MS-MS in the selected reaction monitoring mode. By applying the present LC-MS-MS technique to four real samples, the contents of PC and PB were found to vary over a wide range (0.60-1.4 and 0.18-3.8 mg/g dry wt. for PC and PB, respectively) between samples.

  16. [MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric analysis in the accelerated identification of the Vibrio genus microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasev, M V; Mironova, L V; Basov, E A; Ostyak, A S; Kulikalova, E S; Urbanovich, L Ya; Balahonov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop methodological approaches to identification of the Vibrio genus representatives using the MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric analysis technologies. The aspects of the biological safety in sample preparations for mass-spectrometric analysis were studied, reference spectra of six typical V. cholerae strains were developed. Identification of 55 strains, representatives of the Vibrio genus, including 45 V. cholerae strains with different epidemic importance, was performed using the MALDI Biotyper 3.0 basis comprising V. cholerae reference spectra. The possibility of reliable definition of the tested strain taxonomic belonging to the species level was demonstrated. Thus, the results completely corresponded to the data of classical microbiological identification. Stability and reproducibility of the offered research method was experimentally shown. The results allow identification of the Vibrio genus representatives to be implemented with the use of the mass-spectrometric analysis as an effective method that defines a species belonging of the basic Vibrio genus representatives in the shortest-terms.

  17. Spectrometric methods used in the calibration of radiodiagnostic measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, W. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    Recently a set of parameters for checking the quality of radiation for use in diagnostic radiology was established at the calibration facility of Nederlands Meetinstituut (NMI). The establishment of the radiation quality required re-evaluation of the correction factors for the primary air-kerma standards. Free-air ionisation chambers require several correction factors to measure air-kerma according to its definition. These correction factors were calculated for the NMi free-air chamber by Monte Carlo simulations for monoenergetic photons in the energy range from 10 keV to 320 keV. The actual correction factors follow from weighting these mono-energetic correction factors with the air-kerma spectrum of the photon beam. This paper describes the determination of the photon spectra of the X-ray qualities used for the calibration of dosimetric instruments used in radiodiagnostics. The detector used for these measurements is a planar HPGe-detector, placed in the direct beam of the X-ray machine. To convert the measured pulse height spectrum to the actual photon spectrum corrections must be made for fluorescent photon escape, single and multiple compton scattering inside the detector, and detector efficiency. From the calculated photon spectra a number of parameters of the X-ray beam can be calculated. The calculated first and second half value layer in aluminum and copper are compared with the measured values of these parameters to validate the method of spectrum reconstruction. Moreover the spectrum measurements offer the possibility to calibrate the X-ray generator in terms of maximum high voltage. The maximum photon energy in the spectrum is used as a standard for calibration of kVp-meters.

  18. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    CERN Document Server

    Arefieff, K N; Bezuglov, N N; Dimitrijevic, M S; Klyucharev, A N; Mihajlov, A A; Sreckovic, V A

    2016-01-01

    Ionized geocosmic media parameters in a thermal and a subthermal range of energy have a number of unique features. The photoresonance plasma that is formed by optical excitation of the lowest excited (resonance) atomic states is one example of conversion of radiation energy into electrical one. Since spontaneous fluorescence of excited atoms is probabilistic, the description of the radiating quantized system evolution along with photons energy transfer in a cold atoms medium, should include elements of stochastic dynamics. Finally, the chaotic dynamics of a weakly bound Rydberg electron over a grid of the energy levels diagram of a quasi-molecular Rydberg complex provides an excitation migration of the electron forward to the ionization continuum. This work aims at discussing the specific features of the dynamic resonances formalism in the description of processes involving Rydberg states of an excited atom, including features in the fluorescence spectrum partially caused by the quantum defect control due to ...

  19. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  20. Playing Pinball with Atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; van Houselt, Arie; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of controlling an atomic scale mechanical device by an external electrical signal. On a germanium substrate, a switching motion of pairs of atoms is induced by electrons that are directly injected into the atoms with a scanning tunneling microscope tip. By precisely

  1. Atomization characteristics of a prefilming airblast atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeru; Koito, Atsushi; Hishiki, Manabu

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of water test sprays generated by a prefilming airblast atomizer used for aeroengines was measured in swirling and non-swirling flows with the well established laser scattering particle sizing technique. Atomizing air velocity (or pressure difference) was varied in a range wider than the conditions of actual engines. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) decreased at approximately a 1.5 power of the atomizing air velocity, being a higher velocity index than the previously reported values of 1 to 1.2. It was unexpectedly found that the effect of the liquid/air flow ratio was small. Since swirling flow increased the SMD at lower air velocities yet decreased it at higher ones, it is suggested that the reverse flow near the nozzle pintle adversely affects atomization.

  2. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S S [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Bahrain, PO Box 32038 (Bahrain); Jarad, T M [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Puri, R R [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Theoretical Physics Division, Bombay 400085 (India); Bullough, R K [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion ({approx}5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  3. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S. S.; Jarad, T. M.; Puri, R. R.; Bullough, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion (~5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  4. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  5. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  6. Fast Nondestructive Parallel Readout of Neutral Atom Registers in Optical Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Alt, W.; Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Ratschbacher, L.; Völzke, Y.; Meschede, D.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate the parallel and nondestructive readout of the hyperfine state for optically trapped 87Rb atoms. The scheme is based on state-selective fluorescence imaging and achieves detection fidelities >98 % within 10 ms, while keeping 99% of the atoms trapped. For the readout of dense arrays of neutral atoms in optical lattices, where the fluorescence images of neighboring atoms overlap, we apply a novel image analysis technique using Bayesian inference to determine the internal state of multiple atoms. Our method is scalable to large neutral atom registers relevant for future quantum information processing tasks requiring fast and nondestructive readout and can also be used for the simultaneous readout of quantum information stored in internal qubit states and in the atoms' positions.

  7. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for ...

  8. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  9. Condensed matter applied atomic collision physics, v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Datz, Sheldon

    1983-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 4: Condensed Matter deals with the fundamental knowledge of collision processes in condensed media.The book focuses on the range of applications of atomic collisions in condensed matter, extending from effects on biological systems to the characterization and modification of solids. This volume begins with the description of some aspects of the physics involved in the production of ion beams. The radiation effects in biological and chemical systems, ion scattering and atomic diffraction, x-ray fluorescence analysis, and photoelectron and Auger spectrosc

  10. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  11. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  12. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  13. Optical Thin Film Thickness Measurement for the Single Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Courtney; Frisbie, Dustin; Singh, Jaideep; Spinlab Team

    2017-09-01

    The Single Atom Microscope Project proposes an efficient, selective, and sensitive method to measure the 1022Ne+24 He ->1225 Mg + n reaction. This rare nuclear reaction is a source of neutrons for heavy element development through the slow neutron capture process. This method embeds Magnesium atoms in a solid neon film. The Magnesium atoms exhibit a shifted fluorescence spectrum allowing for the detection of individual fluorescence photons against the excitation light background. Currently, Ytterbium is used in place of Magnesium-25 because it has been more thoroughly studied than Magnesium and we expect it to have a brighter signal. To identify the signal emitted from the Ytterbium atoms, we need to quantify the amount of signal and background per atom in the neon film. We need to know the film thickness to find the number of atoms in the film to determine the amount of light emitted per atom. In preparation for the neon film measurement, I constructed an experiment to advance the understanding of what is required to optically measure a thin film by using a cover glass slide in place of the thin film. This preliminary experiment has determined a measurement method for finding the thickness of a neon thin film on a sapphire substrate. This work is supported by Michigan State University, U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1654610, and U.S. NSF REU.

  14. Experiments with Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-10-01

    The experiments described below show the irradiance and illuminance spectra of two fluorescent lamps in relation to their color temperatures, and the efficacy in comparison to that of an incandescent lamp. Spectra of "warm white" and "cool daylight" fluorescent lamps are demonstrated.

  15. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  16. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  17. Malevolent use of radioactive materials: An international exercise in the analysis of gamma-spectrometric data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowdall, M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Palsson, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    with isotopes and activities that present significant challenges with respect to identification and quantification using gamma ray spectrometry. The MALRAD international exercise was designed to provide a practice opportunity for authorities and laboratories to work with synthetic gamma-spectrometric data......The past years have seen a broadening in the focus of emergency preparedness and first response towards situations involving the malevolent use of radioactive materials in a variety of contexts. Many of these contexts are such that first responders and responsible authorities may be faced...

  18. Alpha-spectrometric analysis of uranium and thorium using solid-phase extraction for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.; Esterlund, R.A.; Patzelt, P

    1999-05-01

    A method is presented here for the preparation of thin uniform samples of naturally occurring uranium and thorium which are highly suitable for {alpha}-spectrometric analysis. The solid-phase extraction procedure simultaneously achieves a complete separation of the analytes from the sample matrix and a high enrichment factor for uranium and thorium, so that the ensuing eluate is ideally suited for either electrodeposition or ICP-MS, without the need for complicated and painstaking sample preparation. In contrast to conventional liquid-liquid phase-extraction methods, no organic waste solutions are produced, and the process can be easily automated.

  19. Mass spectrometric characterization of the neuropeptidome of the ghost crab Ocypode ceratophthalma (Brachyura, Ocypodidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Limei; D’Andrea, Brandon T.; Jia, Chenxi; Liang, Zhidan; Christie, Andrew E.; Li, Lingun

    2013-01-01

    The horn-eyed ghost crab Ocypode ceratophthalma is a terrestrial brachyuran native to the Indo-Pacific region, including the islands of Hawaii. Here, multiple mass spectrometric platforms, including matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS) and nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS), were used to characterize th...

  20. Mass spectrometric study of the kinetics of chemical reactions in tetrafluoroethylene initiated by a gas discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyn' , V.I.; Oparin, V.B.; Potapov, V.K.; Tuzov, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of the time dependence of the partial pressures of fluorohydrocarbons synthesized from tetrafluoroethylene in an atypical glow discharge, the mass spectrometric method was used. The product yield sequence in a state reactor was determined: C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, C/sub 3/F/sub 8/, C/sub 2/F/sub 6/, C/sub 4/F/sub 10/, CF/sub 4/. In the 6-80 Pa range the C/sub 2/F/sub 4/ decomposition rate does not depend on the initial monomer pressure. A kinetic model giving a good description of the experimental results is proposed.

