WorldWideScience

Sample records for atom transferring system

  1. Efficient transfer of francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Gorelov, Alexander; Pearson, Matt; Tandecki, Michael; Collister, Robert; Gwinner, Gerald; Shiells, Kyle; Gomez, Eduardo; Orozco, Luis; Zhang, Jiehang; Zhao, Yanting; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress of the FrPNC collaboration towards Parity Non Conservation Measurements (PNC) using francium atoms at the TRIUMF accelerator. We demonstrate efficient transfer (higher than 40%) to the science vacuum chamber where the PNC measurements will be performed. The transfer uses a downward resonant push beam from the high-efficiency capture magneto optical trap (MOT) towards the science chamber where the atoms are recaptured in a second MOT. The transfer is very robust with respect to variations in the parameters (laser power, detuning, alignment, etc.). We accumulate a growing number of atoms at each transfer pulse (limited by the lifetime of the MOT) since the push beam does not eliminate the atoms already trapped in the science MOT. The number of atoms in the science MOT is on track to meet the requirements for competitive PNC measurements when high francium rates (previously demonstrated) are delivered to our apparatus. The catcher/neutralizer for the ion beam has been tested reliably to 100,000 heating/motion cycles. We present initial tests on the direct microwave excitation of the ground hyperfine transition at 45 GHz. Support from NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and Fulbright from USA, and CONACYT from Mexico.

  2. A charge transfer ionic-embedded atom method potential for the O-Al-Ni-Co-Fe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiaowang; Wadley, Haydn N G [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 116 Engineer' s Way, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) require the growth of a thin ({approx}20 A) dielectric metal oxide layer, such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, on a ferromagnetic metal layer, such as Co, CoFe, or CoNiFe. The atomic assembly mechanisms that combine to form a uniformly thin metal oxide layer on these metal surfaces are not well understood. The application of molecular dynamics simulations to the growth of metal and metal oxide multilayers that involve more than one metal element has not been possible using the conventional interatomic potentials. A recently proposed modified charge transfer ionic-embedded atom method potential appears to correctly enable the charge transfer between oxygen and numerous metal elements to be modelled in a format amenable for molecular dynamics studies. Here we parametrize this charge transfer ionic-embedded atom method potential for the quinternary O-Al-Ni-Co-Fe system so that a direct molecular dynamics simulation of the growth of the tunnelling magnetoresistive multilayers can be realized.

  3. Charge transfer for slow H atoms interacting with Al: Atomic levels and linewidths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, J.; Lorente, N.; Pou, P.; Flores, F.

    1996-10-01

    The charge transfer of slow H atoms colliding with an Al(100) surface is studied by means of a linear combination of atomic orbitals method with local-density many-body contributions. The method is developed in order to calculate atomic levels and associated linewidths. Unlike previous theories, the present method is able to study the effect of the corrugation of the surface, together with the self-consistent potentials involved. This leads to a shift of atomic levels nonlinear on the external charge, contrary to the traditionally assumed image shift. The method works best at very short distances, where the strong coupling between atom and surface promotes molecular orbitals. Thus, the theory expounded in this work can describe the charge-transfer processes of systems in which the atomic levels are near the band edges, as protons scattered off aluminum.

  4. International atomic time and time transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Wlodzimierz

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) keep a central role in the international timekeeping. American Global Positioning System (GPS) is a navigation system that has proven itself to be a reliable source of positioning for both the military community and the civilian community. But, little known by many, is the fact that GPS has proven itself to be an important and valuabe utility to the timekeeping community (Lewandowski et al. 1999). GPS is a versatile and global tool which can be used to both distribute time to an arbitrary number of users and synchronise clocks over large distances with a high degree of precision and accuracy. Similar performance can be obtained with Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). It is expected in the near future satellites of a new European navigation system GALILEO might bring some important opportunities for international timekeeping. This paper after a brief introduction to international timekeeping focuses on the description of recent progress in time transfer techniques using GNSS satellites.

  5. An environmental transfer hub for multimodal atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Daniel E; Gerstl, Stephan S A; Chin, Jackson; Hirschi, Blake; Evans, James E

    2017-01-01

    Environmental control during transfer between instruments is required for samples sensitive to air or thermal exposure to prevent morphological or chemical changes prior to analysis. Atom probe tomography is a rapidly expanding technique for three-dimensional structural and chemical analysis, but commercial instruments remain limited to loading specimens under ambient conditions. In this study, we describe a multifunctional environmental transfer hub allowing controlled cryogenic or room-temperature transfer of specimens under atmospheric or vacuum pressure conditions between an atom probe and other instruments or reaction chambers. The utility of the environmental transfer hub is demonstrated through the acquisition of previously unavailable mass spectral analysis of an intact organic molecule made possible via controlled cryogenic transfer into the atom probe using the hub. The ability to prepare and transfer specimens in precise environments promises a means to access new science across many disciplines from untainted samples and allow downstream time-resolved in situ atom probe studies.

  6. An environmental transfer hub for multimodal atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Gerstl, Stephan S. A.; Chin, Jackson; Hirschi, Blake; Evans, James. E.

    2017-05-02

    Environmental control during transfer between instruments is required for specimens sensitive to air or thermal exposure to prevent morphological or chemical changes. Atom Probe Tomography is an expanding technique but commercial instruments remain limited to loading under ambient conditions. Here we describe a multifunctional environmental transfer hub allowing controlled cryogenic, atmospheric and vacuum transfer between an Atom Probe and other instruments containing separate chambers to allow downstream time-resolved in-situ studies.

  7. Rydberg Atom Quantum Hybrid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Kumar, Santosh; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-04-01

    We report on our recent experimental and theoretical work with Rydberg atom-cavity and Rydberg atom-surface hybrid quantum systems. In the atom-cavity system, Rb contained in a dipole trap is transported into a high-finesse optical cavity using a focus-tunable lens. Cavity assisted Rydberg EIT is observed in the cavity transmission and used to characterize the electric fields in the cavity. The electric fields are attributed to surface adsorbates adhering to the cavity mirrors. We also investigate the coupling of a Rydberg atom ensemble to surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) propagating on piezoelectric superlattices made from thin film ferroelectric materials. Strong coupling between the atomic and surface excitations can be achieved, due to the large Rydberg transition dipole moments and the local field enhancement of the SPhP modes. The system has many advantages for information transport since the atoms need only be placed at distances on the order of mms from the surface and the SPhPs do not couple to free space electro-magnetic fields. Experimental progress will be discussed, including the fabrication of submicron-period periodically poled Lithium Niobate using the direct e-beam writing technique. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  8. Living atom transfer radical polymerization of 4-acetoxystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Bo; Chen, Xianyi; Ivan, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine(bpy) as initi......Living atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 4-acetoxystyrene (1), a protected 4-vinylphenol, leading to poly(4-acetoxystyrene) with well-defined molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution was carried out in bulk with a,a'-dibromoxylene(2)/CuBr/2,2-bipyridine...

  9. Fuel transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  10. Tape transfer atomization patterning of liquid alloys for microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-12

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  11. Tape Transfer Atomization Patterning of Liquid Alloys for Microfluidic Stretchable Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    Stretchable electronics offers unsurpassed mechanical compliance on complex or soft surfaces like the human skin and organs. To fully exploit this great advantage, an autonomous system with a self-powered energy source has been sought for. Here, we present a new technology to pattern liquid alloys on soft substrates, targeting at fabrication of a hybrid-integrated power source in microfluidic stretchable electronics. By atomized spraying of a liquid alloy onto a soft surface with a tape transferred adhesive mask, a universal fabrication process is provided for high quality patterns of liquid conductors in a meter scale. With the developed multilayer fabrication technique, a microfluidic stretchable wireless power transfer device with an integrated LED was demonstrated, which could survive cycling between 0% and 25% strain over 1,000 times.

  12. Nonradiative charge transfer in collisions of protons with rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ling-Ling; Qu, Yi-Zhi; Liu, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jian-Guo; Buenker, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer cross sections for protons colliding with Rb(5s) atoms are calculated by using the quantum-mechanical molecularorbital close-coupling method in an energy range of 10-3 keV-10 keV. The total and state-selective charge-transfer cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental data in the relatively low energy region. The importance of rotational coupling for chargetransfer process is stressed. Compared with the radiative charge-transfer process, nonradiative charge transfer is a dominant mechanism at energies above 15 eV. The resonance structures of state-selective charge-transfer cross sections arising from the competition among channels are analysed in detail. The radiative and nonradiative charge-transfer rate coefficients from low to high temperature are presented.

  13. Insights into the Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of the Blue Aroxyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächle, Josua; Marković, Marijana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2017-10-19

    An experimental and theoretical study on hydrogen-atom transfer dynamics in the hydrogen-bonded substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex of the blue aroxyl (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) is presented. The experimental exchange dynamics is determined in different organic solvents from the temperature-dependent alternating line-width effect in the continuous-wave ESR spectrum. From bent Arrhenius plots, effective tunnelling contributions with parallel heavy-atom motion are concluded. To clarify the transfer mechanism, reaction paths for different conformers of the substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex are modelled theoretically. Various DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods including multireference methods are applied. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical data it is concluded that the system favours concerted hydrogen-atom transfer along a parabolic reaction path caused by heavy-atom motion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Efficient inter-trap transfer of cold francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Collister, R.; Shiells, K.; Tandecki, M.; Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Gomez, E.; Gorelov, A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Zhao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the status of the FrPNC experiments and summarize our plans for measurements of parity non-conservation (PNC) in a sample of cold francium. The FrPNC collaboration has commissioned a laser cooling apparatus at the TRIUMF accelerator that collects and cools francium atoms for PNC experiments. We have recently demonstrated the robust, high efficiency transfer (50 %) of laser cooled francium atoms to a second laser cooling apparatus, located 0.7 m below the first, where the PNC experiments will be conducted.

  15. Efficient inter-trap transfer of cold francium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [University of Maryland and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Physics, Joint Quantum Institute (United States); Collister, R.; Shiells, K. [University of Manitoba, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Tandecki, M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Aubin, S., E-mail: saaubi@wm.edu [College of William and Mary, Department of Physics (United States); Behr, J. A. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gomez, E. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Instituto de Física (Mexico); Gorelov, A. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gwinner, G. [University of Manitoba, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Orozco, L. A. [University of Maryland and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Physics, Joint Quantum Institute (United States); Pearson, M. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Zhao, Y. [Shanxi University, State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy (China)

    2016-12-15

    We report on the status of the FrPNC experiments and summarize our plans for measurements of parity non-conservation (PNC) in a sample of cold francium. The FrPNC collaboration has commissioned a laser cooling apparatus at the TRIUMF accelerator that collects and cools francium atoms for PNC experiments. We have recently demonstrated the robust, high efficiency transfer (50 %) of laser cooled francium atoms to a second laser cooling apparatus, located 0.7 m below the first, where the PNC experiments will be conducted.

  16. Hemoglobin and Red Blood Cells Catalyze Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Tilana B.; Spulber Mariana; Kocik Marzena K.; Seidi Farzad; Charan Himanshu; Rother Martin; Sigg Severin J.; Renggli Kasper; Kali Gergely; Bruns Nico

    2013-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a promiscuous protein that not only transports oxygen but also catalyzes several biotransformations. A novel in vitro catalytic activity of Hb is described. Bovine Hb and human erythrocytes were found to display ATRPase activity i.e. they catalyzed the polymerization of vinyl monomers under conditions typical for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). N isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl eth...

  17. The coordination and atom transfer chemistry of titanium porphyrin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, James Allen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-11-05

    Preparation, characterization, and reactivity of (η2- alkyne)(meso-tetratolylpoprphrinato)titanium(II) complexes are described, along with inetermetal oxygen atom transfer reactions involving Ti(IV) and Ti(III) porphyrin complexes. The η2- alkyne complexes are prepared by reaction of (TTP)TiCl2 with LiAlH4 in presence of alkyne. Structure of (OEP)Ti(η2-Ph-C≡C-Ph) (OEP=octaethylporphryin) was determined by XRD. The compounds undergo simple substitution to displace the alkyne and produce doubly substituted complexes. Structure of (TTP)Ti(4-picoline)2 was also determined by XRD. Reaction of (TTP)Ti=O with (OEP)Ti-Cl yields intermetal O/Cl exchange, which is a one-electron redox process mediated by O atom transfer. Also a zero-electron redox process mediated by atom transfer is observed when (TTP)TiCl2 is reacted with (OEP)Ti=O.

  18. Symmetric large momentum transfer for atom interferometry with BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    We develop and demonstrate a novel scheme for a symmetric large momentum transfer beam splitter for interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates. Large momentum transfer beam splitters are a key technique to enhance the scaling factor and sensitivity of an atom interferometer and to create largely delocalized superposition states. To realize the beam splitter, double Bragg diffraction is used to create a superposition of two symmetric momentum states. Afterwards both momentum states are loaded into a retro-reflected optical lattice and accelerated by Bloch oscillations on opposite directions, keeping the initial symmetry. The favorable scaling behavior of this symmetric acceleration, allows to transfer more than 1000 ℏk of total differential splitting in a single acceleration sequence of 6 ms duration while we still maintain a fraction of approx. 25% of the initial atom number. As a proof of the coherence of this beam splitter, contrast in a closed Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer has been observed with up to 208 ℏk of momentum separation, which equals a differential wave-packet velocity of approx. 1.1 m/s for 87Rb. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1128 geo-Q and the DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm).

  19. Atomic valence in molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, R. C.; Lain, L.; Torre, A.

    2003-06-01

    Atomic valence in molecular systems is described as a partitioning of the hole distribution, the complementary part of the particle distribution. In this scheme, valence splits into three contributions, related to electron spin density, nonuniform occupancy of orbitals (nonpairing terms) and exchange density (pairing terms), respectively, and whose importance depends on the nature of the state of the system. Calculations carried out for correlated CI and Hartree-Fock state functions in both Mulliken and topological AIM type partitionings as well as theoretical results show the suitability of this formulation for describing valence concepts.

  20. Organic thin film transistors with polymer brush gate dielectrics synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, J.C.; Whiting, G.L.; Khodabakhsh, S.

    2008-01-01

    , synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), were used to fabricate low voltage OFETs with both evaporated pentacene and solution deposited poly(3-hexylthiophene). The semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in these systems were studied with a variety of methods including scanning force microscopy...

  1. Acrylamide Homopolymers and Acrylamide-N-Isopropylacrylamide Block Copolymers by Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerization in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, D. A. Z.; Raffa, P.; Picchioni, F.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylamide has been accomplished in aqueous media at room temperature. By using methyl 2-chloropropionate (MeClPr) as the initiator and tris[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-amine (Me6TREN)/copper halogenide (CuX) as the catalyst system, different linear

  2. Wireless power transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2016-02-23

    A system includes a first stage of an inductive power transfer system with an LCL load resonant converter with a switching section, an LCL tuning circuit, and a primary receiver pad. The IPT system includes a second stage with a secondary receiver pad, a secondary resonant circuit, a secondary rectification circuit, and a secondary decoupling converter. The secondary receiver pad connects to the secondary resonant circuit. The secondary resonant circuit connects to the secondary rectification circuit. The secondary rectification circuit connects to the secondary decoupling converter. The second stage connects to a load. The load includes an energy storage element. The second stage and load are located on a vehicle and the first stage is located at a fixed location. The primary receiver pad wirelessly transfers power to the secondary receiver pad across a gap when the vehicle positions the secondary receiver pad with respect to the primary receiver pad.

  3. Hydropersulfides: H-Atom Transfer Agents Par Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Jean-Philippe R; Griesser, Markus; Pratt, Derek A

    2017-05-10

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are formed endogenously via the reaction of the gaseous biotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and disulfides (RSSR) and/or sulfenic acids (RSOH). RSSH have been investigated for their ability to store H 2 S in vivo and as a line of defense against oxidative stress, from which it is clear that RSSH are much more reactive to two-electron oxidants than thiols. Herein we describe the results of our investigations into the H-atom transfer chemistry of RSSH, contrasting it with the well-known H-atom transfer chemistry of thiols. In fact, RSSH are excellent H-atom donors to alkyl (k ∼ 5 × 10 8 M -1 s -1 ), alkoxyl (k ∼ 1 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 ), peroxyl (k ∼ 2 × 10 6 M -1 s -1 ), and thiyl (k > 1 × 10 10 M -1 s -1 ) radicals, besting thiols by as little as 1 order and as much as 4 orders of magnitude. The inherently high reactivity of RSSH to H-atom transfer is based largely on thermodynamic factors; the weak RSS-H bond dissociation enthalpy (∼70 kcal/mol) and the associated high stability of the perthiyl radical make the foregoing reactions exothermic by 15-34 kcal/mol. Of particular relevance in the context of oxidative stress is the reactivity of RSSH to peroxyl radicals, where favorable thermodynamics are bolstered by a secondary orbital interaction in the transition state of the formal H-atom transfer that drives the inherent reactivity of RSSH to match that of α-tocopherol (α-TOH), nature's premier radical-trapping antioxidant. Significantly, the reactivity of RSSH eclipses that of α-TOH in H-bond-accepting media because of their low H-bond acidity (α 2 H ∼ 0.1). This affords RSSH a unique versatility compared to other highly reactive radical-trapping antioxidants (e.g., phenols, diarylamines, hydroxylamines, sulfenic acids), which tend to have high H-bond acidities. Moreover, the perthiyl radicals that result are highly persistent under autoxidation conditions and undergo very rapid dimerization (k = 5 × 10 9 M -1 s -1 ) in

  4. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savels, T.; Savels, Tom; Mosk, Allard; Lagendijk, Aart

    2007-01-01

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near field, the system exhibits

  5. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  6. Transferable Atomic Multipole Machine Learning Models for Small Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Andrienko, Denis; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-07-14

    Accurate representation of the molecular electrostatic potential, which is often expanded in distributed multipole moments, is crucial for an efficient evaluation of intermolecular interactions. Here we introduce a machine learning model for multipole coefficients of atom types H, C, O, N, S, F, and Cl in any molecular conformation. The model is trained on quantum-chemical results for atoms in varying chemical environments drawn from thousands of organic molecules. Multipoles in systems with neutral, cationic, and anionic molecular charge states are treated with individual models. The models' predictive accuracy and applicability are illustrated by evaluating intermolecular interaction energies of nearly 1,000 dimers and the cohesive energy of the benzene crystal.

  7. Muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms; Transfert de charge muonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupays, A

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms. Recently, a method of measurement of the hyperfine structure of ground-state muonic hydrogen based on the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to oxygen has been proposed. This proposal is based on measurements which where performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute in the early nineties which indicate that the muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to oxygen increases by a factor of 4 going from thermal to 0.12 eV energies. The motivation of our calculations was to confirm this behaviour. To study the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate, we have used a time-independent close-coupling method. We have set up an hyperspherical elliptic formalism valid for nonzero total angular momentum which allows accurate computations of state-to-state reactive and charge exchange processes. We have applied this formalism to muon-transfer process to oxygen and neon. The comparison with experimental results is in both cases excellent. Finally, the neon transfer rate dependence with energy suggests to use neon instead of oxygen to perform a measurement of the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen. The results of accurate calculations of the muon transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen and neon are also reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. (author)

  8. Hemoglobin and red blood cells catalyze atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tilana B; Spulber, Mariana; Kocik, Marzena K; Seidi, Farzad; Charan, Himanshu; Rother, Martin; Sigg, Severin J; Renggli, Kasper; Kali, Gergely; Bruns, Nico

    2013-08-12

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a promiscuous protein that not only transports oxygen, but also catalyzes several biotransformations. A novel in vitro catalytic activity of Hb is described. Bovine Hb and human erythrocytes were found to display ATRPase activity, i.e., they catalyzed the polymerization of vinyl monomers under conditions typical for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate (PEGA), and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) were polymerized using organobromine initiators and the reducing agent ascorbic acid in acidic aqueous solution. In order to avoid chain transfer from polymer radicals to Hb's cysteine residues, the accessible cysteines were blocked by a reaction with a maleimide. The formation of polymers with bromine chain ends, relatively low polydispersity indices (PDI), first order kinetics and an increase in the molecular weight of poly(PEGA) and poly(PEGMA) upon conversion indicate that control of the polymerization by Hb occurred via reversible atom transfer between the protein and the growing polymer chain. For poly(PEGA) and poly(PEGMA), the reactions proceeded with a good to moderate degree of control. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and time-resolved ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy revealed that the protein was stable during polymerization, and only underwent minor conformational changes. As Hb and erythrocytes are readily available, environmentally friendly, and nontoxic, their ATRPase activity is a useful tool for synthetic polymer chemistry. Moreover, this novel activity enhances the understanding of Hb's redox chemistry in the presence of organobromine compounds.

  9. Periodic systems of N-atom molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefferlin, R. A.; Zhuvikin, G. V.; Caviness, K. E.; Duerksen, P. J.

    1984-10-01

    The atoms have long been classified into a periodic system, which is now based on quantum mechanics and group theory. A classification of molecules containing any number (N) of atoms is proposed. It is an extension of the periodic system of the atoms. The approach in this paper is that of group theory, although the proposed system has been subjected to exhaustive comparison with experimental and ab initio computational results for diatomic molecules, and conforms to the commonly known behaviors of molecules with larger N. Orthonormal transformations are performed so that the molecules can be arranged according to their numbers of electrons and to the differences of atomic numbers of the constituent atoms. These arrangements parallel the physical reality of atomic bonding and permit partial three-dimensional models of the systems to be constructed for molecules with as many as four atoms.

  10. Electron transfer processes of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions: information from beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Zdenek

    2013-07-01

    Single-electron transfer reactions in collisions of atomic and molecular doubly charged ions, with atoms and molecules, were investigated in a series of crossed-beam scattering, translational spectroscopy and product luminescence experiments. Investigation of a series of atomic dication-atom electron transfer at collision energies of 0.1-10 eV provided data on differential and relative total cross sections of state-to-state processes. Populations of electronic and vibrational states and rotational temperatures of molecular product ions were obtained from studies of non-dissociative electron transfer in systems containing simple molecular dications and/or molecular targets. The product electronic states populated with highest probability were those for which the translational energy release was 3-5 eV, indicating that the 'reaction window' concept, based on the Landau-Zener formalism, is applicable also to molecular systems. Population of the vibrational states of the molecular products could be described by Franck-Condon factors of the vertical transitions between the reactant and product states, especially at higher (keV) collision energies. Rotational temperature of the product molecular cations was found to be surprisingly low, mostly 400-500 K, practically the temperature of the ion source.

  11. The pentafluorostyrene endeavours with atom transfer radical polymerization - quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The versatility of the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of pentafluorostyrene (FS) is comprehensively evaluated. The ATRP of a wide range of monomers derived from FS is likewise discussed with emphasis on the potential polymer applications. A large number of block and star copolymers...... centred around polypentafluorostyrene (PFS) and prepared primarily using the bromomacroinitiator concept is surveyed. Here the main emphasis is on the feasibility of the polymer design, but also the very many different applications are highlighted. The potential grafting onto PFS and PFS block copolymers...... by exploitation of the very labile para-fluorine demonstrates new material architecture possibilities through very mild reaction conditions. Finally the utility of PFS in various conducting materials is elaborated. The amphiphilic nature of PFS in triblock copolymers with polyethers has been exploited for Li+ ion...

  12. A crystalline singlet phosphinonitrene: a nitrogen atom-transfer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielmann, Fabian; Back, Olivier; Henry-Ellinger, Martin; Jerabek, Paul; Frenking, Gernot; Bertrand, Guy

    2012-09-21

    A variety of transition metal-nitrido complexes (metallonitrenes) have been isolated and studied in the context of modeling intermediates in biological nitrogen fixation by the nitrogenase enzymes and the industrial Haber-Bosch hydrogenation of nitrogen gas into ammonia. In contrast, nonmetallic nitrenes have so far only been spectroscopically observed at low temperatures, despite their intermediacy in a range of organic reactions. Here, we report the synthesis of a bis(imidazolidin-2-iminato)phosphinonitrene, which is stable at room temperature in solution and can even be isolated in the solid state. The bonding between phosphorus and nitrogen is analogous to that observed for metallonitrenes. We also show that this nitrido phosphorus derivative can be used to transfer a nitrogen atom to organic fragments, a difficult task for transition metal-nitrido complexes.

  13. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  14. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolay D. Madzharov; Valentin S. Nemkov

    2017-01-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers...

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Atom-Transfer Radical Cyclization at Remote Unactivated C(sp3)-H Sites: Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of Hybrid Vinyl Palladium Radical Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnyy, Maxim; Parasram, Marvin; Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    A novel mild, visible-light-induced palladium-catalyzed hydrogen atom translocation/atom-transfer radical cyclization (HAT/ATRC) cascade has been developed. This protocol involves a 1,5-HAT process of previously unknown hybrid vinyl palladium radical intermediates, thus leading to iodomethyl carbo- and heterocyclic structures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dimer-atom-atom recombination in the universal four-boson system

    OpenAIRE

    Deltuva, A.

    2012-01-01

    The dimer-atom-atom recombination process in the system of four identical bosons with resonant interactions is studied. The description uses the exact Alt, Grassberger and Sandhas equations for the four-particle transition operators that are solved in the momentum-space framework. The dimer-dimer and atom-trimer channel contributions to the ultracold dimer-atom-atom recombination rate are calculated. The dimer-atom-atom recombination rate greatly exceeds the three-atom recombination rate.

  18. Concerted hydrogen atom and electron transfer mechanism for catalysis by lysine-specific demethylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Higashi, Masahiro; Cembran, Alessandro; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-07-18

    We calculate the free energy profile for the postulated hydride transfer reaction mechanism for the catalysis of lysine demethylation by lysine-specific demethylase LSD1. The potential energy surface is obtained by using combined electrostatically embedded multiconfiguration molecular mechanics (EE-MCMM) and single-configuration molecular mechanics (MM). We employ a constant valence bond coupling term to obtain analytical energies and gradients of the EE-MCMM subsystem, which contains 45 quantum mechanics (QM) atoms and which is parametrized with density functional calculations employing specific reaction parameters obtained by matching high-level wave function calculations. In the MM region, we employ the Amber ff03 and TIP3P force fields. The free energy of activation at 300 K is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) umbrella sampling on a system with 102,090 atoms as the maximum of the free energy profile along the reaction coordinate as obtained by the weighted histogram analysis method with 17 umbrella sampling windows. This yields a free energy of activation of only 10 kcal/mol, showing that the previously postulated direct hydride transfer reaction mechanism is plausible, although we find that it is better interpreted as a concerted transfer of a hydrogen atom and an electron.

  19. Photonic quantum state transfer between a cold atomic gas and a crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maring, Nicolas; Farrera, Pau; Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; Heinze, Georg; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-11-22

    Interfacing fundamentally different quantum systems is key to building future hybrid quantum networks. Such heterogeneous networks offer capabilities superior to those of their homogeneous counterparts, as they merge the individual advantages of disparate quantum nodes in a single network architecture. However, few investigations of optical hybrid interconnections have been carried out, owing to fundamental and technological challenges such as wavelength and bandwidth matching of the interfacing photons. Here we report optical quantum interconnection of two disparate matter quantum systems with photon storage capabilities. We show that a quantum state can be transferred faithfully between a cold atomic ensemble and a rare-earth-doped crystal by means of a single photon at 1,552  nanometre telecommunication wavelength, using cascaded quantum frequency conversion. We demonstrate that quantum correlations between a photon and a single collective spin excitation in the cold atomic ensemble can be transferred to the solid-state system. We also show that single-photon time-bin qubits generated in the cold atomic ensemble can be converted, stored and retrieved from the crystal with a conditional qubit fidelity of more than 85 per cent. Our results open up the prospect of optically connecting quantum nodes with different capabilities and represent an important step towards the realization of large-scale hybrid quantum networks.

  20. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete demonstrat...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  1. Understanding Hydrogen Atom Transfer: from Bond Strengths to Marcus Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAYER, JAMES M.

    2010-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) is one of the most fundamental chemical reactions: A–H + B → A + H–B. It is a key step in a wide range of chemical, environmental, and biological processes. Traditional HAT involves p-block radicals such as tBuO• abstracting H• from organic molecules. More recently, it has been recognized that many transition metal species undergo HAT. This has led to a broader perspective, with HAT viewed as one type of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). When transition metal complexes oxidize substrates by removing H• (≡ e– and H+), typically the electron transfers to the metal and the proton transfers to a ligand. Two examples are shown in the Figure: iron-imidazolinate and vanadium-oxo complexes. Although such reagents do not “look like” main group radicals, they have the same pattern of reactivity. For instance, their HAT rate constants parallel the A–H bond strengths within a series of similar reactions. Just like main group radicals, they abstract H• much faster from O–H bonds than from C–H bonds of the same strength. This shows that driving force is not the only determinant of reactivity. We have found that HAT reactivity is well described using a Marcus-theory approach. In the simplest model, the cross relation, kAH/B = (kAH/AkBH/BKeqf)½, predicts the rate constant for AH + B in terms of the self-exchange rate constants (kAH/A for AH + A) and the equilibrium constant. For a variety of transition metal oxidants, kAH/B is predicted within one or two orders of magnitude with only a few exceptions. For 36 organic reactions of oxyl radicals, kAH/B is predicted with an average deviation of a factor of 3.8, and within a factor of 5 for all but six of the reactions. These reactions involve both O–H or C–H bonds, occur either in water or organic solvents, and over a range of 1028 in Keq and 1013 in kAH/B. The treatment of organic reactions of O–H bonds includes the well-established kinetic solvent

  2. Engineering quantum hyperentangled states in atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mehwish; -Islam, Rameez-ul; Abbas, Tasawar; Ikram, Manzoor

    2017-11-01

    Hyperentangled states have boosted many quantum informatics tasks tremendously due to their high information content per quantum entity. Until now, however, the engineering and manipulation of such states were limited to photonic systems only. In present article, we propose generating atomic hyperentanglement involving atomic internal states as well as atomic external momenta states. Hypersuperposition, hyperentangled cluster, Bell and Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger states are engineered deterministically through resonant and off-resonant Bragg diffraction of neutral two-level atoms. Based on the characteristic parameters of the atomic Bragg diffraction, such as comparatively large interaction times and spatially well-separated outputs, such decoherence resistant states are expected to exhibit good overall fidelities and offer the evident benefits of full controllability, along with extremely high detection efficiency, over the counterpart photonic states comprised entirely of flying qubits.

  3. The ALADDIN atomic physics database system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Russell A.

    1990-05-01

    ALADDIN is an atomic physics database system which has been developed in order to provide a broadly-based standard medium for the exchange and management of atomic data. ALADDIN consists of a data format definition together with supporting software for both interactive searches as well as for access to the data by plasma modeling and other codes. 8AB The ALADDIN system is designed to offer maximum flexibility in the choice of data representations and labeling schemes, so as to support a wide range of atomic physics data types and allow natural evolution and modification of the database as needs change. Associated dictionary files are included in the ALADDIN system for data documentation. The importance of supporting the widest possible user community was also central to be ALADDIN design, leading to the use of straightforward text files with concatentated data entries for the file structure, and the adoption of strict FORTRAN 77 code for the supporting software. This will allow ready access to the ALADDIN system on the widest range of scientific computers, and easy interfacing with FORTRAN modeling codes, user developed atomic physics codes and database, etc. This supporting software consists of the ALADDIN interactive searching and data display code, together with the ALPACK subroutine package which provides ALADDIN datafile searching and data retrieval capabilities to user's codes. ALADDIN has been adopted as the standard international atomic physics data exchange format for magnetic confinement fusion applications by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Entry of critically evaluated atomic data sets into ALADDIN format is to be coordinated by the IAEA atomic and Molecular Data Unit, which will also coordinate long-term development and distribution of updated software and documentation. The increasingly widespread adoption of the ALADDIN data format can be expected to greatly facilitate access to atomic data both within and outside of this original

  4. Relative roles of H-atom transfer and electron transfer in the debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by palladized nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Lu, Guining; Lin, Haozhong; Huang, Kaibo; Tang, Ting; Xue, Xiuling; Yang, Xingjian; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    The relative significance of H-atom transfer versus electron transfer in the dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in bimetallic systems has long been debated. In this study, we have investigated this question through the case study of the debromination of 2, 2', 4, 4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47). The debromination rates of isomer products of BDE-47 by palladized nano zero-valent iron (n-ZVI/Pd) in the same reactor were compared. The results confirmed a shift in the debromination pathway of BDE-47 when treated with unpalladized nano zero-valent iron (n-ZVI) vs. treatment with n-ZVI/Pd. Study showed that BDEs could be rapidly debrominated in a palladium-H2 system, and the debromination pathway in this system is the same as that in the n-ZVI/Pd system. These results suggest that the H-atom species adsorbed on the surface of palladium are responsible for the enhanced reaction rates and the shift of the debromination pathway in the n-ZVI/Pd system. The Mulliken charges, calculated with density functional theory, on bromine atoms of PBDEs were directly correlated with the susceptibility to the e-transfer pathway in the n-ZVI system and inversely correlated with the susceptibility to the H-transfer pathway in n-ZVI/Pd system. These experimentally verified correlations in BDE-47 permit the prediction of the dominant debromination pathway in other BDEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acrylamide Homopolymers and Acrylamide-N-Isopropylacrylamide Block Copolymers by Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerization in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Wever, D. A. Z.; Raffa, P.; Picchioni, F.; Broekhuis, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylamide has been accomplished in aqueous media at room temperature. By using methyl 2-chloropropionate (MeClPr) as the initiator and tris[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]-amine (Me6TREN)/copper halogenide (CuX) as the catalyst system, different linear polyacrylamides with apparent molecular weights up to >150 000 g/mol were synthesized with dispersities as low as 1.39. The molecular weights agreed well with the theoretical ones at relatively low-medi...

  6. Electron Transfer in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Jeffrey Wayne

    1993-01-01

    A review of electron transfer in biology is provided. Chemiosmotic theory, a phenomenological discussion of electron transfer in the bacterial reaction center, and a general formalism for treating electron transfer in condensed systems (including biological systems) are presented. The effective electronic donor/acceptor coupling (H_{DA}) for a bridged electron transfer system is defined. An expression for H_{DA} in terms of the bridge Green's function is developed for systems represented by a tight-binding Hamiltonian. H_{DA } is computed exactly for two systems, and the existence of a dimensionless parameter which determines whether the effective coupling oscillates or decays with increasing donor/acceptor distance is shown. A numerical technique for computing H_{DA} is developed and shown to be significantly more powerful than the conventional Larsson technique. The inverse matrix technique and pathway methods for computing the effective coupling in bridged electron transfer systems are defined and compared. The inverse matrix technique is found to be more powerful on general theoretical grounds and more accurate for numerical calculations of the effective coupling for the butane-1-4-diyl diradical and dimethylene cyclohexane. Parameters for electron transfer Hamiltonians and multi-pathway effects are discussed. Calculations for a simple model electron transfer system and tuna cytochrome c demonstrate a dichotomy in the behavior of the effective coupling distance dependence. In one regime the effective coupling varies exponentially with distance and depends only on the average properties of the bridging material; in the other regime the effective coupling has a complex distance dependence and is sensitive to the details of the bridging material. Experiments and theory indicate that both regimes occur in biological systems, providing a new perspective on a recent controversy over the nature of the distance dependence. We review the status of effective coupling

  7. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzharov, Nikolay D.; Nemkov, Valentin S.

    2017-05-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers and continuous power transfer in technological lines. Only a group of devices working in near magnetic field is considered. This article is devoted to overview of different inductive power transfer (IPT) devices. The review of literature in this area showed that industrial IPT are not much discussed and examined. The authors have experience in design and implementation of several types of IPTs belonging to wireless automotive chargers and to industrial application group. Main attention in the article is paid to principles and design of technological IPTs

  8. Remote atom entanglement in a fiber-connected three-atom system

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Qing, Guo; Jing, Chen; He-Shan, Song

    2008-01-01

    An Ising-type atom-atom interaction is obtained in a fiber-connected three-atom system. The interaction is effective when $\\Delta\\approx \\gamma _{0}\\gg g$. The preparations of remote two-atom and three-atom entanglement governed by this interaction are discussed in specific parameters region. The overall two-atom entanglement is very small because of the existence of the third atom. However, the three-atom entanglement can reach a maximum very close to 1.

  9. Implementing quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Berges, J.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the experimental engineering of model systems for the description of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in one spatial dimension via a mixture of bosonic 23Na and fermionic 6Li atoms. The local gauge symmetry is realized in an optical superlattice, using heteronuclear boson-fermion spin-changing interactions which preserve the total spin in every local collision. We consider a large number of bosons residing in the coherent state of a Bose-Einstein condensate on each link between the fermion lattice sites, such that the behavior of lattice QED in the continuum limit can be recovered. The discussion about the range of possible experimental parameters builds, in particular, upon experiences with related setups of fermions interacting with coherent samples of bosonic atoms. We determine the atomic system’s parameters required for the description of fundamental QED processes, such as Schwinger pair production and string breaking. This is achieved by benchmark calculations of the atomic system and of QED itself using functional integral techniques. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of one-dimensional QED may be realized with ultracold atoms using state-of-the-art experimental resources. The experimental setup proposed may provide a unique access to longstanding open questions for which classical computational methods are no longer applicable.

  10. Creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by electron scattering: Quantum-mechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanak, G.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2008-12-01

    Using the wave-packet propagation method of Rodberg and Thaler and the density matrix method of Fano and Blum, we have defined by completely quantum-mechanical methods the cross sections for the creation, destruction, and transfer of atomic multipole moments by both elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons by atomic targets. All cross sections obtained quantum mechanically, except for the coherence transfer cross sections, agree in form with those obtained semiclassically by Fujimoto and co-workers. We also used the converged close-coupling (CCC) method to calculate numerically some of the above cross sections for selected transitions in electron scattering from hydrogen and barium atoms.

