WorldWideScience

Sample records for atomic dark resonances

  1. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  2. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hinds, E.A., E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Ed.Hinds@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  3. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry

  4. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.).

  5. Random search for a dark resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Alexander Holm; Mølmer, Klaus

    is detected. The longer the system is probed, the more likely the frequency is close to resonance and the system populates the dark state. Due to the correspondingly long waiting times between detection events, the evolution is nonergodic and the precision of the frequency estimate does not follow from...... the conventional Cramér-Rao bound of parameter estimation. Instead, a Lévy statistical analysis yields the scaling of the estimation error with time for precision probing of this kind....

  6. Resonant interaction modified by the atomic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz, I; Klimov, A B; Chumakov, S M

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of a resonant atom interacting with a quantum cavity field in the presence of many off-resonant atoms is studied. In the framework of the effective Hamiltonian approach we show that the results of elimination of non-resonant transitions are (a) a dynamical Stark shift of the field frequency, dependent on the populations of non-resonant atoms, (b) dependence of the coupling constant between the resonant atom and the field on the populations of non-resonant atoms, and (c) an effective dipole-dipole interaction between non-resonant atoms. Two effects (the coherent influence and dephasing) of the off-resonant environment on the dynamics of the resonant atom are discussed

  7. Di-photon resonance and Dark Matter as heavy pions

    CERN Document Server

    Redi, Michele; Tesi, Andrea; Vigiani, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We analyse confining gauge theories where the 750 GeV di-photon resonance is a composite techni-pion that undergoes anomalous decays into SM vectors. These scenarios naturally contain accidentally stable techni-pions Dark Matter candidates. The di-photon resonance can acquire a larger width by decaying into Dark Matter through the CP-violating $\\theta$-term of the new gauge theory reproducing the cosmological Dark Matter density as thermal relic.

  8. Di-photon resonance and Dark Matter as heavy pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, Michele; Strumia, Alessandro; Tesi, Andrea; Vigiani, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We analyse confining gauge theories where the 750 GeV di-photon resonance is a composite techni-pion that undergoes anomalous decays into SM vectors. These scenarios naturally contain accidentally stable techni-pions Dark Matter candidates. The di-photon resonance can acquire a larger width by decaying into Dark Matter through the CP-violating θ-term of the new gauge theory reproducing the cosmological Dark Matter density as a thermal relic.

  9. Atom Interferometry for Dark Contents of the Vacuum Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrow, O. [Liverpool U.; Carroll, A. [Liverpool U.; Chattopadhyay, S. [Northern Illinois U.; Coleman, J. [Liverpool U.; Elertas, G. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab; Heffer, J. [Liverpool U.; Metelko, C. [Liverpool U.; Moore, R. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab; Morris, D. [Liverpool U.; Perl, M. [SLAC; Ralph, J. [Liverpool U.; Tinsley, J. [Teddington, Natl. Phys. Lab

    2017-05-25

    A cold atom interferometer is being developed using 85Rb atoms towards a search for the dark contents of the vacuum, and as a test stand for inertial sensing applications. Here we outline the current status of the experiment and report the observation of Ramsey interference fringes in the apparatus.

  10. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  11. The diphoton resonance as a gravity mediator of dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Han

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the possibility of interpreting the recently reported diphoton excess at 750 GeV as a spin-two massive particle (such as a Kaluza–Klein graviton in warped extra-dimensions which serves as a mediator to Dark Matter via its gravitational couplings to the dark sector and to the Standard Model (SM. We model non-universal couplings of the resonance to gauge bosons in the SM and to Dark Matter as a function on their localization in the extra dimension. We find that scalar, fermion or vector dark matter can saturate the dark matter relic density by the annihilation of dark matter into a pair of the SM particles or heavy resonances, in agreement with the diphoton resonance signal strength. We check the compatibility of our hypothesis with other searches for the KK graviton. We show that the invisible decay rate of the resonance into a pair of dark matter is subdominant in the region of the correct relic density, hence leading to no constraints from the mono-jet bound at 8 TeV via the gluon coupling. We also discuss the kinematic features of the decay products of a KK graviton to distinguish the KK graviton from the SM backgrounds or a scalar particle interpretation of the diphoton resonance.

  12. Resonant dark forces and small-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2013-03-15

    A dark force can impact the cosmological history of dark matter (DM), both explaining observed cores in dwarf galaxies and setting the DM relic density through annihilation to dark force bosons. For GeV-TeV DM mass, DM self-scattering in dwarf galaxy halos exhibits quantum mechanical resonances, analogous to a Sommerfeld enhancement for annihilation. We show that a simple model of DM with a dark force can accommodate all astrophysical bounds on self-interactions in halos and explain the observed relic density, through a single coupling constant.

  13. Atom-molecule dark states in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, K.; Thalhammer, G.; Theis, M.; Ritsch, H.; Grimm, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We have created a dark quantum superposition state of a Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and a degenerate gas of Rb 2 ground state molecules in a specific ro-vibrational state using two-color photoassociation. We infer the presence of this coherent atom-molecule gas from a strong resonant suppression of photoassociation loss. In our experiment the maximal molecule population in the dark state is limited to about 100 Rb 2 molecules due to laser induced decay. The experimental findings can be well described by a simple three mode model. (author)

  14. Extracting dark matter signatures from atomic clock stability measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran; Yu, Nan

    2017-10-01

    We analyze possible effects of the dark matter environment on the atomic clock stability measurements. The dark matter is assumed to exist in the form of waves of ultralight scalar fields or in the form of topological defects (monopoles and strings). We identify dark matter signal signatures in clock Allan deviation plots that can be used to constrain the dark matter coupling to the Standard Model fields. The existing data on the Al+/Hg+ clock comparison are used to put new limits on the dilaton dark matter in the region of masses mϕ>10-15 eV . We also estimate the sensitivities of future atomic clock experiments in space, including the cesium microwave and strontium optical clocks aboard the International Space Station, as well as a potential nuclear clock. These experiments are expected to put new limits on the topological dark matter in the range of masses 10-10 eV

  15. Decaying Dark Atom Constituents and Cosmic Positron Excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belotsky, K.; Khlopov, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a scenario where dark matter is in the form of dark atoms that can accommodate the experimentally observed excess of positrons in PAMELA and AMS-02 while being compatible with the constraints imposed on the gamma-ray ux from Fermi/LAT. This scenario assumes that the dominant component......V or slightly below that by decaying to e(+) e(+), mu(+)mu(+) and tau(+) tau(+) produces the observed positron excess. These decays can naturally take place via GUT interactions. If it exists, such a metastable particle can be found in the next run of LHC. The model predicts also the ratio of leptons over...

  16. Multiloop atom interferometer measurements of chameleon dark energy in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan

    2018-02-01

    Chameleon field is one of the promising candidates of dark energy scalar fields. As in all viable candidate field theories, a screening mechanism is implemented to be consistent with all existing tests of general relativity. The screening effect in the chameleon theory manifests its influence limited only to the thin outer layer of a bulk object, thus producing extra forces orders of magnitude weaker than that of the gravitational force of the bulk. For pointlike particles such as atoms, the depth of screening is larger than the size of the particle, such that the screening mechanism is ineffective and the chameleon force is fully expressed on the atomic test particles. Extra force measurements using atom interferometry are thus much more sensitive than bulk mass based measurements, and indeed have placed the most stringent constraints on the parameters characterizing chameleon field. In this paper, we present a conceptual measurement approach for chameleon force detection using atom interferometry in microgravity, in which multiloop atom interferometers exploit specially designed periodic modulation of chameleon fields. We show that major systematics of the dark energy force measurements, i.e., effects of gravitational forces and their gradients, can be suppressed below all hypothetical chameleon signals in the parameter space of interest.

  17. Resonant laser ionization of radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Mishin, V I

    2003-01-01

    Intense radioactive ion beams are produced by the isotope separation on-line method. The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) can provide the chemical selectivity to separate beams with reduced isobaric contamination. The hot cavity RILIS at ISOLDE (CERN) uses copper vapor laser pumped dye lasers for the resonant transitions. Up to now 22 elements have been ionized with efficiencies of the order of 10%. Additional elements have been ionized with similar RILIS set- ups at the Institute of Spectroscopy (Troitsk), IRIS (Gatchina), Mainz University and TIARA (Takasaki). Ideas are discussed for future developments of this type of RILIS, which could further improve the efficiency, selectivity, rapidity of release and stability of the operation. The RILIS can also be applied for atomic spectroscopy studies of exotic radioactive isotopes, which are produced at rates of few atoms per second only. An interesting parallel is shown to the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS), a large-scale application o...

  18. Bichromatic optical tractor beam for resonant atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnov, I.V., E-mail: krasn@icm.krasn.ru [Institute of Computational Modeling, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-03

    We demonstrate a new method for generating a negative (pulling) optical force which can act on resonant particles (atoms, ions and similar ones). This method is based on the use of the gradient force rectification effect in the bichromatic field: special superposition of co-propagating Gauss and cosine-Gauss beams. -- Highlights: ► We propose the bichromatic optical tractor beam (BOTB) for resonant atoms. ► BOTB is a special superposition of co-propagating Helmholtz–Gauss beams. ► The result of its action is negative light pressure — atom attraction to the light source. ► Negative light pressure arises as a result of the gradient force rectification. ► Range of BOTB action is much greater than the transverse size of the beam.

  19. Broadband and Resonant Approaches to Axion Dark Matter Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Yonatan; Safdi, Benjamin R; Thaler, Jesse

    2016-09-30

    When ultralight axion dark matter encounters a static magnetic field, it sources an effective electric current that follows the magnetic field lines and oscillates at the axion Compton frequency. We propose a new experiment to detect this axion effective current. In the presence of axion dark matter, a large toroidal magnet will act like an oscillating current ring, whose induced magnetic flux can be measured by an external pickup loop inductively coupled to a SQUID magnetometer. We consider both resonant and broadband readout circuits and show that a broadband approach has advantages at small axion masses. We estimate the reach of this design, taking into account the irreducible sources of noise, and demonstrate potential sensitivity to axionlike dark matter with masses in the range of 10^{-14}-10^{-6}  eV. In particular, both the broadband and resonant strategies can probe the QCD axion with a GUT-scale decay constant.

  20. Vector dark matter detection using the quantum jump of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiaoli; Di, Haoran

    2018-05-01

    The hidden sector U(1) vector bosons created from inflationary fluctuations can be a substantial fraction of dark matter if their mass is around 10-5 eV. The creation mechanism makes the vector bosons' energy spectral density ρcdm / ΔE very high. Therefore, the dark electric dipole transition rate in atoms is boosted if the energy gap between atomic states equals the mass of the vector bosons. By using the Zeeman effect, the energy gap between the 2S state and the 2P state in hydrogen atoms or hydrogen like ions can be tuned. The 2S state can be populated with electrons due to its relatively long life, which is about 1/7 s. When the energy gap between the semi-ground 2S state and the 2P state matches the mass of the cosmic vector bosons, induced transitions occur and the 2P state subsequently decays into the 1S state. The 2 P → 1 S decay emitted Lyman-α photons can then be registered. The choices of target atoms depend on the experimental facilities and the mass ranges of the vector bosons. Because the mass of the vector boson is connected to the inflation scale, the proposed experiment may provide a probe to inflation.

  1. Multiple atomic dark solitons in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theocharis, G.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Weller, A.; Ronzheimer, J. P.; Gross, C.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the stability and dynamics of multiple dark solitons in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates. Our study is motivated by the fact that multiple matter-wave dark solitons may naturally form in such settings as per our recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 130401 (2008)]. First, we study the dark soliton interactions and show that the dynamics of well-separated solitons (i.e., ones that undergo a collision with relatively low velocities) can be analyzed by means of particle-like equations of motion. The latter take into regard the repulsion between solitons (via an effective repulsive potential) and the confinement and dimensionality of the system (via an effective parabolic trap for each soliton). Next, based on the fact that stationary, well-separated dark multisoliton states emerge as a nonlinear continuation of the appropriate excited eigenstates of the quantum harmonic oscillator, we use a Bogoliubov-de Gennes analysis to systematically study the stability of such structures. We find that for a sufficiently large number of atoms, multiple soliton states are dynamically stable, while for a small number of atoms, we predict a dynamical instability emerging from resonance effects between the eigenfrequencies of the soliton modes and the intrinsic excitation frequencies of the condensate. Finally, we present experimental realizations of multisoliton states including a three-soliton state consisting of two solitons oscillating around a stationary one and compare the relevant results to the predictions of the theoretical mean-field model.

  2. Stimulated transitions in resonant atom Majorana mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabéu, José; Segarra, Alejandro

    2018-02-01

    Massive neutrinos demand to ask whether they are Dirac or Majorana particles. Majorana neutrinos are an irrefutable proof of physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutrinoless double electron capture is not a process but a virtual Δ L = 2 mixing between a parent A Z atom and a daughter A ( Z - 2) excited atom with two electron holes. As a mixing between two neutral atoms and the observable signal in terms of emitted two-hole X-rays, the strategy, experimental signature and background are different from neutrinoless double beta decay. The mixing is resonantly enhanced for almost degeneracy and, under these conditions, there is no irreducible background from the standard two-neutrino channel. We reconstruct the natural time history of a nominally stable parent atom since its production either by nature or in the laboratory. After the time periods of atom oscillations and the decay of the short-lived daughter atom, at observable times the relevant "stationary" states are the mixed metastable long-lived state and the non-orthogonal short-lived excited state, as well as the ground state of the daughter atom. We find that they have a natural population inversion which is most appropriate for exploiting the bosonic nature of the observed atomic transitions radiation. Among different observables of the atom Majorana mixing, we include the enhanced rate of stimulated X-ray emission from the long-lived metastable state by a high-intensity X-ray beam: a gain factor of 100 can be envisaged at current XFEL facilities. On the other hand, the historical population of the daughter atom ground state can be probed by exciting it with a current pulsed optical laser, showing the characteristic absorption lines: the whole population can be excited in a shorter time than typical pulse duration.

  3. ASTROPHYSICS. Atom-interferometry constraints on dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, P; Jaffe, M; Haslinger, P; Simmons, Q; Müller, H; Khoury, J

    2015-08-21

    If dark energy, which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe, consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a "fifth force" between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms, however, can evade these tests by suppressing the forces in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Using a cesium matter-wave interferometer near a spherical mass in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber, we reduced the screening mechanism by probing the field with individual atoms rather than with bulk matter. We thereby constrained a wide class of dark energy theories, including a range of chameleon and other theories that reproduce the observed cosmic acceleration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Three-wave resonant interactions: Multi-dark-dark-dark solitons, breathers, rogue waves, and their interactions and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Yan, Zhenya; Wen, Xiao-Yong

    2018-03-01

    We investigate three-wave resonant interactions through both the generalized Darboux transformation method and numerical simulations. Firstly, we derive a simple multi-dark-dark-dark-soliton formula through the generalized Darboux transformation. Secondly, we use the matrix analysis method to avoid the singularity of transformed potential functions and to find the general nonsingular breather solutions. Moreover, through a limit process, we deduce the general rogue wave solutions and give a classification by their dynamics including bright, dark, four-petals, and two-peaks rogue waves. Ever since the coexistence of dark soliton and rogue wave in non-zero background, their interactions naturally become a quite appealing topic. Based on the N-fold Darboux transformation, we can derive the explicit solutions to depict their interactions. Finally, by performing extensive numerical simulations we can predict whether these dark solitons and rogue waves are stable enough to propagate. These results can be available for several physical subjects such as fluid dynamics, nonlinear optics, solid state physics, and plasma physics.

  5. A Terrestrial Search for Dark Contents of the Vacuum, Such as Dark Energy, Using Atom Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Ronald J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /San Francisco State U.; Muller, Holger; /UC, Berkeley; Perl, Martin L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    We describe the theory and first experimental work on our concept for searching on earth for the presence of dark contents of the vacuum (DCV) using atom interferometry. Specifically, we have in mind any DCV that has not yet been detected on a laboratory scale, but which might manifest itself as dark energy on the cosmological scale. The experimental method uses two atom interferometers to cancel the effect of earth's gravity and diverse noise sources. It depends upon two assumptions: first, that the DCV possesses some space inhomogeneity in density, and second that it exerts a sufficiently strong nongravitational force on matter. The motion of the apparatus through the DCV should then lead to an irregular variation in the detected matter-wave phase shift. We discuss the nature of this signal and note the problem of distinguishing it from instrumental noise. We also discuss the relation of our experiment to what might be learned by studying the noise in gravitational wave detectors such as LIGO. The paper concludes with a projection that a future search of this nature might be carried out using an atom interferometer in an orbiting satellite. The laboratory apparatus is now being constructed.

  6. Fundamentals of metasurface lasers based on resonant dark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droulias, Sotiris; Jain, Aditya; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, our group proposed a metamaterial laser design based on explicitly coupled dark resonant states in low-loss dielectrics, which conceptually separates the gain-coupled resonant photonic state responsible for macroscopic stimulated emission from the coupling to specific free-space propagating modes, allowing independent adjustment of the lasing state and its coherent radiation output. Due to this functionality, it is now possible to make lasers that can overcome the trade-off between system dimensions and Q factor, especially for surface emitting lasers with deeply subwavelength thickness. Here, we give a detailed discussion of the key functionality and benefits of this design, such as radiation damping tunability, directionality, subwavelength integration, and simple layer-by-layer fabrication. We examine in detail the fundamental design tradeoffs that establish the principle of operation and must be taken into account and give guidance for realistic implementations.

  7. Transitions from order to disorder in multiple dark and multiple dark-bright soliton atomic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study quantifying the variation of solitary wave behavior from that of an ordered cloud resembling a 'crystalline' configuration to that of a disordered state that can be characterized as a soliton 'gas'. As our illustrative examples, we use both one-component, as well as two-component, one-dimensional atomic gases very close to zero temperature, where in the presence of repulsive interatomic interactions and of a parabolic trap, a cloud of dark (dark-bright) solitons can form in the one- (two-) component system. We corroborate our findings through three distinct types of approaches, namely a Gross-Pitaevskii type of partial differential equation, particle-based ordinary differential equations describing the soliton dynamical system, and Monte Carlo simulations for the particle system. In addition, we define an 'empirical' order parameter to characterize the order of the soliton lattices and study how this changes as a function of the strength of the 'thermally' (i.e., kinetically) induced perturbations. As may be anticipated by the one-dimensional nature of our system, the transition from order to disorder is gradual without, apparently, a genuine phase transition ensuing in the intermediate regime

  8. Atom loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2013-07-12

    Atom loss resonances in ultracold trapped atoms have been observed at scattering lengths near atom-dimer resonances, at which Efimov trimers cross the atom-dimer threshold, and near two-dimer resonances, at which universal tetramers cross the dimer-dimer threshold. We propose a new mechanism for these loss resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms. As the scattering length is ramped to the large final value at which the atom loss rate is measured, the time-dependent scattering length generates a small condensate of shallow dimers coherently from the atom condensate. The coexisting atom and dimer condensates can be described by a low-energy effective field theory with universal coefficients that are determined by matching exact results from few-body physics. The classical field equations for the atom and dimer condensates predict narrow enhancements in the atom loss rate near atom-dimer resonances and near two-dimer resonances due to inelastic dimer collisions.

  9. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melezhik Vladimir S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  12. Absorption of resonant electromagnetic radiation in electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanbekov, T.U.; Pazdzerskii, V.A.; Usachenko, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Nonrelativistic quantum theory is used to study the possibility of amplification of electromagnetic radiation in forced braking scattering of an electron beam on atoms. The interaction of the atom with the electromagnetic field is considered in the resonant approximation. Cases of large and small detuning from resonance are considered. It is shown that for any orientation of the electron beam relative to the field polarization vector, absorption of radiation occurs, with the major contribution being produced by atomic electrons

  13. Closing in on resonantly produced sterile neutrino dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, John F.; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2017-04-01

    We perform an exhaustive scan of the allowed resonant production regime for sterile neutrino dark matter in order to improve constraints for dark matter structures which arise from the nonthermal sterile neutrino energy spectra. Small-scale structure constraints are particularly sensitive to large lepton asymmetries/small mixing angles which result in relatively warmer sterile neutrino momentum distributions. We revisit Milky Way galaxy subhalo count constraints and combine them with recent searches for x-ray emission from sterile neutrino decays. Together, they rule out models outside the mass range 7.0 keV ≤mνs≤36 keV and lepton asymmetries smaller than 15 ×10-6 per unit entropy density at 95% confidence interval or greater. We also find that, while a portion of the parameter space remains unconstrained, the combination of subhalo counts and x-ray data indicates the candidate 3.55 keV x-ray line signal potentially originating from a 7.1 keV sterile neutrino decay to be disfavored at 93% confidence interval.

  14. Tuning Feshbach resonances in cold atomic gases with interchannel coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Shu; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei

    2017-11-01

    We show that the essential properties of a Feshbach resonance in cold atomic gases can be tuned by dressing the atomic states in different scattering channels through inter-channel couplings. Such a scheme can be readily implemented in the orbital Feshbach resonance of alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms by coupling hyperfine states in the clock-state manifolds. Using 173Yb atoms as an example, we find that both the resonance position and the two-body bound-state energy depend sensitively on the inter-channel coupling strength, which offers control parameters in tuning the inter-atomic interactions. We also demonstrate the dramatic impact of the dressed Feshbach resonance on many-body processes such as the polaron to molecule transition and the BCS-BEC crossover.

  15. Forty years after the first dark resonance experiment: an overview of the COSMA project results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, E.; Bevilacqua, G.; Biancalana, V.; Cecchi, R.; Dancheva, Y.; Khanbekyan, Alen; Marinelli, C.; Moi, L.; Stiaccini, L.; Cartaleva, S.; Andreeva, C.; Alipieva, E.; Gateva, S.; Krasteva, A.; Slavov, D.; Taskova, E. T.; Taslakov, M.; Todorov, P.; Tsvetkov, S.; Wilson Gordon, A.; Margalit, L.; Gawlik, W.; Pustelny, S.; Stabrawa, A.; Sudyka, J.; Wojciechowski, A.; Renzoni, F.; Deans, C.; Hussain, S.; Marmugi, L.; Rassi, D.; Ozun, O.; Sarkisyan, D.; Azizbekyan, H.; Drampyan, R.; Khanbekyan, Alek.; Mirzoyan, R.; Papoyan, A.; Sargsyan, A.; Shmavonyan, S.; Tonoyan, A.; Ghosh, P. N.; Dey, S.; Mitra, S.; Ray, B.; Nasyrov, K. A.; Chapovsky, P.; Entin, V.; Nikolov, N.; Petrov, N.; Budker, D.; Patton, B.; Wickenbrock, A.; Zhivun, L.; Gozzini, S.

    2016-01-01

    COSMA: Coherent Optics Sensors for Medical Application is an European Marie Curie Project running from 2012 to March 2016, with the participation of 10 teams from Armenia, Bulgaria, India, Israel, Italy, Poland, Russia, UK, USA. The main objective was to focus theoretical and experimental research on biomagnetism phenomena, with the specific aim to develop all-optical sensors dedicated to their detection and suitable for applications in clinical diagnostics. The paper presents some of the most recent results obtained during the exchange visits of the involved scientists, after an introduction about the phenomenon which is the pillar of this kind of research and of many other new fields in laser spectroscopy, atomic physics, and quantum optics: the dark resonance.

  16. Optimized coplanar waveguide resonators for a superconductor–atom interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M. A., E-mail: mabeck2@wisc.edu; Isaacs, J. A.; Booth, D.; Pritchard, J. D.; Saffman, M.; McDermott, R. [Department of Physics, University Of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-29

    We describe the design and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities tailored to facilitate strong coupling between superconducting quantum circuits and single trapped Rydberg atoms. For initial superconductor–atom experiments at 4.2 K, we show that resonator quality factors above 10{sup 4} can be readily achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the incorporation of thick-film copper electrodes at a voltage antinode of the resonator provides a route to enhance the zero-point electric fields of the resonator in a trapping region that is 40 μm above the chip surface, thereby minimizing chip heating from scattered trap light. The combination of high resonator quality factor and strong electric dipole coupling between the resonator and the atom should make it possible to achieve the strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics with this system.

  17. Search for domain wall dark matter with atomic clocks on board global positioning system satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin M; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Dailey, Conner; Murphy, Mac; Pospelov, Maxim; Rollings, Alex; Sherman, Jeff; Williams, Wyatt; Derevianko, Andrei

    2017-10-30

    Cosmological observations indicate that dark matter makes up 85% of all matter in the universe yet its microscopic composition remains a mystery. Dark matter could arise from ultralight quantum fields that form macroscopic objects. Here we use the global positioning system as a ~ 50,000 km aperture dark matter detector to search for such objects in the form of domain walls. Global positioning system navigation relies on precision timing signals furnished by atomic clocks. As the Earth moves through the galactic dark matter halo, interactions with domain walls could cause a sequence of atomic clock perturbations that propagate through the satellite constellation at galactic velocities ~ 300 km s -1 . Mining 16 years of archival data, we find no evidence for domain walls at our current sensitivity level. This improves the limits on certain quadratic scalar couplings of domain wall dark matter to standard model particles by several orders of magnitude.

  18. Feshbach resonances in cold collisions of potassium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambini, A.; Geltman, S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic steps that allow the calculation of the scattering length in the collision of two alkali-metal atoms in a well defined magnetic polarization state, and in the presence of a static magnetic field. Calculations are actually done for the low-field seeking state F=1, μ F =-1 of bosonic potassium atoms. The electrostatic potentials obtained through Rydberg-Klein-Rees data are connected to a dispersive, long range tail in which the dominant dipole-dipole C 6 term may take different values within a specified range. We show the occurrence of Feshbach resonances in the ultra cold collision of two identical atoms, belonging either to the bosonic species 39 K or 41 K. Our results demonstrate that there is a range of C 6 values for which the collision of two 39 K atoms displays a single resonance, while for other values of C 6 no resonance occurs. On the other hand, Feshbach resonances are present in the collision of two 41 K atoms for almost all values of the dispersion coefficient C 6 in that range. We also show the origin of the different types of Feshbach resonances that occur in the cold collision of two 41 K atoms. The detection of such resonances can help establish the actual value of the dispersive coefficient

  19. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81 Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Resonances in Mie scattering by an inhomogeneous atomic cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Despite the quantum nature of the process, collective scattering by dense cold samples of two-level atoms can be interpreted classically describing the sample as a macroscopic object with a complex refractive index. We demonstrate that resonances in Mie theory can be easily observable in the cooperative scattering by tuning the frequency of the incident laser field or the atomic number. The solution of the scattering problem is obtained for spherical atomic clouds who have the parabolic densi...

  1. Realizing Fulde-Ferrell Superfluids via a Dark-State Control of Feshbach Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2018-01-01

    We propose that the long-sought Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity with nonzero momentum pairing can be realized in ultracold two-component Fermi gases of K 40 or Li 6 atoms by optically tuning their magnetic Feshbach resonances via the creation of a closed-channel dark state with a Doppler-shifted Stark effect. In this scheme, two counterpropagating optical fields are applied to couple two molecular states in the closed channel to an excited molecular state, leading to a significant violation of Galilean invariance in the dark-state regime and hence to the possibility of Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity. We develop a field theoretical formulation for both two-body and many-body problems and predict that the Fulde-Ferrell state has remarkable properties, such as anisotropic single-particle dispersion relation, suppressed superfluid density at zero temperature, anisotropic sound velocity, and rotonic collective mode. The latter two features can be experimentally probed using Bragg spectroscopy, providing a smoking-gun proof of Fulde-Ferrell superfluidity.

  2. Observing atomic collapse resonances in artificial nuclei on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wong, Dillon; Shytov, Andrey V; Brar, Victor W; Choi, Sangkook; Wu, Qiong; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Regan, William; Zettl, Alex; Kawakami, Roland K; Louie, Steven G; Levitov, Leonid S; Crommie, Michael F

    2013-05-10

    Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.

  3. Resonant Transmission of Cold Atoms through Subwavelength Apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Esteban; Fernandez-Dominguez, A.I.; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it has been observed that transmission of light through subwavelength apertures, which is usually negligible, can be significantly enhanced when surface plasmons are resonantly excited. Here we introduce the idea that similar effects can be expected for cold atoms in structures supporting surface matter waves. We show that surface matter waves are possible in properly designed structures, and then we theoretically demonstrate 100% transmission of rubidium atoms through an array of slits much narrower than the de Broglie wavelength of the atoms. Our results open up the possibility of using surface matter waves to control the flow of neutral atoms

  4. Optical resonance and two-level atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, L

    1987-01-01

    ""Coherent and lucid…a valuable summary of a subject to which [the authors] have made significant contributions by their own research."" - Contemporary PhysicsOffering an admirably clear account of the basic principles behind all quantum optical resonance phenomena, and hailed as a valuable contribution to the literature of nonlinear optics, this distinguished work provides graduate students and research physicists probing fields such as laser physics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, and resonance optics an ideal introduction to the study of the interaction of electroma

  5. Improved Tracking of an Atomic-Clock Resonance Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.; Tu, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of making an electronic oscillator track the frequency of an atomic-clock resonance transition is based on fitting a theoretical nonlinear curve to measurements at three oscillator frequencies within the operational frequency band of the transition (in other words, at three points within the resonance peak). In the measurement process, the frequency of a microwave oscillator is repeatedly set at various offsets from the nominal resonance frequency, the oscillator signal is applied in a square pulse of the oscillator signal having a suitable duration (typically, of the order of a second), and, for each pulse at each frequency offset, fluorescence photons of the transition in question are counted. As described below, the counts are used to determine a new nominal resonance frequency. Thereafter, offsets are determined with respect to the new resonance frequency. The process as described thus far is repeated so as to repeatedly adjust the oscillator to track the most recent estimate of the nominal resonance frequency.

  6. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Ito, C.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, 84 Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. 84 Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level

  7. Resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H. (Inventor); Cantrell, Sean A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope and methodology called resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), employs an ultrasonic wave launched from the bottom of a sample while the cantilever of an atomic force microscope, driven at a frequency differing from the ultrasonic frequency by one of the contact resonance frequencies of the cantilever, engages the sample top surface. The nonlinear mixing of the oscillating cantilever and the ultrasonic wave in the region defined by the cantilever tip-sample surface interaction force generates difference-frequency oscillations at the cantilever contact resonance. The resonance-enhanced difference-frequency signals are used to create images of nanoscale near-surface and subsurface features.

  8. Parametric resonance and cooling on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Bo; Li Xiaolin; Ke Min; Wang Yuzhu

    2008-01-01

    This paper observes the parametric excitation on atom chip by measuring the trap loss when applying a parametric modulation. By modulating the current in chip wires, it modulates not only the trap frequency but also the trap position. It shows that the strongest resonance occurs when the modulation frequency equals to the trap frequency. The resonance amplitude increases exponentially with modulation depth. Because the Z-trap is an anharmonic trap, there exists energy selective excitation which would cause parametric cooling. We confirm this effect by observing the temperature of atom cloud dropping

  9. Bound and resonance states of positronic copper atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takuma; Umair, Muhammad; Kino, Yasushi

    2017-10-01

    We report a theoretical calculation for the bound and S-wave resonance states of the positronic copper atom (e+Cu). A positron is a positively charged particle; therefore, a positronic atom has an attractive correlation between the positron and electron. A Gaussian expansion method is adopted to directly describe this correlation as well as the strong repulsive interaction with the nucleus. The correlation between the positron and electron is much more important than that between electrons in an analogous system of Cu-, although the formation of a positronium (Ps) in e+Cu is not expressed in the ground state structure explicitly. Resonance states are calculated with a complex scaling method and identified above the first excited state of the copper atom. Resonance states below Ps (n = 2) + Cu+ classified to a dipole series show agreement with a simple analytical law. Comparison of the resonance energies and widths of e+Cu with those of e+K, of which the potential energy of the host atom resembles that of e+Cu, reveals that the positions of the resonance for the e+Cu dipole series deviate equally from those of e+K.

  10. Resonance fluorescence from an atom in a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Lane, A. S.; Walls, D. F.

    1987-06-01

    The fluorescent spectrum for a two-level atom which is damped by a squeezed vacuum shows striking differences from the spectrum for ordinary resonance fluorescence. For strong coherent driving fields the Mollow triplet depends on the relative phase of the driving field and the squeezed vacuum field. The central peak may have either subnatural linewidth or supernatural linewidth depending on this phase. The mean atomic polarization also shows a phase sensitivity.

  11. Dark Entangled Steady States of Interacting Rydberg Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasari, Durga; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    their short-lived excited states lead to rapid, dissipative formation of an entangled steady state. We show that for a wide range of physical parameters, this entangled state is formed on a time scale given by the strengths of coherent Raman and Rabi fields applied to the atoms, while it is only weakly...

  12. Scattering resonances of ultracold atoms in confined geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor

    2008-06-18

    Subject of this thesis is the investigation of the quantum dynamics of ultracold atoms in confined geometries. We discuss the behavior of ground state atoms inside a 3D magnetic quadrupole field. Such atoms in enough weak magnetic fields can be approximately treated as neutral point-like particles. Complementary to the well-known positive energy resonances, we point out the existence of short-lived negative energy resonances. The latter originate from a fundamental symmetry of the underlying Hamiltonian. We drive a mapping of the two branches of the spectrum. Moreover, we analyze atomic hyperfine resonances in a magnetic quadrupole field. This corresponds to the case for which both the hyperfine and Zeeman interaction, are comparable, and should be taken into account. Finally, we develop a general grid method for multichannel scattering of two atoms in a two-dimensional harmonic confinement. With our approach we analyze transverse excitations/deexcitations in the course of the collisional process (distinguishable or identical atoms) including all important partial waves and their couplings due to the broken spherical symmetry. Special attention is paid to suggest a non-trivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime and zero-energy limit. (orig.)

  13. Multichannel atomic scattering and confinement-induced resonances in waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.; Saeidian, S.; Schmelcher, P. . Author

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pair atomic collisions in restricted geometry principally differ from the conventional two- body free-space scattering. The restricted geometry leads to quantization of the atomic motion in the direction of confinement. Another nontrivial effect for two distinguishable quantum particles in a transverse harmonic trap is the confinement induced nonseparability of the center-of-mass (CM) and the relative motions. These effects can have experimental mesoscopic developments for ultracold atoms in optical traps and atomic chips. However, only simple analytical estimates were performed for the special case when identical atoms occupy lowest quantum states of a confining trap. In this zero-energy limit the total atom-atom reflection has been predicted for the case of confinement-induced resonance (CIR). The origin of the CIR is a virtual transition from the ground transverse state of the confining potential to the closed excited state during the collision. We have investigated what happens if the energy range of colliding atoms encompasses several quantum states of the confining potential. The developed method permits to analyze the transverse excitations/deexcitains and optimal conditions for avoiding decoherence-inducing mechanisms at atomic collisions in waveguides. Special attention was paid to the analysis of the CIRs for non-zero collision energies in the multimode regimes. We have suggested a nontrivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime at zero-energy limit. We have also fully taken into account the coupling between the CM and the relative motions in case of distinguishable atoms. Specifically we explore in detail the recently discovered dual CIR which is based on a destructive interference mechanism leading to complete transmission in the waveguide although the corresponding scattering in free space-exhibits strong s and p wave scattering. Possible applications include, e.g., cold and ultracold atom-atom

  14. RESONANCE CARS IN BR2 MOLECULES AND BR-ATOMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, I.; Levelt, P.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1991-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced CARS processes were studied in molecular bromine. On the basis of the known spectroscopic constants of the two electronic states involved, the features in the spectra could be identified. CARS signals from Br-atoms produced from dissociation of Br2 were obtained by tuning (omega-1

  15. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength...

  16. Resonance fluorescence microscopy via three-dimensional atom localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta; Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Das, Nityananda; Mahapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A scheme is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a driven two-level atomic system via resonance fluorescence. The field arrangement for the atom localization involves the application of three mutually orthogonal standing-wave fields and an additional traveling-wave coupling field. We have shown the efficacy of such field arrangement in tuning the spatially modulated resonance in all directions. Under different parametric conditions, the 3D localization patterns originate with various shapes such as sphere, sheets, disk, bowling pin, snake flute, flower vase. High-precision localization is achieved when the radiation field detuning equals twice the combined Rabi frequencies of the standing-wave fields. Application of a traveling-wave field of suitable amplitude at optimum radiation field detuning under symmetric standing-wave configuration leads to 100% detection probability even in sub-wavelength domain. Asymmetric field configuration is also taken into consideration to exhibit atom localization with appreciable precision compared to that of the symmetric case. The momentum distribution of the localized atoms is found to follow the Heisenberg uncertainty principle under the validity of Raman-Nath approximation. The proposed field configuration is suitable for application in the study of atom localization in an optical lattice arrangement.

  17. On the influence of resonance photon scattering on atom interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M; Arsenovic, D; Sanz, A S; Davidovic, M

    2010-01-01

    Here, the influence of resonance photon-atom scattering on the atom interference pattern at the exit of a three-grating Mach-Zehnder interferometer is studied. It is assumed that the scattering process does not destroy the atomic wave function describing the state of the atom before the scattering process takes place, but only induces a certain shift and change of its phase. We find that the visibility of the interference strongly depends on the statistical distribution of transferred momenta to the atom during the photon-atom scattering event. This also explains the experimentally observed (Chapman et al 1995 Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 2783) dependence of the visibility on the ratio d p /λ i =y' 12 (2π/kdλ i ), where y' 12 is the distance between the place where the scattering event occurs and the first grating, k is the wave number of the atomic centre-of-mass motion, d is the grating constant and λ i is the photon wavelength. Furthermore, it is remarkable that photon-atom scattering events happen experimentally within the Fresnel region, i.e. the near-field region, associated with the first grating, which should be taken into account when drawing conclusions about the relevance of 'which-way' information for the interference visibility.

  18. Atomic-Beam Magnetic Resonance Experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the atomic-beam magnetic resonance (ABMR) experiments at ISOLDE is to map the nuclear behaviour in wide regions of the nuclear chart by measuring nuclear spins and moments of ground and isomeric states. This is made through an investigation of the atomic hyperfine structure of free, neutral atoms in a thermal atomic-beam using radio-frequency techniques. On-line operation allows the study of short-lived nuclei far from the region of beta-stability.\\\\ \\\\ The ABMR experiments on the |2S^1 ^2 elements Rb, Cs, Au and Fr have been completed, and present efforts are directed towards the elements with an open p-shell and on the rare-earth elements.\\\\ \\\\ The experimental data obtained are compared with results from model calculations, giving information on the single-particle structure and on the nuclear shape parameters.