  1. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric determination of levodropropizine plasma levels in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaratin, P; De Angelis, L; Cattabeni, F

    1988-08-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526) in plasma is described. The method proved to be highly selective and sensitive. Drug concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml could be measured. Levodropropizine plasma levels were measured in 6 healthy volunteers after administration of an acute 60 mg dose. Peak concentrations were reached between 40 and 60 min and measurable amounts of drug were present till 8 h after administration.

  2. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  3. Multicolor, Fluorescent Supercapacitor Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingxia; Xie, Songlin; Fu, Xuemei; Sun, Xuemei; Wang, Bingjie; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-05

    Fiber-shaped supercapacitors have attracted broad attentions from both academic and industrial communities due to the demonstrated potentials as next-generation power modules. However, it is important while remains challenging to develop dark-environment identifiable supercapacitor fibers for enhancement on operation convenience and security in nighttime applications. Herein, a novel family of colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers has been produced from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets. Fluorescent dye particles are introduced and stably anchored on the surfaces of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes to prepare hybrid fiber electrodes with a broad range of colors from red to purple. The fluorescent component in the dye introduces fluorescent indication capability to the fiber, which is particularly promising for flexible and wearable devices applied in dark environment. In addition, the colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers also maintain high electrochemical performance under cyclic bending and charge-discharge processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Single-atom-resolved fluorescence imaging of an atomic Mott insulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherson, Jacob; Weitenberg, Christof; Andres, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The reliable detection of single quantum particles has revolutionized the field of quantum optics and quantum information processing. For several years, researchers have aspired to extend such detection possibilities to larger-scale, strongly correlated quantum systems 1 , 2 in order to record in...

  5. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  7. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  8. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  9. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  10. Atomicity in Electronic Commerce,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Atomicity in Electronic Commerce J. D. Tygar January 1996 CMU-CS-96-112 School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213...other research sponsor. Keywords: electronic commerce , atomicity, NetBill, IBIP, cryptography, transaction pro- cessing, ACID, franking, electronic ...goods over networks. Electronic commerce has inspired a large variety of work. Unfortunately, much of that work ignores traditional transaction

  11. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  12. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  13. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  14. Maximally Atomic Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Brzozowski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The atoms of a regular language are non-empty intersections of complemented and uncomplemented quotients of the language. Tight upper bounds on the number of atoms of a language and on the quotient complexities of atoms are known. We introduce a new class of regular languages, called the maximally atomic languages, consisting of all languages meeting these bounds. We prove the following result: If L is a regular language of quotient complexity n and G is the subgroup of permutations in the transition semigroup T of the minimal DFA of L, then L is maximally atomic if and only if G is transitive on k-subsets of 1,...,n for 0 <= k <= n and T contains a transformation of rank n-1.

  15. Nondestructive light-shift measurements of single atoms in optical dipole traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chung-Yu; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    We measure the ac Stark shifts of the 5S1/2,F=2→5P3/2,F'=3 transitions of individual optically trapped 87Rb atoms using a nondestructive detection technique that allows us to measure the fluorescent signal of one and the same atom for over 60 s. These measurements allow the efficient and rapid characterization of single-atom traps that is required for many coherent quantum information protocols. Although this method is demonstrated using a single-atom trap, the concept is readily extended to resolvable atomic arrays.

  16. Combined AFM and confocal fluorescence microscope for applications in bio-nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassies, R.; van der Werf, Kees; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Hunter, C.N.; Olsen, J.D.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Otto, Cornelis

    2005-01-01

    We present a custom-designed atomic force fluorescence microscope (AFFM), which can perform simultaneous optical and topographic measurements with single molecule sensitivity throughout the whole visible to near-infrared spectral region. Integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal

  17. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  18. ADVANCED APPROACHES TO ARSINE ATOMIZATION FOR AS SPECIATION BY CRYOFOCUSING WITH ATOMIC ABSORPTION AND ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE DETECTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) yields methylated arsenicals that contain arsenic in +3 or +5 oxidation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are significantly more toxic than their pentavalent counterparts. Therefore, determination of tri- and pentavalent forms of m...

  19. The Bremen mass spectrometric facility for the measurement of helium isotopes, neon, and tritium in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sültenfuss, Jürgen; Roether, Wolfgang; Rhein, Monika

    2009-06-01

    We describe the mass spectrometric facility for measuring helium isotopes, neon, and tritium that has been operative at this institute since 1989, and also the sampling and sample preparation steps that precede the mass spectrometric analysis. For water samples in a near-equilibrium with atmospheric air, the facility achieves precision for (3)He/(4)He ratios of+/-0.4% or better, and+/-0.8 % or better for helium and neon concentrations. Tritium precision is typically+/-3 % and the detection limit 10 mTU ( approximately 1.2.10(-3) Bq/kg of pure water). Sample throughputs can reach some thousands per year. These achievements are enabled, among other features, by automation of the measurement procedure and by elaborate calibration, assisted by continual development in detail. To date, we have measured more than 15,000 samples for tritium and 23,000 for helium isotopes and neon, mostly in the context of oceanographic and hydrologic work. Some results of such work are outlined. Even when atmospheric tritium concentrations have become rather uniform, tritium provides water ages if (3)He data are taken concurrently. The technique can resolve tritium concentrations in waters of the pre-nuclear era.

  20. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA and independent (DIA mass spectrometric (MS workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3 of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014 [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964.

  1. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  2. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  3. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-07-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Atomic transition probabilities of Er i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J E; Den Hartog, E A [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wyart, J-F, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.ed, E-mail: jean-francois.wyart@lac.u-psud.f, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.ed [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS (UPR3321), Bat. 505, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay (France)

    2010-12-14

    Atomic transition probabilities for 562 lines of the first spectrum of erbium (Er i) are reported. These data are from new branching fraction measurements on Fourier transform spectra normalized with previously reported radiative lifetimes from time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements (Den Hartog et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 155004). The wavelength range of the data set is from 298 to 1981 nm. In this work we explore the utility of parametric fits based on the Cowan code in assessing branching fraction errors due to lines connecting to unobserved lower levels.

  6. Atomic transition probabilities of Gd i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawler, J E; Den Hartog, E A [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bilty, K A, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: biltyka@uwec.edu, E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States)

    2011-05-14

    Fourier transform spectra are used to determine emission branching fractions for 1290 lines of the first spectrum of gadolinium (Gd i). These branching fractions are converted to absolute atomic transition probabilities using previously reported radiative lifetimes from time-resolved laser-induced-fluorescence measurements (Den Hartog et al 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 055001). The wavelength range of the data set is from 300 to 1850 nm. A least squares technique for separating blends of the first and second spectra lines is also described and demonstrated in this work.

  7. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koktysh, Dmitry [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Station B 351822, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington, E-mail: dmitry.koktysh@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: wellington.pham@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue South AA, 1105 MCN, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and visible light emitting ({approx}600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) ({approx}800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS{sub 2}/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koktysh, Dmitry; Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington

    2011-07-01

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and visible light emitting (~600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) (~800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS2/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Quantum caustics in resonance-fluorescence trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghiloo, M.; Tan, D.; Harrington, P. M.; Lewalle, P.; Jordan, A. N.; Murch, K. W.

    2017-11-01

    We employ phase-sensitive amplification to perform homodyne detection of the resonance fluorescence from a driven superconducting artificial atom. Entanglement between the emitter and its fluorescence allows us to track the individual quantum state trajectories of the emitter conditioned on the outcomes of the field measurements. We analyze the ensemble properties of these trajectories by considering trajectories that connect specific initial and final states. By applying the stochastic path-integral formalism, we calculate equations of motion for the most-likely path between two quantum states and compare these predicted paths to experimental data. Drawing on the mathematical similarity between the action formalism of the most-likely quantum paths and ray optics, we study the emergence of caustics in quantum trajectories: places where multiple extrema in the stochastic action occur. We observe such multiple most-likely paths in experimental data and find these paths to be in reasonable quantitative agreement with theoretical calculations.

  10. Determination of absolute population densities of eroded tungsten in hollow cathode lamps and fluorescent lamps by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadrath, S [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Ehlbeck, J [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Lieder, G [Research Light Sources, Osram GmbH, Hellabrunner Str. 1, D 81536 Muenchen (Germany); Sigeneger, F [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2005-09-07

    The high energy ion bombardment during instant start of a fluorescent lamp (FL) leads to intense sputtering of the electrode material including tungsten and emitter. Thus, a cold started FL often suffers from early failures due to coil fracture. The main goal of this paper is to investigate tungsten erosion. We have employed the ultra-sensitive method of laser-induced fluorescence. This technique is particularly well-suited to determining absolute population densities of neutral and singly ionized atoms of liberated electrode material. In addition to FL, our investigations have been performed also on hollow cathode lamps (HCLs). These are useful because they provide a variable source of sputtered tungsten atoms and can serve as tuning tools for precise adjustment of the laser radiation. We will present absolute atomic tungsten population densities in a commercial FL and in an HCL. Furthermore, the results of a theoretical investigation of the argon plasma and the tungsten density in the HCL are represented.

  11. Single-atom nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Prati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Single-Atom Nanoelectronics covers the fabrication of single-atom devices and related technology, as well as the relevant electronic equipment and the intriguing new phenomena related to single-atom and single-electron effects in quantum devices. It also covers the alternative approaches related to both silicon- and carbon-based technologies, also from the point of view of large-scale industrial production. The publication provides a comprehensive picture of the state of the art at the cutting edge and constitutes a milestone in the emerging field of beyond-CMOS technology. Although there are

  12. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  13. Fluorescent radiation converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  14. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  15. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  16. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced in X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K

    2002-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) can resolve 'phase problem' in crystal diffraction and therefore it provides 3D atomic images around specific elements. Since first demonstration of the XFH in 1996, view of atoms has been improved rapidly with the refinement of the hologram data collection method. The present performance of the XFH makes it possible to apply to impurity, thin film and quasicrystal, and opens a way to practical tool for determination of local structure. In this paper, theory including solutions for twin image problem, advanced experimental systems and application to Si sub 0 sub . sub 9 sub 9 sub 9 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 0 sub 1 are discussed. (author)

  18. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  19. Atomic & Molecular Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-07-12

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic & Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  20. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razmi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: razmi@qom.ac.ir; Abdollahi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom 37185-359 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mah.abdollahi@gmail.com

    2008-11-10

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock{exclamation_point}.