  11. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit - the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  12. Long range intermolecular forces in triatomic systems: connecting the atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2005-01-01

    The long-range forces that act between three atoms are analysed in both atom-diatom and atom-atom-atom representations. Expressions for atom-diatom dispersion coefficients are obtained in terms of 3-body nonadditive coefficients. The anisotropy of atom-diatom C_6 dispersion coefficients arises primarily from nonadditive triple-dipole and quadruple-dipole forces, while pairwise-additive forces and nonadditive triple-dipole and dipole-dipole-quadrupole forces contribute significantly to atom-di...

  13. Transferable Pseudo-Classical Electrons for Aufbau of Atomic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. PMID:24752384

  14. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-05

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  16. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  17. Atomic recombination rate determination through heat-transfer measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Anderson, L. A.; Sheldahl, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental demonstration is presented which shows that under suitable conditions the volume recombination coefficient can be determined by measuring the heat transfer rate into the wall of a cylinder through which a dissociated stream is passing. The experimental results obtained are in agreement with those of other investigators.

  18. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  19. The role of coherent excitation and collisional energy transfer in atomic vapor filters and photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Tiffany Lee

    Many optical techniques, including laser Doppler velocimetry, free space optical communications, and chemical imaging, require-or can be enhanced by-high spectral resolution photon detection. Such detection is characterized by spectral discrimination on the order of GHz or MHz i.e., approximately 10-4 nm in the near-infrared region. This spectral resolution has recently been achieved by exploiting the narrow absorption features of gas phase atoms. Absorption of light by alkali vapors is intrinsically selective and can be monitored by detecting the fluorescence resulting from laser excitation coupled to selectively excited atomic states. Imaging can be accomplished by spatially expanding the excitation lasers into two dimensions. Fluorescence photons are only created and detected when the interrogated object is forced to scatter radiation of an energy precisely matching one of the transitions of a pre-determined optimal excitation/fluorescence scheme. Devices based on resonance fluorescence photon detection have recently been described using cesium atoms. In this work, the sensitivity and spectral resolution of cesium-based photon detectors were evaluated and improved. To this end, initial experiments focused on laser induced fluorescence in room temperature cesium vapor. The fluorescence response of the detector was augmented by the use of cesium-induced collisional excitation energy transfer between states involved in the chosen excitation scheme. Additional studies focused on helium and argon-induced collisions in the vapor to increase the signal output while maintaining adequate spatial resolution in imaging mode. The probability or cross section of helium-cesium collisions at the operating temperature of the detector was determined by use of a simplified rate equation model. The spectral response of the detector was improved by the use of coherent optical effects resulting from the interaction of a multi-level atomic system with narrowband radiation. Superior

  20. Model Hamiltonians for atomic and molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J.; Moskowitz, Jules W.; Schmidt, K. E.

    1989-01-01

    A model Hamiltonian, designed to allow larger systems to be treated with the Green's function Monte Carlo method, is introduced for atomic and molecular systems. The model reduces the statistical variance associated with Green's function Monte Carlo calculations by reducing potential energy fluctuations in the core regions. By performing calculations of Li, LiH, and Li2 we show that this method can be used to obtain energy differences with much less computer time than required for the complete interaction. Increases in efficiency for larger systems will be even greater.

  1. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions of imido manganese(V) corrole: one reaction with two mechanistic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdilla, Michael J; Dexheimer, Jennifer L; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2007-09-19

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions of (tpfc)MnNTs have been investigated (tpfc = 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole and Ts = p-toluenesulfonate). 9,10-Dihydroanthracene and 1,4-dihydrobenzene reduce (tpfc)MnNTs via HAT with second-order rate constants 0.16 +/- 0.03 and 0.17 +/- 0.01 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, at 22 degrees C. The products are the respective arenes, TsNH(2) and (tpfc)Mn(III). Conversion of (tpfc)MnNTs to (tpfc)Mn by reaction with dihydroanthracene exhibits isosbestic behavior, and formation of 9,9',10,10'-tetrahydrobianthracene is not observed, suggesting that the intermediate anthracene radical rebounds in a second fast step without accumulation of a Mn(IV) intermediate. The imido complex (tpfc)Mn(V)NTs abstracts a hydrogen atom from phenols as well. For example, 2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol is oxidized to the corresponding phenoxyl radical with a second-order rate constant of 0.32 +/- 0.02 M(-1) s(-1) at 22 degrees C. The other products from imido manganese(V) are TsNH(2) and the trivalent manganese corrole. Unlike reaction with dihydroarenes, when phenols are used isosbestic behavior is not observed, and formation of (tpfc)Mn(IV)(NHTs) is confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. A Hammett plot for various p-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butyl phenols yields a V-shaped dependence on sigma, with electron-donating substituents exhibiting the expected negative rho while electron-withdrawing substituents fall above the linear fit (i.e., positive rho). Similarly, a bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) correlation places electron-withdrawing substituents above the well-defined negative slope found for the electron-donating substituents. Thus two mechanisms are established for HAT reactions in this system, namely, concerted proton-electron transfer and proton-gated electron transfer in which proton transfer is followed by electron transfer.

  2. Synthesis of triblock and random copolymers of 4- acetoxystyrene and styrene by living atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Bo; Chen, Xianyi; Ivan, Bela

    1997-01-01

    Triblock copolymers containing polystyrene (PSt) and poly(4-acetoxystyrene) (PAcOSt) segments have been prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the first step one of the two monomers was polymerized in bulk using the initiating system alpha,alpha'-dibromo-p-xylene/CuBr/2...... weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Polymerization of a mixture of equal molar amounts of the two monomers yielded a random copolymer with narrow molecular weight distribution....

  3. Atom-Transfer Radical Addition to Unactivated Alkenes by using Heterogeneous Visible-Light Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liang-Liang; Cong, Huan

    2017-11-23

    Heterogeneous visible-light photocatalysis represents an important route toward the development of sustainable organic synthesis. In this study visible light-induced, heavy metal-free atom-transfer radical addition to unactivated terminal olefins is carried out by using the combination of heterogeneous titanium dioxide as photocatalyst and a hypervalent iodine(III) reagent as co-initiator. The reaction can be applied to a range of substrates with good functional-group tolerance under very mild conditions. In addition to a number of commonly used atom-transfer reagents, the relatively challenging chloroform is also suitable. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-04-11

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  5. Fast adiabatic quantum state transfer and entanglement generation between two atoms via dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Lei; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2017-04-01

    We propose a dressed-state scheme to achieve shortcuts to adiabaticity in atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics for speeding up adiabatic two-atom quantum state transfer and maximum entanglement generation. Compared with stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, the dressed-state scheme greatly shortens the operation time in a non-adiabatic way. By means of some numerical simulations, we determine the parameters which can guarantee the feasibility and efficiency both in theory and experiment. Besides, numerical simulations also show the scheme is robust against the variations in the parameters, atomic spontaneous emissions and the photon leakages from the cavity.

  6. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  7. Effect of energy transfer from atomic electron shell to an α particle emitted by decaying nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashov, S. Yu., E-mail: igashov@theor.mephi.ru [All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The process of energy transfer from the electron shell of an atom to an α particle propagating through the shell is formulated mathematically. Using the decay of the {sup 226}Ra nucleus as an example, it is demonstrated that this phenomenon increases the α-decay intensity in contrast with other known effects of similar type. Moreover, the α decay of the nucleus is more strongly affected by the energy transfer than by all other effects taken together.

  8. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  9. Optical fiber data transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    This Phase 2 effort applies the results of Phase 1 to design and fabricate an optical slip ring system for a helicopter rotor blade/wind tunnel application. In this application, there are two assemblies: one on the rotating portion of the mechanical system, one on the stationary portion. The assembly on the rotating portion digitizes and encodes 128 transducer signals from various parts of the blade, and optically transfers data across the noncontacting coupling. Two complete identical independent channels are provided. On the stationary side, the signals are decoded and one channel is transmitted in digital form to a computer for recording and analysis. The second channel reconstructs the analog transducer signals for real time observation. In the opposite direction, eight signal channels enable control signals to be passed from the stationary to the rotating part of the system. Power to the rotor mounted electronics is supplied via power slip rings. The advantages of the optical over the traditional electro-mechanical slip ring method of data transfer across a rotating joint are long life, low-maintenance, immunity to crosstalk, and wider bandwidth. Successful completion of this effort demonstrated that this method is practical and reliable, and can be implemented under difficult conditions of available space, power, environment, and stringent performance and equipment life requirements.

  10. TRANSFER PRICING AS A SYSTEM-FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Guisin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that transfer pricing plays a system-building role for multi-profile commercial banks of today. Bank transfer pricing system properties are outlined. Examples of practical implementation of the transfer pricing to bank activities are brought about. Impact of transferprices on key aspects of the bank management and control system is discussed.

  11. Polymer coating comprising 2-methoxyethyl acrylate units synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012184029A The present invention relates to preparation of a polymer coating comprising or consisting of polymer chains comprising or consisting of units of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate synthesized by Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI ATRP) such as ARGET SI ATRP...

  12. Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization - a Technique to Develop Biofunctional Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The initial formation of initiating sites for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on various polymer surfaces and numerous inorganic and metallic surfaces is elaborated. The subsequent ATRP grafting of a multitude of monomers from such surfaces to generate thin covalently linked polymer...

  13. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  14. Novel fluorinated block copolymer architectures fuelled by atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jankova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Block copolymers based on poly(pentafluorostyrene), PFS, in various numbers and of different lengths, and polystyrene are prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Di- and triblock copolymers with varying amounts of PFS were synthesized employing either I phenylethylbromide or 1,4-...

  15. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization from Electrospun Mats: An Alternative to Nafion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Tynelius, Oskar

    2017-01-01

    Proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications are synthesized by surface-initiated(SI) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene)is electrospun into 50 μm thick mat, which is then employed as multifunctionalinitiator for copper...

  16. Optimization of transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... We present here our experimental results on transfer of laser-cooled atom cloud to a quadrupole magnetic trap. We show that by choosing appropriately the ratio of potential energy in magnetic trap to kinetic energy of cloud in molasses, we can obtain the maximum phase-space density in the magnetic trap.

  17. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  18. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  19. Atom transfer radical polymerization preparation and photophysical properties of polypyridylruthenium derivatized polystyrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhen; Ito, Akitaka; Keinan, Shahar; Chen, Zuofeng; Watson, Zoe; Rochette, Jason; Kanai, Yosuke; Taylor, Darlene; Schanze, Kirk S; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-08-05

    A ruthenium containing polymer featuring a short carbonyl-amino-methylene linker has been prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The polymer was derived from ATRP of the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) derivative of p-vinylbenzoic acid, followed by an amide coupling reaction of the NHS-polystyrene with Ru(II) complexes derivatized with aminomethyl groups (i.e., [Ru(bpy)2(CH3-bpy-CH2NH2)](2+) where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and CH3-bpy-CH2NH2 is 4-methyl-4'-aminomethyl-2,2'-bipyridine). The Ru-functionalized polymer structure was confirmed by using nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy, and the results suggest that a high loading ratio of polypyridylruthenium chromophores on the polystyrene backbone was achieved. The photophysical properties of the polymer were characterized in solution and in rigid ethylene glycol glasses. In solution, emission quantum yield and lifetime studies reveal that the polymer's metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states are quenched relative to a model Ru complex chromophore. In rigid media, the MLCT-ground state band gap and lifetime are both increased relative to solution with time-resolved emission measurements revealing fast energy transfer hopping within the polymer. Molecular dynamics studies of the polymer synthesized here as well as similar model systems with various spatial arrangements of the pendant Ru complex chromophores suggest that the carbonyl-amino-methylene linker probed in our target polymer provides shorter Ru-Ru nearest-neighbor distances leading to an increased Ru*-Ru energy hopping rate, compared to those with longer linkers in counterpart polymers.

  20. Probing resonant energy transfer in collisions of ammonia with Rydberg helium atoms by microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of experiments demonstrating the spectroscopic detection of Förster resonance energy transfer from NH3 in the X1A1 ground electronic state to helium atoms in 1sns 3S1 Rydberg levels, where n = 37 and n = 40. For these values of n, the 1sns 3S1 → 1snp 3PJ transitions in helium lie close to resonance with the ground-state inversion transitions in NH3 and can be tuned through resonance using electric fields of less than 10 V/cm. In the experiments, energy transfer was detected by direct state-selective electric field ionization of the 3S1 and 3PJ Rydberg levels and by monitoring the population of the 3DJ levels following pulsed microwave transfer from the 3PJ levels. Detection by microwave spectroscopic methods represents a highly state selective, low-background approach to probing the collisional energy transfer process and the environment in which the atom-molecule interactions occur. The experimentally observed electric-field dependence of the resonant energy transfer process, probed both by direct electric field ionization and by microwave transfer, agrees well with the results of calculations performed using a simple theoretical model of the energy transfer process. For measurements performed in zero electric field with atoms prepared in the 1s40s 3S1 level, the transition from a regime in which a single energy transfer channel can be isolated for detection to one in which multiple collision channels begin to play a role has been identified as the NH3 density was increased.

  1. Theoretical investigation of the coupling between hydrogen-atom transfer and stacking interaction in adenine-thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2013-04-15

    Three different dimers of the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair are studied to point out the changes of important properties (structure, atomic charge, energy and so on) induced by coupling between the movement of the atoms in the hydrogen bonds and the stacking interaction. The comparison of these results with those for the A-T monomer system explains the role of the stacking interaction in the hydrogen-atom transfer in this biologically important base pair. The results support the idea that this coupling depends on the exact dimer considered and is different for the N-N and N-O hydrogen bonds. In particular, the correlation between the hydrogen transfer and the stacking interaction is more relevant for the N-N bridge than for the N-O one. Also, the two different mechanisms of two-hydrogen transfer (step by step and concerted) can be modified by the stacking interaction between the base pairs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  3. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  4. NADS - Nuclear And Atomic Data System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinley, M S; Beck, B; McNabb, D

    2004-09-17

    We have developed NADS (Nuclear and Atomic Data System), a web-based graphical interface for viewing pointwise and grouped cross-sections and distributions. Our implementation is a client / server model. The client is a Java applet that displays the graphical interface, which has interactive 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D plots and tables. The server, which can serve and perform computations the data, has been implemented in Python using the FUDGE package developed by Bret Beck at LLNL. Computational capabilities include algebraic manipulation of nuclear evaluated data in databases such as LLNL's ENDL-99, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI as well as user data. Processed data used in LLNL's transport codes are accessible as well. NADS is available from http://nuclear.llnl.gov/

  5. Magnetic Correlations in Cold Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Lode

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic correlations have recently been measured experimentally in cold atomic systems. These stretch over the entire system size fitting under the fermionic microscope realizing Heisenberg antiferromagnetism and constitute one of the greatest developments in recent years in this field. In the first part of the talk I review the experiment performed in the Bloch/Gross group by M. Boll et al. on Hubbard chains, demonstrating a simultaneous measurement of spin and charge. Correlations up to three sites have been discerned, allowing to extract an entropy density not greater than 0.5. I briefly comment on recent developments by this team. In the second part I move on to the two-dimensional case. The establishment of an antiferromagnetic Heisenberg phase in the Greiner lab paves the way to study open questions in the doped regime. Finally, I discuss the challenges to study FFLO instabilities for Hubbard systems with population imbalance as well as p-wave superfluidity by spin-nematic Fermi surface deformations and Ising antiferromagnetic transitions in explicitly SU(2) broken Hubbard models.

  6. Direct time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer of deoxyblebbistatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-De; Zhu, Ruixue; Lee Phillips, David

    2017-09-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of deoxyblebbistatin was investigated using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. An ultrafast intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (IHAT) appears to take place via the first singlet excited state of deoxyblebbistatin within 8 ps. Absorption and fluorescence photochemical results indicate the IHAT process leads to mainly conversion of deoxyblebbistatin into an enol form final product which was observed and characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Radical zinc-atom-transfer-based carbozincation of haloalkynes with dialkylzincs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Chemla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of alkylidenezinc carbenoids by 1,4-addition/carbozincation of dialkylzincs or alkyl iodides based on zinc atom radical transfer, in the presence of dimethylzinc with β-(propargyloxyenoates having pendant iodo- and bromoalkynes, is disclosed. Formation of the carbenoid intermediate is fully stereoselective at −30 °C and arises from a formal anti-selective carbozincation reaction. Upon warming, the zinc carbenoid is stereochemically labile and isomerizes to its more stable form.

  8. Bibliography on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions. Updated 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawara, H.

    1997-04-01

    Following our previous compilations (IPPJ-AM-45 (1986), NIFS-DATA-7 (1990), NIFS-DATA-20 (1993)), bibliographic information on experimental and theoretical studies on electron transfer processes in ion-ion/atom/molecule collisions is up-dated. The references published through 1954-1996 are listed in the order of the publication year. For easy finding of the references for a combination of collision partners, a simple list is provided. (author)

  9. Seawater uranium sorbents: preparation from a mesoporous copolymer initiator by atom-transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Yanfeng; Mayes, Richard T.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Sun, Xiao-Guang [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Costas [Energy and Transportation Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Jihua [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Suree [Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dai, Sheng [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-12-09

    Nanoporous template-free initiators for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were synthesized with surface and framework initiator sites and tailorable pore structures. Polyacrylonitrile grown on one initiator was converted into polyamidoxime to generate a uranium sorbent for seawater extraction with a high uptake rate and capacity relative to those of nonwoven irradiation-grafted polyethylene-fiber composites. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Synthesis of novel size exclusion chromatography support by surface initiated aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Bryan R; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Haynes, Charles A; Brooks, Donald E

    2007-11-06

    We report the use of aqueous surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) to grow polymer brushes from a "gigaporous" polymeric chromatography support for use as a novel size exclusion chromatography medium. Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) was grown from hydrolyzable surface initiators via SI-ATRP catalyzed by 1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyltriethylenetetramine (HMTETA)/CuCl. Grafted polymer was characterized semiquantitatively by ATR-FTIR and also cleaved and quantitatively characterized for mass, molecular weight, and polydispersity via analytical SEC/MALLS. The synthesis provides control over graft density and allows the creation of dense brushes. Incorporation of negative surface charge was found to be crucial for improving the initiation efficiency. As polymer molecular weight and density could be controlled through reaction conditions, the resulting low-polydispersity grafted polymer brush medium is shown to be suitable for use as a customizable size exclusion chromatography medium for investigating the principals of entropic interaction chromatography. All packed media investigated showed size-dependent partitioning of solutes, even for low graft density systems. Increasing the molecular weight of the grafts allowed solutes more access to the volume fraction in the column available for partitioning. Compared to low graft density media, increased graft density caused eluted solute probes to be retained less within the column and allowed for greater size discrimination of probes whose molecular weights were less than 10(4) kDa.

  11. A Many-Atom Cavity QED System with Homogeneous Atom-Cavity Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jongmin; Teper, Igor; Hosten, Onur; Kasevich, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a many-atom-cavity system with a high-finesse dual-wavelength standing wave cavity in which all participating rubidium atoms are nearly identically coupled to a 780-nm cavity mode. This homogeneous coupling is enforced by a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by the field of a 1560-nm cavity mode.

  12. Experimental verification of orbital engineering at the atomic scale: Charge transfer and symmetry breaking in nickelate heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Rui, Xue; Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Disa, Ankit S.; Longo, Paolo; Okunishi, Eiji; Walker, Fred; Ahn, Charles H.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Epitaxial strain, layer confinement, and inversion symmetry breaking have emerged as powerful new approaches to control the electronic and atomic-scale structural properties of complex metal oxides. Trivalent rare-earth (RE) nickelate R E NiO3 heterostructures have been shown to be exemplars since the orbital occupancy, degeneracy, and, consequently, electronic/magnetic properties can be altered as a function of epitaxial strain, layer thickness, and superlattice structure. One recent example is the tricomponent LaTiO3-LaNiO3-LaAlO3 superlattice which exhibits charge transfer and orbital polarization as the result of its interfacial dipole electric field. A crucial step towards control of these parameters for future electronic and magnetic device applications is to develop an understanding of both the magnitude and range of the octahedral network's response towards interfacial strain and electric fields. An approach that provides atomic-scale resolution and sensitivity towards the local octahedral distortions and orbital occupancy is therefore required. Here, we employ atomic-resolution imaging coupled with electron spectroscopies and first-principles theory to examine the role of interfacial charge transfer and symmetry breaking in a tricomponent nickelate superlattice system. We find that nearly complete charge transfer occurs between the LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 layers, resulting in a mixed Ni2 +/Ni3 + valence state. We further demonstrate that this charge transfer is highly localized with a range of about 1 unit cell within the LaNiO3 layers. We also show how Wannier-function-based electron counting provides a simple physical picture of the electron distribution that connects directly with formal valence charges. The results presented here provide important feedback to synthesis efforts aimed at stabilizing new electronic phases that are not accessible by conventional bulk or epitaxial film approaches.

  13. Enhancing the quantum state transfer between two atoms in separate cavities via weak measurement and its reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ling; Huang, Jinsong; Xu, Zhonghui; Xiao, Xing

    2017-10-01

    Taking the advantage of weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal, we propose a scheme to enhance the fidelity of transferring quantum state from one atom trapped in cavity to another distant one trapped in another cavity which is coupled by an optical fiber. It is turned out that the fidelity can be greatly improved even when the system is under serious dissipation. Moreover, the scheme works in both the strong-coupling and weak-coupling regimes. It is also robust to the ratio of the coupling constant between the atoms and the cavity modes to the coupling constant between the fiber and cavity modes. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the probabilistic nature of weak measurements.

  14. Hydroperoxyl Radicals (HOO(.) ): Vitamin E Regeneration and H-Bond Effects on the Hydrogen Atom Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrowski, Jakub; Litwinienko, Grzegorz; Baschieri, Andrea; Amorati, Riccardo

    2016-11-07

    Hydroperoxyl (HOO(.) ) and alkylperoxyl (ROO(.) ) radicals show a different behavior in H-atom-transfer processes. Both radicals react with an analogue of α-tocopherol (TOH), but HOO(.) , unlike ROO(.) , is able to regenerate TOH by a fast H-atom transfer: TO(.) +HOO(.) →TOH+O2 . The kinetic solvent effect on the H-atom transfer from TOH to HOO(.) is much stronger than that observed for ROO(.) because noncovalent interactions with polar solvents (Solv⋅⋅⋅HOO(.) ) destabilize the transition state. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Matter, energy, and heat transfer in a classical ballistic atom pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Tommy A; Das, Kunal K; Mitchell, Kevin A; Aubin, Seth; Delos, John B

    2014-11-01

    A ballistic atom pump is a system containing two reservoirs of neutral atoms or molecules and a junction connecting them containing a localized time-varying potential. Atoms move through the pump as independent particles. Under certain conditions, these pumps can create net transport of atoms from one reservoir to the other. While such systems are sometimes called "quantum pumps," they are also models of classical chaotic transport, and their quantum behavior cannot be understood without study of the corresponding classical behavior. Here we examine classically such a pump's effect on energy and temperature in the reservoirs, in addition to net particle transport. We show that the changes in particle number, of energy in each reservoir, and of temperature in each reservoir vary in unexpected ways as the incident particle energy is varied.

  16. A DFT Study of R-X Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Relevance to the Initiation Process of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillies, Malcolm Bjørn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2003-01-01

    DFT calculations at the B3P86/6-31G** level have been carried out to derive the bond dissociation energies (BDE) and free energies for a number of R-X systems (X ) Cl, Br, I, N3, and S2-CNMe2) that have been or can potentially be used as initiators for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)....

  17. Orbital Express fluid transfer demonstration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberger, Scott; SooHoo, David; Abraham, Gabriel

    2008-04-01

    Propellant resupply of orbiting spacecraft is no longer in the realm of high risk development. The recently concluded Orbital Express (OE) mission included a fluid transfer demonstration that operated the hardware and control logic in space, bringing the Technology Readiness Level to a solid TRL 7 (demonstration of a system prototype in an operational environment). Orbital Express (funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, DARPA) was launched aboard an Atlas-V rocket on March 9th, 2007. The mission had the objective of demonstrating technologies needed for routine servicing of spacecraft, namely autonomous rendezvous and docking, propellant resupply, and orbital replacement unit transfer. The demonstration system used two spacecraft. A servicing vehicle (ASTRO) performed multiple dockings with the client (NextSat) spacecraft, and performed a variety of propellant transfers in addition to exchanges of a battery and computer. The fluid transfer and propulsion system onboard ASTRO, in addition to providing the six degree-of-freedom (6 DOF) thruster system for rendezvous and docking, demonstrated autonomous transfer of monopropellant hydrazine to or from the NextSat spacecraft 15 times while on orbit. The fluid transfer system aboard the NextSat vehicle was designed to simulate a variety of client systems, including both blowdown pressurization and pressure regulated propulsion systems. The fluid transfer demonstrations started with a low level of autonomy, where ground controllers were allowed to review the status of the demonstration at numerous points before authorizing the next steps to be performed. The final transfers were performed at a full autonomy level where the ground authorized the start of a transfer sequence and then monitored data as the transfer proceeded. The major steps of a fluid transfer included the following: mate of the coupling, leak check of the coupling, venting of the coupling, priming of the coupling, fluid transfer, gauging

  18. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  19. The role of charge transfer in the oxidation state change of Ce atoms in the TM13-CeO2(111) systems (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au): a DFT + U investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchuk, Polina; Freire, Rafael L H; Ungureanu, Crina G; Seminovski, Yohanna; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2015-05-28

    Despite extensive studies of transition metal (TM) clusters supported on ceria (CeO2), fundamental issues such as the role of the TM atoms in the change in the oxidation state of Ce atoms are still not well understood. In this work, we report a theoretical investigation based on static and ab initio molecular dynamics density functional theory calculations of the interaction of 13-atom TM clusters (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) with the unreduced CeO2(111) surface represented by a large surface unit cell and employing Hubbard corrections for the strong on-site Coulomb correlation in the Ce f-electrons. We found that the TM13 clusters form pyramidal-like structures on CeO2(111) in the lowest energy configurations with the following stacking sequence, TM/TM4/TM8/CeO2(111), while TM13 adopts two-dimensional structures at high energy structures. TM13 induces a change in the oxidation state of few Ce atoms (3 of 16) located in the topmost Ce layer from Ce(IV) (itinerant Ce f-states) to Ce(III) (localized Ce f-states). There is a charge flow from the TM atoms to the CeO2(111) surface, which can be explained by the electronegativity difference between the TM (Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) and O atoms, however, the charge is not uniformly distributed on the topmost O layer due to the pressure induced by the TM13 clusters on the underlying O ions, which yields a decrease in the ionic charge of the O ions located below the cluster and an increase in the remaining O ions. Due to the charge flow mainly from the TM8-layer to the topmost O-layer, the charge cannot flow from the Ce(IV) atoms to the O atoms with the same magnitude as in the clean CeO2(111) surface. Consequently, the effective cationic charge decreases mainly for the Ce atoms that have a bond with the O atoms not located below the cluster, and hence, those Ce atoms change their oxidation state from IV to III. This increases the size of the Ce(III) compared with the Ce(IV) cations, which builds-in a strain within the topmost Ce layer, and

  20. A Laser Stabilization System for Rydberg Atom Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-06

    A Laser Stabilization System for Rydberg Atom Physics We purchased 2 dual wavelength ultrastable ultralow expansion glass cavities along with optics...term locking could be achieved for 2 photon Rydberg atom excitation. Both systems were offset locked using a high bandwidth resonant electro-optic...Rydberg Atom Physics Report Title We purchased 2 dual wavelength ultrastable ultralow expansion glass cavities along with optics and electronics to

  1. Water-assisted atom transfer radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide: nature of solvent and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianding; Narain, Ravin

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate here via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) at low temperature that the negative function of water in aqueous ATRP is significantly suppressed. By the addition of a small amount of water in a water-miscible organic solvent and maintaining low polymerization temperature, the ATRP of NIPAM is relatively fast and well controlled. We observed that the rate of the polymerization in pure organic solvent at a monomer concentration of 20 wt % is slow, and relatively low conversions were obtained. The low conversion of PNIPAM in pure alcoholic media (such as methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol) is attributed to the poor solubility of the resulting low molecular weight polymer in such solvents. The consequence is that the PNIPAM chains are aggregated, resulting in the inaccessibility of the embedded halide atom of the polymer chain ends by the copper catalyst. As expected, the ATRP of NIPAM in pure water was found to be fast and uncontrolled. These results have therefore prompted us to study the ATRP of NIPAM in aqueous-organic mixtures. Room temperature polymerization of NIPAM in mixed aqueous-organic solvent mixtures (organic:water = 4:1 or 3:1) revealed to be fast and uncontrolled. However, when the NIPAM polymerization was conducted at low temperature (0 degrees C) in such solvent systems, the polymerization turned out to be well-controlled as the molar masses progress linearly with conversion, and pseudo-first-order kinetic plots were obtained. Furthermore, monomodal GPC traces and narrow molecular weight distributions were obtained in all aqueous-organic solvent systems. Chain extension for aqueous ATRP of NIPAM revealed to proceed well at low temperature as compared to room temperature. Furthermore, we observe that the rates of the polymerization of NIPAM in different aqueous-organic mixtures follow the trend of polarity in the case of the polar aprotic solvents. However, in the case of polar protic solvent

  2. Expanded corn starch as a versatile material in atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene and methyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankushi; Kumar, Arvind; Latha, Patnam Padma; Ray, Siddharth Sankar; Chatterjee, Alok Kumar

    2015-10-05

    Polymerization of styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) was performed by surface initiated (SI) and activator generated by electron transfer (AGET) systems of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using renewable expanded corn starch (ECS) as a support. This prepared ECS is found to have V type crystallinity with 50 m(2)g(-1) surface area (<1m(2)g(-1) for corn starch (CS)) and average pore volume of 0.43 cm(3)g(-1) (<0.1cm(3)g(-1) for CS). In SI-ATRP, hydroxyl groups on ECS were converted into macro-initiator by replacing with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide (BIBB) with a 0.06 degree of substitution determined from NMR. In AGET-ATRP, CuBr2/ligand complex get adsorbed on ECS (Cu(II)/ECS=10 wt.%) to catalyze the polymerization. Synthesized PS/PMMA was characterized by SEM, FT-IR, (1)H NMR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen atom vs electron transfer in catecholase-mimetic oxidations by superoxometal complexes. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simándi, Tatiana M; May, Zoltán; Szigyártó, Imola Cs; Simándi, László I

    2005-01-21

    Dioximato-cobalt(II), -iron(II) and -manganese(II) complexes (1)-(6), acting as functional catecholase and phenoxazinone synthase models, exhibit a deuterium kinetic isotope effect predicted by theory (k4H/k4D < or = 3) in the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and 2-aminophenol by O2. KIEs in the range of (k4H/k4D approximately 1.79-3.51) are observed with (1) and (2) as catalysts, pointing to hydrogen atom transfer in the rate-determining step from the substrate hydroxy group to the metal-bound superoxo ligand. Less significant KIEs (1.06-1.20) are exhibited by catalysts systems (3)-(6), indicating that proton-coupled electron transfer is the preferred route in those cases.

  4. Handshake electron transfer from hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a series of metallic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, J A; Softley, T P

    2016-06-21

    Thin metallic films have a 1D quantum well along the surface normal direction, which yields particle-in-a-box style electronic quantum states. However the quantum well is not infinitely deep and the wavefunctions of these states penetrate outside the surface where the electron is bound by its own image-charge attraction. Therefore a series of discrete, vacant states reach out from the thin film into the vacuum increasing the probability of electron transfer from an external atom or molecule to the thin film, especially for the resonant case where the quantum well energy matches that of the atom. We show that "handshake" electron transfer from a highly excited Rydberg atom to these thin-film states is experimentally measurable. Thicker films have a wider 1D box, changing the energetic distribution and image-state contribution to the thin film wavefunctions, resulting in more resonances. Calculations successfully predict the number of resonances and the nature of the thin-film wavefunctions for a given film thickness.

  5. Saturn facility oil transfer automation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Nathan R.; Thomas, Rayburn Dean; Lewis, Barbara Ann; Malagon, Hector Ricardo.

    2014-02-01

    The Saturn accelerator, owned by Sandia National Laboratories, has been in operation since the early 1980s and still has many of the original systems. A critical legacy system is the oil transfer system which transfers 250,000 gallons of transformer oil from outside storage tanks to the Saturn facility. The oil transfer system was iden- ti ed for upgrade to current technology standards. Using the existing valves, pumps, and relay controls, the system was automated using the National Instruments cRIO FGPA platform. Engineered safety practices, including a failure mode e ects analysis, were used to develop error handling requirements. The uniqueness of the Saturn Oil Automated Transfer System (SOATS) is in the graphical user interface. The SOATS uses an HTML interface to communicate to the cRIO, creating a platform independent control system. The SOATS was commissioned in April 2013.

  6. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  7. How Large are Nonadiabatic Effects in Atomic and Diatomic Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yubo; Tubman, Norm; Krogel, Jaron; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David

    2015-01-01

    With recent developments in simulating nonadiabatic systems to high accuracy, it has become possible to determine how much energy is attributed to nuclear quantum effects beyond zero-point energy. In this work we calculate the non-relativistic ground-state energies of atomic and molecular systems without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For this purpose we utilize the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method, in which the nodes depend on both the electronic and ionic positions. We report ground-state energies for all systems studied, ionization energies for the first-row atoms and atomization energies for the first-row hydrides. We find the ionization energies of the atoms to be nearly independent of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, within the accuracy of our results. The atomization energies of molecular systems, however, show small effects of the nonadiabatic coupling between electrons and nuclei.

  8. In situ AFM investigation of electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Feng

    2013-02-12

    Electrochemically induced surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization is traced by in situ AFM technology for the first time, which allows visualization of the polymer growth process. It affords a fundamental insight into the surface morphology and growth mechanism simultaneously. Using this technique, the polymerization kinetics of two model monomers were studied, namely the anionic 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMA) and the cationic 2-(metharyloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (METAC). The growth of METAC is significantly improved by screening the ammonium cations by the addition of ionic liquid electrolyte in aqueous solution. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hydrophilization of poly(ether ether ketone) films by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (SI-ATRP) has been exploited to hydrophilize PEEK. The ketone groups on the PEEK surface were reduced to hydroxyl groups which were converted to bromoisobutyrate initiating sites for SI-ATRP. The modification steps were followed by contact...... angle measurements and XPS. Moreover, ATR FTIR has been used to confirm the formation of initiating groups. Grafting of PEGMA from PEEK was performed in aqueous solution. The presence of the PPEGMA grafts on PEEK was revealed by the thermograms from TGA whereas investigations with AFM rejected changes...

  10. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen atom transfer in the cytosine-guanine base pair and its coupling with electronic rearrangement. Concerted vs stepwise mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2010-07-29

    The transformation of the DNA base pairs from the Watson-Crick (WC) structures to its tautomers having imino-enol form can be achieved via two types of hydrogen atom transfer processes: (i) concerted, and/or (ii) stepwise (step by step). Here, we have studied and compared these two mechanisms in the cytosine-guanine (C-G) system. In the first mechanism there is the concerted movement of two hydrogen atoms along two of the three H-bridges that bond the bases, one from the cytosine to guanine and the other in the opposite direction. This movement must be coupled to an electronic reorganization, with some bond orders that pass from single to double and vice versa, in order to preserve the neutrality of these new structures. In the stepwise mechanism the movement of the hydrogen atoms and the electronic reorganization are not concerted, and it implicates the movement of a hydrogen atom at a time with the identification of two or more steps in this reaction. There are two possible neutral imino-enol structures in the C-G system, and both have been considered here. The principal result from this paper is that a different behavior is observed if the hydrogen transfer begins with a H of the guanine or of the cytosine and that a concerted (synchronic in the N-N and asynchronic in the N-O) double-hydrogen transfer can be activated only when the first H atom to move is that of the guanine, in particular. This is different from the A-T system(1) studied previously where the movement in a N-N bridge produces a zwitterionic structure and that in the N-O the concerted double-hydrogen transfer. In both cases a general conclusion can be given: the concerted double-hydrogen process begins with a hydrogen atom of a purinic base.

  11. [Preparation of a novel polymer monolith using atom transfer radical polymerization method for solid phase extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Qi, Li; Qiao, Juan; Mao, Lanqun; Chen, Yi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel polymer monolith based solid phase extraction (SPE) material has been prepared by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Firstly, employing ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a cross-linker, a polymer monolith filled in a filter head has been in-situ prepared quickly under mild conditions. Then, the activators generated by electron transfer ATRP (ARGET ATRP) was used for the modification of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl-methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) on the monolithic surface. Finally, this synthesized monolith for SPE was successfully applied in the extraction and enrichment of steroids. The results revealed that ATRP can be developed as a facile and effective method with mild reaction conditions for monolith construction and has the potential for preparing monolith in diverse devices.