  19. Theory of inelastic effects in resonant atom-surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The progress of theoretical and experimental developments in atom-surface scattering is briefly reviewed. The formal theory of atom-surface resonant scattering is reviewed and expanded, with both S and T matrix approaches being explained. The two-potential formalism is shown to be useful for dealing with the problem in question. A detailed theory based on the S-matrix and the two-potential formalism is presented. This theory takes account of interactions between the incident atoms and the surface phonons, with resonant effects being displayed explicitly. The Debye-Waller attenuation is also studied. The case in which the atom-surface potential is divided into an attractive part V/sub a/ and a repulsive part V/sub r/ is considered at length. Several techniques are presented for handling the scattering due to V/sub r/, for the case in which V/sub r/ is taken to be the hard corrugated surface potential. The theory is used to calculate the scattered intensities for the system 4 He/LiF(001). A detailed comparison with experiment is made, with polar scans, azimuthal scans, and time-of-flight measurements being considered. The theory is seen to explain the location and signature of resonant features, and to provide reasonable overall agreement with the experimental results

  20. Atomic many-body theory of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.P.; Altun, Z.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the use of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) to include effects of electron correlations is discussed. The various physical processes contributing to the broad photoionization cross sections of the rare gases are studied in terms of the relevant many-body diagrams. Use of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE) is discussed by Amusia and Cherepkov. Calculations using the relativistic RPAE are reviewed by Johnson. In addition, many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) is used to study resonances which are due to excitation of bound states degenerate with the continuum. Very interesting giant resonance structure can occur when an inner shell electron is excited into a vacant open-shell orbital of the same principal quantum number. A particular example which is studied is the neutral manganese atom 3p 6 3d 5 4s 2 ( 6 S), in which the spins of the five 3d electrons are aligned. A very large resonance occurs in the 3d and 4s cross sections due to 3p → 3d excitation near 51 eV, and calculations of this resonance by MBPT and RPAE are discussed. A second example of this type of resonance occurs in open-shell rare-earth atoms with configurations 4d 10 4f/sup n/5s 2 5p 6 s 2 . Calculations and experimental results will be discussed for the case of europium with a half-filled sub-shell 4f 7 . 71 references, 15 figures

  1. Atomic force microscope characterization of a resonating nanocantilever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abadal, G.; Davis, Zachary James; Borrise, X.

    2003-01-01

    parallel to the cantilever. In order to minimize the interaction between AFM probe and the resonating transducer cantilever, the AFM is operated in a dynamic noncontact mode, using oscillation amplitudes corresponding to a low force regime. The dependence of the static cantilever deflection on DC voltage......An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used as a nanometer-scale resolution tool for the characterization of the electromechanical behaviour of a resonant cantilever-based mass sensor. The cantilever is actuated electrostatically by applying DC and AC voltages from a driver electrode placed closely...

  2. Tunable Supermode Dielectric Resonators for Axion Dark-Matter Haloscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Ben T.; Flower, Graeme; Tobar, Lucas E.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    We present frequency-tuning mechanisms for dielectric resonators, which undergo "supermode" interactions as they tune. The tunable schemes are based on dielectric materials strategically placed inside traditional cylindrical resonant cavities, necessarily operating in transverse-magnetic modes for use in axion haloscopes. The first technique is based on multiple dielectric disks with radii smaller than that of the cavity. The second scheme relies on hollow dielectric cylinders similar to a Bragg resonator, but with a different location and dimension. Specifically, we engineer a significant increase in form factor for the TM030 mode utilizing a variation of a distributed Bragg reflector resonator. Additionally, we demonstrate an application of traditional distributed Bragg reflectors in TM modes which may be applied to a haloscope. Theoretical and experimental results are presented showing an increase in Q factor and tunability due to the supermode effect. The TM030 ring-resonator mode offers a between 1 and 2-order-of-magnitude improvement in axion sensitivity over current conventional cavity systems and will be employed in the forthcoming ORGAN experiment.

  3. Resonance Fluorescence from an Artificial Atom in Squeezed Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Toyli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental realization of resonance fluorescence in squeezed vacuum. We strongly couple microwave-frequency squeezed light to a superconducting artificial atom and detect the resulting fluorescence with high resolution enabled by a broadband traveling-wave parametric amplifier. We investigate the fluorescence spectra in the weak and strong driving regimes, observing up to 3.1 dB of reduction of the fluorescence linewidth below the ordinary vacuum level and a dramatic dependence of the Mollow triplet spectrum on the relative phase of the driving and squeezed vacuum fields. Our results are in excellent agreement with predictions for spectra produced by a two-level atom in squeezed vacuum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2539 (1987], demonstrating that resonance fluorescence offers a resource-efficient means to characterize squeezing in cryogenic environments.

  4. Sound of Dark Matter: Searching for Light Scalars with Resonant-Mass Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2016-01-22

    The fine-structure constant and the electron mass in string theory are determined by the values of scalar fields called moduli. If the dark matter takes on the form of such a light modulus, it oscillates with a frequency equal to its mass and an amplitude determined by the local dark-matter density. This translates into an oscillation of the size of a solid that can be observed by resonant-mass antennas. Existing and planned experiments, combined with a dedicated resonant-mass detector proposed in this Letter, can probe dark-matter moduli with frequencies between 1 kHz and 1 GHz, with much better sensitivity than searches for fifth forces.

  5. Feshbach-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Atom-Molecule Conversion with Ultranarrow Photoassociation Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taie, Shintaro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    We reveal the existence of high-density Feshbach resonances in the collision between the ground and metastable states of 171Yb and coherently produce the associated Feshbach molecules by photoassociation. The extremely small transition rate is overcome by the enhanced Franck-Condon factor of the weakly bound Feshbach molecule, allowing us to observe Rabi oscillations with long decay time between an atom pair and a molecule in an optical lattice. We also perform the precision measurement of the binding energies, which characterizes the observed resonances. The ultranarrow photoassociation will be a basis for practical implementation of optical Feshbach resonances.

  6. Interacting Dark Resonances with Plasmonic Meta-Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-17

    full electrodynamics simulations to corroborate our results. Such multilayered meta-molecules can bring a new dimension to higher quality factor...exhibit many remarkable phenomena in atom optics,1 cavity quan- tum electrodynamics (cQED),2 quantum computation, and quantum information.3 For instance...Several classical or plasmonic analogue of quantum optical phenom- ena like plasmon induced transparency (PIT),5,6 electromag- netic induced

  7. The search for axion-like dark matter using magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, Alexander; Casper Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The nature of dark matter is one of the most important open problems in modern physics, and it is necessary to develop techniques to search for a wide class of dark-matter candidates. Axions, originally introduced to resolve the strong CP problem in quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and axion-like particles (ALPs) are strongly motivated dark matter candidates. Nuclear spins interacting with axion-like background dark matter experience an energy shift, oscillating at the frequency equal to the axion Compton frequency. The Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiments (CASPEr) use precision magnetometry and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to search for the effects of this interaction. The experimental signature is precession of the nuclear spins under the condition of magnetic resonance: when the bias magnetic field is tuned such that the nuclear spin sublevel splitting is equal to the axion Compton frequency. These experiments have the potential to detect axion-like dark matter in a wide mass range (10-12 eV to 10-6 eV, scanned by changing the bias magnetic field from approximately 1 gauss to 20 tesla) and with coupling strengths many orders of magnitude beyond the current astrophysical and laboratory limits, and all the way down to those corresponding to the QCD axion. Supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  8. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  9. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christoper P

    2018-02-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.

  10. Sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and resonant effects in ultra high energy regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Miranda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Interest in light dark matter candidates has recently increased in the literature; some of these works consider the role of additional neutrinos, either active or sterile. Furthermore, extragalactic neutrinos have been detected with energies higher than have ever been reported before. This opens a new window of opportunities to the study of neutrino properties that were unreachable up to now. We investigate how an interaction potential between neutrinos and dark matter might induce a resonant enhancement in the oscillation probability, an effect that may be tested with future neutrino data.

  11. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen gas at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, W.N.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.W.; Kubik, P.R.; Marsolais, R.M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H 2 and 4 He, we have been able to store a low density (approximately 10 12 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T=1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4 He→H 2 + 4 He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4 He gas and the pressure shift of the hyperfine frequency due to the 4 He buffer gas. Here we discuss the application of hyperfine frequency shifts as a probe of the H-He potential, and as a means for determining the binding energy of H on liquid helium

  12. Atomic collisions: electron detachment and resonant inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojha, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Part I: Electron detachment in collisions of negative ions, H - + He. In conflict from the expectation from a compound state model, observation shows that the detachment cross section increases with energy in the adiabatic region below 2 keV. The compound state model is not appropriate because of a strong s-wave component in the wavefunction allows the extra electron to run away as soon as its state becomes unbound. The detachment cross section increases with the collision velocity because detachment is induced by a breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation which shifts to larger separations of the nuclei as the collision velocity increases. Part II: Resonance excitation in electron rare gas collisions. A new method is proposed for calculating the positions of resonances and cross sections in electron molecule collisions by enclosing the entire system in a spherical box, thus converting the problem to a bound state problem. It is used to calculate the energies of [np 52 P/sub 3/2,1/2/](n + l)s(n + l)p 3 P resonances in collisions of slow electrons with Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The problem is simplified by invoking the Grandparent Model (that the resonances consist of two loosely bound electrons outside a compact positive ion core). The model is tested by explaining the Schulz's Law. Cross sections for excitation of Ne and Ar atoms from the ground state to the lowest metastable and uv emitting levels are calculated

  13. Hyperfine resonance of atomic deuterium at 1 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, M.W.; Hayden, M.E.; Hardy, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic-deuterium gas was studied at temperatures just above 1 K. A short rf discharge was used to dissociate solid D 2 on the surface of a sealed pyrex bulb lined with a saturated helium film. Pulsed magnetic resonance on the β-δ transition at its minimum frequency (309 MHz in a magnetic field of 3.9 mT) was used to observe the resulting D. The free induction decays were shortened by spin-exchange collisions with impurity H atoms present in the sample. The H density, inferred using calculated spin-exchange cross sections, was typically higher than the D density. In addition, the samples of D were short-lived decaying exponentially in time with a strongly temperature-dependent lifetime. It was found that recombination with the H impurity was not the cause of the sample decay, and it is proposed that the decay is due to the thermally activated process wherein D atoms penetrate the liquid helium film that coats the cell walls. Analysis of the lifetime data yields the value 13.6 (6) K for the rest energy of a D atom dissolved in liquid helium, the first measurement of this quantity for any hydrogen isotope

  14. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  15. Dynamics of lumps and dark-dark solitons in the multi-component long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jiguang; Porsezian, Kuppuswamy; He, Jingsong; Kanna, Thambithurai

    2018-01-01

    General semi-rational solutions of an integrable multi-component (2+1)-dimensional long-wave-short-wave resonance interaction system comprising multiple short waves and a single long wave are obtained by employing the bilinear method. These solutions describe the interactions between various types of solutions, including line rogue waves, lumps, breathers and dark solitons. We only focus on the dynamical behaviours of the interactions between lumps and dark solitons in this paper. Our detailed study reveals two different types of excitation phenomena: fusion and fission. It is shown that the fundamental (simplest) semi-rational solutions can exhibit fission of a dark soliton into a lump and a dark soliton or fusion of one lump and one dark soliton into a dark soliton. The non-fundamental semi-rational solutions are further classified into three subclasses: higher-order, multi- and mixed-type semi-rational solutions. The higher-order semi-rational solutions show the process of annihilation (production) of two or more lumps into (from) one dark soliton. The multi-semi-rational solutions describe N ( N ≥2) lumps annihilating into or producing from N -dark solitons. The mixed-type semi-rational solutions are a hybrid of higher-order semi-rational solutions and multi-semi-rational solutions. For the mixed-type semi-rational solutions, we demonstrate an interesting dynamical behaviour that is characterized by partial suppression or creation of lumps from the dark solitons.

  16. Resonance fluorescence spectrum of two atoms, coherently driven by a strong resonant laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficek, Z.; Tanas, R.; Kielich, S.

    1981-01-01

    In Lehmberg's approach, we consider the resonance fluorescence spectrum of two radiatively interacting atoms. In the strong field limit we have obtained analytical solutions for the spectrum of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes without decoupling approximation. Our solutions are valid for all values of the distance r 12 separating the atoms. The spectrum of the symmetric modes contains additional sidebands in 2Ω (Ω is the Rabi frequency) with amplitude dependent on (a/Ω) 2 , where a is a parameter dependent on r 12 . The antisymmetric part of the spectrum has no additional sidebands in 2Ω. For small distances r 12 (a = 1) our results for the symmetric modes are identical with those of Agarwal et al. apart from the so-called scaling factor. For large distance r 12 (a = 0) the spectra of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are identical with the well-known one-atom spectrum. (orig.)

  17. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  18. Optomechanical terahertz detection with single meta-atom resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belacel, Cherif; Todorov, Yanko; Barbieri, Stefano; Gacemi, Djamal; Favero, Ivan; Sirtori, Carlo

    2017-11-17

    Most of the common technologies for detecting terahertz photons (>1 THz) at room temperature rely on slow thermal devices. The realization of fast and sensitive detectors in this frequency range is indeed a notoriously difficult task. Here we propose a novel device consisting of a subwavelength terahertz meta-atom resonator, which integrates a nanomechanical element and allows energy exchange between the mechanical motion and the electromagnetic degrees of freedom. An incident terahertz wave thus produces a nanomechanical signal that can be read out optically with high precision. We exploit this concept to demonstrate a terahertz detector that operates at room temperature with high sensitivity and a much higher frequency response compared to standard detectors. Beyond the technological issue of terahertz detection, our architecture opens up new perspectives for fundamental science of light-matter interaction at terahertz frequencies, combining optomechanical approaches with semiconductor quantum heterostructures.

  19. Excited, bound and resonant positron-atom systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, M W J [Department of Physics and Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, San Diego CA 92182 (United States); Mitroy, J, E-mail: mbromley@physics.sdsu.ed [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies and Faculty of Education, Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia)

    2010-01-01

    Calculations have demonstrated that eleven neutral atoms can bind positrons, while many more can bind positronium. This is a short review of recent progress made in understanding some of the underlying mechanisms. The emphasis here being on configuration interaction calculations with excited state configurations. These have demonstrated the existence of a {sup 2}P{sup o} excited state of e{sup +}Ca, which consists predominantly of a positronium cluster orbiting the Ca{sup +} ion in the L = 1 partial wave. Preliminary results are presented of excited state positron binding to a model alkali atom, where the excited {sup 1}P{sup o} states are stable over a limited region. Implications for the unnatural parity, {sup 2,4}S{sup o}, states of PsH, LiPs, NaPs and KPs are also discussed. The e{sup +}Mg, e{sup +}Cu, e{sup +}Zn and e{sup +}Cd systems show a lack of a {sup 2}P{sup o} excited state, each instead possessing a low-energy p-wave shape resonance of varying strength.

  20. Quark Synthesis String Theory From Dark Matter to Light Emitting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, William

    2012-10-01

    Forefather physicists formulated fusion based on nucleosynthesis. They directed that whole nucleons synthesize. Quark Synthesis String Theory now shows that it's the string-like quarks that do the synthesizing: not whole nucleons. In a dark region, string-like quarks synthesize with other string-like quarks to make rope-like quarks. Quarks structure into threesomes bound only by electrostatic and gravitational forces. Quarks not structuring as threesomes remain dark. Balanced threesomes of string-like quarks become neutrons. Balanced threesomes of rope-like quarks become more massive neutroniumA nuclei. After their formation, neutrons and neutroniumAs quickly begin emitting electrons. This paper develops equations that correctly describe nuclear structures and their electron emissions. Electron emission beta decay is calculated for the 30 least massive neutroniumA nuclei and their subsequent transmutation thru 203 intermediate nuclei on their way to becoming well known nuclei centering the 30 least massive light emitting atoms. This is a perfect 233 for 233 match between calculations of Quark Synthesis String Theory and factual nuclear data. This perfect match provides affirmation that nuclei have no need for the unknown strong or week forces and mediating particles. Nuclear physics succeeds using a string theory that has the quarks doing the synthesizing.

  1. Dark Atoms and the Positron-Annihilation-Line Excess in the Galactic Bulge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-R. Cudell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It was recently proposed that stable particles of charge −2, O--, can exist and constitute dark matter after they bind with primordial helium in O-helium (OHe atoms. We study here in detail the possibility that this model provides an explanation for the excess of gamma radiation in the positron-annihilation line from the galactic bulge observed by INTEGRAL. This explanation assumes that OHe, excited to a 2s state through collisions in the central part of the Galaxy, deexcites to its ground state via an E0 transition, emitting an electron-positron pair. The cross-section for OHe collisions with excitation to 2s level is calculated and it is shown that the rate of such excitations in the galactic bulge strongly depends not only on the mass of O-helium, which is determined by the mass of O--, but also on the density and velocity distribution of dark matter. Given the astrophysical uncertainties on these distributions, this mechanism constrains the O-- mass to lie in two possible regions. One of these is reachable in the experimental searches for stable multicharged particles at the LHC.

  2. Resonant and Soliton Transport of Ultracold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbo, Chester Philipp

    In this thesis, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of strongly interacting ultracold atoms in optical lattices. At ultracold temperatures, the dynamics cannot be described classically, but instead, must take into account quantum effects. Here, our focus is on transport and precision measurement. We use exact analysis of few-body systems and mean field analysis. For larger systems, we use a numerical approach called the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method which is considered an efficient computational tool for the quantum evolution of 1D systems. After introducing basic concepts, we treat the motional properties of particles in a tilted lattice in a regime where the inter-particle interactions are resonant with the linear potential. In this regime, the dynamics is described by an Ising model with a transverse field which is a basic system to study quantum magnetism and quantum phase transitions. We introduce analytical and numerical methods to draw a simple picture of the dynamics. This helps us to formulate a slinky-like transport scheme that provides full control of the motional direction of particles. After a study of transport on a tilted lattice, we treat the transport of nonlinear waves in strongly interacting systems. These nonlinear waves are called solitons, which are described as local perturbations of a medium that survive after collisions. We identify two species of classical soliton solutions in our system and study their stability under quantum evolution via DMRG. We shift focus from the dynamics related to transport and turn to precision measurements in optical lattice clocks. Here, we investigate one aspect of their limitations which is due to collisions of atoms loaded onto a single site. These collisions introduce a frequency shift in the clock measurement. We provide a microscopic description of the origin of this frequency shift. Our results have motivated improvement in the accuracy and precision of next generation

  3. Oscillations of Doppler-Raby of two level atom moving in resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskij, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the two-level atom with the quantum mode of the high-quality resonator uniformly moving by the classic trajectory, is considered. The recurrent formula for the probability of the atom transition with the photon radiation is determined through the dressed states method. It is shown, that the ratio between the Doppler shift value of the atom transition and the Raby frequency value of the atom-field system qualitatively effects the dependence of the moving atom transition probability on its position in the resonator, as well as on its value [ru

  4. Efimov resonances in atomic three-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J. Zs.; Papp, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 143201 (2005)], we reported an accumulation of three-body resonant states attached to n=2 and higher two-body thresholds. A more careful investigation revealed that there are resonances of the same kind above the n=1 threshold as well. This suggests that the resonances attached to the thresholds are Efimov resonances

  5. Beyond the Förster formulation for resonance energy transfer: the role of dark states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissa, C; Manna, A K; Terenziani, F; Painelli, A; Pati, S K

    2011-07-28

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) is investigated in pairs of charge-transfer (CT) chromophores. CT chromophores are an interesting class of π conjugated chromophores decorated with one or more electron-donor and acceptor groups in polar (D-π-A), quadrupolar (D-π-A-π-D or A-π-D-π-A) or octupolar (D(-π-A)(3) or A(-π-D)(3)) structures. Essential-state models accurately describe low-energy linear and nonlinear spectra of CT-chromophores and proved very useful to describe spectroscopic effects of electrostatic interchromophore interactions in multichromophoric assemblies. Here we apply the same approach to describe RET between CT-chromophores. The results are quantitatively validated by an extensive comparison with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, confirming that essential-state models offer a simple and reliable approach for the calculation of electrostatic interchromophore interactions. This is an important result since it sets the basis for more refined treatments of RET: essential-state models are in fact easily extended to account for molecular vibrations in truly non-adiabatic approaches and to account for inhomogeneous broadening effects due to polar solvation. Optically forbidden (dark) states of quadrupolar and octupolar chromophores offer an interesting opportunity to verify the reliability of the dipolar approximation. In striking contrast with the dipolar approximation that strictly forbids RET towards or from dark states, our results demonstrate that dark states can take an active role in RET with interaction energies that, depending on the relative orientation of the chromophores, can be even larger than those relevant to allowed states. Essential-state models, whose predictions are quantitatively confirmed by TDDFT results, allow us to relate RET interaction energies towards allowed and dark states to the supramolecular symmetry of the RET-pair, offering reliable design strategies to optimize RET-interactions. This

  6. Resonantly produced 7 keV sterile neutrino dark matter models and the properties of Milky Way satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N

    2014-04-25

    Sterile neutrinos produced through a resonant Shi-Fuller mechanism are arguably the simplest model for a dark matter interpretation of the origin of the recent unidentified x-ray line seen toward a number of objects harboring dark matter. Here, I calculate the exact parameters required in this mechanism to produce the signal. The suppression of small-scale structure predicted by these models is consistent with Local Group and high-z galaxy count constraints. Very significantly, the parameters necessary in these models to produce the full dark matter density fulfill previously determined requirements to successfully match the Milky Way Galaxy's total satellite abundance, the satellites' radial distribution, and their mass density profile, or the "too-big-to-fail problem." I also discuss how further precision determinations of the detailed properties of the candidate sterile neutrino dark matter can probe the nature of the quark-hadron transition, which takes place during the dark matter production.

  7. The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr): a dark-matter search with nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcon, Antoine; Aybas, Deniz; Blanchard, John W.; Centers, Gary; Figueroa, Nataniel L.; Graham, Peter W.; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson; Rajendran, Surjeet; Gil Sendra, Marina; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Trahms, Lutz; Wang, Tao; Wickenbrock, Arne; Wu, Teng; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr) is a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment (NMR) seeking to detect axion and axion-like particles which could make up the dark matter present in the Universe. We review the predicted couplings of axions and axion-like particles with baryonic matter that enable their detection via NMR. We then describe two measurement schemes being implemented in CASPEr. The first method, presented in the original CASPEr proposal, consists of a resonant search via continuous-wave NMR spectroscopy. This method offers the highest sensitivity for frequencies ranging from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz, corresponding to masses {m}{{a}}∼ {10}-14–{10}-6 eV. Sub-Hz frequencies are typically difficult to probe with NMR due to the diminishing sensitivity of magnetometers in this region. To circumvent this limitation, we suggest new detection and data processing modalities. We describe a non-resonant frequency-modulation detection scheme, enabling searches from mHz to Hz frequencies ({m}{{a}}∼ {10}-17–{10}-14 eV), extending the detection bandwidth by three decades.

  8. Searching for an oscillating massive scalar field as a dark matter candidate using atomic hyperfine frequency comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-01-01

    We use six years of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but pr...

  9. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  10. Counting Tm dopant atoms around GaN dots using high-angle annular dark field images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvière, J-L; Okuno, H; Jouneau, P H; Bayle-Guillemaud, P; Daudin, B

    2011-01-01

    High resolution Z-contrast STEM imaging is used to study the Tm doping of GaN quantum dots grown in AlN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging allows us to visualize directly individual Tm atoms in the AlN matrix and even to count the number of Tm atoms in a given AlN atomic column. A new visibility coefficient to determine quantitatively the number of Tm atoms in a given atomic column is introduced. It is based on locally integrated intensities rather than on peak intensities of HAADF images. STEM image simulations shows that this new visibility is less sensitive to the defocus-induced blurring or to the position of the Tm atom within the thin lamella. Most of the Tm atoms diffuse out of GaN dots. Tm atoms are found at different positions in the AlN matrix, (i) Above the wetting layer, Tm atoms are spread within a thickness of 14 AlN monolayers (MLs). (ii) Above the quantum dots all the Tm are located in the same plane situated at 2-3 MLs above the apex of the GaN dot, i.e. at a distance of 14 MLs from the wetting layer, (iii) In addition, Tm can diffuse very far from the GaN dot by following threading dislocations lines.

  11. Optical bistability of a thin film of resonant atoms in a phase-sensitive thermostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basharov, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that when a thin film of two-level atoms interacting with a resonant coherent electromagnetic wave is additionally illuminated with a squeezed field, a bistable transmission/reflection regime for coherent waves is obtained. This regime depends strongly on the phase difference between the coherent and the squeezed fields. New regimes, including a bistable regime, for the interaction of a coherent field with a film of resonant atoms are predicted based on this phenomenon. 14 refs., 5 figs

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  13. Fractional resonances in the atom-optical δ-kicked accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Mark; Halkyard, P.L.; Gardiner, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider resonant dynamics in a dilute atomic gas falling under gravity through a periodically pulsed standing-wave laser field. Our numerical calculations are based on a Monte Carlo method for an incoherent mixture of noninteracting plane waves, and we show that quantum resonances are highly ...

  14. Atom-molecule equilibration in a degenerate Fermi gas with resonant interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, J. E.; Nikuni, T.; Nygaard, Nicolai

    2004-01-01

    We present a nonequilibrium kinetic theory describing atom-molecule population dynamics in a two-component Fermi gas with a Feshbach resonance. Key collision integrals emerge that govern the relaxation of the atom-molecule mixture to chemical and thermal equilibrium. Our focus is on the pseudogap...

  15. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-02

    STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber...developing tapered fiber mount at the end of the program Side Effort: Explored pulse reflection from a temporally moving boundary. There is a temporal

  16. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuragawa, H.; Minowa, T.; Shimazu, M.

    1988-01-01

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 10 3 cm -3 at the ionization area. (author)

  17. Interference of laser-induced resonances in the continuous structures of a helium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magunov, A I; Strakhova, S I

    2003-01-01

    Coherent effects in the interference of overlapping laser-induced resonances in helium atoms are considered. The simultaneous action of single-mode radiation of the 294-nm second harmonic of a cw dye laser and a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser on helium atoms provides the overlap of two resonances induced by transitions from the 1s2s 1 S and 1s4s 1 S helium levels. The shape of the overlapping laser-induced resonances in the rotating-wave approximation is described by analytic expressions, which depend on the laser radiation intensities and the ratio of laser frequencies. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Electron scattering by an atom in the field of resonant laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agre, M.; Rapoport, L.

    1982-01-01

    The collision of an electron with an atom in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation that is at resonance with two atomic multiplets is investigated theoretically. Expressions are obtained for the amplitudes of the elastic and inelastic scattering with emission (absorption) of photons. The case of a ground state at resonance with a doublet is considered in detail. It is shown that photon absorption takes place predominantly in the case of resonance in inelastic transitions from a state of the lower multiplet, and photon emission takes place in transitions from a state of the upper multiplet

  19. Nonlinear narrow Doppler-free resonances for optical transitions and annihilation radiation of a positronium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities of obtaining narrow resonances without the Doppler broadening for transition between the fine structure levels of the ground and first excited states of a positronium atom are considered. An analysis is carried out of the conditions required for observation of the narrow resonances of saturation of single quantum absorption in the 1S-2P transitions and observation of narrow two-photon absorption resonances in the 1S-2S transitions. It is shown that narrow 2γ annihilation radiation lines of a positronium atom may be obtained with a width much smaller than the Doppler one

  20. Modeling and understanding of effects of randomness in arrays of resonant meta-atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tretyakov, Sergei A.; Albooyeh, Mohammad; Alitalo, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    In this review presentation we will discuss approaches to modeling and understanding electromagnetic properties of 2D and 3D lattices of small resonant particles (meta-atoms) in transition from regular (periodic) to random (amorphous) states. Nanostructured metasurfaces (2D) and metamaterials (3D......) are arrangements of optically small but resonant particles (meta-atoms). We will present our results on analytical modeling of metasurfaces with periodical and random arrangements of electrically and magnetically resonant meta-atoms with identical or random sizes, both for the normal and oblique-angle excitations....... We show how the electromagnetic response of metasurfaces is related to the statistical parameters of the structure. Furthermore, we will discuss the phenomenon of anti-resonance in extracted effective parameters of metamaterials and clarify its relation to the periodicity (or amorphous nature...

  1. Resonance enhancement of two photon absorption by magnetically trapped atoms in strong rf-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Applying a many mode Floquet formalism for magnetically trapped atoms interacting with a polychromatic rf-field, we predict a large two photon transition probability in the atomic system of cold 87Rb atoms. The physical origin of this enormous increase in the two photon transition probability is due to the formation of avoided crossings between eigen-energy levels originating from different Floquet sub-manifolds and redistribution of population in the resonant intermediate levels to give rise to the resonance enhancement effect. Other exquisite features of the studied atom-field composite system include the splitting of the generated avoided crossings at the strong field strength limit and a periodic variation of the single and two photon transition probabilities with the mode separation frequency of the polychromatic rf-field. This work can find applications to characterize properties of cold atom clouds in the magnetic traps using rf-spectroscopy techniques.

  2. Off-resonant transitions in the collective dynamics of multi-level atomic ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We study the contributions of off-resonant transitions to the dynamics of a system of N multi-level atoms sharing one excitation and interacting with the quantized vector electromagnetic field. The rotating wave approximation significantly simplifies the derivation of the equations of motion...... describing the collective atomic dynamics, but it leads to an incorrect expression for the dispersive part of the atom–atom interaction terms. For the case of two-level atoms and a scalar electromagnetic field, it turns out that the atom–atom interaction can be recovered correctly if integrals over...... the photon mode frequencies are extended to incorporate negative values. We explicitly derive the atom–atom interaction for multi-level atoms, coupled to the full vector electromagnetic field, and we recover also in this general case the validity of the results obtained by the extension to negative...

  3. Feshbach and Efimov Resonances in A 6Li- 133Cs Atomic Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Jacob

    This thesis reports measurements of interactions in Fermi-Bose 6Li-133Cs mixtures. Precise control of this Bose-Fermi mixture allowed us to probe few-body physics in regimes which were previously inaccessible. In particular, we performed the first model-independent test of geometric scaling of Efimov physics and probed Efimov resonances farther in the weakly coupled, narrow resonance regime than previously possible. For this work, we built a new apparatus which overcomes the many challenges faced by Li-Cs mixtures. We developed several novel dipole trapping schemes which overcome the difficulties of mixing Li and Cs, including the large differences in initial trapping and cooling between these atomic species and a large differential gravitational sag. We also achieved part per million level magnetic field control near 900 G, necessary for the precise measurements near narrow Feshbach resonances undertaken in this thesis, by pioneering a tomographic magnetic field calibration technique. With this apparatus, we first probed the Feshbach resonances of the Li-Cs mixture. This is an essential first step, allowing us to understand and control the two-body interactions between our atoms. Next we began to probe Efimov physics, an important three-body phenomenon wherein an infinite series of three-body bound states arise near two-body scattering resonances, such as Feshbach resonances. We demonstrated the universal scaling expected theoretically for Efimov states near a Feshbach resonance. This task was made feasible in our system by a reduced Efimov scaling constant, yet still required precise magnetic field control. Finally, additional universal behavior of the first Efimov resonance has been observed empirically in a variety of atomic systems. While theory has explained this observed universality, predictions also indicate departures for narrow Feshbach resonances, contrary to previous experimental results. By further improving our magnetic field control to probe a very

  4. Quantum dynamics of atoms in a resonator-generated optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschler, C.; Ritsch, H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We investigate the quantum motion of coherently driven ultracold atoms in the field of a damped high-Q optical cavity mode. The laser field is chosen far detuned from the atomic transition but close to a cavity resonance, so that spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed but a coherent field builds up in the resonator by stimulated scattering. On one hand the shape of the atomic wave function determines the field dynamics via the magnitude of the scattering and the effective refractive index the atoms create for the mode. The mode intensity on the other hand determines the optical dipole force on the atoms.The system shows rich atom-field dynamics including self organization, self-trapping, cooling or heating. In the limit of deep trapping we are able to derive a system of closed, coupled equations for a finite set of atomic expectation values and the field. This allows us to determine the self-consistent ground state of the system as well as the eigenfrequencies and damping rates for excitations. To treat several atoms in more detail we introduce the Bose-Hubbard model. This allows us to investigate several aspects of the quantum motion of the atoms inside the cavity. (author)

  5. Dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography in patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Lauenstein, Thomas; Goehde, Susanne; Kuehle, Christiane; Herborn, Christoph U. [University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [University of California, Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Langhorst, Jost; Zoepf, Thomas; Gerken, Guido [University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Essen (Germany); Goyen, Mathias [Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    To assess dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) for the evaluation of patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis. Forty patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis underwent MRC within 72 h prior to conventional colonoscopy (CC). A three-dimensional T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence was acquired after an aqueous enema and intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents. All MRC data were evaluated by two radiologists. Based on wall thickness and focal uptake of contrast material and pericolic reaction including mesenteric infiltration on T1-weighted sequence the sigmoid colon was assessed for the presence of diverticulitis. MRC classified 17 of the 40 patients as normal with regard to sigmoid diverticulitis. However, CC confirmed the presence of light inflammatory signs in four patients which were missed in MRC. MRC correctly identified wall thickness and contrast uptake of the sigmoid colon in the other 23 patients. In three of these patients false-positive findings were observed, and MRC classified the inflammation of the sigmoid colon as diverticulitis whereas CC and histopathology confirmed invasive carcinoma. MRC detected additionally relevant pathologies of the entire colon and could be performed in cases where CC was incomplete. MRC may be considered a promising alternative to CC for the detection of sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.)

  6. Dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography in patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Lauenstein, Thomas; Goehde, Susanne; Kuehle, Christiane; Herborn, Christoph U.; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Langhorst, Jost; Zoepf, Thomas; Gerken, Guido; Goyen, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    To assess dark-lumen magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) for the evaluation of patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis. Forty patients with suspected sigmoid diverticulitis underwent MRC within 72 h prior to conventional colonoscopy (CC). A three-dimensional T1-weighted volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination sequence was acquired after an aqueous enema and intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents. All MRC data were evaluated by two radiologists. Based on wall thickness and focal uptake of contrast material and pericolic reaction including mesenteric infiltration on T1-weighted sequence the sigmoid colon was assessed for the presence of diverticulitis. MRC classified 17 of the 40 patients as normal with regard to sigmoid diverticulitis. However, CC confirmed the presence of light inflammatory signs in four patients which were missed in MRC. MRC correctly identified wall thickness and contrast uptake of the sigmoid colon in the other 23 patients. In three of these patients false-positive findings were observed, and MRC classified the inflammation of the sigmoid colon as diverticulitis whereas CC and histopathology confirmed invasive carcinoma. MRC detected additionally relevant pathologies of the entire colon and could be performed in cases where CC was incomplete. MRC may be considered a promising alternative to CC for the detection of sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.)

  7. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-05

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  8. Resonance effects in projectile-electron loss in relativistic collisions with excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A B

    2005-01-01

    The theory of electron loss from projectile-ions in relativistic ion-atom collisions is extended to the case of collisions with excited atoms. The main feature of such collisions is a resonance which can emerge between electron transitions in the ion and atom. The resonance becomes possible due to the Doppler effect and has a well-defined impact energy threshold. In the resonance case, the ion-atom interaction is transmitted by the radiation field and the range of this interaction becomes extremely long. Because of this the presence of other atoms in the target medium and the size of the space occupied by the medium have to be taken into account and it turns out that microscopic loss cross sections may be strongly dependent on such macroscopic parameters as the target density, temperature and size. We consider both the total and differential loss cross sections and show that the resonance can have a strong impact on the angular and energy distributions of electrons emitted from the projectiles and the total number of electron loss events

  9. Resonance interaction energy between two entangled atoms in a photonic bandgap environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notararigo, Valentina; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia

    2018-03-26

    We consider the resonance interaction energy between two identical entangled atoms, where one is in the excited state and the other in the ground state. They interact with the quantum electromagnetic field in the vacuum state and are placed in a photonic-bandgap environment with a dispersion relation quadratic near the gap edge and linear for low frequencies, while the atomic transition frequency is assumed to be inside the photonic gap and near its lower edge. This problem is strictly related to the coherent resonant energy transfer between atoms in external environments. The analysis involves both an isotropic three-dimensional model and the one-dimensional case. The resonance interaction asymptotically decays faster with distance compared to the free-space case, specifically as 1/r 2 compared to the 1/r free-space dependence in the three-dimensional case, and as 1/r compared to the oscillatory dependence in free space for the one-dimensional case. Nonetheless, the interaction energy remains significant and much stronger than dispersion interactions between atoms. On the other hand, spontaneous emission is strongly suppressed by the environment and the correlated state is thus preserved by the spontaneous-decay decoherence effects. We conclude that our configuration is suitable for observing the elusive quantum resonance interaction between entangled atoms.

  10. Resonance oscillations of nonreciprocal long-range van der Waals forces between atoms in electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherkunov, Yury

    2018-03-01

    We study theoretically the van der Waals interaction between two atoms out of equilibrium with an isotropic electromagnetic field. We demonstrate that at large interatomic separations, the van der Waals forces are resonant, spatially oscillating, and nonreciprocal due to resonance absorption and emission of virtual photons. We suggest that the van der Waals forces can be controlled and manipulated by tuning the spectrum of artificially created random light.

  11. Resonance properties of a three-level atom with quantized field modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, H.I.

    1984-01-01

    A system of one three-level atom and one or two quantized electro-magnetic field modes coupled to each other by the dipole interaction, with the rotating wave approximation is studied. All three atomic configurations, i.e., cascade Lambda- and V-types, are treated simultaneously. The system is treated as closed, i.e., no interaction with the external radiation field modes, to reveal the internal structures and symmetries in the system. The general dynamics of the system are investigated under several distinct initial conditions and their similarities and differences with the dynamics of the Jaynes-Cummings model are revealed. Also investigated is the possibility of so-called coherent trapping of the atom in the quantized field modes in a resonator. An atomic state of coherent trapping exists only for limited cases, and it generally requires the field to be in some special states, depending on the system. The discussion of coherent trapping is extended into a system of M identical three-level atoms. The stability of a coherent-trapping state when fluorescence can take place is discussed. The distinction between a system with resonator field modes and one with ideal laser modes is made clear, and the atomic relaxation to the coherent-trapping atomic state when a Lambda-type atom is irradiated by two ideal laser beams is studied. The experimental prospects to observe the collapse-revival phenomena in the atomic occupation probabilities, which is characteristic of a system with quantized resonator field modes is discussed

  12. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  13. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  14. Dark matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. That is, not only is the night sky dark, but also most of the matter and the energy in the universe is dark. For every atom visible in planets, stars and galaxies today there exists at least five or six times as much 'Dark Matter' in the universe. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious but pervasive dark matter, which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. Dark energy remains even more elusive, as we lack candidate fields that emerge from well established physics. I will describe various attempts to measure dark matter by direct and indirect means, and discuss the prospects for progress in unravelling dark energy.