  1. The Casimir atomic pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmi, H.; Abdollahi, M.

    2008-11-01

    We want to introduce an atomic pendulum whose driving force (torque) is due to the quantum vacuum fluctuations. Applying the well-known Casimir-Polder effect to a special configuration (a combined structure of an atomic nanostring and a conducting plate), an atomic pendulum (Casimir atomic pendulum) is designed. Using practically acceptable data corresponding to the already known world of nanotechnology and based on reasonable/reliable numerical estimates, the period of oscillation for the pendulum is computed. This pendulum can be considered as both a new micro(nano)-electromechanical system and a new simple vacuum machine. Its design may be considered as a first step towards realizing the visualized vacuum (Casimir) clock!

  2. Dalton's Atomic Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DOBBIN, LEONARD

    1896-01-01

    WITH reference to the communications from the authors and from the reviewer of the "New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory," published in NATURE for May 14, I beg leave to offer the following remarks...

  3. Atomic Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  4. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  5. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  6. Single short-column liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometric detection for trace environmental analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenboom, A.C.; Vreuls, J.J.; Rontree, J.A.; van Baar, B.L.M.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.; Slobodník, J.

    1996-01-01

    Single short, i.e. ca 2-cm long, high-pressure-packed columns coupled with mass spectrometric (MS) or tandem MS detection enable rapid trace-level determination and identification of environmental pollutants in water samples. In this study an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface

  7. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, S.; Scattergood, T.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 A) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system resulted in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  8. Atomic Clocks Research - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    magnet. Since atomic deflection in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is inversely proportional to the square of the atomic speed, the atomic velocity...purifier and controlled leak; an atomic source (i.e., the dissociator under 39 study); a dipole electromagnetic with pole pieces shaped to produce an...34Relaxation Magnetique d’Atomes de Rubidium sur des Parois Paraffines," J. Phys. (Paris) 24, 379 (1963). 21. S. Wexler, "Deposition of Atomic Beams

  9. Wave Atom Based Watermarking

    OpenAIRE

    Bukhari, Ijaz; Nuhman-ul-Haq; Hyat, Khizar

    2013-01-01

    Watermarking helps in ensuring originality, ownership and copyrights of a digital image. This paper aims at embedding a Watermark in an image using Wave Atom Transform. Preference of Wave Atoms on other transformations has been due to its sparser expansion, adaptability to the direction of local pattern, and sharp frequency localization. In this scheme, we had tried to spread the watermark in an image so that the information at one place is very small and undetectable. In order to extract the...

  10. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  11. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  12. Atomic Bomb Health Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Luckey, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation,...

  13. Atomic interferometry; Interferometrie atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J. [Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation {lambda} = h/(mv), where {lambda} is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  14. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  15. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  16. Photodesorption of Na atoms from rough Na surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Gerlach, R.; Manson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the desorption of Na atoms from large Na clusters deposited on dielectric surfaces. High-resolution translational energy distributions of the desorbing atoms are determined by three independent methods, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence, as well as single-photon and resonance......-enhanced two-photon ionization techniques. Upon variation of surface temperature and for different substrates (mica vs lithium fluoride) clear non-Maxwellian time-of-flight distributions are observed with a cos θ angular dependence and most probable kinetic energies below that expected of atoms desorbing from...... atoms are scattered by surface vibrations. Recent experiments providing time constants for the decay of the optical excitations in the clusters support this model. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory indicates the importance of both absorption of the laser photons via direct excitation...

  17. Pulsed metastable atom source for low vapour-pressure metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Urena, A.; Verdasco Costales, E. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Facultad de Quimica); Saez Rabanos, V. (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales)

    1990-03-01

    The basic design and most relevant experimental conditions of a pulsed metastable atomic-beam oven are described. The stainless steel oven is suitable for vaporising metals and salts up to around 1400 K producing intense beams of metastable alkaline-earth atoms when pulsed or continuous wave low voltage discharges are used. Several applications using atomic calcium in its {sup 3}P and {sup 1}D electronic state are reported. The beam characterisation and discharge efficiency have been measured by time-of-flight or laser-induced fluorescence techniques. In addition, a method of changing the metastable n{sup 3}P/n{sup 1}D ratio, by raising the oven temperature, is described which looks very promising for the study of electronic selectivity in reactive collision processes. Finally several spectroscopic applications for atomic and molecular beam determinations are reported. (author).

  18. Effects of external fields, dimension and polarization on the resonance fluorescence of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaseghi, B., E-mail: vaseghi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Razavi, S.M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper simultaneous effects of external electric and magnetic fields, dimension and polarization on the resonance fluorescence spectrum and photon statistics of a spherical quantum dot with parabolic confinement are investigated. With special attention to the optical scattering processes resonance fluorescence spectrum and second-order correlation function are calculated and plotted for different external parameters. Our results show the occurrence of resonance fluorescence similar to atomic systems and considerable effects of external fields, quantum confinement and light polarization on the resonance fluorescence spectrum and second-order correlation function in the quantum dot systems. The existence of Mollow triplets and photon antibunching are strongly depend on these external agents.

  19. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here.

  20. Thermogravimetric/mass spectrometric characterization of two energy crops, Arundo donax and Miscanthus sinensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Piroska; Varhegyi, G; Till, Ferenc [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Laboratory for Inorganic Chemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Faix, Oscar [BFH, Institute for Wood Chemistry and Chemical Technology of Wood, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Two herbaceous plants, Arundo donax and Miscanthus sinensis with high biomass production potential, were studied by simultaneous thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry (TG/MS) in an inert argon atmosphere at a heating rate of 20C min{sup -1}. The effect of particle size, the partial removal of the minerals by acid- and water-washing, and the effect of potassium carbonate as catalyst were studied. Experiments with covered sample pans were carried out to investigate the effect of secondary tar cracking on the charcoal production. TG/MS supplied intensity profiles of the low molecular weight volatile products as a function of time or temperature. Their comparison to the weight-loss rate curves (DTG) provided information of the details of the degradation mechanism. The amounts of various volatile pyrolysis products were estimated by the integrals of the corresponding mass spectrometric intensities. The factors influencing the char yield were discussed

  1. Spectrometric gamma radiation of shale cores applied to sweet spot discrimination in Eastern Pomerania, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupio, Rafal; de Alemar Barberes, Gabriel

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the application and calculation of hydrocarbon anomalies in two different boreholes located in Eastern Pomerania (northern Poland). Spectrometric data from borehole geophysical probe (borehole 1) and portable gamma logger (borehole 2) were used to analyze shale formations. The results from borehole 1 presented a statistically significant, moderate correlation between calculated hydrocarbon anomalies and hydrocarbon saturation data obtained from well log interpretation. Borehole 2 has been analyzed focusing on the gamma radiation of the core samples, and the positive results of borehole 1. Hydrocarbon anomalies calculated from spectral gamma radiation are reliable indicators of sweet spots, based solely on a cursory evaluation of core measurements. These preliminary information acquired from gamma-ray measurements could help increase sampling precision of further geochemical analysis.

  2. An accelerated mass spectrometric method for measuring myo-inositol in phosphatidylinositol in rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Joseph; Ma, Kaizung; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2006-03-01

    A fast and efficient chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CI-GC-MS) method for measuring myo-inositol in phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) in rat brain has been developed. Previously, quantitation of PtdIns involved the release of the myo-inositol by two enzymatic reactions using phospholipase C and alkaline phosphatase. The hydrolytic action of these enzymes was replaced by using commercially available 48% hydrofluoric acid (HF) at 80 °C for 30 min. The process can be carried out on the crude Folch extract of brain phospholipids without prior thin layer chromatography (TLC) purification, thereby significantly increasing the speed of analysis. For quantification, unlabeled myo-inositol, labeled myo- and neo-inositol (internal standard) were converted to acetate derivatives and analyzed by CI-GC-MS.

  3. Mass-spectrometric determination of trace elements in aqueous media without preconcentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foss, Gordon Oluf [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Feasibility of using a low pressure glow discharge as an ion source for the mass spectrometric determination of trace elements in aqueous media was investigated. A cryogenically cooled hollow cathode ion source was developed to analyze aqueous samples without external preconcentration. Aqueous solutions containing seventy elements were analyzed and the detection limits, sensitivity factors, and linear regression correlation coefficients were determined. A standard test solution of trace elements in water was analyzed and the concentrations of trace elements were calculated using the sensitivity factors determined previously. The results compared favorably within the error limits predicted by the semiquantitative survey methods used. Tap water and natural lake water samples were examined and minimal interference effects due to organic compounds and biological compounds were noted. A research ion optical system (RIOS) was developed as a flexible mass analyzer for the development of new ion sources. The RIOS is a double focussing mass analyzer designed utilizing the Mattauch-Herzog geometry with externally adjustable slit assemblies.

  4. Quantitative Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Post-Extraction Stability Assessment of the Euglenoid Toxin Euglenophycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V. Zimba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Euglenophycin is a recently discovered toxin produced by at least one species of euglenoid algae. The toxin has been responsible for several fish mortality events. To facilitate the identification and monitoring of euglenophycin in freshwater ponds, we have developed a specific mass spectrometric method for the identification and quantitation of euglenophycin. The post-extraction stability of the toxin was assessed under various conditions. Euglenophycin was most stable at room temperature. At 8 °C there was a small, but statistically significant, loss in toxin after one day. These methods and knowledge of the toxin’s stability will facilitate identification of the toxin as a causative agent in fish kills and determination of the toxin’s distribution in the organs of exposed fish.

  5. A superheterodyne spectrometer for electronic paramagnetic. Resonance; Spectrometre superheterodyne de resonance paramagnetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laffon, J.L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-12-15

    After a few generalities about electron paramagnetic resonance, a consideration of different experimental techniques authorises the choice of a particular type of apparatus. An EPR superheterodyne spectrometer built in the laboratory and having a novel circuit is described in detail. With this apparatus, many experimental results have been obtained and some of these are described as example. (author) [French] Apres quelques generalites sur le phenomene de resonance paramagnetique electronique, une synthese des differentes techniques experimentales, permet de fixer le choix d'un type d'appareillage. Un spectrometre de RPE superheterodyne realise en laboratoire et comportant un circuit original est expose dans le detail. Cet appareil a permis de nombreux resultats experimentaux dont quelques-uns sont decrits a titre d'exemple. (auteur)

  6. Spectrometric studies on stability of tenuazonic acid (TeA) solution in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combina, M; Dalcero, A; Torres, A

    1998-06-01

    The stability of tenuazonic acid solution at different temperatures and storage times was studied using methanol, methanol-water (8:2 v/v), benzene and benzene-acetonitrile (98:2 v/v) as solvents. Solutions were analysed by a spectrometric method TeA U.V.-spectrum was recorded. Results indicated that the optimum temperature for long-time storage period of tenuazonic acid solution in any solvent assayed is -20°C. Benzene and benzene-acetonitrile (98:2 v/v) could be advised to make tenuazonic acid solution which will be stored less than 2 months at 4°C. Methanol and methanolwater (8:2 v/v) are not recommended because a low stability of TeA solution in this solvents.