  12. Charge Versus Energy Transfer in Atomically Thin Graphene-Transition Metal Dichalcogenide van der Waals Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlicher, Guillaume; Lorchat, Etienne; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    Made from stacks of two-dimensional materials, van der Waals heterostructures exhibit unique light-matter interactions and are promising for novel optoelectronic devices. The performance of such devices is governed by near-field coupling through, e.g., interlayer charge and/or energy transfer. New concepts and experimental methodologies are needed to properly describe two-dimensional heterointerfaces. Here, we report an original study of interlayer charge and energy transfer in atomically thin metal-semiconductor [i.e., graphene-transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD, here molybdenum diselenide, MoSe2 )] heterostructures using a combination of microphotoluminescence and Raman scattering spectroscopies. The photoluminescence intensity in graphene /MoSe2 is quenched by more than 2 orders of magnitude and rises linearly with the incident photon flux, demonstrating a drastically shortened (about 1 ps) room-temperature MoSe2 exciton lifetime. Key complementary insights are provided from a comprehensive analysis of the graphene and MoSe2 Raman modes, which reveals net photoinduced electron transfer from MoSe2 to graphene and hole accumulation in MoSe2 . Remarkably, the steady-state Fermi energy of graphene saturates at 290 ±15 meV above the Dirac point. This reproducible behavior is observed both in ambient air and in vacuum and is discussed in terms of intrinsic factors (i.e., band offsets) and environmental effects. In this saturation regime, balanced photoinduced flows of electrons and holes may transfer to graphene, a mechanism that effectively leads to energy transfer. Using a broad range of incident photon fluxes and diverse environmental conditions, we find that the presence of net photoinduced charge transfer has no measurable impact on the near-unity photoluminescence quenching efficiency in graphene /MoSe2 . This absence of correlation strongly suggests that energy transfer to graphene (either in the form of electron exchange or dipole-dipole interaction) is the

  13. Charge Versus Energy Transfer in Atomically Thin Graphene-Transition Metal Dichalcogenide van der Waals Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Froehlicher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Made from stacks of two-dimensional materials, van der Waals heterostructures exhibit unique light-matter interactions and are promising for novel optoelectronic devices. The performance of such devices is governed by near-field coupling through, e.g., interlayer charge and/or energy transfer. New concepts and experimental methodologies are needed to properly describe two-dimensional heterointerfaces. Here, we report an original study of interlayer charge and energy transfer in atomically thin metal-semiconductor [i.e., graphene-transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD, here molybdenum diselenide, MoSe_{2}] heterostructures using a combination of microphotoluminescence and Raman scattering spectroscopies. The photoluminescence intensity in graphene/MoSe_{2} is quenched by more than 2 orders of magnitude and rises linearly with the incident photon flux, demonstrating a drastically shortened (about 1 ps room-temperature MoSe_{2} exciton lifetime. Key complementary insights are provided from a comprehensive analysis of the graphene and MoSe_{2} Raman modes, which reveals net photoinduced electron transfer from MoSe_{2} to graphene and hole accumulation in MoSe_{2}. Remarkably, the steady-state Fermi energy of graphene saturates at 290±15  meV above the Dirac point. This reproducible behavior is observed both in ambient air and in vacuum and is discussed in terms of intrinsic factors (i.e., band offsets and environmental effects. In this saturation regime, balanced photoinduced flows of electrons and holes may transfer to graphene, a mechanism that effectively leads to energy transfer. Using a broad range of incident photon fluxes and diverse environmental conditions, we find that the presence of net photoinduced charge transfer has no measurable impact on the near-unity photoluminescence quenching efficiency in graphene/MoSe_{2}. This absence of correlation strongly suggests that energy transfer to graphene (either in the form of electron

  14. Charge transfer and association of Na+ with 87Rb atoms from extremely low to intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L. L.; Liu, L.; Wu, Y.; Qu, Y. Z.; Wang, J. G.; Buenker, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    The nonradiative charge-transfer processes in Na++87Rb(5s) collisions have been investigated by using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method and the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method for the energy range of 10-4-5 and 0.3-100 keV/u, respectively. The radiative charge-transfer, radiative-decay, and radiative-association processes have been investigated by using the fully quantum, optical-potential, and semiclassical methods for the energy range of 10-18-0.2 eV/u. The nonradiative charge-transfer processes dominate the collisions for energies above 0.2 eV/u and radiative-decay processes dominate in the lower-energy region. At the very low collision energies of 10-18-10-3 eV/u, the radiative-association process is more important than the radiative charge-transfer process. Most importantly, it is found that the radiative cross sections exhibit Langevin behavior as E-1/2 for energies less than 10-2 eV/u.

  15. Charge migration and charge transfer in molecular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jakob Wörner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of charge at the molecular level plays a fundamental role in many areas of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science. Today, more than 60 years after the seminal work of R. A. Marcus, charge transfer is still a very active field of research. An important recent impetus comes from the ability to resolve ever faster temporal events, down to the attosecond time scale. Such a high temporal resolution now offers the possibility to unravel the most elementary quantum dynamics of both electrons and nuclei that participate in the complex process of charge transfer. This review covers recent research that addresses the following questions. Can we reconstruct the migration of charge across a molecule on the atomic length and electronic time scales? Can we use strong laser fields to control charge migration? Can we temporally resolve and understand intramolecular charge transfer in dissociative ionization of small molecules, in transition-metal complexes and in conjugated polymers? Can we tailor molecular systems towards specific charge-transfer processes? What are the time scales of the elementary steps of charge transfer in liquids and nanoparticles? Important new insights into each of these topics, obtained from state-of-the-art ultrafast spectroscopy and/or theoretical methods, are summarized in this review.

  16. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  17. Functionalized polymer film surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Li, J.S. [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yang, W.T. [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xu, F.J., E-mail: xufj@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2013-05-01

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of polymer films, without altering the substrate properties, is crucial to their wide-spread applications. In this work, a simple one-step method for the direct immobilization of benzyl chloride groups (as the effective atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators) on the polymer films was developed via benzophenone-induced coupling of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC). Polyethylene (PE) and nylon films were selected as examples of polymer films to illustrate the functionalization of film surfaces via surface-initiated ATRP. Functional polymer brushes of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, sodium 4-styrenesulfonate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate, as well as their block copolymer brushes, have been prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the VBC-coupled PE or nylon film surfaces. With the development of a simple approach to the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on polymer film surfaces and the inherent versatility of surface-initiated ATRP, the surface functionality of polymer films can be precisely tailored. - Highlights: ► Atom transfer radical polymerization initiators were simply immobilized. ► Different functional polymer brushes were readily prepared. ► Their block copolymer brushes were also readily prepared.

  18. Hybrid Atom Electrostatic System for Satellite Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahzam, Nassim; Bidel, Yannick; Bresson, Alexandre; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Françoise; Lebat, Vincent; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The subject of this poster comes within the framework of new concepts identification and development for future satellite gravity missions, in continuation of previously launched space missions CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE and ongoing and prospective studies like NGGM, GRACE 2 or E-GRASP. We were here more focused on the inertial sensors that complete the payload of such satellites. The clearly identified instruments for space accelerometry are based on the electrostatic technology developed for many years by ONERA and that offer a high level of performance and a high degree of maturity for space applications. On the other hand, a new generation of sensors based on cold atom interferometry (AI) is emerging and seems very promising in this context. These atomic instruments have already demonstrated on ground impressive results, especially with the development of state-of-the-art gravimeters, and should reach their full potential only in space, where the microgravity environment allows long interaction times. Each of these two types of instruments presents their own advantages which are, for the electrostatic sensors (ES), their demonstrated short term sensitivity and their high TRL, and for AI, amongst others, the absolute nature of the measurement and therefore no need for calibration processes. These two technologies seem in some aspects very complementary and a hybrid sensor bringing together all their assets could be the opportunity to take a big step in this context of gravity space missions. We present here the first experimental association on ground of an electrostatic accelerometer and an atomic accelerometer and underline the interest of calibrating the ES instrument with the AI. Some technical methods using the ES proof-mass as the Raman Mirror seem very promising to remove rotation effects of the satellite on the AI signal. We propose a roadmap to explore further in details and more rigorously this attractive hybridization scheme in order to assess its potential

  19. Quantum Optics with Atom-like Systems in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    29 2.4.1 Optical Rabi oscillations and resonant spin readout . . . . . . 31 2.4.2 Multi-level systems and all-optical spin...external electromagnetic fields. In addition, the atoms are trapped and cooled using ion traps or optical lattices to reduce the effect of atomic motion...the diamond lattice . We do this by making use of the same Λ type system involved in generating spin-photon entanglement. Such a level structure allows

  20. Localization and Targeted Transfer of Atomic-Scale Nonlinear Excitations: Perspectives for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopidakis, G.; Aubry, S.

    We review nonlinearity-induced localization in discrete systems with emphasis on theory and numerical calculations on models used in materials physics to describe interatomic interactions. We discuss how the concept of discrete breather or intrinsic localized mode could become an important tool for understanding nanoscale phenomena in molecules and solids. A particularly attractive field of application for nonlinear localized excitations is the controlled and directed transport of energy. We discuss the recently proposed targeted transfer of localized excitations based on the concept of nonlinear resonance and its potential applications. As an area for such applications, we present directional ultrafast electron transfer at low temperatures using this selective transfer mechanism and we give examples from biological electron transfer. We finally discuss possible applications in nanotechnology and biomolecules.

  1. LANGUAGE SYSTEM: INFORMATION, INFORMATIONAL CONTENT, INFORMATION TRANSFERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Galievna Zarifullina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to research of language system as information system. To this point of view informational content and information transferity are properties of language as main and the most fail-safe communication instrument in human society.  In whole, informational content and information transferity are aspects of information. In that meaning the language realizes function that associated with database of information system: realization of information in formalized form, accumulation, storage and information transfer.But language itself is not an information. Information is language and speech, created with language. Language should be defined as database, because in human thought language doesn’t present as information, but as the formalized model, the system, which elements are bounded with each other and united by the algorithms. The modern forms of language existence are distributed database with multiple accesses, because language belongs to language native bearers, which use it simultaneously.

  2. All-Atom Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Theory and Simulation of Self-Assembly, Energy Transfer and Structural Transition in Nanosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Duran, John Michael

    The study of nanosystems and their emergent properties requires the development of multiscale computational models, theories and methods that preserve atomic and femtosecond resolution, to reveal details that cannot be resolved experimentally today. Considering this, three long time scale phenomena were studied using molecular dynamics and multiscale methods: self-assembly of organic molecules on graphite, energy transfer in nanosystems, and structural transition in vault nanoparticles. Molecular dynamics simulations of the self-assembly of alkoxybenzonitriles with different tail lengths on graphite were performed to learn about intermolecular interactions and phases exhibited by self-organized materials. This is important for the design of ordered self-assembled organic photovoltaic materials with greater efficiency than the disordered blends. Simulations revealed surface dynamical behaviors that cannot be resolved experimentally today due to the lack of spatiotemporal resolution. Atom-resolved structures predicted by simulations agreed with scanning tunneling microscopy images and unit cell measurements. Then, a multiscale theory based on the energy density as a field variable is developed to study energy transfer in nanoscale systems. For applications like photothermal microscopy or cancer phototherapy is required to understand how the energy is transferred to/from nanosystems. This multiscale theory could be applied in this context and here is tested for cubic nanoparticles immersed in water for energy being transferred to/from the nanoparticle. The theory predicts the energy transfer dynamics and reveals phenomena that cannot be described by current phenomenological theories. Finally, temperature-triggered structural transitions were revealed for vault nanoparticles using molecular dynamics and multiscale simulations. Vault is a football-shaped supramolecular assembly very distinct from the commonly observed icosahedral viruses. It has very promising

  3. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  4. Simulation of temperature effect on the structure control of polystyrene obtained by atom-transfer radical polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roniérik Pioli Vieira

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper uses a new kinetic modeling and simulations to analyse the effect of temperature on the polystyrene properties obtained by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. Differently from what has been traditionaly published in ATRP modeling works, it was considered “break” reactions in the mechanism aiming to reproduce the process at high temperatures. Results suggest that there is an upper limit temperature (130 °C, above which the polymer architecture loses the control. In addition, for the system considered in this work, the optimum operating temperature was 100 °C, because at this temperature polymer with very low polydispersity index is obtained, at considerable fast polymerization rate. Therefore, this present paper provides not only a tool to study ATRP processes by simulations, but also a tool for analysis and optimization, being a basis for future works dealing with this monomer and process.

  5. Surface Modification of Nanoporous 1,2-Polybutadiene by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization or Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Schulte, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry were used to obtain functional nanoporous polymers based oil nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) with gyroid morphology. The ATRP monolith initiator was prepared by immobilizing bromoester initiators onto the pore walls...... through two different methodologies: (1) three-step chemical conversion of double bonds of PB into bromoisobutyrate, and (2) photochemical functionalization of PB with bromoisobutyrate groups. Azide functional groups were attached onto the pore walls before click reaction with alkynated MPEG. Following...... ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while...

  6. Wideband laser locking to an atomic reference with modulation transfer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negnevitsky, V; Turner, L D

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate that conventional modulated spectroscopy apparatus, used for laser frequency stabilization in many atomic physics laboratories, can be enhanced to provide a wideband lock delivering deep suppression of frequency noise across the acoustic range. Using an acousto-optic modulator driven with an agile oscillator, we show that wideband frequency modulation of the pump laser in modulation transfer spectroscopy produces the unique single lock-point spectrum previously demonstrated with electro-optic phase modulation. We achieve a laser lock with 100 kHz feedback bandwidth, limited by our laser control electronics. This bandwidth is sufficient to reduce frequency noise by 30 dB across the acoustic range and narrows the imputed linewidth by a factor of five.

  7. On Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Using Diazonium Chemistry To Introduce the Initiator Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iruthayaraj, Joseph; Chernyy, Sergey; Lillethorup, Mie

    2011-01-01

    of bromine shows a gradual transition from mushroom to brush-type conformation of the surface anchored chains in both polar and nonpolar reaction medium. Interestingly, it is revealed that very thick polymer brushes, on the order of 1 μm, can be obtained at high bromine content of the initiator layer......This work features the controllability of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate, initiated by a multilayered 2-bromoisobutyryl moiety formed via diazonium chemistry. The thickness as a function of polymerization time has been studied by varying...... Cu(II)/Cu(I) complexes (L = Me(6)TREN, PMDETA, and BIPY). It is also observed that the ability of polymer brushes to reinitiate depends on the initial thickness and the solvent used for generating it....

  8. Seawater uranium sorbents. Preparation from a mesoporous copolymer initiator by atom-transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Yanfeng; Mayes, Richard T.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Sun, Xiao-Guang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Kim, Jungseung; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; Chen, Jihua [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Brown, Suree [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-12-09

    From the sea to the reactor: Nanoporous template-free initiators for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were synthesized with surface and framework initiator sites and tailorable pore structures. Polyacrylonitrile grown on one initiator was converted into polyamidoxime to generate a uranium sorbent for seawater extraction with a high uptake rate and capacity relative to those of nonwoven irradiation-grafted polyethylene-fiber composites. [German] Aus dem Meer in den Reaktor: Nanoporoese templatfreie Initiatoren fuer die radikalische Atomtransferpolymerisation (ATRP) mit einstellbarer Porenstruktur und Initiatorstellen an der Oberflaeche und im Geruestinneren wurden hergestellt. Auf einem Initiator erzeugtes Polyacrylnitril wurde in ein Polyamidoxim umgewandelt, um Uran aus Meerwasser zu extrahieren. Aufnahmerate und -kapazitaet waren hoch im Vergleich zu nichtverwobenen Kompositen aus Fasern und photochemisch aufgebrachtem Polyethylen.

  9. Modification of Jute Fibers with Polystyrene via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Jankova, Katja Atanassova; Egsgaard, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was investigated as a method of covalently bonding polystyrene to jute (Corchorus capsularis) and as a possible approach to fiber composites with enhanced properties. Jute fibers were modified with a brominated initiator and subsequently ATRP modified...... to attach polystyrene and then examined using SEM, DSC, TGA, FTIR, XPS, elemental analysis, and Py-GC-MS. These techniques confirmed that polystyrene had been covalently bound to the fibers and consequently ATRP-modified jute fiber mats were used to prepare hot-pressed polystyrene composites. Composite...... applications, we conclude that further optimization of the ATRP method is required, possibly targeting higher and more uniform loading of polystyrene on the fibers....

  10. Effect of current and atomized grain size distribution on the solidification of Plasma Transferred Arc coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Bond

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA is the only thermal spray process that results in a metallurgical bond, being frequently described as a hardfacing process. The superior properties of coatings have been related to the fine microstructures obtained, which are finer than those processed under similar heat input with welding techniques using wire feedstock. This observation suggests that the atomized feedstock plays a role on the solidification of coatings. In this study a model for the role of the powders grains in the solidification of PTA coatings is put forward and discussed. An experiment was setup to discuss the model which involved the deposition of an atomized Co-based alloy with different grain size distributions and deposition currents. X ray diffraction showed that there were no phase changes due to the processing parameters. Microstructure analysis by Laser Confocal Microscopy, dilution with the substrate steel and Vickers microhardness were used the characterized coatings and enriched the discussion confirming the role of the powdered feedstock on the solidification of coatings.

  11. Modelling of the heat transfer during oxygen atoms recombination on metallic surfaces in a plasma reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavadias, S; Cauquot, P; Amouroux, J

    1997-01-01

    Space shuttle overheating during the re-entry phase, due to catalytic oxygen recombination on the thermal protection system, is a problem of practical and theoretical interest. The energy transfer is characterised by the product of the accommodation and the recombination coefficients. Previous

  12. Preparation of a novel polymer monolith with functional polymer brushes by two-step atom-transfer radical polymerization for trypsin immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zheng, Wei; Shen, Ying; Qi, Li; Li, Yaping; Qiao, Juan; Wang, Fuyi; Chen, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Novel porous polymer monoliths grafted with poly{oligo[(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-co-glycidyl methacrylate} brushes were fabricated via two-step atom-transfer radical polymerization and used as a trypsin-based reactor in a continuous flow system. This is the first time that atom-transfer radical polymerization technique was utilized to design and construct polymer monolith bioreactor. The prepared monoliths possessed excellent permeability, providing fast mass transfer for enzymatic reaction. More importantly, surface properties, which were modulated via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization, were found to have a great effect on bioreactor activities based on Michaelis-Menten studies. Furthermore, three model proteins were digested by the monolith bioreactor to a larger degree within dramatically reduced time (50 s), about 900 times faster than that by free trypsin (12 h). The proposed method provided a platform to prepare porous monoliths with desired surface properties for immobilizing various enzymes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine infrared CH intensities of hydrocarbons: a quantum theory of atoms in molecules model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arnaldo F; Richter, Wagner E; Meneses, Helen G C; Bruns, Roy E

    2014-11-14

    Atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effects determine most of the infrared fundamental CH intensities of simple hydrocarbons, methane, ethylene, ethane, propyne, cyclopropane and allene. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux model predicted the values of 30 CH intensities ranging from 0 to 123 km mol(-1) with a root mean square (rms) error of only 4.2 km mol(-1) without including a specific equilibrium atomic charge term. Sums of the contributions from terms involving charge flux and/or dipole flux averaged 20.3 km mol(-1), about ten times larger than the average charge contribution of 2.0 km mol(-1). The only notable exceptions are the CH stretching and bending intensities of acetylene and two of the propyne vibrations for hydrogens bound to sp hybridized carbon atoms. Calculations were carried out at four quantum levels, MP2/6-311++G(3d,3p), MP2/cc-pVTZ, QCISD/6-311++G(3d,3p) and QCISD/cc-pVTZ. The results calculated at the QCISD level are the most accurate among the four with root mean square errors of 4.7 and 5.0 km mol(-1) for the 6-311++G(3d,3p) and cc-pVTZ basis sets. These values are close to the estimated aggregate experimental error of the hydrocarbon intensities, 4.0 km mol(-1). The atomic charge transfer-counter polarization effect is much larger than the charge effect for the results of all four quantum levels. Charge transfer-counter polarization effects are expected to also be important in vibrations of more polar molecules for which equilibrium charge contributions can be large.

  14. Fiber laser system for cesium and rubidium atom interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Diboune, Clément; Bidel, Yannick; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative fiber laser system for both cesium and rubidium manipulation. The architecture is based on frequency conversion of two lasers at 1560 nm and 1878 nm. By taking advantage of existing fiber components at these wavelengths, we demonstrate an all fiber laser system delivering 350 mW at 780 nm for rubidium and 210 mW at 852 nm for cesium. This result highlights the promising nature of such laser system especially for Cs manipulation for which no fiber laser system has been reported. It offers new perspectives for the development of atomic instruments dedicated to onboard applications and opens the way to a new generation of atom interferometers involving three atomic species $^{85}$Rb, $^{87}$Rb and $^{133}$Cs for which we propose an original laser architecture.

  15. Miniaturized lab system for future cold atom experiments in microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kulas, Sascha; Resch, Andreas; Hartwig, Jonas; Ganske, Sven; Matthias, Jonas; Schlippert, Dennis; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Damjanic, Marcin; Weßels, Peter; Kohfeldt, Anja; Luvsandamdin, Erdenetsetseg; Schiemangk, Max; Grzeschik, Christoph; Krutzik, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Herrmann, Sven; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present the technical realization of a compact system for performing experiments with cold $^{87}{\\text{Rb}}$ and $^{39}{\\text{K}}$ atoms in microgravity in the future. The whole system fits into a capsule to be used in the drop tower Bremen. One of the advantages of a microgravity environment is long time evolution of atomic clouds which yields higher sensitivities in atom interferometer measurements. We give a full description of the system containing an experimental chamber with ultra-high vacuum conditions, miniaturized laser systems, a high-power thulium-doped fiber laser, the electronics and the power management. In a two-stage magneto-optical trap atoms should be cooled to the low $\\mu$K regime. The thulium-doped fiber laser will create an optical dipole trap which will allow further cooling to sub-$\\mu$K temperatures. The presented system fulfills the demanding requirements on size and power management for cold atom experiments on a microgravity platform, especially with respect to the use of an op...

  16. Poly(vinyl acetate-Based Block Copolymer/Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by In Situ Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Semsarzadeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene (St and methyl methacrylate (MMA was performed at 90oC in the absence and presence of nanoclay (Cloisite 30B. Trichloromethyl-terminated poly(vinyl acetate telomerand CuCl/ PMDETA were used as a macroinitiator and catalyst system, respectively. The experimental results showed that the atom transfer radical polymerization of St and MMA in the absence or presence of nanoclay proceeds via a controlled/living mode. It was observed that nanoclay significantly enhances the homopolymerization rate of MMA, which was attributed to the activated conjugated C=C bond of MMA monomer via interaction between the carbonyl group of MMA monomer and the hydroxyl moiety (Al-O-H of nanoclay as well as the effect of nanoclay on the dynamic equilibrium between the active (macro radicals and dormant species.Homopolymerization rate of St (a non-coordinative monomer with nanoclay decreased slightly in the presence of nanoclay. This could be explained by insertion of a portion of macroinitiator into the clay galleries, where no sufficient St monomer exists due to the low compatibility or interaction of St monomer with nanoclay to react with the macroinitiator. The results obtained from XRD, TEM and TGA analyses were fully in agreement with the kinetic data. Structure of the poly(vinyl acetate-bpolystyrene nanocomposite was found to be a combination of stacking layers and exfoliated structures while poly(vinyl acetate-b-poly(methyl methacryale nanocomposite had an exfoliated structure. This difference in the structure of nanocomposites was attributed to the different capability of the monomers (styrene and methyl methacrylate to react with the hydroxyl moiety (Al-O-H of nanoclay.

  17. Method and system for continuous atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Libera, Joseph A.

    2017-03-21

    A system and method for continuous atomic layer deposition. The system and method includes a housing, a moving bed which passes through the housing, a plurality of precursor gases and associated input ports and the amount of precursor gases, position of the input ports, and relative velocity of the moving bed and carrier gases enabling exhaustion of the precursor gases at available reaction sites.

  18. Satellite system considerations for computer data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. L.; Kaul, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Communications satellites will play a key role in the transmission of computer generated data through nationwide networks. This paper examines critical aspects of satellite system design as they relate to the computer data transfer task. In addition, it discusses the factors influencing the choice of error control technique, modulation scheme, multiple-access mode, and satellite beam configuration based on an evaluation of system requirements for a broad range of application areas including telemetry, terminal dialog, and bulk data transmission.

  19. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  20. Single crystal to single crystal transformation and hydrogen-atom transfer upon oxidation of a cerium coordination compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ursula J; Mahoney, Brian D; Lewis, Andrew J; DeGregorio, Patrick T; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-04-15

    Trivalent and tetravalent cerium compounds of the octamethyltetraazaannulene (H2omtaa) ligand have been synthesized. Electrochemical analysis shows a strong thermodynamic preference for the formal cerium(IV) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) congener Ce(Homtaa)(omtaa) occurs by hydrogen-atom transfer that includes a single crystal to single crystal transformation upon exposure to an ambient atmosphere.

  1. Forest Resource Information System. Phase 3: System transfer report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczynski, R. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Transfer of the forest reserve information system (FRIS) from the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing to St. Regis Paper Company is described. Modifications required for the transfer of the LARYS image processing software are discussed. The reformatting, geometric correction, image registration, and documentation performed for preprocessing transfer are described. Data turnaround was improved and geometrically corrected and ground-registered CCT LANDSAT 3 data provided to the user. The technology transfer activities are summarized. An application test performed in order to assess a Florida land acquisition is described. A benefit/cost analysis of FRIS is presented.

  2. Transferable aspherical atom model refinement of protein and DNA structures against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to the independent-atom model (IAM), in which all atoms are assumed to be spherical and neutral, the transferable aspherical atom model (TAAM) takes into account the deformed valence charge density resulting from chemical bond formation and the presence of lone electron pairs. Both models can be used to refine small and large molecules, e.g. proteins and nucleic acids, against ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction data. The University at Buffalo theoretical databank of aspherical pseudo-atoms has been used in the refinement of an oligopeptide, of Z-DNA hexamer and dodecamer duplexes, and of bovine trypsin. The application of the TAAM to these data improves the quality of the electron-density maps and the visibility of H atoms. It also lowers the conventional R factors and improves the atomic displacement parameters and the results of the Hirshfeld rigid-bond test. An additional advantage is that the transferred charge density allows the estimation of Coulombic interaction energy and electrostatic potential.

  3. Subsurface Sample Acquisition and Transfer Systems (SSATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafeek, S.; Gorevan, S. P.; Kong, K. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In the exploration of planets and small bodies, scientists will need the services of a deep drilling and material handling system to not only obtain the samples necessary for analyses but also to precisely transfer and deposit those samples in in-situ instruments on board a landed craft or rover. The technology for such a deep sampling system as the SSATS is currently been developed by Honeybee Robotics through a PIDDP effort. The SSATS has its foundation in a one-meter prototype (SATM) drill that was developed under the New Millenium Program for ST4/Champollion. Additionally the SSATS includes relevant coring technology form a coring drill (Athena Mini-Corer) developed for the Mars Sample Return Mission. These highly developed technologies along with the current PIDDP effort, is combined to produce a sampling system that can acquire and transfer samples from various depths. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Intramolecular Halogen Atom Coordinated H Transfer via Ion-Neutral Complex in the Gas Phase Dissociation of Protonated Dichlorvos Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Cheng, Shuai

    2017-10-01

    Intramolecular halogen atom coordinated H transfer reaction in the gas phase dissociation of protonated dichlorvos derivatives has been explored by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Upon collisional activation, protonated dichlorvos underwent dissociation reaction via cleavage of the P-O bond to give reactive ion-neutral complex (INC) intermediate, [dimethoxylphosphinoylium + dichloroacetaldehyde]. Besides direct dissociation of the complex, intramolecular chlorine atom coordinated H transfer reaction within the complex takes place, leading to the formation of protonated dimethyl chlorophosphate. To investigate the fragmentation mechanism, deuterium-labeled experiments and several other halogen-substituted (Br and F) analogs of dichlorvos were prepared and evaluated, which display a similar intramolecular halogen transfer. Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations were performed and the computational results also support the mechanism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. QuickCash: Secure Transfer Payment Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhothaily, Abdulrahman; Alrawais, Arwa; Song, Tianyi; Lin, Bin; Cheng, Xiuzhen

    2017-06-13

    Payment systems play a significant role in our daily lives. They are an important driver of economic activities and a vital part of the banking infrastructure of any country. Several current payment systems focus on security and reliability but pay less attention to users' needs and behaviors. For example, people may share their bankcards with friends or relatives to withdraw money for various reasons. This behavior can lead to a variety of privacy and security issues since the cardholder has to share a bankcard and other sensitive information such as a personal identification number (PIN). In addition, it is commonplace that cardholders may lose their cards, and may not be able to access their accounts due to various reasons. Furthermore, transferring money to an individual who has lost their bankcard and identification information is not a straightforward task. A user-friendly person-to-person payment system is urgently needed to perform secure and reliable transactions that benefit from current technological advancements. In this paper, we propose two secure fund transfer methods termed QuickCash Online and QuickCash Offline to transfer money from peer to peer using the existing banking infrastructure. Our methods provide a convenient way to transfer money quickly, and they do not require using bank cards or any identification card. Unlike other person-to-person payment systems, the proposed methods do not require the receiving entity to have a bank account, or to perform any registration procedure. We implement our QuickCash payment systems and analyze their security strengths and properties.

  6. QuickCash: Secure Transfer Payment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Alhothaily

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Payment systems play a significant role in our daily lives. They are an important driver of economic activities and a vital part of the banking infrastructure of any country. Several current payment systems focus on security and reliability but pay less attention to users’ needs and behaviors. For example, people may share their bankcards with friends or relatives to withdraw money for various reasons. This behavior can lead to a variety of privacy and security issues since the cardholder has to share a bankcard and other sensitive information such as a personal identification number (PIN. In addition, it is commonplace that cardholders may lose their cards, and may not be able to access their accounts due to various reasons. Furthermore, transferring money to an individual who has lost their bankcard and identification information is not a straightforward task. A user-friendly person-to-person payment system is urgently needed to perform secure and reliable transactions that benefit from current technological advancements. In this paper, we propose two secure fund transfer methods termed QuickCash Online and QuickCash Offline to transfer money from peer to peer using the existing banking infrastructure. Our methods provide a convenient way to transfer money quickly, and they do not require using bank cards or any identification card. Unlike other person-to-person payment systems, the proposed methods do not require the receiving entity to have a bank account, or to perform any registration procedure. We implement our QuickCash payment systems and analyze their security strengths and properties.

  7. Surface modification of nanodiamond through metal free atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Shi, Kexin; Heng, Chunning; Mao, Liucheng; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Surface modification of ND with water soluble and biocompatible polymers. • Functionalized ND through metal free surface initiated ATRP. • The metal free surface initiated ATRP is rather simple and effective. • The ND-poly(MPC) showed high dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility. - Abstract: Surface modification of nanodiamond (ND) with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) [poly(MPC)] has been achieved by using metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The ATRP initiator was first immobilized on the surface of ND through direct esterification reaction between hydroxyl group of ND and 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide. The initiator could be employed to obtain ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites through SI-ATRP using an organic catalyst. The final functional materials were characterized by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis in detailed. All of these characterization results demonstrated that ND-poly(MPC) have been successfully obtained via metal free photo-initiated SI-ATRP. The ND-poly(MPC) nanocomposites shown enhanced dispersibility in various solvents as well as excellent biocompatibility. As compared with traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP is rather simple and effective. More importantly, this preparation method avoided the negative influence of metal catalysts. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a promising strategy for fabrication of polymeric nanocomposites with great potential for different applications especially in biomedical fields.

  8. Sustainable Electrochemically-Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization with Inexpensive Non-Platinum Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantin, Marco; Lorandi, Francesca; Isse, Abdirisak A; Gennaro, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemically-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) of oligo(ethylene oxide) methyl ether methacrylate in water is investigated on glassy carbon, Au, Ti, Ni, NiCr and SS304. eATRPs are performed both in divided and undivided electrochemical cells operating under either potentiostatic or galvanostatic mode. The reaction is fast, reaching high conversions in ≈4 h, and yields polymers with dispersity <1.2 and molecular weights close to the theoretical values. Most importantly, eATRP in a highly simplified setup (undivided cell under galvanostatic mode) with inexpensive nonnoble metals, such as NiCr and SS304, as cathode is well-controlled. Additionally, these electrodes neither release harmful ions in solution nor react directly with the CX chain end and can be reused several times. It is demonstrated that Pt can be replaced with cheaper, and more readily available materials without negatively affecting eATRP performance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Constructing Functional Ionic Membrane Surface by Electrochemically Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Ran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium polyacrylate (PAANa contained polyethersulfone membrane that was fabricated by preparation of PES-NH2 via nonsolvent phase separation method, the introduction of bromine groups as active sites by grafting α-Bromoisobutyryl bromide, and surface-initiated electrochemically atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-eATRP of sodium acrylate (AANa on the surface of PES membrane. The polymerization could be controlled by reaction condition, such as monomer concentration, electric potential, polymerization time, and modifier concentration. The membrane surface was uniform when the monomer concentration was 0.9 mol/L, the electric potential was −0.12 V, the polymerization time was 8 h, and the modifier concentration was 2 wt.%. The membrane showed excellent hydrophilicity and blood compatibility. The water contact angle decreased from 84° to 68° and activated partial thromboplastin increased from 51 s to 84 s after modification of the membranes.

  10. Effect of Reactant Concentration Variations on the Kinetics of Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Acrylonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Roghani-Mamaqani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylontrile synthesis, via atom transfer radical polymerization, is studied in various initiator concentrations, transitional metal catalyst and different concentrations of CuBr2. The variations of monomer conversion and the lin-earity of semi-logarithmic kinetic profile which is the evidence of living polymerization and constant radical concentration in the reaction medium, were revealed by gas chromatography technique (GC. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC studies revealed that, the number average molecular weight increases linearly against monomer conversion, an indicative of living nature of the polymerization process. Additionally, the conversion, apparent rate constant and number average molecular weight increased with increased initiator concentration as well as the transitional metal complex concentration. However, addition of CuBr2 lowered conversion, kapp, and the number average molecular weight of polyacrylonitrile. Molecular weight distribution of synthesized polymers broadened with increased initiator concentration and also transitional metal complex concentration. However, addition of CuBr2 has resulted in narrower molecular weight distribution polyacrylonitrile. Moreover, all the samples experienced a drop in PDI value from nearly 2 to almost 1.1 as the reaction progressed.

  11. Ultralow fouling polyacrylamide on gold surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsheng; Singh, Anuradha; Lalani, Reza; Liu, Lingyun

    2012-04-09

    In this work, polyacrylamide is investigated as an ultralow fouling surface coating to highly resist protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and bacterial attachment. Polyacrylamide was grafted on gold surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Protein adsorption from a wide range of biological media, including single protein solutions of fibrinogen, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme, dilute and undiluted human blood serum, and dilute and undiluted human blood plasma, was studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Dependence of the protein resistance on polyacrylamide film thickness was examined. With the optimal film thickness, the adsorption amount of all three single proteins on polyacrylamide-grafted surfaces was polyacrylamide-grafted surfaces were 5, 6.5, 17, and 28 pg/mm(2), respectively, comparable (if not better) than the adsorption levels on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) surfaces, the best antifouling materials known to date. The polyacrylamide-grafted surfaces were also shown strongly resistant to adhesion from bovine aortic endothelial cells and two bacterial species, Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis ( S. epidermidis ) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa ). Strong hydrogen bond with water is considered the key attribute for the ultralow fouling properties of polyacrylamide. This is the first work to graft gold surfaces with polyacrylamide brushes via ATRP to achieve ultralow fouling surfaces, demonstrating that polyacrylamide is a promising alternative to traditional PEG-based antifouling materials.

  12. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  13. Efficient Functionalization of Polyethylene Fibers for the Uranium Extraction from Seawater through Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neti, Venkata S. [Chemical; Das, Sadananda [Chemical; Brown, Suree [Department; Janke, Christopher J. [Materials; Kuo, Li-Jung [Marine; Gill, Gary A. [Marine; Dai, Sheng [Chemical; Department; Mayes, Richard T. [Chemical

    2017-09-14

    Brush-on-brush structures are proposed as one method to overcome support effects in grafted polymers. Utilizing glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) grafted on polyethylene (PE) fibers using radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) provides a hydrophilic surface on the hydrophobic PE. When integrated with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), the grafting of acrylonitrile (AN) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA) can be controlled and manipulated more easily than with RIGP. Poly(acrylonitrile)-co-poly(hydroxyethyl acrylate) chains were grown via ATRP on PE-GMA fibers to generate an adsorbent for the extraction of uranium from seawater. The prepared adsorbents in this study demonstrated promise (159.9 g- U/kg of adsorbent) in laboratory screening tests using a high uranium concentration brine and 1.24 g-U/Kg of adsorbent in the filtered natural seawater in 21-days. The modest capacity in 21- days exceeds previous efforts to generate brush-on-brush adsorbents by ATRP while manipulating the apparent surface hydrophilicity of the trunk material (PE).

  14. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  15. THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY’s SAFEGUARDS SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio-Andrés, Gabriel; Universidad Católica de Cordoba

    2008-01-01

    Entrusted with the responsibility of establishing and administering the international safeguards system with the purpose of ensuring that nuclear energy would not be used for furthering military purposes, the International Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter “IAEA” or “the Agency”) is a key piece of the international system for the maintenance of world peace and security. Despite the initial enthusiasm surrounding the foundation of the IAEA in the 1950s, it required several years for the Agency...

  16. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Daniel Francis Alan; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D; Jankowski, Todd Andrew

    2014-04-15

    A submersible pumping system for downhole use in extracting fluids containing hydrocarbons from a well. In one embodiment, the pumping system comprises a rotary induction motor, a motor casing, one or more pump stages, and a cooling system. The rotary induction motor rotates a shaft about a longitudinal axis of rotation. The motor casing houses the rotary induction motor such that the rotary induction motor is held in fluid isolation from the fluid being extracted. The pump stages are attached to the shaft outside of the motor casing, and are configured to impart fluid being extracted from the well with an increased pressure. The cooling system is disposed at least partially within the motor casing, and transfers heat generated by operation of the rotary induction motor out of the motor casing.