  15. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prastani, C; Vetushka, A.; Fejfar, A.; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, torsional resonance tunneling mode atomic force microscopy is used to study the conductivity of nanoparticles. SnS nanoparticles capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and with In2S3 shell are analyzed. This contactless technique allows carrying out measurements on nanoparticles

  16. Microscopic Many-Body Theory of Atomic Bose Gases near a Feshbach Resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duine, R.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2003-01-01

    A Feshbach resonance in the s-wave scattering length occurs if the energy of the two atoms in the incoming open channel is close to the energy of a bound state in a coupled closed channel. Starting from the microscopic Hamiltonian that describes this situation, we derive the

  17. Atom-resonant squeezed light from a tunable monolithic ppRKTP parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Joanna A; Mitchell, Morgan W

    2018-02-15

    We demonstrate vacuum squeezing at the D 1 line of atomic rubidium (795 nm) with a tunable, doubly-resonant, monolithic subthreshold optical parametric oscillator in periodically-poled Rb-doped potassium titanyl phosphate (ppRKTP). The squeezing appears to be undiminished by a strong dispersive optical nonlinearity recently observed in this material.

  18. Mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials studied by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert J. Moon; Arvind Raman

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials is key to the development of new cellulose nanomaterial based products. Using contact resonance atomic force microscopy we measured and mapped the transverse elastic modulus of three types of cellulosic nanoparticles: tunicate cellulose nanocrystals, wood cellulose nanocrystals, and wood cellulose...

  19. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinello, Francesco; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Carmignato, Simone

    2015-01-01

    fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young's modulus and related surface parameters.In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever...

  20. The hydrogen atom in crossed static electromagnetic and non-resonant laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgaker, T.; Tomashevsky, I.

    1992-01-01

    The energy splittings and wave function of a hydrogen atom in crossed uniform static electromagnetic and non-resonant monochromatic electric fields of arbitrary mutual orientation are obtained within the ''one-shell'' approximation. The intensities of the Lyman lines are also obtained. A special analytical method is used. Relativistic corrections and spin-orbit interactions are not considered. (orig.)

  1. The photoionization of atomic Eu in the vicinity of its giant resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the partial photoionization cross sections of outer subshells of atomic Eu in the giant resonance region are determined by the action of the 4d-electron excitations. The cross section for photoionization of the semifilled 4f 7 subshell is also entirely dominated by the interaction with 4d 10 electrons. (orig.)

  2. New design of InGaAs guided-mode resonance photodiode for SWIR low dark current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdun, Michaël.; Portier, Benjamin; Jaworowicz, Katarzyna; Jaeck, Julien; Dupuis, Christophe; Haidar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a full-dielectric guided mode resonant photodiode. It has been designed to enhance the absorption by excitation of several resonances in the SWIR domain. The device consists of an InP/InGaAs/InP P-i-N heterojunction containing an active layer as thin as 90 nm on top of a subwavelength lamellar grating and a gold mirror. We successfully compared the electro-optical characterizations of individual pixels with electro-magnetic simulations. In particular, we observe near perfect collection of the photo-carriers and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 71% around 1.55 μm. Moreover, compared with InGaAs resonator state-of-the-art detector, we show a broader spectral response in the 1.2-1.7 μm range, thus paving the way for SWIR low dark current imaging.

  3. Observation of the Borromean Three-Body Förster Resonances for Three Interacting Rb Rydberg Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, D B; Beterov, I I; Yakshina, E A; Entin, V M; Ryabtsev, I I; Cheinet, P; Pillet, P

    2017-10-27

    Three-body Förster resonances at long-range interactions of Rydberg atoms were first predicted and observed in Cs Rydberg atoms by Faoro et al. [Nat. Commun. 6, 8173 (2015)NCAOBW2041-172310.1038/ncomms9173]. In these resonances, one of the atoms carries away an energy excess preventing the two-body resonance, leading thus to a Borromean type of Förster energy transfer. But they were in fact observed as the average signal for the large number of atoms N≫1. In this Letter, we report on the first experimental observation of the three-body Förster resonances 3×nP_{3/2}(|M|)→nS_{1/2}+(n+1)S_{1/2}+nP_{3/2}(|M^{*}|) in a few Rb Rydberg atoms with n=36, 37. We have found here clear evidence that there is no signature of the three-body Förster resonance for exactly two interacting Rydberg atoms, while it is present for N=3-5 atoms. This demonstrates the assumption that three-body resonances can generalize to any Rydberg atom. As such resonance represents an effective three-body operator, it can be used to directly control the three-body interactions in quantum simulations and quantum information processing with Rydberg atoms.

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Giant Resonances in Atoms, Molecules, and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Esteva, J; Karnatak, R

    1987-01-01

    Often, a new area of science grows at the confines between recognised subject divisions, drawing upon techniques and intellectual perspectives from a diversity of fields. Such growth can remain unnoticed at first, until a characteristic fami ly of effects, described by appropriate key words, has developed, at which point a distinct subject is born. Such is very much the case with atomic 'giant resonances'. For a start, their name itself was borrowed from the field of nuclear collective resonances. The energy range in which they occur, at the juncture of the extreme UV and the soft X-rays, remains to this day a meeting point of two different experimental techniques: the grating and the crystal spectrometer. The impetus of synchrotron spectroscopy also played a large part in developing novel methods, described by many acronyms, which are used to study 'giant resonances' today. Finally, although we have described them as 'atomic' to differentiate them from their counterparts in Nuclear Physics, their occurrence ...

  5. Systematics of multielement determination with resonance ionization mass spectrometry and thermal atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L.J.; Fassett, J.D.; Travis, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The systematics for multielement determination using resonance ionization mass spectrometry and thermal atomization is developed. The aspects of atomization, ionization, and detection are discussed and resonance ionization is demonstrated for 19 elements. The selective, sequential ionization of seven elements from a single sample is also demonstrated. A one-wavelength, two-photon ionization scheme generally is used in which the first photon excites a bound transition in the near-ultraviolet region and second photon promotes the electron into theionization continuum. The wavelength-dependence ion formation from the thermally produced atom reservoirs is demonstrated for these elements by scanning a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser across its tunable wavelength range. The observed wavelengths where ionization occurs have been correlated where possible with allowed transitions between known electronic energy levels. The elements accessible by using four common dyes are tabulated. More than 20 elements are accessible within the wavelength range of each dye

  6. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library and its application in cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Kang, Nam-Young; Yu, Xiaotong; Sahu, Srikanta; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report a new strategy for constructing a dye library with large Stokes shifts. By coupling a dark donor with BODIPY acceptors of tunable high quantum yield, a novel dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library, named BNM, has been synthesized. Upon excitation of the dark donor (BDN) at 490 nm, the absorbed energy is transferred to the acceptor (BDM) with high efficiency, which was tunable in a broad range from 557 nm to 716 nm, with a high quantum yield of up to 0.8. It is noteworthy to mention that the majority of the non-radiative energy loss of the donor was converted into the acceptor's fluorescence output with a minimum leak of donor emission. Fluorescence imaging tested in live cells showed that the BNM compounds are cell-permeable and can also be employed for live-cell imaging. This is a new library which can be excited through a dark donor allowing for strong fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, the BNM library is well suited for high-throughput screening or multiplex experiments in biological applications by using a single laser excitation source. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ion-beam modification of 2-D materials - single implant atom analysis via annular dark-field electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangert, U., E-mail: Ursel.Bangert@ul.ie [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Stewart, A.; O’Connell, E.; Courtney, E. [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Ramasse, Q.; Kepaptsoglou, D. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hofsäss, H.; Amani, J. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-PLatz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Tu, J.-S.; Kardynal, B. [Peter Grünberg Institut 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Functionalisation of two-dimensional (2-D) materials via low energy ion implantation could open possibilities for fabrication of devices based on such materials. Nanoscale patterning and/or electronically doping can thus be achieved, compatible with large scale integrated semiconductor technologies. Using atomic resolution High Angle Annular Dark Field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy supported by image simulation, we show that sites and chemical nature of individual implants/ dopants in graphene, as well as impurities in hBN, can uniquely and directly be identified on grounds of their position and their image intensity in accordance with predictions from Z-contrast theories. Dopants in graphene (e.g., N) are predominantly substitutional. In other 2-Ds, e.g. dichalcogenides, the situation is more complicated since implants can be embedded in different layers and substitute for different elements. Possible configurations of Se-implants in MoS{sub 2} are discussed and image contrast calculations performed. Implants substituting for S in the top or bottom layer can undoubtedly be identified. We show, for the first time, using HAADF contrast measurement that successful Se-integration into MoS{sub 2} can be achieved via ion implantation, and we demonstrate the possibility of HAADF image contrast measurements for identifying impurities and dopants introduced into in 2-Ds. - Highlights: • Ion implantation of 2-dimensional materials. • Targeted and controlled functionalisation of graphene and 2-D dichalcocenides. • Atomic resolution High Angle Dark Field scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Determination of atomic site and elemental nature of dopants in 2-D materials. • Quantitative information from Z-contrast images.

  8. Van der Waals enhancement of optical atom potentials via resonant coupling to surface polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-08-17

    Contemporary experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) with gas-phase neutral atoms rely increasingly on laser cooling and optical, magneto-optical or magnetostatic trapping methods to provide atomic localization with sub-micron uncertainty. Difficult to achieve in free space, this goal is further frustrated by atom-surface interactions if the desired atomic placement approaches within several hundred nanometers of a solid surface, as can be the case in setups incorporating monolithic dielectric optical resonators such as microspheres, microtoroids, microdisks or photonic crystal defect cavities. Typically in such scenarios, the smallest atom-surface separation at which the van der Waals interaction can be neglected is taken to be the optimal localization point for associated trapping schemes, but this sort of conservative strategy generally compromises the achievable cavity QED coupling strength. Here we suggest a new approach to the design of optical dipole traps for atom confinement near surfaces that exploits strong surface interactions, rather than avoiding them, and present the results of a numerical study based on (39)K atoms and indium tin oxide (ITO). Our theoretical framework points to the possibility of utilizing nanopatterning methods to engineer novel modifications of atom-surface interactions. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  9. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What You See Ain't What. You Got, Resonance, Vol.4,. No.9,1999. Dark Matter. 2. Dark Matter in the Universe. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this.

  10. Hadronic atoms and ticklish nuclei: the E2 nuclear resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, M.

    1975-06-01

    The E2 nuclear resonance effect in hadronic atoms offers a way to increase the hadronic information that can be obtained from hadronic x-ray experiments. The effect occurs when an atomic deexcitation energy closely matches a nuclear excitation energy, so that some configuration mixing occurs. It shows up as an attenuation of some of the hadronic x-ray lines from a resonant versus a normal isotope target. The effect was observed very clearly in pionic cadmium in a recent LAMPF experiment. A planned LAMPF experiment will use the nuclear resonance effect to determine whether the p-wave π-nucleus interaction does indeed become repulsive for Z greater than or equal to 35 as predicted. The effect also appears in the kaonic molybdenum data taken at LBL because several of the stable molybdenum isotopes are resonant. A number of promising cases for π - , K - , anti p, and Σ - atoms are discussed and a spectacular and potentially very informative experiment on anti p- 100 Mo is proposed. (9 figures, 9 tables) (U.S.)

  11. Terahertz response of fractal meta-atoms based on concentric rectangular square resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zhenyu, E-mail: zyzhao@shnu.edu.cn; Shi, Wangzhou [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Peng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the terahertz electromagnetic responses of fractal meta-atoms (MAs) induced by different mode coupling mechanisms. Two types of MAs based on concentric rectangular square (CRS) resonators are presented: independent CRS (I-CRS) and junctional-CRS (J-CRS). In I-CRS, each resonator works as an independent dipole so as to result in the multiple resonance modes when the fractal level is above 1. In J-CRS, however, the generated layer is rotated by π/2 radius to the adjacent CRS in one MA. The multiple resonance modes are coupled into a single mode resonance. The fractal level increasing induces resonance modes redshift in I-CRS while blueshift in J-CRS. When the fractal level is below 4, the mode Q factor of J-CRS is in between the two modes of I-CRS; when the fractal level is 4 or above, the mode Q factor of J-CRS exceeds the two modes of I-CRS. Furthermore, the modulation depth (MD) decreases in I-CRS while it increases in J-CRS with the increase in fractal levels. The surface currents analysis reveals that the capacitive coupling of modes in I-CRS results in the modes redshift, while the conductive coupling of modes in J-CRS induces the mode blueshift. A high Q mode with large MD can be achieved via conductive coupling between the resonators of different scales in a fractal MA.

  12. Optical resonator for a standing wave dipole trap for fermionic lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis reports on the the construction of an optical resonator for a new resonator dipole trap to store the fermionic 6 Li-isotope and to investigate its scattering properties. It was demonstrated that the resonator enhances the energy density of a (1064 nm and 40 mW) laser beam by a factor of more than 100. A fused silica vacuum cell is positioned inside the resonator under Brewster's angle. The losses of the resonator depend mainly on the optical quality of the cell. The expected trap depth of the dipole trap is 200 μK and the photon scattering rate is expected to be about 0.4 s -1 . The resonator is stabilized by means of a polarization spectroscopy method. Due to high trap frequencies, which are produced by the tight enclosure of the standing wave in the resonator, the axial motion must be quantized. A simple model to describe this quantization has been developed. A magneto-optical trap, which serves as a source of cold lithium atoms, was put in operation. (orig.)

  13. Resonance studies of H atoms adsorbed on frozen H2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crampton, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Observations are reported of the ground state hyperfine resonance of hydrogen atoms stored in a 5 cm. diameter bottle coated with frozen molecular hydrogen. Dephasing of the hyperfine resonance while the atoms are adsorbed produces frequency shifts which vary by a factor of two over the temperature range 3.7 K to 4.6 K and radiative decay rates which vary by a factor of five over this range. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the frequency shifts and decay rates are consistent with a non-uniform distribution of surface adsorption energies with mean about 38(8) K, in agreement with theoretical estimates for a smooth surface. Extrapolation of the 30 nanosec. mean adsorption times at 4.2 K predicts very long adsorption times for H on H 2 below 1 K. Studies of level population recovery rates provide evidence for surface electron spin exchange collisions between adsorbed atoms with collision duration long compared to the hyperfine period, suggesting that the atoms are partially mobile on the surface. The lowest rates observed for level population recovery set a lower limit of about 500 atom-surface collisions at 4.2 K without recombination

  14. Measuring exchange interactions between atomic spins using electron spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian; Choi, Taeyoung; Heinrich, Andreas; Lutz, Christopher

    Exchange interactions between neighboring atoms give rise to magnetic order in magnetic materials. As the size of the electronic device is miniaturized toward the limit of single atoms, magnetic nanostructures such as coupled atomic dimers and clusters are explored more as prototypes for possible data storage, spintronics as well as quantum computing applications. Characterizing inter-atom exchange interactions calls for increasing spatial resolution and higher energy sensitivity to better understand this fundamental interaction. Here, using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we studied a magnetically coupled atomic dimer consisting of two 3d transition metal atoms, with one adsorbed on an insulating layer (MgO) and the other attached to the STM tip. We demonstrate the ability to measure the short-range exchange interaction between the two atomic spins with orders-of-magnitude variation ranging from milli-eV all the way to micro-eV. This is realized by the successful combination of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques in STM implemented at different energy scales. We unambiguously confirm the exponential decay behavior of the direct exchange interaction.

  15. Isotopically resolved photoelectron imaging unravels complex atomic autoionization dynamics by two-color resonant ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, P; Gryzlova, E V; Cubaynes, D; Garcia, G A; Nahon, L; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Meyer, M

    2013-12-13

    Angle-resolved electron spectroscopy in coincidence with high-resolution mass spectroscopy has been applied to study two-color resonant photoionization in atomic xenon. Separation of different isotopes enabled us to extract results for the electronic dynamics free from depolarization effects, which are generally introduced by the coupling of the electronic and nuclear angular momenta. The concerted experimental and theoretical analysis of the photoelectron angular distributions in the region of an autoionizing resonance emphasizes the strong sensitivity of the observed structures to the fine details of the treatment of the underlying dynamics.

  16. Frequency, amplitude, and phase measurements in contact resonance atomic force microscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The resonance frequency, amplitude, and phase response of the first two eigenmodes of two contact-resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM configurations, which differ in the method used to excite the system (cantilever base vs sample excitation, are analyzed in this work. Similarities and differences in the observables of the cantilever dynamics, as well as the different effect of the tip–sample contact properties on those observables in each configuration are discussed. Finally, the expected accuracy of CR-AFM using phase-locked loop detection is investigated and quantification of the typical errors incurred during measurements is provided.

  17. Orbital alignment effects in near-resonant Rydberg atoms-rare gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, W.A.; Morrison, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of near-resonant energy transfer collisions involving rare-gas atoms and alkali or alkaline earth atoms which have been initially excited to an aligned state via one or more linearly polarized rasters have yielded a wealth of insight into orbital alignment and related effects. We have extended this inquiry to initially aligned Rydberg states, examining state-to-state and alignment-selected cross sections using quantum collision theory augmented by approximations appropriate to the special characteristics of the Rydberg state (e.g., the quasi-free-electron model and the impulse approximation)

  18. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Carlos J; Pereira, Ana L C; Schulz, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal. PMID:28144546

  19. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2015-06-19

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2–WSe2–graphene and WSe2–MoS2–graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics.

  20. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Pitarke, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen-assisted laser-induced resonant transitions between metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzer, B.; Hartmann, F.J.; Egidy, T. von

    1996-11-01

    Laser resonance transitions between normally metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms were observed making use of state dependent quenching effects caused by small admixtures of H 2 molecules. By selectively shortening the lifetimes of states with higher principal quantum number n as compared to those of lower n, this method for the first time provides access to all initially populated metastable states of p-bar He + atoms. This was demonstrated by observing the transitions (n,l) = (38,l) → (39,l+1), l 35, 36, 37 and (n,l) = (37,l) → (38,l+1), l = 34, 35, 36. (author)

  2. Zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons: one-dimensional resonant channels in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos. J. Páez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate phosphorene zigzag nanoribbons as a platform for constriction engineering. In the presence of a constriction at one of the edges, quantum confinement of edge-protected states reveals conductance peaks, if the edge is uncoupled from the other edge. If the constriction is narrow enough to promote coupling between edges, it gives rise to Fano-like resonances as well as antiresonances in the transmission spectrum. These effects are shown to mimic an atomic chain like behavior in a two dimensional atomic crystal.

  3. Hydrogen-assisted laser-induced resonant transitions between metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, B; Von Egidy, T; Maierl, C; Pohl, R; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Kumakura, M; Morita, N; Hayano, R S; Hori, Masaki; Ishikawa, T; Torii, H A; Sugai, I; Horváth, D

    1997-01-01

    Laser resonance transitions between normally metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms were observed making use of state dependent quenching effects caused by small admixtures of \\htwo\\ molecules. By selectively shortening the lifetimes of states with higher principal quantum number $n$ as compared to those of lower $n$, this method for the first time provides access to all initially populated metastable states of \\pbar\\hep\\ atoms. This was demonstrated by observing the transitions $(n,l)=(38,l)\\rightarrow (39,l+1),\\ l=35,36,37$ and $(n,l)=(37,l)\\rightarrow (38,l+1),\\ l=34,35,36$.

  4. Nanoparticle sizing: a comparative study using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacava, L.M.; Lacava, B.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Buske, N.; Tronconi, A.L.; Morais, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to unfold the nanoparticle size of a ferrofluid sample. Compared to TEM, the AFM method showed a nanoparticle diameter (D m ) reduction of 20% and standard deviation (σ) increase of 15%. The differences in D m and σ were associated with the AFM tip and the nanoparticle concentration on the substrate

  5. Nanometer-range atomic order directly recovered from resonant diffuse scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, Miloš; Kub, Jiří; Fábry, Jan; Hlinka, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 5 (2016), 1-8, č. článku 054202. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-04121S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diffuse scattering * resonant scattering * atomic structure * perovskites * relaxors * PbMg 1/3 Nb 2/3 O 3 (PMN) Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  6. Realistic Gamow shell model for resonance and continuum in atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F. R.; Sun, Z. H.; Wu, Q.; Hu, B. S.; Dai, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    The Gamow shell model can describe resonance and continuum for atomic nuclei. The model is established in the complex-moment (complex-k) plane of the Berggren coordinates in which bound, resonant and continuum states are treated on equal footing self-consistently. In the present work, the realistic nuclear force, CD Bonn, has been used. We have developed the full \\hat{Q}-box folded-diagram method to derive the realistic effective interaction in the model space which is nondegenerate and contains resonance and continuum channels. The CD-Bonn potential is renormalized using the V low-k method. With choosing 16O as the inert core, we have applied the Gamow shell model to oxygen isotopes.

  7. Modification of optical properties by adiabatic shifting of resonances in a four-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bibhas Kumar; Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2018-04-01

    We describe the linear and nonlinear optical properties of a four-level atomic system, after reducing it to an effective two-level atomic model under the condition of adiabatic shifting of resonances driven by two coherent off-resonant fields. The reduced form of the Hamiltonian corresponding to the two-level system is obtained by employing an adiabatic elimination procedure in the rate equations of the probability amplitudes for the proposed four-level model. For a weak probe field operating in the system, the nonlinear dependence of complex susceptibility on the Rabi frequencies and the detuning parameters of the off-resonant driving fields makes it possible to exhibit coherent control of single-photon and two-photon absorption and transparency, the evolution of enhanced Self-Kerr nonlinearity and noticeable dispersive switching. We have shown how the quantum interference results in the generic four-level model at the adiabatic limit. The present scheme describes the appearance of single-photon transparency without invoking any exact two-photon resonance.

  8. Nonresonant absorption of one photon by one atom and resonant absorption of two photons by two atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, Masataka

    1990-01-01

    When a radiation field of frequency ω 1 interacts with atoms, etch of which has a transition frequency ω ba =(E b -E a )/h, with ω 1 -ω ba =Δ≠0, nonresonant absorption can take place with probability P 1 inversely proportional to Δ 2 (a pressure broadening). When another radiation field of frequency ω 2 , such that ω 1 +ω 2 =2ω ba, interacts simultaneously with the gas a resonant two-photon absorption can take place in addition to the nonresonant absorption. The probability of this two-photon absorption process, P 2 , is found to be inversely proportional to Δ 4 . If Ω=| | is the Rabi frequency of the transition, it is found that P 2 /(P 1 (Δ)+P 1 (-Δ)) is given by 12 {Ω(-Δ)Ω(-Δ)} 2 / {Δ 2 (Ω(-Δ) 2 + Ω(Δ) 2 )}. (author)

  9. Probing resonant energy transfer in collisions of ammonia with Rydberg helium atoms by microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of experiments demonstrating the spectroscopic detection of Förster resonance energy transfer from NH3 in the X1A1 ground electronic state to helium atoms in 1sns 3S1 Rydberg levels, where n = 37 and n = 40. For these values of n, the 1sns 3S1 → 1snp 3PJ transitions in helium lie close to resonance with the ground-state inversion transitions in NH3 and can be tuned through resonance using electric fields of less than 10 V/cm. In the experiments, energy transfer was detected by direct state-selective electric field ionization of the 3S1 and 3PJ Rydberg levels and by monitoring the population of the 3DJ levels following pulsed microwave transfer from the 3PJ levels. Detection by microwave spectroscopic methods represents a highly state selective, low-background approach to probing the collisional energy transfer process and the environment in which the atom-molecule interactions occur. The experimentally observed electric-field dependence of the resonant energy transfer process, probed both by direct electric field ionization and by microwave transfer, agrees well with the results of calculations performed using a simple theoretical model of the energy transfer process. For measurements performed in zero electric field with atoms prepared in the 1s40s 3S1 level, the transition from a regime in which a single energy transfer channel can be isolated for detection to one in which multiple collision channels begin to play a role has been identified as the NH3 density was increased.

  10. Probing resonant energy transfer in collisions of ammonia with Rydberg helium atoms by microwave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, V; Hogan, S D

    2017-12-28

    We present the results of experiments demonstrating the spectroscopic detection of Förster resonance energy transfer from NH 3 in the X 1 A 1 ground electronic state to helium atoms in 1sns 3 S 1 Rydberg levels, where n = 37 and n = 40. For these values of n, the 1sns 3 S 1 → 1snp 3 P J transitions in helium lie close to resonance with the ground-state inversion transitions in NH 3 and can be tuned through resonance using electric fields of less than 10 V/cm. In the experiments, energy transfer was detected by direct state-selective electric field ionization of the 3 S 1 and 3 P J Rydberg levels and by monitoring the population of the 3 D J levels following pulsed microwave transfer from the 3 P J levels. Detection by microwave spectroscopic methods represents a highly state selective, low-background approach to probing the collisional energy transfer process and the environment in which the atom-molecule interactions occur. The experimentally observed electric-field dependence of the resonant energy transfer process, probed both by direct electric field ionization and by microwave transfer, agrees well with the results of calculations performed using a simple theoretical model of the energy transfer process. For measurements performed in zero electric field with atoms prepared in the 1s40s 3 S 1 level, the transition from a regime in which a single energy transfer channel can be isolated for detection to one in which multiple collision channels begin to play a role has been identified as the NH 3 density was increased.

  11. Resonant two-photon absorption and electromagnetically induced transparency in open ladder-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Han Seb; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2013-03-25

    We have experimentally and theoretically studied resonant two-photon absorption (TPA) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the open ladder-type atomic system of the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 0, 1, 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 1, 2, 3) transitions in (87)Rb atoms. As the coupling laser intensity was increased, the resonant TPA was transformed to EIT for the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 3) transition. The transformation of resonant TPA into EIT was numerically calculated for various coupling laser intensities, considering all the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S(1/2)-5P(3/2)-5D(5/2) transition. From the numerical results, the crossover from TPA to EIT could be understood by the decomposition of the spectrum into an EIT component owing to the pure two-photon coherence and a TPA component caused by the mixed term.

  12. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A dark green fluorescent protein as an acceptor for measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hideji; Shibata, Akihiro C E; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-10-15

    Measurement of Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) is a powerful method for visualization of intracellular signaling activities such as protein-protein interactions and conformational changes of proteins. Here, we developed a dark green fluorescent protein (ShadowG) that can serve as an acceptor for FLIM-FRET. ShadowG is spectrally similar to monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) and has a 120-fold smaller quantum yield. When FRET from mEGFP to ShadowG was measured using an mEGFP-ShadowG tandem construct with 2-photon FLIM-FRET, we observed a strong FRET signal with low cell-to-cell variability. Furthermore, ShadowG was applied to a single-molecule FRET sensor to monitor a conformational change of CaMKII and of the light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain in HeLa cells. These sensors showed reduced cell-to-cell variability of both the basal fluorescence lifetime and response signal. In contrast to mCherry- or dark-YFP-based sensors, our sensor allowed for precise measurement of individual cell responses. When ShadowG was applied to a separate-type Ras FRET sensor, it showed a greater response signal than did the mCherry-based sensor. Furthermore, Ras activation and translocation of its effector ERK2 into the nucleus could be observed simultaneously. Thus, ShadowG is a promising FLIM-FRET acceptor.

  14. Resonance Fluorescence of a Trapped Four-Level Atom with Bichromatic Driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergou, J.; Jakob, M.; Abranyos, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The resonance fluorescence spectrum of a bichromatically driven four-level atom is polarization dependent. Very narrow lines occur in the incoherent parts of the spectrum for polarization directions which are different from that of the driving fields. The degree of squeezing has a maximum of 56% which should make it easily observable. The second-order correlation function exhibits anti bunching for zero time delay and strong super bunching for certain values of the interaction parameter and time delay. For these parameters resonant two-photon emission takes place in the form of polarization entangled photon pairs. The system can be a novel source of photons in the EPR and/or Bell states. Some experiments will be proposed which make use of this unique source. (Authors)

  15. Quantum ground state of self-organized atomic crystals in optical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vidal, Sonia; de Chiara, Gabriele; Larson, Jonas; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-04-01

    Cold atoms, driven by a laser and simultaneously coupled to the quantum field of an optical resonator, may self-organize in periodic structures. These structures are supported by the optical lattice, which emerges from the laser light they scatter into the cavity mode and form when the laser intensity exceeds a threshold value. We study theoretically the quantum ground state of these structures above the pump threshold of self-organization by mapping the atomic dynamics of the self-organized crystal to a Bose-Hubbard model. We find that the quantum ground state of the self-organized structure can be the one of a Mott insulator, depending on the pump strength of the driving laser. For very large pump strengths, where the intracavity-field intensity is maximum and one would expect a Mott-insulator state, we find intervals of parameters where the phase is compressible. These states could be realized in existing experimental setups.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance of atomic hydrogen (H0) centers in pink tourmaline from Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A model for explaining the atom of hydrogen (H 0 ) in pink tourmaline irradiated with gamma rays is presented. The concentration of H 0 was evaluated and the H 0 lines using the electron paramagnetic resonance were analysed. The g factor and the hyperfine interaction constant were measured with accuracy and determined by matrix diagonalization of spin hamiltonian in vetor space of four dimensions, followed by an iterative calculation with quick convergence the local electric field produced by charges in the lattice was calculated and compared with the value obtained experimentally. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Small sample analysis using sputter atomization/resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    We have used secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to investigate the emission of ions via argon sputtering from U metal, UO 2 , and U 3 O 8 samples. We have also used laser resonance ionization techniques to study argon-sputtered neutral atoms and molecules emitted from these same samples. For the case of U metal, a significant enhancement in detection sensitivity for U is obtained via SA/RIMS. For U in the fully oxidized form (U 3 O 8 ), SA/RIMS offers no improvement in U detection sensitivity over conventional SIMS when sputtering with argon. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  18. Scattering amplitude of ultracold atoms near the p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Naidon, Pascal; Ueda, Masahito

    2010-01-01

    Most of the current theories on the p-wave superfluid in cold atomic gases are based on the effective-range theory for the two-body scattering, where the low-energy p-wave scattering amplitude f 1 (k) is given by f 1 (k)=-1/[ik+1/(Vk 2 )+1/R]. Here k is the incident momentum, V and R are the k-independent scattering volume and effective range, respectively. However, due to the long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction between two colliding ultracold atoms, the p-wave scattering amplitude of the two atoms is not described by the effective-range theory [J. Math. Phys. 4, 54 (1963); Phys. Rev. A 58, 4222 (1998)]. In this paper we provide an explicit calculation for the p-wave scattering of two ultracold atoms near the p-wave magnetic Feshbach resonance. We show that in this case the low-energy p-wave scattering amplitude f 1 (k)=-1/[ik+1/(V eff k 2 )+1/(S eff k)+1/R eff ] where V eff , S eff , and R eff are k-dependent parameters. Based on this result, we identify sufficient conditions for the effective-range theory to be a good approximation of the exact scattering amplitude. Using these conditions we show that the effective-range theory is a good approximation for the p-wave scattering in the ultracold gases of 6 Li and 40 K when the scattering volume is enhanced by the resonance.

  19. Circuit-QED: How strong can the coupling between a Josephson junction atom and a transmission line resonator be?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoret, M.H. [College de France, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Girvin, Steven; Schoelkopf, Robert [Applied Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8284 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    After reviewing the limitation by the fine structure constant {alpha} of the dimensionless coupling constant of an hydrogenic atom with a mode of the electromagnetic field in a cavity, we show that the situation presents itself differently for an artificial Josephson atom coupled to a transmission line resonator. Whereas the coupling constant for the case where such an atom is placed inside the dielectric of the resonator is proportional to {alpha}{sup 1/2}, the coupling of the Josephson atom when it is placed in series with the conducting elements of the resonator is proportional to {alpha}{sup -1/2} and can reach values greater than 1. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Diphenylacrylonitrile-connected BODIPY dyes: fluorescence enhancement based on dark and AIE resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liangbin; Lin, Xiaoru; Guo, Hongyu; Yang, Fafu

    2017-07-19

    This study focuses on the construction of novel diphenylacrylonitrile-connected BODIPY dyes with high fluorescence in both solution and an aggregated state by combining DRET and FRET processes in a single donor-acceptor system. The first BODIPY derivatives with one, two, or three AIE-active diphenylacrylonitrile groups were designed and synthesized in moderate yields. Strong fluorescence emissions were observed in the THF solution under excitation at the absorption wavelength of non-emissive diphenylacrylonitrile chromophores, implying the existence of the DRET process between the dark diphenylacrylonitrile donor and the emissive BODIPY acceptor. In the THF/H 2 O solution, the fluorescence intensity of the novel BODIPY derivatives gradually increased under excitation at the absorption wavelength of diphenylacrylonitrile chromophores, suggesting a FRET process between diphenylacrylonitrile and BODIPY moieties. A greater number of diphenylacrylonitrile units led to higher energy-transfer efficiencies. The pseudo-Stokes shift for both DRET and FRET processes was as large as 190 nm.

  1. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  2. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic sensing using atomic defects in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinolds, Michael

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized modern medicine by providing non-invasive, chemically selective, three-dimensional imaging of living organisms. Industrial-scale MRI has the capability to image with millimeter-scale spatial resolution and has the sensitivity to detect as few as 1014 nuclear spins. Increasing spatial resolution to the atomic scale and sensitivity to the single-spin level would enable a wide array of applications most notably including imaging molecular structur. However, conventional MRI methods are already highly optimized, and further order-of-magnitude-scale improvements cannot be reasonably expected without employing fundamentally different technologies. This thesis presents an alternative approach to conventional MRI that pushes resolution and sensitivity to the individual atom and molecular level. The guiding principle for achieving multiple order-of-magnitude improvements is to miniaturize the key components of MRI: the detector and the source of magnetic-field gradients. By scaling down the physical size of these components to the nano- and atomic- scales, the signals from individual spins become measurable and resolvable. To miniature the detector, we employ an optically-active, paramagnetic atomic defect in diamond---a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center---as our sensor. Owing to its optical readout, long coherence times, atomic-size, and room-temperature compatibility, NV centers in diamond have the capability to measure the magnetic fields from individual spins, provided the sensor can be placed sufficiently close to a target to be measured. This thesis describes the experimental realization of a microscope that can perform sensitive magnetometry experiments using a single NV center that magnetically images by spatially scanning the NV center within a few nanometers of magnetic targets. With this technique we are able to demonstrate the first room-temperature magnetic imaging of individual electron spins. For miniaturizing

  3. Functional dependence of resonant harmonics on nanomechanical parameters in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramazio, Federico; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Rull Trinidad, Enrique; Staufer, Urs; Fraxedas, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of the dependence of resonant higher harmonics of rectangular cantilevers of an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a function of relevant parameters such as the cantilever force constant, tip radius and free oscillation amplitude as well as the stiffness of the sample's surface. The simulations reveal a universal functional dependence of the amplitude of the 6th harmonic (in resonance with the 2nd flexural mode) on these parameters, which can be expressed in terms of a gun-shaped function. This analytical expression can be regarded as a practical tool for extracting qualitative information from AFM measurements and it can be extended to any resonant harmonics. The experiments confirm the predicted dependence in the explored 3-45 N/m force constant range and 2-345 GPa sample's stiffness range. For force constants around 25 N/m, the amplitude of the 6th harmonic exhibits the largest sensitivity for ultrasharp tips (tip radius below 10 nm) and polymers (Young's modulus below 20 GPa).

  4. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V; Houel, Julien; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D; Warburton, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10(7) and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920-980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  5. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Warburton, Richard J.; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2013-01-01

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10 7 and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920–980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance

  6. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Warburton, Richard J. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Brunner, Daniel [Instituto de Física Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos, IFISC (CSIC-UIB), Campus Universitat Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Ludwig, Arne [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Reuter, Dirk [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department Physik, Universität Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10{sup 7} and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920–980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  7. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos...Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos” Date 13

  8. Photoionization of Xe inside C60: Atom-fullerene hybridization, giant cross-section enhancement, and correlation confinement resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madjet, Mohamed E.; Renger, Thomas; Hopper, Dale E.; McCune, Matthew A.; Chakraborty, Himadri S.; Rost, Jan-M.; Manson, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical study of the subshell photoionization of the Xe atom endohedrally confined in C 60 is presented. Powerful hybridization of the Xe 5s state with the bottom edge of C 60 π band is found that induces strong structures in the 5s ionization, causing the cross section to differ significantly from earlier results that omit this hybridization. The hybridization also affects the angular distribution asymmetry parameter of Xe 5p ionization near the Cooper minimum. The 5p cross section, on the other hand, is greatly enhanced by borrowing considerable oscillator strength from the C 60 giant plasmon resonance via the atom-fullerene dynamical interchannel coupling. Beyond the C 60 plasmon energy range the atomic subshell cross sections display confinement-induced oscillations in which, over the large 4d shape resonance region, the dominant 4d oscillations induce their ''clones'' in all degenerate weaker channels known as correlation confinement resonances.

  9. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold 85 Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  10. Optical and atomic stochastic resonances in the driven dissipative Jaynes-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyang; Tao, Shengdan; Liu, Cunjin; Guan, Shengguo; Xie, Min; Fan, Bixuan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study the stochastic resonance (SR) effect in a driven dissipative Jaynes-Cummings model. The SR effect is systematically investigated in the semiclassical and full quantum frameworks, and in both cases we find that SRs simultaneously occur for optical and atomic degrees of freedom. In particular, at zero temperature, quantum SR can be induced merely by vacuum fluctuations. Although the qualitative features of semiclassical SR and quantum SR are similar, their mechanisms are completely different: semiclassical SR is induced by thermal activation while quantum SR is induced by quantum-tunneling-assisted transitions. Our results provide a theoretical basis for experimentally observing and studying the SR phenomenon of the Jaynes-Cummings model in the quantum regime.

  11. Electron Spin Resonance and Atomic Force Microscopy Study on Gadolinium Doped Ceria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Oliva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined electron spin resonance (ESR and atomic force microscopy (AFM study on Ce1−xGdxO2−x/2 samples is here presented, aimed at investigating the evolution of the ESR spectral shape as a function of x in a wide composition range. At low x=0.02, the spectrum is composed of features at geff≈2; 2.8; 6. With increasing x, this pattern merges into a single geff≈2 broad ESR curve, which assumes a Dysonian-shaped profile at x≥0.5, whereas, at these x values, AFM measurements show an increasing surface roughness. It is suggested that the last could cause the formation of surface polaritons at the origin of the particular ESR spectral profile observed at these high Gd doping levels.