  7. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  8. Determination of Mass Spectrometric Sensitivity of Different Metalloporphyrin Esters Relative to Porphyrin Ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Møller, J.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative determination of metalloporphyrin contamination in preparations of biologically important porphyrins was achieved mass spectrometrically by application of the integrated ion current technique. For this purpose, the relative molecular ion sensitivities of the contaminating metal...... complexes were determined from the ratios of the integrated molecular ion currents of a series of calibration samples containing a porphyrin ester and one of its metal complexes in known molar ratio. Complexes formed with divalent ions of Cu, Zn, Fe, Co and Ni of copro- as well as uro......-prophyrin permethylester were all found to have the same molecular ion sensitivities as their metal-free porphyrin ester. The relative metalloporphyrin ester content in a sample of porphyrin ester was thus obtained directly as the integrated ion current ratios of the normalized molecular ions. The preparation...

  9. Mass spectrometric imaging of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in Ginkgo biloba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sebastian; Stengel, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Ginkgo biloba L. is known to be rich in flavonoids and flavonoid glycosides. However, the distribution within specific plant organs (e.g. within leaves) is not known. By using HPLC-MS and MS/MS we have identified a number of previously known G. biloba flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids from leaves. Namely, kaempferol, quercetin, isorhamnetin, myricetin, laricitrin/mearnsetin and apigenin glycosides were identified. Furthermore, biflavonoids like ginkgetin/isoginkgetin were also detected. The application of MALDI mass spectrometric imaging, enabled the compilation of concentration profiles of flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids in G. biloba L. leaves. Both, flavonoid glycosides and biflavonoids show a distinct distribution in leaf thin sections of G. biloba L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THUNNUS GENUS FOUR SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pepe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate identification of similar fish species is necessary to prevent illegal substitution and is imposed by labeling regulations in UE countries (1. The genus Thunnus comprises many species of different quality and commercial value. The increasing trade of fish preparations of the species included in this genus and the consequent loss of the external anatomical and morphological features enables fraudulent substitutions. This study reports data relating to the proteomic analysis of four tuna species (T. thynnus, T. alalunga, T. albacares, T. obesus. Sarcoplasmic proteins were studied by mono and two dimensional electrophoresis. The most significant proteins for the characterization of the species were analyzed by mass spectrometric techniques. As reported in a previous study (2, an accurate identification of the species seems possible, owing to the polymorphism displayed by the species of the Thunnus genus.

  11. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2D...... gel and their contents were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) or nanoelectrospray ionization time-of-flight (TOF) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) after in-gel digestion with trypsin. A database search identified the proteins as the C1 and C2 heterogeneous nuclear......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  12. Differentiating organic from conventional peppermints using chromatographic and flow injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Boyan; Lu, Yingjian; Qin, Fang; Chen, Pei; Shi, Haiming; Charles, Denys; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2012-12-05

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and flow injection mass spectrometric (FIMS) fingerprinting techniques were tested for their potential in differentiating organic and conventional peppermint samples. Ten organic and ten conventional peppermint samples were examined using HPLC-UV and FIMS methods. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that both HPLC and FIMS fingerprints could determine the difference in the commercial organic and conventional peppermints. FIMS fingerprinting provided a rapid test to differentiate organic and conventional peppermints in 1 min of analysis and has potential for high-throughput applications. On the other hand, HPLC fingerprints provide more information about the chemical composition of the samples, but take a longer time to differentiate organic and conventional peppermint samples.

  13. Spectrometric gamma radiation of shale cores applied to sweet spot discrimination in Eastern Pomerania, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupio, Rafal; de Alemar Barberes, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the application and calculation of hydrocarbon anomalies in two different boreholes located in Eastern Pomerania (northern Poland). Spectrometric data from borehole geophysical probe (borehole 1) and portable gamma logger (borehole 2) were used to analyze shale formations. The results from borehole 1 presented a statistically significant, moderate correlation between calculated hydrocarbon anomalies and hydrocarbon saturation data obtained from well log interpretation. Borehole 2 has been analyzed focusing on the gamma radiation of the core samples, and the positive results of borehole 1. Hydrocarbon anomalies calculated from spectral gamma radiation are reliable indicators of sweet spots, based solely on a cursory evaluation of core measurements. These preliminary information acquired from gamma-ray measurements could help increase sampling precision of further geochemical analysis.

  14. Highly luminescent N-doped carbon quantum dots as an effective multifunctional fluorescence sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Ma, Juanjuan; Shan, Xiaoyue; Feng, Hui; Shao, Linxiang; Chen, Jianrong

    2014-02-17

    The doping of carbon quantum dots with nitrogen provides a promising direction to improve fluorescence performance and broaden their applications in sensing systems. Herein we report a one-pot solvothermal synthesis of N-doped carbon quantum dots (NCQDs) and the synthesis of a series of NCQDs with different nitrogen contents. The as-prepared NCQDs were compared with carbon quantum dots (CQDs); the introduction of nitrogen atoms largely increased the quantum yield of NCQDs and highest emission efficiency is up to 36.3 %. The fluorescence enhancement may originate from more polyaromatic structures induced by incorporated nitrogen atoms and protonation of nitrogen atoms on dots. It was found that NCQDs can act as a multifunctional fluorescence sensing platform because they can be used to detect pH values, Ag(I), and Fe(III) in aqueous solution. The fluorescence intensity of NCQDs is inversely proportional to pH values across a broad range from 5.0 to 13.5, which indicates that NCQDs can be devised as an effective pH indicator. Selective detection of Ag(I) and Fe(III) was achieved based on their distinctive fluorescence influence because Ag(I) can significantly enhance the fluorescence whereas Fe(III) can greatly quench the fluorescence. The quantitative determination of Ag(I) can be accomplished with NCQDs by using the linear relationship between fluorescence intensity of NCQDs and concentration of Ag(I). The sensitive detection of H2O2 was developed by taking advantage of the distinct quenching ability of Fe(III) and Fe(II) toward the fluorescence of NCQDs. Cellular toxicity test showed NCQDs still retain low toxicity to cells despite the introduction of a great deal of nitrogen atoms. Moreover, bioimaging experiments demonstrated that NCQDs have stronger resistance to photobleaching than CQDs and more excellent fluorescence labeling performance. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A–G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  16. GNU polyxmass: a software framework for mass spectrometric simulations of linear (bio-polymeric analytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusconi Filippo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, a variety of (bio-polymers can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. The detailed interpretation of the spectra requires a huge number of "hypothesis cycles", comprising the following three actions 1 put forth a structural hypothesis, 2 test it, 3 (invalidate it. This time-consuming and painstaking data scrutiny is alleviated by using specialized software tools. However, all the software tools available to date are polymer chemistry-specific. This imposes a heavy overhead to researchers who do mass spectrometry on a variety of (bio-polymers, as each polymer type will require a different software tool to perform data simulations and analyses. We developed a software to address the lack of an integrated software framework able to deal with different polymer chemistries. Results The GNU polyxmass software framework performs common (bio-chemical simulations–along with simultaneous mass spectrometric calculations–for any kind of linear bio-polymeric analyte (DNA, RNA, saccharides or proteins. The framework is organized into three modules, all accessible from one single binary program. The modules let the user to 1 define brand new polymer chemistries, 2 perform quick mass calculations using a desktop calculator paradigm, 3 graphically edit polymer sequences and perform (bio-chemical/mass spectrometric simulations. Any aspect of the mass calculations, polymer chemistry reactions or graphical polymer sequence editing is configurable. Conclusion The scientist who uses mass spectrometry to characterize (bio-polymeric analytes of different chemistries is provided with a single software framework for his data prediction/analysis needs, whatever the polymer chemistry being involved.

  17. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Boyer, Anne E; Barr, John R

    2015-08-31

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  18. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  19. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  20. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  1. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  2. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-02

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  3. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  4. Cold Rydberg Atoms Trapped in a CO2 Optical Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-03

    Dipole trap chamber, showing the MOT region and the ion time of flight region (in front of the MCP detector ); b) Fluorescence image of atoms in our CO2...using the pulsed field ionization technique (PFI). The ions, formed either in a MOT or a dipole trap, are image onto a MCP detector and a phosphorus...have installed an electron detector and an ion detector ; the later will be able to obtain images of the atoms in the dipole trap. Recently, we have

  5. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  6. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia C. Capelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's, all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules, the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  7. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  8. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  9. From Atoms to Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-31

    Honea. M.L. Homer, J.L. Persson, R.L. Whetten , Chem. atoms Phys. Lett. 171 (1990) 147. [17] M.R. Hoare, Adv. Chem. Phys. 40 (1979) 49. Two types of...Persson, M.E. LaVilla, R.L. tal conditions, the clusters become rigid. Thereafter, Whetten , J. Phys. Chem. 93 (1989) 2869. each newly added atom condenses...106 (1981) 265. M. Broyer, Phys. Rev. A 39 (1989) 6056. [9] W. Ekardt, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 289. [38] R.L. Whetten , private

  10. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  11. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Masao; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Matsuo, Tatsuki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Characteristic features of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for CML in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic for atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. In the distribution of AML subtypes of FAB classification, there was no M3 cases in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral blood of proximal survivors. (author).