  17. System Transfer, Education, and Development in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Cossa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the author used conceptual historical method to assess the phenomenon of system transfer and the association between education and development in Mozambique. The assessment was administered through critical analysis of documents pertaining to the Salazar (1924-1966, Machel (1975-1986, and Chissano (1986-2005 administrations. The findings were that (a the colonial government created economic and educational systems for colonizing Mozambique, whereas the Machel and Chissano administrations adapted foreign systems of government and education (i.e., Socialism, Soviet, Democracy, Portuguese, etc., to their particular context without altering the inherent theoretical basis of the systems transferred; (b the Machel and Chissano administrations, implicitly or explicitly, perceived the relationship between education and development as circular causality rather than a unidirectional linear causality, while the Salazar administration perceived it as unidirectional linear causality; and (c while the Machel and Chissano administrations focused on primary education, literacy campaigns, and education of women and girls, they differed in the reasons for such focus.

  18. A Kinetico-Mechanistic Study on CuII Deactivators Employed in Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerk, Timothy J; Martinez, Manuel; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2016-10-03

    Copper complexes of tertiary amine ligands have emerged as the catalysts of choice in the extensively employed atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) protocol. The halide ligand substitution reactions of five-coordinate copper(II) complexes of tris[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]amine (Me6tren), one of the most active ATRP catalysts, has been studied in a range of organic solvents using stopped-flow techniques. The kinetic and activation parameters indicate that substitution reactions on [CuII(Me6tren)X]+ (X- = Cl- and Br-) and [CuII(Me6tren)(Solv)]2+ (Solv = MeCN, DMF, DMSO, MeOH, EtOH) are dissociatively activated; this behavior is independent of the solvent used. Adjusting the effective concentration of the solvent by addition of an olefinic monomer to the solution does not affect the kinetics of the halide binding (kon) but can alter the outer-sphere association equilibrium constant (KOS) between reactants prior to the formal ligand substitution. Halide (X-/Y-) exchange reactions (X = Br and Y = Cl) involving the complex [Cu(Me6tren)X]+ and Y- reveal that the substitution is thermodynamically favored. The influence of solvent on the substitution reactions of [Cu(Me6tren)X]+ is complex; the more polar DMF confers a greater entropic driving force but larger enthalpic demands than MeCN. These substitution reactions are compared with those for copper(II) complexes bearing the tris[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]amine (Et6tren) and tris[2-(pyridyl)methyl]amine (tpa) ligands, which have also been used as catalysts for ATRP. Changing the ligand has a significant impact on the kinetics of X-/Y- exchange. These correlations are discussed in relation to the ability of five-coordinate [CuLX]+ complexes to deactivate radicals in ATRP.

  19. High-order-harmonic generation in atomic and molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Noslen; Chacón, Alexis; Pérez-Hernández, Jose A.; Biegert, Jens; Lewenstein, Maciej; Ciappina, Marcelo F.

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation (HHG) results from the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter. It configures an invaluable tool to produce attosecond pulses, moreover, to extract electron structural and dynamical information of the target, i.e., atoms, molecules, and solids. In this contribution, we introduce an analytical description of atomic and molecular HHG, that extends the well-established theoretical strong-field approximation (SFA). Our approach involves two innovative aspects: (i) First, the bound-continuum and rescattering matrix elements can be analytically computed for both atomic and multicenter molecular systems, using a nonlocal short range model, but separable, potential. When compared with the standard models, these analytical derivations make possible to directly examine how the HHG spectra depend on the driven media and laser-pulse features. Furthermore, we can turn on and off contributions having distinct physical origins or corresponding to different mechanisms. This allows us to quantify their importance in the various regions of the HHG spectra. (ii) Second, as reported recently [N. Suárez et al., Phys. Rev. A 94, 043423 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.043423], the multicenter matrix elements in our theory are free from nonphysical gauge- and coordinate-system-dependent terms; this is accomplished by adapting the coordinate system to the center from which the corresponding time-dependent wave function originates. Our SFA results are contrasted, when possible, with the direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in reduced and full dimensionality. Very good agreement is found for single and multielectronic atomic systems, modeled under the single active electron approximation, and for simple diatomic molecular systems. Interference features, ubiquitously present in every strong-field phenomenon involving a multicenter target, are also captured by our model.

  20. Three-dimensional effects in resonant charge transfer between atomic particles and nanosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    Resonant charge transfer (RCT) between negative ions and a metallic nanosystem was investigated by means of a high-performance ab initio three-dimensional (3D) numerical solver. During RCT, an electron was shown to occupy succesively nanosystem eigenstates along the z , ρ , and φ coordinates. Electron tunneling into a nanosystem is a reversible process, because after some time the electron propagates back to the ion. RCT efficiency in a nanosystem was found to exhibit quantum-size effects as well as lateral ion position dependence. This means that during ion-surface interaction, the nanosystem's size and the ion trajectory strongly influence the final charge state of the ion. In the case of real 3D systems (without cylindrical symmetry), the electron density currents form quantum vortices; this result is rather nontrivial for static systems. In addition, the limits of the adiabatic approximation (rate equation) for the RCT calculation with nanosystems are defined.

  1. In Situ Investigation of Electrochemically Mediated Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization by Electrochemical Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daqun; Hu, Weihua

    2017-04-18

    Electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (eATRP) initiates/controls the controlled/living ATRP chain propagation process by electrochemically generating (regenerating) the activator (lower-oxidation-state metal complex) from deactivator (higher-oxidation-state metal complex). Despite successful demonstrations in both of the homogeneous polymerization and heterogeneous systems (namely, surface-initiated ATRP, SI-ATRP), the eATRP process itself has never been in situ investigated, and important information regarding this process remains unrevealed. In this work, we report the first investigation of the electrochemically mediated SI-ATRP (eSI-ATRP) by rationally combining the electrochemical technique with real-time surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the experiment, the potential of a SPR gold chip modified by the self-assembled monolayer of the ATRP initiator was controlled to electrochemically reduce the deactivator to activator to initiate the SI-ATRP, and the whole process was simultaneously monitored by SPR with a high time resolution of 0.1 s. It is found that it is feasible to electrochemically trigger/control the SI-ATRP and the polymerization rate is correlated to the potential applied to the gold chip. This work reveals important kinetic information for eSI-ATRP and offers a powerful platform for in situ investigation of such complicated processes.

  2. Conventional and atom transfer radical copolymerization of phenoxycarbonylmethyl methacrylate-styrene and thermal behavior of their copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP of phenoxycarbonylmethyl methacrylate (PCMMA with styrene (St were performed in bulk at 110°C in the presence of ethyl 2-bromoacetate, cuprous(Ibromide (CuBr, and N,N,N’,N”,N”-pentamethyldiethyltriamine. Also, a series conventional free-radical polymerization (CFRP of PCMMA and styrene were carried out in the presence of 2,2’-azobisisobutyronitrile in 1,4-dioxane solvent at 60°C. The structure of homo and copolymers was characterized by IR, 1H and 13C-NMR techniques. The composition of the copolymers was calculated by 1H-NMR spectra. The average-molecular weight of the copolymers were investigated by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC. For copolymerization system, their monomer reactivity ratios were obtained by using both Kelen-Tüdõs and Fineman-Ross equations. Thermal analysis measurements of homo- and copolymers prepared CFRP and ATRP methods were measured by TGA-50 and DSC-50. Blends of poly(PCMMA and poly(St obtained via ATRP method have been prepared by casting films from dichlorormethane solution. The blends were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The initial decomposition temperatures of the resulting copolymers increased with increasing mole fraction of St.

  3. Rational preparation of dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wenming [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Lukuan [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhou, Zhiping, E-mail: zhouzp@ujs.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Liu, Hong [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xie, Binze; Xu, Wanzhen [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2013-10-01

    A computational simulation method is introduced to simulate the dibenzothiophene-monomer pre-assembly system of molecular imprinted polymers. The interaction type and intensity between dibenzothiophene and monomer are discussed from the binding energy and spatial position distribution. The simulation and analysis results indicate that the amount of the function monomer is not the more the better in preparing molecular imprinted polymers. Based on the above results, a novel dibenzothiophene-imprinted polymers with the favorable specific adsorption effect was prepared by surface imprinting technique combined with atom transfer radical polymerization. This combined technologies are used for preparing a desulfurization adsorbent for the first time. Various measures were selected to characterize the structure and morphology of the prepared adsorbent. The characterization results show that the adsorbent has suitable features for further adsorption process. A series of static adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze its adsorption performance. The adsorption process follows Elovich model by the kinetic analysis and Sips equation by the isothermal analysis. The approach we described will provide another opportunity in the deep desulfurization field.

  4. Surface modification of glycidyl-containing poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips using surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuefei; Liu, Jikun; Lee, Milton L

    2008-02-01

    Fabrication of microfluidic systems from polymeric materials is attractive because of simplicity and low cost. Unfortunately, the surfaces of many polymeric materials can adsorb biological samples. Therefore, it is necessary to modify their surfaces before these polymeric materials can be used for separation and analysis. Oftentimes it is difficult to modify polymeric surfaces because of their resistance to chemical reaction. Recently, we introduced a surface-reactive acrylic polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate) (PGMAMMA), which can be modified easily and is suitable for fabrication of microfluidic devices. Epoxy groups on the surface can be activated by air plasma treatment, hydrolysis, or aminolysis. In this work, the resulting hydroxyl or amino groups were reacted with 2-bromoisobutylryl bromide to introduce an initiator for surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) layers grown on the surface using this method were uniform, hydrophilic, stable, and resistant to protein adsorption. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize activated polymer surfaces, initiator-bound surfaces, and PEG-grafted surfaces. We obtained excellent capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations of proteins and peptides with the PEG-modified microchips. A separation efficiency of 4.4 x 10(4) plates for a 3.5 cm long separation channel was obtained.

  5. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  6. 46 CFR 153.430 - Heat transfer systems; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat transfer systems; general. 153.430 Section 153.430... Temperature Control Systems § 153.430 Heat transfer systems; general. Each cargo cooling system required by... separated from all other cooling and heating systems; and (c) Allow manual regulation of the system's heat...

  7. Room temperature deintercalation of alkali metal atoms from epitaxial graphene by formation of charge-transfer complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H.-C.; Ahn, S. J.; Kim, H. W.; Moon, Y.; Rai, K. B. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, S. H. [College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305–764 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, J. R., E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SAINT, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-22

    Atom (or molecule) intercalations and deintercalations have been used to control the electronic properties of graphene. In general, finite energies above room temperature (RT) thermal energy are required for the intercalations and deintercalations. Here, we demonstrate that alkali metal atoms can be deintercalated from epitaxial graphene on a SiC substrate at RT, resulting in the reduction in density of states at the Fermi level. The change in density of states at the Fermi level at RT can be applied to a highly sensitive graphene sensor operating at RT. Na atoms, which were intercalated at a temperature of 80 °C, were deintercalated at a high temperature above 1000 °C when only a thermal treatment was used. In contrast to the thermal treatment, the intercalated Na atoms were deintercalated at RT when tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) molecules were adsorbed on the surface. The RT deintercalation occurred via the formation of charge-transfer complexes between Na atoms and F4-TCNQ molecules.

  8. Construction of energy transfer systems within nanosized polymer micelles and their fluorescence modulation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2010-04-06

    The nanoparticle-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) systems have recently attracted considerable attention due to some of their advantages; however, these systems are structurally more complicated than that of small molecule systems, and the energy transfer behavior for particle systems has been seldom investigated. In this study, we synthesized a series of ABC triblock copolymers that contain hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), hydrophobic poly(styrene) (PS) and photochromic poly(2-(3-(3',3'-dimethyl-6-nitrospiro(indoline-2',2-[2H-1]benzopyran)-1'-yl)propanoylo-xy)ethyl methacrylate) (PSPMA) blocks by using the sequential two-step atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The amphiphilic micelles made from these copolymers can incorporate a hydrophobic fluorescent dye, the nitrobenzoxadiazolyl derivative (NBD), thus forming a water dispersible energy transfer system with the fluorescent dye NBD as the donor and spiropyran moieties as the potential acceptor. The spectral properties of NBD/triblock copolymers with varied PS block lengths and PSPMA block lengths have been investigated; the results indicate that the length of PS block in triblock copolymers can affect the energy transfer efficiency of the micelle-based fluorescence modulation system, the micelles with moderate PS block length are preferable for forming FRET system with higher energy transfer efficiency, and short PSPMA blocks (less than 5 repetition units) are enough for efficient energy transfer.

  9. Theory of laser-induced ultrafast magneto-optic spin flip and transfer in charged two-magnetic-center molecular ions: Role of bridging atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Jin, Wei; Xiang, Hongping; Lefkidis, Georgios; Hübner, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Laser-induced ultrafast spin manipulations in positively charged two-magnetic-center molecular ions with a small number of bridging atoms are investigated to explore the role of bridging atoms in the spin switching process and spin transferability between the magnetic centers via the Λ process. Taking O and Mg as examples for bridging atoms, fully ab initio calculations demonstrate that spin flip can be readily achieved on subpicosecond time scales at both magnetic centers of the linear structures composed of two nonidentical magnetic atoms with a single bridging atom in between. Although these two nonmagnetic elements possess completely different chemical and electronic natures, both types of bridging atoms contribute to spin density redistribution at the magnetic atoms, especially for the low-lying triplet states that are suitable to act as initial and final states in the Λ-type process of spin flip or transfer. This also provides a rule of thumb that spins in the linear structures can be flipped more easily since symmetric structures exhibit weaker magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The spin transfer process achieved in the structure [Fe-O(Mg)-Co]+ demonstrates that if both bridging atoms are involved to further lower the symmetry of the linear structures, spin transferability between the Fe and Co atoms can be improved.

  10. Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) Automated Task Order Management System (ATOMS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Shawn; Fikes, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes operational aspects of the ATOMS system. The information provided is limited to the functionality provided by ATOMS and does not include information provided in the contractor's proprietary financial and task management system.

  11. A portable laser system for high precision atom interferometry experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Malte; Giorgini, Antonio; Tino, Guglielmo M; Peters, Achim

    2010-01-01

    We present a modular rack-mounted laser system for the cooling and manipulation of neutral rubidium atoms which has been developed for the portable gravimeter GAIN, an atom interferometer that will be capable of performing high precision gravity measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest. This laser system is designed to be compact, mobile and robust, yet it still offers improvements over many conventional laboratory-based laser systems. Our system is contained in a standard 19" rack and emits light at five different wavelengths simultaneously on up to 12 fibre ports at a total output power of 800 mW. These wavelengths can be changed and switched between ports in less than a microsecond. The setup includes two phase-locked Raman lasers with a phase noise spectral density of less than 1 \\mu rad/sqrt(Hz) in the frequency range in which our gravimeter is most sensitive to noise. We characterize this laser system and evaluate the performance limits it imposes on an interferometer.

  12. Potential Role of Atomic Force Microscopy in Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information datasets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on PCR for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  13. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems. Progress report, 1 August 1980-31 July 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, C.D.

    1981-03-01

    Studies of electron correlations of doubly-excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and ionization in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

  14. HEAT TRANSFER AND TRITIUM PRODUCING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1962-06-01

    This invention related to a circulating lithium-containing blanket system in a neution source hav'ing a magnetic field associated therewith. The blanket serves simultaneously and efficiently as a heat transfer mediunm and as a source of tritium. The blanket is composed of a lithium-6-enriched fused salt selected from the group consisting of lithium nitrite, lithium nitrate, a mixture of said salts, a mixture of each of said salts with lithium oxide, and a mixture of said salts with each other and with lithium oxide. The moderator, which is contained within the blanket in a separate conduit, can be water. A stellarator is one of the neutron sources which can be used in this invention. (AEC)

  15. PREPARATION OF BLOCK COPOLYMERS OF POLY(STYRENE) AND POLY(T-BUTYL ACRYLATE) OF VARIOUS MOLECULAR WEIGHTS AND ARCHITECTURES BY ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block copolymers of polystyrene and poly(t-butyl acrylate) were prepared using atom transfer radical polymerization techniques. These polymers were synthesized with a CuBr/N,N,N,NTransferable Potentials for Phase Equilibria. 4. United-Atom Description of Linear and Branched Alkenes and Alkylbenzenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WICK,COLLIN D.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; SIEPMANN,J. ILJA

    2000-07-12

    The Transferable Potentials for Phase Equilibria-United Atom (TraPPE-UA) force field for hydrocarbons is extended to alkenes and alkylbenzenes by introducing the following pseudo-atoms: CH{sub 2}(sp{sup 2}), CH(sp{sup 2}), CH(aro), R-C(aro) for the link to aliphatic side chains, and C(aro) for the link of two benzene rings. In this united-atom force field, the nonbonded interactions of the hydrocarbon pseudo-atoms are solely governed by Lennard-Jones 12-6 potentials, and the Lennard-Jones well depth and size parameters for the new pseudo-atoms were determined by fitting to the single-component vapor-liquid phase equilibria of a few selected model compounds. Configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the NVT version of the Gibbs ensemble were carried out to calculate the single-component vapor-liquid coexistence curves for ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans- and cis-2-butene. 2-methylpropene, 1,5-hexadiene, 1-octene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene, and naphthalene. The phase diagrams for the binary mixtures of (supercritical) ethene/n-heptane and benzene/n-pentane were determined from simulations in the NpT Gibbs ensemble. Although the TraPPE-UA force field is rather simple and makes use of relatively few different pseudo-atoms, its performance, as judged by comparisons to other popular force fields and available experimental data, is very satisfactory.

  16. Wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2011-04-01

    This paper will explore the possibilities of implementing a wireless embedded control system for atomically precise manufacturing. The manufacturing process, similar to Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, takes place within an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) chamber at a pressure of 10-10 torr. In order to create vibration isolation, and to keep internal noise to a minimum, a wireless link inside the UHV chamber becomes essential. We present a MATLAB simulation of the problem, and then demonstrate a hardware scheme between a Gumstix computer and a Linux based laptop for controlling nano-manipulators with three degrees of freedom. © 2011 IEEE.

  17. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  18. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lan, Minbo, E-mail: minbolan@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry and Research Center of Analysis and Test, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Antifouling PVP brushes were successfully grafted on PU films by SI-ATRP. • The effect of polymerization time on surface property and topography was studied. • Hydrophilicity and protein fouling resistance of PVP–PU films were greatly promoted. • Competitive adsorption of three proteins on PVP–PU films was evaluated. - Abstract: An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU–PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU–PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm{sup 2}, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  19. Symplectic Fermi liquid and its realization in cold atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramires, Aline

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we study a system of interacting fermions with large spin and SP(N ) symmetry. We contrast their behavior with the case of SU(N ) symmetry by analyzing the conserved quantities and the dynamics in each case. We also develop the Fermi liquid theory for fermions with SP(N ) symmetry. We find that the effective mass and inverse compressibility are always enhanced in the presence of interactions and that the N dependence of the enhancement is qualitatively different in distinct parameter regimes. The Wilson ratio can be enhanced, indicating that the system can be made closer to a magnetic instability, in contrast to the SU(N ) scenario. We conclude by discussing the experimental routes to SP(N ) symmetry within cold atoms and the exciting possibility of realizing physics in higher dimensions in these systems.

  1. Plasmon excitations in two-dimensional atomic cluster systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yan-Qin; Yu, Ya-Bin, E-mail: apybyu@hnu.edu.cn; Xue, Hong-Jie; Wang, Ya-Xin; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Properties of plasmon excitations in two-dimensional (2D) atomic cluster systems are theoretically studied within an extended Hubbard model. The collective oscillation equations of charge, plasmon eigen-equations and the energy-absorption spectrum formula are presented. The calculated results show that different symmetries of plasmons exist in the cluster systems, and the symmetry of charge distribution in the plasmon resonance originate from the intrinsic symmetry of the corresponding eigen-plasmon modes, but not from the symmetry of applied external fields; however, the plasmon excitation with a certain polarization direction should be excited by the field in this direction, the dipole mode of plasmons can be excited by both uniform and non-uniform fields, but multipole ones cannot be excited by an uniform field. In addition, we show that for a given electron density, plasmon spectra are red-shifted with increasing size of the systems.

  2. THE CONCEPT OF TRANSFER PRICING SYSTEM IN RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey S. Besfamilnyy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the author's denition of transfer prices and transfer pricing based on the analysis of the current legislation in Russia as well as on current economic practice. Considered state regulation of transfer pricing for the purpose of harmonization of relationship between government and business. Given the denition of the transfer pricing system in Russian Federation and the description of its main parts and connections between them, necessary for effective functioning.

  3. Indigenous Knowledge Management Transfer Systems Across ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous knowledge transfer is becoming an increasingly important issue in the development fraternity as development practitioners seek answers to develop indigenous communities. This article reports on the findings of a study that was aimed at establishing how indigenous knowledge can be preserved and transferred ...

  4. Hydrophilization of Poly(ether ether ketone) Films by Surface-initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Charlotte Juel; Eskimergen, Rüya; Burkrinsky, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    and confirmed by ATR FTIR, water contact ang;le, and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The surface topography was evaluated by "Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the degree of functionalization. The performed modification allowed for successful...

  5. Replacement of Cross-Site Transfer System Startup Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    This Startup Plan provides a discussion of organizational responsibilities, work planning, quality assurance (QA), personnel qualifications, and testing requirements for the Cross-Site Transfer System.

  6. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  7. Tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions with homobimetallic ruthenium–arene complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Borguet

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tandem catalysis of ring-closing metathesis/atom transfer radical reactions was investigated with the homobimetallic ruthenium–indenylidene complex [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl(3-phenyl-1-indenylidene(PCy3] (1 to generate active species in situ. The two catalytic processes were first carried out independently in a case study before the whole sequence was optimized and applied to the synthesis of several polyhalogenated bicyclic γ-lactams and lactones from α,ω-diene substrates bearing trihaloacetamide or trichloroacetate functionalities. The individual steps were carefully monitored by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies in order to understand the intimate details of the catalytic cycles. Polyhalogenated substrates and the ethylene released upon metathesis induced the clean transformation of catalyst precursor 1 into the Ru(II–Ru(III mixed-valence compound [(p-cymeneRu(μ-Cl3RuCl2(PCy3], which was found to be an efficient promoter for atom transfer radical reactions under the adopted experimental conditions.

  8. Atomic Bose-Hubbard Systems with Single-Particle Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Philipp Moritz

    Experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide outstanding opportunities to realize exotic quantum states due to a high degree of tunability and control. In this thesis, I present experiments that extend this control from global parameters to the level of individual particles. Using a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb, we have developed a single-site addressing scheme based on digital amplitude holograms. The system self-corrects for aberrations in the imaging setup and creates arbitrary beam profiles. We are thus able to shape optical potentials on the scale of single lattice sites and control the dynamics of individual atoms. We study the role of quantum statistics and interactions in the Bose-Hubbard model on the fundamental level of two particles. Bosonic quantum statistics are apparent in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of massive particles, which we observe in tailored double-well potentials. These underlying statistics, in combination with tunable repulsive interactions, dominate the dynamics in single- and two-particle quantum walks. We observe highly coherent position-space Bloch oscillations, bosonic bunching in Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference and the fermionization of strongly interacting bosons. Many-body states of indistinguishable quantum particles are characterized by large-scale spatial entanglement, which is difficult to detect in itinerant systems. Here, we extend the concept of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference from individual particles to many-body states to directly quantify entanglement entropy. We perform collective measurements on two copies of a quantum state and detect entanglement entropy through many-body interference. We measure the second order Renyi entropy in small Bose-Hubbard systems and detect the buildup of spatial entanglement across the superfluid-insulator transition. Our experiments open new opportunities for the single-particle-resolved preparation and characterization of many-body quantum states.

  9. Oxygen-atom transfer chemistry and thermolytic properties of a di-tert-butylphosphate-ligated Mn4O4 cubane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Allsburg, Kurt M; Anzenberg, Eitan; Drisdell, Walter S; Yano, Junko; Tilley, T Don

    2015-03-16

    [Mn4O4{O2P(OtBu)2}6] (1), an Mn4O4 cubane complex combining the structural inspiration of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex with thermolytic precursor ligands, was synthesized and fully characterized. Core oxygen atoms within complex 1 are transferred upon reaction with an oxygen-atom acceptor (PEt3), to give the butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(OtBu)2}6(OPEt3)2]. The cubane structure is restored by reaction of the latter complex with the O-atom donor PhIO. Complex 1 was investigated as a precursor to inorganic Mn metaphosphate/pyrophosphate materials, which were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the fate of the Mn4O4 unit. Under the conditions employed, thermolyses of 1 result in reduction of the manganese to Mn(II) species. Finally, the related butterfly complex [Mn4O2{O2P(pin)}6(bpy)2] (pin = pinacolate) is described. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. W-314, waste transfer alternative piping system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, I.G.

    1998-04-30

    It is proposed that the reliability, operability, and flexibility of the Retrieval Transfer System be substantially upgraded by replacing the planned single in-farm pipeline from the AN-AY-AZ-(SY) Tank Farm Complex to the AP Farm with three parallel pipelines outside the tank farms. The proposed system provides simplified and redundant routes for the various transfer missions, and prevents the risk of transfer gridlock when the privatization effort swings into full operation.

  11. Transfer pricing under an origin based VAT system

    OpenAIRE

    Genser, Bernd; Günther G. Schulze

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes transfer pricing incentives under a destination-based and an origin-based VAT system. While a switch to the origin-based VAT may moderate or reinforce the incentive for transfer pricing induced by income tax differentials, we show that in the case of the EU this switch tends to reduce the transfer pricing incentive and thus should remove one of the last major objections against the adoption of an origin-based VAT system in the EU.

  12. Experimental evidence of resonant energy collisional transfers between argon 1s and 2p states and ground state H atoms by laser collisional induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Emile; van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, laser collisional induced fluorescence (LCIF) is used to probe resonant excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma resulting from heavy particle collisions. Different radiative transitions between the 1s and 2p states (in Paschen's notation) of argon are optically pumped by a nanosecond laser pulse. The spontaneous fluorescence and collisional responses of the argon and hydrogen systems are monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. A surfatron plasma source is used to generate an argon plasma with a few per cent hydrogen addition at pressures between 0.65 and 20 mbar. The electron density is measured independently by means of Thomson scattering. The overall response of the plasma due to optical pumping of argon is briefly discussed and an overview of the known heteronuclear excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma is given. The propagation of the shortcut in the Ar(1s) to H(n = 2) excitation transfer due to the optical pumping of the Ar(1s) states is seen in the atomic hydrogen LCIF responses. For the first time, we give direct experimental evidence of the existence of an efficient excitation transfer: Additionally, measurements are performed in order to estimate the resonant energy transfer between the resonant argon 1s states and hydrogen atoms: for which no previously measured cross sections could be found in the literature. These are extra quenching channels of argon 1s and 2p states that should be included in collisional-radiative modeling of argon-hydrogen discharges. The high repetition rate of the dye laser allows us to obtain a high sensitivity in the measurements. LCIF is shown to be a powerful tool for unraveling electron and also heavy particle excitation channels in situ in the plasma phase. The technique was previously developed for measuring electron or species densities locally in the plasma, but we show that it can be advantageously used to probe collisional transfers between very short-lived species which exist

  13. Back-Influence of Molecular Motion on Energy Transfer in the Landau-Teller Model of Atom Molecule Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2016-07-21

    This year we celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Landau-Teller model for energy exchange in a collinear collision of an atom with a harmonic diatomic molecule. Even after 80 years though, the analytic theory to date has not included in it the back-influence of the oscillator's motion on the energy transfer between the approaching particle and the molecule. This is the topic of the present paper. The back-influence can be obtained by employing classical second-order perturbation theory. The second-order theory is used in both a classical and semiclassical context. Classically, analytic expressions are derived for the final phase and action of the diatom, after the collision. The energy loss of the atom is shown to decrease linearly with the increasing energy of the oscillator. The magnitude of this decrease is a direct consequence of the back-reaction of the oscillator on the translational motion. The qualitative result is universal, in the sense that it is not dependent on the details of the interaction of the atom with the oscillator. A numerical application to a model collision of an Ar atom with a Br2 diatom demonstrates the importance and accuracy of the second-order perturbation theory. The same results are then used to derive a second-order perturbation theory semiclassical expression for the quantum transition probability from initial vibrational state ni to final vibrational state nf of the oscillator. A comparison of the theory with exact quantum data is presented for a model collision of Br2 with a hydrogen molecule, where the hydrogen molecule is considered as a single approaching particle.

  14. Automated liquid-helium transfer tube lifting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kiyonori; Suzui, Mitsukazu

    1990-07-01

    An automatic liquid-helium transfer tube lifting system has been developed, in which the transfer tube can be raised or lowered very slowly by remote control. This system relieves the operator of considerable manual labor, and protects the O-ring seals from damage at low temperature.

  15. Atomic force microscopy study of the adsorption of protein molecules on transferred Langmuir monolayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainutdinov, R. V., E-mail: radmir@ns.crys.ras.ru; Tolstikhina, A. L.; Stepina, N. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Novikova, N. N. [Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Yur' eva, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Khripunov, A. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Macromolecular Compounds (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-15

    Ordered protein films have been obtained by the adsorption of protein molecules on a Langmuir monolayer, which had previously formed on a silicon substrate, using the Langmuir-Blodgett and molecular self-organization methods. A mixture of cholesterol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a polymer-cellulose acetopivalinate-were used as immobilization materials. Protein molecules (catalase and alkaline phosphatase) immobilized on solid substrates have been investigated by atomic force micros-copy. It was shown that the developed combined technique provides a deposition of homogeneous ultrathin protein films with a high degree of filling.

  16. Mass Transfer and Tidal Dynamics in White Dwarf Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jeffrey; Fuller, J.

    2014-01-01

    Compact white dwarf (WD) binary systems (with orbital periods ranging from minutes to hours) can produce a variety of interesting astrophysical objects (e.g., type Ia supernovae, AM CVn systems, R Cor Bor stars, sdB stars) upon the onset of mass transfer. These systems are driven toward Roche lobe overflow by the emission of gravitational radiation, but it is not known whether the mass transfer will be stable (forming an Am CVn system) or become unstable (resulting in a merger). We analyze how the combined effects of mass transfer and tidal torques affect the evolution of these systems by creating numerical models with the MESA stellar evolution program. Using new calculations of the tidal torque in rotating WDs, we predict the outcome of mass transfer in these systems as a function of the masses of the WD components. We find that the stability of mass transfer depends primarily on the peak mass transfer rate near the period minimum, which is highly dependent on the WD masses and on the strength of the tidal torques. Except for low WD accretor masses, the tidal torques are insufficient to significantly increase the stability of mass transfer. We find that mass transfer is generally unstable for WD donor masses greater than about 0.25 solar masses, and that the 12 minute system SDSS J0615 will end its inspiral in a WD merger, likely producing an R Cor Bor star.

  17. Overvoltage protection system for wireless power transfer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Paul H.; Jones, Perry T.; Miller, John M.; Onar, Omer C.; Tang, Lixin; White, Clifford P.

    2017-05-02

    A wireless power transfer overvoltage protection system is provided. The system includes a resonant receiving circuit. The resonant receiving circuit includes an inductor, a resonant capacitor and a first switching device. The first switching device is connected the ends of the inductor. The first switching device has a first state in which the ends of the inductor are electrically coupled to each other through the first switching device, and a second state in which the inductor and resonant capacitor are capable of resonating. The system further includes a control module configured to control the first switching device to switching between the first state and the second state when the resonant receiving circuit is charging a load and a preset condition is satisfied and otherwise, the first switching device is maintained in the first state.

  18. Upper Secondary Students' Understanding of the Basic Physical Interactions in Analogous Atomic and Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.

    2013-01-01

    Comparing the atom to a "tiny solar system" is a common teaching analogy, and the extent to which learners saw the systems as analogous was investigated. English upper secondary students were asked parallel questions about the physical interactions between the components of a simple atomic system and a simple solar system to investigate…

  19. Cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P.D.

    A cooperative heat transfer and ground coupled storage system wherein collected solar heat energy is ground stored and permitted to radiate into the adjacent ground for storage therein over an extended period of time when such heat energy is seasonally maximally available. Thereafter, when said heat energy is seasonally minimally available and has propagated through the adjacent ground a substantial distance, the stored heat energy may be retrieved by a circumferentially arranged heat transfer means having a high rate of heat transfer.

  20. Physics of Polarized Scattering at Multi-level Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2015-03-01

    The symmetric peak observed in linear polarization in the core of the solar sodium D1 line at 5896 Å has remained enigmatic since its discovery nearly two decades ago. One reason is that the theory of polarized scattering has not been experimentally tested for multi-level atomic systems in the relevant parameter domains, although the theory is continually being used for the interpretation of astrophysical observations. A laboratory experiment that was set up a decade ago to find out whether the D1 enigma is a problem of solar physics or quantum physics revealed that the D1 system has a rich polarization structure in situations where standard scattering theory predicts zero polarization, even when optical pumping of the m state populations of the hyperfine-split ground state is accounted for. Here we show that the laboratory results can be modeled in great quantitative detail if the theory is extended to include the coherences in both the initial and final states of the scattering process. Radiative couplings between the allowed dipole transitions generate coherences in the initial state. Corresponding coherences in the final state are then demanded by a phase closure selection rule. The experimental results for the well understood D2 line are used to constrain the two free parameters of the experiment, collision rate and optical depth, to suppress the need for free parameters when fitting the D1 results.

  1. Accelerated Oxygen Atom Transfer and C-H Bond Oxygenation by Remote Redox Changes in Fe3Mn-Iodosobenzene Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Carsch, Kurtis M; Gul, Sheraz; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Thompson, Niklas B; Takase, Michael K; Yano, Junko; Agapie, Theodor

    2017-04-18

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of [LFe 3 (PhPz) 3 OMn( s PhIO)][OTf] x (3: x=2; 4: x=3), where 4 is one of very few examples of iodosobenzene-metal adducts characterized by X-ray crystallography. Access to these rare heterometallic clusters enabled differentiation of the metal centers involved in oxygen atom transfer (Mn) or redox modulation (Fe). Specifically, 57 Fe Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy provided unique insights into how changes in oxidation state (Fe III 2 Fe II Mn II vs. Fe III 3 Mn II ) influence oxygen atom transfer in tetranuclear Fe 3 Mn clusters. In particular, a one-electron redox change at a distal metal site leads to a change in oxygen atom transfer reactivity by ca. two orders of magnitude. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Bottom-Up Fabrication of Nanopatterned Polymers on DNA Origami by In Situ Atom-Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokura, Yu; Jiang, Yanyan; Welle, Alexander; Stenzel, Martina H; Krzemien, Katarzyna M; Michaelis, Jens; Berger, Rüdiger; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2016-05-04

    Bottom-up strategies to fabricate patterned polymers at the nanoscale represent an emerging field in the development of advanced nanodevices, such as biosensors, nanofluidics, and nanophotonics. DNA origami techniques provide access to distinct architectures of various sizes and shapes and present manifold opportunities for functionalization at the nanoscale with the highest precision. Herein, we conduct in situ atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) on DNA origami, yielding differently nanopatterned polymers of various heights. After cross-linking, the grafted polymeric nanostructures can even stably exist in solution without the DNA origami template. This straightforward approach allows for the fabrication of patterned polymers with low nanometer resolution, which provides access to unique DNA-based functional hybrid materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Polymeric nanocapsules with controllable crosslinking degree via combination of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation and photocrosslinking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Mu, Bin; Du, Pengcheng; Hong, Zhilai

    2013-06-01

    The crosslinked polystyrene nanocapsules with controllable crosslinking degree have been prepared by the ultraviolet (UV)-induced photocrosslinking of the polystyrene grafted silica nanoparticles (SN-PS), which was obtained by the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerisation of styrene from the modified silica nanoparticle templates, after the silica templates were etched with hydrofluoric acid. The effect of the UV-irradiating time on the inner diameter of the nanocapsules, and the degree of crosslinking and the thickness of the shells was investigated. The dynamic light scattering results showed that the degree of crosslinking of the obtained nanocapsules increased with the prolongation of the UV-irradiation time, therefore the inner diameter of the nanocapsules increased. However, the percentage of grafting of the crosslinked polymer shells decreased with increasing the UV-irradiation time because of the photodecomposition of the polystyrene grafted during the UV-irradiated crosslinking process, according to the thermogravimetric analysis.

  4. Atomic scattering in the diffraction limit: electron transfer in keV Li+-Na(3s, 3p) collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Nielsen, C.V.; Rybaltover, M.

    2002-01-01

    We measure angle differential cross sections (DCS) in Li+ + Na --> Li + Na+ electron transfer collisions in the 2.7-24 keV energy range. We do this with a newly constructed apparatus which combines the experimental technique of cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy with a laser-cooled target...... of the de Broglie wavelength lambda(dB) = 150 fm at a velocity v = 0.20 au and the effective atomic diameter for electron capture 2R = 20 au. Parallel AO and MO semiclassical coupled-channel calculations of the Na(3s, 3p) --> Li(2s, 2p) state-to-state collision amplitudes have been performed, and quantum...

  5. Controlled atom transfer radical polymerization of MMA onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Chung, Jin Suk; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    We report on the grafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) onto the surface of high-density functionalized graphene oxides (GO) through controlled radical polymerization (CRP). To increase the density of surface grafting, GO was first diazotized (DGO), followed by esterification with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, which resulted in an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator-functionalized DGO-Br. The functionalized DGO-Br was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and XRD patterns. PMMA chains were then grafted onto the DGO-Br surface through a 'grafting from' technique using ATRP. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results revealed that polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) follows CRP. Thermal studies show that the resulting graphene-PMMA nanocomposites have higher thermal stability and glass transition temperatures (T g) than those of pristine PMMA.