  12. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  13. Chip Scale Atomic Resonator Frequency Stabilization System With Ultra-Low Power Consumption for Optoelectronic Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianye; Zhang, Yaolin; Lu, Haoyuan; Hou, Dong; Zhang, Shuangyou; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    We present a long-term chip scale stabilization scheme for optoelectronic oscillators (OEOs) based on a rubidium coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic resonator. By locking a single mode of an OEO to the (85)Rb 3.035-GHz CPT resonance utilizing an improved phase-locked loop (PLL) with a PID regulator, we achieved a chip scale frequency stabilization system for the OEO. The fractional frequency stability of the stabilized OEO by overlapping Allan deviation reaches 6.2 ×10(-11) (1 s) and  ∼ 1.45 ×10 (-11) (1000 s). This scheme avoids a decrease in the extra phase noise performance induced by the electronic connection between the OEO and the microwave reference in common injection locking schemes. The total physical package of the stabilization system is [Formula: see text] and the total power consumption is 400 mW, which provides a chip scale and portable frequency stabilization approach with ultra-low power consumption for OEOs.

  14. On the tip calibration for accurate modulus measurement by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passeri, D., E-mail: daniele.passeri@uniroma1.it [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Centro di Ricerca per le Nanotecnologie Applicate all' Ingegneria della Sapienza (CNIS), University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Vlassak, J.J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Accurate quantitative elastic modulus measurements using contact resonance atomic force microscopy require the calibration of geometrical and mechanical properties of the tip as well as the choice of a suitable model for describing the cantilever-tip-sample system. In this work, we demonstrate with both simulations and experiments that the choice of the model influences the results of the calibration. Neglecting lateral force results in the underestimation of the tip indentation modulus and in the overestimation of the tip-sample contact radius. We propose a new approach to the calibration and data analysis, where lateral forces and cantilever inclination are neglected (which simplifies the calculations) and the tip parameters are assumed as fictitious. - Highlights: ► A calibration procedure is proposed for quantitative contact resonance AFM. ► It allows the use of simple analytical model that neglects lateral forces. ► Tip parameters are used as fictitious parameters. ► The approach is demonstrated with simulations and experiments.

  15. Probes for Dark Matter Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of cosmological dark matter is in the bedrock of the modern cosmology. The dark matter is assumed to be nonbaryonic and to consist of new stable particles. However if composite dark matter contains stable electrically charged leptons and quarks bound by ordinary Coulomb interaction in elusive dark atoms, these charged constituents of dark atoms can be the subject of direct experimental test at the colliders. In such models the excessive negatively double charged particles are bo...

  16. Studying plasmonic resonance modes of hierarchical self-assembled meta-atoms based on their transfer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadharma, Radius N. S.; Fruhnert, Martin; Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical self-assembled meta-atoms are made from a larger number of suitably arranged metallic nanoparticles. They constitute the basic building blocks for isotropic metamaterials. The properties of these meta-atoms are usually studied upon illumination with a plane wave and by analyzing the multipolar composition of the scattered field. This, however, does not always provide full information. The coupling between multiple meta-atoms is usually not considered, and a physical understanding for the cause of the response is often incomplete. Here we overcome these limitations by performing a spectral eigenvalue analysis of the transfer matrix of isolated and coupled self-assembled meta-atoms. Emphasis is put on using a transfer-matrix formulation in either a local or a global coordinate frame. We show that for the magnetic resonance, coupling to nearest neighbors is weak, suggesting the possibility to preserve the response of the isolated meta-atom upon tight packaging in a metamaterial.

  17. Constraints from Ly-α forests on non-thermal dark matter including resonantly-produced sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Julien; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Armengaud, Éric; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2017-12-01

    We use the large BOSS DR9 sample of quasar spectra to constrain two cases of non-thermal dark matter models: cold-plus-warm dark matter (C+WDM) where the warm component is a thermal relic, and sterile neutrinos resonantly produced in the presence of a lepton asymmetry (RPSN). We establish constraints on the thermal relic mass mx and its relative abundance Fwdm=Ωwdm/Ωdm using a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations in 28 C+WDM configurations. We find that the 3σ bounds in the mx - Fwdm parameter space approximately follow Fwdm ~ 0.35 (keV/mx)-1.37 from BOSS data alone. We also establish constraints on sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle by further producing the non-linear flux power spectrum of 8 RPSN models, where the input linear power spectrum is computed directly from the particles distribution functions. We find values of lepton asymmetries for which sterile neutrinos as light as ~ 6.5 keV (resp. 3.5 keV) are consistent with BOSS data at the 2σ (resp. 3σ) level. These limits tighten by close to a factor of 2 for values of lepton asymmetries departing from those yielding the coolest distribution functions. Our Lyman-α forest bounds can be additionally strengthened if we include higher-resolution data from XQ-100, HIRES and MIKE that allow us to probe smaller scales. At these scales, the measured flux power spectrum exhibits a suppression that can be due to Doppler broadening, IGM pressure smoothing or free-streaming of WDM particles. In order to distinguish between these mechanisms, thermal history at redshifts z >= 5 should be determined. In the current work, we show that if one extrapolates temperatures from lower redshifts via broken power laws in T0 and γ, then our 3σ C+WDM {bounds strengthen to Fwdm ~ 0.20 (keV/mx)-1.37, and the lightest resonantly-produced sterile neutrinos consistent with our extended data set have masses of ~ 7.0 keV at the 3σ level. In particular, using dedicated hydrodynamical simulations, we show that} a

  18. Pairwise additivity in the nuclear magnetic resonance interactions of atomic xenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2009-04-14

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of atomic (129/131)Xe is used as a versatile probe of the structure and dynamics of various host materials, due to the sensitivity of the Xe NMR parameters to intermolecular interactions. The principles governing this sensitivity can be investigated using the prototypic system of interacting Xe atoms. In the pairwise additive approximation (PAA), the binary NMR chemical shift, nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC), and spin-rotation (SR) curves for the xenon dimer are utilized for fast and efficient evaluation of the corresponding NMR tensors in small xenon clusters Xe(n) (n = 2-12). If accurate, the preparametrized PAA enables the analysis of the NMR properties of xenon clusters, condensed xenon phases, and xenon gas without having to resort to electronic structure calculations of instantaneous configurations for n > 2. The binary parameters for Xe(2) at different internuclear distances were obtained at the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock level of theory. Quantum-chemical (QC) calculations at the corresponding level were used to obtain the NMR parameters of the Xe(n) (n = 2-12) clusters at the equilibrium geometries. Comparison of PAA and QC data indicates that the direct use of the binary property curves of Xe(2) can be expected to be well-suited for the analysis of Xe NMR in the gaseous phase dominated by binary collisions. For use in condensed phases where many-body effects should be considered, effective binary property functions were fitted using the principal components of QC tensors from Xe(n) clusters. Particularly, the chemical shift in Xe(n) is strikingly well-described by the effective PAA. The coordination number Z of the Xe site is found to be the most important factor determining the chemical shift, with the largest shifts being found for high-symmetry sites with the largest Z. This is rationalized in terms of the density of virtual electronic states available for response to magnetic perturbations.

  19. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom adsorbed on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dino, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Rodulfo, Emmanuel Tapas; Nishi, Mayuko

    2006-01-01

    Manifestations of the Kondo effect on an atomic length scale on and around a magnetic atom adsorbed on a nonmagnetic surface differ depending on the spectroscopic mode of operation of the scanning tunneling microscope. Two prominent signatures of the Kondo effect that can be observed at surfaces are the development of a sharp resonance (Yosida-Kondo resonance) at the Fermi level, which broadens with increasing temperature, and the splitting of this sharp resonance upon application of an external magnetic field. Until recently, observing the temperature and magnetic field dependence has been a challenge, because the experimental conditions strongly depend on the system's critical temperature, the so-called Kondo temperature T K . In order to clearly observe the temperature dependence, one needs to choose a system with a large T K . One can thus perform the experiments at temperatures T K . However, because the applied external magnetic field necessary to observe the magnetic field dependence scales with T K , one needs to choose a system with a very small T K . This in turn means that one should perform the experiments at very low temperatures, e.g., in the mK range. Here we discuss the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the Yosida-Kondo resonance for a single magnetic atom on a metal surface, in relation to recent experimental developments

  20. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  1. Elastic-properties measurement at high temperatures through contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinello, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.marinello@unipd.it; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Sartori, Luigi; Cavalli, Raffaele [University of Padova, Department of Land, Environment, Agriculture and Forestry, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Carmignato, Simone [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, Stradella San Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy); Savio, Enrico [University of Padova, Department of Industrial Engineering, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); De Chiffre, Leonardo [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet 425, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-23

    Miniaturization of products and need for further improvement of machines performance introduce new serious challenges in materials characterization. In particular non-destructive mechanical testing in the sub-micrometer scale is needed to better understand and improve micro-manufacturing operations. To this regard, some open issues are of particular interest: low depth of penetration, high lateral resolution and measurements at elevated temperatures. An interesting solution is given by acoustic microscopy techniques, which can be successfully implemented for advanced research in surface elasticity, allowing fast direct and non-destructive measurement of Young’s modulus and related surface parameters. In this work an instrument set up for Contact Resonance Atomic Force Microscopy is proposed, where the sample with is coupled to a heating stage and a piezoelectric transducer directly vibrate the cantilever during scanning, in order to allow exploitation of high resolution measurements at relatively high temperatures. Such instrument set up was undergone a set of calibration experiments in order to allow not only qualitative but also quantitative characterization of surfaces. The work was completed with a feasibility study with mechanical and topography measurements at temperatures as high as 150°C, with lateral resolution lower than 100 nm.

  2. Dark matter that can form dark stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Hyung Do; Scopel, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The first stars to form in the Universe may be powered by the annihilation of weakly interacting dark matter particles. These so-called dark stars, if observed, may give us a clue about the nature of dark matter. Here we examine which models for particle dark matter satisfy the conditions for the formation of dark stars. We find that in general models with thermal dark matter lead to the formation of dark stars, with few notable exceptions: heavy neutralinos in the presence of coannihilations, annihilations that are resonant at dark matter freeze-out but not in dark stars, some models of neutrinophilic dark matter annihilating into neutrinos only and lighter than about 50 GeV. In particular, we find that a thermal DM candidate in standard Cosmology always forms a dark star as long as its mass is heavier than ≅ 50 GeV and the thermal average of its annihilation cross section is the same at the decoupling temperature and during the dark star formation, as for instance in the case of an annihilation cross section with a non-vanishing s-wave contribution

  3. Frozen lattice and absorptive model for high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A comparison study in terms of integrated intensity and atomic column position measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, M; Lobato, I; Van Aert, S

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, both the frozen lattice (FL) and the absorptive potential (AP) approximation models are compared in terms of the integrated intensity and the precision with which atomic columns can be located from an image acquired using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The comparison is made for atoms of Cu, Ag, and Au. The integrated intensity is computed for both an isolated atomic column and an atomic column inside an FCC structure. The precision has been computed using the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which provides a theoretical lower bound on the variance with which parameters can be estimated. It is shown that the AP model results into accurate measurements for the integrated intensity only for small detector ranges under relatively low angles and for small thicknesses. In terms of the attainable precision, both methods show similar results indicating picometer range precision under realistic experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oscillating spin-2 dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti; Urban, Federico R.

    2018-01-01

    The negative outcomes of laboratory searches, juxtaposed with cosmological observations, may indicate that dark matter has a gravitational origin. We show that coherent oscillations of a massive spin-2 field emerging from bimetric theory can easily account for the observed dark matter abundance. The framework, based on the only known consistent extension of general relativity to interacting spin-2 fields, is testable in precision measurements of the electric charge variation by means of atomic clocks, molecular systems, dedicated resonant mass detectors, as well as gravity interferometers and axionlike-particle experiments. These searches, therefore, provide a new window into the phenomenology of gravity which complements the results of dedicated tests of gravitation. We also present a multimetric extension of the scenario that straightforwardly implements the clockwork mechanism for gravity, explaining the apparent weakness of this force.

  5. Observation and resonant x-ray optical interpretation of multi-atom resonant photoemission effects in O 1s emission from NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, N.; Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Kay, A.W.; Sell, B.C.; Watanabe, M.; Ohldag, H.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.T.; Hussain, Z.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the variation of the O 1s intensity from a NiO(001) surface as the excitation energy is varied through the Ni 2p1/2,3/2 absorption resonances, and as the incidence angle of the radiation is varied from grazing to larger values. For grazing incidence, a strong multi-atom resonant photoemission(MARPE) effect is seen on the O 1s intensity as the Ni 2p resonances are crossed, but its magnitude decreases rapidly as the incidence angle is increased. Resonant x-ray optical (RXRO) calculations are found to predict these effects very well, although the experimental effects are found to decrease at higher incidence angles faster than those in theory. The potential influence of photoelectron diffraction effects on such measurements are also considered, including experimental data with azimuthal-angle variation and corresponding multiple-scattering-diffraction calculations, but we conclude that they do not vary beyond what is expected on the basis of the change in photoelectron kinetic energy. Varying from linear polarization to circular polarization is found to enhance these effects in NiO considerably, although the reasons are not clear. We also discuss the relationship of these measurements to other related interatomic resonance experiments and theoretical developments, and make some suggestions for future studies in this area

  6. Resonant Formation of dμt Molecules in Deuterium: An Atomic Beam Measurement of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M. C.; Adamczak, A.; Bailey, J. M.; Beer, G. A.; Beveridge, J. L.; Faifman, M. P.; Huber, T. M.; Kammel, P.; Kim, S. K.; Knowles, P. E.

    2000-01-01

    Resonant formation of dμt molecules in collisions of muonic tritium (μt ) on D 2 was investigated using a beam of μt atoms, demonstrating a new direct approach in muon catalyzed fusion studies. Strong epithermal resonances in dμt formation were directly revealed for the first time. From the time-of-flight analysis of 2036±116 dt fusion events, a formation rate consistent with 0.73±(0.16) meas ± (0.09) model times the theoretical prediction was obtained. For the largest peak at a resonance energy of 0.423±0.037 eV , this corresponds to a rate of (7.1±1.8)x10 9 s -1 , more than an order of magnitude larger than those at low energies. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  8. Dynamics of excimer laser-ablated aluminum neutral atom plume measured by dye laser resonance absorption photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Ventzek, P.L.G.

    1991-01-01

    We report the first dye laser resonance absorption photographs of a single species of aluminum ground-state neutral atoms in the plume ablated from solid aluminum by KrF excimer laser radiation. Aluminum ground-state neutral atoms were diagnosed by illuminating the ablated plume with a dye laser tuned to the 3 2 P 1/2 --4 2 S 1/2 transition at 394.4 nm. Measurements have been performed in vacuum as well as in argon and air environments. Streaming velocities measured for neutral aluminum atoms in vacuum ranged from 0.5x10 6 cm/s at low excimer laser fluences of 1--2 J/cm 2 to 3.4x10 6 cm/s at high fluences of 7 J/cm 2 . Dye laser resonance absorption photography measurements of ablated aluminum in argon and air showed slower expansion at 50 and 200 Torr, while observations at 760 Torr indicate turbulent mixing of aluminum neutrals near the surface. Differences between data in argon and air may be due to oxidation of neutral aluminum atoms

  9. Storage and conversion of quantum-statistical properties of light in resonant quantum memory on a tripod atomic configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, A. S.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Golubeva, T. Yu; Golubev, Yu M.

    2016-10-01

    We have considered theoretically the feasibility of broadband quantum memory based on the resonant tripod-type atomic configuration. In this case, the writing of a signal field is carried out simultaneously into two channels, and characterized by an excitation of two spin waves of the atomic ensemble. With simultaneous read out from both channels, quantum properties of the original signal are mapped onto the retrieval pulse no worse than in the case of memory based on a Λ-type atomic configuration. At the same time new possibilities are opened up for the manipulation of quantum states associated with sequential reading out (and/or sequential writing) of signal pulses. For example, a pulse in the squeezed state is converted into two partially entangled pulses with partially squeezed quadratures. Alternatively, two independent signal pulses with orthogonally squeezed quadratures can be converted into two entangled pulses.

  10. Electron spin resonance of the solvation of radiation-produced silver atoms in alcohol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.S.W.; Kevan, L.

    1982-01-01

    Frozen solutions of silver salts exposed to 60 Co γ-irradiation form silver atoms by reaction of radiation-produced electrons with the silver ion. At 4 K the silver atoms are initially produced in a nonequilibrium or presolvated state and upon brief thermal excitation to 77 K the first solvation shell geometry changes towards an equilibrium or solvated silver atom. This is most pronounced in water but also occurs in methanol, ethanol and n-propanol matrices. The changes in the electron spin resonance magnetic parameters upon silver atom solvation have been determined. In alcohol-water mixtures Ag 0 is preferentially solvated by polycrystalline water at low alcohol concentration. Above a particular alcohol mole percent Ag 0 suddenly changes its environment to a glassy alcohol one. This sudden change occurs at 17, 13 and 6 mol % methanol, ethanol and n-propanol, respectively. These mole percents correlate with the minimum of the excess enthalpy of mixing and with the hydrogen atom trapping ability of these alcohol-water mixtures. The results also suggest that the local environmental disorder around Ag 0 increases with alcohol chain length in alcohol-water frozen solutions. (author)

  11. Novel tunable dynamic tweezers using dark-bright soliton collision control in an optical add/drop filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeka, Chat; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Yupapin, Preecha P; Ali, Jalil

    2010-12-01

    We propose a novel system of the dynamic optical tweezers generated by a dark soliton in the fiber optic loop. A dark soliton known as an optical tweezer is amplified and tuned within the microring resonator system. The required tunable tweezers with different widths and powers can be controlled. The analysis of dark-bright soliton conversion using a dark soliton pulse propagating within a microring resonator system is analyzed. The dynamic behaviors of soliton conversion in add/drop filter is also analyzed. The control dark soliton is input into the system via the add port of the add/drop filter. The dynamic behavior of the dark-bright soliton conversion is observed. The required stable signal is obtained via a drop and throughput ports of the add/drop filter with some suitable parameters. In application, the trapped light/atom and transportation can be realized by using the proposed system.

  12. Maximum coherent superposition state achievement using a non-resonant pulse train in non-degenerate three-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Li; Niu, Yueping; Jin, Luling; Gong, Shangqing

    2010-01-01

    The coherent superposition state of the lower two levels in non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms is investigated using the accumulative effects of non-resonant pulse trains when the repetition period is smaller than the decay time of the upper level. First, using a rectangular pulse train, the accumulative effects are re-examined in the non-resonant two-level atoms and the modified constructive accumulation equation is analytically given. The equation shows that the relative phase and the repetition period are important in the accumulative effect. Next, under the modified equation in the non-degenerate three-level Λ atoms, we show that besides the constructive accumulation effect, the use of the partial constructive accumulation effect can also achieve the steady state of the maximum coherent superposition state of the lower two levels and the latter condition is relatively easier to manipulate. The analysis is verified by numerical calculations. The influence of the external levels in such a case is also considered and we find that it can be avoided effectively. The above analysis is also applicable to pulse trains with arbitrary envelopes.

  13. Resonance interaction of two-level atoms with an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanchenko, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    A consistent investigation of two-level atom interaction with the quantum electromagnetic field is conducted. Radiation mechanism of two-level atom relaxation is described in the framework of Keldysh diagram technique. It is shown that equilibrium state in strong fields is established at the expense of radiation transitions between quaSi-enepgetic statrs. There is no full saturation in strong fields

  14. A Separable Insertion Method to Calculate Atomic and Molecular Resonances on a FE-DVR Grid using Exterior Complex Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeln, Brant Anthony

    The study of metastable electronic resonances, anion or neutral states of finite lifetime, in molecules is an important area of research where currently no theoretical technique is generally applicable. The role of theory is to calculate both the position and width, which is proportional to the inverse of the lifetime, of these resonances and how they vary with respect to nuclear geometry in order to generate potential energy surfaces. These surfaces are the basis of time-dependent models of the molecular dynamics where the system moves towards vibrational excitation or fragmentation. Three fundamental electronic processes that can be modeled this way are dissociative electronic attachment, vibrational excitation through electronic impact and autoionization. Currently, experimental investigation into these processes is being preformed on polyatomic molecules while theoreticians continue their fifty-year-old search for robust methods to calculate them. The separable insertion method, investigated in this thesis, seeks to tackle the problem of calculating metastable resonances by using existing quantum chemistry tools along with a grid-based method employing exterior complex scaling (ECS). Modern quantum chemistry methods are extremely efficient at calculating ground and (bound) excited electronic states of atoms and molecules by utilizing Gaussian basis functions. These functions provide both a numerically fast and analytic solution to the necessary two-electron, six-dimensional integrals required in structure calculations. However, these computer programs, based on analytic Gaussian basis sets, cannot construct solutions that are not square-integrable, such as resonance wavefunctions. ECS, on the other hand, can formally calculate resonance solutions by rotating the asymptotic electronic coordinates into the complex plane. The complex Siegert energies for resonances, Eres = ER - iGamma/2 where ER is the real-valued position of the resonance and Gamma is the width

  15. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  16. Microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential in finite nuclei with Λ(1405) and Σ(1385) resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Masaki; Hirenzaki, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We derive kaonic-atom optical potentials in finite nuclei microscopically by taking into account the K - NΛ(1405) and K - NΣ(1385) interactions. Using the microscopic optical potentials we solve kaonic atoms with the Klein-Gordon equation in momentum space and obtain the kaonic-atom level shifts and the widths. The experimental data are reproduced well. We discuss also phenomenological optical potentials and compare them with the microscopic ones. In addition, we derive optical potentials in the local-density approximation with the use of the finite-matter kaon self-energy. We find a similarity with the microscopic optical potential derived with finite geometry. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of thallium evaporation by the method of laser resonance photoionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhlibaev, O; Temorov, Zh.P.

    1998-01-01

    Using the method of laser stepwise resonance photoionization the evaporation rate the vapor pressure were measured for metallic thallium in the temperature range of 480-1205 K. The minimal pressure having been measured equals 10 -9 Pa

  18. Models of the Dynamics of Spatially Separated Broadband Electromagnetic Fields Interacting with Resonant Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharov, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Markov model of spontaneous emission of an atom localized in a spatial region with a broadband electromagnetic field with zero photon density is considered in the conditions of coupling of the electromagnetic field with the broadband field of a neighboring space. The evolution operator of the system and the kinetic equation for the atom are obtained. It is shown that the field coupling constant affects the rate of spontaneous emission of the atom, but is not manifested in the atomic frequency shift. The analytic expression for the radiative decay constant for the atom is found to be analogous in a certain sense to the expression for the decay constant for a singly excited localized ensemble of identical atoms in the conditions when the effect of stabilization of its excited state by the Stark interaction with the vacuum broadband electromagnetic field is manifested. The model is formulated based on quantum stochastic differential equations of the non- Wiener type and the generalized algebra of the Ito differential of quantum random processes.

  19. Search for dijet resonances in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV and constraints on dark matter and other models

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Zykunov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Ruan, Manqi; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Alexakhin, Vadim; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Danilov, Mikhail; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Verweij, Marta; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Topakli, Huseyin; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Jesus, Orduna; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Si, Weinan; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Yujun; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kumar, Ajay; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-06-10

    A search is presented for narrow resonances decaying to dijet final states in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 13 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.9 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass spectrum is well described by a smooth parameterization and no significant evidence for the production of new particles is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are reported on the production cross section for narrow resonances with masses above 0.6 TeV. In the context of specific models, the limits exclude string resonances with masses below 7.4 TeV, scalar diquarks below 6.9 TeV, axigluons and colorons below 5.5 TeV, excited quarks below 5.4 TeV, color-octet scalars below 3.0 TeV, $\\mathrm{ W^{+} } ' $ bosons below 2.7 TeV, $\\mathrm{ Z }'$ bosons below 2.1 TeV and between 2.3 and 2.6 TeV, and RS gravitons below 1.9 TeV. These extend previous limits in the dijet channel. Vector and axial-vector mediators in a simplified model of interactions between quarks and dark matter are excluded below...

  20. Dark state in a nonlinear optomechanical system with quadratic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue-Xin; Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    We consider a hybrid system consisting of a cavity optomechanical device with nonlinear quadratic radiation pressure coupled to an atomic ensemble. By considering the collective excitation, we show that this system supports nontrivial, nonlinear dark states. The coupling strength can be tuned via the lasers that ensure the population transfer adiabatically between the mechanical modes and the collective atomic excitations in a controlled way. In addition, we show how to detect the dark-state resonance by calculating the single-photon spectrum of the output fields and the transmission of the probe beam based on two-phonon optomechanically induced transparency. Possible application and extension of the dark states are also discussed. Supported by the National Fundamental Research Program of China (Grants No. 2011CB921200 and No. 2011CBA00200), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB01030200), and NSFC (Grants No. 61275122 and 11474266).

  1. Existence and switching behavior of bright and dark Kerr solitons in whispering-gallery mode resonators with zero group-velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talla Mbé, Jimmi H.; Milián, Carles; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2017-07-01

    We use the generalized Lugiato-Lefever model to investigate the phenomenon of Kerr optical frequency comb generation when group-velocity dispersion is null. In that case, the first dispersion term that plays a leading role is third-order dispersion. We show that this term is sufficient to allow for the existence of both bright and dark solitons. We identify the areas in the parameter space where both kind of solitons can be excited inside the resonator. We also unveil a phenomenon of hysteretic switching between these two types of solitons when the power of the pump laser is cyclically varied. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  2. Observation of double resonant laser induced transitions in the $v = n - l - 1 = 2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic helium-4 atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Tamura, H; Torii, H A; Hori, Masaki; Maas, F E; Morita, N; Kumakura, M; Sugai, I; Hartmann, F J; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Ketzer, B; Pohl, R; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    1997-01-01

    A new laser-induced resonant transition in the $v=n-l-1=2$ metastable cascade of antiprotonic $^4$He atoms has been found by using a double resonance technique. This was done by setting the first laser to the already known 470.724 nm resonance ($(n,l)=(37,34)\\rightarrow (36,33)$), while the $(38,35)\\rightarrow (37,34)$ transition was searched for with the second laser. The resonant transition was found at wavelength of 529.622$\\pm$0.003 nm, showing excellent agreement with a recent prediction of Korobov.

  3. Anomalies in resonant absorption line profiles of atoms with large hyperfine splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, A.I.; Pod'yachev, S.P.; Privalov, T.I.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    We examine a monochromatic absorption line in the velocity-nonselective excitation of atoms when the components of the hyperfine stricture of the electronic ground states are optically pumped. We show that the absorption lines possess unusual substructures for some values of the hyperfine splitting of the ground state (which exceed the Doppler absorption linewidth severalfold). These substructures in the absorption spectrum are most apparent if the hyperfine structure of the excited electronic state is taken into account. We calculate the absorption spectra of monochromatic light near the D 1 and D 2 lines of atomic rubidium 85,87 Rb. With real hyperfine splitting taken into account, the D 1 and D 2 lines are modeled by 4- and 6-level diagrams, respectively. Finally, we show that atomic rubidium vapor can be successfully used to observe the spectral features experimentally

  4. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-05

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting.

  5. Periodically modulated dark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingying; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Wenxian

    2018-04-01

    Phenomena of electromagnetically induced transparency (PEIT) may be interpreted by the Autler-Townes Splitting (ATS), where the coupled states are split by the coupling laser field, or by the quantum destructive interference (QDI), where the atomic phases caused by the coupling laser and the probe laser field cancel. We propose modulated experiments to explore the PEIT in an alternative way by periodically modulating the coupling and the probe fields in a Λ-type three-level system initially in a dark state. Our analytical and numerical results rule out the ATS interpretation and show that the QDI interpretation is more appropriate for the modulated experiments. Interestingly, dark state persists in the double-modulation situation where control and probe fields never occur simultaneously, which is significant difference from the traditional dark state condition. The proposed experiments are readily implemented in atomic gases, artificial atoms in superconducting quantum devices, or three-level meta-atoms in meta-materials.

  6. The dark side of cosmology: dark matter and dark energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spergel, David N

    2015-03-06

    A simple model with only six parameters (the age of the universe, the density of atoms, the density of matter, the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, the scale dependence of this amplitude, and the epoch of first star formation) fits all of our cosmological data . Although simple, this standard model is strange. The model implies that most of the matter in our Galaxy is in the form of "dark matter," a new type of particle not yet detected in the laboratory, and most of the energy in the universe is in the form of "dark energy," energy associated with empty space. Both dark matter and dark energy require extensions to our current understanding of particle physics or point toward a breakdown of general relativity on cosmological scales. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. New generation polyphase resonant converter-modulators for the Korean atomic energy research institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gribble, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This paper will present operational data and performance parameters of the newest generation polyphase resonant high voltage converter modulator (HVCM) as developed and delivered to the KAERI 100 MeV ''PEFP'' accelerator [1]. The KAERI design realizes improvements from the SNS and SLAC designs [2]. To improve the IGBT switching performance at 20 kHz for the KAERI system, the HVCM utilizes the typical zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) at turn on and as well as artificial zero-current-switching (ZCS) at turn-off. The new technique of artificial ZCS technique should result in a 6 fold reduction of IGBT switching losses (3). This improves the HCVM conversion efficiency to better than 95% at full average power, which is 500 kW for the KAERI two klystron 105 kV, 50 A application. The artificial ZCS is accomplished by placing a resonant RLC circuit across the input busswork to the resonant boost transformer. This secondary resonant circuit provides a damped ''kick-back'' to assist in IGBT commutation. As the transformer input busswork is extremely low inductance (< 10 nH), the single RLC network acts like it is across each of the four IGBT collector-emitter terminals of the H-bridge switching network. We will review these topological improvements and the overall system as delivered to the KAERI accelerator and provide details of the operational results.

  8. Resonant interaction of a single atom with single photons from a down-conversion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, C.; Rohde, F.; Piro, N.; Almendros, M.; Huwer, J.; Mitchell, M. W.; Hennrich, M.; Haase, A.; Dubin, F.; Eschner, J.

    2010-01-01

    We observe the interaction of a single trapped calcium ion with single photons produced by a narrow-band, resonant down-conversion source [A. Haase , Opt. Lett. 34, 55 (2009)], employing a quantum jump scheme. Using the temperature dependence of the down-conversion spectrum and the tunability of the narrow source, absorption of the down-conversion photons is quantitatively characterized.

  9. Atomic and Molecular Complex Resonances from Real Eigenvalues Using Standard (Hermitian) Electronic Structure Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landau, A.; Haritan, I.; Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 19 (2016), s. 3098-3108 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : autoionizing states * coordinate calculation * scattering resonances Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  10. Atom-at-a-time laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of nobelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Lauth, Werner; Backe, Hartmut; Block, Michael; Ackermann, Dieter; Cheal, Bradley; Chhetri, Premaditya; Düllmann, Christoph Emanuel; van Duppen, Piet; Even, Julia; Ferrer, Rafael; Giacoppo, Francesca; Götz, Stefan; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Huyse, Mark; Kaleja, Oliver; Khuyagbaatar, Jadambaa; Kunz, Peter; Lautenschläger, Felix; Mistry, Andrew Kishor; Raeder, Sebastian; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Walther, Thomas; Wraith, Calvin; Yakushev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy of a primordial isotope has traditionally formed the basis for understanding the atomic structure of an element. Such studies have been conducted for most elements and theoretical modelling can be performed to high precision, taking into account relativistic effects that scale

  11. Dark group: dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macorra, A. de la

    2004-01-01

    We study the possibility that a dark group, a gauge group with particles interacting with the standard model particles only via gravity, is responsible for containing the dark energy and dark matter required by present day observations. We show that it is indeed possible and we determine the constrains for the dark group. The non-perturbative effects generated by a strong gauge coupling constant can de determined and a inverse power law scalar potential IPL for the dark meson fields is generated parameterizing the dark energy. On the other hand it is the massive particles, e.g., dark baryons, of the dark gauge group that give the corresponding dark matter. The mass of the dark particles is of the order of the condensation scale Λ c and the temperature is smaller then the photon's temperature. The dark matter is of the warm matter type. The only parameters of the model are the number of particles of the dark group. The allowed values of the different parameters are severely restricted. The dark group energy density at Λ c must be Ω DGc ≤0.17 and the evolution and acceptable values of dark matter and dark energy leads to a constrain of Λ c and the IPL parameter n giving Λ c =O(1-10 3 ) eV and 0.28≤n≤1.04

  12. Resonant interaction of a single atom with single photons from a down-conversion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, C.; Rohde, F.; Piro, N.; Almendros, M.; Huwer, J.; Mitchell, M. W.; Hennrich, M.; Haase, A.; Dubin, F.; Eschner, J.

    2010-01-01

    We observe the interaction of a single trapped calcium ion with single photons produced by a narrow-band, resonant down-conversion source [A. Haase et al., Opt. Lett. 34, 55 (2009)], employing a quantum jump scheme. Using the temperature dependence of the down-conversion spectrum and the tunability of the narrow source, absorption of the down-conversion photons is quantitatively characterized.

  13. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prastani, C.; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Fejfar, Antonín; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 8 (2012), , "083107-1"-"083107-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk 7E10061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * nanoparticles * tin compounds * tunnelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2012

  14. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    KAUST Repository

    Yakshina, E. A.

    2016-10-21

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ∼100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb(nP3/2)+Rb(nP3/2)→Rb(nS1/2)+Rb([n+1]S1/2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  15. Adiabatic passage of radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances in Rydberg atoms for two-qubit gates and the generation of Bell states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beterov, I. I.; Hamzina, G. N.; Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2018-03-01

    High-fidelity entangled Bell states are of great interest in quantum physics. Entanglement of ultracold neutral atoms in two spatially separated optical dipole traps is promising for implementation of quantum computing and quantum simulation and for investigation of Bell states of material objects. We propose a method to entangle two atoms via long-range Rydberg-Rydberg interaction. Alternative to previous approaches, based on Rydberg blockade, we consider radio-frequency-assisted Stark-tuned Förster resonances in Rb Rydberg atoms. To reduce the sensitivity of the fidelity of Bell states to the fluctuations of interatomic distance, we propose to use the double adiabatic passage across the radio-frequency-assisted Stark-tuned Förster resonances, which results in a deterministic phase shift of the collective two-atom state.

  16. Numerical computations of the Lennard-Jones resonances and ''relative displacements'' of the scattered atomic beams from the system He/LiF(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of the attractive part of the interaction potential on the scattering of He atoms from a LiF(001) surface. We calculate, in particular, the Lennard-Jones resonances on the intensities and the phases of the scattered amplitudes, using a square well in the front of a hard corrugated surface model. We show that the amplitudes for incident energies smaller than the depth of the well are dominated by the resonances

  17. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  18. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscetti I

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Moscetti,1 Emanuela Teveroni,2,3 Fabiola Moretti,3 Anna Rita Bizzarri,1 Salvatore Cannistraro1 1Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Department DEB, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; 2Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Università Cattolica di Roma, Roma, Italy; 3Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR, Roma, Italy Abstract: Murine double minute 2 (MDM2 and 4 (MDM4 are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. Keywords: MDM2, MDM4, atomic force spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance

  19. Resonant Coulomb excitation of atomic nuclei propagating through a crystal in the channeling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The Coulomb-excitation total cross section and the distribution of decay products originating from a resonant state of a nucleus interacting with a crystal lattice has been calculated for the case of a single inelastic collision (with respect to internal degrees of freedom in a nucleus). These observables have been expressed in terms of time-dependent correlators which describe thermal oscillations of lattice nuclei and the motion of the center of mass of a nucleus propagating across a crystal target in the channelling mode. An expression generalizing the spectrum of equivalent photons calculated by the Weizsaecker-Williams method is given

  20. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  1. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria [JILA (NIST and University of Colorado) and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (''slinky scheme'').

  2. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (''slinky scheme'').

  3. Resonantly enhanced tunneling and transport of ultracold atoms on tilted optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbo, Chester P.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Peden, Brandon M.; Holland, Murray J.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the resonantly enhanced tunneling dynamics of ultracold bosons loaded on a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice, which can be used to simulate a chain of Ising spins and associated quantum phase transitions. The center-of-mass motion after a sudden tilt both at commensurate and incommensurate fillings is obtained via analytic, time-dependent exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group methods. We identify a maximum in the amplitude of the center-of-mass oscillations at the quantum critical point of the effective spin system. For the dynamics of incommensurate systems, which cannot be mapped to a spin model, we develop an analytical approach in which the time evolution is obtained by projecting onto resonant families of small clusters. We compare the results of this approach at low fillings to the exact time evolution and find good agreement even at filling factors as large as 2/3. Using this projection onto small clusters, we propose a controllable transport scheme applicable in the context of Atomtronic devices on optical lattices (“slinky scheme”).

  4. Dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caldwell, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Observations continue to indicate that the Universe is dominated by invisible components - dark matter and dark energy. Shedding light on this cosmic darkness is a priority for astronomers and physicists" (3 pages)

  5. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...... theoretical consciousness through historical narrative ‘in practice’, by discussing selected historical topics from Western cultural history, within the disciplines of history, literature, visual arts, musicology, archaeology, philosophy, and theology. The title Resonances indicates the overall perspective...... of the book: how connotations of past meanings may resonate through time, in new contexts, assuming new meanings without surrendering the old....

  6. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  7. LINE SHAPES OF DOPPLER-FREE RESONANCE IN SRFM: STRONG ATOM-WALL INTERACTION AND PRESSURE EFFECT ON THE FREQUENCY SHIFT OF AN ALKALI VAPOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B BOUHAFS

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The attractive potential energy between the atoms of rubidium vapor and a dielectric wall has been investigated by monitoring the reflection light at the interface. The atom- wall interaction potential of the form V(z = - C /z3 (z: atom-wall allows to predict experimental results only for weak regime, i.e., where C<< 0.2 kHzmm3. In the strong interaction case, the dispersive line shape is turned into an absorption-type line shape. The influence of atomic density on the shift of  the selective reflection resonance  relatively to the frequency of unperturbed atomic transition is found to be red with a negative slope. This technique opens the way to characterize the windows made of different materials thin films.

  8. Parity Violation by a Dark Gauge Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hye-Sung

    2014-01-01

    We overview the dark parity violation, which means the parity violation induced by a dark gauge boson of very small mass and coupling. When a dark gauge boson has an axial coupling, as in dark Z model, it can change the effective Weinberg angle in the low-energy experiments such as the atomic parity violation and the low-Q^2 polarized electron scatterings. Such low-energy parity tests are an excellent probe of the dark force.