  12. Correlative atomic force microscopy and localization-based super-resolution microscopy: revealing labelling and image reconstruction artefacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrate, Aitor; Casado, Santiago; Flors, Cristina

    2014-03-17

    Hybrid microscopy: A correlative microscopy tool that combines in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy based on single-molecule localization and atomic force microscopy is presented. Direct comparison with high- resolution topography allows the authors to improve fluorescence labeling and image analysis in super-resolution imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Economical Alternatives for High Sensitivity in Atomic Spectrometry Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yavuz Ataman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used analytical tools for determination of elements at trace levels are atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, inductively coupled plasma, optical emission and mass spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICP-MS and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS. Although sensitive plasma techniques are becoming predominant in most of the western laboratories, AAS keeps its importance in developing countries. Simple and inexpensive ways of enhancing sensitivity will be described for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer. Although there are many chemical preconcentration procedures to improve sensitivity of flame AAS, only some atom trapping techniques will be included here. One kind of atom trapping device is a slotted quartz tube (SQT used for in situ preconcentration of analyte species followed by a rapid revolatilization cycle to obtain an enhanced signal. These devices provide limits of detection at a level of µg L-1. Another kind of atom trapping involves use of vapor generation technique and quartz or tungsten atom trapping surfaces. The analytical steps consist of the generation of volatile species, usually by hydride formation using NaBH4, trapping these species at the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and finally re-volatilizing analyte species by rapid heating of trap. These species are transported using a carrier gas to an externally heated quartz tube as commonly used in hydride generation AAS systems; a transient signal is formed and measured. These traps have limits of detection in the order of ng L-1.

  14. Barium transport in the hot spot region of fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigeneger, F.; Rackow, K.; Uhrlandt, D.; Ehlbeck, J.; Lieder, G.

    2010-09-01

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the vicinity of the hot spot in fluorescent lamps operating at 25 kHz is investigated by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. By laser-induced fluorescence, the particle densities of barium atoms and ions were measured time-resolved at different distances from the spot centre. In addition, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was measured using an improved band method. The model combines a kinetic part for the electrons with a fluid part for the barium atoms and ions. Both parts are spatially resolved in spherically symmetric geometry. The space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation yields the electron density and the ionization rate coefficient of barium as functions of the cathode fall voltage. These results are used to solve the time-dependent particle balance equations of barium atoms and ions which include the ionization of barium as gain and loss terms, respectively. Good agreement between the measured and calculated particle densities of barium atoms is obtained. A sensitive dependence of the ionization frequency and of the barium particle densities on the cathode fall voltage was found.

  15. Barium transport in the hot spot region of fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigeneger, F; Rackow, K; Uhrlandt, D; Ehlbeck, J; Lieder, G [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-09-29

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the vicinity of the hot spot in fluorescent lamps operating at 25 kHz is investigated by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. By laser-induced fluorescence, the particle densities of barium atoms and ions were measured time-resolved at different distances from the spot centre. In addition, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was measured using an improved band method. The model combines a kinetic part for the electrons with a fluid part for the barium atoms and ions. Both parts are spatially resolved in spherically symmetric geometry. The space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation yields the electron density and the ionization rate coefficient of barium as functions of the cathode fall voltage. These results are used to solve the time-dependent particle balance equations of barium atoms and ions which include the ionization of barium as gain and loss terms, respectively. Good agreement between the measured and calculated particle densities of barium atoms is obtained. A sensitive dependence of the ionization frequency and of the barium particle densities on the cathode fall voltage was found.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  17. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-09-06

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the

  18. Fluorescent Thiol-Derivatized Gold Clusters Embedded in Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Carotenuto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to aurophilic interactions, linear and/or planar Au(I-thiolate molecules spontaneously aggregate, leading to molecular gold clusters passivated by a thiolate monolayer coating. Differently from the thiolate precursors, such cluster compounds show very intensive visible fluorescence characteristics that can be tuned by alloying the gold clusters with silver atoms or by conjugating the electronic structure of the metallic core with unsaturated electronic structures in the organic ligand through the sulphur atom. Here, the photoluminescence features of some examples of these systems are shortly described.

  19. The application of x-ray fluorescence analysis with total external reflection for determining the microelements in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnolutskii, V.P.; Losev, N.F.; Poluyanova, G.I. [Rostov Don State University, Rostov na Donu (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The results of studying the metrological parameters of a small-size energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer with total external reflection of primary radiation are presented. The results of direct x-ray fluorescence measurement of spectral intensities from coal powder sample 1 mg in mass using the spectrometer are in agreement with the data of neutron activation and atomic emission analysis.

  20. Mass-spectrometric fragmentation of sodium 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-ylthio)acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Salionov, V. A.; B. A. Varynskyi; V. V. Parchenko

    2015-01-01

    The study of physical and chemical characteristics and establishing patterns of mass spectrometric fragmentation are the actual tasks of modern pharmaceutical science, have both scientific interest and practical importance. Aim. The purpose of our experiment was to confirm the identity and study patterns of mass spectrometric decomposition for sodium 2-(4-methyl-5-(thiophene-2-yl) -4H-1,2,4-triazoles-3-ilthio) acetate. Methods and results. The study was carried out on the apparatus LC...

  1. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  2. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  3. Atomic physics and reality

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    An account of the long standing debate between Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein regarding the validity of the quantum mechanical description of atomic phenomena.With physicts, John Wheeler (Texas), John Bell (CERN), David Rohm (London), Abner Shimony (Boston), Alain Aspect (Paris)

  4. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Atomic Force Microscopy - A Tool to Unveil the Mystery of Biological Systems ... Transcription and Disease Laboratory, Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 ...

  6. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  7. Fluorescent polymers from non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan O; Voll, Dominik; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-25

    A facile, fast and ambient-temperature avenue towards highly fluorescent polymers is introduced via polymerizing non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers based on light-induced NITEC chemistry, providing a platform technology for fluorescent polymers. The resulting polypyrazolines were analyzed in depth and the photo-triggered step-growth process was monitored in a detailed kinetic study.

  8. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy in polymer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raja, T.N.; Brouwer, A.M.; Demchenko, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer science is an interdisciplinary field, combining chemistry, physics, and in some cases biology. Structure, morphology, and dynamical phenomena in natural and synthetic polymers can be addressed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The most attractive aspect of fluorescent reporters is that their

  10. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  11. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003553.htm Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) is a lab test that looks for micro- ...

  12. Metabolite identification of triptolide by data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis in combination with online hydrogen/deuterium exchange and multiple data-mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fuying; Liu, Ting; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yongwei; Wan, Yakun; Xing, Jie

    2011-10-30

    Triptolide (TP), the primary active component of the herbal medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has shown promising antileukemic and anti-inflammatory activity. The pharmacokinetic profile of TP indicates an extensive metabolic elimination in vivo; however, its metabolic data is rarely available partly because of the difficulty in identifying it due to the absence of appropriate ultraviolet chromophores in the structure and the presence of endogenous interferences in biological samples. In the present study, the biotransformation of TP was investigated by improved data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis, using an LTQ/Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with the online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange technique for rapid structural characterization. Accurate full-scan MS and MS/MS data were processed with multiple post-acquisition data-mining techniques, which were complementary and effective in detecting both common and uncommon metabolites from biological matrices. As a result, 38 phase I, 9 phase II and 8 N-acetylcysteine (NAC) metabolites of TP were found in rat urine. Accurate MS/MS data were used to support assignments of metabolite structures, and online H/D exchange experiments provided additional evidence for exchangeable hydrogen atoms in the structure. The results showed the main phase I metabolic pathways of TP are hydroxylation, hydrolysis and desaturation, and the resulting metabolites subsequently undergo phase II processes. The presence of NAC conjugates indicated the capability of TP to form reactive intermediate species. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of LC/HR-MS(n) in combination with multiple post-acquisition data-mining methods and the online H/D exchange technique for the rapid identification of drug metabolites. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of small molecules using fullerene-derivatized silica as energy-absorbing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Zoltan; Vallant, Rainer M; Takátsy, Anikó; Bakry, Rania; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2010-05-01

    In spite of the growing acceptance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of a wide variety of compounds, including polymers and proteins, its use in analyzing low-molecular-weight molecules (silica particles with different pore sizes are applied as thin layer for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis. Thus, an interference of intrinsic matrix ions can be eliminated or minimized in comparison with the state-of-the-art weak organic acid matrices. The desorption/ionization ability of the developed fullerene-silica materials depends on the applied laser power, sample preparation and pore size of the silica particles. Thus, fullerene-silica serves as an LDI support for mass spectrometric analysis of molecules (silica is demonstrated by the mass analysis of variety of small molecules such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, phospholipids and drugs. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Mass spectrometric identification of an azobenzene derivative produced by smectite-catalyzed conversion of 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Rutherford, D.W.; Rostad, C.E.; Garbarino, J.R.; Ferrer, I.; Kennedy, K.R.; Momplaisir, G.-M.; Grange, A.

    2003-01-01

    The compound 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-amino-HPAA) reacts with smectite to form a soluble azobenzene arsonic acid compound. This reaction is of particular interest because it provides a possible mechanism for the formation of a new type of arsenic compound in natural water systems. 3-Amino-HPAA is a degradation product excreted by chickens that are fed rations amended with roxarsone. Roxarsone is used to control coccidial intestinal parasites in most of the broiler chickens grown in the United States. The structure of the azobenzene arsonic acid compound was first inferred from negative-ion and positive-ion low-resolution mass-spectrometric analyses of the supernatant of the smectite suspension. Elemental composition of the parent ion determined by high-resolution positive-ion mass spectrometric measurements was consistent with the proposed structure of the azobenzene arsonic acid compound. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

  16. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  17. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  18. Processing and Assessment of Spectrometric, Stereoscopic Imagery Collected Using a Lightweight UAV Spectral Camera for Precision Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Jussi Mäkynen; Paula Litkey; Teemu Hakala; Ilkka Pölönen; Jere Kaivosoja; Heikki Saari; Eija Honkavaara; Liisa Pesonen

    2013-01-01

    Imaging using lightweight, unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) is one of the most rapidly developing fields in remote sensing technology. The new, tunable, Fabry-Perot interferometer-based (FPI) spectral camera, which weighs less than 700 g, makes it possible to collect spectrometric image blocks with stereoscopic overlaps using light-weight UAV platforms. This new technology is highly relevant, because it opens up new possibilities for measuring and monitoring the environment, which is becomin...

  19. Evaluation of several electrolyte mixture-cathode material combinations in electrodeposition of americium radioisotopes for alpha-spectrometric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmpotić, Matea; Rožmarić, Martina; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2017-10-01

    Three different types of electrolytes, subsequently modified and adjusted, in combination with three cathode materials used as source backings were analysed for electrodeposition of americium isotopes for alpha-spectrometric measurements. The obtained results are discussed in terms of electrodeposition yield and source quality (source homogeneity and spectral resolution, FWHM). The optimal conditions for source preparation are provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of Atoms and Atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... Modelling the Energetics of Encapsulation of. Atoms and Atomic Clusters into Carbon. Nanotubes: Insights from Analytical Approaches. R. S. Swathi. School of Chemistry. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research. Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India ...