  6. Phenyl Benzo[b]phenothiazine as a Visible Light Photoredox Catalyst for Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashi-Silab, Sajjad; Pan, Xiangcheng; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2017-05-02

    This paper reports use of phenyl benzo[b]phenothiazine (Ph-benzoPTZ) as a visible light-induced metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) photoredox catalyst. Well-controlled polymerizations of various methacrylate monomers were conducted under a 392 nm visible light LED using Ph-benzoPTZ to activate different alkyl halides. The use of the photocatalyst enabled temporal control over the growth of polymer chains during intermittent on/off periods. The polymerization was initiated and progressed only under stimulation by light and completely stopped in the absence of light. Block copolymers were synthesized to demonstrate high retention of chain end fidelity in the polymers and livingness of the process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Achieving highly effective nonfouling performance for surface-grafted poly(HPMA) via atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Lingyan; Zheng, Jie

    2010-11-16

    Human blood plasma and serum pose significant challenges to implanted devices because of highly unfavorable nonspecific protein adsorption on the surface. In this work, we introduce an improved two-step method to immobilize initiator thiols on a gold substrate for the surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). We investigate protein adsorption from a single-protein solution, diluted (10%) and undiluted (100%) human blood plasma, and serum on the poly(HPMA) brushes with different film thicknesses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. SPR results show a correlation between antifouling properties and film thickness; that is, the poly(HPMA) brushes exhibit high protein resistance at medium film thicknesses of ∼25-40 nm (e.g. HPMA) brush also demonstrates its high resistance to fibroblast adhesion. This work provides an alternative surface polymerization approach to preparing effective antifouling poly(HPMA) materials for potential applications in blood-contacting medical devices.

  8. Synthesis of tri-block copolymers through reverse atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate using polyurethane macroiniferter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Reverse atom transfer radical polymerization was successfully used for the first time to synthesis tri-block copolymers. Poly (methyl methacrylate-block-polyurethane-block-poly (methyl methacrylate tri-block copolymers were synthesized using tetraphenylethane-based polyurethane as a macroiniferter, copper(II halide as a catalyst and N, N, N′, N″, N″-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine as a ligand. Controlled nature of the polymerization was confirmed by the linear increase of number average molecular weight with increasing conversion. Mole contents of poly (methyl methacrylate present in the tri-block copolymers were calculated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the results were comparable with the gel permeation chromatography results. Differential scanning calorimetric results confirmed the presence of two different types of blocks in the tri-block copolymers.

  9. Visual prosthesis wireless energy transfer system optimal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueping; Yang, Yuan; Gao, Yong

    2014-01-16

    Wireless energy transfer system is an effective way to solve the visual prosthesis energy supply problems, theoretical modeling of the system is the prerequisite to do optimal energy transfer system design. On the basis of the ideal model of the wireless energy transfer system, according to visual prosthesis application condition, the system modeling is optimized. During the optimal modeling, taking planar spiral coils as the coupling devices between energy transmitter and receiver, the effect of the parasitic capacitance of the transfer coil is considered, and especially the concept of biological capacitance is proposed to consider the influence of biological tissue on the energy transfer efficiency, resulting in the optimal modeling's more accuracy for the actual application. The simulation data of the optimal model in this paper is compared with that of the previous ideal model, the results show that under high frequency condition, the parasitic capacitance of inductance and biological capacitance considered in the optimal model could have great impact on the wireless energy transfer system. The further comparison with the experimental data verifies the validity and accuracy of the optimal model proposed in this paper. The optimal model proposed in this paper has a higher theoretical guiding significance for the wireless energy transfer system's further research, and provide a more precise model reference for solving the power supply problem in visual prosthesis clinical application.

  10. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment...

  11. Transfer Learning in Integrated Cognitive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    and represented in a modular form. In addition, the agent can reuse learned knowledge about the map. The agent exhibits (positive) transfer if it...other concepts as well as primitive facts. The concept hierarchy provides relational, modular descriptions of the current state. It can also be used...specifically, ASU has focused on expanding ICARUS’ representational and inference capabilities to support temporal reasoning, and on improving the

  12. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingjing, E-mail: jjwang1@hotmail.com; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from SS surfaces for marine antifouling. • All brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of biofouling. • The antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density of hydrogels. - Abstract: Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  13. Light-Mediated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Semi-Fluorinated (Meth)acrylates: Facile Access to Functional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discekici, Emre H; Anastasaki, Athina; Kaminker, Revital; Willenbacher, Johannes; Truong, Nghia P; Fleischmann, Carolin; Oschmann, Bernd; Lunn, David J; Read de Alaniz, Javier; Davis, Thomas P; Bates, Christopher M; Hawker, Craig J

    2017-04-26

    A highly efficient photomediated atom transfer radical polymerization protocol is reported for semi-fluorinated acrylates and methacrylates. Use of the commercially available solvent, 2-trifluoromethyl-2-propanol, optimally balances monomer, polymer, and catalyst solubility while eliminating transesterification as a detrimental side reaction. In the presence of UV irradiation and ppm concentrations of copper(II) bromide and Me6-TREN (TREN = tris(2-aminoethyl amine)), semi-fluorinated monomers with side chains containing between three and 21 fluorine atoms readily polymerize under controlled conditions. The resulting polymers exhibit narrow molar mass distributions (Đ ≈ 1.1) and high end group fidelity, even at conversions greater than 95%. This level of control permits the in situ generation of chain-end functional homopolymers and diblock copolymers, providing facile access to semi-fluorinated macromolecules using a single methodology with unprecedented monomer scope. The results disclosed herein should create opportunities across a variety of fields that exploit fluorine-containing polymers for tailored bulk, interfacial, and solution properties.

  14. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  15. Data Transfer Minimization for Coherent Passive Location Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    particularly those that must operate from mobile platforms, techniques that minimize data transfer requirements while maintaining reliable system performance...must be carefully considered during system design. Performance losses of several candidate data transfer reduction techniques of varying complexity are compared with minimal bounds obtained from rate distortion theory....at physically separate receivers. They are inherently robust. Performance characteristics and system requirements including observation intervals, data

  16. High refractive index and lasing without inversion in an open four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Juzeliūnas, Gediminas; Raheli, A.; Sahrai, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, a novel atomic scheme is proposed to study the transient evolution of the atomic response with applications to lasing with and without population inversion. We introduce an open four-level atomic medium and compare its transient properties with the corresponding closed system. The impact of cavity parameters i.e. the atomic exit rate from cavity and atomic injection rates on transient response of weak probe field of open system are investigated. It is realized that existence of cavity parameters leads to some interesting results such as large amplification, high refractive index without absorption as well as lasing with and without inversion. These results cannot be obtained in corresponding closed system, due to lack of atomic exit and injection rates. This extra controllability and flexibility, makes open four-level system much more practical than its counterpart closed one.

  17. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilo, Fabjola [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Borgese, Laura, E-mail: laura.borgese@unibs.itl [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pazzaglia, Ugo [Dipartimento Specialità Medico Chirurgiche Sc. Radiol. e Sanità Pubblica, University of Brescia, v.le Europa, 11, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Depero, Laura E. [INSTM and Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, via Branze, 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Co and Cr migrate from bare alloy implant to the surrounding tissue showing a cluster distribution. • Co and Cr migrate from the TiO{sub 2} coated implant to the surrounding tissue showing a decreasing gradient distribution from the alloy surface. • TiO{sub 2} coating layers obtained by ALD on Co–Cr alloy show a barrier effect for the migration of metals. • The thicker the TiO{sub 2} layer deposited by ALD, the lower the metal migration. • The migration of metals from bare alloy toward the surrounding tissue increases with time. This effect is not detected in the coated samples. - Abstract: We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co–Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO{sub 2}. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO{sub 2} layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  18. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) Processes Promoted by the Quinolinimide-N-oxyl Radical. A Kinetic and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLabio, Gino A; Franchi, Paola; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Lucarini, Fiorella; Lucarini, Marco; Mazzonna, Marco; Prasad, Viki Kumar; Ticconi, Barbara

    2017-06-16

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of organic compounds to the quinolinimide-N-oxyl radical (QINO) was performed in CH3CN. The HAT rate constants are significantly higher than those observed with the phthalimide-N-oxyl radical (PINO) as a result of enthalpic and polar effects due to the presence of the N-heteroaromatic ring in QINO. The relevance of polar effects is supported by theoretical calculations conducted for the reactions of the two N-oxyl radicals with toluene, which indicate that the HAT process is characterized by a significant degree of charge transfer permitted by the π-stacking that occurs between the toluene and the N-oxyl aromatic rings in the transition state structures. An increase in the HAT reactivity of QINO was observed in the presence of 0.15 M HClO4 and 0.15 M Mg(ClO4)2 due to the protonation or complexation with the Lewis acid of the pyridine nitrogen that leads to a further decrease in the electron density in the N-oxyl radical. These results fully support the use of N-hydroxyquinolinimide as a convenient substitute for N-hydroxyphthalimide in the catalytic aerobic oxidations of aliphatic hydrocarbons characterized by relatively high C-H bond dissociation energies.

  19. Engineered Resilient Systems: Knowledge Capture and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-29

    ld be captured. The st udy description at a t op level shou ld include an overview, identification of key decision makers, t he goals for the study...capture and transfer across TSE st udies . EXPLORATION CASE STUDY One of t he tasks in this research proj ect was to conduct an exploratory case study to...knowledge t radeoffs in a TSE st udy using RSC 54 Products similar to Figure 18 would be very useful to practitioners as well as for further

  20. Plasmons in nanoscale and atomic-scale systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadaaki Nagao, Gui Han, ChungVu Hoang, Jung-Sub Wi, Annemarie Pucci, Daniel Weber, Frank Neubrech, Vyacheslav M Silkin, Dominik Enders, Osamu Saito and Masud Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmons in metallic nanomaterials exhibit very strong size and shape effects, and thus have recently gained considerable attention in nanotechnology, information technology, and life science. In this review, we overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities and discuss the optical functional properties of localized plasmon polaritons in nanometer-scale to atomic-scale objects. First, the pioneering works on plasmons by electron energy loss spectroscopy are briefly surveyed. Then, we discuss the effects of atomistic charge dynamics on the dispersion relation of propagating plasmon modes, such as those for planar crystal surface, atomic sheets and straight atomic wires. Finally, standing-wave plasmons, or antenna resonances of plasmon polariton, of some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires (the smallest possible plasmonic building blocks are exemplified along with their applications.

  1. Convective heat and mass transfer in rotating disk systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevchuk, Igor V

    2009-01-01

    The book describes results of investigations of a series of convective heat and mass transfer problems in rotating-disk systems. Methodology used included integral methods, self-similar and approximate analytical solutions, as well as CFD.

  2. Effect of dipole-dipole interaction in two atom systems : A steady state analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Shaik; Lakshmi, P Anantha

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour of a system of two two-level atoms, both identical as well as non-identical, under the influence of a continuously varying dipole-dipole coupling parameter for a wide range of other parameters such as the atomic level separations and the coupling strength of the external radiation field is explored. A detailed analysis of the behaviour of various level populations and some of the atomic coherences is presented. The influence of the competing effects between the Rabi field strength and the dipole dipole interaction on the two photon absorption probability is explored in detail both for identical as well as non-identical atoms. There are significant variations in the behaviour of identical and non-identical atoms as a function of the dipole coupling strength, even for small amounts of non-identity of the atoms, which in this study is incorporated through the atomic level separations.

  3. Control of pneumatic transfer system for neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Wu, J. S.; Kim, H. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, S. H.; Moon, J. H.; Baek, S. Y

    2000-06-01

    Pneumatic transfer system(PTS) is one of the facilities to be used in irradiation of target materials for neutron activation analysis(NAA) in the research reactor. There are two systems the manual and the automatic system in PTS of HANARO research reactor. The pneumatic transfer system consists of many devices, sends and loads the capsules from NAA laboratory into three holes in the reflector tank of reactor and retrieves irradiated capsules after irradiation. This report describes the part's design, control system and the operation procedures. All the algorithm described in the text will be used for maintenance and upgrading.

  4. Structure of the electron momentum density of atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna; Koga, T. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050 (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    The present paper addresses the controversial problem on the nonmonotonic behavior of the spherically-averaged momentum density {gamma}(p) observed previously for some ground-state atoms based on the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave functions of Clementi and Roetti. Highly accurate RHF wave functions of Koga et al. are used to study the existence of extrema in the momentum density {gamma}(p) of all the neutral atoms from hydrogen to xenon. Three groups of atoms are clearly identified according to the nonmonotonicity parameter {mu}, whose value is either equal to, larger, or smaller than unity. Additionally, it is found that the function p{sup -{alpha}} {gamma}(p) is (i) monotonically decreasing from the origin for {alpha}{>=}0.75, (ii) convex for {alpha}{>=}1.35, and (iii) logarithmically convex for {alpha}{>=}3.64 for all the neutral atoms with nuclear charges Z = 1-54. Finally, these monotonicity properties are applied to derive simple yet general inequalities which involve three momentum moments left angle p{sup t} right angle. These inequalities not only generalize similar inequalities reported so far but also allow us to correlate some fundamental atomic quantities, such as the electron-electron repulsion energy and the peak height of Compton profile, in a simple manner. (orig.) 40 refs.

  5. Acrylamide-b-N-isopropylacrylamide block copolymers : Synthesis by atomic transfer radical polymerization in water and the effect of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic ratio on the solution properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, Diego Armando Z.; Ramalho, Graham; Picchioni, Francesco; Broekhuis, Antonius Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    A series of block copolymers of acrylamide and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) characterized by different ratios between the length of the two blocks have been prepared through atomic transfer radical polymerization in water at room temperature. The solution properties of the block copolymers were

  6. The Characteristics of an Abstract System for the Transfer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NWUuser

    PER / PELJ 2012(15)3. 120 / 183. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ABSTRACT SYSTEM FOR THE TRANSFER OF. PROPERTY IN SOUTH AFRICAN LAW AS DISTINGUISHED FROM A CAUSAL. SYSTEM. PJW Schutte. *. 1. Introduction. Two divergent systems are usually differentiated between when it comes to the way.

  7. A Microcontroller-Based Automatic Transfer Switching System for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a Microcontroller-Based Automatic Transfer Switching System (MBATSS), which eliminates the challenges of a manual changeover system. A voltage sensing circuit, a Hall Effect current sensor, relays, LEDs and an LCD were all coordinated using a PIC16F877A microcontroller. A system flow chart was ...

  8. Novel gene transfer systems: intelligent gene transfer vectors for gene medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery systems for gene transfer are called 'vectors'. These systems were originally invented as a delivery system for the transfection in vitro or in vivo. Several vectors are then developed for clinical use of gene medicines and currently some of them are approved as animal drugs. Conventional drug delivery system generally consists of approved (existing) materials to avoid additional pre-clinical or clinical studies. However, current vectors contain novel materials to improve an efficacy of gene medicines. Thus, these vectors have functions more than a mere delivery of active ingredients. For example some vectors have immunological functions such as adjuvants in vaccines. These new types of vectors are called 'intelligent' or 'innovative' vector system', since the concept or strategy for the development is completely different from conventional drug delivery systems. In this article, we described a current status of 'intelligent gene transfer vectors and discussed on the potentials of them.

  9. Polymer brushes on single-walled carbon nanotubes by atom transfer radical polymerization of n-butyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shuhui; Qin, Dongqi; Ford, Warren T; Resasco, Daniel E; Herrera, Jose E

    2004-01-14

    Polymer brushes with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as backbones were synthesized by grafting n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA) from the ends and sidewalls of SWNT via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Carboxylic acid groups on SWNT were formed by nitric acid oxidation. The ATRP initiators were covalently attached to the SWNT by esterification of 2-hydroxyethyl 2'-bromopropionate with carboxylic acid groups. Methyl 2-bromopropionate (MBP) was added as free initiator during the brush preparation to control growth of the brushes and to monitor the polymerization kinetics. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) results show that the molecular weight of free poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA) increased linearly with nBMA monomer conversion. PnBMA cleaved from the SWNT after high conversion had the same molecular weight as PnBMA produced in solution. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) show that the amount of PnBMA grown from the SWNT increased linearly with the molecular weight of the free PnBMA. The most highly PnBMA-functionalized SWNT dissolve in 1,2-dichlorobenzene, chloroform, and tetrahydrofuran, and solubility increases with the amount of PnBMA bound to SWNT. Near-infrared and Raman spectra indicate that the side walls of the SWNT were lightly functionalized by the nitric acid treatment and that the degree of functionalization of the SWNT did not change significantly during the formation of initiator or during the polymerization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show contour lengths of the SWNT brushes on a mica surface from 200 nm to 2.0 microm and an average height of the backbone of 2-3 nm, indicating that the bundles of original SWNT were broken into individual tubes by functionalization and polymerization.

  10. Multiparametric Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Müller, Daniel J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2017-04-18

    There is a need in biochemical research for new tools that can image and manipulate biomolecular and cellular systems at the nanoscale. During the past decades, there has been tremendous progress in developing atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to analyze biosystems, down to the single-molecule level. Force-distance (FD) curve-based AFM in particular has enabled researchers to map and quantify biophysical properties and biomolecular interactions on a wide variety of specimens. Despite its great potential, this AFM method has long been limited by its low spatial and temporal resolutions. Recently, novel FD-based multiparametric imaging modalities have been developed, allowing us to simultaneously image the structure, elasticity and interactions of biological samples at high spatiotemporal resolution. By oscillating the AFM tip, spatially resolved FD curves are obtained at much higher frequency than before, and as a result, samples are mapped at a speed similar to that of conventional topographic imaging. In this Account, we discuss the general principle of multiparametric AFM imaging and we provide a snapshot of recent studies showing how this new technology has been applied to biological specimens, from soluble proteins to membranes and cells. We emphasize novel methodologies that we recently developed, in which multiparametric imaging is combined with probes functionalized with chemical groups, ligands, or even live cells, in order to image and quantify receptor interaction forces and free-energy landscapes in a way not possible before. Key breakthroughs include observing the mechanical and chemical properties of single proteins in purple membranes, measuring the electrostatic potential of transmembrane pore forming proteins, structurally localizing chemical groups of water-soluble proteins, mapping and nanomechanical analysis of single sensors on yeast cells, imaging the sites of assembly and extrusion of single filamentous bacteriophages in living bacteria

  11. Effect of metal shielding on a wireless power transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Huang, Xueliang; Chen, Chen; Tan, Linlin; Wang, Wei; Guo, Jinpeng

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of non-ferromagnetic metal shielding (NFMS) material on the resonator of wireless power transfer (WPT) is studied by modeling, simulation and experimental analysis. And, the effect of NFMS material on the power transfer efficiency (PTE) of WPT systems is investigated by circuit model. Meanwhile, the effect of ferromagnetic metal shielding material on the PTE of WPT systems is analyzed through simulation. A double layer metal shield structure is designed. Experimental results demonstrate that by applying the novel double layer metal shielding method, the system PTE increases significantly while the electromagnetic field of WPT systems declines dramatically.

  12. Study of the transfer of electrons and hydrogen atoms between substituted p-benzoquinone triplets and diphenylamine by flash-photolysis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, P.P.; Kokrashvili, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    The primary and secondary aromatic amines quench the triplet states of carbonyl compounds through processes involving the transfer of charges and hydrogen atoms. The interaction of the benzophenone triplet with primary and secondary aromatic amines involves a one-step transfer of H atoms, and leads to the formation of ketyl and aminyl radicals in both polar and nonpolar solvents. The triplet state of 2,6-diphenyl-1,4-benzoquinone can be quenched through diphenylamine (DPA), a secondary aromatic amine, the quenching mechanism involving a diffusion-limited transfer of both charges and H atoms. The processes of electron and H atom transfer are in competition here, proceeding independently in the collision complex. Neutral radicals and short-lived radical-ion pairs (t approx. 100 nsec) are formed as the result of quenching in low-polarity solvents. Both neutral and charged radicals are formed through quenching in acetonitrile, but only radical-ions are formed through quenching in alcoholic solution. Only charged radicals are formed through quenching of duroquinone by DPA in ethanol-water mixtures. An understanding of the factors determining the mechanism of carbonyl compound triplet state quenching by electron and H atom donors can be obtained through a study of the effect of the structures of the reacting molecules, and the solvent, on the kinetics of the transfer processes. The present work has used flash photolysis methods to study the intermediates formed during the quenching of the triplet states of the p-benzoquinones by DFA in solvents of various polarities.

  13. Mass transfer in asymptotic-giant-branch binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason; Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Binary stars can interact via mass transfer when one member (the primary) ascends onto a giant branch. The amount of gas ejected by the binary and the amount of gas accreted by the secondary over the lifetime of the primary influence the subsequent binary phenomenology. Some of the gas ejected by the binary will remain gravitationally bound and its distribution will be closely related to the formation of planetary nebulae. We investigate the nature of mass transfer in binary systems containing an AGB star by adding radiative transfer to the AstroBEAR AMR Hydro/MHD code.

  14. A theoretical study of the atomic and electronic structures of three prospective atomic scale wire systems

    CERN Document Server

    Shevlin, S A

    2001-01-01

    transport properties of the line are also calculated. Finally we find which of the two models of the (4x1)-Si(111)-ln reconstruction is thermodynamically favoured in a supercell geometry. We use ab initio plane wave techniques in the Local-Density-Approximation, and calculate and compare the electronic structure of the two models with respect to the characteristic energies for electron dispersion along and across the chain structures. We also consider the effects of electronic structure on the in-plane transport properties of the indium lines. The structural and electronic properties of several candidate atomic scale wires are analysed. Three candidates are studied: the trans-polyacetylene molecule, the silicon line on the (001) face of cubic silicon carbide (the (nx2) series of reconstructions) and the indium chain on the (111) face of silicon carbide (the (4x1) reconstruction). We use the polyacetylene molecule as a test-bed for the techniques that we use to calculate transport properties in an empirically ...

  15. Successful synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    LHC synchronization test successful The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.

  16. Coupled Atom-Polar Molecule Condensate Systems: A Theoretical Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-14

    proportional to the laser �eld and the free-bound FC factor. Simultaneously, a series of laser �elds of (molecular) Rabi frequency i (i 2) are applied to...experimental e¤orts focused mainly on solid 4He [53]. The interest in the formation of supersolid in continuous (as oppose to lattice ) ultracold atom models

  17. Transference and counter-transference in systems psychodynamic group process consultation: The consultant’s experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cilliers

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored consultants’ experiences of transference and counter-transference when conducting group relations training from the systems psychodynamic stance. A phenomenological research design was used with semistructured interviews conducted on a purposive sample of 13 organisational development consultants in a financial institution. The data was analysed by means of content analysis. The results showed that consultants have varied receptiveness in terms of receiving projections and managing transference. These differences involve triggers, characteristics and systemic valence. The consultants experienced counter- transference on five different cognitive and emotional levels. Distinguishing between personal and group emotions, receiving projections and managing transference, all contribute to the complexity of organisational consulting. Opsomming Hierdie studie het ondersoek ingestel na konsultante se ervarings van oordrag en teen-oordrag tydens groepverhoudingsopleiding vanuit die sistemiese psigodinamiese posisie. ’n Fenomenologiese navorsingsontwerp is gebruik met semi-gestruktureerde onderhoude gevoer met ’n doelgerigte steekproef van 13 organisasie ontwikkelingskonsultante in ’n finansiële instelling. Die data is ontleed deur middel van inhoudsontleding. Die resultate het aangetoon dat konsultante uiteenlopende ontvanklikheid het wat betref die ontvangs van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag. Hierdie verskille behels snellers, kenmerke en sistemiese valensie. Die konsultante het teen-oordrag ervaar op vyf verskillende kognitiewe and emosionele vlakke. Om onderskeid te tref tussen persoonlike en groep-emosies, die ontvang van projeksies en die hantering van oordrag, dra alles by tot die kompleksiteit van konsultering.

  18. All optical three dimensional spatio-temporal correlator for automatic event recognition using a multiphoton atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjur, Mehjabin S.; Fouda, Mohamed F.; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2016-12-01

    We describe an automatic event recognition (AER) system based on a three-dimensional spatio-temporal correlator (STC) that combines the techniques of holographic correlation and photon echo based temporal pattern recognition. The STC is shift invariant in space and time. It can be used to recognize rapidly an event (e.g., a short video clip) that may be present in a large video file, and determine the temporal location of the event. Using polar Mellin transform, it is possible to realize an STC that is also scale and rotation invariant spatially. Numerical simulation results of such a system are presented using quantum mechanical equations of evolution. For this simulation we have used the model of an idealized, decay-free two level system of atoms with an inhomogeneous broadening that is larger than the inverse of the temporal resolution of the data stream. We show how such a system can be realized by using a lambda-type three level system in atomic vapor, via adiabatic elimination of the intermediate state. We have also developed analytically a three dimensional transfer function of the system, and shown that it agrees closely with the results obtained via explicit simulation of the atomic response. The analytical transfer function can be used to determine the response of an STC very rapidly. In addition to the correlation signal, other nonlinear terms appear in the explicit numerical model. These terms are also verified by the analytical model. We describe how the AER can be operated in a manner such that the correlation signal remains unaffected by the additional nonlinear terms. We also show how such a practical STC can be realized using a combination of a porous-glass based Rb vapor cell, a holographic video disc, and a lithium niobate crystal.

  19. Applications of atomic layer deposition in nanoelectronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Damon Brooks

    2007-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a promising deposition technique for nanoelectronic applications. Reasons for this include low temperature processing, self-limiting growth, and sub-nanometer thickness precision. ALD can be used as a complementary technique to coat preexisting nanostructures, or as a technique to directly fabricate nanostructures. In this dissertation, applications of ALD in two nanoelectronic systems are investigated: carbon nanotubes and nanocrystals. Conformal ALD on as-grown suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is not possible due to the inertness of ALD precursor molecules to the SWNT surface. A covalent functionalization technique is presented that makes SWNTs reactive with ALD precursor molecules. Precursor reactivity with the functionalized nanotubes is shown to be due to -NO2 functional groups attached to the nanotube sidewalls. The effect of this functionalization technique on nanotube conductance is shown to be reversible, and doping caused by the deposited oxides is discussed. To improve upon the covalent functionalization method, alternating exposures of nitrogen dioxide gas and trimethylaluminum vapor are shown to functionalize the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a self-limited functional layer. These functionalized nanotubes are shown to be susceptible to ALD of continuous, radially isotropic material. This allows for the creation of coaxial nanotube structures of multiple materials with precisely controlled diameters. This functionalization technique involves only weak physical bonding, avoiding covalent modification, which should preserve the unique optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. As a fabrication technique, ALD is used to fabricate arrays of Ru nanocrystals 1--4 nm in diameter. The nanocrystal density is found to depend sensitively on the nucleating surface. A maximum density of 7 x 1012 cm -2--8 x 1012 cm-2 is achieved on Al2O3. Incorporation of these nanocrystals in

  20. Learning Transfer--Validation of the Learning Transfer System Inventory in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velada, Raquel; Caetano, Antonio; Bates, Reid; Holton, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the construct validity of learning transfer system inventory (LTSI) for use in Portugal. Furthermore, it also aims to analyze whether LTSI dimensions differ across individual variables such as gender, age, educational level and job tenure. Design/methodology/approach: After a rigorous translation…

  1. Proton-Conducting Sulfonated Ionomers by Chemical Modification and Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Møller

    (PSU), Udel, is chosen as backbone due to its mechanical and thermal properties. Sulfonic acid functionalized, dendronised side chains are attached by click chemistry in the study of hydrocarbon structures with highly flexible spacers. Various degrees of sulfonation (DS) are used in the perspectivation...... to a partially fluorinated system that is based on a poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)-containing backbone with fully sulfonated PS grafts. To counteract the dimensional change upon water contact that is a result of the increased IEC, the ionomer is blended with a high molecular weight PVDF, which contributes....... The blends are highly humidity sensitive, yet, despite lower absolute conductivities than Nafion, they display a reduced dependence on both humidity and temperature. Under fully humidified conditions the blends perform superior to fully sulfonated graft copolymer analogues. The combination of a high degree...

  2. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Duo [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  3. In situ development of self-reinforced cellulose nanocrystals based thermoplastic elastomers by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juan; Wang, Chunpeng; Wang, Jifu; Chu, Fuxiang

    2016-05-05

    Recently, the utilization of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a reinforcing material has received a great attention due to its high elastic modulus. In this article, a novel strategy for the synthesis of self-reinforced CNCs based thermoplastic elastomers (CTPEs) is presented. CNCs were first surface functionalized with an initiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Subsequently, SI-ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) was carried out in the presence of sacrificial initiator to form CTPEs in situ. The CTPEs together with the simple blends of CNCs and linear poly(MMA-co-BA) copolymer (P(MMA-co-BA)) were characterized for comparative study. The results indicated that P(MMA-co-BA) was successfully grafted onto the surface of CNCs and the compatibility between CNCs and the polymer matrix in CTPEs was greatly enhanced. Specially, the CTPEs containing 2.15wt% CNCs increased Tg by 19.2°C and tensile strength by 100% as compared to the linear P(MMA-co-BA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by atom transfer radical polymerization for the rapid extraction of avermectin from fish samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Lei; Qin, Dongli; Chen, Ligang

    2017-01-01

    A novel and highly efficient approach to obtain magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers is described to detect avermectin in fish samples. The magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized by surface imprinting polymerization using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes as the support materials, atom transfer radical polymerization as the polymerization method, avermectin as template, acrylamide as functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as crosslinker. The characteristics of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were assessed by using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The binding characteristics of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were researched through isothermal adsorption experiment, kinetics adsorption experiment, and the selectivity experiment. Coupled with ultra high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, the extraction conditions of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers as adsorbents for avermectin were investigated in detail. The recovery of avermectin was 84.2-97.0%, and the limit of detection was 0.075 μg/kg. Relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precisions were in the range of 1.7-2.9% and 3.4-5.6%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the extraction method not only has high selectivity and accuracy, but also is convenient for the determination of avermectin in fish samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The Role of Mass Transfer in Membrane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Gürel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are situated in the foreground among the considerably popular treatment systems in the last years. The use of membranes was become widespread in many fields such as drinking water treatment, wastewater treatment and obtaining drinking water from sea water. The predominance of membranes against the classical systems regarding the wastewater treatment, and the decreasing cost of membrane materials each day provided these systems to enter among the preferable options. There are considerably different types of membranes. Microfiltration (MF, ultrafiltration (UF, nanofiltration (NF and reverse osmosis (RO are the processes drawing most attention. One of the most important considerations in membrane processes is the amount of constituents passing from the membrane and rejecting by the membrane. Mass transfer concept arises in this place. Mass transfer is a critically important case used in the design of treatment systems and the estimation of efficiency. In addition to the points mentioned above, investigation of mass transfer occurring in membranes is important in comparing of different membrane types. In this review article, general information about the membranes, membrane types, uses of membranes and module designs are given, concept of mass transfer is viewed and the mass transfer processes realizing in these treatment systems are assessed.

  6. Effect of pairwise dipole–dipole interaction among three-atom systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... We present an analysis of a system of three two-level atoms interacting with one another through dipole–dipole interaction. The interaction manifests between the excited state of one of the atoms and the ground state of its nearest neighbour. Steady-state populations of the density matrix elements are ...

  7. Nitroxide mediated and atom transfer radical graft polymerization of atactic polymers onto syndiotactic polystyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abbasian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 'Living' radical graft polymerization was employed to prepare graft copolymers with nitroxide-mediated arylated syndiotactic polystyrene as the backbone and polystyrene (PS, poly(p-methylstyrene (PMS and poly(methylmethacrylate (PMMA as branches. A two-stage process has been developed to synthesize the macroinitiator. First, syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS was modified by the Friedel-Crafts reaction to introduce chlorine; second, the chlorine groups were converted to nitroxide mediated groups by coupling with 1-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO-OH. The resulting macroinitiator (sPS-TEMPO for 'living' free radical polymerization was then heated in the presence of styrene and p-methylstyrene to form graft and block copolymers. We used the obtained copolymer and N-bromosuccinimide as brominating agent to achieve polymers with bromine groups. This brominated copolymer was used as a macroinitiator for polymerizing methyl methacrylate in the presence of the CuBr/bpy catalyst system. The formation of the graft and block copolymers was confirmed by DSC, ¹H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. This approach using macroinitiators is an effective method for the preparation of new materials.

  8. Operational test report for 2706-T complex liquid transfer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENZEL, H.R.

    1999-09-01

    This document is the Operational Test Report (OTR). It enters the Record Copy of the W-259 Operational Test Procedure (HNF-3610) into the document retrieval system. Additionally, the OTR summarizes significant issues associated with testing the 2706-T waste liquid transfer and storage system.

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer in model systems of photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, U.

    1988-01-01

    This Thesis describes Investigations on photoinduced electron transfer (ET) for several compounds, serving as model systems of the natural photosynthesis. In addition, the properties of the systems, e.g. the conformation in solution and the electronic properties of the photoexcited states

  10. Shared symmetries of the hydrogen atom and the two-bit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, A. R. P.; Alber, G.

    2017-12-01

    The hydrogen atom is the simplest system of atomic and molecular physics, while a two-qubit system is the simplest of quantum information. Remarkably, they share common symmetry aspects which are described in this paper, based on a correspondence between the four-dimensional unitary group and the six-dimensional rotational group with its non-compact extensions. Both systems involve 15 basic operators. Reductions to Lorentz and Poincare space–time group symmetries of a free particle are also discussed.

  11. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Tsay, S.C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  12. Lunar transfer vehicle design issues with electric propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes parametric design studies of electric propulsion lunar transfer vehicles. In designing a lunar transfer vehicle, selecting the 'best' operating points for the design parameters allows significant reductions in the mass in low earth orbit (LEO) for the mission. These parameters include the specific impulse, the power level, and the propulsion technology. Many of the decisions regarding the operating points are controlled by the propulsion and power system technologies that are available for the spacecraft. The relationship between these technologies is discussed and analyzed here. It is found that both ion and MPD propulsion offer significant LEO mass reductions over O2/H2 for lunar transfer vehicle missions. The recommended operating points for the lunar transfer vehicle are an I(sp) of 5000 lb(f)-s/lb(m) and a 1 MW power level. For large lunar missions, krypton may be the best choice for ion propulsion.

  13. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via phase-sensitive absorption spectra in a four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Yu, Rong; Sun, Zhaoyu; Ding, Chunling; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new scheme for highly efficient three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a coherently driven closed-loop four-level atomic system via measuring the probe absorption of the weak field. Due to the spatially dependent atom–field interaction, the absorption spectra of the weak probe laser field carry the information about the atomic position. By solving the density-matrix equations of motion and properly modulating the system parameters such as the probe detuning, the relative phase of three driving fields, and the intensity of the control and microwave fields, we can realize high-precision and high-resolution 3D atom localization. Furthermore, we can find the atom at a certain position with 100% probability under appropriate conditions, and then we employ the dressed-state analysis to explain qualitatively the reason of high-precision 3D atom localization.

  14. Linear Atom Guides: Guiding Rydberg Atoms and Progress Toward an Atom Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Mallory A.

    In this thesis, I explore a variety of experiments within linear, two-wire, magnetic atom guides. Experiments include guiding of Rydberg atoms; transferring between states while keeping the atoms contained within the guide; and designing, constructing, and testing a new experimental apparatus. The ultimate goal of the atom guiding experiments is to develop a continuous atom laser. The guiding of 87Rb 59D5/2 Rydberg atoms is demonstrated. The evolution of the atoms is driven by the combined effects of dipole forces acting on the center-of-mass degree of freedom as well as internal-state transitions. Time delayed microwave and state-selective field ionization, along with ion detection, are used to investigate the evolution of the internal-state distribution as well as the Rydberg atom motion while traversing the guide. The observed decay time of the guided-atom signal is about five times that of the initial state. A population transfer between Rydberg states contributes to this lengthened lifetime, and also broadens the observed field ionization spectrum. The population transfer is attributed to thermal transitions and, to a lesser extent, initial state-mixing due to Rydberg-Rydberg collisions. Characteristic signatures in ion time-of-flight signals and spatially resolved images of ion distributions, which result from the coupled internal-state and center-of-mass dynamics, are discussed. Some groups have used a scheme to make BECs where atoms are optically pumped from one reservoir trap to a final state trap, irreversibly transferring those atoms from one trap to the other. In this context, transfer from one guided ground state to another is studied. In our setup, before the atoms enter the guide, they are pumped into the | F = 1, mF = --1> state. Using two repumpers, one tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 0 transition (R10) and the other tuned to the F = 1 → F' = 2 transition (R12), the atoms are pumped between these guided states. Magnetic reflections within the guide

  15. Heat transfer fluids for solar DHW systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedel, S.; Bezzel, E.

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the sudden clogging of the pipes in collectors as a consequence of liquid deterioration after repeated boiling during stagnation. A method to perform simple screening as accelerated tests of a large number liquid of samples subjected to various chemical- and physical environments have been designed. The acceleration factor of experiments relative to real systems is quite substantial primarily due to the extensive stress cycles in tests. Possible degradation mechanisms have been investigated and generally, there are two different paths to degradation of glycol: Thermal degradation and oxidative degradation primarily yielding propylene derivatives and carboxylic acids respectively. Polymerisation is an obvious possibility in a system containing various organic compounds such as acids and alcohols. Consequently, the reaction patterns alter making room for alternative interconnected mechanisms thus generating a broad spectrum of possible degradation products. Reserve alkalinity and pH are somewhat unreliable means of solely estimating the state of a liquid in relation to degradation and precipitation, as curvature of the RA-pH relations are different from liquid to liquid. For the majority of liquids, precipitation is not correlated with pH and RA. Coloration and precipitation in the liquid phase during stagnation separated liquids in two sub-categories. Fluids with inhibitor have sparing to moderate sedimentation and are brownish-black due to deterioration. Glycols without additives were either pale or colourless and did not precipitate. During normal operation, all fluids are clear and transparent and the majority has the same initial colour. The same distinction in liquids was observed on examination on the inside surface of the tubes concerning extent and the quantity of deposit. Liquids with additives tend to have significantly more deposit covering a larger surface than liquids without. Visual evaluation has proved that

  16. Polaron assisted charge transfer in model biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Movaghar, Bijan

    2016-11-01

    We use a tight binding Hamiltonian to simulate the electron transfer from an initial charge-separating exciton to a final target state through a two-arm transfer model. The structure is copied from the model frequently used to describe electron harvesting in photosynthesis (photosystems I). We use this network to provide proof of principle for dynamics, in quantum system/bath networks, especially those involving interference pathways, and use these results to make predictions on artificially realizable systems. Each site is coupled to the phonon bath via several electron-phonon couplings. The assumed large energy gaps and weak tunneling integrals linking the last 3 sites give rise to"Stark Wannier like" quantum localization; electron transfer to the target cluster becomes impossible without bath coupling. As a result of the electron-phonon coupling, local electronic energies relax when the site is occupied, and transient polaronic states are formed as photo-generated electrons traverse the system. For a symmetric constructively interfering two pathway network, the population is shared equally between two sets of equivalent sites and therefore the polaron energy shift is smaller. The smaller energy shift however makes the tunnel transfer to the last site slower or blocks it altogether. Slight disorder (or thermal noise) can break the symmetry, permitting essentially a "one path", and correspondingly more efficient transfer.