  9. Effects of adsorbed pyridine derivatives and ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited alumina coatings on the conduction band-edge energy of TiO2 and on redox-shuttle-derived dark currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J D; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-01-15

    Both the adsorption of t-butylpyridine and the atomic-layer deposition of ultrathin conformal coatings of insulators (such as alumina) are known to boost open-circuit photovoltages substantially for dye-sensitized solar cells. One attractive interpretation is that these modifiers significantly shift the conduction-edge energy of the electrode, thereby shifting the onset potential for dark current arising from the interception of injected electrons by solution-phase redox shuttle components such as Co(phenanthroline)(3)(3+) and triiodide. For standard, high-area, nanoporous photoelectrodes, band-edge energies are difficult to measure directly. In contrast, for flat electrodes they are readily accessible from Mott-Schottky analyses of impedance data. Using such electrodes (specifically TiO(2)), we find that neither organic nor inorganic electrode-surface modifiers shift the conduction-band-edge energy sufficiently to account fully for the beneficial effects on electrode behavior (i.e., the suppression of dark current). Additional experiments reveal that the efficacy of ultrathin coatings of Al(2)O(3) arises chiefly from the passivation of redox-catalytic surface states. In contrast, adsorbed t-butylpyridine appears to suppress dark currents mainly by physically blocking access of shuttle molecules to the electrode surface. Studies with other derivatives of pyridine, including sterically and/or electronically diverse derivatives, show that heterocycle adsorption and the concomitant suppression of dark current does not require the coordination of surface Ti(IV) or Al(III) atoms. Notably, the favorable (i.e., negative) shifts in onset potential for the flow of dark current engendered by organic and inorganic surface modifiers are additive. Furthermore, they appear to be largely insensitive to the identity of shuttle molecules.

  10. Atomic-Monolayer Two-Dimensional Lateral Quasi-Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors with Resonant Tunneling Phenomenon

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Che-Yu

    2017-10-04

    High-frequency operation with ultra-thin, lightweight and extremely flexible semiconducting electronics are highly desirable for the development of mobile devices, wearable electronic systems and defense technologies. In this work, the first experimental observation of quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors utilizing a monolayer of the lateral WSe2-MoS2 junctions as the conducting p-n channel is demonstrated. Both lateral n-p-n and p-n-p heterojunction bipolar transistors are fabricated to exhibit the output characteristics and current gain. A maximum common-emitter current gain of around 3 is obtained in our prototype two-dimensional quasi-heterojunction bipolar transistors. Interestingly, we also observe the negative differential resistance in the electrical characteristics. A potential mechanism is that the negative differential resistance is induced by resonant tunneling phenomenon due to the formation of quantum well under applying high bias voltages. Our results open the door to two-dimensional materials for high-frequency, high-speed, high-density and flexible electronics.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  12. Large-field behavior of the LoSurdo-Stark resonances in atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, G. (Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)); Silverstone, H.J. (Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States))

    1994-12-01

    The Schroedinger equation for atomic hydrogen in a large electric field [ital F] is solved by separation in parabolic coordinates. As [ital F][r arrow][infinity], the scaled field [ital f] that enters the separated equations tends to 0. Thus the large-[ital F] asymptotics depend on the small-[ital f] behavior of the separated equations, each of which in turn is equivalent to a quarticly perturbed two-dimensional anharmonic oscillator. The Bender-Wu branch cuts of the oscillator play a major role in the hydrogen asymptotics. A simple iterative algorithm permits the calculation of the branch points at which two eigenvalues coincide. We have found numerically that, as [ital F][r arrow][infinity], the separation constant [beta][sub 1] returns to the smaller of the unperturbed values [beta][sub 1][sup (0)] or [beta][sub 2][sup (0)]. At the same time, [beta][sub 2] tends to the negative of the smaller value. As the real electric field [ital F] increases from 0 to [infinity], in each case that [beta][sub 1][sup (0)] and [beta][sub 2][sup (0)] are not equal, the trajectory of either [ital f] or [ital e][sup [minus][ital i][pi

  13. RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    maceutical, paper, food, dyes, petrochemi- cals, pigments, etc., to identify molecules, to monitor reaction products and so on. One of the most spectacular contributions of NMR has been in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a method that has today revolutionized diagnosis and treatment of diseases in ...

  14. Blinking fluorescence of single donor-acceptor pairs: important role of "dark'' states in resonance energy transfer via singlet levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osad'ko, I S; Shchukina, A L

    2012-06-01

    The influence of triplet levels on Förster resonance energy transfer via singlet levels in donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs is studied. Four types of D-A pair are considered: (i) two-level donor and two-level acceptor, (ii) three-level donor and two-level acceptor, (iii) two-level donor and three-level acceptor, and (iv) three-level donor and three-level acceptor. If singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are ineffective, the energy transfer efficiency E=I_{A}/(I_{A}+I_{D}), where I_{D} and I_{A} are the average intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence, can be described by the simple theoretical equation E(F)=FT_{D}/(1+FT_{D}). Here F is the rate of energy transfer, and T_{D} is the donor fluorescence lifetime. In accordance with the last equation, 100% of the donor electronic energy can be transferred to an acceptor molecule at FT_{D}≫1. However, if singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are effective, the energy transfer efficiency is described by another theoretical equation, E(F)=F[over ¯](F)T_{D}/[1+F[over ¯](F)T_{D}]. Here F[over ¯](F) is a function of F depending on singlet-triplet transitions in both donor and acceptor molecules. Expressions for the functions F[over ¯](F) are derived. In this case the energy transfer efficiency will be far from 100% even at FT_{D}≫1. The character of the intensity fluctuations of donor and acceptor fluorescence indicates which of the two equations for E(F) should be used to find the value of the rate F. Therefore, random time instants of photon emission in both donor and acceptor fluorescence are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for all four types of D-A pair. Theoretical expressions for start-stop correlators (waiting time distributions) in donor and acceptor fluorescence are derived. The probabilities w_{N}^{D}(t) and w_{N}^{A}(t) of finding N photons of donor and acceptor fluorescence in the time interval t are calculated for various values of the energy

  15. Application of Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy for the screening of blood samples from patients with clinical variant and sporadic CJD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ironside James W

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD infection and reports of vCJD transmission through blood transfusion emphasise the need for blood screening assays to ensure the safety of blood and transplanted tissues. Most assays aim to detect abnormal prion protein (PrPSc, although achieving required sensitivity is a challenge. Methods We have used innovative Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy (ADRS, which determines dielectric properties of materials which are established by reflectivity and penetration of radio/micro waves, to analyse blood samples from patients and controls to identify characteristic ADR signatures unique to blood from vCJD and to sCJD patients. Initial sets of blood samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors were screened as training samples to determine group-specific ADR characteristics, and provided a basis for classification of blinded sets of samples. Results Blood sample groups from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors screened by ADRS were classified with 100% specificity and sensitivity, discriminating these by a co-variance expert analysis system. Conclusion ADRS appears capable of recognising and discriminating serum samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases, and normal healthy adults, and might be developed to provide a system for primary screening or confirmatory assay complementary to other screening systems.

  16. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  17. Application of Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy for the screening of blood samples from patients with clinical variant and sporadic CJD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagge, Timothy J; Barclay, G Robin; Stove, G Colin; Stove, Gordon; Robinson, Michael J; Head, Mark W; Ironside, James W; Turner, Marc L

    2007-01-01

    Background Sub-clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) infection and reports of vCJD transmission through blood transfusion emphasise the need for blood screening assays to ensure the safety of blood and transplanted tissues. Most assays aim to detect abnormal prion protein (PrPSc), although achieving required sensitivity is a challenge. Methods We have used innovative Atomic Dielectric Resonance Spectroscopy (ADRS), which determines dielectric properties of materials which are established by reflectivity and penetration of radio/micro waves, to analyse blood samples from patients and controls to identify characteristic ADR signatures unique to blood from vCJD and to sCJD patients. Initial sets of blood samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors) were screened as training samples to determine group-specific ADR characteristics, and provided a basis for classification of blinded sets of samples. Results Blood sample groups from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases and normal healthy adults (blood donors) screened by ADRS were classified with 100% specificity and sensitivity, discriminating these by a co-variance expert analysis system. Conclusion ADRS appears capable of recognising and discriminating serum samples from vCJD, sCJD, non-CJD neurological diseases, and normal healthy adults, and might be developed to provide a system for primary screening or confirmatory assay complementary to other screening systems. PMID:17760958

  18. Dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, D.; Pietroni, M.; Riotto, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is a puzzle why the densities of dark matter and dark energy are nearly equal today when they scale so differently during the expansion of the universe. This conundrum may be solved if there is a coupling between the two dark sectors. In this Letter we assume that dark matter is made of cold relics with masses depending exponentially on the scalar field associated to dark energy. Since the dynamics of the system is dominated by an attractor solution, the dark matter particle mass is forced to change with time as to ensure that the ratio between the energy densities of dark matter and dark energy become a constant at late times and one readily realizes that the present-day dark matter abundance is not very sensitive to its value when dark matter particles decouple from the thermal bath. We show that the dependence of the present abundance of cold dark matter on the parameters of the model differs drastically from the familiar results where no connection between dark energy and dark matter is present. In particular, we analyze the case in which the cold dark matter particle is the lightest supersymmetric particle

  19. Conversion of Gravitons into Dark Photons in Cosmological Dark Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki, Emi; Soda, Jiro

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that gravitons can convert into photons, and vice versa, in the presence of cosmological magnetic fields. We study this conversion process in the context of atomic dark matter scenario. In this scenario, we can expect cosmological dark magnetic fields, which are free from the stringent constraint from the cosmic microwave observations. We find that gravitons can effectively convert into dark photons in the presence of cosmological dark magnetic fields. The graviton-dark photo...

  20. In-situ scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy Young's modulus determination of indium oxide microrods for micromechanical resonator applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolomé, Javier; Hidalgo, Pedro; Maestre, David; Cremades, Ana, E-mail: cremades@fis.ucm.es; Piqueras, Javier [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-21

    Electric field induced mechanical resonances of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods are studied by in-situ measurements in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Young's moduli of rods with different cross-sectional shapes are calculated from the resonance frequency, and a range of values between 131 and 152 GPa are obtained. A quality factor of 1180–3780 is measured from the amplitude-frequency curves, revealing the suitability of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods as micromechanical resonators. The Young's modulus, E, of one of the rods is also measured from the elastic response in the force-displacement curve recorded in an atomic force microscope. E values obtained by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and by atomic force microscopy are found to differ in about 8%. The results provide data on Young's modulus of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and confirm the suitability of in-situ scanning electron microscopy mechanical resonance measurements to investigate the elastic behavior of semiconductor microrods.

  1. Transmission and time delay properties of an integrated system consisting of atomic vapor cladding on top of a micro ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Liron; Levy, Uriel

    2012-12-17

    In this paper we analyze the transmission and time delay properties of light propagating through a microring resonator (MRR) consisting of a solid core waveguide surrounded by an atomic vapor cladding. Using the atomic effective susceptibility of Rubidium we derive the complex transmission spectrum of the integrated system. We show, that when the system is under-coupled, the transmission can exceed the standalone MRR's background transmission and is accompanied by enhanced positive time delay. It is shown that in this case the contrast of the atomic lines is greatly enhanced. This allows achieving high optical densities at short propagation length. Furthermore, owing to its features such as small footprint, high tunability, and high delay-transmission product, this system may become an attractive choice for chip scale manipulations of light.

  2. Dark Sector Mass Relations from RG Focusing

    OpenAIRE

    Kearney, John; Pierce, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Dark sector mass relations, such as those which permit near-threshold or near-resonance annihilation in the early universe, could arise due to IR-attractive ratios in renormalization group equations. Achieving a particular ratio requires specific dark matter gauge charges or interactions, leading to predictions about the dark matter properties. Furthermore, additional states with masses comparable to the dark matter mass may be necessary, potentially giving rise to novel phenomenology. We exp...

  3. Dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Dark energy research aims to illuminate the mystery of the observed cosmic acceleration, one of the fundamental problems in physics and astronomy today. This book presents a systematic and detailed review of the current state of dark energy research, with the focus on the examination of the major observational techniques for probing dark energy. It can be used as a textbook to train students and others who wish to enter this extremely active field in cosmology.

  4. Dark stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pnigouras, Pantelis; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2017-01-01

    to the formation of compact objects predominantly made of dark matter. Considering both fermionic and bosonic (scalar φ4) equations of state, we construct the equilibrium structure of rotating dark stars, focusing on their bulk properties and comparing them with baryonic neutron stars. We also show that these dark...... objects admit the I-Love-Q universal relations, which link their moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and quadrupole moments. Finally, we prove that stars built with a dark matter equation of state are not compact enough to mimic black holes in general relativity, thus making them distinguishable...

  5. Evaluation of resolved resonance parameters of fission product nuclides with atomic numbers Z=46-51 for JENDL-3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yutaka

    1996-08-01

    Resolved resonance parameters of the following fission product nuclides with atomic numbers Z=46-51 have been evaluated for JENDL-3.2: 102,104,105,106,107,108,110 Pd, 107,109,110m Ag, 106,108,110,111,112,113,114,116 Cd, 113,115I n, 121,123 Sb. Evaluation was made on the basis of JENDL-2 for most nuclides and of the data recommended by Mughabghab et al. for the nuclides whose data have not been contained in JENDL-2. Data measured after the JENDL-2 evaluation (1982) have been taken into account in the evaluation. Spin of the resonance state and angular momentum of the incident neutron have been given for all levels. When there exist no measured data, the spin has been given tentatively on the basis of a random sampling technique using their statistical properties, and the angular momentum was also tentatively given on the basis of the Bayes's theorem on conditional probability using the s- and p-wave strength functions and average level spacings. The resonance parameters have been evaluated so as to reproduce measured capture area of individual resonance levels, thermal cross section and resonance integral. Evaluated results have been compiled into JENDL-3.2 in the formats of ENDF-5 and ENDF-6. (author)

  6. The interpretation of resonance formation in coupled-channel models of positron scattering by atomic hydrogen using localized optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Hewitt, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    Above-threshold resonances can occur in coupled-channel models of the e + + H system when Ps formation is taken into account (although it should be pointed out that, in this specific system, resonances do not occur in an exact theory). In general, to understand the mechanism of resonance formation it is useful to obtain the exact optical potential in a given channel in a localized form. The methods of achieving this localization are discussed with reference to a specific application to the resonance found in the two-state approximation for the l = 0 partial wave. (author)

  7. A conjecture on the origin of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao Shan

    2004-01-01

    The recent observation shows that our universe contains 4% atoms (ordinary matter), 23% cold dark matter, and 73% dark energy. Here we propose a conjecture on the origin of the observed dark energy in our universe. The analysis indicates that the dark energy may originate from the quantum-gravitational vacuum fluctuations limited in our universe.

  8. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  9. Dark matter and dark radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant α-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on α-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies α-circumflex -3 for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  10. Controlling the optical bistability beyond the multi-photon resonance condition in a three-level closed-loop atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Nozari, Narges; Vafafard, Azar; Sahrai, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the optical bistability behavior of a three-level closed-loop atomic system beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. Using the Floquet decomposition, we solve the time-dependent equations of motion, beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. By identifying the different scattering processes contributing to the medium response, it is shown that in general the optical bistability behavior of the system is not phase-dependent. The phase dependence is due to the scattering of the driving and coupling fields into the probe field at a frequency, which, in general, differs from the probe field frequency. - Highlights: → We investigate optical bistability of a three-level closed-loop atomic system, beyond the multi-photon resonance condition. → By applying Floquet decomposition to the equation of motion, the different scattering processes contributing to the medium response are determined. → It is shown that the phase dependence of optical bistability arises from the scattering of the driving and coupling fields into the probe field frequency.

  11. Heavy Sterile Neutrino in Dark Matter Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi C. Divari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterile neutrinos are possible dark matter candidates. We examine here possible detection mechanisms, assuming that the neutrino has a mass of about 50 keV and couples to the ordinary neutrino. Even though this neutrino is quite heavy, it is nonrelativistic with a maximum kinetic energy of 0.1 eV. Thus new experimental techniques are required for its detection. We estimate the expected event rate in the following cases: (i measuring electron recoil in the case of materials with very low electron binding; (ii low temperature crystal bolometers; (iii spin induced atomic excitations at very low temperatures, leading to a characteristic photon spectrum; (iv observation of resonances in antineutrino absorption by a nucleus undergoing electron capture; (v neutrino induced electron events beyond the end point energy of beta decaying systems, for example, in the tritium decay studied by KATRIN.

  12. Inventing atomic resolution scanning dielectric microscopy to see a single protein complex operation live at resonance in a neuron without touching or adulterating the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Lokesh; Sahu, Satyajit; Ghosh, Subrata; Shiga, Takashi; Fujita, Daisuke; Bandyopadhyay, Anirban

    2016-12-01

    A substantial ion flow in a normally wet protein masks any other forms of signal transmission. We use hysteresis and linear conduction (both are artifacts) as a marker to precisely wet a protein, which restricts the ionic conduction (hysteresis disappears), and at the same time, it is not denatured (quantized conductance and Raman spectra are intact). Pure electric visualization of proteins at work by eliminating the screening of ions, electrons, would change the way we study biology. Here we discuss the technical challenges resolved for imaging a protein or live cell using nonlinear dielectric response (spatial distribution of conductance, capacitance and phase, GCP trio). We electromagnetically triggered electrical, mechanical, thermal and ionic resonant vibrations in a protein. During resonant oscillations, we imaged the protein using resonant scanning tunneling microscopy of biomaterials (Brestum) and during ionic firing we imaged live what happens inside an axon core of a neuron by using our atomic scale scanning dielectric microscopy (Asadim). Both Asadim and Brestum are housed in a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope (bio-STM) and a special micro-grid developed by us (patent JP-5187804) for fractal supercomputing. We found the trick to turn a membrane transparent and see inside without making any physical contact. We image live that a protein molecule adopts a unique configuration for each resonance frequency, - thus far unknown to biology. "Membrane alone fires" is found to be wrong after a century, micro-neuro-filaments communicate prior to firing to decide its necessity and then regulate it suitably. We introduce a series of technologies e.g., fractal grid, point contact, micro THz antenna, to discover that from atomic structure to a living cell, the biomaterials vibrate collectively.

  13. From Dark to Light to Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET): Polarity-Sensitive Aggregation-Induced Emission (AIE)-Active Tetraphenylethene-Fused BODIPY Dyes with a Very Large Pseudo-Stokes Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Esra; Meral, Kadem; Atılgan, Serdar

    2016-01-11

    The work presented herein is devoted to the fabrication of large Stokes shift dyes in both organic and aqueous media by combining dark resonance energy transfer (DRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in one donor-acceptor system. In this respect, a series of donor-acceptor architectures of 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) dyes substituted by one, two, or three tetraphenylethene (TPE) luminogens were designed and synthesised. The photophysical properties of these three chromophore systems were studied to provide insight into the nature of donor-acceptor interactions in both THF and aqueous media. Because the generation of emissive TPE donor(s) is strongly polarity dependent, due to its aggregation-induced emission (AIE) feature, one might expect the formation of appreciable fluorescence emission intensity with a very large pseudo-Stokes shift in aqueous media when considering FRET process. Interestingly, similar results were also recorded in THF for the chromophore systems, although the TPE fragment(s) of the dyes are non-emissive. The explanation for this photophysical behaviour lies in the DRET. This is the first report on combining two energy-transfer processes, namely, FRET and DRET, in one polarity-sensitive donor-acceptor pair system. The accuracy of the dark-emissive donor property of the TPE luminogen is also presented for the first time as a new feature for AIE phenomena. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dark coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S.

    2009-01-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed

  15. Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  16. DarkSUSY: Computing Supersymmetric Dark Matter Properties Numerically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondolo, P.

    2004-07-16

    The question of the nature of the dark matter in the Universe remains one of the most outstanding unsolved problems in basic science. One of the best motivated particle physics candidates is the lightest supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the lightest neutralino - a linear combination of the supersymmetric partners of the photon, the Z boson and neutral scalar Higgs particles. Here we describe DarkSUSY, a publicly-available advanced numerical package for neutralino dark matter calculations. In DarkSUSY one can compute the neutralino density in the Universe today using precision methods which include resonances, pair production thresholds and coannihilations. Masses and mixings of supersymmetric particles can be computed within DarkSUSY or with the help of external programs such as FeynHiggs, ISASUGRA and SUSPECT. Accelerator bounds can be checked to identify viable dark matter candidates. DarkSUSY also computes a large variety of astrophysical signals from neutralino dark matter, such as direct detection in low-background counting experiments and indirect detection through antiprotons, antideuterons, gamma-rays and positrons from the Galactic halo or high-energy neutrinos from the center of the Earth or of the Sun. Here we describe the physics behind the package. A detailed manual will be provided with the computer package.

  17. International Conference on Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    CERN Document Server

    Mintz, Stephan; Perlmutter, Arnold; Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference, Orbis Scientiae 1996, focused on the topics: The Neutrino Mass, Light Cone Quantization, Monopole Condensation, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves which we have adopted as the title of these proceedings. Was there any exciting news at the conference? Maybe, it depends on who answers the question. There was an almost unanimous agreement on the overall success of the conference as was evidenced by the fact that in the after-dinner remarks by one of us (BNK) the suggestion of organizing the conference on a biannual basis was presented but not accepted: the participants wanted the continuation of the tradition to convene annually. We shall, of course, comply. The expected observation of gravitational waves will constitute the most exciting vindication of Einstein's general relativity. This subject is attracting the attention of the experimentalists and theorists alike. We hope that by the first decade of the third millennium or earlier, gravitational waves will be detected,...

  18. Exceptional composite dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo [Universite Paris Saclay, CEA, CNRS, Institut de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carmona, Adrian [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Chala, Mikael [Universitat de Valencia y IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    We study the dark matter phenomenology of non-minimal composite Higgs models with SO(7) broken to the exceptional group G{sub 2}. In addition to the Higgs, three pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons arise, one of which is electrically neutral. A parity symmetry is enough to ensure this resonance is stable. In fact, if the breaking of the Goldstone symmetry is driven by the fermion sector, this Z{sub 2} symmetry is automatically unbroken in the electroweak phase. In this case, the relic density, as well as the expected indirect, direct and collider signals are then uniquely determined by the value of the compositeness scale, f. Current experimental bounds allow one to account for a large fraction of the dark matter of the Universe if the dark matter particle is part of an electroweak triplet. The totality of the relic abundance can be accommodated if instead this particle is a composite singlet. In both cases, the scale f and the dark matter mass are of the order of a few TeV. (orig.)

  19. Composite Dark Sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new paradigm in Composite Dark Sectors, where the full Standard Model (including the Higgs boson) is extended with a strongly-interacting composite sector with global symmetry group G spontaneously broken to H is contained in G. We show that, under well-motivated conditions, the lightest neutral pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons are natural dark matter candidates for they are protected by a parity symmetry not even broken in the electroweak phase. These models are characterized by only two free parameters, namely the typical coupling g D and the scale f D of the composite sector, and are therefore very predictive. We consider in detail two minimal scenarios, SU(3)/[SU(2) x U(1)] and [SU(2) 2 x U(1)]/[SU(2) x U(1)], which provide a dynamical realization of the Inert Doublet and Triplet models, respectively. We show that the radiatively-induced potential can be computed in a five-dimensional description with modified boundary conditions with respect to Composite Higgs models. Finally, the dark matter candidates are shown to be compatible, in a large region of the parameter space, with current bounds from dark matter searches as well as electroweak and collider constraints on new resonances.

  20. Atomic Warrior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 9. Atomic Warrior. Shabhana Narasimhan. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 9 September 2001 pp 106-109. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/09/0106-0109. Author Affiliations.

  1. The dark universe dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    According to the standard cosmological model, 95% of the present mass density of the universe is dark: roughly 70% of the total in the form of dark energy and 25% in the form of dark matter. In a series of four lectures, I will begin by presenting a brief review of cosmology, and then I will review the observational evidence for dark matter and dark energy. I will discuss some of the proposals for dark matter and dark energy, and connect them to high-energy physics. I will also present an overview of an observational program to quantify the properties of dark energy.

  2. Searching a dark photon with HADES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Krása, Antonín; Křížek, Filip; Kugler, Andrej; Sobolev, Yuri, G.; Tlustý, Pavel; Wagner, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 731, APR (2014), s. 265-271 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-06759S; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : HADES * dark photon * hidden sector * dark matter * rare eta decays Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 6.131, year: 2014

  3. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  4. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  5. Coulomb systems with a short-range interaction: the Σ-p atom and resonant levels of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, A.E.; Lisin, V.I.; Popov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    An equation relating the shift and width of atomic levels to the strong scattering length, which was derived previously ]T. L. Trueman, Nucl. Phys. 26, 57 (1961); A. E. Kudryavtsev and V. S. Popov, Pis'ma Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 29, 311 (1979) [JETP Lett. 29, 280 (1979)]; V. S. Popov, A. E. Kudryavtsev, and V. D. Mir, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 77, 1727 (1979) [Sov. Phys. JETP 50, 865 (1979)

  6. Theoretical studies of inelastic molecule-surface and resonant electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowrey, R.C. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In part I, two problems in the inelastic scattering of molecules from nonvibrating surfaces are discussed. First, the close coupling (CC) method is used to study the orientational dependence of the transition probabilities for vibrationally and rotationally inelastic scattering of H 2 and N 2 from flat surfaces. The dependence of vibrational transition probabilities on the orientation of the molecule is strong but decreases as the energy increases. Second, a new approximation to the CC method for treating scattering of molecules from corrugated surfaces is discussed. The proposed local normal model of j/sub z/ conservation assumes that the component of the rotational angular momentum of the incident molecule which is parallel to the normal to the surface at the impact point is conserved during a collision. In part II, the use of the complex basis function method to study two shape resonances in electron scattering is discussed. The complex self-consistent-field (CSCF) method was used to obtain the position and width of the 2 D shape resonance in electron-calcium scattering. Comparison with experimental results shows that the lifetime is influenced by correlation effects. The CSCF and complex configuration interaction (CCI) methods were used to obtain the complex potential energy function for nuclear motion for the 2 Σ/sub u/ + resonance state of H 2 -

  7. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Alexander William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  8. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Alexander William

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  9. Dark Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Dark spots (left) and 'fans' appear to scribble dusty hieroglyphics on top of the Martian south polar cap in two high-resolution Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera images taken in southern spring. Each image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  10. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this second part we will see that even clusters of galaxies must harbour dark matter. As if this was not enough, it turns out that if our knowledge of the ...

  11. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide. Over the last twenty years, astronomers have been forced to postulate the presence of large quantities of 'dark matter' to explain their observations. They are ...

  12. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interests include cinema, stamps and sketching. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Dark Matter. 1. What You See Ain'/ What You Got. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide.

  13. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, Ultraviolet Resonance Raman (UVRR) Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for Study of the Kinetics of Formation and Structural Characterization of Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic studies of tau fibril formation in vitro most commonly employ spectroscopic probes such as thioflavinT fluorescence and laser light scattering or negative stain transmission electron microscopy. Here, I describe the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as complementary probes for studies of tau aggregation. The sensitivity of vibrational spectroscopic techniques (FTIR and UVRR) to secondary structure content allows for measurement of conformational changes that occur when the intrinsically disordered protein tau transforms into cross-β-core containing fibrils. AFM imaging serves as a gentle probe of structures populated over the time course of tau fibrillization. Together, these assays help further elucidate the structural and mechanistic complexity inherent in tau fibril formation.

  14. Double-resonance optical-pumping effect and ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency signal without Doppler background in cesium atomic vapour cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bao-Dong; Gao Jing; Liang Qiang-Bing; Wang Jie; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2011-01-01

    In a Doppler-broadened ladder-type cesium atomic system (6S 1/2 -6P 3/2 -8S 1/2 ), this paper characterizes electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in two different experimental arrangements, and investigates the influence of the double-resonance optical-pumping (DROP) effect on EIT in both arrangements. When the probe laser is weak, DROP is explicitly suppressed. When the probe laser is moderate, population of the intermediate level (6P 3/2 F' = 5) is remarkable, therefore DROP is mixed with EIT. An interesting bimodal spectrum with the broad component due to DROP and the narrow part due to EIT has been clearly observed in cesium 6S 1/2 F = 4−6P 3/2 F' = 5−8S 1/2 F″ = 4 transitions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  15. Resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy of atoms and simple molecules: Satellite features and dependence on energy detuning and photon polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žitnik, M., E-mail: matjaz.zitnik@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Jadranska 21, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kavčič, M.; Bohinc, R.; Bučar, K.; Mihelič, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cao, W. [Research Centre for Molecular Materials, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Guillemin, R.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Carniato, S.; Kawerk, E. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Piancastelli, M.N. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Simon, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-10-15

    We summarize recent results dealing with high resolution (resonant) X-ray spectroscopy of atomic and molecular targets in the tender X-ray energy region. We comment on advantages, new possibilities and problems related to RIXS spectroscopy with respect to the standard photoabsorption technique, where scanning the probe energy is the only option. In particular, three research areas are covered: X-ray emission mediated by energy dependent photoabsorption to multi-electron excited states, the Cl K core-hole clock studies exemplified by systematic study of chloro(fluoro)-hydrocarbon targets and the polarization dependent X-ray emission studies. Due to its spectral selectivity and simultaneous detection capability, high resolution wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has the capability to resolve structural and dynamical properties of matter within new instrumentation frontiers.

  16. Energy Approach to Nuclei and Atoms in a Strong Laser Field: Stark Effect and Multi-photon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Lovett, L.

    2010-01-01

    A consistent energy approach to nuclei and atoms in a strong electromagnetic (laser) field is presented. The photon emission and absorption lines are described by the moments of different orders, which are calculated with the use of the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix adiabatic formalism. In relativistic version the Gell-Mann and Low formulae expresses an imaginary part of the energy shift ImE through the scattering matrix, including interaction of quantum system as with laser field as with a field of photon vacuum.

  17. A Geant4-based Simulation to Evaluate the Feasibility of Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) in Determining Atomic Compositions of Body Tissue in Cancer Diagnostics and Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbo, Yekaterina; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Liyanage, Nilanga

    2017-01-01

    Customarily applied in homeland security for identifying concealed explosives and chemical weapons, NRF (Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence) may have high potential in determining atomic compositions of body tissue. High energy photons incident on a target excite the target nuclei causing characteristic re-emission of resonance photons. As the nuclei of each isotope have well-defined excitation energies, NRF uniquely indicates the isotopic content of the target. NRF radiation corresponding to nuclear isotopes present in the human body is emitted during radiotherapy based on Bremsstrahlung photons generated in a linear electron accelerator. We have developed a Geant4 simulation in order to help assess NRF capabilities in detecting, mapping, and characterizing tumors. We have imported a digital phantom into the simulation using anatomical data linked to known chemical compositions of various tissues. Work is ongoing to implement the University of Virginia's cancer center treatment setup and patient geometry, and to collect and analyze the simulation's physics quantities to evaluate the potential of NRF for medical imaging applications. Preliminary results will be presented.

  18. Photoionization of resonantly driven atomic states by an extreme ultraviolet-free-electron laser: intensity dependence and renormalization of Rabi frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, B; Brand, A; Glässl, M; Vagov, A; Axt, V M; Pietsch, U

    2013-01-01

    We analyze theoretically the high intensity photoionization dynamics of a system with two atomic states resonantly coupled by coherent extreme ultraviolet laser radiation that also gives rise to the ionization. The ground state occupation of such a system is shown to exhibit damped Rabi oscillations. The corresponding ionization, which is responsible for the damping, scales almost linearly with the field intensity when the pulse length exceeds the Rabi period. For shorter pulses a quadratic scaling is found. The Rabi frequency is shifted compared to its value for an isolated two-level system. The shift increases with excitation intensity and can acquire a high percentage of the unrenormalized frequency at high intensities. Analytical results obtained within a simplified solvable model demonstrate that the damping and the shift both result from the coupling of the discrete states to the ionization continuum and are therefore closely related. Numerical simulations for a two-electron system reveal at high intensities the importance of off-resonant ionization channels. (paper)

  19. Resonance absorption spectroscopy for laser-ablated lanthanide atom. (1) Optimized experimental conditions for isotope-selective absorption of gadolinium (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Oba, Masaki; Iimura, Hideki; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Maruyama, Yoichiro; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated TRU fuel, we are developing an analytical technique on the basis of the resonance absorption spectroscopy for the laser-ablation plume. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of this technique, we measured absorption spectra of Gd atom with various plume production conditions (ablation laser intensity, ambient gas and its pressure) and observation conditions (transition, probe height from sample, observation timing). As a result, high resolution spectrum was obtained from the observation of slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The observed narrowest linewidth of about 0.85GHz was found to be close to the Doppler width estimated for Gd atom of room temperature. Furthermore, relaxation rate of higher meta-stable state was found to be higher than that of ground state, suggesting that use of the transition arising from ground state or lower meta-stable state is preferable for highly sensitive isotope analysis. (author)

  20. Di-photon excess illuminates dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backović, Mihailo; Mariotti, Alberto; Redigolo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simplified model of dark matter with a scalar mediator to accommodate the di-photon excess recently observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Decays of the resonance into dark matter can easily account for a relatively large width of the scalar resonance, while the magnitude of the total width combined with the constraint on dark matter relic density leads to sharp predictions on the parameters of the Dark Sector. Under the assumption of a rather large width, the model predicts a signal consistent with ∼300 GeV dark matter particle and ∼750 GeV scalar mediator in channels with large missing energy. This prediction is not yet severely bounded by LHC Run I searches and will be accessible at the LHC Run II in the jet plus missing energy channel with more luminosity. Our analysis also considers astro-physical constraints, pointing out that future direct detection experiments will be sensitive to this scenario.

  1. Trace isotope analysis using resonance ionization mass spectrometry based on isotope selection with doppler shift of laser ablated atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Yuki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    We have proposed a novel isotope selective Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) concept, which can avoid the Doppler broadening on solid sample direct measurement based on laser ablation technique. We have succeeded in experimentally demonstrating the principle of our RIMS concept. Through comparison between the simulated and experimental results, we have validated the simulation model. It would be concluded from these results that we could achieve the isotope selectivity defined as the ratio of 41 Ca to 40 Ca sensitivity to be 4.5x10 10 by adopting the multi-step excitation scheme in the present method. As future works, we will try to experimentally perform the multi-step excitation scheme and improve the detection efficiency by modifying the ion extraction configuration. (author)

  2. Identificación experimental de estados de resonancia en la estructura portante de un atomizador. // Experimental identification of resonance states in portable structure of an atomizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cabrera Gómez

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Los atomizadores fabricados por una empresa productora de maquinaria agrícola generan durante su funcionamientoniveles de ruido que resultan molestos tanto para el operario como para el resto de los habitantes de las zonas donde seemplean estos equipos, fundamentalmente en tareas vinculadas a la protección de árboles frutales. Para evaluar la situación,se procedió a realizar mediciones de vibraciones y ruido, las que permitieron cuantificar los niveles de estos parámetros, asícomo identificar las principales fuentes que los generan. También se detectó un posible problema de resonancia estructuralque amplifica considerablemente la vibración producida por el giro del ventilador. Con la finalidad de precisar lascaracterísticas de tal resonancia, se efectuaron nuevas series de mediciones centrando la atención básicamente en el estudiodel comportamiento modal del chasis. El análisis modal experimental realizado sobre la estructura objeto de estudiopermitió comprobar la evidente presencia de estados resonantes. Una vez identificada la causa del problema, se procedió asimular modificaciones de parámetros físicos sobre el modelo modal obtenido, proponiéndose la variante más apropiadapara su solución.Palabras claves: Resonancia mecánica, análisis modal, comportamiento dinámico, medición de vibraciones,frecuencias propias.___________________________________________________________________SummaryThe atomizers manufactured by an agricultural machinery company generate during their operation levels of noise that areannoying as much for the operative as for the rest of the inhabitants of the areas where these equipments are used,fundamentally in tasks linked to the protection of fruit-bearing trees. To evaluate the situation, mensurations of vibrationsand noise were to carried out, wich allowed to quantify the levels of these parameters, as well as to identify the mainsources that generate them. A possible problem of structural

  3. ADMX Dark-Matter Axion Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Leslie J.

    2004-01-01

    The axion, a hypothetical elementary particle, emerged from a compelling solution to the Strong-CP Problem in QCD. Subsequently, the axion was recognized to be a good Cold Dark Matter candidate. Although dark-matter axions have only feeble couplings to matter and radiation, these axions may be detected through resonant conversion of axions into microwave photons in a high-Q cavity threaded by a strong static magnetic field. This technique is at present the only means whereby dark-matter axions with plausible couplings may be detected at the required sensitivity. This talk describes recent results from the Axion Dark Matter Experiment (ADMX), now the world's most sensitive search for axions. There will also be a short overview of the ADMX upgrade, which promises sensitivity to even the more feebly coupled dark matter axions even should they make up only a minority fraction of the local dark matter halo

  4. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high-energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom, a saddle point (called the Stark saddle point) appears. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy, one can find classical orbits that are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths, observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength, the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation, another orbit of similar shape is found. This orbit becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum mechanically exact calculations, we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincaré sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  5. Dark Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Bali-Hudáková, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the variability of the demand and the development of new trends in the fields of the tourism industry. Special attention is devoted to a new arising trend of the Dark Tourism. This trend has appeared in the end of the 20th century and it has gained the attraction of media, tourists, tourism specialists and other stakeholders. First part of the thesis is concerned with the variety of the tourism industry and the ethic question of the tourism development. The other par...