  1. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  2. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  3. Immobilization and detection of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles on functionalized silicon substrate: cytometric and spectrometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajos, Katarzyna; Kamińska, Agnieszka; Awsiuk, Kamil; Bajor, Adrianna; Gruszczyński, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Anna; Żądło, Andrzej; Kowalik, Artur; Budkowski, Andrzej; Stępień, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Among the various biomarkers that are used to diagnose or monitor disease, extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent one of the most promising targets in the development of new therapeutic strategies and the application of new diagnostic methods. The detection of circulating platelet-derived microvesicles (PMVs) is a considerable challenge for laboratory diagnostics, especially in the preliminary phase of a disease. In this study, we present a multistep approach to immobilizing and detecting PMVs in biological samples (microvesicles generated from activated platelets and human platelet-poor plasma) on functionalized silicon substrate. We describe the application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry methods to the detection of immobilized PMVs in the context of a novel imaging flow cytometry (ISX) technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This novel approach allowed us to confirm the presence of the abundant microvesicle phospholipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) on a surface with immobilized PMVs. Phosphatidylcholine groups (C5H12N+; C5H15PNO4+) were also detected. Moreover, we were able to show that ellipsometry permitted the immobilization of PMVs on a functionalized surface to be evaluated. The sensitivity of the ISX technique depends on the size and refractive index of the analyzed microvesicles. Graphical abstract Human platelets activated with thrombin (in concentration 1IU/mL) generate population of PMVs (platelet derived microvesicles), which can be detected and enumerated with fluorescent-label method (imaging cytometry). Alternatively, PMVs can be immobilized on the modified silicon substrate which is functionalized with a specific IgM murine monoclonal antibody against human glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex (PAC-1). Immobilized PMVs can be subjected to label-free analyses by means ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

  4. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  5. Relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric survey data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mohamed A S

    2016-02-01

    In the last decades of years, there was considerable growth in the use of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry. With this growth, there was an increasing need to standardize airborne measurements, so that they can be independent of survey parameters. Acceptable procedures were developed for converting airborne to ground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of total-count intensity as well as, potassium, equivalent uranium and equivalent thorium concentrations, due to natural sources of radiation. The present study aims mainly to establish relationships between ground and airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data, North Ras Millan, Southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. The relationships between airborne and ground gamma-ray spectrometric data were deduced for the original and separated rock units in the study area. Various rocks in the study area, represented by Quaternary Wadi sediments, Cambro-Ordovician sandstones, basic dykes and granites, are shown on the detailed geologic map. The structures are displayed, which located on the detailed geologic map, are compiled from the integration of previous geophysical and surface geological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Description of a multimode gamma spectrometer; Description d'un spectrometre gamma multimode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardine, J.; Haouat, G.; Humeau, C.; Lachkar, J.; Sigaud, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). Centre d' Etudes; Roquefort, H. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A 'multimode' gamma spectrometer known as the 'SGMM 10' has been studied and built. It can detect photons by one of three different modes: total absorption, photoelectric and anti-Compton effect, or the pair effect. These results are recorded in such a way that the experimenter can interpret the measurements according to the mode which is the best adapted to the energy of the photons under study. The instrument is made up of a central detector, a Ge(Li) semi-conductor with its cryostat, and an annular crystal, a large volume NaI(Tl) scintillator consisting of four optically isolated sectors. The energy and time data produced by these detectors are processed by an electronic unit. The document entitled 'description of a multi-mode gamma spectrometer' gives an overall description of the SGMM 10 type device and its mode of operation; it also details the laboratory results obtained with this apparatus. (authors) [French] Il a ete etudie et realise un spectrometre gamma 'multimode', designe sous le sigle 'SGMM 10' qui permet la detection des photons suivant l'un des trois modes: absorption totale, effet photoelectrique et anti-Compton, ou effet de paires. L'enregistrement des resultats est concu de facon que l'utilisateur puisse indifferemment interpreter les donnees experimentales suivant le mode le mieux adapte a l'energie des photons. Il se compose d'un detecteur central, semiconducteur Ge(Li) avec son cryostat, et d'un cristal annulaire, scintillateur INa(Tl) de gros volume, forme de quatre secteurs optiquement isoles. Les informations en energie et en temps provenant de ces detecteurs sont traitees par un ensemble electronique. Le document 'description d'un spectrometre gamma multimode' decrit l'ensemble du dispositif type SGMM 10, son mode de fonctionnement, et precise les resultats des essais en laboratoire. (auteurs)

  7. Mass spectrometric characterization of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) YK-11 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Dib, Josef; Lagojda, Andreas; Kühne, Dirk; Packschies, Lars; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-07-30

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of therapeutics targeting inter alia conditions referred to as cachexia and sarcopenia. Due to their anabolic properties, the use of SARMs is prohibited in sports as regulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), and doping control laboratories test for these anabolic agents in blood and urine. In order to accomplish and maintain comprehensive test methods, the characterization of new drug candidates is critical for efficient sports drug testing. Hence, in the present study the mass spectrometric properties of the SARM YK-11 were investigated. YK-11 was synthesized according to literature data and three different stable-isotope-labeled analogs were prepared to support the mass spectrometric studies. Using high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry following electrospray ionization as well as electron ionization, the dissociation pathways of YK-11 were investigated, and characteristic features of its (product ion) mass spectra were elucidated. These studies were flanked by density functional theory (DFT) computation providing information on proton affinities of selected functional groups of the analyte. The steroidal SARM YK-11 was found to readily protonate under ESI conditions followed by substantial in-source dissociation processes eliminating methanol, acetic acid methyl ester, and/or ketene. DFT computation yielded energetically favored structures of the protonated species resulting from the aforementioned elimination processes particularly following protonation of the steroidal D-ring substituent. Underlying dissociation pathways were suggested, supported by stable-isotope labeling of the analyte, and diagnostic product ions for the steroidal nucleus and the D-ring substituent were identified. Further, trimethylsilylated YK-11 and its deuterated analogs were subjected to electron ionization high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry, complementing the dataset characterizing

  8. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  9. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  10. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. M.; Richardson, R. W.

    1983-12-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  11. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  12. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  13. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  14. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing...housings, plastic grates, old wiring) and the new LED technology (cardboard packaging) were broken down and separated into the appropriate container for... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  15. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  16. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  17. Atomes et rayonnement

    OpenAIRE

    Dalibard, Jean; Haroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Matière et lumière sont intimement liées dans notre modélisation du monde physique. De l’élaboration de la théorie quantique à l’invention du laser, l’interaction entre atomes et rayonnement a joué un rôle central dans le développement de la science et de la technologie d’aujourd’hui. La maîtrise de cette interaction permet désormais d’atteindre les plus basses températures jamais mesurées. Le refroidissement de gaz d’atomes par la lumière d’un laser conduit à une « matière quantique » aux pr...

  18. Copper spherical cavity arrays: Fluorescence enhancement in PFO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spada, Edna R., E-mail: edspada@gmail.com [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Valente, Gustavo T.; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Sartorelli, Maria L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Caixa Postal 476, 88040-900, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Guimarães, Francisco E.G.; Faria, Roberto M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    This manuscript addresses the use of a well-ordered antidot copper nanostructure as a active substrate for surface enhancement fluorescence (SEF). The antidot array was produced by electrodeposition and nanosphere lithography and characterized by microscopy technique, its successful application as SEF-active substrates was verified using polyfluorene (PFO) as a probe layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate the regularity of the metal surface as well PFO coated process and confocal laser fluorescence microscopy (CLSM) to determine the behavior exhibited by the fluorescent layer due to the existence of the nanostructured surface. No accumulation PFO in the cavities was detected and the more intense emission regions coincides with the position of the cavities and is at about one order of magnitude higher.

  19. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  1. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    stability of the design and will be measured at a future time. Angle random walk can be calculated from first principles from the shot-noise limited...interferometer cannot distinguish between the two sources of phase shifts. We describe a design for a dual atom interferometer to simultaneously...stability. This paper is organized as follows: we first describe the basic building blocks of the interferometer: beam splitters and mirrors. We then

  2. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  3. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

  4. High-speed atomic force microscopy combined with inverted optical microscopy for studying cellular events

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Yuki; Sakai, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Aiko; Uekusa, Yoshitsugu; Yagi, Akira; Imaoka, Yuka; Ito, Shuichi; Karaki, Koichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopy (AFM)-optical fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating cellular morphologies and events. However, the slow data acquisition rates of the conventional AFM unit of the hybrid system limit the visualization of structural changes during cellular events. Therefore, high-speed AFM units equipped with an optical/fluorescence detection device have been a long-standing wish. Here we describe the implementation of high-speed AFM coupled with an optic...

  5. Detection of vapor phase mercury species by laser fluorescence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaomei

    Several mercury species emissions have been identified in off-gases from industrial processes. At present, there is no commercial continuous emission monitoring (CEM) technique or instrumentation to reliably monitor volatile mercury species emissions from industrial stacks. Conventional measurement methods, such as cold vapor trap based techniques for elemental mercury, have difficulty in achieving both high sensitivity and the fast time resolution required for real-time monitoring. This doctoral research work gives a systematic study of potential methods for real-time trace detection of volatile elemental mercury and mercury compounds in industrial stack gases. It is based on laser-induced fluorescence techniques; photofragment fluorescence spectroscopy for detection of volatile mercury compounds, and resonance fluorescence for detection of elemental mercury. The capabilities and limitations of these detection techniques are investigated in this dissertation. Detection of mercury compounds is a challenge since they are non-fluorescent. With photofragment fluorescence spectroscopy, target compound concentrations are related to the fluorescence intensity from an excited fragment. In this doctoral research work, low concentrations of mercuric bromide vapor in an atmospheric pressure flow cell are irradiated by a focused laser beam at 222nm. Photofragment fluorescence is monitored at 253.7nm. Two detection schemes, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) and photomultiplier tube (PMT), are applied for the measurement of photofragment fluorescence. The performances of these two systems are compared in the dissertation. A supersonic jet is combined with resonance fluorescence for detection of elemental mercury vapor. With test gas expanded into a vacuum, fluorescence quenching and spectral broadening are reduced. In the experiment, the gas jet is crossed with a laser beam at 253.7nm to excite atomic fluorescence, which is distinguished from the elastic background by time gating

  6. Atomic and Molecular Physics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    Atomic Quantum Memories in Nano-Scale Optical Circuits: Jeff Kimble, Oskar Painter (CalTech) • Demonstration of a nanofiber atom trap: A. Goban...et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 033603 (2012) • Cavity QED with atomic mirrors: D. Chang, et al, N. J. Phys. 14, 063003 (2012) • Fiber -coupled chip... PMMA -diamond hybrid cavities, coupling stable NV centers • Cavity Optomechanics with Cold Atoms: Dan Stamper-Kurn (UC Berkeley) • Squeezed light

  7. A Transportable Gravity Gradiometer Based on Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Thompson, Robert J.; Kellogg, James R.; Aveline, David C.; Maleki, Lute; Kohel, James M.