  17. Phase-sensitive atom localization for closed-loop quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Juzeliūnas, Gediminas

    2016-07-01

    A scheme of high-precision two- and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization is proposed and analyzed by using a density matrix method for a five-level atom-light coupling scheme. In this system four strong laser components (which could be standing waves) couple a pair of atomic internal states to another pair of states in all possible ways to form a closed-loop diamond-shape configuration of the atom-light interaction. By systematically solving the density matrix equations of the motion, we show that the imaginary part of the susceptibility for the weak probe field is position dependent. As a result, one can obtain information about the position of the atom by measuring the resulting absorption spectra. Focusing on the signatures of the relative phase of the applied fields stemming from the closed- loop structure of the diamond- shape subsystem, we find out that there exists a significant phase dependence of the eigenvalues required to have a maximum in the probe absorption spectra. It is found that by properly selecting the controlling parameters of the system, a nearly perfect 2D atom localization can be obtained. Finally, we numerically explore the phase control of 3D atom localization for the present scheme and show the possibility to obtain 1/2 detecting probability of finding the atom at a particular volume in 3D space within one period of standing waves.

  18. Transfer Efficiency Analysis of Wireless Power Transfer System under Frequency Drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shoudao; Li, Zhongqi; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer (WPT) is an emerging technology that may create new applications for wireless power charging. However, low efficiency resulting from resonant frequency drift is a main obstructing factor for promoting this technology. In this paper, the system efficiency...... and input impedance are obtained by solving the system equivalent equations and based on that a method of adjusting the operating frequency and load resistor is proposed. When resonant frequency drift occurs, the WPT system can now operate at quasi-resonant state and the efficiency can be improved by using...

  19. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  20. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  1. Study of elementary transfer mechanisms during a collision between a swift multi-charged heavy ion and a neutral atom; Etude des mecanismes elementaires de transfert d`energie au cours d`une collision entre un ion lourd rapide multi-charge et un atome neutre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, P. [Caen Univ., 14 (France)

    1995-12-31

    This work is dedicated to the study of the energy transfer mechanisms which occur during a collision between a swift multicharged heavy ion and a neutral atom. The elementary energy energy transfer mechanisms (scattering, excitation, ionization, capture) and their consequences on the target velocity after the collision (recoil velocity) are recalled in the first chapter. In the case of small projectile diffusion angles, we show that the recoil velocity component, transverse to the incident projectile direction, results principally from the diffusion mechanism, while the longitudinal component is due essentially to the mass transfer and the inelastic energy transfer mechanisms. Since the target recoil velocities are very small, we have built an experimental set-up which reduces the impreciseness on their measurement due to the target thermal spread using, as targets, cooled atoms of a supersonic jet (temperature < 1 K). The association of time of flight and localisation techniques allows us, for each ionised target atom, to determine the three recoil velocity components with a very good accuracy (a few tens of meters per second). In chapter three, we describe the data analysis method. And then we present in the last chapter the results we have obtained for the collision systems Xe{sup 44+}(6.7 MeV/A) + Ar => Xe{sup 44} + Ar{sup q+}+qe{sup -} (q ranging from 1 to 7); Xe{sup 44+} (6.7 MeV/A) + He => Xe{sup 44+} He{sup 1+,2+}+1e{sup -},2e{sup -}. We show that it is possible to interpret the recoil velocity in terms of kinetic energy transferred to the target and to the electrons ejected from the target. (author) 44 refs.

  2. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  3. Production and transfer of energy and information in Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulos, Chris G; Bianco-Martinez, Ezequiel; Baptista, Murilo S

    2014-01-01

    We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an "experimental" implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

  4. Production and transfer of energy and information in Hamiltonian systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris G Antonopoulos

    Full Text Available We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an "experimental" implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

  5. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications.

  6. Novel UV Initiator for Functionalization of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization Applied on Two Different Grades of Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Bøgelund, J.

    2010-01-01

    A novel nonoxidative method for preparation of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has been developed based on a UV sensitive initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The method has been investigated with respect to ligands and polymerization time for the prepara......A novel nonoxidative method for preparation of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has been developed based on a UV sensitive initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The method has been investigated with respect to ligands and polymerization time...... for the preparation of polystyrene functionalized MWCNT. It was found that pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) gave superior results with higher loading in shorter polymerization time. A comparative study of the method applied on two different grades of nonoxidized MWCNT has been performed, illustrating large...

  7. Transfer effects in learning a second language grammatical gender system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabourin, Laura; Stowe, Laurie A; de Haan, Ger J

    In this article second language (L2) knowledge of Dutch grammatical gender is investigated. Adult speakers of German, English and a Romance language (French, Italian or Spanish) were investigated to explore the role of transfer in learning the Dutch grammatical gender system. In the first language

  8. Modeling and design of reacting systems with phase transfer catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piccolo, Chiara; Hodges, George; Piccione, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Issues related to the design of biphasic (liquid) catalytic reaction operations are discussed. A chemical system involving the reaction of an organic-phase soluble reactant (A) with an aqueous-phase soluble reactant (B) in the presence of phase transfer catalyst (PTC) is modeled and based on it, ...

  9. Putting Dreyfus into Action: The European Credit Transfer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitsch, Jorg; Luomi-Messerer, Karin; Becker, Matthias; Spottl, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to look closely at the development of a European Credit Transfer System for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET). The European Commission, together with the member States, are working on it and several pilot projects have been initiated within the Leonardo da Vinci Programme of the European Commission.…

  10. Combining Polymers with the Functionality of Proteins: New Concepts for Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization, Nanoreactors and Damage Self-reporting Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bruns Nico; Lörcher Samuel; Makyla Katarzyna; Pollard Jonas; Renggli Kasper; Spulber Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are macromolecules with a great diversity of functions. By combining these biomolecules with polymers exciting opportunities for new concepts in polymer sciences arise. This highlight exemplifies the aforementioned with current research results of our group. We review our discovery that the proteins horseradish peroxidase and hemoglobin possess ATRPase activity i.e. they catalyze atom transfer radical polymerizations. Moreover a permeabilization method for polymersomes is presented w...

  11. Development of atom-economical catalytic asymmetric reactions under proton transfer conditions: construction of tetrasubstituted stereogenic centers and their application to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Naoya

    2011-01-01

    The development of atom-economical catalytic asymmetric reactions based on two distinct sets of catalyst, a rare earth metal/amide-based ligand catalyst and a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base catalyst, is reviewed. These catalytic systems exhibit high catalytic activity and stereoselectivity by harnessing a cooperative catalysis through hydrogen bond/metal coordination and soft-soft interactions/hard-hard interactions, respectively. The effectiveness of these cooperative catalysts is clearly delineated by the high stereoselectivity in reactions with highly coordinative substrates, and the specific activation of otherwise low-reactive pronucleophiles under proton transfer conditions. The rare earth metal/amide-based ligand catalyst was successfully applied to catalytic asymmetric aminations, nitroaldol (Henry) reactions, Mannich-type reactions, and conjugate addition reactions, generating stereogenic tetrasubstituted centers. Catalytic asymmetric amination and anti-selective catalytic asymmetric nitroaldol reactions were successfully applied to the efficient enantioselective synthesis of therapeutic candidates, such as AS-3201 and the β(3)-adrenoreceptor agonist, showcasing the practical utility of the present protocols. The soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalyst was specifically developed for the chemoselective activation of soft Lewis basic allylic cyanides and thioamides, which are otherwise low-reactive pronucleophiles. The cooperative action of the catalyst allowed for efficient catalytic generation of active carbon nucleophiles in situ, which were integrated into subsequent enantioselective additions to carbonyl-type electrophiles.

  12. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase.

  13. Multicharged optical vortices induced in a dissipative atomic vapor system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Wu, Zhenkun; Yuan, Chenzhi; Wang, Ruimin; Lu, Keqing; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We investigate numerically the dynamics of optical vortex beams carrying different topological charges, launched in a dissipative three level ladder type nonlinear atomic vapor. We impose the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) condition on the medium. Linear, cubic, and quintic susceptibilities, considered simultaneously with the dressing effect, are included in the analysis. Generally, the beams slowly expand during propagation and new vortices are induced, commonly appearing in oppositely charged pairs. We demonstrate that not only the form and the topological charge of the incident beam, but also its growing size in the medium greatly affect the formation and evolution of vortices. We formulate common rules for finding the number of induced vortices and the corresponding rotation directions, stemming from the initial conditions of various incident beams, as well as from the dynamical aspects of their propagation. The net topological charge of the vortex is conserved during propagation, as it sh...

  14. A Systematic Modelling Framework for Phase Transfer Catalyst Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Hyung Kim, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Phase-transfer catalyst systems contain two liquid phases, with a catalyst (PTC) that transfers between the phases, driving product formation in one phase and being regenerated in the other phase. Typically the reaction involves neutral species in an organic phase and regeneration involves ions...... in an aqueous phase. These reacting systems are receiving increased attention as novel organic synthesis options due to their flexible operation, higher product yields, and ability to avoid hazardous or expensive solvents. Major considerations in the design and analysis of PTC systems are physical and chemical...... equilibria, as well as kinetic mechanisms and rates. This paper presents a modelling framework for design and analysis of PTC systems that requires a minimum amount of experimental data to develop and employ the necessary thermodynamic and reaction models and embeds them into a reactor model for simulation...

  15. Aspects of forced convective heat transfer in geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilty, K.; Chapman, D.S.; Mase, C.

    1978-07-01

    A knowledge of convective heat transfer is essential to understanding geothermal systems and other systems of moving groundwater. A simple, kinematic approach toward convective heat transfer is taken here. Concern is not with the cause of the groundwater motion but only with the fact that the water is moving and transferring heat. The mathematical basis of convective heat transfer is the energy equation which is a statement of the first law of thermodynamics. The general solution of this equation for a specific model of groundwater flow has to be done numerically. The numerical algorithm used here employs a finite difference approximation to the energy equation that uses central differences for the heat conduction terms and one-sided differences for the heat convection terms. Gauss--Seidel iteration is then used to solve the finite difference equation at each node of a non-uniform mesh. The Monroe and Red Hill hot springs, a small hydrothermal system in central Utah, provide an example to illustrate the application of convective heat transfer theory to a geophysical problem. Two important conclusions regarding small geothermal systems follow immediately from the results of this application. First, the most rapid temperature rise in the convecting part of a geothermal system is near the surface. Below this initially rapid temperature increase the temperature increases very slowly, and thus temperatures extrapolated from shallow boreholes can be seriously in error. Second, the temperatures and heat flows observed at Monroe and Red Hill, and probably at many other small geothermal areas, can easily result from moderate vertical groundwater velocities in faults and fracture zones in an area of normal heat flow.

  16. Electron transfer in systems of well-defined geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overfield, R.E.; Kaufmann, K.J.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Two mesopyropheophorbide macrocycles can be joined via two covalent linkages to produce a cyclophane. It is possible to insert one or two Mg atoms into the cyclophane. The Qy transitions of the macrocycles are nearly orthogonal. The visible absorption spectrum of the monometal cyclophane is nearly a superposition of the spectra of the monomers. Emission from the monometal cyclophane arises primarily from the red most absorbing chromophore. The excited state difference spectrum shows that both macrocycles are excited. Fluorescence lifetimes of the monometal cyclophane decrease with increasing dielectric strength. Changes in the fluorescence and the triplet yield parallel the shortening of the singlet lifetime. Thus the radiative rate is solvent independent. This is in contrast to what one would expect if the emitting state had charge transfer character. Since the fluorescence lifetime is dependent on dielectric, the nonradiative relaxation from the singlet state is due to formation of a radical pair. The decay rate of the postulated radical pair was monitored by observing the kinetics of ground state repopulation. For the geometry of this cyclophane, electron transfer proceeds relatively slowly (k = 3 x 10/sup 9/ sec/sup -1/) in the forward direction. Modeling calculations indicate that the rate of annihilation of the radical pair may decrease as the solvent dielectric decreases.

  17. Network analysis and Canada's large value transfer system

    OpenAIRE

    Embree, Lana; Roberts, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the characteristics and structure of a network of financial institutions can provide insight into the complex relationships and interdependencies that exist in a payment, clearing, and settlement system (PCSS), and allow an intuitive understanding of the PCSS's efficiency, stability, and resiliency. The authors review the literature related to the PCSS network and describe the daily and intraday network structure of payment activity in the Large Value Transfer System (LVTS), which...

  18. Plasmon-Exciton Resonant Energy Transfer: Across Scales Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Kabbash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of an excitonic element in close proximity of a plasmonic nanostructure, under certain conditions, may lead to a nonradiative resonant energy transfer known as Exciton Plasmon Resonant Energy Transfer (EPRET process. The exciton-plasmon coupling and dynamics have been intensely studied in the last decade; still many relevant aspects need more in-depth studies. Understanding such phenomenon is not only important from fundamental viewpoint, but also essential to unlock many promising applications. In this review we investigate the plasmon-exciton resonant energy transfer in different hybrid systems at the nano- and mesoscales, in order to gain further understanding of such processes across scales and pave the way towards active plasmonic devices.

  19. Quantifying ‘Causality’ in Complex Systems: Understanding Transfer Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razak, Fatimah; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2014-01-01

    ‘Causal’ direction is of great importance when dealing with complex systems. Often big volumes of data in the form of time series are available and it is important to develop methods that can inform about possible causal connections between the different observables. Here we investigate the ability of the Transfer Entropy measure to identify causal relations embedded in emergent coherent correlations. We do this by firstly applying Transfer Entropy to an amended Ising model. In addition we use a simple Random Transition model to test the reliability of Transfer Entropy as a measure of ‘causal’ direction in the presence of stochastic fluctuations. In particular we systematically study the effect of the finite size of data sets. PMID:24955766

  20. [Implementation of an internal transfer pricing system for anaesthesia services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raetzell, M; Reissmann, H; Steinfath, M; Schuster, M; Schmidt, C; Scholz, J; Bauer, M

    2004-12-01

    Internal transfer pricing system (ITPS) of anaesthesia services is established to guarantee a close connection of delivered service and the budget of the department of anaesthesia. In most cases a time-based system is used with the pricing unit being calculated as the quotient from the enumerator "costs" divided by the denominator "anaesthesia time in minutes". The implementation of a transfer pricing system requires the identification of all relevant costs caused by the department of anaesthesia and a cost centre structure is needed which allocates all costs correctly according to their cause. The regulations regarding cost calculations as defined by the German DRG System should be considered. To generate valid data not only the necessary technical infrastructure is needed, but also detailed training of the staff and plausibility checks are needed to ensure correct and complete data. Subsequent agreements with the hospital administration are necessary in order to adjust the system if extrinsic cost increases occur. This paper gives a step-by-step guidance for the successful implementation of an internal transfer pricing system based on anaesthesia time.

  1. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Schkolnik, V; Wenzlawski, A; Grosse, J; Kohfeldt, A; Döringshoff, K; Wicht, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Braxmaier, C; Krutzik, M; Peters, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone towards space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 liters and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technol...

  2. Quantum dot-dye hybrid systems for energy transfer applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ting

    2010-07-01

    In this thesis, we focus on the preparation of energy transfer-based quantum dot (QD)-dye hybrid systems. Two kinds of QD-dye hybrid systems have been successfully synthesized: QD-silica-dye and QD-dye hybrid systems. In the QD-silica-dye hybrid system, multishell CdSe/CdS/ZnS QDs were adsorbed onto monodisperse Stoeber silica particles with an outer silica shell of thickness 2-24 nm containing organic dye molecules (Texas Red). The thickness of this dye layer has a strong effect on the total sensitized acceptor emission, which is explained by the increase in the number of dye molecules homogeneously distributed within the silica shell, in combination with an enhanced surface adsorption of QDs with increasing dye amount. Our conclusions were underlined by comparison of the experimental results with Monte-Carlo simulations, and by control experiments confirming attractive interactions between QDs and Texas Red freely dissolved in solution. New QD-dye hybrid system consisting of multishell QDs and organic perylene dyes have been synthesized. We developed a versatile approach to assemble extraordinarily stable QD-dye hybrids, which uses dicarboxylate anchors to bind rylene dyes to QD. This system yields a good basis to study the energy transfer between QD and dye because of its simple and compact design: there is no third kind of molecule linking QD and dye; no spacer; and the affinity of the functional group to the QD surface is strong. The FRET signal was measured for these complexes as a function of both dye to QD ratio and center-to-center distance between QD and dye by controlling number of covered ZnS layers. Data showed that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer in our QD-dye hybrid system. FRET efficiency can be controlled by not only adjusting the number of dyes on the QD surface or the QD to dye distance, but also properly choosing different dye and QD components. Due to the strong stability, our QD

  3. Entanglement of a two-atom system driven by the quantum vacuum in arbitrary cavity size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Hidalgo, G., E-mail: gfloreshidalgo@unifei.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Química, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, 37500-903, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Rojas, M., E-mail: moises.leyva@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil); Rojas, Onofre, E-mail: ors@dfi.ufla.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Lavras, CP 3037, 37200-000, Lavras, MG (Brazil)

    2017-05-10

    We study the entanglement dynamics of two distinguishable atoms confined into a cavity and interacting with a quantum vacuum field. As a simplified model for this system, we consider two harmonic oscillators linearly coupled to a massless scalar field which are inside a spherical cavity of radius R. Through the concurrence, the entanglement dynamics for the two-atom system is discussed for a range of initial states composed of a superposition of atomic states. Our results reveal how the entanglement of the two atoms behaves through the time evolution, in a precise way, for arbitrary cavity size and for arbitrary coupling constant. All our computations are analytical and only the final step is numerical. - Highlights: • Entanglement time evolution in arbitrary cavity size is considered. • In free space concurrence approaches a fixed value at large time. • For finite cavity, concurrence behaves almost as a periodic function of time.

  4. Entanglement of a two-atom system driven by the quantum vacuum in arbitrary cavity size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Hidalgo, G.; Rojas, M.; Rojas, Onofre

    2017-05-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics of two distinguishable atoms confined into a cavity and interacting with a quantum vacuum field. As a simplified model for this system, we consider two harmonic oscillators linearly coupled to a massless scalar field which are inside a spherical cavity of radius R. Through the concurrence, the entanglement dynamics for the two-atom system is discussed for a range of initial states composed of a superposition of atomic states. Our results reveal how the entanglement of the two atoms behaves through the time evolution, in a precise way, for arbitrary cavity size and for arbitrary coupling constant. All our computations are analytical and only the final step is numerical.

  5. Nervous system modification by transplants and gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, L C

    1994-11-01

    New possibilities to modify function and direct repair in the central nervous system (CNS) have been established by the merger of gene transfer technology with neural transplantation. Rapid advances in viral-mediated DNA-delivery procedures permit the study of novel gene expression in neurons and glial cells. Foreign genes, transferred by a virus vector, can be used to generate new cell lines, identify transplanted cells, and express growth factors or enzymes for neurotransmitter synthesis. In addition to CNS cell types, non-neural cells are also being studied with transgene technology in the nervous system. Functional effects have been obtained with grafts of genetically modified cells in animal models of several nervous system disorders, and the recent results set the stage for potential application of these techniques to human CNS gene therapy.

  6. Identifying electron transfer coordinates in donor-bridge-acceptor systems using mode projection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xunmo; Keane, Theo; Delor, Milan; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Weinstein, Julia; Bittner, Eric R.

    2017-02-01

    We report upon an analysis of the vibrational modes that couple and drive the state-to-state electronic transfer branching ratios in a model donor-bridge-acceptor system consisting of a phenothiazine-based donor linked to a naphthalene-monoimide acceptor via a platinum-acetylide bridging unit. Our analysis is based upon an iterative Lanczos search algorithm that finds superpositions of vibronic modes that optimize the electron/nuclear coupling using input from excited-state quantum chemical methods. Our results indicate that the electron transfer reaction coordinates between a triplet charge-transfer state and lower lying charge-separated and localized excitonic states are dominated by asymmetric and symmetric modes of the acetylene groups on either side of the central atom in this system. In particular, we find that while a nearly symmetric mode couples both the charge-separation and charge-recombination transitions more or less equally, the coupling along an asymmetric mode is far greater suggesting that IR excitation of the acetylene modes preferentially enhances charge-recombination transition relative to charge-separation.

  7. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  8. Dynamics of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Yuan, Heng

    2013-10-20

    We present the transfer function of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope through a series of differential equations and validate the transfer function by experimental test. A transfer function is the basis for further control system design. We build the differential equations based on a complete set of Bloch equations describing the all-optical atomic spin gyroscope, and obtain the transfer function through application of the Laplace transformation to these differential equations. Moreover, we experimentally validate the transfer function in an all-optical Cs-Xe129 atomic spin gyroscope through a series of step responses. This transfer function is convenient for analysis of the form of control system required. Furthermore, it is available for the design of the control system specifically to improve the performance of all-optical atomic spin gyroscopes.

  9. Two simple systems with cold atoms: quantum chaos tests and nonequilibrium dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Cavan; Aoud, Yassine Ait El; Yurovsky, Vladimir A; Olshanii, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    This article is an attempt to provide a link between the quantum nonequilibrium dynamics of cold gases and fifty years of progress in the lowdimensional quantum chaos. We identify two atomic systems lying on the interface: two interacting atoms in a harmonic multimode waveguide and an interacting two-component Bose-Bose mixture in a double-well potential. In particular, we study the level spacing distribution, the wavefunction statistics, the eigenstate thermalization, and the ability to ther...

  10. Assessment of Atomic Mobility for the Bcc Phase of the Ti-Al-Mo System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yunlong

    2017-09-01

    The atomic mobility for the bcc phase of the Ti-Al-Mo ternary system was developed by critical assessment of the experimental diffusion data by using the DICTRA software. The results shown the calculated diffusion coefficients presented the good agreements by the comprehensive comparisons with the experimental diffusion coefficients. The developed Ti-Al-Mo ternary atomic mobility was then subsequently validated by appropriate prediction of the interdiffusion behavior with comparison of the diffusion-couple experiments in the literature.

  11. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  12. Chain conformation and nano-patterning of polymer brushes prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang

    Over the past decade, the development of surface-initiated living polymerization methods has brought a breakthrough to surface modification owing to their control ability. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (si-ATRP), as the most popular one, has been widely employed to give novel polymer structures and functionalities to various surfaces for the purposes of tailoring surface properties, introducing new functions, or preparing so-called "smart surfaces", which can respond to external stimuli such as solvent type, pH, temperature, electric and magnetic fields etc. In this thesis, the mechanistic study of the si-ATRP was first carried out through modeling to gain good understanding of si-ATRP. Si-ATRP was then employed to prepare different types of polymer brushes to produce "smart surfaces". The kinetic model was developed using the method of moment. Combined with experimental data, a quantitative analysis was carried out for the si-ATRP mechanism. All information of grafted polymer chains, including active chain concentration, radical concentration, chain length, polydispersity, was illustrated. A new radical termination mechanism, termed as migration-termination, was proposed for si-ATRP. Si-ATRP was then employed to graft poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (POEGMA) block poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes on silicon wafer surfaces. Simple solvent treatment gave nanoscale patterns via the phase segregation of POEGMA and PMMA segments. Various patterns including spherical aggregates, wormlike aggregates, stripe patterns, perforated layers and complete overlayers, were obtained by adjusting the upper block layer thickness. Furthermore, these nanopatterns had a unique stimuli-responsive property, i.e., switching between different morphologies reversibly after being treated with selective solvents. POEGMA-block-poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) brushes, having two hydrophilic segments, were synthesized

  13. Analysis of the Coupling Coefficient in Inductive Energy Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Mendes Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless energy transfer systems, the energy is transferred from a power source to an electrical load without the need of physical connections. In this scope, inductive links have been widely studied as a way of implementing these systems. Although high efficiency can be achieved when the system is operating in a static state, it can drastically decrease if changes in the relative position and in the coupling coefficient between the coils occur. In this paper, we analyze the coupling coefficient as a function of the distance between two planar and coaxial coils in wireless energy transfer systems. A simple equation is derived from Neumann’s equation for mutual inductance, which is then used to calculate the coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is computed using CST Microwave Studio and compared to calculation and experimental results for two coils with an excitation signal of up to 10 MHz. The results showed that the equation presents good accuracy for geometric parameters that do not lead the solution of the elliptic integral of the first kind to infinity.

  14. Heat transfer and fluid flow in nuclear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fenech, Henri

    1982-01-01

    Heat Transfer and Fluid in Flow Nuclear Systems discusses topics that bridge the gap between the fundamental principles and the designed practices. The book is comprised of six chapters that cover analysis of the predicting thermal-hydraulics performance of large nuclear reactors and associated heat-exchangers or steam generators of various nuclear systems. Chapter 1 tackles the general considerations on thermal design and performance requirements of nuclear reactor cores. The second chapter deals with pressurized subcooled light water systems, and the third chapter covers boiling water reacto

  15. From the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the results are analyzed statistically, they appear to have a close relation with those of the complex systems. Experimentally, two types of situations involving simple scatter- ing systems have been studied: electron transport through microstructures called 'ballistic quantum dots', whose dimensions are of the order of 1 m, and ...

  16. First row transition metal atoms embedded in multivacancies in a rippled graphene system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombrú, Dominique; Faccio, Ricardo; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2018-03-01

    Ab-initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to study systems where a first row transition metal atom is embedded in a rippled graphene due to the existence of an 8-order multivacancy. In addition to these cases, also the inclusion of a zinc atom, with a 3d10 electron configuration, was also studied. Structural distortions and magnetic response for each system were studied. A correlation was found for the magnitude of the rippling and the distortion in the vacancy. Variation in the trends was found for Cu and Zn cases, which were explained on the basis of the filling of the 3dx2-y2 orbital. All the systems exhibit lower magnetic moment in comparison to the metal-less system. The quenching of the magnetic moment due to the carbon atoms in the vacancy is observed for Sc and Cu.

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, S Jimena; Odella, Emmanuel; Moore, Gary F; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2018-01-08

    Artificial photosynthetic constructs can in principle operate more efficiently than natural photosynthesis because they can be rationally designed to optimize solar energy conversion for meeting human demands rather than the multiple needs of an organism competing for growth and reproduction in a complex ecosystem. The artificial photosynthetic constructs described in this Account consist primarily of covalently linked synthetic chromophores, electron donors and acceptors, and proton donors and acceptors that carry out the light absorption, electron transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes characteristic of photosynthetic cells. PCET is the movement of an electron from one site to another accompanied by proton transfer. PCET and the transport of protons over tens of angstroms are important in all living cells because they are a fundamental link between redox processes and the establishment of transmembrane gradients of proton electrochemical potential, known as proton-motive force (PMF), which is the unifying concept in bioenergetics. We have chosen a benzimidazole phenol (BIP) system as a platform for the study of PCET because with appropriate substitutions it is possible to design assemblies in which one or multiple proton transfers can accompany oxidation of the phenol. In BIP, oxidation of the phenol increases its acidity by more than ten pKa units; thus, electrochemical oxidation of the phenol is associated with a proton transfer to the imidazole. This is an example of a PCET process involving transfer of one electron and one proton, known as electron-proton transfer (EPT). When the benzimidazole moiety of BIP is substituted at the 4-position with good proton acceptor groups such as aliphatic amines, experimental and theoretical results indicate that two proton transfers occur upon one-electron oxidation of the phenol. This phenomenon is described as a one-electron-two-proton transfer (E2PT) process and results in translocation of

  18. Lasing by driven atoms-cavity system in collective strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-09-12

    The interaction of laser cooled atoms with resonant light is determined by the natural linewidth of the excited state. An optical cavity is another optically resonant system where the loss from the cavity determines the resonant optical response of the system. The near resonant combination of an optical Fabry-Pérot cavity with laser cooled and trapped atoms couples two distinct optical resonators via light and has great potential for precision measurements and the creation of versatile quantum optics systems. Here we show how driven magneto-optically trapped atoms in collective strong coupling regime with the cavity leads to lasing at a frequency red detuned from the atomic transition. Lasing is demonstrated experimentally by the observation of a lasing threshold accompanied by polarization and spatial mode purity, and line-narrowing in the outcoupled light. Spontaneous emission into the cavity mode by the driven atoms stimulates lasing action, which is capable of operating as a continuous wave laser in steady state, without a seed laser. The system is modeled theoretically, and qualitative agreement with experimentally observed lasing is seen. Our result opens up a range of new measurement possibilities with this system.

  19. Phase behaviour of transfer functions in vibrating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jianyuan; Ohlrich, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicabilities of pole-zero models and wave propagation theory in estimating the phase characteristics of vibrating systems. The measured phase spectra are compared with the estimated reverberant phase limit and wave propagation phase. The relations between transfer...... on frequency in this band, but from the transition frequency and onwards the phase increases only with the square root of frequency. This behaviour is characteristic for free propagating waves....

  20. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-01-01

    's function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems.......We present a first-principles method for studying the electronic transport through nanoscale atomic systems under non-equilibrium conditions. The method is based on density functional theory, and allows the calculation of the response of the system to an applied finite potential difference...

  1. A DYNAMICAL SYSTEM APPROACH IN MODELING TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Husniah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a mathematical model of two parties technology transfer from a leader to a follower. The model is reconstructed via dynamical system approach from a known standard Raz and Assa model and we found some important conclusion which have not been discussed in the original model. The model assumes that in the absence of technology transfer from a leader to a follower, both the leader and the follower have a capability to grow independently with a known upper limit of the development. We obtain a rich mathematical structure of the steady state solution of the model. We discuss a special situation in which the upper limit of the technological development of the follower is higher than that of the leader, but the leader has started earlier than the follower in implementing the technology. In this case we show a paradox stating that the follower is unable to reach its original upper limit of the technological development could appear whenever the transfer rate is sufficiently high.  We propose a new model to increase realism so that any technological transfer rate could only has a positive effect in accelerating the rate of growth of the follower in reaching its original upper limit of the development.

  2. New magnet transport system for the LHC beam transfer lines

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The first of 700 magnets has been installed in one of the two transfer tunnels built to transfer the SPS beam into the LHC. The start of this first installation phase of the LHC transfer lines provides the opportunity to launch a new and highly original modular system for transporting and installing all kinds of magnets in very narrow tunnels. The system (pictured here in one of the tunnels) is based on very compact bogies, up to four of which can be coupled together to form a convoy. The wheels are fitted with individual motors enabling them to swivel through an angle of 90° and the convoy to move laterally. The lead vehicle is powered by an electric rail set into the roof of the tunnel. The system is backed up by electrical batteries that enable it to operate in the absence of an outside power source or in the event of power failure. Last but not least, for the long-distance transport of magnets, it can be optically guided by a line traced on the tunnel floor. The convoy moves through the particularly narr...

  3. Investigation of the Mechanism of Electron Capture and Electron Transfer Dissociation of Peptides with a Covalently Attached Free Radical Hydrogen Atom Scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Chang Ho; Yin, Sheng; Peng, Ivory; Loo, Joseph A; Beauchamp, J L

    2015-11-15

    The mechanisms of electron capture and electron transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD) are investigated by covalently attaching a free-radical hydrogen atom scavenger to a peptide. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-l-oxyl (TEMPO) radical was chosen as the scavenger due to its high hydrogen atom affinity (ca. 280 kJ/mol) and low electron affinity (ca. 0.45 ev), and was derivatized to the model peptide, FQX TEMPO EEQQQTEDELQDK. The X TEMPO residue represents a cysteinyl residue derivatized with an acetamido-TEMPO group. The acetamide group without TEMPO was also examined as a control. The gas phase proton affinity (882 kJ/mol) of TEMPO is similar to backbone amide carbonyls (889 kJ/mol), minimizing perturbation to internal solvation and sites of protonation of the derivatized peptides. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication generated stable odd-electron b and y type ions without indication of any TEMPO radical induced fragmentation initiated by hydrogen abstraction. The type and abundance of fragment ions observed in the CID spectra of the TEMPO and acetamide tagged peptides are very similar. However, ECD of the TEMPO labeled peptide dication yielded no backbone cleavage. We propose that a labile hydrogen atom in the charge reduced radical ions is scavenged by the TEMPO radical moiety, resulting in inhibition of N-C α backbone cleavage processes. Supplemental activation after electron attachment (ETcaD) and CID of the charge-reduced precursor ion generated by electron transfer of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication produced a series of b + H (b H ) and y + H (y H ) ions along with some c ions having suppressed intensities, consistent with stable O-H bond formation at the TEMPO group. In summary, the results indicate that ECD and ETD backbone cleavage processes are inhibited by scavenging of a labile hydrogen atom by the localized TEMPO radical moiety. This observation supports the conjecture that ECD and ETD processes involve long

  4. Heterogeneous Single-Atom Catalyst for Visible-Light-Driven High-Turnover CO2Reduction: The Role of Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Chen, Shuangming; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jiawen; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Zhang, Wenkai; Xiong, Yujie

    2018-02-14

    Visible-light-driven conversion of CO 2 into chemical fuels is an intriguing approach to address the energy and environmental challenges. In principle, light harvesting and catalytic reactions can be both optimized by combining the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous photocatalysts; however, the efficiency of charge transfer between light absorbers and catalytic sites is often too low to limit the overall photocatalytic performance. In this communication, it is reported that the single-atom Co sites coordinated on the partially oxidized graphene nanosheets can serve as a highly active and durable heterogeneous catalyst for CO 2 conversion, wherein the graphene bridges homogeneous light absorbers with single-atom catalytic sites for the efficient transfer of photoexcited electrons. As a result, the turnover number for CO production reaches a high value of 678 with an unprecedented turnover frequency of 3.77 min -1 , superior to those obtained with the state-of-the-art heterogeneous photocatalysts. This work provides fresh insights into the design of catalytic sites toward photocatalytic CO 2 conversion from the angle of single-atom catalysis and highlights the role of charge kinetics in bridging the gap between heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysts. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Microcontroller-driven fluid-injection system for atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, S; Alonso, L; Jacquet, P; Adamcik, J; Haeberli, C; Dietler, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a programmable microcontroller-driven injection system for the exchange of imaging medium during atomic force microscopy. Using this low-noise system, high-resolution imaging can be performed during this process of injection without disturbance. This latter circumstance was exemplified by the online imaging of conformational changes in DNA molecules during the injection of anticancer drug into the fluid chamber.

  6. E-Beam—a new transfer system for isolator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Theo; Huber, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In every aseptic filling application, the sterile transfer of goods into the aseptic area is a challenge, and there are many different ways to do it. With isolator technology a higher sterility assurance level (SAL) is achieved. This SAL is only as good as the weakest segment in the chain of manufacturing. The transfer of goods into and out of the isolator is one of these critical segments. Today different techniques, some already well established, others still very new, are available on the market like: dry heat tunnel, autoclave, pulsed light, rapid transfer systems (RTP), H 2O 2 tunnel, UV light, etc. all these systems are either not applicable for continuous transfer, only good for heat-compatible materials like glass, or do not guarantee a 6 log spore reduction. E-Beam opens new perspectives in this field. With E-beam technology it is possible to transfer heat-sensitive (plastic), pre-sterilised materials at high speed, continuously into an aseptic area. E-Beam unifies three different technologies, that result in a very efficient and high-speed decontamination machine designed for the pharmaceutical industry. First, there is the electron beam that decontaminates the goods and an accurate shielding that protects the surrounding from this beam. Second, there is the conveyor system that guarantees the output and the correct exposure time underneath the beam. And third, there is the isolator interface to provide correct differential pressure and clean air inside the tunnel as well as the decontamination of the tunnel with H 2O 2 prior to production. The E-beam is a low-energy electron beam, capable of decontaminating any kind of surface. It penetrates only a few micrometers into the material and therefore does not deform the packaging media. Currently, machines are being built to transfer pre-sterilised syringes, packed in plastic tubs with a Tyvek cover into an aseptic filling isolator with the following data: decontamination efficiency of 10 6 (6 log spore

  7. Optical bistability and multistability in an open ladder-type atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Hamedi, Hamid Reza; Rahimpour Soleimani, Hamid

    2013-05-01

    A novel scheme is proposed for controlling the optical bistability and multistability in an atomic system. In an open ladder-type three-level atomic system, it is shown that, by adjusting the ratio between atomic injections and exit rates from the cavity, the intensity threshold of optical bistability can be controlled. The effect of incoherent pumping field and spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) on optical bistability for different values of exit rates is also discussed. It is found that SGC makes the medium phase dependent, so the optical bistability and multistability threshold can be controlled via relative phase between applied fields. Moreover, it is shown that the optical bistability can be switched to optical multistability, which is favorable for the next generation of all-optical systems and quantum networks.