  6. Dark blood versus bright blood T2* acquisition in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for thalassaemia major (TM) patients: Evaluation of feasibility, reproducibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori, Carlo; Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Pitocco, Francesca; De Vivo, Aldo Eros; Schena, Emiliano; Mortato, Luca; Pirro, Federica; Cianciulli, Paolo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of dark blood (DB) versus bright blood (BB) sequences. To assess the intra and inter-observer variability and inter-study reproducibility between BB versus DB. To evaluate image quality level in the two sequences. Methods: In a setting of 138 patients we performed CMR using cardiac gated Gradient-multiecho single breath-hold BB and DB sequences in the middle ventricular septum. Each acquisition was repeated during the same exam. Truncation method was used to account for background noise. Image quality (IQ) was assessed using a 5 point grading scale and image analysis was conducted by 2 experienced observers. Results: Compared with the conventional BB acquisition, the coefficient of correlation and significance of the DB technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001), inter-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001) and inter-study reproducibility (p < 0.001). The variability is also lower for DB sequences for T2* values <14 ms. Assessment of artifacts showed a superior score for DB versus BB scans (4 versus 3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in terms of inter observer and inter study variability using DB sequences was obtained. The greatest disparity between them was seen in inter-study reproducibility and higher IQ in DB was seen. Study demonstrates better performance of DB imaging compared to BB in presence of comparable effectiveness

  7. Dark blood versus bright blood T2* acquisition in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for thalassaemia major (TM) patients: Evaluation of feasibility, reproducibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Carlo, E-mail: c.liguori@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Pitocco, Francesca; De Vivo, Aldo Eros [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Schena, Emiliano [Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Mortato, Luca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Pirro, Federica [Department of Biomaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Herart, Largo A. Gemelli 1, 00135 Rome (Italy); Cianciulli, Paolo [Thalassemia Unit, Ospedale Sant Eugenio, Piazzale dell’Umanesimo 10, 00143 Rome (Italy); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of dark blood (DB) versus bright blood (BB) sequences. To assess the intra and inter-observer variability and inter-study reproducibility between BB versus DB. To evaluate image quality level in the two sequences. Methods: In a setting of 138 patients we performed CMR using cardiac gated Gradient-multiecho single breath-hold BB and DB sequences in the middle ventricular septum. Each acquisition was repeated during the same exam. Truncation method was used to account for background noise. Image quality (IQ) was assessed using a 5 point grading scale and image analysis was conducted by 2 experienced observers. Results: Compared with the conventional BB acquisition, the coefficient of correlation and significance of the DB technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001), inter-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001) and inter-study reproducibility (p < 0.001). The variability is also lower for DB sequences for T2* values <14 ms. Assessment of artifacts showed a superior score for DB versus BB scans (4 versus 3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in terms of inter observer and inter study variability using DB sequences was obtained. The greatest disparity between them was seen in inter-study reproducibility and higher IQ in DB was seen. Study demonstrates better performance of DB imaging compared to BB in presence of comparable effectiveness.

  8. An Exact Method to Determine the Photonic Resonances of Quasicrystals Based on Discrete Fourier Harmonics of Higher-Dimensional Atomic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad A. Namin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous method for obtaining the diffraction patterns of quasicrystals is presented. Diffraction patterns are an essential analytical tool in the study of quasicrystals, since they can be used to determine their photonic resonances. Previous methods for approximating the diffraction patterns of quasicrystals have relied on evaluating the Fourier transform of finite-sized super-lattices. Our approach, on the other hand, is exact in the sense that it is based on a technique that embeds quasicrystals into higher dimensional periodic hyper-lattices, thereby completely capturing the properties of the infinite structure. The periodicity of the unit cell in the higher dimensional space can be exploited to obtain the Fourier series expansion in closed-form of the corresponding atomic surfaces. The utility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to one-dimensional Fibonacci and two-dimensional Penrose quasicrystals. The results are verified by comparing them to those obtained by using the conventional super-lattice method. It is shown that the conventional super-cell approach can lead to inaccurate results due to the continuous nature of the Fourier transform, since quasicrystals have a discrete spectrum, whereas the approach introduced in this paper generates discrete Fourier harmonics. Furthermore, the conventional approach requires very large super-cells and high-resolution sampling of the reciprocal space in order to produce accurate results leading to a very large computational burden, whereas the proposed method generates accurate results with a relatively small number of terms. Finally, we propose how this approach can be generalized from the vertex model, which assumes identical particles at all vertices, to a more realistic case where the quasicrystal is composed of different atoms.

  9. Decaying dark matter from dark instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Erlich, Joshua; Primulando, Reinard

    2010-01-01

    We construct an explicit, TeV-scale model of decaying dark matter in which the approximate stability of the dark matter candidate is a consequence of a global symmetry that is broken only by instanton-induced operators generated by a non-Abelian dark gauge group. The dominant dark matter decay channels are to standard model leptons. Annihilation of the dark matter to standard model states occurs primarily through the Higgs portal. We show that the mass and lifetime of the dark matter candidate in this model can be chosen to be consistent with the values favored by fits to data from the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments.

  10. Atomic nucleus and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    1976-01-01

    Negatively charged leptons and hadrons can be incorporated into atomic shells forming exotic atoms. Nucleon resonances and Λ hyperons can be considered as constituents of atomic nuclei. Information derived from studies of such exotic systems enriches our knowledge of both the interactions of elementary particles and of the structure of atomic nuclei. (author)

  11. Can dark matter decay in dark energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, S. H.; Jesus, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the interaction between dark energy and dark matter from a thermodynamical perspective. By assuming they have different temperatures, we study the possibility of occurring a decay from dark matter into dark energy, characterized by a negative parameter Q. We find that, if at least one of the fluids has nonvanishing chemical potential, for instance μ x dm =0 or μ x =0 and μ dm >0, the decay is possible, where μ x and μ dm are the chemical potentials of dark energy and dark matter, respectively. Using recent cosmological data, we find that, for a fairly simple interaction, the dark matter decay is favored with a probability of ∼93% over the dark energy decay. This result comes from a likelihood analysis where only background evolution has been considered.

  12. Unification of dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, T.T.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scenario in which dark energy and dark matter are described in a unified manner. The ultralight pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone (pNG) boson, A, naturally explains the observed magnitude of dark energy, while the bosonic supersymmetry partner of the pNG boson, B, can be a dominant component of dark matter. The decay of B into a pair of electron and positron may explain the 511 keV γ ray from the Galactic Center

  13. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhan Zhiming [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Liu Jibing, E-mail: clding2006@126.com, E-mail: huajia_li@163.com [Department of Physics, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China)

    2011-07-28

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  14. Two-dimensional atom localization via a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Zhan Zhiming; Liu Jibing

    2011-01-01

    A scheme of two-dimensional atom localization based on a coherence-controlled absorption spectrum in an N-tripod-type five-level system is proposed, in which the atom interacts with a weak probe field and three standing-wave fields. Position information of the atom can be achieved by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that the localization properties are significantly improved due to the interaction of dark resonances. It is also shown that the localization factors depend strongly on the system parameters that lead to such spatial structures of localization as chain-like, wave-like, '8'-like, spike-like, crater-like and heart-like patterns. By properly adjusting the system parameters, we can achieve a high-precision and high-resolution atom localization under certain conditions.

  15. The cosmic cocktail three parts dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The ordinary atoms that make up the known universe-from our bodies and the air we breathe to the planets and stars-constitute only 5 percent of all matter and energy in the cosmos. The rest is known as dark matter and dark energy, because their precise identities are unknown. The Cosmic Cocktail is the inside story of the epic quest to solve one of the most compelling enigmas of modern science - what is the universe made of? - told by one of today's foremost pioneers in the study of dark matter. Blending cutting-edge science with her own behind-the-scenes insights as a leading researcher in the

  16. Self-interacting asymmetric dark matter coupled to a light massive dark photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Pearce, Lauren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) with sizeable self-interactions mediated by a light species offers a compelling explanation of the observed galactic substructure; furthermore, the direct coupling between DM and a light particle contributes to the DM annihilation in the early universe. If the DM abundance is due to a dark particle-antiparticle asymmetry, the DM annihilation cross-section can be arbitrarily large, and the coupling of DM to the light species can be significant. We consider the case of asymmetric DM interacting via a light (but not necessarily massless) Abelian gauge vector boson, a dark photon. In the massless dark photon limit, gauge invariance mandates that DM be multicomponent, consisting of positive and negative dark ions of different species which partially bind in neutral dark atoms. We argue that a similar conclusion holds for light dark photons; in particular, we establish that the multi-component and atomic character of DM persists in much of the parameter space where the dark photon is sufficiently light to mediate sizeable DM self-interactions. We discuss the cosmological sequence of events in this scenario, including the dark asymmetry generation, the freeze-out of annihilations, the dark recombination and the phase transition which gives mass to the dark photon. We estimate the effect of self-interactions in DM haloes, taking into account this cosmological history. We place constraints based on the observed ellipticity of large haloes, and identify the regimes where DM self-scattering can affect the dynamics of smaller haloes, bringing theory in better agreement with observations. Moreover, we estimate the cosmological abundance of dark photons in various regimes, and derive pertinent bounds

  17. The effect of core-valence intra-atomic quadrupolar interaction in resonant x-ray scattering at the Dy M4,5 edges in DyB2C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Javier; Mirone, Alessandro; Staub, Urs

    2010-01-13

    The dependences on energy of the resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction intensities in DyB(2)C(2) for the (00½) reflection at the Dy M(4,5) edges have been calculated with an atomic multiplet Hamiltonian including the effect of the crystal field and introducing an intra-atomic quadrupolar interaction between the 3d core and 4f valence shell. These calculations are compared with experimental results (Mulders et al 2006 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18 11195) for the antiferroquadrupolar and antiferromagnetic phases of DyB(2)C(2). We reproduce all the features appearing in the (00½) reflection energy profile in the antiferroquadrupolar ordered phase, and we reproduce the behaviour of the resonant x-ray scattering intensity at different energies in the vicinity of the Dy M(5) edge when the temperature is lowered within the antiferromagnetic phase. These calculations show that a detailed description of the energy dependences of resonant x-ray scattering signals at the M edges in 4f and 5f systems with multipolar ordering may require the inclusion of an aspherical intra-atomic Coulomb interaction.

  18. Binding of Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptide p28 to Wild Type and Mutated p53 as studied by Raman, Atomic Force and Surface Plasmon Resonance spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Sara; Santini, Simona; Yamada, Tohru; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Mutations within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the tumor suppressor p53 are found in >50% of human cancers and may significantly modify p53 secondary structure impairing its function. p28, an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, binds to the DBD through hydrophobic interaction and induces a posttranslational increase in wildtype and mutant p53 restoring functionality. We use mutation analyses to explore which elements of secondary structure may be critical to p28 binding. Molecular modeling, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) were used to identify which secondary structure of site-directed and naturally occurring mutant DBDs are potentially altered by discrete changes in hydrophobicity and the molecular interaction with p28. We show that specific point mutations that alter hydrophobicity within non-mutable and mutable regions of the p53 DBD alter specific secondary structures. The affinity of p28 was positively correlated with the β-sheet content of a mutant DBD, and reduced by an increase in unstructured or random coil that resulted from a loss in hydrophobicity and redistribution of surface charge. These results help refine our knowledge of how mutations within p53-DBD alter secondary structure and provide insight on how potential structural alterations in p28 or similar molecules improve their ability to restore p53 function. Raman spectroscopy, AFS, SPR and computational modeling are useful approaches to characterize how mutations within the p53DBD potentially affect secondary structure and identify those structural elements prone to influence the binding affinity of agents designed to increase the functionality of p53. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Measuring brain manganese and iron accumulation in rats following 14 weeks of low-dose manganese treatment using atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Zhang, Na; Anderson, Joel G; Erikson, Keith M; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Aschner, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to a movement disorder due to preferential Mn accumulation in the globus pallidus and other basal ganglia nuclei. Iron (Fe) deficiency also results in increased brain Mn levels, as well as dysregulation of other trace metals. The relationship between Mn and Fe transport has been attributed to the fact that both metals can be transported via the same molecular mechanisms. It is not known, however, whether brain Mn distribution patterns due to increased Mn exposure vs. Fe deficiency are the same, or whether Fe supplementation would reverse or inhibit Mn deposition. To address these questions, we utilized four distinct experimental populations. Three separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats on different diets (control diet [MnT], Fe deficient [FeD], or Fe supplemented [FeS]) were given weekly intravenous Mn injections (3 mg Mn/kg body mass) for 14 weeks, whereas control (CN) rats were fed the control diet and received sterile saline injections. At the conclusion of the study, both blood and brain Mn and Fe levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The data indicate that changes in dietary Fe levels (either increased or decreased) result in regionally specific increases in brain Mn levels compared with CN or MnT animals. Furthermore, there was no difference in either Fe or Mn accumulation between FeS or FeD animals. These data suggest that dietary Fe manipulation, whether increased or decreased, may contribute to brain Mn deposition in populations vulnerable to increased Mn exposure.

  20. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  1. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Nesbet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance, postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  2. Strategies for dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of alternative forms of dark matter, both baryonic and nonbaryonic, is reviewed. Alternative arguments are presented for the predominance of either cold dark matter (CDM) or of baryonic dark matter (BDM). Strategies are described for dark matter detection, both for dark matter that consists of weakly interacting relic particles and for dark matter that consists of dark stellar remnants

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  4. Dark Matter in the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The question “What is the Universe made of?” is the longest outstanding problem in all of physics. Ordinary atoms only constitute 5% of the total, while the rest is of unknown composition. Already in 1933 Fritz Zwicky observed that the rapid motions of objects within clusters of galaxies were unexplained by the gravitation pull of luminous matter, and he postulated the existence of Dunkle Materie, or dark matter. A variety of dark matter candidates exist, including new fundamental particles already postulated in particle theories: axions and WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). Over the past 25 years, there has been a three pronged approach to WIMP detection: creating them at particle accelerators; searched for detection of astrophysical WIMPs scattering off of nuclei in underground detectors; and “indirect detection” of WIMP annihilation products (neutrinos, positrons, or photons). As yet the LHC has only placed bounds rather than finding discovery. For 13 years the DAMA experiment has proc...

  5. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  6. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  7. Impeded Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  8. Impeded Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang, Xiao-Ping [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence & Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics,Johannes Gutenberg University,Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Xue, Wei [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-12

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario “Impeded Dark Matter”. We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  9. Constraining dark sectors with monojets and dijets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chala, Mikael; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Nardini, Germano; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We consider dark sector particles (DSPs) that obtain sizeable interactions with Standard Model fermions from a new mediator. While these particles can avoid observation in direct detection experiments, they are strongly constrained by LHC measurements. We demonstrate that there is an important complementarity between searches for DSP production and searches for the mediator itself, in particular bounds on (broad) dijet resonances. This observation is crucial not only in the case where the DSP is all of the dark matter but whenever - precisely due to its sizeable interactions with the visible sector - the DSP annihilates away so efficiently that it only forms a dark matter subcomponent. To highlight the different roles of DSP direct detection and LHC monojet and dijet searches, as well as perturbativity constraints, we first analyse the exemplary case of an axial-vector mediator and then generalise our results. We find important implications for the interpretation of LHC dark matter searches in terms of simplified models.

  10. DarkSide search for dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T.; Alton, D.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Beltrame, P.; Benziger, J.; Bonfini, G.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Bussino, S.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Chidzik, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Condon, C.; D' Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Vincenzi, M. De; Haas, E. De; Derbin, A.; Pietro, G. Di; Dratchnev, I.; Durben, D.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Franco, D.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guo, C.; Guray, G.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Joliet, C.; Kayunov, A.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kidner, S.; Klemmer, R.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Komor, M.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Li, P.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Love, C.; Ludhova, L.; Luitz, S.; Lukyanchenko, L.; Lund, A.; Lung, K.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I.; Mari, S.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meroni, E.; Meyers, P.; Mohayai, T.; Montanari, D.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Nelson, A.; Nemtzow, A.; Nurakhov, N.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Parsells, R.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Perfetto, F.; Pinsky, L.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Sands, W.; Seigar, M.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvarov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Thompson, J.; Tonazzo, A.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wang, H.; Westerdale, S.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zehfus, M.; Zhong, W.; Zuzel, G.

    2013-11-22

    The DarkSide staged program utilizes a two-phase time projection chamber (TPC) with liquid argon as the target material for the scattering of dark matter particles. Efficient background reduction is achieved using low radioactivity underground argon as well as several experimental handles such as pulse shape, ratio of ionization over scintillation signal, 3D event reconstruction, and active neutron and muon vetos. The DarkSide-10 prototype detector has proven high scintillation light yield, which is a particularly important parameter as it sets the energy threshold for the pulse shape discrimination technique. The DarkSide-50 detector system, currently in commissioning phase at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory, will reach a sensitivity to dark matter spin-independent scattering cross section of 10-45 cm2 within 3 years of operation.

  11. Very heavy dark Skyrmions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    A dark sector with a solitonic component provides a means to circumvent the problem of generically low annihilation cross sections of very heavy dark matter particles. At the same time, enhanced annihilation cross sections are necessary for indirect detection of very heavy dark matter components beyond 100 TeV. Non-thermally produced dark matter in this mass range could therefore contribute to the cosmic γ-ray and neutrino flux above 100 TeV, and massive Skyrmions provide an interesting framework for the discussion of these scenarios. Therefore a Higgs portal and a neutrino portal for very heavy Skyrmion dark matter are discussed. The Higgs portal model demonstrates a dark mediator bottleneck, where limitations on particle annihilation cross sections will prevent a signal from the potentially large soliton annihilation cross sections. This problem can be avoided in models where the dark mediator decays. This is illustrated by the neutrino portal for Skyrmion dark matter. (orig.)

  12. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  13. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    In the first two of these lectures, I present the evidence for baryonic dark matter and describe possible forms that it may take. The final lecture discusses formation of baryonic dark matter, and sets the cosmological context.

  14. Dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, G.

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental question of astrophysics and cosmology is the nature of dark matter. Astrophysical observations show clearly the existence of some kind of dark matter, though they cannot yet reveal its nature. Dark matter can consist of baryonic particles, or of other (known or unknown) elementary particles. Baryonic dark matter probably exists in the form of dust, gas, or small stars. Other elementary particles constituting the dark matter can possibly be measured in terrestrial experiments. Possibilities for dark matter particles are neutrinos, axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). While a direct detection of relic neutrinos seems at the moment impossible, there are experiments looking for baryonic dark matter in the form of Massive Compact Halo Objects, and for particle dark matter in the form of axions and WIMPS. (orig.)

  15. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  16. Codecaying Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Kuflik, Eric; Ng, Wee Hao

    2016-11-18

    We propose a new mechanism for thermal dark matter freeze-out, called codecaying dark matter. Multicomponent dark sectors with degenerate particles and out-of-equilibrium decays can codecay to obtain the observed relic density. The dark matter density is exponentially depleted through the decay of nearly degenerate particles rather than from Boltzmann suppression. The relic abundance is set by the dark matter annihilation cross section, which is predicted to be boosted, and the decay rate of the dark sector particles. The mechanism is viable in a broad range of dark matter parameter space, with a robust prediction of an enhanced indirect detection signal. Finally, we present a simple model that realizes codecaying dark matter.

  17. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  18. Dark stars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  19. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  20. Double Fano resonances in plasmon coupling nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fei; Jin, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Fano resonances are investigated in nanorods with symmetric lengths and side-by-side assembly. Single Fano resonance can be obtained by a nanorod dimer, and double Fano resonances are shown in nanorod trimers with side-by-side assembly. With transverse plasmon excitation, Fano resonances are caused by the destructive interference between a bright superradiant mode and dark subradiant modes. The bright mode originates from the electric plasmon resonance, and the dark modes originate from the magnetic resonances induced by near-field inter-rod coupling. Double Fano resonances result from double dark modes at different wavelengths, which are induced and tuned by the asymmetric gaps between the adjacent nanorods. Fano resonances show a high figure of merit and large light extinction in the periodic array of assembled nanorods, which can potentially be used in multiwavelength sensing in the visible and near-infrared regions. (paper)

  1. Dark Mass Creation During EWPT Via Dark Energy Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Casper, Steven

    2013-01-01

    We add Dark Matter Dark Energy terms with a quintessence field interacting with a Dark Matter field to a MSSM EW Lagrangian previously used to calculate the magnetic field created during the EWPT. From the expectation value of the quintessence field we estimate the Dark Matter mass for parameters used in previous work on Dark Matter-Dark Energy interactions.

  2. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  3. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with Λ CDM . Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the Λ CDM model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter space of such scenarios

  4. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-03-20

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with {lambda}{sub CDM}. Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the {lambda}{sub CDM} model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter

  5. Simplified models for dark matter face their consistent completions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, Dorival; Machado, Pedro A. N.; No, Jose Miguel

    2017-03-01

    Simplified dark matter models have been recently advocated as a powerful tool to exploit the complementarity between dark matter direct detection, indirect detection and LHC experimental probes. Focusing on pseudoscalar mediators between the dark and visible sectors, we show that the simplified dark matter model phenomenology departs significantly from that of consistent ${SU(2)_{\\mathrm{L}} \\times U(1)_{\\mathrm{Y}}}$ gauge invariant completions. We discuss the key physics simplified models fail to capture, and its impact on LHC searches. Notably, we show that resonant mono-Z searches provide competitive sensitivities to standard mono-jet analyses at $13$ TeV LHC.

  6. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: the dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption, and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark elect...

  7. Dark Matter Caustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Aravind

    2010-01-01

    The continuous infall of dark matter with low velocity dispersion in galactic halos leads to the formation of high density structures called caustics. Dark matter caustics are of two kinds : outer and inner. Outer caustics are thin spherical shells surrounding galaxies while inner caustics have a more complicated structure that depends on the dark matter angular momentum distribution. The presence of a dark matter caustic in the plane of the galaxy modifies the gas density in its neighborhood which may lead to observable effects. Caustics are also relevant to direct and indirect dark matter searches.

  8. Hunting the dark Higgs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, Michael; Grohsjean, Alexander; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Schwanenberger, Christian; Penning, Bjoern

    2017-05-01

    We discuss a novel signature of dark matter production at the LHC resulting from the emission of an additional Higgs boson in the dark sector. The presence of such a dark Higgs boson is motivated simultaneously by the need to generate the masses of the particles in the dark sector and the possibility to relax constraints from the dark matter relic abundance by opening up a new annihilation channel. If the dark Higgs boson decays into Standard Model states via a small mixing with the Standard Model Higgs boson, one obtains characteristic large-radius jets in association with missing transverse momentum that can be used to efficiently discriminate signal from backgrounds. We present the sensitivities achievable in LHC searches for dark Higgs bosons with already collected data and demonstrate that such searches can probe large regions of parameter space that are inaccessible to conventional mono-jet or di-jet searches.

  9. Optics with an Atom Laser Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, Immanuel; Koehl, Michael; Greiner, Markus; Haensch, Theodor W.; Esslinger, Tilman

    2001-01-01

    We report on the atom optical manipulation of an atom laser beam. Reflection, focusing, and its storage in a resonator are demonstrated. Precise and versatile mechanical control over an atom laser beam propagating in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is achieved by optically inducing spin flips between atomic ground states with different magnetic moment. The magnetic force acting on the atoms can thereby be effectively switched on and off. The surface of the atom optical element is determined by the resonance condition for the spin flip in the inhomogeneous magnetic field. More than 98% of the incident atom laser beam is reflected specularly

  10. Dark nebulae, dark lanes, and dust belts

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Antony

    2012-01-01

    As probably the only book of its type, this work is aimed at the observer who wants to spend time with something less conventional than the usual fare. Because we usually see objects in space by means of illumination of one kind or another, it has become routine to see them only in these terms. However, part of almost everything that we see is the defining dimension of dark shading, or even the complete obscuration of entire regions in space. Thus this book is focused on everything dark in space: those dark voids in the stellar fabric that mystified astronomers of old; the dark lanes reported in many star clusters; the magical dust belts or dusty regions that have given so many galaxies their identities; the great swirling 'folds' that we associate with bright nebulae; the small dark feature detectable even in some planetary nebulae; and more. Many observers pay scant attention to dark objects and details. Perhaps they are insufficiently aware of them or of the viewing potential they hold, but also it may be...

  11. Scalar dark matter: real vs complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hongyan; Zheng, Sibo [Department of Physics, Chongqing University,Chongqing 401331 (China)

    2017-03-27

    We update the parameter spaces for both a real and complex scalar dark matter via the Higgs portal. In the light of constraints arising from the LUX 2016 data, the latest Higgs invisible decay and the gamma ray spectrum, the dark matter resonant mass region is further restricted to a narrow window between 54.9−62.3 GeV in both cases, and its large mass region is excluded until 834 GeV and 3473 GeV for the real and complex scalar, respectively.

  12. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  13. Stark resonances in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecchi, V.; Maioli, M.; Modena Univ.; Sacchetti, A.

    1992-01-01

    By slightly restricting the conditions given by Herbst and Howland, we prove the existence of resonances in the Stark effect of disordered systems (and atomic crystals) for large atomic mean distance. In the crystal case the ladders of resonances have the Wannier behavior for small complex field. (orig.)

  14. Extended micro objects as dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotsky, K.; Rubin, S.; Svadkovsky, I.

    2017-05-01

    Models of various forms of composite dark matter (DM) predicted by particle theory and the DM constituents formed by gravity that are not reduced to new elementary particle candidates are discussed. Main attention is paid to a gravitational origin of the DM. The influence of extended mass spectrum of primordial black holes on observational limits is considered. It is shown that non-uniformly deformed extra space can be considered as point-like masses which possess only gravitational interaction with each other and with the ordinary particles. The recently discussed six-dimensional stable wormholes could contribute to the DM. The contribution of dark atoms is also considered.

  15. Hidden charged dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Tu, Huitzu; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Can dark matter be stabilized by charge conservation, just as the electron is in the standard model? We examine the possibility that dark matter is hidden, that is, neutral under all standard model gauge interactions, but charged under an exact (\\rm U)(1) gauge symmetry of the hidden sector. Such candidates are predicted in WIMPless models, supersymmetric models in which hidden dark matter has the desired thermal relic density for a wide range of masses. Hidden charged dark matter has many novel properties not shared by neutral dark matter: (1) bound state formation and Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation after chemical freeze out may reduce its relic density, (2) similar effects greatly enhance dark matter annihilation in protohalos at redshifts of z ∼ 30, (3) Compton scattering off hidden photons delays kinetic decoupling, suppressing small scale structure, and (4) Rutherford scattering makes such dark matter self-interacting and collisional, potentially impacting properties of the Bullet Cluster and the observed morphology of galactic halos. We analyze all of these effects in a WIMPless model in which the hidden sector is a simplified version of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the dark matter is a hidden sector stau. We find that charged hidden dark matter is viable and consistent with the correct relic density for reasonable model parameters and dark matter masses in the range 1 GeV ∼ X ∼< 10 TeV. At the same time, in the preferred range of parameters, this model predicts cores in the dark matter halos of small galaxies and other halo properties that may be within the reach of future observations. These models therefore provide a viable and well-motivated framework for collisional dark matter with Sommerfeld enhancement, with novel implications for astrophysics and dark matter searches

  16. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  17. Laser manipulation of atoms and nanofabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurdík, Erich

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental interaction processes between atoms and photons are exploited to control external degrees of freedom of the atoms. Laser light, when properly tuned near an atomic resonance, exerts such forces that the atoms are repelled from or attracted to the regions with low light intensities. We use

  18. Parametric resonances in the amplitude-modulated probe-field absorption spectrum of a two-level atom driven by a resonance amplitude- and phase-modulated pumping field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushilov, N.V.; Kholodkevich, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    An analytical expression is derived for the polarization induced by a weak probe field with periodically modulated amplitude in a two-level medium saturated by a strong amplitude-and phase-modulated resonance field. It is shown that the absorption spectrum of the probe field includes parametric resonances, the maxima corresponding to the condition δ= 2nΓ-Ω w and the minima to that of δ= (2n + 1)Γ- w , where δ is the probe-field detuning front the resonance frequency, Ω w is the modulation frequency of the probe-field amplitude, and Γ is the transition line width, n = 1, 2, 3, hor-ellipsis. At the specific modulation parameters, a substantial region of negative values (i.e., the region of amplification without the population inversion) exists in the absorption spectrum of the probe field

  19. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 μK in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 μm, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip

  20. Dark discrete gauge symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batell, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We investigate scenarios in which dark matter is stabilized by an Abelian Z N discrete gauge symmetry. Models are surveyed according to symmetries and matter content. Multicomponent dark matter arises when N is not prime and Z N contains one or more subgroups. The dark sector interacts with the visible sector through the renormalizable kinetic mixing and Higgs portal operators, and we highlight the basic phenomenology in these scenarios. In particular, multiple species of dark matter can lead to an unconventional nuclear recoil spectrum in direct detection experiments, while the presence of new light states in the dark sector can dramatically affect the decays of the Higgs at the Tevatron and LHC, thus providing a window into the gauge origin of the stability of dark matter.

  1. Dark matter an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter: An Introduction tackles the rather recent but fast-growing subject of astroparticle physics, encompassing three main areas of fundamental physics: cosmology, particle physics, and astrophysics. Accordingly, the book discusses symmetries, conservation laws, relativity, and cosmological parameters and measurements, as well as the astrophysical behaviors of galaxies and galaxy clusters that indicate the presence of dark matter and the possible nature of dark matter distribution.

  2. Interacting warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Norman; Palma, Guillermo; Zambrano, David; Avelino, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We explore a cosmological model composed by a dark matter fluid interacting with a dark energy fluid. The interaction term has the non-linear λρ m α ρ e β form, where ρ m and ρ e are the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy, respectively. The parameters α and β are in principle not constrained to take any particular values, and were estimated from observations. We perform an analytical study of the evolution equations, finding the fixed points and their stability properties in order to characterize suitable physical regions in the phase space of the dark matter and dark energy densities. The constants (λ,α,β) as well as w m and w e of the EoS of dark matter and dark energy respectively, were estimated using the cosmological observations of the type Ia supernovae and the Hubble expansion rate H(z) data sets. We find that the best estimated values for the free parameters of the model correspond to a warm dark matter interacting with a phantom dark energy component, with a well goodness-of-fit to data. However, using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) we find that this model is overcame by a warm dark matter – phantom dark energy model without interaction, as well as by the ΛCDM model. We find also a large dispersion on the best estimated values of the (λ,α,β) parameters, so even if we are not able to set strong constraints on their values, given the goodness-of-fit to data of the model, we find that a large variety of theirs values are well compatible with the observational data used

  3. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  4. Asymmetric Dark Matter and Dark Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Martinez, Enrique Fernandez; Mena, Olga; Redondo, Javier; Serra, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) models invoke a particle-antiparticle asymmetry, similar to the one observed in the Baryon sector, to account for the Dark Matter (DM) abundance. Both asymmetries are usually generated by the same mechanism and generally related, thus predicting DM masses around 5 GeV in order to obtain the correct density. The main challenge for successful models is to ensure efficient annihilation of the thermally produced symmetric component of such a light DM candidate without violating constraints from collider or direct searches. A common way to overcome this involves a light mediator, into which DM can efficiently annihilate and which subsequently decays into Standard Model particles. Here we explore the scenario where the light mediator decays instead into lighter degrees of freedom in the dark sector that act as radiation in the early Universe. While this assumption makes indirect DM searches challenging, it leads to signals of extra radiation at BBN and CMB. Under certain conditions, precise measurements of the number of relativistic species, such as those expected from the Planck satellite, can provide information on the structure of the dark sector. We also discuss the constraints of the interactions between DM and Dark Radiation from their imprint in the matter power spectrum

  5. Chaplygin dark star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2005-01-01

    We study the general properties of a spherically symmetric body described through the generalized Chaplygin equation of state. We conclude that such an object, dubbed generalized Chaplygin dark star, should exist within the context of the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) model of unification of dark energy and dark matter, and derive expressions for its size and expansion velocity. A criteria for the survival of the perturbations in the GCG background that give origin to the dark star are developed, and its main features are analyzed

  6. Ground-state magneto-optical resonances in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Petrov, L.; Slavov, D.; Atvars, A.; Auzinsh, M.; Blush, K.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are presented related to the ground-state magneto-optical resonance observed in cesium vapor confined in an extremely thin cell (ETC), with thickness equal to the wavelength of the irradiating light. It is shown that utilization of the ETC allows one to examine the formation of a magneto-optical resonance on the individual hyperfine transitions, thus distinguishing processes resulting in dark (reduced absorption) or bright (enhanced absorption) resonance formation. We report experimental evidence of bright magneto-optical resonance sign reversal in Cs atoms confined in an ETC. A theoretical model is proposed based on the optical Bloch equations that involves the elastic interaction processes of atoms in the ETC with its walls, resulting in depolarization of the Cs excited state, which is polarized by the exciting radiation. This depolarization leads to the sign reversal of the bright resonance. Using the proposed model, the magneto-optical resonance amplitude and width as a function of laser power are calculated and compared with the experimental ones. The numerical results are in good agreement with those of experiment

  7. Spectra of resonance surface photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antsiferov, V.V.; Smirnov, G.I.; Telegin, G.G. [Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The theory of nonactivated electron transfer between atoms interacting reasonantly with coherent radiation and a metal surface is developed. The spectral resonances in photoabsorption and surface photoionization are found to be related to nonlinear interference effects in the interaction between discrete atomic levels and the continuum formed by the quasi-continuous electron spectrum of a normal metal. The asymmetry in the resonance surface photoionization spectrum is shown to have a shape typical of the Fano autoionization resonances. 18 refs.

  8. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Frequency stability of optical lattice clocks Jérôme Lodewyck, Philip G Westergaard, Arnaud Lecallier, Luca Lorini and Pierre Lemonde Ultracold quantum gases in triangular optical lattices C Becker, P Soltan-Panahi, J Kronjäger, S Dörscher, K Bongs and K Sengstock Cold atoms near superconductors: atomic spin coherence beyond the Johnson noise limit B Kasch, H Hattermann, D Cano, T E Judd, S Scheel, C Zimmermann, R Kleiner, D Koelle and J Fortágh Focusing a deterministic single-ion beam Wolfgang Schnitzler, Georg Jacob, Robert Fickler, Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler and Kilian Singer Tuning the structural and dynamical properties of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate: ripples and instability islands M Asad-uz-Zaman and D Blume Double-resonance lineshapes in a cell with wall coating and buffer gas Svenja Knappe and Hugh G Robinson Transport and interaction blockade of cold bosonic atoms in a triple-well potential P Schlagheck, F Malet, J C Cremon and S M Reimann Fabrication of a planar micro Penning trap and numerical investigations of versatile ion positioning protocols M Hellwig, A Bautista-Salvador, K Singer, G Werth and F Schmidt-Kaler Laser cooling of a magnetically guided ultracold atom beam A Aghajani-Talesh, M Falkenau, V V Volchkov, L E Trafford, T Pfau and A Griesmaier Creation efficiency of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond S Pezzagna, B Naydenov, F Jelezko, J Wrachtrup and J Meijer Top-down pathways to devices with few and single atoms placed to high precision Jessica A Van Donkelaar, Andrew D Greentree, Andrew D C Alves, Lenneke M Jong, Lloyd C L Hollenberg and David N Jamieson Enhanced electric field sensitivity of rf-dressed Rydberg dark states M G Bason, M Tanasittikosol, A Sargsyan, A K Mohapatra, D Sarkisyan, R M Potvliege and C S Adams

  9. DAMA annual modulation and mirror Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerulli, R.; Cappella, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Villar, P. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Saragossa (Spain); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Canfranc Estacion, Huesca (Spain); Bernabei, R.; Belli, P. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Incicchitti, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Addazi, A.; Berezhiani, Z. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi, AQ (Italy); Universita di L' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Coppito, AQ (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    The DAMA experiment using ultra low background NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators has measured an annual modulation effect in the keV region which satisfies all the peculiarities of an effect induced by Dark Matter particles. In this paper we analyze this annual modulation effect in terms of mirror Dark Matter, an exact duplicate of ordinary matter from parallel hidden sector, which chemical composition is dominated by mirror helium while it can also contain significant fractions of heavier elements as Carbon and Oxygen. Dark mirror atoms are considered to interact with the target nuclei in the detector via Rutherford-like scattering induced by kinetic mixing between mirror and ordinary photons, both being massless. In the present analysis we consider various possible scenarios for the mirror matter chemical composition. For all the scenarios, the relevant ranges for the kinetic mixing parameter have been obtained taking also into account various existing uncertainties in nuclear and particle physics quantities. (orig.)

  10. Molecular hydrogen in interstellar dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M.; Robinson, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified H2 formation mechanism is proposed in which small interstellar grains furnish the reaction sites. This mechanism results in a maximum value for the rate constant of about 2 by 10 to the -18th power per cu cm/sec for dark clouds at 10 K. Also, the nascent molecules are ejected in excited states, in qualitative agreement with Copernicus observations. A time-dependent treatment of the chemical evolution of a dark cloud with little or no ionizing radiation shows that the clouds require more than 10 million years to achieve chemical equilibrium. The observed residual atomic hydrogen in several dark clouds suggests that the clouds are 1 to 10 million years old. Other consequences of the temporal cloud model are in accord with astronomical observations.

  11. Interacting dark matter and dark radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong

    2017-05-01

    We give a brief review on the interacting Dark Matter (iDM) scenario and its effects on cosmology and particle physics. If DM candidates can have strong self-interactions or interactions with other relativistic particles, we can refer them generally as iDM. IDM is an interesting possibility that is motivated both theoretically and observationally. The relativistic particles could belong to Standard Model (SM), such as photons and neutrinos, or be dark radiation (DR) in new physics. The resulting perturbed Boltzmann equations are concisely discussed and illustrations on matter power spectrum are given.

  12. Asymmetric dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David E.; Luty, Markus A.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a simple class of models in which the relic density of dark matter is determined by the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In these models a B-L asymmetry generated at high temperatures is transferred to the dark matter, which is charged under B-L. The interactions that transfer the asymmetry decouple at temperatures above the dark matter mass, freezing in a dark matter asymmetry of order the baryon asymmetry. This explains the observed relation between the baryon and dark matter densities for the dark matter mass in the range 5-15 GeV. The symmetric component of the dark matter can annihilate efficiently to light pseudoscalar Higgs particles a or via t-channel exchange of new scalar doublets. The first possibility allows for h 0 →aa decays, while the second predicts a light charged Higgs-like scalar decaying to τν. Direct detection can arise from Higgs exchange in the first model or a nonzero magnetic moment in the second. In supersymmetric models, the would-be lightest supersymmetric partner can decay into pairs of dark matter particles plus standard model particles, possibly with displaced vertices.

  13. Baryonic Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    De Paolis, F.; Jetzer, Ph.; Ingrosso, G.; Roncadelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reasons supporting the idea that most of the dark matter in galaxies and clusters of galaxies is baryonic are discussed. Moreover, it is argued that most of the dark matter in galactic halos should be in the form of MACHOs and cold molecular clouds.

  14. The Dark Matter Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Robert H.

    1. Introduction; 2. Early history of the dark matter hypothesis; 3. The stability of disk galaxies: the dark halo solutions; 4. Direct evidence: extended rotation curves of spiral galaxies; 5. The maximum disk: light traces mass; 6. Cosmology and the birth of astroparticle physics; 7. Clusters

  15. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D., E-mail: davsark@yahoo.com, E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am [National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Institute for Physical Research (Armenia); Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C. [Université de Bourgogne-Dijon, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS (France); Cartaleva, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Electronics (Bulgaria); Wilson-Gordon, A. D. [Bar-Ilan University Ramat Gan, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Auzinsh, M. [University of Latvia, Department of Physics (Latvia)

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  17. Enabling forbidden dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, James M.; Liu, Hongwan; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2017-10-01

    The thermal relic density of dark matter is conventionally set by two-body annihilations. We point out that in many simple models, 3 →2 annihilations can play an important role in determining the relic density over a broad range of model parameters. This occurs when the two-body annihilation is kinematically forbidden, but the 3 →2 process is allowed; we call this scenario not-forbidden dark matter. We illustrate this mechanism for a vector-portal dark matter model, showing that for a dark matter mass of mχ˜MeV -10 GeV , 3 →2 processes not only lead to the observed relic density, but also imply a self-interaction cross section that can solve the cusp/core problem. This can be accomplished while remaining consistent with stringent CMB constraints on light dark matter, and can potentially be discovered at future direct detection experiments.