    2010-01-01

    rest frame for the trapped atoms. While still in this moving-frame molasses, the laser frequencies are further detuned from the atomic resonance (while maintaining this relative frequency shift) to cool the atom cloud's temperature to 2 K or below, corresponding to an rms velocity of less than 2 cm/s. After launch, the cold atoms undergo further state and velocity selection to prepare for atom interferometry. The atom interferometers are then realized using laser-induced stimulated Raman transitions to perform the necessary manipulations of each atom, and the resulting interferometer phase is measured using laser-induced fluorescence for state-normalized detection. More than 20 laser beams with independent controls of frequency, phase, and intensity are required for this measurement sequence. This instrument can facilitate the study of Earth's gravitational field from surface and air vehicles, as well as from space by allowing gravity mapping from a low-cost, single spacecraft mission. In addition, the operation of atom interferometer-based instruments in space offers greater sensitivity than is possible in terrestrial instruments due to the much longer interrogation times available in the microgravity environment. A space-based quantum gravity gradiometer has the potential to achieve sensitivities similar to the GRACE mission at long spatial wavelengths, and will also have resolution similar to GOCE for measurement at shorter length scales.

  8. Superradiance in a Large and Dilute Cloud of Cold Atoms in the Linear-Optics Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Michelle O; Krešić, Ivor; Kaiser, Robin; Guerin, William

    2016-08-12

    Superradiance has been extensively studied in the 1970s and 1980s in the regime of superfluorescence, where a large number of atoms are initially excited. Cooperative scattering in the linear-optics regime, or "single-photon superradiance," has been investigated much more recently, and superradiant decay has also been predicted, even for a spherical sample of large extent and low density, where the distance between atoms is much larger than the wavelength. Here, we demonstrate this effect experimentally by directly measuring the decay rate of the off-axis fluorescence of a large and dilute cloud of cold rubidium atoms after the sudden switch off of a low-intensity laser driving the atomic transition. We show that, at large detuning, the decay rate increases with the on-resonance optical depth. In contrast to forward scattering, the superradiant decay of off-axis fluorescence is suppressed near resonance due to attenuation and multiple-scattering effects.

  9. Highly charged ions in exotic atoms research at PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anagnostopoulos, D.F.; Biri, S.; Boisbourdain, V.; Demeter, M.; Borchert, G.; Egger, J.P.; Fuhrmann, H.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hennebach, M.; Indelicato, P.; Liu, Y.W.; Manil, B.; Markushin, V.E.; Marton, H.; Nelms, N.; Rusi El Hassani, A.J.; Simons, L.M. E-mail: leopold.simons@psi.ch; Stingelin, L.; Wasser, A.; Wells, A.; Zmeskal, J

    2003-05-01

    During their de-excitation, exotic atoms formed in low pressure gases reach a state of high or even complete ionization. X-rays emitted from higher n-states of electron-free atoms have well defined energies with the error originating only from the error in the mass values of the constituent particles. They served as a basis for a new determination of the pion mass as well as for a high precision measurement of the pionic hydrogen ground state shift. The response function of the Bragg spectrometer has been determined with X-rays from completely ionized pionic carbon and with a dedicated electron cyclotron resonance ion trap (ECRIT). A further extension of the ECRIT method implemented in the experiment allows a direct calibration of exotic atom transitions as well as a precise determination of the energy of fluorescence lines.

  10. Blue fluorescent cGMP sensor for multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP (cGMP regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP and Ca(2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indicator is an effective alternative to avoid this problem, but color variants of a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor are limited. In this study, to construct a new color fluorescent sensor, we converted the FRET-based sensor into a single wavelength indicator using a dark FRET acceptor. We developed a blue fluorescent cGMP biosensor, which is spectrally compatible with a FRET-based cAMP sensor using cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP. We cotransfected them and loaded a red fluorescent probe for Ca(2+ into cells, and accomplished triple-parameter fluorescence imaging of these cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+, confirming the applicability of this combination to individually monitor their dynamics in a single cell. This blue fluorescent sensor and the approach using this FRET pair would be useful for multiparameter fluorescence imaging to understand complex signal transduction networks.

  11. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  12. Breaking the atom with Samson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Väänänen, J.; Coecke, B.; Ong, L.; Panangaden, P.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence atom =(x,y) was introduced in [11]. Here x and y are finite sets of attributes (or variables) and the intuitive meaning of =(x,y) is that the attributes x completely (functionally) determine the attributes y. One may wonder, whether the dependence atom is truly an atom or whether it

  13. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  14. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lished the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly ellipti- cal. Keywords. Rydberg atom; quantum trajectory. PACS No. 03.65.Ge. 1. Introduction. Ever since the advent of quantum ...

  15. Mass spectrometric isotope dilution analyses of palladium, silver, cadmium and tellurium in carbonaceous chondrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loss, R.D.; Rosman, K.J.R.; De Laeter, J. (Western Australian Inst. of Tech., Bentley. Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1984-08-01

    The mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique was used to measure the elemental abundances of Pd, Ag, Cd and Te in Orgueil (C1), Ivuna (C1), Murray (C2) and Allende (C3) chondrites. The Pd abundance of 554 ppb for the Cl chondrites is almost identical to the recommended value of Anders and Ebihara (1982); that for Cd (712 ppb) is approximately 5% higher, whereas that for Ag (198 ppb) is approximately 10% lower than the recommended values. A smooth distribution for the abundances of the odd-A nuclides between 65 <= A <= 209 have been observed except for small irregularities in the Pd-Ag-Cd and the Sm-Eu mass regions. The results from the present work have the effect of smoothing out the dip in the Pd-Ag-Cd region and indicate that there is no systematic fractionation of cosmochemical element groups in this mass region. A Te abundance of 2.25 ppm has been determined for the Cl chondrites Orgueil and Ivuna in agreement with the value of Smith et al. (1977). This value is some 30% lower than the value of Kraehenbuehl et al. (1973) but is in good agreement with the more recent measurements from Chicago. The Kraehenbuehl et al. value causes /sup 128/Te and /sup 130/Te to lie approximately 30% above the r-process peak at A = 130, whereas the new value fits smoothly into the general trend.

  16. Analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticides by capillary GC with mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana

    2012-09-04

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS) has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP) residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important.

  17. Optimization and comparison of multiple MALDI matrix application methods for small molecule mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Rawson, Stephanie; Li, Lingjun

    2014-10-21

    The matrix application technique is critical to the success of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) experiment. This work presents a systematic study aiming to evaluate three different matrix application techniques for MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) of endogenous metabolites from legume plant, Medicago truncatula, root nodules. Airbrush, automatic sprayer, and sublimation matrix application methods were optimized individually for detection of metabolites in the positive ionization mode exploiting the two most widely used MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA). Analytical reproducibility and analyte diffusion were examined and compared side-by-side for each method. When using DHB, the optimized method developed for the automatic matrix sprayer system resulted in approximately double the number of metabolites detected when compared to sublimation and airbrush. The automatic sprayer method also showed more reproducible results and less analyte diffusion than the airbrush method. Sublimation matrix deposition yielded high spatial resolution and reproducibility but fewer analytes in the higher m/z range (500-1000 m/z). When the samples were placed in a humidity chamber after sublimation, there was enhanced detection of higher mass metabolites but increased analyte diffusion in the lower mass range. When using CHCA, the optimized automatic sprayer method and humidified sublimation method resulted in double the number of metabolites detected compared to standard airbrush method.

  18. A Spectrometric Method for Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration Measurement with a Reusable and Cost-Efficient Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Hsu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H2O2 can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10−5% to 1 × 10−3% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/% and 3.49 × 10−5% (0.35 ppm, respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance.

  19. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Hrouzková

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important.

  20. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS) has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP) residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important. PMID:23202677

  1. Mass spectrometric study of rhamnolipid biosurfactants and their interactions with cell membrane phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashynska V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the formation of supramolecular complexes of biogenous rhamnolipids with membrane phospholipids that is considered as a molecular mechanism of the biosurfactants antimicrobial action. Method. In the present work rhamnolipid biosurfactant samples produced by Pseudomonas sp. PS-17 strain have been investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the first time. Results. As a result of the study, characteristic mass spectra of the rhamnolipid samples were obtained, that can be used as reference spectra for mass spectrometric identification of the compounds in any biological or industrial samples. At the next stage of the experiments the pair systems, containing the biosurfactants and a membrane phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, have been tested. The cationized noncovalent complexes of the rhamnolipids with the phospholipid were observed in the spectra. Conclusions. The results obtained testify to the consideration that rhamnolipids (similar to other membranotropic agents can form stable supramolecular complexes with membrane phospholipids that are able to evoke the biosurfactants antimicrobial action. A great potential of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the biosurfactants identification and study has been demonstrated in the work.