  8. Specific gene repression by CRISPRi system transferred through bacterial conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Weiyue; Lee, Derrick; Wong, Eric; Dadlani, Priyanka; Dinh, David; Huang, Verna; Kearns, Kendall; Teng, Sherry; Chen, Susan; Haliburton, John; Heimberg, Graham; Heineike, Benjamin; Ramasubramanian, Anusuya; Stevens, Thomas; Helmke, Kara J; Zepeda, Veronica; Qi, Lei S; Lim, Wendell A

    2014-12-19

    In microbial communities, bacterial populations are commonly controlled using indiscriminate, broad range antibiotics. There are few ways to target specific strains effectively without disrupting the entire microbiome and local environment. Here, we use conjugation, a natural DNA horizontal transfer process among bacterial species, to deliver an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system for targeting specific genes in recipient Escherichia coli cells. We show that delivery of the CRISPRi system is successful and can specifically repress a reporter gene in recipient cells, thereby establishing a new tool for gene regulation across bacterial cells and potentially for bacterial population control.

  9. Optimized trajectories of the transfer cask system in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, Filipe [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Vale, Alberto, E-mail: avale@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Fonte, Daniel [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, Isabel [Institute for Systems and Robotics, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    The transfer cask system (TCS) is one of the remote handling systems that will operate in ITER, transporting heavy and highly activated in-vessel components between the tokamak building and the hot cell building. A motion planning methodology for the TCS was developed, providing smooth paths that maximize the clearance to obstacles and that incorporate manoeuvres whenever necessary. This paper presents the results of the TCS planning algorithm with trajectories computed for nominal operations. The length of the journey, the velocity, the time duration, and the risk of collision were evaluated individually for each trajectory. A summary of all results, conclusions and future work are presented and discussed.

  10. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) transfer orbit attitude control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placanica, Samuel J.; Flatley, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft will be launched by the Shuttle from Vandenberg AFB into a 300 km altitude, 99 deg inclination, 6 a.m. or 6 p.m. ascending node orbit. After release from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, an on-board monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system will raise the orbit altitude to 900 km. The spacecraft continuously spins during transfer orbit operations with the spin axis nominally horizontal and in or near the orbit plane. The blowdown propulsion system consists of twelve 5 lb thrusters (3 'spin', 3 'despin', and 6 'axial') with the latter providing initially 30 lb of force parallel to the spin axis for orbit raising. The spin/despin jets provide a constant roll rate during the transfer orbit phase of the mission and the axials control pitch and yaw. The axial thrusters are pulsed on for attitude control during coast periods and are normally on- and off-modulated for control during orbit raising. Attitude sensors employed in the control loops include an array of two-axis digital sun sensors and three planar earth scanners for position measurements, as well as six gyroscopes for rate information. System redundancy is achieved by means of unique three-axes-in-a-plane geometry. This triaxial concept results in a fail-safe operational system with no performance degradation for many different component failure modes.

  11. From Nanoscale Systems to Ultracold Atoms and Molecules, and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    eliminated, resulting in effective multimode interactions between the mechanical modes . In the case of linear coupling, the coherent contribution to the...Gaoxiang Li, P. Meystre. Dissipation-driven two- mode mechanical squeezed states in optomechanical systems, Physical Review A, (03 2013): 0. doi...PhysRevA.88.063809 H. Seok, L. F. Buchmann, E. M. Wright, P. Meystre. Multimode strong-coupling quantum optomechanics, Physical Review A, (12 2013

  12. Universal quantum gates for photon-atom hybrid systems assisted by bad cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Yu; Liu, Qian; Wei, Hai-Rui; Li, Tao; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We present two deterministic schemes for constructing a CNOT gate and a Toffoli gate on photon-atom and photon-atom-atom hybrid quantum systems assisted by bad cavities, respectively. They are achieved by cavity-assisted photon scattering and work in the intermediate coupling region with bad cavities, which relaxes the difficulty of their implementation in experiment. Also, bad cavities are feasible for fast quantum operations and reading out information. Compared with previous works, our schemes do not need any auxiliary qubits and measurements. Moreover, the schematic setups for these gates are simple, especially that for our Toffoli gate as only a quarter wave packet is used to interact the photon with each of the atoms every time. These atom-cavity systems can be used as the quantum nodes in long-distance quantum communication as their relatively long coherence time is suitable for multi-time operations between the photon and the system. Our calculations show that the average fidelities and efficiencies of our two universal hybrid quantum gates are high with current experimental technology. PMID:27067992

  13. The giant acoustic atom - a single quantum system with a deterministic time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Grimsmo, Arne; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Pletyukhov, Mikhail; Johansson, Göran

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of a single transmon qubit coupled to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) via two distant connection points. Since the acoustic speed is five orders of magnitude slower than the speed of light, the travelling time between the two connection points needs to be taken into account. Therefore, we treat the transmon qubit as a giant atom with a deterministic time delay. We find that the spontaneous emission of the system, formed by the giant atom and the SAWs between its connection points, initially follows a polynomial decay law instead of an exponential one, as would be the case for a small atom. We obtain exact analytical results for the scattering properties of the giant atom up to two-phonon processes by using a diagrammatic approach. The time delay gives rise to novel features in the reflection, transmission, power spectra, and second-order correlation functions of the system. Furthermore, we find the short-time dynamics of the giant atom for arbitrary drive strength by a numerically exact method for open quantum systems with a finite-time-delay feedback loop. L. G. acknowledges financial support from Carl-Zeiss Stiftung (0563-2.8/508/2).

  14. Applications of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamical Systems is a reference on the new field of relativistic optics, examining topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles. Based on 30 years of research, this unique book connects the properties of quantum equations to corresponding classical equations used to calculate the energetic values and the symmetry properties of atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems. In addition, it examines applications for these methods, and for the calculation of

  15. Combined laser and atomic force microscope lithography on aluminum: Mask fabrication for nanoelectromechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Boisen, Anja; Davis, Zachary James

    1999-01-01

    A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production of nanoelectromecha......A direct-write laser system and an atomic force microscope (AFM) are combined to modify thin layers of aluminum on an oxidized silicon substrate, in order to fabricate conducting and robust etch masks with submicron features. These masks are very well suited for the production...

  16. Stability and Group Index Switching in a Four-Level Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Ahmadi Sangachin, Elnaz; Asadpour Seyyed, Hossein

    2014-08-01

    A four-level atomic system is proposed for stability and group index switching in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence. It is found that the transition from optical bistability (OB) to optical multistability (OM) and subluminal to superluminal can be obtained simultaneously. It is shown that the relative phase between applied fields can affect the stability and group index behaviors of weak probe light in the medium. Our proposed model provides a new scheme for simultaneous switching from OB to OM and (sub-to-super) luminal light propagation in an atomic system.

  17. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  18. Open conformal systems and perturbations of transfer operators

    CERN Document Server

    Pollicott, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this book is on open conformal dynamical systems corresponding to the escape of a point through an open Euclidean ball. The ultimate goal is to understand the asymptotic behavior of the escape rate as the radius of the ball tends to zero. In the case of hyperbolic conformal systems this has been addressed by various authors. The conformal maps considered in this book are far more general, and the analysis correspondingly more involved. The asymptotic existence of escape rates is proved and they are calculated in the context of (finite or infinite) countable alphabets, uniformly contracting conformal graph-directed Markov systems, and in particular, conformal countable alphabet iterated function systems. These results have direct applications to interval maps, meromorphic maps and rational functions. Towards this goal the authors develop, on a purely symbolic level, a theory of singular perturbations of Perron--Frobenius (transfer) operators associated with countable alphabet subshifts of finite t...

  19. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  20. INTRODUCTION: Many-Body Theory of Atomic Systems: Proceedings of the Nobel Symposium 46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Lundqvist, Stig

    1980-01-01

    A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating meeting. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key participants is usually in the range 20-40. These symposia are organized through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposals from individuals. They have been made possible through a major grant from the Tri-Centennial Fund of the Bank of Sweden. Our first ideas to arrange a Nobel Symposium on many-body theory of atomic systems came up more than two years ago. It was quite obvious to us that a major break-through was happening in this field. Very accurate schemes have been available for some time for studying the static properties of small closed-shell atomic systems. By "atomic" systems we understand here atoms as well as free molecules, which can be treated by the same formalism, although the technical approaches might be quite different. The conceptual and computational developments in recent years, however, have made it possible to apply the many-body formalism also to heavier systems. Although no rigorous relativistic many-body theory yet exists, there seems to be a general agreement about the way relativistic calculations should be performed on normal atoms and molecules. Schemes based on relativistic perturbation theory as well as on relativistic multi- configurational Hartree-Fock are now in operation and a rapid development is expected in this area. Another field of atomic theory, where significant progress has been made recently, is in the application of many-body formalism to open-shell systems. General schemes, applicable to systems with one or several open shells, are now available, which will make it possible to apply many-body formalism to a much larger group of atomic systems and, in particular, to systems of more physical interest, A number of atomic properties - not only the correlation energy - can then be compared with the

  1. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Magnetite Nanoparticles with Statistical Poly(tert-butyl acrylate)-poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Patcharin Kanhakeaw; Boonjira Rutnakornpituk; Uthai Wichai; Metha Rutnakornpituk

    2015-01-01

    This work presented the surface modification of magnetite nanoparticle (MNP) with poly[(t-butyl acrylate)-stat-(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate)] copolymers (P[(t-BA)-stat-PEGMA]) via a surface-initiated “grafting from” atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Loading molar ratio of t-BA to PEGMA was systematically varied (100 : 0, 75 : 25, 50 : 50, and 25 : 75, resp.) such that the degree of hydrophilicity of the copolymers, affecting the particle dispersibility in water,...

  2. Synthesis of block copolymers by combination of atom transfer radical polymerization and visible light-induced free radical promoted cationic polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Muhammet U; Acik, Gokhan; Yagci, Yusuf

    2012-02-27

    A new synthetic approach for the preparation of block copolymers by mechanistic transformation from atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to visible light-induced free radical promoted cationic polymerization is described. A series of halide end-functionalized polystyrenes with different molecular weights synthesized by ATRP were utilized as macro-coinitiators in dimanganese decacarbonyl [Mn(2) (CO)(10) ] mediated free radical promoted cationic photopolymerization of cyclohexene oxide or isobutyl vinyl ether. Precursor polymers and corresponding block copolymers were characterized by spectral, chromatographic, and thermal analyses. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Heralded quantum gates for atomic systems assisted by the scattering of photons off single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Liu, Qian; Qiu, Jing; Yang, Guo-Jian; Alzahrani, Faris; Hobiny, Aatef; Deng, Fu-Guo; Zhang, Mei

    2017-12-01

    Quantum logic gates are essential in quantum information processing. Here, we propose three heralded schemes for universal quantum gates, including the controlled-NOT, Toffoli, and Fredkin gates on atomic systems, assisted by the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. Interestingly, our schemes can turn faulty scattering processes of photons off atoms into the detection of the photon polarization. Furthermore, auxiliary atomic qubits are not needed and only one photon medium is adopted. With current technology, we discuss the feasibility of these universal quantum gates, concluding that they are feasible and scalable in solid-state quantum systems. We provide a different method for realizing universal quantum gates, and it may be useful in quantum information processing in the future.

  4. Interaction-induced decay of a heteronuclear two-atom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Jiaheng; Liu, Min; He, Xiaodong; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Kunpeng; Wang, Jin; Papoular, D. J.; Shlyapnikov, G. V.; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two-atom systems in small traps are of fundamental interest for understanding the role of interactions in degenerate cold gases and for the creation of quantum gates in quantum information processing with single-atom traps. One of the key quantities is the inelastic relaxation (decay) time when one of the atoms or both are in a higher hyperfine state. Here we measure this quantity in a heteronuclear system of 87Rb and 85Rb in a micro optical trap and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the presence of both fast and slow relaxation processes, depending on the choice of the initial hyperfine states. This experimental method allows us to single out a particular relaxation process thus provides an extremely clean platform for collisional physics studies. Our results have also implications for engineering of quantum states via controlled collisions and creation of two-qubit quantum gates. PMID:26199051

  5. Enhacements to the TTS-502 time transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandierendonck, A. J.; Hua, Q. D.

    1985-04-01

    Two years ago STI introduced an affordable, relatively compact time transfer system on the market -- the TTS-502, and described that system at the 1981 PTTI conference. Over the past few months, that system has been improved, and new features have been added. In addition, new options have been made available to further enhance the capabilities of the system. These enhancements include the addition of a positioning algorithm and new options providing a corrected 5 MHz output that is phase coherent with the 1 pps output, and providing an internal Rubidium Oscillator. The Positioning Algorithm was developed because not all time transfer users had the luxury of the Defense Mapping Agency's (DMA) services for determining their position in WGS-72 coordinates. The enhanced TTS-502 determines the GPS position anywhere in the world, independent of how many GPS satellites are concurrently visible. However, convergence time to a solution is inversely proportional to the number of satellites concurrently visible and the quality of frequency standard used in conjunction with the TTS-502. Real World solution results will be presented for a variety of cases and satellite scheduling scenarios. Typically, positioning accuracies were achieved better than 5 to 10 meters r.s.s. using the C/A code only at Sunnyvale, California.

  6. Storage and retrieval of time-entangled soliton trains in a three-level atom system coupled to an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welakuh, Davis D. M.; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2017-11-01

    The storage and subsequent retrieval of coherent pulse trains in the quantum memory (i.e. cavity-dark state) of three-level Λ atoms, are considered for an optical medium in which adiabatic photon transfer occurs under the condition of quantum impedance matching. The underlying mechanism is based on intracavity Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency, by which properties of a cavity filled with three-level Λ-type atoms are manipulated by an external control field. Under the impedance matching condition, we derive analytic expressions that suggest a complete transfer of an input field into the cavity-dark state by varying the mixing angle in a specific way, and its subsequent retrieval at a desired time. We illustrate the scheme by demonstrating the complete transfer and retrieval of a Gaussian, a single hyperbolic-secant and a periodic train of time-entangled hyperbolic-secant input photon pulses in the atom-cavity system. For the time-entangled hyperbolic-secant input field, a total controllability of the periodic evolution of the dark state population is made possible by changing the Rabi frequency of the classical driving field, thus allowing to alternately store and retrieve high-intensity photons from the optically dense Electromagnetically-Induced transparent medium. Such multiplexed photon states, which are expected to allow sharing quantum information among many users, are currently of very high demand for applications in long-distance and multiplexed quantum communication.

  7. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  8. Advanced Payload Transfer Measurement System (APT-MS) Mechanical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, William V.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two feet or so of transfer, for a large or heavy payload to its restraining fixture, the consequences of unplanned contact (or impact) between payload and support structure can range from merely annoying to something approaching disaster. Current transfer methods employ technicians with meter sticks stationed at the various hold-down locations to estimate the distances to contact. This information is communicated orally to the crane operator. It is understandable that this work proceeds carefully and therefore slowly. The objectives of this study are (1) to explore mechanical sources of measurement error; and (2) to develop an improved prototype design that is compact, inexpensive, and addresses the measurement error issues. APT is a relatively inexpensive electro-mechanical device that reduces both time and manpower required to make shuttle payload transfers. APT measurement system would provide a GUI for the 'move-conductor' (crane operator) so he could see the displacements of all hold-down interfaces as they move together and thus have a more accurate, comprehensive and 'real-time' picture of the engagement activity. An error model attempts to include all estimatable sources of mechanical error and design features were introduced to reduce or eliminate major sources of error.

  9. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  10. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  11. Gain and Absorption of a Probe Light in an Open Tripod Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng-Feng; Lin, Jin-Da; Deng, Jian-Liao; He, Hui-Juan; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2012-05-01

    We theoretically investigate an open four-level atomic system interacting with control, probe and microwave fields. When there is no repumping light and a microwave field is applied, the probe light can be absorbed or amplified, which has different features than those of a system whose populations are pumped into only one ground state. In this system the microwave field and the population distributions of the ground states can be used as switches to control the propagation of the probe light.

  12. Configurable memory system and method for providing atomic counting operations in a memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofatto, Ralph E.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Ohmacht, Martin

    2010-09-14

    A memory system and method for providing atomic memory-based counter operations to operating systems and applications that make most efficient use of counter-backing memory and virtual and physical address space, while simplifying operating system memory management, and enabling the counter-backing memory to be used for purposes other than counter-backing storage when desired. The encoding and address decoding enabled by the invention provides all this functionality through a combination of software and hardware.

  13. Experimental Study of RF Energy Transfer System in Indoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, S.-E.; Proynov, P. P.; Stark, B. H.; Hilton, G. S.; Craddock, I. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a multi-transmitter, 2.43 GHz Radio-Frequency (RF) wireless power transfer (WPT) system for powering on-body devices. It is shown that under typical indoor conditions, the received power range spans several orders of magnitude from microwatts to milliwatts. A body-worn dual-polarised rectenna (rectifying antenna) is presented, designed for situations where the dominant polarization is unpredictable, as is the case for the on-body sensors. Power management circuitry is demonstrated that optimally loads the rectenna even under highly intermittent conditions, and boosts the voltage to charge an on-board storage capacitor.

  14. User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDam, Andries

    1998-01-01

    Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

  15. Numerical Studies of Collective Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Electron and Cold Atom Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezayi, Edward

    2013-07-25

    Numerical calculations were carried out to investigate a number of outstanding questions in both two-dimensional electron and cold atom systems. These projects aimed to increase our understanding of the properties of and prospects for non-Abelian states in quantum Hall matter.

  16. Kerr nonlinearity and EIT in a double Lambda type atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Hamid Reza; Khaledi-Nasab, Ali; Raheli, Ali

    2013-10-01

    The giant Kerr nonlinearity in a four-level double Lambda type atomic system is theoretically predicted. We find that an enhanced Kerr nonlinearity can be achieved just by the intensity of coupling filed that lies within the transparency window. It is also shown that the giant Kerr nonlinearity with reduced absorption can be achieved by the quantum interference mechanisms.

  17. The Langevin and generalised Langevin approach to the dynamics of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Snook, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The Langevin and Generalised Langevin Approach To The Dynamics Of Atomic, Polymeric And Colloidal Systems is concerned with the description of aspects of the theory and use of so-called random processes to describe the properties of atomic, polymeric and colloidal systems in terms of the dynamics of the particles in the system. It provides derivations of the basic equations, the development of numerical schemes to solve them on computers and gives illustrations of application to typical systems.Extensive appendices are given to enable the reader to carry out computations to illustrate many of the points made in the main body of the book.* Starts from fundamental equations* Gives up-to-date illustration of the application of these techniques to typical systems of interest* Contains extensive appendices including derivations, equations to be used in practice and elementary computer codes

  18. Introducing a downsized, open computer system with asynchronous transfer mode in PACS and its effect on image data transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Koyama, Y; Suzuki, H; Oriuchi, N; Aoyagi, K; Tomaru, Y; Ookoshi, A; Yamamoto, S; Nakajima, T; Aoki, J; Endo, K

    1998-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the introduction of a downsized, open computer system and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) as a network in a medium-sized picture archiving and communication system (PACS), we conducted experiments on image data transmission. The speed of image transfer, including registration in the computers in the new PACS, was four to eleven times faster than that in our first PACS. However, the introduction of ATM did not contribute significantly to the improvement of speed of image transfer because of the use of Ethernet branches between the gateway and display workstation computers. A star architecture without Ethernet branches may be suitable for PACS using an ATM network.

  19. Magnetic-field-mediated coupling and control in hybrid atomic-nanomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, A.; LeBlanc, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetically coupled hybrid quantum systems enable robust quantum state control through Landau-Zener transitions. Here, we show that an ultracold atomic sample magnetically coupled to a nanomechanical resonator can be used to cool the resonator's mechanical motion, to measure the mechanical temperature, and to enable entanglement of more than one of these mesoscopic objects. We calculate the expected coupling for both permanent-magnet and current-conducting nanostring resonators and describe how this hybridization is attainable using recently developed fabrication techniques, including SiN nanostrings and atom chips.

  20. Coupled-cluster calculations of properties of Boron atom as a monovalent system

    CERN Document Server

    Gharibnejad, H

    2015-01-01

    We present relativistic coupled-cluster (CC) calculations of energies, magnetic-dipole hyperfine constants, and electric-dipole transition amplitudes for low-lying states of atomic boron. The trivalent boron atom is computationally treated as a monovalent system. We explore performance of the CC method at various approximations. Our most complete treatment involves singles, doubles and the leading valence triples. The calculations are done using several approximations in the coupled-cluster (CC) method. The results are within 0.2-0.4% of the energy benchmarks. The hyperfine constants are reproduced with 1-2% accuracy.

  1. Two simple systems with cold atoms: quantum chaos tests and non-equilibrium dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Cavan; Aoud, Yassine Ait El; Olshanii, Maxim [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston MA 02125 (United States); Yurovsky, Vladimir A, E-mail: Maxim.Olshanii@umb.ed [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    This paper is an attempt to establish a link between the quantum nonequilibrium dynamics of cold gases and 50 years of progress in low-dimensional quantum chaos. We identify two atomic systems lying in the interface: two interacting atoms in a harmonic multimode waveguide and an interacting two-component Bose-Bose mixture in a double-well potential. In particular, we study the level spacing distribution, the wavefunction statistics, the eigenstate thermalization and the ability to thermalize in a relaxation process as such.

  2. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  3. Theory of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamic Systems is intended for scientists and graduate students interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and applied scientists interested in accurate atomic and molecular models. This is a reference to those working in the new field of relativistic optics, in topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles, and is based on 30 years of research. The novelty of this work consists of accurate connections between the properties of quantum equations and correspon

  4. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  5. Oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions: insights from quantum chemistry calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hujun; Liu, Chengcheng; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Ting; Lei, Qunfang; Fang, Wenjun

    2016-01-21

    The mechanisms for the oxidation of phenyl and hydride ligands of bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium derivatives (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) by nitrous oxide via selective oxygen atom transfer reactions have been systematically studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the basis of the calculations, we investigated the original mechanism proposed by Hillhouse and co-workers for the activation of N2O. The calculations showed that the complex with an initial O-coordination of N2O to the coordinatively unsaturated Hf center is not a local minimum. Then we proposed a new reaction mechanism to investigate how N2O is activated and why N2O selectively oxidize phenyl and hydride ligands of . Frontier molecular orbital theory analysis indicates that N2O is activated by nucleophilic attack by the phenyl or hydride ligand. Present calculations provide new insights into the activation of N2O involving the direct oxygen atom transfer from nitrous oxide to metal-ligand bonds instead of the generally observed oxygen abstraction reaction to generate metal-oxo species.

  6. Electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clays. Role in U and Hg(II) transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michelle [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During this project, we investigated Fe electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. We used selective chemical extractions, enriched Fe isotope tracer experiments, computational molecular modeling, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that structural Fe(III) in clay minerals is reduced by aqueous Fe(II) and that electron transfer occurs when Fe(II) is sorbed to either basal planes and edge OH-groups of clay mineral. Findings from highly enriched isotope experiments suggest that up to 30 % of the Fe atoms in the structure of some clay minerals exhanges with aqueous Fe(II). First principles calculations using a small polaron hopping approach suggest surprisingly fast electron mobility at room temperature in a nontronite clay mineral and are consistent with temperature dependent Mössbauer data Fast electron mobility suggests that electrons may be able to conduct through the mineral fast enough to enable exchange of Fe between the aqueous phase and clay mineral structure. over the time periods we observed. Our findings suggest that Fe in clay minerals is not as stable as previously thought.

  7. Mechanistic elucidation of the stepwise formation of a tetranuclear manganese pinned butterfly cluster via N-N bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and cluster rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clifton R; Gau, Michael R; Baglia, Regina A; McWilliams, Sean F; Zdilla, Michael J

    2014-12-31

    A mechanistic pathway for the formation of the structurally characterized manganese-amide-hydrazide pinned butterfly complex, Mn4(μ3-PhN-NPh-κ(3)N,N')2(μ-PhN-NPh-κ(2)-N,N')(μ-NHPh)2L4 (L = THF, py), is proposed and supported by the use of labeling studies, kinetic measurements, kinetic competition experiments, kinetic isotope effects, and hydrogen atom transfer reagent substitution, and via the isolation and characterization of intermediates using X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data support a formation mechanism whereby bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amido]manganese(II) (Mn(NR2)2, where R = SiMe3) reacts with N,N'-diphenylhydrazine (PhNHNHPh) via initial proton transfer, followed by reductive N-N bond cleavage to form a long-lived Mn(IV) imido multinuclear complex. Coordinating solvents activate this cluster for abstraction of hydrogen atoms from an additional equivalent of PhNHNHPh resulting in a Mn(II)phenylamido dimer, Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(NR2)2L2. This dimeric complex further assembles in fast steps with two additional equivalents of PhNHNHPh replacing the terminal silylamido ligands with η(1)-hydrazine ligands to give a dimeric Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(PhN-NHPh)2L4 intermediate, and finally, the addition of two additional equivalents of Mn(NR2)2 and PhNHNHPh gives the pinned butterfly cluster.

  8. Ab initio evaluation of the thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of alkyl halides and radicals and their mechanistic implications for atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching Yeh; Coote, Michelle L; Gennaro, Armando; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-09-24

    High-level ab initio molecular orbital calculations are used to study the thermodynamics and electrochemistry relevant to the mechanism of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) and standard reduction potentials (SRPs) are reported for a series of alkyl halides (R-X; R = CH 2CN, CH(CH 3)CN, C(CH 3) 2CN, CH 2COOC 2H 5, CH(CH 3)COOCH 3, C(CH 3) 2COOCH 3, C(CH 3) 2COOC 2H 5, CH 2Ph, CH(CH 3)Ph, CH(CH 3)Cl, CH(CH 3)OCOCH 3, CH(Ph)COOCH 3, SO 2Ph, Ph; X = Cl, Br, I) both in the gas phase and in two common organic solvents, acetonitrile and dimethylformamide. The SRPs of the corresponding alkyl radicals, R (*), are also examined. The computational results are in a very good agreement with the experimental data. For all alkyl halides examined, it is found that, in the solution phase, one-electron reduction results in the fragmentation of the R-X bond to the corresponding alkyl radical and halide anion; hence it may be concluded that a hypothetical outer-sphere electron transfer (OSET) in ATRP should occur via concerted dissociative electron transfer rather than a two-step process with radical anion intermediates. Both the homolytic and heterolytic reactions are favored by electron-withdrawing substituents and/or those that stabilize the product alkyl radical, which explains why monomers such as acrylonitrile and styrene require less active ATRP catalysts than vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate. The rate constant of the hypothetical OSET reaction between bromoacetonitrile and Cu (I)/TPMA complex was estimated using Marcus theory for the electron-transfer processes. The estimated rate constant k OSET = approximately 10 (-11) M (-1) s (-1) is significantly smaller than the experimentally measured activation rate constant ( k ISET = approximately 82 M (-1) s (-1) at 25 degrees C in acetonitrile) for the concerted atom transfer mechanism (inner-sphere electron transfer, ISET), implying that the ISET mechanism is preferred. For

  9. Oxidative atom-transfer to a trimanganese complex to form Mn6(μ6-E) (E = O, N) clusters featuring interstitial oxide and nitride functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, Alison R; Zhao, Qinliang; Xiao, Dianne J; Betley, Theodore A

    2011-10-26

    Utilizing a hexadentate ligand platform, a trinuclear manganese complex of the type ((H)L)Mn(3)(thf)(3) was synthesized and characterized ([(H)L](6-) = [MeC(CH(2)N(C(6)H(4)-o-NH))(3)](6-)). The pale-orange, formally divalent trimanganese complex rapidly reacts with O-atom transfer reagents to afford the μ(6)-oxo complex ((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-O)(NCMe)(4), where two trinuclear subunits bind the central O-atom and the ((H)L) ligands cooperatively bind both trinuclear subunits. The trimanganese complex ((H)L)Mn(3)(thf)(3) rapidly consumes inorganic azide ([N(3)]NBu(4)) to afford a dianionic hexanuclear nitride complex [((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-N)](NBu(4))(2), which subsequently can be oxidized with elemental iodine to ((H)L)(2)Mn(6)(μ(6)-N)(NCMe)(4). EPR and alkylation of the interstitial light atom substituent were used to distinguish the nitride from the oxo complex. The oxo and oxidized nitride complexes give rise to well-defined Mn(II) and Mn(III) sites, determined by bond valence summation, while the dianionic nitride shows a more symmetric complex, giving rise to indistinguishable ion oxidation states based on crystal structure bond metrics.

  10. Transferable Anisotropic United-Atom Force Field Based on the Mie Potential for Phase Equilibrium Calculations: n-Alkanes and n-Olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmen, Andrea; Gross, Joachim

    2015-09-03

    A new transferable force field parametrization for n-alkanes and n-olefins is proposed in this work. A united-atom approach is taken, where hydrogen atoms are lumped with neighboring atoms to single interaction sites. A comprehensive study is conducted for alkanes, optimizing van der Waals force field parameters in 6 dimensions. A Mie n-6 potential is considered for the van der Waals interaction, where for n-alkanes we simultaneously optimize the energy parameters ϵCH3 and ϵCH2 as well as the size parameters σCH3 and σCH2 of the CH3(sp(3)) and CH2(sp(3)) groups. Further, the repulsive exponent n of the Mie n-6 potential is varied. Moreover, we investigate the bond length toward the terminal CH3 group as a degree of freedom. According to the AUA (anisotropic united-atom) force field, the bond length between the terminal CH3 group and the neighboring interaction site should be increased by Δl compared with the carbon-carbon distance in order to better account for the hydrogen atoms. The parameter Δl is considered as a degree of freedom. The intramolecular force field parametrization is taken from existing force fields. A single objective function for the optimization is defined as squared relative deviations in vapor pressure and in liquid density of propane, n-butane, n-hexane, and n-octane. A similar study is also done for olefins, where the objective function includes 1-butene, 1-hexene, 1-octene, cis-2-pentene, and trans-2-pentene. Molecular simulations are performed in the grand canonical ensemble with transition-matrix sampling where the phase equilibrium properties are obtained with the histogram reweighting technique. The 6-dimensional optimization of strongly correlated parameters is possible, because the analytic PC-SAFT equation of state is used to locally correlate simulation results. The procedure is iterative but leads to very efficient convergence. An implementation is proposed, where the converged result is not affected (disturbed) by the

  11. GaN-Based Laser Wireless Power Transfer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo De Santi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present a potential application of gallium nitride-based optoelectronic devices. By using a laser diode and a photodetector, we designed and demonstrated a free-space compact and lightweight wireless power transfer system, whose efficiency is limited by the efficiency of the receiver. We analyzed the effect of the electrical load, temperature, partial absorption and optical excitation distribution on the efficiency, by identifying heating and band-filling as the most impactful processes. By comparing the final demonstrator with a commercial RF-based Qi system, we conclude that the efficiency is still low at close range, but is promising in medium to long range applications. Efficiency may not be a limiting factor, since this concept can enable entirely new possibilities and designs, especially relevant for space applications.

  12. Efficiency at maximum power of a heat engine working with a two-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jianhui; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli

    2013-04-01

    We consider the finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine whose working substance is composed of a two-level atomic system. The engine cycle, consisting of two quantum adiabatic and two quantum isochoric (constant-frequency) processes and working between two heat reservoirs at temperatures T(h) and T(c)(engine model based on a mesoscopic or macroscopic system. If the internal friction is included, we find that the EMP decreases as the friction coefficient increases.

  13. Quantum properties of a parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharypov A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the quantum properties of two light fields used to parametric four-wave mixing in a Raman type atomic system. The system realizes an effective Hamiltonian of beamsplitter type coupling between the light fields, which allows to control squeezing and amplitude distribution of the light fields, as well as realizing their entanglement. The scheme can be feasibly applied to engineer the quantum properties of two single-mode light fields in properly chosen input states.

  14. Proton and hydrogen atom detection efficiency of resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrenberg, P.J.; Clark, K.C.

    1976-10-01

    The absolute detection efficiency for protons and for hydrogen atoms in the energy range 5--60 keV is determined for a resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system. Significant history-dependent gain variations are discussed. The detector system is suitable for use in coincidence experiments requiring particle-counting rates to 1.0 MHz and timing accuracies of 3.0 nsec. (AIP)

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate the hydrogen atom transfer during reaction between 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical and antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudier, Ariane; Tournebize, Juliana [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bartosz, Grzegorz [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); El Hani, Safae; Bengueddour, Rachid [Laboratoire de Nutrition et Sante, Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ibn Tofail University, Kenitra (Morocco); Sapin-Minet, Anne [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Leroy, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.leroy@pharma.uhp-nancy.fr [CITHEFOR - EA 3452, Faculte de Pharmacie, Nancy-Universite, 5 Rue Albert Lebrun, BP 80403, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and its product measurement by HPLC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lowest limit of detection by monitoring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption problem of the radical on HPLC parts have been pointed out. - Abstract: 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH{center_dot}) is a stable nitrogen centred radical widely used to evaluate direct radical scavenging properties of various synthetic or natural antioxidants (AOs). The bleaching rate of DPPH{center_dot} absorbance at 515 nm is usually monitored for this purpose. In order to avoid the interference of complex coloured natural products used as antioxidant supplements or cosmetics, HPLC systems have been reported as alternative techniques to spectrophotometry. They also rely upon measurement of DPPH{center_dot} quenching rate and none of them permits to identify and measure 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazine (DPPH-H), the reduced product of DPPH{center_dot} resulting from hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which is the main mechanism of the reaction between DPPH{center_dot} and AOs. We presently report an HPLC method devoted to the simultaneous measurement of DPPH{center_dot} and DPPH-H. Both were fully separated on a C18 column eluted with acetonitrile-10 mM ammonium citrate buffer pH 6.8 (70:30, v/v) and detected at 330 nm. Adsorption process of DPPH{center_dot} onto materials of the HPLC system was pointed out. Consequently, the linearity range observed for DPPH{center_dot} was restricted, thus a much lower limit of detection was obtained for DPPH-H than for DPPH{center_dot} using standards (0.02 and 14 {mu}M, respectively). The method was applied to three commonly used AOs, i.e. Trolox{sup Registered-Sign }, ascorbic acid and GSH, and compared with spectrophotometry. Further application to complex matrices (cell culture media, vegetal extracts) and nanomaterials demonstrated (i) its usefulness because of

  16. Reconstructive surgery for male stress urinary incontinence: Experiences using the ATOMS system at a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause, Jens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose possible success-driven solutions for problem and complication rates encountered with the ATOMS sling system, based on first-hand experience; and to provide possible actual alternative scenarios for the treatment of male . Patients and methods: During the defined period (between 4/2010 and 04/2014, 36 patients received ATOMS system implants at our clinic. We collected pre- and post-operative evaluation data using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ SF. As an expansion of the questionnaire, we added questions about post-operative perineal pain, the general satisfaction with the results of the intervention and willingness to recommend the operation to a best friend. Results: Our data shows a relatively high explantation rate, but a surprisingly high patient satisfaction rate. Explantation was required mainly due to late onset infections or other symptomatic factors. Compared to other studies early onset infections were rare. Conclusion: A non-invasive, uncomplicated adjustable system to alleviate male stress urinary incontinence remains a challenge. Although there are various systems available for the treatment of male stress urinary incontinence, it seems that despite the advantages of the ATOMS system, an artificial sphincter system may pose more advantages based on our experience, understanding and knowledge of its well-documented long-term solutions and problems.

  17. Quantum phases of low-dimensional ultra-cold atom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Ludwig G.

    2007-06-01

    In this thesis we derive and explore the quantum phases of various types of ultracold atom systems, as well as their experimental signature. The technology of cooling, trapping and manipulating ultracold atoms has advanced in an amazing fashion during the last decade, which has led to the study of many-body effects of atomic ensembles. We first consider atomic mixtures in one dimension, which show a rich structure of phases, using a Luttinger liquid description. We then go on to consider how noise correlations in time-of-flight images of one-dimensional systems can be used to draw conclusions about the many-body state that they're in. Thirdly, we consider the quantum phases of Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices, either square lattices or triangular lattices, using the powerful method of functional renormalization group analysis. Lastly, we study the phases of two-coupled quasi-superfluids in two dimensions, which shows unusual phases, and which could be used to realize the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, i.e. the generation of topological defects by ramping across a phase transition, first proposed in the context of an early universe scenario.

  18. Apparatus and Method for Effecting Data Transfer Between Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Joey V. (Inventor); Grosz, Francis B., Jr. (Inventor); Lannes, Kenny (Inventor); Maniscalco, David G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting data transfer between data systems comprising a first transceiver and a second transceiver. The first transceiver has an input for receiving digital data from one of the data systems, an output for serially outputting digital data to one of the data systems, at least one transmitter for converting digital data received at the input into optical signals, and at least one receiver for receiving optical signals and serially converting the received optical signals to digital data for output to the data output. The second transceiver has an input for receiving digital data from another one of the data systems, an output for serially outputting digital data to the another one of the data systems, at least one transmitter for serially converting digital data received at the input of the second transceiver into optical signals, and at least one receiver for receiving optical signals and serially converting the received optical signals to digital data for output to the output of the second transceiver. The apparatus further comprises an optical link connecting the first and second transceivers. The optical link comprising a pair of optical fibers. One of the optical fibers optically links the transmitter of the first transceiver to the receiver of the second transceiver. The other optical fiber optically links the receiver of the first transceiver to the transmitter of the second transceiver.