  18. Macro Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, David M; Lynn, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter is a vital component of the current best model of our universe, $\\Lambda$CDM. There are leading candidates for what the dark matter could be (e.g. weakly-interacting massive particles, or axions), but no compelling observational or experimental evidence exists to support these particular candidates, nor any beyond-the-Standard-Model physics that might produce such candidates. This suggests that other dark matter candidates, including ones that might arise in the Standard Model, should receive increased attention. Here we consider a general class of dark matter candidates with characteristic masses and interaction cross-sections characterized in units of grams and cm$^2$, respectively -- we therefore dub these macroscopic objects as Macros. Such dark matter candidates could potentially be assembled out of Standard Model particles (quarks and leptons) in the early universe. A combination of earth-based, astrophysical, and cosmological observations constrain a portion of the Macro parameter space; ho...

  19. Dark cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping-Kai, E-mail: pingkai.hu@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kusenko, Alexander, E-mail: kusenko@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Takhistov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vtakhist@physics.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    If dark matter particles have an electric charge, as in models of millicharged dark matter, such particles should be accelerated in the same astrophysical accelerators that produce ordinary cosmic rays, and their spectra should have a predictable rigidity dependence. Depending on the charge, the resulting “dark cosmic rays” can be detected as muon-like or neutrino-like events in Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and other detectors. We present new limits and propose several new analyses, in particular, for the Super-Kamiokande experiment, which can probe a previously unexplored portion of the millicharged dark matter parameter space. Most of our results are fairly general and apply to a broad class of dark matter models.

  20. Dark cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Kai Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available If dark matter particles have an electric charge, as in models of millicharged dark matter, such particles should be accelerated in the same astrophysical accelerators that produce ordinary cosmic rays, and their spectra should have a predictable rigidity dependence. Depending on the charge, the resulting “dark cosmic rays” can be detected as muon-like or neutrino-like events in Super-Kamiokande, IceCube, and other detectors. We present new limits and propose several new analyses, in particular, for the Super-Kamiokande experiment, which can probe a previously unexplored portion of the millicharged dark matter parameter space. Most of our results are fairly general and apply to a broad class of dark matter models.

  1. Fingerprinting Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sapone, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar field models) which is often generically called "dark energy". We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Atomic inner-shell physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects on atomic inner shells; relativistic calculation of atomic transition probabilities; many-body effects in energetic atomic transitions; Auger Electron spectrometry of core levels of atoms; experimental evaluation of inner-vacancy level energies for comparison with theory; mechanisms for energy shifts of atomic K-X rays; atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation; investigations of inner-shell states by the electron energy-loss technique at high resolution; coherence effects in electron emission by atoms; inelastic X-ray scattering including resonance phenomena; Rayleigh scattering: elastic photon scattering by bound electrons; electron-atom bremsstrahlung; X-ray and bremsstrahlung production in nuclear reactions; positron production in heavy-ion collisions, and X-ray processes in heavy-ion collisions

  3. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Song, Kyu Seok; Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Chul Joong; Han, Phil Soon

    1992-01-01

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  4. The Effect of Vibration Characteristics on the Atomization Rate in a Micro-Tapered Aperture Atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiufeng; Zhang, Jianhui; Huang, Jun; Wang, Ying

    2018-03-21

    Because little is known about the atomization theory of a micro-tapered aperture atomizer, we investigated the vibration characteristics of this type of atomizer. The atomization mechanism of a micro-tapered aperture atomizer was described, and the atomization rate equation was deduced. As observed via microscopy, the angle of the micro-tapered aperture changes with the applied voltage, which proved the existence of a dynamic cone angle. The forward and reverse atomization rates were measured at various voltages, and the influence of the micro-tapered aperture and its variation on the atomization rate was characterized. The resonance frequency of the piezoelectric vibrator was obtained using a laser vibrometer, and the atomization rates were measured at each resonance frequency. From experiments, we found that the atomization rates at the first five resonance frequencies increased as the working frequency increased. At the fifth resonance frequency (121.1 kHz), the atomization rate was maximized (0.561 mL/min), and at the sixth resonance frequency (148.3 kHz), the atomization rate decreased significantly (0.198 mL/min). The experimental results show that the vibration characteristics of the piezoelectric vibrator have a relatively strong impact on the atomization rate. This research is expected to contribute to the manufacture of micro-tapered aperture atomizers.

  5. The Effect of Vibration Characteristics on the Atomization Rate in a Micro-Tapered Aperture Atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiufeng Yan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Because little is known about the atomization theory of a micro-tapered aperture atomizer, we investigated the vibration characteristics of this type of atomizer. The atomization mechanism of a micro-tapered aperture atomizer was described, and the atomization rate equation was deduced. As observed via microscopy, the angle of the micro-tapered aperture changes with the applied voltage, which proved the existence of a dynamic cone angle. The forward and reverse atomization rates were measured at various voltages, and the influence of the micro-tapered aperture and its variation on the atomization rate was characterized. The resonance frequency of the piezoelectric vibrator was obtained using a laser vibrometer, and the atomization rates were measured at each resonance frequency. From experiments, we found that the atomization rates at the first five resonance frequencies increased as the working frequency increased. At the fifth resonance frequency (121.1 kHz, the atomization rate was maximized (0.561 mL/min, and at the sixth resonance frequency (148.3 kHz, the atomization rate decreased significantly (0.198 mL/min. The experimental results show that the vibration characteristics of the piezoelectric vibrator have a relatively strong impact on the atomization rate. This research is expected to contribute to the manufacture of micro-tapered aperture atomizers.

  6. Dark matter: the astrophysical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of dark matter is one of the most urgent problems in cosmology. I describe the astrophysical case for dark matter, from both an observational and a theoretical perspective. This overview will therefore focus on the observational motivations rather than the particle physics aspects of dark matter constraints on specific dark matter candidates. First, however, I summarize the astronomical evidence for dark matter, then I highlight the weaknesses of the standard cold dark matter model (LCDM) to provide a robust explanation of some observations. The greatest weakness in the dark matter saga is that we have not yet identified the nature of dark matter itself

  7. The dark side of technology

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Technological progress comes with a dark side where good ideas and intentions produce undesirable results (extreme downsides include atomic and biological weapons). The many and various unexpected outcomes of technology span humorous to bizarre, to situations that threaten human survival. Development can be positive for some, but negative and isolating for others (e.g. older or poorer people). Progress is often transient, as faster electronics and computers dramatically shorten retention time of data, knowledge, and information loss (e.g. even photos may be unreadable within a generation). Progress and globalization are also destroying past languages and cultures. Advances cut across all areas of science and life, and the scope is vast from biology, medicine, agriculture, transport, electronics, computers, long-range communications, to a global economy. Reliance on technology causes unexpected technology-driven vulnerability to natural events (e.g. intense sunspot activity) that could annihilate advanced soci...

  8. Generation of dark solitons in oscillating Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theocharis, G. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece); Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-4515 (United States); Nistazakis, H.E. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece); Department of Telecommunications Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese, Tripolis 22100 (Greece); Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece)]. E-mail: dfrantz@cc.uoa.gr; Bishop, A.R. [Center for Nonlinear Studies and Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-04-11

    We propose an experimentally tractable setting for observing an 'instability' of a repulsive oscillating Bose-Einstein condensate that leads to the generation of dark solitons. We illustrate that when the trap of the condensate (which incorporates a localized impurity) is displaced so that the condensate flow is characterized by an atomic velocity larger than the local speed of sound, dark solitons are generated. The subcritical, near critical and supercritical are analyzed in detail.

  9. Review on Dark Photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curciarello Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available e+e− collider experiments at the intensity frontier are naturally suited to probe the existence of a force beyond the Standard Model between WIMPs, the most viable dark matter candidates. The mediator of this new force, known as dark photon, should be a new vector gauge boson very weakly coupled to the Standard Model photon. No significant signal has been observed so far. I will report on current limits set on the coupling factor ε2 between the photon and the dark photon by e+e− collider experiments.

  10. Dark Matter in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Silvia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Results of Dark Matter searches in mono-X analysis with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider are reported. The data were collected in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. A description of the main characteristics of each analysis and how the main backgrounds are estimated is shown. The observed data are in agreement with the expected Standard Model backgrounds for all analysis described. Exclusion limits are presented for Dark Matter models including pair production of dark matter candidates.

  11. Dark Matter in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00222441; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Dark Matter searches with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is shown. Results of Mono-X analyses requiring large missing transverse momentum and a recoiling detectable physics object (X) are reported. The data were collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The observed data are in agreement with the expected Standard Model backgrounds for all analyses described. Exclusion limits are presented for Dark Matter models including pair production of Dark Matter candidates.

  12. Dark Matter Detection Using Helium Evaporation and Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Seidel, George M.; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-01

    We describe a method for dark matter detection based on the evaporation of helium atoms from a cold surface and their subsequent detection using field ionization. When a dark matter particle scatters off a nucleus of the target material, elementary excitations (phonons or rotons) are produced. Excitations which have an energy greater than the binding energy of helium to the surface can result in the evaporation of helium atoms. We propose to detect these atoms by ionizing them in a strong electric field. Because the binding energy of helium to surfaces can be below 1 meV, this detection scheme opens up new possibilities for the detection of dark matter particles in a mass range down to 1 MeV /c2 .

  13. Dark Matter Detection Using Helium Evaporation and Field Ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey J; Seidel, George M; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-03

    We describe a method for dark matter detection based on the evaporation of helium atoms from a cold surface and their subsequent detection using field ionization. When a dark matter particle scatters off a nucleus of the target material, elementary excitations (phonons or rotons) are produced. Excitations which have an energy greater than the binding energy of helium to the surface can result in the evaporation of helium atoms. We propose to detect these atoms by ionizing them in a strong electric field. Because the binding energy of helium to surfaces can be below 1 meV, this detection scheme opens up new possibilities for the detection of dark matter particles in a mass range down to 1  MeV/c^{2}.

  14. Sterile neutrinos as the origin of dark and baryonic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-02-08

    We demonstrate for the first time that three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, evading thus the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. We identify the range of sterile neutrino properties that is consistent with all known constraints. We find a domain of parameters where the new particles can be found with present day experimental techniques, using upgrades to existing experimental facilities.

  15. Dark matter and dark energy solutions using by observational evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, E. C. Gunay; Yilmaz, I.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we examine dark energy, dark matter and baryonic matter in FRW by observational evidences. Also we study our model by considering possible dark energy candidates such as Phantom energy. Obtained solutions show that dark energy candidate may be phantom energy depending on accuracy of today's observation.

  16. Cold dark matter plus not-so-clumpy dark relics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diamanti, R.; Ando, S.; Gariazzo, S.; Mena, O.; Weniger, C.

    Various particle physics models suggest that, besides the (nearly) cold dark matter that accounts for current observations, additional but sub-dominant dark relics might exist. These could be warm, hot, or even contribute as dark radiation. We present here a comprehensive study of two-component dark

  17. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  18. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M.J.; Lembessis, V.E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A.J.; Girkin, J.M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓθ)) modes with different l indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blu...

  19. Dark Matter and Dark Energy Summary and Future Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress reported at this Royal Society Discussion Meeting and advertizes some possible future directions in our drive to understand dark matter and dark energy. Additionally, a first attempt is made to place in context the exciting new results from the WMAP satellite, which were published shortly after this Meeting. In the first part of this review, pieces of observational evidence shown here that bear on the amounts of dark matter and dark energy are reviewed. Subsequently, particle candidates for dark matter are mentioned, and detection strategies are discussed. Finally, ideas are presented for calculating the amounts of dark matter and dark energy, and possibly relating them to laboratory data.

  20. Inelastic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David; Weiner, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Many observations suggest that much of the matter of the universe is nonbaryonic. Recently, the DAMA NaI dark matter direct detection experiment reported an annual modulation in their event rate consistent with a WIMP relic. However, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) Ge experiment excludes most of the region preferred by DAMA. We demonstrate that if the dark matter can only scatter by making a transition to a slightly heavier state (Δm∼100 keV), the experiments are no longer in conflict. Moreover, differences in the energy spectrum of nuclear recoil events could distinguish such a scenario from the standard WIMP scenario. Finally, we discuss the sneutrino as a candidate for inelastic dark matter in supersymmetric theories

  1. Xenophobic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason; Sanford, David

    2013-07-01

    We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fn/fp≈-0.64, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.

  2. Dark matter warms up

    CERN Multimedia

    Peplow, Mark

    2006-01-01

    "Unseen mass looks to be more "tepid" than thought. Astronomers have measured the temperature of dark matter for the first time. The discovery should help particle hunters to identify exactly what this mysterious substance is made of" (1 page)

  3. Cleaning up dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    "An experiment in Italy has found tantalizing but puzzling evidence for axions, one if the leading candidates for dark matter. The authors explain how a pair of spinning neutron stars should settle the issue once and for all." (3 pages)

  4. Little composite dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T -parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T -parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling [Formula: see text], thus evading direct detection.

  5. Inflatable Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Hooper, Dan; McDermott, Samuel D

    2016-01-22

    We describe a general scenario, dubbed "inflatable dark matter," in which the density of dark matter particles can be reduced through a short period of late-time inflation in the early Universe. The overproduction of dark matter that is predicted within many, otherwise, well-motivated models of new physics can be elegantly remedied within this context. Thermal relics that would, otherwise, be disfavored can easily be accommodated within this class of scenarios, including dark matter candidates that are very heavy or very light. Furthermore, the nonthermal abundance of grand unified theory or Planck scale axions can be brought to acceptable levels without invoking anthropic tuning of initial conditions. A period of late-time inflation could have occurred over a wide range of scales from ∼MeV to the weak scale or above, and could have been triggered by physics within a hidden sector, with small but not necessarily negligible couplings to the standard model.

  6. Lectures on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seljak, U.

    2001-01-01

    These lectures concentrate on evolution and generation of dark matter perturbations. The purpose of the lectures is to present, in a systematic way, a comprehensive review of the cosmological parameters that can lead to observable effects in the dark matter clustering properties. We begin by reviewing the relativistic linear perturbation theory formalism. We discuss the gauge issue and derive Einstein's and continuity equations for several popular gauge choices. We continue by developing fluid equations for cold dark matter and baryons and Boltzmann equations for photons, massive and massless neutrinos. We then discuss the generation of initial perturbations by the process of inflation and the parameters of that process that can be extracted from the observations. Finally we discuss evolution of perturbations in various regimes and the imprint of the evolution on the dark matter power spectrum both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime. (author)

  7. The Dark Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario

    2010-04-01

    1. A brief history of dark matter Vera Rubin; 2. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds Kailash Sahu; 3. Searching for galactic dark matter Harvey Richer; 4. Hot gas in clusters of galaxies and Omega Megan Donahue; 5. Tracking the Baryon density from the Big Bang to the present Gary Steigman; 6. Modified Newtonian dynamics and its implications Bob Sanders; 7. Cosmological parameters and quintessence from radio galaxies Ruth Daly and Eric Guerra; 8. The mass density of the Universe Neta Bahcall; 9. Growth of structure in the Universe John Peacock; 10. Cosmological implications of the most distant supernova (known) Adam Riess; 11. Dynamical probes of the Halo mass function Chris Kochanek; 12. Detection of gravitational waves from inflation Marc Kamionkowski and Andrew Jaffe; 13. Cosmological constant problems and their solution Alex Vilenkin; 14. Dark Matter and dark energy: a physicist's perspective Michael Dine.

  8. Gravity's dark side: Doing without dark matte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of searching, the 'dark matter' thought to hold galaxies together is still nowhere to be found. Matthew Chalmers describes how some physicists think it makes more sense to change our theory of gravity instead. Einstein's general theory of relativity is part of the bedrock of modern physics. It describes in elegant mathematical terms how matter causes space-time to curve, and therefore how objects move in a gravitational field. Since it was published in 1916, general relativity has passed every test asked of it with flying colours, and to many physicists the notion that it is wrong is sacrilege. But the motivation for developing an alternative theory of gravity is compelling. Over the last few years cosmologists have arrived at a simple yet extraordinarily successful model of universe. The trouble is that it requires most of the cosmos to be filled with mysterious stuff that we cannot see. In particular, general relativity - or rather its non-relativistic limit otherwise known as Newtonian gravity - can only correctly describe the dynamics of galaxies if we invoke huge quantities of 'dark matter'. Furthermore, an exotic entity called dark energy is necessary to account for the recent discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Indeed, in the standard model of cosmology, visible matter such as stars, planets and physics textbooks accounts for just 4% of the total universe. (U.K.)

  9. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  10. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  11. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The author both reviews and makes the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the open-quotes standard modelclose quotes of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for open-quotes new physics.close quotes The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10 -6 --10 -4 eV), a light neutrino (20--90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. The author briefly mentions more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. 119 refs

  12. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  13. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  14. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  15. Stopping atoms with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.N.; Wieman, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of light pressure to cool and stop neutral atoms has been an area of considerable interest recently. Cooled neutral atoms are needed for a variety of interesting experiments involving neutral atom traps and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. Laser cooling of sodium has previously been demonstrated using elegant but quite elaborate apparatus. These techniques employed stabilized dye lasers and a variety of additional sophisticated hardware. The authors have demonstrated that a frequency chirp technique can be implemented using inexpensive diode lasers and simple electronics. In this technique the atoms in an atomic beam scatter resonant photons from a counterpropagating laser beam. The momentum transfer from the photons slows the atoms. The primary difficulty is that as the atoms slow their Doppler shift changes, and so they are no longer in resonance with the incident photons. In the frequency chirp technique this is solved by rapidly changing the laser frequency so that the atoms remain in resonance. To achieve the necessary frequency sweep with a dye laser one must use an extremely sophisticated high-speed electrooptic modulator. With a diode laser, however, the frequency can be smoothly and rapidly varied over many gigahertz simply by changing the injection current

  16. Photoelectron spectra as a probe of double-core resonsance in two-electron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobe, R.; Haan, S.L.; Eberly, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The authors calculate photoelectron spectra for a two-electron atom under the influence of two external driving fields, using an essential states formalism. They focus on the regime of so-called coherence transfer, in which electron-electron correlation transfers field-induced photo-coherence from one electron to the other. In the case studied here, two laser fields are resonant with coupled atomic transitions, in the manner familiar from three-level dark-state spectroscopy. Dynamical two electron effects are monitored via the photoelectron energy spectrum. The authors show that the distribution of the photoelectron energies can be singly, doubly or triply peaked depending on the relative laser intensities. The electron spectra are independent of the turn-on sequence of the fields

  17. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental atomic physics program within the physics division is carried out by two groups, whose reports are given in this section. Work of the accelerator atomic physics group is centered around the 6.5-MV EN tandem accelerator; consequently, most of its research is concerned with atomic processes occurring to, or initiated by, few MeV/amu heavy ions. Other activities of this group include higher energy experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), studies of electron and positron channeling radiation, and collaborative experiments at other institutions. The second experimental group concerns itself with lower energy atomic collision physics in support of the Fusion Energy Program. During the past year, the new Electron Cyclotron Resonance Source has been completed and some of the first data from this facility is presented. In addition to these two activities in experimental atomic physics, other chapters of this report describe progress in theoretical atomic physics, experimental plasma diagnostic development, and atomic data center compilation activities

  18. Stationary Electron Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, David E.

    1998-04-01

    I will present a novel theory concerning the position and nature of the electron inside the atom. This new concept is consistant with present experimental evidence and adheres strictly to the valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model presently used in chemistry for predicting the shapes of molecules and ions. In addition, I will discuss the atomic model concept as being a true harmonic oscillator, periodic motion at resonant frequency which produces radiation at discrete frequencies or line spectra is possible because the electron is under the action of two restoring forces, electrostatic attraction and superconducting respulsion of the electron's magnetic field by the nucleus.

  19. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of CH281BrF near 8 μm: rovibrational analysis of the ν3 and ν8 fundamentals and resonances with the dark states 2ν5 and ν6 + ν9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroppa, P.; Tasinato, N.; Baldacci, A.

    2014-01-01

    -type absorption. Due to the proximity of the band origins to those of closely lying overtones and combination bands, the v3 = 1 and v8 = 1 levels were found perturbed through Coriolis resonance by the v5 = 2 (A) and v6 = v9 = 1 (A) states, respectively. The spectral analysis resulted in the identification of 3132...

  20. Determination of the electromagnetic dipole strength distribution in medium-heavy atomic nuclei by means of nuclear resonance fluorescence; Bestimmung der elektromagnetischen Dipolstaerkeverteilung in mittelschweren Atomkernen mittels Kernresonanzfluoreszenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massarczyk, Ralph Jens

    2011-01-17

    During the last hundred years several models were developed to describe the configuration of nuclei. These models have to make predictions, which should be comparable with experiments. As a standard type of experiment the nuclear resonance fluorescence was established. A nucleus is excited by irradiation with photons. By emitting one or more photons the nucleus decays back to the ground state. With this method it is possible to measure energy levels and to determine the strength of their excitation. A continuum of unresolved peaks gives additional strength. The existing setup at the linear electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf uses bremsstrahlung, produced as a secondary beam in a thin Niobium foil. During the years 2008/09 experiments on the nuclei of {sup 86}Kr and {sup 136}Ba took place there. In this work they will be analyzed. Photon flux and efficiency determination have been done as well as simulations on detector response and non-nuclear scattered background events. For this purpose the GEANT4 package was used. Finally the resulting cross sections were corrected for branching and feeding.

  1. Working the Dark Side

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjering, Jens Christian Borrebye

    A few days after the terror attacks of 9/11, then Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on television with a call for “working the dark side.” While still unclear what this expression entailed at the time, Cheney's comment appears in retrospect to almost have been prophetic for the years to come...... – years where parts of the U.S. Army and intelligence community set up a rampant torture regime all across the world. Yet, the connection between a so-called “dark side,” “working” this “dark side,” and the torture that followed is not a given, but, instead, a consequence of a set of very specific legal......, political, and personal choices in the early years after 9/11. This dissertation is an investigation into how the notion of a “dark side” took form, and of how and why the specific make-up of this“dark side” ended up creating a torture regime which already today seems almost unreal. The dissertation's first...

  2. Dark matter detection - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  3. Dark matter detection - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of todays particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the Universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the Universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world- wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  4. Dark matter detection - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The quest for the mysterious missing mass of the universe has become one of the big challenges of today's particle physics and cosmology. Astronomical observations show that only 1% of the matter of the universe is luminous. Moreover there is now convincing evidence that 85% of all gravitationally observable matter in the universe is of a new exotic kind, different from the 'ordinary' matter surrounding us. In a series of three lectures we discuss past, recent and future efforts made world-wide to detect and/or decipher the nature of Dark Matter. In Lecture I we review our present knowledge of the Dark Matter content of the Universe and how experimenters search for it's candidates; In Lecture II we discuss so-called 'direct detection' techniques which allow to search for scattering of galactic dark matter particles with detectors in deep-underground laboratories; we discuss the interpretation of experimental results and the challenges posed by different backgrounds; In Lecture III we take a look at the 'indirect detection' of the annihilation of dark matter candidates in astrophysical objects, such as our sun or the center of the Milky Way; In addition we will have a look at efforts to produce Dark Matter particles directly at accelerators and we shall close with a look at alternative nonparticle searches and future prospects. (author)

  5. Dark matter, neutrinos, and our solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Nirmala

    2013-01-01

    Dark Matter, Neutrinos, and Our Solar System is a unique enterprise that should be viewed as an important contribution to our understanding of dark matter, neutrinos and the solar system. It describes these issues in terms of links, between cosmology, particle and nuclear physics, as well as between cosmology, atmospheric and terrestrial physics. It studies the constituents of dark matter (classified as hot warm and cold) first in terms of their individual structures (baryonic and non-baryonic, massive and non-massive, interacting and non-interacting) and second, in terms of facilities available to detect these structures (large and small). Neutrinos (an important component of dark matter) are treated as a separate entity. A detailed study of these elusive (sub-atomic) particles is done, from the year 1913 when they were found as byproducts of beta decay -- until the discovery in 2007 which confirmed that neutrino flavors were not more than three (as speculated by some). The last chapter of the book details t...

  6. The dark matter distribution of NGC 5921

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Israa Abdulqasim Mohammed; Hashim, Norsiah; Abidin, Zamri Zainal

    2018-04-01

    We used the neutral atomic hydrogen data of the Very Large Array for the spiral galaxy NGC 5921 with z = 0.0045 at the distance of 22.4 Mpc, to investigate the nature of dark matter. The investigation was based on two theories, namely, dark matter and Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). We presented the kinematic analysis of the rotation curve with two models of dark matter, namely, the Burkert and NFW profiles. The results revealed that the NFW halo model can reproduce the observed rotation curve, with χ 2_{red}≈ 1, while the Burkert model is unable to fit the observation data. Therefore, the dark matter density profile of NGC 5921 can be presented as a cuspy halo. We also tried to investigate the observed rotation curve of NGC 5921 with MOND, along with the possible assumption on baryonic matter and distance. We note that MOND is still incapable of mimicking the rotation curve with the observed data of the galaxy.

  7. Probing atomic scale transformation of fossil dental enamel using Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a case study from the Tugen Hills (Rift Gregory, Kenya).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haohao; Balan, Etienne; Gervais, Christel; Ségalen, Loïc; Roche, Damien; Person, Alain; Fayon, Franck; Morin, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence

    2014-09-01

    A series of fossil tooth enamel samples was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (13)C and (19)F magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Tooth remains were collected in Mio-Pliocene deposits of the Tugen Hills in Kenya. Significant transformations were observed in fossil enamel as a function of increasing fluorine content (up to 2.8wt.%). FTIR spectroscopy revealed a shift of the ν1 PO4 stretching band to higher frequency. The ν2 CO3 vibrational band showed a decrease in the intensity of the primary B-type carbonate signal, which was replaced by a specific band at 864cm(-1). This last band was ascribed to a specific carbonate environment in which the carbonate group is closely associated to a fluoride ion. The occurrence of this carbonate defect was consistently attested by the observation of two different fluoride signals in the (19)F NMR spectra. One main signal, at ∼-100ppm, is related to structural F ions in the apatite channel and the other, at -88ppm, corresponds to the composite defect. These spectroscopic observations can be understood as resulting from the mixture of two phases: biogenic hydroxylapatite (bioapatite) and secondary fluorapatite. SEM observations of the most altered sample confirmed the extensive replacement of the bioapatite by fluorapatite, resulting from the dissolution of the primary bioapatite followed by the precipitation of carbonate-fluorapatite. The ν2 CO3 IR bands can be efficiently used to monitor the extent of this type of bioapatite transformation during fossilization. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Revival of the unified dark energy-dark matter model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, M.C.; Bertolami, O.; Sen, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) proposal for unification of dark energy and dark matter and show that it admits an unique decomposition into dark energy and dark matter components once phantomlike dark energy is excluded. Within this framework, we study structure formation and show that difficulties associated to unphysical oscillations or blowup in the matter power spectrum can be circumvented. Furthermore, we show that the dominance of dark energy is related to the time when energy density fluctuations start deviating from the linear δ∼a behavior

  9. Dark matter as a weakly coupled dark baryon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitridate, Andrea; Redi, Michele; Smirnov, Juri; Strumia, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Dark Matter might be an accidentally stable baryon of a new confining gauge interaction. We extend previous studies exploring the possibility that the DM is made of dark quarks heavier than the dark confinement scale. The resulting phenomenology contains new unusual elements: a two-stage DM cosmology (freeze-out followed by dark condensation), a large DM annihilation cross section through recombination of dark quarks (allowing to fit the positron excess). Light dark glue-balls are relatively long lived and give extra cosmological effects; DM itself can remain radioactive.

  10. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Asymmetric Higgsino dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Riotto, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In the supersymmetric framework, prior to the electroweak phase transition, the existence of a baryon asymmetry implies the existence of a Higgsino asymmetry. We investigate whether the Higgsino could be a viable asymmetric dark matter candidate. We find that this is indeed possible. Thus, supersymmetry can provide the observed dark matter abundance and, furthermore, relate it with the baryon asymmetry, in which case the puzzle of why the baryonic and dark matter mass densities are similar would be explained. To accomplish this task, two conditions are required. First, the gauginos, squarks, and sleptons must all be very heavy, such that the only electroweak-scale superpartners are the Higgsinos. With this spectrum, supersymmetry does not solve the fine-tuning problem. Second, the temperature of the electroweak phase transition must be low, in the (1-10) GeV range. This condition requires an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  12. Dark Energy. What the ...?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, Risa

    2007-10-30

    What is the Universe made of? This question has been asked as long as humans have been questioning, and astronomers and physicists are finally converging on an answer. The picture which has emerged from numerous complementary observations over the past decade is a surprising one: most of the matter in the Universe isn't visible, and most of the Universe isn't even made of matter. In this talk, I will explain what the rest of this stuff, known as 'Dark Energy' is, how it is related to the so-called 'Dark Matter', how it impacts the evolution of the Universe, and how we can study the dark universe using observations of light from current and future telescopes.

  13. Dark chocolate exacerbates acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongraviopap, Saivaree; Asawanonda, Pravit

    2016-05-01

    The effects of chocolate on acne exacerbations have recently been reevaluated. For so many years, it was thought that it had no role in worsening acne. To investigate whether 99% dark chocolate, when consumed in regular daily amounts, would cause acne to worsen in acne-prone male subjects, twenty-five acne prone male subjects were asked to consume 25 g of 99% dark chocolate daily for 4 weeks. Assessments which included Leeds revised acne scores as well as lesion counts took place weekly. Food frequency questionnaire was used, and daily activities were recorded. Statistically significant changes of acne scores and numbers of comedones and inflammatory papules were detected as early as 2 weeks into the study. At 4 weeks, the changes remained statistically significant compared to baseline. Dark chocolate when consumed in normal amounts for 4 weeks can exacerbate acne in male subjects with acne-prone skin. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  15. Massive hidden photons as lukewarm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Postma, Marieke

    2008-11-01

    We study the possibility that a keV-MeV mass hidden photon (HP), i.e. a hidden sector U(1) gauge boson, accounts for the observed amount of dark matter. We focus on the case where the HP interacts with the standard model sector only through kinetic mixing with the photon. The relic abundance is computed including all relevant plasma effects into the photon's self-energy, which leads to a resonant yield almost independent of the HP mass. The HP can decay into three photons. Moreover, if light enough it can be copiously produced in stars. Including bounds from cosmic photon backgrounds and stellar evolution, we find that the hidden photon can only give a subdominant contribution to the dark matter. This negative conclusion may be avoided if another production mechanism besides kinetic mixing is operative. (orig.)

  16. Cosmology and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachev, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This lecture course covers cosmology from the particle physicist perspective. Therefore, the emphasis will be on the evidence for the new physics in cosmological and astrophysical data together with minimal theoretical frameworks needed to understand and appreciate the evidence. I review the case for non-baryonic dark matter and describe popular models which incorporate it. In parallel, the story of dark energy will be developed, which includes accelerated expansion of the Universe today, the Universe origin in the Big Bang, and support for the Inflationary theory in CMBR data.

  17. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  18. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  19. Dark Side of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Side of the Universe (DSU) workshops bring together a wide range of theorists and experimentalists to discuss current ideas on models of the dark side, and relate them to current and future experiments. This year's DSU will take place in the colorful Norwegian city of Bergen. Topics include dark matter, dark energy, cosmology, and physics beyond the standard model. One of the goals of the workshop is to expose in particular students and young researchers to the fascinating topics of dark matter and dark energy, and to provide them with the opportunity to meet some of the best researchers in these areas .

  20. Dark matter and its detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Xiaojun; Qin Bo

    2011-01-01

    We first explain the concept of dark matter,then review the history of its discovery and the evidence of its existence. We describe our understanding of the nature of dark matter particles, the popular dark matter models,and why the weakly interacting massive particles (called WIMPs) are the most attractive candidates for dark matter. Then we introduce the three methods of dark matter detection: colliders, direct detection and indirect detection. Finally, we review the recent development of dark matter detection, including the new results from DAMA, CoGent, PAMELA, ATIC and Fermi. (authors)

  1. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  2. Dark energy and dark matter in galaxy halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetradis, N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the dark matter is coupled through its mass to a scalar field associated with the dark energy of the Universe. In order for such a field to play a role at the present cosmological distances, it must be effectively massless at galactic length scales. We discuss the effect of the field on the distribution of dark matter in galaxy halos. We show that the profile of the distribution outside the galaxy core remains largely unaffected and the approximately flat rotation curves persist. The dispersion of the dark matter velocity is enhanced by a potentially large factor relative to the case of zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter. The counting rates in terrestrial dark matter detectors are similarly enhanced. Existing bounds on the properties of dark matter candidates can be extended to the coupled case, by taking into account the enhancement factor

  3. Dark matter and dark energy: The critical questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael S. Turner

    2002-01-01

    Stars account for only about 0.5% of the content of the Universe; the bulk of the Universe is optically dark. The dark side of the Universe is comprised of: at least 0.1% light neutrinos; 3.5% ± 1% baryons; 29% ± 4% cold dark matter; and 66% ± 6% dark energy. Now that we have characterized the dark side of the Universe, the challenge is to understand it. The critical questions are: (1) What form do the dark baryons take? (2) What is (are) the constituent(s) of the cold dark matter? (3) What is the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is causing the Universe to speed up

  4. New interactions in the dark sector mediated by dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookfield, Anthony W.; Bruck, Carsten van de; Hall, Lisa M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Cosmological observations have revealed the existence of a dark matter sector, which is commonly assumed to be made up of one particle species only. However, this sector might be more complicated than we currently believe: there might be more than one dark matter species (for example, two components of cold dark matter or a mixture of hot and cold dark matter) and there may be new interactions between these particles. In this paper we study the possibility of multiple dark matter species and interactions mediated by a dark energy field. We study both the background and the perturbation evolution in these scenarios. We find that the background evolution of a system of multiple dark matter particles (with constant couplings) mimics a single fluid with a time-varying coupling parameter. However, this is no longer true on the perturbative level. We study the case of attractive and repulsive forces as well as a mixture of cold and hot dark matter particles

  5. Sterile neutrino portal to Dark Matter II: exact dark symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, Miguel; Rius, Nuria [Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, C/Catedratico Jose Beltran, 2, 46980, Paterna (Spain); Sanz, Veronica [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    We analyze a simple extension of the standard model (SM) with a dark sector composed of a scalar and a fermion, both singlets under the SM gauge group but charged under a dark sector symmetry group. Sterile neutrinos, which are singlets under both groups, mediate the interactions between the dark sector and the SM particles, and generate masses for the active neutrinos via the seesaw mechanism. We explore the parameter space region where the observed Dark Matter relic abundance is determined by the annihilation into sterile neutrinos, both for fermion and scalar Dark Matter particles. The scalar Dark Matter case provides an interesting alternative to the usual Higgs portal scenario. We also study the constraints from direct Dark Matter searches and the prospects for indirect detection via sterile neutrino decays to leptons, which may be able to rule out Dark Matter masses below and around 100 GeV. (orig.)

  6. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  7. Unified Description of Dark Energy and Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Petry, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Dark energy in the universe is assumed to be vacuum energy. The energy-momentum of vacuum is described by a scale-dependent cosmological constant. The equations of motion imply for the density of matter (dust) the sum of the usual matter density (luminous matter) and an additional matter density (dark matter) similar to the dark energy. The scale-dependent cosmological constant is given up to an exponent which is approximated by the experimentally decided density parameters of dark matter and...

  8. Electron scattering studies of selected electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole transitions in light and heavy nuclei, the new multipole giant resonances and atomic transitions - recent results from the DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent experimental work from the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (DALINAC) is briefly summarized. Particular emphasis is given to the following topics: high resolution inelastic electron scattering (ΔE approximately 30 keV FWHM) has been used to study the radiative width and magnetization density of the 2 + , T = 1 state at 16.11 MeV in 12 C, E2 strength distribution in 28 Si below an excitation energy of 13 MeV and the isospin forbidden E1 electroexcitation of the 1 - , T = 0 state at 6.95 MeV in 40 Ca. High resolution inelastic electron scattering was also employed to determine certain M1 transitions in 14 N, 28 Si, 39 K, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb and the M2 strength distribution in the two heaviest nuclei. At medium energy resolution (ΔE approximately 200 keV FWHM) spectra at various angles and bombarding energies have been measured from (4-31) MeV for 208 Pb. They are being analyzed in order to determine E0, E1, E2, E3 and M1 giant resonance strength in the continuum. The Z and E dependence and the scaling behaviour of the atomic inner shell ionization cross section at relativistic electron impact is studied on gaseous and solid targets. (orig./BJ) [de

  9. Composite dark matter from a model with composite Higgs boson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu. Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    In a previous paper \\cite{Khlopov:2007ic}, we showed how the minimal walking technicolor model (WTC) can provide a composite dark matter candidate, by forming bound states between a -2 electrically charged techniparticle and a $^4He^{++}$. We studied the properties of these \\emph......{techni-O-helium} $tOHe$ "atoms", which behave as warmer dark matter rather than cold. In this paper we extend our work on several different aspects. We study the possibility of a mixed scenario where both $tOHe$ and bound states between +2 and -2 electrically charged techniparticles coexist in the dark matter density....... We argue that these newly proposed bound states solely made of techniparticles, although they behave as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), due to their large elastic cross section with nuclei, can only account for a small percentage of the dark matter density. Therefore we conclude...

  10. Dichromatic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yang; Su, Meng; Zhao, Yue

    2013-02-01

    Both the robust INTEGRAL 511 keV gamma-ray line and the recent tentative hint of the 135 GeV gamma-ray line from Fermi-LAT have similar signal morphologies, and may be produced from the same dark matter annihilation. Motivated by this observation, we construct a dark matter model to explain both signals and to accommodate the two required annihilation cross sections that are different by more than six orders of magnitude. In our model, to generate the low-energy positrons for INTEGRAL, dark matter particles annihilate into a complex scalar that couples to photon via a charge-radius operator. The complex scalar contains an excited state decaying into the ground state plus an off-shell photon to generate a pair of positron and electron. Two charged particles with non-degenerate masses are necessary for generating this charge-radius operator. One charged particle is predicted to be long-lived and have a mass around 3.8 TeV to explain the dark matter thermal relic abundance from its late decay. The other charged particle is predicted to have a mass below 1 TeV given the ratio of the two signal cross sections. The 14 TeV LHC will concretely test the main parameter space of this lighter charged particle.