  2. A hybrid sorption - Spectrometric method for determination of synthetic anionic dyes in foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Tatyana I; Ramazanova, Gyulselem R; Apyari, Vladimir V

    2017-04-15

    A sorption-spectrometric method for determination of the anionic synthetic dyes based on their sorption on silica sorbent modified with hexadecyl groups (C16) followed by measuring the diffuse reflectance spectra on the surface of the sorbent has been proposed. Adsorption of sulfonated azo dyes Tartrazine (E102), Sunset Yellow FCF (E110), Ponceau 4R (E124) reaches maximum in acidic medium (1M HCl - pH 1). For the quinophthalone type dye Quinoline Yellow (E104), the adsorption is also maximal in an acidic medium (1M HCl - pH 2). The triphenylmethane dye Fast Green FCF (E143) is absorbed in the wider area of pH (1M HCl - pH 6). Increasing concentration of the dyes in a solution led to the increase in absorption band intensity in diffuse reflectance spectra of the adsorbent, which was used for their direct determination. The proposed method was applied to the determination of dyes in beverages and pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. XMS: cross-platform normalization method for multimodal mass spectrometric tissue profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golf, Ottmar; Muirhead, Laura J; Speller, Abigail; Balog, Júlia; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Kumar, Sacheen; Mróz, Anna; Veselkov, Kirill; Takáts, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a proof of concept cross-platform normalization approach to convert raw mass spectra acquired by distinct desorption ionization methods and/or instrumental setups to cross-platform normalized analyte profiles. The initial step of the workflow is database driven peak annotation followed by summarization of peak intensities of different ions from the same molecule. The resulting compound-intensity spectra are adjusted to a method-independent intensity scale by using predetermined, compound-specific normalization factors. The method is based on the assumption that distinct MS-based platforms capture a similar set of chemical species in a biological sample, though these species may exhibit platform-specific molecular ion intensity distribution patterns. The method was validated on two sample sets of (1) porcine tissue analyzed by laser desorption ionization (LDI), desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), and rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometric (REIMS) in combination with Fourier transformation-based mass spectrometry; and (2) healthy/cancerous colorectal tissue analyzed by DESI and REIMS with the latter being combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We demonstrate the capacity of our method to reduce MS-platform specific variation resulting in (1) high inter-platform concordance coefficients of analyte intensities; (2) clear principal component based clustering of analyte profiles according to histological tissue types, irrespective of the used desorption ionization technique or mass spectrometer; and (3) accurate "blind" classification of histologic tissue types using cross-platform normalized analyte profiles.

  4. A Chemical Eight Group Separation Method for Routine Use in Gamma Spectrometric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsahl, K.

    1961-04-15

    A method for the separation of chemical elements in 8 groups suitable for gamma spectrometric analysis has been developed. One group of elements is separated by distillation during dissolution of the sample. The other groups are obtained by means of short ion exchange columns coupled in series An anion exchange column saturated with chloride ions separates chloride complexes, peroxides and other anions from a 3-n HCl + 0.3 % H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sample solution. Some of the chloride complexes are eluted with 0.1-n HCl + 0.3 % H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and subsequently adsorbed as cations on a cation exchange column in hydrogen form. A few eluted elements which do not form cations in this case are found in the effluent. Elements passing the anion exchange column in chloride form without adsorption are separated from a H{sub 2}O solution as citrate complexes, hydroxides, cations and hexametaphosphate complexes. This is done by coupling in series two anion exchange columns subsequently in citrate and hydroxide form and followed by a cation exchanger in sodium form. A mixed bed column ends the series. The behaviour in the separation series of most elements forming gamma emitting isotopes with half lives exceeding 10 minutes on irradiation with thermal neutrons has been studied. The method has been used, routinely for one year.

  5. Gamma-spectrometric module based on HPGe detector for radiation portal monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratjev Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of small-sized and powerful enough electric cryocoolers of various types on the market, has opened the perspective of HPGe detectors application, cooled by such coolers, in radiation portal monitors. The first results of a spectrometric module based on HPGe detector with relative efficiency of 45% cooled by a Stirling-cycle cryocooler, are presented. The spectrometer has provided energy resolutions of less than 0.95 keV and 1.95 keV at energies of 122 keV and 1332 keV, respectively. The deterioration of the energy resolution of HPGe detector cooled by electric cryocooler in comparison to the resolution with liquid nitrogen cooling was about 8% at the energy of 1332 keV. With the use of activated filters to suppress pulses produced by the mechanical vibrations, the energy resolution of the spectrometer was 0.8 keV and 1.8 keV, respectively, however, the detector relative efficiency at the energy of 1332 keV has dropped to 39 %.

  6. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Benzoxazinoid Glycosides from Rhizopus-Elicited Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Wouter J C; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Duran, Katharina; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-08-17

    Benzoxazinoids function as defense compounds and have been suggested to possess health-promoting effects. In this work, the mass spectrometric behavior of benzoxazinoids from the classes benzoxazin-3-ones (with subclasses lactams, hydroxamic acids, and methyl derivatives) and benzoxazolinones was studied. Wheat seeds were germinated with simultaneous elicitation by Rhizopus. The seedling extract was screened for the presence of benzoxazinoid (glycosides) using reversed-phase ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection coupled in line to multiple-stage mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-PDA-MS(n)). Benzoxazin-3-ones from the different subclasses showed distinctly different ionization and fragmentation behaviors. These features were incorporated into a newly proposed decision guideline to aid the classification of benzoxazinoids. Glycosides of the methyl derivative 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one were tentatively identified for the first time in wheat. We conclude that wheat seedlings germinated with simultaneous fungal elicitation contain a diverse array of benzoxazinoids, mainly constituted by benzoxazin-3-one glycosides.

  7. Mass spectrometric observations of metal oxychlorides produced by oxidation-chlorination reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Mcnallan, M. J.; Lee, Y. Y.

    1989-01-01

    It was recently reported that Cr2O3-forming alloys show less corrosion resistance than Al2O3-forming alloys in Cl2/O2 mixtures, which is attributed to the formation of porous Cr2O3 scales and stable CrO2Cl2 vapor species. This paper reports the results of direct mass spectrometric observations with a high-pressure sampling mass spectrometer of these metal oxychlorides forming on the surfaces of Hastelloy S and Alloy 600 superalloys. Samples were preoxidized for 2 hrs at 900 C before the exposure to a O2/Ar gas mixture containing 1 percent Cl2. Results of X-ray diffraction showed scales containing Cr2O3 and NiCr2O4 on both alloys. After exposure to Cl2, large quantities of Cr2O2Cl2 were demonstrated for both alloys, indicating that this is a route for the breakdown of Cr2O3 scales. The Mo present in the Hastelloy S leads to more rapid attack by Cl2, resulting in the formation of MoO2Cl2.

  8. Spectroscopic and Spectrometric Methods Used for the Screening of Certain Herbal Food Supplements Suspected of Adulteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateescu, Cristina; Popescu, Anca Mihaela; Radu, Gabriel Lucian; Onisei, Tatiana; Raducanu, Adina Elena

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: This study was carried out in order to find a reliable method for the fast detection of adulterated herbal food supplements with sexual enhancement claims. As some herbal products are advertised as "all natural", their "efficiency" is often increased by addition of active pharmaceutical ingredients such as PDE-5 inhibitors, which can be a real health threat for the consumer. Methodes: Adulterants, potentially present in 50 herbal food supplements with sexual improvement claims, were detected using 2 spectroscopic methods - Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared - known for reliability, reproductibility, and an easy sample preparation. GC-MS technique was used to confirm the potential adulterants spectra. Results: About 22% (11 out of 50 samples) of herbal food supplements with sexual enhancement claims analyzed by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods proved to be "enriched" with active pharmaceutical compounds such as: sildenafil and two of its analogues, tadalafil and phenolphthalein. The occurence of phenolphthalein could be the reason for the non-relevant results obtained by FTIR method in some samples. 91% of the adulterated herbal food supplements were originating from China. Conclusion: The results of this screening highlighted the necessity for an accurate analysis of all alleged herbal aphrodisiacs on the Romanian market. This is a first such a screening analysis carried out on herbal food supplements with sexual enhancement claims.

  9. Ingénierie moléculaire et fluorescence pour la reconnaissance de cations toxiques

    OpenAIRE

    Souchon, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    This work is a part of the “Toxicologie Nucléaire Environnementale” program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb2+, Cd2+ and Cs+ in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used ...

  10. Speciation of four selenium compounds using high performance liquid chromatography with on-line detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method for the speciation of selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenite and selenate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atomic spectrometric detection is presented. An organic polymeric strong anion exchange column was used as the stationary phase in combination...... of 1300 W. The limit of detection achieved under these conditions was 1 mu g L-1 (100 mu L injections). The HPLC-ICP-MS system was used for selenium speciation of selenite and selenate in aqueous solutions during a BCR certification exercise and for selenium speciation in the certified reference material...

  11. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...

  12. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  13. Atomic holography with electrons and x-rays: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Len, Patrick Michael [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    Gabor first proposed holography in 1948 as a means to experimentally record the amplitude and phase of scattered wavefronts, relative to a direct unscattered wave, and to use such a "hologram" to directly image atomic structure. But imaging at atomic resolution has not yet been possible in the way he proposed. Much more recently, Szoeke in 1986 noted that photoexcited atoms can emit photoelectron of fluorescent x-ray wavefronts that are scattered by neighboring atoms, thus yielding the direct and scattered wavefronts as detected in the far field that can then be interpreted as holographic in nature. By now, several algorithms for directly reconstructing three-dimensional atomic images from electron holograms have been proposed (e.g. by Barton) and successfully tested against experiment and theory. Very recently, Tegze and Faigel, and Grog et al. have recorded experimental x-ray fluorescence holograms, and these are found to yield atomic images that are more free of the kinds of aberrations caused by the non-ideal emission or scattering of electrons. The basic principles of these holographic atomic imaging methods are reviewed, including illustrative applications of the reconstruction algorithms to both theoretical and experimental electron and x-ray holograms. The author also discusses the prospects and limitations of these newly emerging atomic structural probes.

  14. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  15. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  16. Atomic mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A K

    1990-01-01

    This volume brings together some of the presently available theoretical techniques which will be useful in the design of solid-state materials. At present, it is impossible to specify the atomic composition of a material and its macroscopic physical properties. However, the future possibilities for such a science are being laid today. This is coming about due to the development of fast, cheap computers which will be able to undertake the calculations which are necessary.Since this field of science is fairly new, it is not yet quite clear which direction of analysis will eventually prov

  17. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  18. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  19. Thomson scattering using an atomic notch filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, L. P.; Freriks, J. M.; de Hoog, F. J.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2000-05-01

    One of the biggest problems in performing Thomson scattering experiments in low-density plasmas is the very high stray light intensity in comparison with the Thomson scattering intensity. This problem is especially present in fluorescent lamps because of the proximity of the glass tube. We propose an atomic notch filter in combination with a dye laser and an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) filter as a way of reducing this stray light level. The dye laser produces 589 nm radiation which is guided through the ASE filter that increases the spectral purity. The beam is then guided in the fluorescent lamp, where the Thomson scattering process takes place. The scattered light is collected and guided through a sodium vapor absorption cell, where the stray light is absorbed because it is resonant to the D2 transition of sodium. The spectral width of the Thomson scattering light is large enough to be transmitted through the absorption cell. In this way we only measure the Thomson scattering light.

  20. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.