  11. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  12. Dark matter axions '96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions' energy spectra and galactic halos' properties

  13. Dark matter candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    One of the simplest, yet most profound, questions we can ask about the Universe is, how much stuff is in it, and further what is that stuff composed of? Needless to say, the answer to this question has very important implications for the evolution of the Universe, determining both the ultimate fate and the course of structure formation. Remarkably, at this late date in the history of the Universe we still do not have a definitive answer to this simplest of questions---although we have some very intriguing clues. It is known with certainty that most of the material in the Universe is dark, and we have the strong suspicion that the dominant component of material in the Cosmos is not baryons, but rather is exotic relic elementary particles left over from the earliest, very hot epoch of the Universe. If true, the Dark Matter question is a most fundamental one facing both particle physics and cosmology. The leading particle dark matter candidates are: the axion, the neutralino, and a light neutrino species. All three candidates are accessible to experimental tests, and experiments are now in progress. In addition, there are several dark horse, long shot, candidates, including the superheavy magnetic monopole and soliton stars. 13 refs

  14. Dark Barchan Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows north polar sand dunes in the summertime. During winter and early spring, north polar dunes are covered with bright frost. When the frost sublimes away, the dunes appear darker than their surroundings. To a geologist, sand has a very specific meaning. A sand grain is defined independently of its composition; it is a particle with a size between 62.5 and 2000 microns. Two thousand microns equals 2 millimeters. The dunes are dark because they are composed of sand grains made of dark minerals and/or rock fragments. Usually, dark grains indicate the presence of unoxidized iron, for example, the dark volcanic rocks of Hawaii, Iceland, and elsewhere. This dune field is located near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Dune slip faces indicate winds that blow from the upper left toward lower right. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  15. with dark matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-16

    Nov 16, 2012 ... to have a dramatic impact on neutrino physics, dark matter and all fermion masses and mixings. Keywords. Radiative see-saw; fermion masses; grand unification. PACS Nos 12.10.Dm; 12.60.Jv; 14.60.Pq. 1. Introduction. In SO(10) grand unified theory which contains all standard fermions of one generation.

  16. Template Composite Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drach, Vincent; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We present a non perturbative study of SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental Dirac flavours. We discuss how the model can be used as a template for composite Dark Matter (DM). We estimate one particular interaction of the DM candidate with the Standard Model : the interaction through photon...

  17. Little composite dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Reuven; Perez, Gilad; Weiler, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    We examine the dark matter phenomenology of a composite electroweak singlet state. This singlet belongs to the Goldstone sector of a well-motivated extension of the Littlest Higgs with T-parity. A viable parameter space, consistent with the observed dark matter relic abundance as well as with the various collider, electroweak precision and dark matter direct detection experimental constraints is found for this scenario. T-parity implies a rich LHC phenomenology, which forms an interesting interplay between conventional natural SUSY type of signals involving third generation quarks and missing energy, from stop-like particle production and decay, and composite Higgs type of signals involving third generation quarks associated with Higgs and electroweak gauge boson, from vector-like top-partners production and decay. The composite features of the dark matter phenomenology allows the composite singlet to produce the correct relic abundance while interacting weakly with the Higgs via the usual Higgs portal coupling λ _{ {DM}}˜ O(1%), thus evading direct detection.

  18. Simplified Dark Matter Models

    OpenAIRE

    Morgante, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    I review the construction of Simplified Models for Dark Matter searches. After discussing the philosophy and some simple examples, I turn the attention to the aspect of the theoretical consistency and to the implications of the necessary extensions of these models.

  19. Dark influences: imprints of dark satellites on dwarf galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starkenburg, T. K.; Helmi, A.

    Context. In the context of the current Λ cold dark matter cosmological model small dark matter halos are abundant and satellites of dwarf galaxies are expected to be predominantly dark. Since low mass galaxies have smaller baryon fractions, interactions with these satellites may leave particularly

  20. Dark clouds in particle physics and cosmology: the issues of dark matter and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    Unveiling the nature of dark matter and dark energy is one of the main tasks of particle physics and cosmology in the 21st century. We first present an overview of the history and current status of research in cosmology, at the same time emphasizing the new challenges in particle physics. Then we focus on the scientific issues of dark energy, dark matter and anti-matter, and review the recent progress made in these fields. Finally, we discuss the prospects for future research on the experimental probing of dark matter and dark energy in China. (authors)

  1. Neutrinos and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempp, L.

    2008-02-15

    From the observed late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion arises the quest for the nature of Dark Energy. As has been widely discussed, the cosmic neutrino background naturally qualifies for a connection with the Dark Energy sector and as a result could play a key role for the origin of cosmic acceleration. In this thesis we explore various theoretical aspects and phenomenological consequences arising from non-standard neutrino interactions, which dynamically link the cosmic neutrino background and a slowly-evolving scalar field of the dark sector. In the considered scenario, known as Neutrino Dark Energy, the complex interplay between the neutrinos and the scalar field not only allows to explain cosmic acceleration, but intriguingly, as a distinct signature, also gives rise to dynamical, time-dependent neutrino masses. In a first analysis, we thoroughly investigate an astrophysical high energy neutrino process which is sensitive to neutrino masses. We work out, both semi-analytically and numerically, the generic clear-cut signatures arising from a possible time variation of neutrino masses which we compare to the corresponding results for constant neutrino masses. Finally, we demonstrate that even for the lowest possible neutrino mass scale, it is feasible for the radio telescope LOFAR to reveal a variation of neutrino masses and therefore to probe the nature of Dark Energy within the next decade. A second independent analysis deals with the recently challenged stability of Neutrino Dark Energy against the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations, driven by the new scalar force felt between neutrinos. Within the framework of linear cosmological perturbation theory, we derive the equation of motion of the neutrino perturbations in a model-independent way. This equation allows to deduce an analytical stability condition which translates into a comfortable upper bound on the scalar-neutrino coupling which is determined by the ratio of the densities in cold dark

  2. Non-baryonic dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkes, I.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the nature of the dark matter and the possibility of the detection of non-baryonic dark matter in an underground experiment. Among the useful detectors the low temperature bolometers are considered in some detail. (author)

  3. An elusive vector dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ren Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though the sensitivity of direct dark matter search experiments reaches the level of about 10−45 cm2, no confident signal of dark matter has been observed. We point out that, if dark matter is a vector boson, the null result in direct dark matter search experiments may be due to the destructive effects in dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering. We illustrate the scenario using a modified Higgs portal model that includes exotic quarks. The significant cancellation can occur for a certain mass gap between new heavy quark and dark matter. As a result, the spin-independent dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering is so suppressed that the future direct search experiments will hardly observe the signal of dark matter.

  4. Probing dark matter with active galactic nuclei jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Profumo, Stefano; Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We study the possibility of detecting a signature of particle dark matter in the spectrum of gamma-ray photons from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) resulting from the scattering of high-energy particles in the AGN jet off of dark matter particles. We consider particle dark matter models in the context of both supersymmetry and universal extra dimensions , and we present the complete lowest-order calculation for processes where a photon is emitted in dark matter-electron and/or dark matter-proton scattering, where electrons and protons belong to the AGN jet. We find that the process is dominated by a resonance whose energy is dictated by the particle spectrum in the dark matter sector (neutralino and selectron for the case of supersymmetry, Kaluza-Klein photon and electron for universal extra dimensions ). The resulting gamma-ray spectrum exhibits a very characteristic spectral feature, consisting of a sharp break to a hard power-law behavior. Although the normalization of the gamma-ray flux depends strongly on assumptions on both the AGN jet geometry, composition and particle spectrum as well as on the particle dark matter model and density distribution, we show that for realistic parameters choices, and for two prominent nearby AGNs (Centaurus A and M87), the detection of this effect is in principle possible. Finally, we compare our predictions and results with recent gamma-ray observations from the Fermi, H.E.S.S., and VERITAS telescopes.

  5. Composite dark matter from a model with composite Higgs boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. D77, 065002 (2008)], we showed how the minimal walking technicolor model can provide a composite dark matter candidate, by forming bound states between a -2 electrically charged techniparticle and a 4 He ++ . We studied the properties of these techni-O-helium tOHe''atoms,'' which behave as warmer dark matter rather than cold. In this paper, we extend our work on several different aspects. We study the possibility of a mixed scenario where both tOHe and bound states between +2 and -2 electrically charged techniparticles coexist in the dark matter density. We argue that these newly proposed bound states are solely made of techniparticles, although they behave as weakly interacting massive particles, due to their large elastic cross section with nuclei, can only account for a small percentage of the dark matter density. Therefore, we conclude that within the minimal walking technicolor model, composite dark matter should be mostly composed of tOHe. Moreover, in this paper, we put cosmological bounds in the masses of the techniparticles, if they compose the dark matter density. Finally, we propose within this setup, a possible explanation of the discrepancy between the DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA findings and the negative results of CDMS and other direct dark matter searches that imply nuclear recoil measurement, which should accompany ionization.

  6. Decoherence Spectroscopy for Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Trubko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Decoherence due to photon scattering in an atom interferometer was studied as a function of laser frequency near an atomic resonance. The resulting decoherence (contrast-loss spectra will be used to calibrate measurements of tune-out wavelengths that are made with the same apparatus. To support this goal, a theoretical model of decoherence spectroscopy is presented here along with experimental tests of this model.

  7. Welcome to the dark side

    CERN Multimedia

    Hogan, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    "Physicists says that 96% of the Universe is unseen, and appeal tot he ideas of "dark matter" and "dark energy" to make up the difference. In the first of two articles, jeanny hogan reports that attempts to identify the mysterious dark matter are on the verge of success. In the second, Geoff Brumfiel asks why dark energy, hailed as a breakthrough when discovered a decade ago, is proving more frustrating than ever tot he scientists who study it." (4,5 pages)

  8. Signals of Supersymmetric Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Afsar

    1999-01-01

    The Lightest Supersymmetric Particle predicted in most of the supersymmetric scenarios is an ideal candidate for the dark matter of cosmology. Their detection is of extreme significance today. Recently there have been intriguing signals of a 59 Gev neutralino dark matter at DAMA in Gran Sasso. We look at other possible signatures of dark matter in astrophysical and geological frameworks. The passage of the earth through dense clumps of dark matter would produce large quantities of heat in the...

  9. Black Holes as Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    While the energy of the universe has been established to be about 0.04 baryons, 0.24 dark matter and 0.72 dark energy, the cosmological entropy is almost entirely, about $(1 - 10^{-15})$, from black holes and only $10^{-15}$ from everything else. This identification of all dark matter as black holes is natural in statistical mechanics. Cosmological history of dark matter is discussed.

  10. Searches for hadronically decaying dark matter mediator particles at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)782253; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Searches for sub-TeV hadronic resonances such as Dark Matter (DM) mediator particles in the sub-TeV regions at ATLAS are statistically limited, since not all data from inclusive jet triggers can be recorded. Recording partial events containing only a small subset of the full event information overcomes this limitation. This poster highlights the Trigger Level Analysis strategy used to search for light dijet resonances. No excesses are found between 450 and 950 GeV and constraints are set on a simplified model of a DM mediator with axial coupling to quarks and DM particles and on Gaussian resonances.

  11. Caustic rings of dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Sikivie, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produces a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. The density profile of the caustic is derived for a specific case. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter.

  12. Dark Matter Searches at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Terashi, Koji; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present dark matter searches at the LHC in the PIC2017 conference. The main emphasis is placed on the direct dark matter searches while the interpretation of searches for SUSY and invisible Higgs signals for the dark matter is also presented.

  13. The DarkSide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DarkSide-50 at Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS, Italy, is a direct dark matter search experiment based on a liquid argon TPC. DS-50 has completed its first dark matter run using atmospheric argon as target. The detector performances and the results of the first physics run are presented in this proceeding.

  14. How dark chocolate is processed

    Science.gov (United States)

    This month’s column will continue the theme of “How Is It Processed?” The column will focus on dark chocolate. The botanical name for the cacao tree is Theobroma cacao, which literally means “food of the Gods.” Dark chocolate is both delicious and nutritious. Production of dark chocolate will be des...

  15. Interacting dark matter disguised as warm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Celine; Riazuelo, Alain; Hansen, Steen H.; Schaeffer, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We explore some of the consequences of dark-matter-photon interactions on structure formation, focusing on the evolution of cosmological perturbations and performing both an analytical and a numerical study. We compute the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and matter power spectrum in this class of models. We find, as the main result, that when dark matter and photons are coupled, dark matter perturbations can experience a new damping regime in addition to the usual collisional Silk damping effect. Such dark matter particles (having quite large photon interactions) behave like cold dark matter or warm dark matter as far as the cosmic microwave background anisotropies or matter power spectrum are concerned, respectively. These dark-matter-photon interactions leave specific imprints at sufficiently small scales on both of these two spectra, which may allow us to put new constraints on the acceptable photon-dark-matter interactions. Under the conservative assumption that the abundance of 10 12 M · galaxies is correctly given by the cold dark matter, and without any knowledge of the abundance of smaller objects, we obtain the limit on the ratio of the dark-matter-photon cross section to the dark matter mass σ γ-DM /m DM -6 σ Th /(100 GeV)≅6x10 -33 cm 2 GeV -1

  16. Quantum Field Theory of Interacting Dark Matter/Dark Energy: Dark Monodromies

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Kaloper, Nemanja

    2016-11-28

    We discuss how to formulate a quantum field theory of dark energy interacting with dark matter. We show that the proposals based on the assumption that dark matter is made up of heavy particles with masses which are very sensitive to the value of dark energy are strongly constrained. Quintessence-generated long range forces and radiative stability of the quintessence potential require that such dark matter and dark energy are completely decoupled. However, if dark energy and a fraction of dark matter are very light axions, they can have significant mixings which are radiatively stable and perfectly consistent with quantum field theory. Such models can naturally occur in multi-axion realizations of monodromies. The mixings yield interesting signatures which are observable and are within current cosmological limits but could be constrained further by future observations.

  17. Dark Skies Rangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Creating awareness about the importance of the protection of our dark skies is the main goal of the Dark Skies Rangers project, a joint effort from the NOAO and the Galileo Teacher Training Program. Hundreds of schools and thousands of students have been reached by this program. We will focus in particular on the experience being developed in Portugal where several municipalities have now received street light auditing produced by students with suggestions on how to enhance the energy efficiency of illumination of specific urban areas. In the International Year of Light we are investing our efforts in exporting the successful Portuguese experience to other countries. The recipe is simple: train teachers, engage students, foster the participation of local community and involve local authorities in the process. In this symposium we hope to draft the cookbook for the near future.

  18. CN in dark clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchwell, E.; Bieging, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We have detected CN (N = 1--0) emission toward six locations in the Taurus dark cloud complex, but not toward L183 or B227. The two hyperfine components, F = 3/2--1/2 and F = 5/2--3/2 (of J = 3/2--1/2), have intensity ratios near unity toward four locations in Taurus, consistent with large line optical depths. CN column densities are found to be > or approx. =6 x 10 13 cm -2 in those directions where the hyperfine ratios are near unity. By comparing CN with NH 3 and C 18 O column densities, we find that the relative abundance of CN in the Taurus cloudlets is at least a factor of 10 greater than in L183. In this respect, CN fits the pattern of enhanced abundances of carbon-bearing molecules (in partricular the cyanopolyynes) in the Taurus cloudlets relative to similar dark clouds outside Taurus

  19. Dark matter from unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM), which leads to unification of the SM coupling constants, breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically by a new strongly coupled sector and leads to novel dark matter candidates. In this model, the coupling constant unification requires...... eigenstates of this sector and determine the resulting relic density. The results are constrained by available data from colliders and direct and indirect dark matter experiments. We find the model viable and outline briefly future research directions....... the existence of electroweak triplet and doublet fermions singlet under QCD and new strong dynamics underlying the Higgs sector. Among these new matter fields and a new right handed neutrino, we consider the mass and mixing patterns of the neutral states. We argue for a symmetry stabilizing the lightest mass...

  20. Influence of the atomic structure on the quantum state of sputtered Ir atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastiaansen, J.; Philipsen, V.; Lievens, P.; Silverans, R.E.; Vandeweert, E.

    2004-01-01

    The probability of the ejection of a neutral atom in a specific quantum state after keV-ion beam sputtering is often interpreted in terms of the interaction between the atomic states of the escaping atom and the electronic states of the solid. In this work, we examined this interplay in the sputtering of iridium as this element has--unlike the elements employed in previous investigations--a complex atomic structure due to strong configuration interactions. Double-resonant two-photon laser ionization is used to probe the sputtered Ir atoms yielding information about the probability for an ejected atom to populate a specific atomic state and its escape velocity. The qualitative features of the corresponding population partition and state-selective velocity distributions show the influence of the excitation energy and the electronic structure of the different atomic states. A comparison is made between the experimental data and predictions from the resonant electron transfer description

  1. Baryonic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Both canonical primordial nucleosynthesis constraints and large-scale structure measurements, as well as observations of the fundamental cosmological parameters, appear to be consistent with the hypothesis that the universe predominantly consists of baryonic dark matter (BDM). The arguments for BDM to consist of compact objects that are either stellar relics or substellar objects are reviewed. Several techniques for searching for halo BDM are described.

  2. A dark energy multiverse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles-Perez, Salvador; Martin-Moruno, Prado; Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto; Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-21

    We present cosmic solutions corresponding to universes filled with dark and phantom energy, all having a negative cosmological constant. All such solutions contain infinite singularities, successively and equally distributed along time, which can be either big bang/crunches or big rips singularities. Classically these solutions can be regarded as associated with multiverse scenarios, being those corresponding to phantom energy that may describe the current accelerating universe. (fast track communication)

  3. Dark Web 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-21

    input data to get access (email or online banks), unlinked content (unpublished blogs or or- ganizational databases), proprietary data (study results...reigns, enables darknet communication. One Chinese blogger who established a darknet blog said “This is a free Chinese Internet world, here you can...thought my first contact with the dark web would be on a Chinese website. I hope the webmaster continues their good work13.” These tactics reflect

  4. Dark Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    13 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. The dominant winds responsible for these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest). They are located near 76.6oN, 257.2oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right.

  5. DARK MATTER: Optical shears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for dark matter continues to build up. Last year (December 1993, page 4) excitement rose when the French EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) and the US/Australia MACHO collaborations reported hints that small inert 'brown dwarf stars could provide some of the Universe's missing matter. In the 1930s, astronomers first began to suspect that there is a lot more to the Universe than meets the eye

  6. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  7. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  8. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  9. The dark components of the Universe are slowly clarified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdyuzha, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The dark sector of the Universe is beginning to be clarified step by step. If the dark energy is vacuum energy, then 123 orders of this energy are reduced by ordinary physical processes. For many years, these unexplained orders were called a crisis of physics. There was indeed a “crisis” before the introduction of the holographic principle and entropic force in physics. The vacuum energy was spent on the generation of new quantum states during the entire life of the Universe, but in the initial period of its evolution the vacuum energy (78 orders) were reduced more effectively by the vacuum condensates produced by phase transitions, because the Universe lost the high symmetry during its expansion. Important problems of physical cosmology can be solved if the quarks, leptons, and gauge bosons are composite particles. The dark matter, partially or all consisting of familon-type pseudo-Goldstone bosons with a mass of 10 —5 –10 –3 eV, can be explained in the composite model. Three generations of elementary particles are absolutely necessary in this model. In addition, this model realizes three relativistic phase transitions in a medium of familons at different redshifts, forming a large-scale structure of dark matter that was “repeated” by baryons. We predict the detection of dark energy dynamics, the detection of familons as dark matter particles, and the development of spectroscopy for the dark medium due to the probable presence of dark atoms in it. Other viewpoints on the dark components of the Universe are also discussed briefly.

  10. Dark matter wants Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Asano, M.; Fujii, K.; Takubo, Y.; Honda, T.; Saito, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Humdi, R.S.; Ito, H.; Kanemura, S; Nabeshima, T.; Okada, N.; Suehara, T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main purposes of physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) is to study the property of dark matter such as its mass, spin, quantum numbers, and interactions with particles of the standard model. We discuss how the property can or cannot be investigated at the ILC using two typical cases of dark matter scenario: 1) most of new particles predicted in physics beyond the standard model are heavy and only dark matter is accessible at the ILC, and 2) not only dark matter but also other new particles are accessible at the ILC. We find that, as can be easily imagined, dark matter can be detected without any difficulties in the latter case. In the former case, it is still possible to detect dark matter when the mass of dark matter is less than a half mass of the Higgs boson.

  11. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs

  12. Cold dark matter plus not-so-clumpy dark relics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Roberta; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Gariazzo, Stefano; Mena, Olga; Weniger, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Various particle physics models suggest that, besides the (nearly) cold dark matter that accounts for current observations, additional but sub-dominant dark relics might exist. These could be warm, hot, or even contribute as dark radiation. We present here a comprehensive study of two-component dark matter scenarios, where the first component is assumed to be cold, and the second is a non-cold thermal relic. Considering the cases where the non-cold dark matter species could be either a fermion or a boson, we derive consistent upper limits on the non-cold dark relic energy density for a very large range of velocity dispersions, covering the entire range from dark radiation to cold dark matter. To this end, we employ the latest Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, the recent BOSS DR11 and other Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, and also constraints on the number of Milky Way satellites, the latter of which provides a measure of the suppression of the matter power spectrum at the smallest scales due to the free-streaming of the non-cold dark matter component. We present the results on the fraction fncdm of non-cold dark matter with respect to the total dark matter for different ranges of the non-cold dark matter masses. We find that the 2σ limits for non-cold dark matter particles with masses in the range 1-10 keV are fncdm100 keV range they are fncdm<=0.43 (0.45), respectively.

  13. Cold dark matter plus not-so-clumpy dark relics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamanti, Roberta; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Weniger, Christoph; Gariazzo, Stefano; Mena, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Various particle physics models suggest that, besides the (nearly) cold dark matter that accounts for current observations, additional but sub-dominant dark relics might exist. These could be warm, hot, or even contribute as dark radiation. We present here a comprehensive study of two-component dark matter scenarios, where the first component is assumed to be cold, and the second is a non-cold thermal relic. Considering the cases where the non-cold dark matter species could be either a fermion or a boson, we derive consistent upper limits on the non-cold dark relic energy density for a very large range of velocity dispersions, covering the entire range from dark radiation to cold dark matter. To this end, we employ the latest Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, the recent BOSS DR11 and other Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measurements, and also constraints on the number of Milky Way satellites, the latter of which provides a measure of the suppression of the matter power spectrum at the smallest scales due to the free-streaming of the non-cold dark matter component. We present the results on the fraction f ncdm of non-cold dark matter with respect to the total dark matter for different ranges of the non-cold dark matter masses. We find that the 2σ limits for non-cold dark matter particles with masses in the range 1–10 keV are f ncdm ≤0.29 (0.23) for fermions (bosons), and for masses in the 10–100 keV range they are f ncdm ≤0.43 (0.45), respectively.

  14. Electromagnetic transitions in the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulehla, I.; Suk, M.; Trka, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Methods to achieve excitation of atoms are outlined and conditions necessary for the occurrence of electromagnetic transitions in the atomic shell are given. Radiative transitions between the energy states of the atom include stimulated absorption, spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission. Selection rules applying to the majority of observed transitions are given. The parity concept is explained. It is shown how the electromagnetic field and its interaction with the magnetic moment of the atom lead to a disturbance of the energy states of the atom and the occurrence of various electro-optical and magneto-optical phenomena. The Stark effect and electron spin resonance are described. X-rays and X-ray spectra, the Auger effect and the internal photoeffect are also dealt with. The principle of the laser is explained. (M.D.). 22 figs., 1 tab

  15. Robert Dicke and Atomic Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 4. Robert Dicke and Atomic Physics. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 16 Issue 4 April 2011 pp 322-332. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/04/0322-0332. Keywords.

  16. Gauge U(1 dark symmetry and radiative light fermion masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Kownacki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A gauge U(1 family symmetry is proposed, spanning the quarks and leptons as well as particles of the dark sector. The breaking of U(1 to Z2 divides the two sectors and generates one-loop radiative masses for the first two families of quarks and leptons, as well as all three neutrinos. We study the phenomenological implications of this new connection between family symmetry and dark matter. In particular, a scalar or pseudoscalar particle associated with this U(1 breaking may be identified with the 750 GeV diphoton resonance recently observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC.

  17. Late forming dark matter in theories of neutrino dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Subinoy; Weiner, Neal

    2011-01-01

    We study the possibility of late forming dark matter, where a scalar field, previously trapped in a metastable state by thermal or finite density effects, goes through a phase transition near the era matter-radiation equality and begins to oscillate about its true minimum. Such a theory is motivated generally if the dark energy is of a similar form, but has not yet made the transition to dark matter, and, in particular, arises automatically in recently considered theories of neutrino dark energy. If such a field comprises the present dark matter, the matter power spectrum typically shows a sharp break at small, presently nonlinear scales, below which power is highly suppressed and previously contained acoustic oscillations. If, instead, such a field forms a subdominant component of the total dark matter, such acoustic oscillations may imprint themselves in the linear regime.

  18. Adiabatic instability in coupled dark energy/dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Rachel; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Trodden, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We consider theories in which there exists a nontrivial coupling between the dark matter sector and the sector responsible for the acceleration of the Universe. Such theories can possess an adiabatic regime in which the quintessence field always sits at the minimum of its effective potential, which is set by the local dark matter density. We show that if the coupling strength is much larger than gravitational, then the adiabatic regime is always subject to an instability. The instability, which can also be thought of as a type of Jeans instability, is characterized by a negative sound speed squared of an effective coupled dark matter/dark energy fluid, and results in the exponential growth of small scale modes. We discuss the role of the instability in specific coupled cold dark matter and mass varying neutrino models of dark energy and clarify for these theories the regimes in which the instability can be evaded due to nonadiabaticity or weak coupling.

  19. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future

  20. Nonlocal astrophysics dark matter, dark energy and physical vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2017-01-01

    Non-Local Astrophysics: Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Physical Vacuum highlights the most significant features of non-local theory, a highly effective tool for solving many physical problems in areas where classical local theory runs into difficulties. The book provides the fundamental science behind new non-local astrophysics, discussing non-local kinetic and generalized hydrodynamic equations, non-local parameters in several physical systems, dark matter, dark energy, black holes and gravitational waves. Devoted to the solution of astrophysical problems from the position of non-local physics Provides a solution for dark matter and dark energy Discusses cosmological aspects of the theory of non-local physics Includes a solution for the problem of the Hubble Universe expansion, and of the dependence of the orbital velocity from the center of gravity

  1. Status of the scalar singlet dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, Peter; Balázs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Buckley, Andy; Chrząszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Dal, Lars A.; Edsjö, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Jackson, Paul; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Krislock, Abram; Kvellestad, Anders; McKay, James; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Raklev, Are; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin

    2017-08-01

    One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a Z_2 symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above ˜ 1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned.

  2. Status of the scalar singlet dark matter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); Bringmann, Torsten; Dal, Lars A.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Buckley, Andy [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chrzaszcz, Marcin [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Polish Academy of Sciences, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Conrad, Jan; Edsjoe, Joakim; Farmer, Ben [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cornell, Jonathan M. [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jackson, Paul; White, Martin [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Kahlhoefer, Felix [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kvellestad, Anders; Savage, Christopher [NORDITA, Stockholm (Sweden); McKay, James; Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Mahmoudi, Farvah [Univ. Lyon, Univ. Lyon 1, ENS de Lyon, CNRS, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon UMR5574, Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Martinez, Gregory D. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Putze, Antje [LAPTh, Universite de Savoie, CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Rogan, Christopher [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Saavedra, Aldo [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); The University of Sydney, Centre for Translational Data Science, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Serra, Nicola [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Weniger, Christoph [University of Amsterdam, GRAPPA, Institute of Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Collaboration

    2017-08-15

    One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a Z{sub 2} symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above ∝ 1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned. (orig.)

  3. Status of the scalar singlet dark matter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Dal, Lars A.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are; Buckley, Andy; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Edsjoe, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Jackson, Paul; White, Martin; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kvellestad, Anders; Savage, Christopher; McKay, James; Scott, Pat; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a Z 2 symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above ∝ 1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned. (orig.)

  4. Sourcing dark matter and dark energy from α-attractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Swagat S.; Sahni, Varun; Shtanov, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    In [1], Kallosh and Linde drew attention to a new family of superconformal inflationary potentials, subsequently called α-attractors [2]. The α-attractor family can interpolate between a large class of inflationary models. It also has an important theoretical underpinning within the framework of supergravity. We demonstrate that the α-attractors have an even wider appeal since they may describe dark matter and perhaps even dark energy. The dark matter associated with the α-attractors, which we call α-dark matter (αDM), shares many of the attractive features of fuzzy dark matter, with V (φ) = ½ m 2 φ 2 , while having none of its drawbacks. Like fuzzy dark matter, αDM can have a large Jeans length which could resolve the cusp-core and substructure problems faced by standard cold dark matter. αDM also has an appealing tracker property which enables it to converge to the late-time dark matter asymptote, ( w ) ≅ 0, from a wide range of initial conditions. It thus avoids the enormous fine-tuning problems faced by the m 2 φ 2 potential in describing dark matter.

  5. Dark Martian Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    30 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, windblown sand dunes in a crater in the Hesperia region of Mars. The steepest slopes on the dunes -- their slipfaces -- point toward the south-southwest, indicating that the winds responsible for the dunes blew from the north-northeast (top/upper right). Location near: 12.4oS, 236.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  6. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  7. Dark matter in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opher, Reuven

    2001-01-01

    We treat here the problem of dark matter in galaxies. Recent articles seem to imply that we are entering into the precision era of cosmology, implying that all of the basic physics of cosmology is known. However, we show here that recent observations question the pillar of the standard model: the presence of nonbaryonic 'dark matter' in galaxies. Using Newton's law of gravitation, observations indicate that most of the matter in galaxies in invisible or dark. From the observed abundances of light elements, dark matter in galaxies must be primarily nonbaryonic. The standard model and its problems in explaining nonbaryonic dark matter will first be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of a modification of Newton's law of gravitation to explain dark matter in galaxies. (author)

  8. Quantum vacuum and dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hajdukovic, Dragan Slavkov

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum was proposed as alternative to the dark matter paradigm. In the present paper we consider four benchmark measurements: the universality of the central surface density of galaxy dark matter haloes, the cored dark matter haloes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the non-existence of dark disks in spiral galaxies and distribution of dark matter after collision of clusters of galaxies (the Bullet cluster is a famous example). Only some of these phenomena (but not all of them) can (in principle) be explained by the dark matter and the theories of modified gravity. However, we argue that the framework of the gravitational polarization of the quantum vacuum allows the understanding of the totality of these phenomena.

  9. Resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmetz, Tilo

    2008-01-01

    In the present dissertation experiments on resonator quantum electrodynamics on a microtrap chip are described. Thereby for the first time single atoms catched in a chip trap could be detected. For this in the framework of this thesis a novel optical microresonator was developed, which can because of its miniaturization be combined with the microtrap technique introduced in our working group for the manipulation of ultracold atoms. For this resonator glass-fiber ends are used as mirror substrates, between which a standing light wave is formed. With such a fiber Fabry-Perot resonator we obtain a finess of up to ∼37,000. Because of the small mode volumina in spite of moderate resonator quality the coherent interaction between an atom and a photon can be made so large that the regime of the strong atom-resonator coupling is reached. For the one-atom-one-photon coupling rate and the one-atom-one-photon cooperativity thereby record values of g 0 =2π.300 MHz respectively C 0 =210 are reached. Just so for the first time the strong coupling regime between a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and the field of a high-quality resonator could be reached. The BEC was thereby by means of the magnetic microtrap potentials deterministically brought to a position within the resonator and totally transformed in a well defined antinode of an additionally optical standing-wave trap. The spectrum of the coupled atom-resonator system was measured for different atomic numbers and atom-resonator detunings, whereby a collective vacuum Rabi splitting of more than 20 GHz could be reached. [de

  10. Decaying Dark Atom Constituents and Cosmic Positron Excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Belotsky

    2014-01-01

    μ+μ+ and τ+τ+ produces the observed positron excess. These decays can naturally take place via GUT interactions. If it exists, such a metastable particle can be found in the next run of LHC. The model predicts also the ratio of leptons over baryons in the universe to be close to -3.

  11. Direct search for dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Dark matter is hypothetical matter which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation. The existence of dark matter is only inferred from gravitational effects of astrophysical observations to explain the missing mass component of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles are currently the most popular candidate to explain the missing mass component. I review the current status of experimental searches of dark matter through direct detection using terrestrial detectors.

  12. Astrophysical probes of dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Travis J.

    In the ACDM model,≈ 26% of the matter-energy content of the Universe is in the form of an unidentified Cold Dark Matter. Observations indicate that the Dark Matter is a new exotic particle not accounted for in the Standard Model of particle physics. Identifying the Dark Matter particle is one of the most pressing problems in cosmology and particle physics. In this thesis we investigate several possible astrophysical signatures of Dark Matter: Dark Matter annihilations in cold White Dwarfs provide a source of luminosity that could halt their cooling. This effect can be used to constrain the Dark Matter density local to the White Dwarf. In the case of the coldest White Dwarf in a Globular Cluster, a constraint on the maximum Dark Matter content is derived. Globular Clusters do not appear to have Dark Matter halos today, but could have possessed them in the past. We investigate whether Globular Clusters could have lost their halos through multi-body gravitational interactions--we find that this scenario is unlikely. Finally, we explore the effects of Asymmetric Dark Matter on stellar evolution. Asymmetric Dark Matter can alter the transport of energy in the cores of stars. We show that this has potentially observable effects on low mass Main Sequence and post-Main Sequence stars. Our main conclusion is that astrophysical observations can potentially rule out some Dark Matter models. On the other hand, if the properties of the Dark Matter particle become known, then its astrophysical effects must be taken into account when evaluating observations.

  13. Caustic rings of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produce a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. It is found in particular that the density profile of the caustic behaves as the inverse distance to the ring. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  14. Mechanical resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Padowitz, David; Matsiev, L; Kolosov, Oleg

    2004-01-01

    A sensor and methods for making and using the same in which a mechanical resonator is employed, comprising a resonator portion for resonating in a fluid without the substantial generation of acoustic waves; and an electrical connection between the resonator portion for oscillating and a source of an input signal; wherein the portion for resonating, the electrical connection or both includes a base material and a performance-tuning material that is different from the base material.

  15. Optical ferris wheel for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, S.; Leach, J.; Padgett, M. J.; Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Wright, A. J.; Girkin, J. M.; Ohberg, P.; Arnold, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a versatile optical ring lattice suitable for trapping cold and quantum degenerate atomic samples. We demonstrate the realisation of intensity patterns from pairs of Laguerre-Gauss (exp(iℓө) modes with different ℓ indices. These patterns can be rotated by introducing a frequency shift between the modes. We can generate bright ring lattices for trapping atoms in red-detuned light, and dark ring lattices suitable for trapping atoms with minimal heating in the optical vortices of blue-detuned light. The lattice sites can be joined to form a uniform ring trap, making it ideal for studying persistent currents and the Mott insulator transition in a ring geometry.

  16. The DarkSide project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, Ivone Freire Da Mota; Alexander, Thomas R.; Alton, A.; Arisaka, K.; Back, Henning O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, Bianca; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, Severino; Cadeddu, Matteo; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, Macro; Catalanotti, Sergio; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D' Angelo, D.; D' Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, Sandro; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, Mario; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, Giuseppe; Edkins, E.; Empl, Anton; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A.; Granato, Francesco; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M. Y.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, Edward; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, Alexander; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y. Q.; Machulin, I.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, Alissa; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B.; Muratova, V.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, James; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, Marco; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, Andrew; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Savarese, Claudio; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D.; Shields, E.; Singh, Parth; Skorokhvatov, Mikhail; Smirnov, Oleg; Sotnikov, Albert; Stanford, Chris; Suvorov, Yura; Tartaglia, Roberto; Tatarowicz, John; Testera, Gemma; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, Eugenii; Vishneva, Alina; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wada, Masayuki; Walker, Susan E.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, James; Wojcik, M.; Xiang, Xin; Xu, Jingke; Yang, C. G.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zec, Adam; Zhong, W. L.; Zhu, Chengliang; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    DarkSide is a graded experimental project based on radiopure argon, and is now, and will be, used in direct dark matter searches. The present DarkSide-50 detector, operating at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, is a dual-phase, 50 kg, liquid argon time-projection-chamber surrounded by an active liquid scintillator veto. It is designed to be background free in 3 years of operation. DS-50 performances, when filled with atmospheric argon, are reported. However DS-50 filled with underground argon, shows impressive reduction of the 39Ar isotope. The application of this powerful technology in a future generation of the DarkSide program is discussed.

  17. Kaluza-Klein dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, H C; Matchev, K T; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Feng, Jonathan L; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that cold dark matter is made of Kaluza-Klein particles and explore avenues for its detection. The lightest Kaluza-Klein state is an excellent dark matter candidate if standard model particles propagate in extra dimensions and Kaluza-Klein parity is conserved. We consider Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons. In sharp contrast to the case of supersymmetric dark matter, these annihilate to hard positrons, neutrinos and photons with unsuppressed rates. Direct detection signals are also promising. These conclusions are generic to bosonic dark matter candidates.

  18. Supersymmetric dark matter: Indirect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dark matter detection experiments are improving to the point where they can detect or restrict the primary particle physics candidates for non baryonic dark matter. The methods for detection are usually categorized as direct, i.e., searching for signals caused by passage of dark matter particles in terrestrial detectors, or indirect. Indirect detection methods include searching for antimatter and gamma rays, in particular gamma ray lines, in cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos from the centre of the Earth or Sun caused by accretion and annihilation of dark matter particles. A review is given of recent progress in indirect detection, both on the theoretical and experimental side

  19. Dark matter. A light move

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Doebrich, Babette

    2013-11-01

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.

  20. Dark matter. A light move

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Doebrich, Babette [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    This proceedings contribution reports from the workshop Dark Matter - a light move, held at DESY in Hamburg in June 2013. Dark Matter particle candidates span a huge parameter range. In particular, well motivated candidates exist also in the sub-eV mass region, for example the axion. Whilst a plethora of searches for rather heavy Dark Matter particles exists, there are only very few experiments aimed at direct detection of sub-eV Dark Matter to this date. The aim of our workshop was to discuss if and how this could be changed in the near future.