  19. Controllability of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Doppler Broadened Four-Level Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elnabi, Somia; Osman, K. I.

    2013-04-01

    The influence of Doppler broadening on a four-level N-type atomic system has been investigated in the presence of spontaneous generating coherence. The atomic system interacting with three electromagnetic fields and includes the nonradiative decay, the effect of co- and counter-propagation of the fields is considered. The probe susceptibility behaviors can be modified by Doppler broadening via nonperturbative treatments of the density matrix elements solution in the absence and presence of the spontaneous generating coherence. Some interesting features are enhanced for the spectral behaviors and controllability of electromagnetically induced transparency, which were found to be in good agreement to some experimental results without including Zeeman sublevels to the system.

  20. The international regulation of Informal Value Transfer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ajay Shah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available After the 11th September 2001 attacks on the United States international attention quickly focused on the sources and methods of terrorist financing. Among the methods terrorists and other criminal actors use to transfer funds are Informal Value Transfer Systems (IVTS which operate either outside the formal financial sector, or through use of the formal financial sector, but without leaving a full record of the transaction. Though the vast majority of funds moved through IVTS are the earnings of migrant workers and immigrant communities, the lack of uniform worldwide regulation of IVTS provides ample opportunity for abuse and misuse. The international community primarily responded to IVTS concerns through the Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering, which issued a series of recommendations and best practices for states in regulating IVTS operations. While these recommendations are a secure beginning to regulation of IVTS operating within ethnic communities, they fail to address the more modern forms of IVTS that have come about in the post-Cold War globalised world. Comprehensive recommendations governing all types of IVTS, as well as concerted international cooperation and coordination are necessary to address this global phenomenon.

  1. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2007-03-01

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass ( m0), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 ± 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 ± 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 ± 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection limits (3

  2. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Pamela C. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Parsons, Patrick J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lead Poisoning/Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)], E-mail: patrick.parsons@wadsworth.org

    2007-03-15

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m{sub 0}), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 {+-} 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 {+-} 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 {+-} 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection

  3. Technology Transfer and Technology Management in Strategic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Salwan

    2005-01-01

    In a knowledge-based economy, the issues of technology transfer and management of technology, especially in sensitive strategic industries, are of major concern. The transfer of technology is a complex multidisciplinary area of technology management involving technology transfers from overseas developing agencies and internal technology transfers. Technology isa combination of four basic com~onents-facilities, abilities, facts, and frameworks. Economics of scale and complexities in technologi...

  4. Hydrodynamic, Atomic Kinetic, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer Models of the X-ray Spectra of Compact Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-02-08

    We describe the results of an effort, funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, to model, using FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamic simulations, XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC atomic data, and Monte Carlo radiation transport, the radiatively-driven photoionized wind and accretion flow of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this final report, we describe the purpose, approach, and technical accomplishments of this effort, including maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of the X-ray emission lines of the well-studied HMXB Vela X-1.

  5. Development of a Magneto-Optical Trap System of Francium Atoms for the Electron Electric-Dipole-Moment Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, K.; Aoki, T.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Inoue, T.; Aoki, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Ito, S.; Itoh, M.; Hayamizu, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Wakasa, T.; Sakemi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The finite value of an electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) provides the direct evidence for the violation of time reversal symmetry. Fr atoms, whose enhancement factor is 895, trapped by laser cooling and trapping techniques are one of the strongest candidates for measuring the eEDM. We are constructing a beamline for measuring the eEDM using laser- cooled Fr atoms at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center. We have developed laser light sources including the frequency stabilization system and a magneto-optical trap system for Fr atoms. As the Fr production requires the cyclotron operation, we also use Rb atoms whose chemical properties are similar to those of the Fr atoms. Thus, the Rb beam is utilized for optimizing the operation parameters of the entire apparatus. We have also developed the laser light sources for Rb atoms and observed the beat signal for frequency stabilization of the source using the frequency offset locking method.

  6. Hydride, hydrogen atom, proton, and electron transfer driving forces of various five-membered heterocyclic organic hydrides and their reaction intermediates in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Yu, Ao; Wang, Chun-Hua; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2008-02-27

    weak one-electron oxidation agents. The energies of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in 3H, 3H+*, and 3* with a hydroxyl group at ortho-position on the 2-phenyl ring were estimated by using experimental method, the results disclose that the hydrogen bond energy is 3.2, 2.8-3.0, and 3.9-4.0 kcal/mol for 3H, 3H+*, and 3* in acetonitrile, respectively, which is favorable for hydrogen atom transfer but unfavorable for hydride transfer from 3H. The relative effective charges on the active center in ZH, ZH+*, Z*, and Z+, which is an efficient measurement of electrophilicity or nucleophilicity as well as dimerizing ability of a chemical species, were estimated by using experimental method; the results indicate that 1*-5* belong to electron-sufficient carbon-radicals, 6*-7* belong to electron-deficient carbon radicals, they are all difficult to dimerize, and that 1+-5+ belong to weak electrophilic agents, 6+-7+ belong to strong electrophilic agents. All these information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of the chemical thermodynamics of the five-membered heterocyclic compounds as organic hydride donors, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of the five-membered heterocyclic organic hydrides.

  7. The Impact of Technical Data Transfer Problems During a Transition of Weapons System Production Between Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    39 Tech Data Transfer THE IMPACT OF TECHNICAL DATA TRANSFER PROBLEMS DURING A TRANSITION OF WEAPONS SYSTEM PRODUCTION BETWEEN NATIONS Michael E...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Impact of Technical Data Transfer Problems During a Transition of Weapons System Production Between Nations 5a. CONTRACT...of the L119 and established roy- alty payment procedures. The decision to produce the M119 41 Tech Data Transfer domestically was based on two

  8. Dichotomous Hydrogen Atom Transfer vs. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer During Activation of X-H Bonds (X = C, N, O) by Nonheme Iron-Oxo Complexes of Variable Basicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lacy, David C.; Borovik, A. S.; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    We describe herein the hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT)/ proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactivity for FeIV-oxo and FeIII-oxo complexes (1–4) that activate C-H, N-H, and O-H bonds in 9,10 dihydroanthracene (S1), dimethylformamide (S2), 1,2 diphenylhydrazine (S3), p-methoxyphenol (S4), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (S5). In 1–3, the iron is pentacoordinated by tris[N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea]3−) or its derivatives. These complexes are basic, in the order 3 >> 1 > 2. Oxidant 4, [FeIVN4Py(O)]2+ (N4Py: N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-bis(2-pyridyl) methylamine), is the least basic oxidant. The DFT results match experimental trends and exhibit a mechanistic spectrum ranging from concerted HAT and PCET reactions to concerted-asynchronous proton transfer (PT) / electron transfer (ET) mechanisms, all the way to PT. The singly occupied orbital along the O---H---X (X= C, N, O) moiety in the TS shows clearly that in the PCET cases, the electron is transferred separately from the proton. The Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not account for the observed reactivity pattern, as evidenced by the scatter in the plot of calculated barrier vs. reactions driving forces. However, a plot of the deformation energy in the TS vs. the respective barrier provides a clear signature of the HAT/PCET dichotomy. Thus, in all C-H bond activations, the barrier derives from the deformation energy required to create the TS, whereas in N-H/O-H bond activations, the deformation energy is much larger than the corresponding barrier, indicating the presence of stabilizing interaction between the TS fragments. A valence bond model is used to link the observed results with the basicity/acidity of the reactants. PMID:24124906

  9. A Rydberg Atom Ensemble-Surface Phonon Polariton Quantum Hybrid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yuanxi; Sheng, Jiteng; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a quantum hybrid system in the strong coupling regime, formed by a Rydberg atom ensemble and a surface phonon polariton (SPhP) propagating on a periodically poled piezoelectric metamaterial surface. We present our theoretical results and initial experiments on the possibilities for achieving strong coupling. Due to the large Rydberg transition dipole moments and the local field enhancement of confined SPhP excitations, the strong coupling regime can be achieved with a dilute atomic ensemble and a proper superlattice design according to our calculations. With submicron periodically poled crystals, even when the atomic ensemble is mms away from the crystal surface, the collective atom-surface coupling can exceed the loss rates, leading to the observation of strong coupling phenomena. For our work, the Rydberg transition from 87S1/2 to 87P1/2 in rubidium is chosen to couple to a SPhP mode at 5 GHz, corresponding to a periodically poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) surface with a period of 1 μm . To fabricate the PPLN we use the direct e-beam write poling method. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  10. A thermally driven differential mutation approach for the structural optimization of large atomic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Katja

    2017-09-01

    A computational method is presented which is capable to obtain low lying energy structures of topological amorphous systems. The method merges a differential mutation genetic algorithm with simulated annealing. This is done by incorporating a thermal selection criterion, which makes it possible to reliably obtain low lying minima with just a small population size and is suitable for multimodal structural optimization. The method is tested on the structural optimization of amorphous graphene from unbiased atomic starting configurations. With just a population size of six systems, energetically very low structures are obtained. While each of the structures represents a distinctly different arrangement of the atoms, their properties, such as energy, distribution of rings, radial distribution function, coordination number, and distribution of bond angles, are very similar.

  11. Negative refraction with absorption suppressed by electromagnetically induced transparency in a left-handed atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, ShunCai

    2012-02-01

    This paper intends to realize negative refraction with absorption suppressed by the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a dense four-level atomic system. Without the two equal transition frequencies responding to the probe field, the atomic system displays a negative refraction with the simultaneously negative permittivity and negative permeability (left-handedness). The response of the probe field is amplified and propagates transparency in some frequency extents. Therefore, our aim for searching the low-loss negative refraction can be achieved in the scheme, given the main applied limitation of the negative refractive materials is the large amount of dissipation and absorption. However, an excessive signal field intensity would increase the absorption near the resonance in our scheme.

  12. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  13. Search for domain wall dark matter with atomic clocks on board global positioning system satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Benjamin M; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Dailey, Conner; Murphy, Mac; Pospelov, Maxim; Rollings, Alex; Sherman, Jeff; Williams, Wyatt; Derevianko, Andrei

    2017-10-30

    Cosmological observations indicate that dark matter makes up 85% of all matter in the universe yet its microscopic composition remains a mystery. Dark matter could arise from ultralight quantum fields that form macroscopic objects. Here we use the global positioning system as a ~ 50,000 km aperture dark matter detector to search for such objects in the form of domain walls. Global positioning system navigation relies on precision timing signals furnished by atomic clocks. As the Earth moves through the galactic dark matter halo, interactions with domain walls could cause a sequence of atomic clock perturbations that propagate through the satellite constellation at galactic velocities ~ 300 km s -1 . Mining 16 years of archival data, we find no evidence for domain walls at our current sensitivity level. This improves the limits on certain quadratic scalar couplings of domain wall dark matter to standard model particles by several orders of magnitude.

  14. Secure Data Transfer Guidance for Industrial Control and SCADA Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, Robert E.; Fluckiger, Jerry D.; Clements, Samuel L.; Tews, Cody W.; Burnette, John R.; Goranson, Craig A.; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-09-01

    This document was developed to provide guidance for the implementation of secure data transfer in a complex computational infrastructure representative of the electric power and oil and natural gas enterprises and the control systems they implement. For the past 20 years the cyber security community has focused on preventative measures intended to keep systems secure by providing a hard outer shell that is difficult to penetrate. Over time, the hard exterior, soft interior focus changed to focus on defense-in-depth adding multiple layers of protection, introducing intrusion detection systems, more effective incident response and cleanup, and many other security measures. Despite much larger expenditures and more layers of defense, successful attacks have only increased in number and severity. Consequently, it is time to re-focus the conventional approach to cyber security. While it is still important to implement measures to keep intruders out, a new protection paradigm is warranted that is aimed at discovering attempted or real compromises as early as possible. Put simply, organizations should take as fact that they have been, are now, or will be compromised. These compromises may be intended to steal information for financial gain as in the theft of intellectual property or credentials that lead to the theft of financial resources, or to lie silent until instructed to cause physical or electronic damage and/or denial of services. This change in outlook has been recently confirmed by the National Security Agency [19]. The discovery of attempted and actual compromises requires an increased focus on monitoring events by manual and/or automated log monitoring, detecting unauthorized changes to a system's hardware and/or software, detecting intrusions, and/or discovering the exfiltration of sensitive information and/or attempts to send inappropriate commands to ICS/SCADA (Industrial Control System/Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems.

  15. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of an inter-atomic potential for the Pd-H binary system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada); Leonard, Francois Leonard; Griffin, Joshua D.; Zhou, Xiao Wang

    2007-09-01

    Ongoing research at Sandia National Laboratories has been in the area of developing models and simulation methods that can be used to uncover and illuminate the material defects created during He bubble growth in aging bulk metal tritides. Previous efforts have used molecular dynamics calculations to examine the physical mechanisms by which growing He bubbles in a Pd metal lattice create material defects. However, these efforts focused only on the growth of He bubbles in pure Pd and not on bubble growth in the material of interest, palladium tritide (PdT), or its non-radioactive isotope palladium hydride (PdH). The reason for this is that existing inter-atomic potentials do not adequately describe the thermodynamics of the Pd-H system, which includes a miscibility gap that leads to phase separation of the dilute (alpha) and concentrated (beta) alloys of H in Pd at room temperature. This document will report the results of research to either find or develop inter-atomic potentials for the Pd-H and Pd-T systems, including our efforts to use experimental data and density functional theory calculations to create an inter-atomic potential for this unique metal alloy system.

  17. Resonant line transfer in a fog: using Lyman-alpha to probe tiny structures in atomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; McCourt, Michael; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by observational and theoretical work that suggest very small-scale (≲ 1 pc) structure in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies and in other environments, we study Lyman-α (Lyα) radiative transfer in an extremely clumpy medium with many clouds of neutral gas along the line of sight. While previous studies have typically considered radiative transfer through sightlines intercepting ≲ 10 clumps, we explored the limit of a very large number of clumps per sightline (up to fc 1000). Our main finding is that, for covering factors greater than some critical threshold, a multiphase medium behaves similarly to a homogeneous medium in terms of the emergent Lyα spectrum. The value of this threshold depends on both the clump column density and the movement of the clumps. We estimated this threshold analytically and compare our findings to radiative transfer simulations with a range of covering factors, clump column densities, radii, and motions. Our results suggest that (I) the success in fitting observed Lyα spectra using homogeneous "shell models" (and the corresponding failure of multiphase models) hints at the presence of very small-scale structure in neutral gas, which is in agreement within a number of other observations; and (II) the recurrent problems of reproducing realistic line profiles from hydrodynamical simulations may be due to their inability to resolve small-scale structure, which causes simulations to underestimate the effective covering factor of neutral gas clouds. The movie associated to Fig. B.2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  19. Combining polymers with the functionality of proteins: new concepts for atom transfer radical polymerization, nanoreactors and damage self-reporting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Nico; Lörcher, Samuel; Makyła, Katarzyna; Pollarda, Jonas; Renggli, Kasper; Spulber, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are macromolecules with a great diversity of functions. By combining these biomolecules with polymers, exciting opportunities for new concepts in polymer sciences arise. This highlight exemplifies the aforementioned with current research results of our group. We review our discovery that the proteins horseradish peroxidase and hemoglobin possess ATRPase activity, i.e. they catalyze atom transfer radical polymerizations. Moreover, a permeabilization method for polymersomes is presented, where the photo-reaction of an α-hydroxyalkylphenone with block copolymer vesicles yields enzyme-containing nanoreactors. A further intriguing possibility to obtain functional nanoreactors is to enclose a polymerization catalyst into the thermosome, a protein cage from the family of chaperonins. Last but not least, fluorescent proteins are discussed as mechanoresponsive molecular sensors that report microdamages within fiber-reinforced composite materials.

  20. Optical Power Transfer System for Powering a Remote Mobility System for Multiple Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An optical power transfer system for powering a remote mobility system for multiple missions comprising a high power source and a chilling station connected to a laser source. The laser source transmits a high optical energy to a beam switch assembly via an optical fiber. The beam switch assembly is optically connected to actively cooled fiber spoolers. Docking stations are adapted for securing the fiber spoolers until alternatively ready for use by a remote mobility system. The remote mobility system is optically connected to the fiber spoolers and has a receiving port adapted for securing the fiber spoolers thereon. The fiber spooler transmits the optical energy to a power conversion system which converts the optical energy received to another usable form of energy. More than one power source may be used where the remote mobility system transfers from one source to another while maintaining an operational radius to each source.

  1. Transfer Prices Implication Upon Tax System. The Romanian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumiter Florin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer prices are a top field in financial and legal scientific research and practical activity. Although this research field is still in the beginning, due to its complexity, as well as it’s inter-, multi- and transdisciplinarity, it can be noted that empirical studies, as well as practical researches in economic and legal matters, have intensified. Moreover, this field of transfer prices is in close connection with the area of international double taxation, which shows its international character. In this article we sought a holistic approach to the transfer price phenomenon, dealing with economic and legal technical aspects that we believed are important to emphasise. Without addressing the issue of transfer prices in an exhaustive manner, in this article we presented both the legal and the economic framework of transfer prices in Romania. The added value of this article lies in the approach to transfer prices, both legally and economically.

  2. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Systems in Supramolecular Macrocyclic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xin-Yue; Song, Nan; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2017-09-29

    The fabrication of smart materials is gradually becoming a research focus in nanotechnology and materials science. An important criterion of smart materials is the capacity of stimuli-responsiveness, while another lies in selective recognition. Accordingly, supramolecular host-guest chemistry has proven a promising support for building intelligent, responsive systems; hence, synthetic macrocyclic hosts, such as calixarenes, cucurbiturils, cyclodextrins, and pillararenes, have been used as ideal building blocks. Meanwhile, manipulating and harnessing light artificially is always an intensive attempt for scientists in order to meet the urgent demands of technological developments. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), known as a well-studied luminescent activity and also a powerful tool in spectroscopic area, has been investigated from various facets, of which the application range has been broadly expanded. In this review, the innovative collaboration between FRET and supramolecular macrocyclic chemistry will be presented and depicted with typical examples. Facilitated by the dynamic features of supramolecular macrocyclic motifs, a large variety of FRET systems have been designed and organized, resulting in promising optical materials with potential for applications in protein assembly, enzyme assays, diagnosis, drug delivery monitoring, sensing, photosynthesis mimicking and chemical encryption.

  3. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Systems in Supramolecular Macrocyclic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yue Lou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of smart materials is gradually becoming a research focus in nanotechnology and materials science. An important criterion of smart materials is the capacity of stimuli-responsiveness, while another lies in selective recognition. Accordingly, supramolecular host-guest chemistry has proven a promising support for building intelligent, responsive systems; hence, synthetic macrocyclic hosts, such as calixarenes, cucurbiturils, cyclodextrins, and pillararenes, have been used as ideal building blocks. Meanwhile, manipulating and harnessing light artificially is always an intensive attempt for scientists in order to meet the urgent demands of technological developments. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET, known as a well-studied luminescent activity and also a powerful tool in spectroscopic area, has been investigated from various facets, of which the application range has been broadly expanded. In this review, the innovative collaboration between FRET and supramolecular macrocyclic chemistry will be presented and depicted with typical examples. Facilitated by the dynamic features of supramolecular macrocyclic motifs, a large variety of FRET systems have been designed and organized, resulting in promising optical materials with potential for applications in protein assembly, enzyme assays, diagnosis, drug delivery monitoring, sensing, photosynthesis mimicking and chemical encryption.

  4. BPM SYSTEM FOR THE SNS RING AND TRANSFER LINES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAWSON,W.C.; CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CUPOLO,J.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MEAD,J.; SIKORA,R.

    2002-05-06

    The Spallation Neutron Source Ring accumulates about 1060 pulses of 38mA peak current IGeV H-minus particles from the Linac thru the HEBT line, then delivers this accumulated beam in a single pulse to the mercury target via the RTBT line. Bunching frequency of beam in the HEBT line is 402.5MHz, and about 1MHz in the Ring and RTBT. Position monitor electrodes in HEBT are of the shorted stripline type, with apertures of 12cm except in the dispersive bend, where the aperture is 21cm. Ring and RTBT electrodes are open striplines, with apertures of 21, 26, 30, and 36cm. All pickups are dual plane. The electronics will be PC-based with the Analog/Digital Front End passing data and receiving control and timing thru a custom PC1 interface developed by LANL[l]. LabVIEW will be used to direct the acquisition, process the data, and transfer results via Ethernet to the EPICS control system. To handle the dynamic range required with well over 60dB variation in signal size, the Ring and RTBT electronics will employ a fast gain switching technique that will take advantage of the 300ns tail-to-head gap to provide position measurement during the entire accumulation cycle. Beam-based alignment will be utilized as part of the system calibration.

  5. Cohesive Relations for Surface Atoms in the Iron-Technetium Binary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-technetium alloys are of relevance to the development of waste forms for disposition of radioactive technetium-99 obtained from spent nuclear fuel. Corrosion of candidate waste forms is a function of the local cohesive energy (loc of surface atoms. A theoretical model for calculating loc is developed. Density functional theory was used to construct a modified embedded atom (MEAM potential for iron-technetium. Materials properties determined for the iron-technetium system were in good agreement with the literature. To explore the relationship between local structure and corrosion, MEAM simulations were performed on representative iron-technetium alloys and intermetallics. Technetium-rich phases have lower loc, suggesting that these phases will be more noble than iron-rich ones. Quantitative estimates of loc based on numbers of nearest neighbors alone can lead to errors up to 0.5 eV. Consequently, atomistic corrosion simulations for alloy systems should utilize physics-based models that consider not only neighbor counts, but also local compositions and atomic arrangements.

  6. A study of the transferability of influenza case detection systems between two large healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Wagner, Michael M; Cooper, Gregory F; Ferraro, Jeffrey P; Su, Howard; Gesteland, Per H; Haug, Peter J; Millett, Nicholas E; Aronis, John M; Nowalk, Andrew J; Ruiz, Victor M; López Pineda, Arturo; Shi, Lingyun; Van Bree, Rudy; Ginter, Thomas; Tsui, Fuchiang

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy and transferability of Bayesian case detection systems (BCD) that use clinical notes from emergency department (ED) to detect influenza cases. A BCD uses natural language processing (NLP) to infer the presence or absence of clinical findings from ED notes, which are fed into a Bayesain network classifier (BN) to infer patients' diagnoses. We developed BCDs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (BCDUPMC) and Intermountain Healthcare in Utah (BCDIH). At each site, we manually built a rule-based NLP and trained a Bayesain network classifier from over 40,000 ED encounters between Jan. 2008 and May. 2010 using feature selection, machine learning, and expert debiasing approach. Transferability of a BCD in this study may be impacted by seven factors: development (source) institution, development parser, application (target) institution, application parser, NLP transfer, BN transfer, and classification task. We employed an ANOVA analysis to study their impacts on BCD performance. Both BCDs discriminated well between influenza and non-influenza on local test cases (AUCs > 0.92). When tested for transferability using the other institution's cases, BCDUPMC discriminations declined minimally (AUC decreased from 0.95 to 0.94, pparser on UPMC notes. The ANOVA analysis showed five significant factors: development parser, application institution, application parser, BN transfer, and classification task. We demonstrated high influenza case detection performance in two large healthcare systems in two geographically separated regions, providing evidentiary support for the use of automated case detection from routinely collected electronic clinical notes in national influenza surveillance. The transferability could be improved by training Bayesian network classifier locally and increasing the accuracy of the NLP parser.

  7. A study of the transferability of influenza case detection systems between two large healthcare systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ye

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the accuracy and transferability of Bayesian case detection systems (BCD that use clinical notes from emergency department (ED to detect influenza cases.A BCD uses natural language processing (NLP to infer the presence or absence of clinical findings from ED notes, which are fed into a Bayesain network classifier (BN to infer patients' diagnoses. We developed BCDs at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (BCDUPMC and Intermountain Healthcare in Utah (BCDIH. At each site, we manually built a rule-based NLP and trained a Bayesain network classifier from over 40,000 ED encounters between Jan. 2008 and May. 2010 using feature selection, machine learning, and expert debiasing approach. Transferability of a BCD in this study may be impacted by seven factors: development (source institution, development parser, application (target institution, application parser, NLP transfer, BN transfer, and classification task. We employed an ANOVA analysis to study their impacts on BCD performance.Both BCDs discriminated well between influenza and non-influenza on local test cases (AUCs > 0.92. When tested for transferability using the other institution's cases, BCDUPMC discriminations declined minimally (AUC decreased from 0.95 to 0.94, p<0.01, and BCDIH discriminations declined more (from 0.93 to 0.87, p<0.0001. We attributed the BCDIH decline to the lower recall of the IH parser on UPMC notes. The ANOVA analysis showed five significant factors: development parser, application institution, application parser, BN transfer, and classification task.We demonstrated high influenza case detection performance in two large healthcare systems in two geographically separated regions, providing evidentiary support for the use of automated case detection from routinely collected electronic clinical notes in national influenza surveillance. The transferability could be improved by training Bayesian network classifier locally and increasing the

  8. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  9. Altered transfer of momentary mental states (ATOMS as the basic unit of psychosis liability in interaction with environment and emotions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna T W Wigman

    Full Text Available Psychotic disorders are thought to represent altered neural function. However, research has failed to map diagnostic categories to alterations in neural networks. It is proposed that the basic unit of psychotic psychopathology is the moment-to-moment expression of subtle anomalous experiences of subclinical psychosis, and particularly its tendency to persist from moment-to-moment in daily life, under the influence of familial, environmental, emotional and cognitive factors.In a general population twin sample (n = 579 and in a study of patients with psychotic disorder (n = 57, their non-psychotic siblings (n = 59 and unrelated controls (n = 75, the experience sampling paradigm (ESM; repetitive, random sampling of momentary mental states and context was applied. We analysed, in a within-person prospective design, (i transfer of momentary anomalous experience at time point (t-1 to time point (t in daily life, and (ii moderating effects of negative affect, positive affect, daily stressors, IQ and childhood trauma. Additionally, (iii familial associations between persistence of momentary anomalous experience and psychotic symptomatology were investigated. Higher level of schizotypy in the twins (but not higher level of psychotic symptoms in patients predicted more persistence of momentary anomalous experience in daily life, both within subjects and across relatives. Persistence of momentary anomalous experience was highest in patients, intermediate in their siblings and lowest in controls. In both studies, persistence of momentary anomalous experience was moderated by higher levels of negative affect, daily stressors and childhood trauma (only in twins, and by lower levels of positive affect. The study of alterations in the moment-to-moment transfer of subtle anomalous experience of psychosis, resulting in their persistence, helps to explain why psychotic and emotional dysregulation tend to cluster in a single phenotype such as

  10. Dynamics Resonances in Atomic States of Astrophysical Relevance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since spontaneous fluorescence of excited atoms is probabilistic, the description of the radiating quantized system evolution along with photon energy transfer in a cold atom medium, should include elements of stochastic dynamics. Finally, the chaotic dynamics of a weakly bound Rydberg electron over a grid of the energy ...

  11. Application of Lattice Boltzmann Methods in Complex Mass Transfer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a novel computational fluid dynamics method that can easily handle complex and dynamic boundaries, couple local or interfacial interactions/reactions, and be easily parallelized allowing for simulation of large systems. While most of the current studies in LBM mainly focus on fluid dynamics, however, the inherent power of this method makes it an ideal candidate for the study of mass transfer systems involving complex/dynamic microstructures and local reactions. In this thesis, LBM is introduced to be an alternative computational method for the study of electrochemical energy storage systems (Li-ion batteries (LIBs) and electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs)) and transdermal drug design on mesoscopic scale. Based on traditional LBM, the following in-depth studies have been carried out: (1) For EDLCs, the simulation of diffuse charge dynamics is carried out for both the charge and the discharge processes on 2D systems of complex random electrode geometries (pure random, random spheres and random fibers). Steric effect of concentrated solutions is considered by using modified Poisson-Nernst-Plank (MPNP) equations and compared with regular Poisson-Nernst-Plank (PNP) systems. The effects of electrode microstructures (electrode density, electrode filler morphology, filler size, etc.) on the net charge distribution and charge/discharge time are studied in detail. The influence of applied potential during discharging process is also discussed. (2) For the study of dendrite formation on the anode of LIBs, it is shown that the Lattice Boltzmann model can capture all the experimentally observed features of microstructure evolution at the anode, from smooth to mossy to dendritic. The mechanism of dendrite formation process in mesoscopic scale is discussed in detail and compared with the traditional Sand's time theories. It shows that dendrite formation is closely related to the inhomogeneous reactively at the electrode-electrolyte interface

  12. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  13. The GNC Measurement System for the Automated Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Y.; da Cunha, P.

    The Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) is a European Space Agency (ESA) funded spacecraft developed by EADS Space Transportation as prime contractor for the space segment together with major European industrial partners, in the frame of the International Space Station (ISS). Its mission objective is threefold : to supply the station with fret and propellant, to reboost ISS to a higher orbit and to dispose of waste from the station. The ATV first flight, called Jules Verne and planned on 2005, will be the first European Vehicle to perform an orbital rendezvous. The GNC Measurement System (GMS) is the ATV on board function in charge of the measurement data collection and preconditioning for the navigation, guidance and control (GNC) algorithms. The GMS is made up of hardware which are the navigation sensors (with a certain level of hardware redundancy for each of them), and of an on-board software that manages, monitors and performs consistency checks to detect and isolate potential sensor failures. The GMS relies on six kinds of navigation sensors, used during various phases of the mission : the gyrometers assembly (GYRA), the accelerometers assembly (ACCA), the star trackers (STR), the GPS receivers, the telegoniometers (TGM) and the videometers (VDM), the last two being used for the final rendezvous phase. The GMS function is developed by EADS Space Transportation together with other industrial partners: EADS Astrium, EADS Sodern, Laben and Dasa Jena Optronik.

  14. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  15. Towards hybrid quantum systems: Trapping a single atom near a nanoscale solid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiecke T.G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe and demonstrate a method to deterministically trap single atoms near nanoscale solid-state objects. The trap is formed by the interference of an optical tweezer and its reflection from the nano object, creating a one-dimensional optical lattice where the first lattice site is at z0 ∼ λ/4 from the surface. Using a tapered optical fiber as the nanoscopic object, we characterize the loading into different lattice sites by means of the AC-Stark shift induced by a guided fiber mode. We demonstrate a loading efficiency of 94(6% into the first lattice site, and measure the cooperativity for the emission of the atom into the guided mode of the nanofiber. We show that by tailoring the dimensions of the nanofiber the distance of the trap to the surface can be adjusted. This method is applicable to a large variety of nanostructures and represents a promising starting point for interfacing single atoms with arbitrary nanoscale solid-state systems.

  16. From kaonic atoms to kaonic nuclei: A search for antikaon-mediated bound nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmeskal, Johann

    2008-10-01

    Strong interaction processes were intensively studied at low energy with exotic atoms, touching one of the fundamental problems in hadron physic today - the still unsolved question of how hadron masses are generated. The question of the origin of the large hadron masses made up of light quarks, the current mass of the up ( u) and down ( d) quarks ( m≈5 MeV) is two orders of magnitude smaller than a typical hadron mass of about 1 GeV, will be discussed in the context with the experimental work done in the field of exotic atoms expanded to exotic nuclei. An overview of the properties of exotic hydrogen atoms made of pions and kaons are presented, using high precision experiments unrevealing the nature of strong interaction physics at low energy. A new field which contributes to the understanding of the origin of the large hadron mass is the study of the mass modification in a nuclear medium. Antikaon mediated bound nuclear systems would be an ideal tool, if they exist, to look for chiral restoration at high density and zero temperature or even more exotic to look for phase transitions.

  17. A Design Study Of A Wireless Power Transfer System For Use To Transfer Energy From A Vibration Energy Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabham, N. J.; Harden, C.; Vincent, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A wirelessly powered remote sensor node is presented along with its design process. The purpose of the node is the further expansion of the sensing capabilities of the commercial Perpetuum system used for condition monitoring on trains and rolling stock which operates using vibration energy harvesting. Surplus harvested vibration energy is transferred wirelessly to a remote satellite sensor to allow measurements over a wider area to be made. This additional data is to be used for long term condition monitoring. Performance measurements made on the prototype remote sensor node are reported and advantages and disadvantages of using the same RF frequency for power and data transfer are identified.

  18. Photon transfer in a system of coupled superconducting microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muirhead, C. M., E-mail: c.m.muirhead@bham.ac.uk; Gunupudi, B.; Colclough, M. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-28

    A novel scheme is proposed for the study of energy transfer in a pair of coupled thin film superconducting microwave resonators. We show that the transfer could be achieved by modulating the kinetic inductance and that this has a number of advantages over earlier theoretical and experimental schemes, which use modulation of capacitance by vibrating nanobars or membranes. We show that the proposed scheme lends itself to the study of the classical analogues of Rabi and Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg oscillations and Landau-Zener transitions using experimentally achievable parameters. We consider a number of ways in which energy transfer (photon shuttle) between the two resonators could be achieved experimentally.

  19. Properties of ground states of atomic nuclei in self-consistent theory of finite fermi-system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapershtejn, Eh.E.; Khodel' , V.A. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1983-05-01

    Ground states of atomic nuclei are described within the framework of the self-consistent theory of finite Fermi systems. The developed approach is compared with the Hartree-Fock method with effective forces.

  20. The standard calibration instrument automation system for the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Part 3: Program documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. P.; Roth, G. S.

    1982-04-01

    Complete documentation of the 15 programs and 11 data files of the EPA Atomic Absorption Instrument Automation System is presented. The system incorporates the following major features: (1) multipoint calibration using first, second, or third degree regression or linear interpolation, (2) timely quality control assessments for spiked samples, duplicates, laboratory control standards, reagent blanks, and instrument check standards, (3) reagent blank subtraction, and (4) plotting of calibration curves and raw data peaks. The programs of this system are written in Data General Extended BASIC, Revision 4.3, as enhanced for multi-user, real-time data acquisition. They run in a Data General Nova 840 minicomputer under the operating system RDOS, Revision 6.2. There is a functional description, a symbol definitions table, a functional flowchart, a program listing, and a symbol cross reference table for each program. The structure of every data file is also detailed.

  1. Switching from subluminal to superluminal light propagation via a coherent pump field in a four-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Shangqi [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Educational Ministry of China, Changchun 130021 (China); Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wan Rengang; Kou Jun; Jiang Yun; Gao Jinyue [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Educational Ministry of China, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2009-12-15

    We theoretically investigate the influence of a coherent pump field on the propagation of a weak light pulse of a probe field in a four-level atomic system. Due to the modulation of the pump field, the light pulse can be manipulated from subluminal to superluminal with negligible distortion. This scheme can be realized in both the ultracold and Doppler-broadened atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the spectral linewidth with an anomalous dispersion is reduced by thermal averaging; therefore, one can obtain a larger negative group refractive index in room-temperature vapor than the largest value achieved in ultracold atomic gas.

  2. A mass transfer in heterogeneous systems by the adsorption method (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bošković-Vragolović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A mass transfer coefficient between: a liquid and single sphere and a liquid and column wall in packed and fluidized beds of a spherical inert particle have been studied experimentally using the adsorption method. The experiments were conducted in a column 40 mm in diameter for packed and fluidized beds, and in a two-dimensional column 140 mm×10 mm for the flow past single sphere. In all runs, the mass transfer rates were determined in the presence of spherical glass particles, 3 mm in diameter, for packed and fluidized beds. The mass transfer data were obtained by studying transfer for flow past single sphere, 20 mm in diameter. This paper discusses the possibilities of application of the adsorption method for fluid flow visualization. Local and average mass transfer coefficients were determined from the color intensity of the surface of the foils of silica gel. Correlations, Sh = f(Re and jD = f(Re, were derived using the mass transfer coefficient data.

  3. Quantum mechanical theory of a structured atom-diatom collision system - A + BC/1-Sigma/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of a 2-p state atom colliding with a singlet sigma state diatom, which involves multiple potential surfaces, is investigated. Within a diabatic representation for the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction), coupled scattering equations are derived in both space-fixed and body-fixed coordinate systems. Coefficients, analogous to Percival-Seaton coefficients, are obtained. Approximations to the exact equations, including angular momenta decoupling approximations, are discussed for both the space-fixed and body-fixed formalisms.

  4. Atomic Weights Confirm Bipolar Model of Oscillations in a Chain System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ries A.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We apply the bipolar model of oscillations in a chain system to the data set of standard atomic weights. 90% of these masses could be reproduced by this model and were expressed in continued fraction form, where all numerators are Euler’s number and the sum of the free link and all partial denominators yields zero. All outliers were either radioactive or polynuclidic elements whose isotopic compositions as found in samples on Earth might not be fully representative for the mean values when considering samples from all parts of the universe.

  5. From atomic to mesoscale the role of quantum coherence in systems of various complexities

    CERN Document Server

    Novikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the latest advancements and future developments of atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics and its vital role in modern sciences and technologies. The chapters are devoted to studies of a wide range of quantum systems, with an emphasis on understanding of quantum coherence and other quantum phenomena originated from light-matter interactions. The book intends to survey the current research landscape and to highlight major scientific trends in AMO physics as well as those interfacing with interdisciplinary sciences. The volume may be particularly useful for young researchers working on establishing their scientific interests and goals.

  6. General laser interaction theory in atom-diatom systems for both adiabatic and nonadiabatic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Brue, Daniel A; Parker, Gregory A; Chang, Sin-Tarng

    2006-04-27

    This paper develops the general theory for laser fields interacting with bimolecular systems. In this study, we choose to use the multipolar gauge on the basis of gauge invariance. We consider both the adiabatic and nonadiabatic cases and find they produce similar interaction pictures. As an application of this theory, we present the study of rovibrational energy transfer in Ar + CO collisions in the presence of an intense laser field.

  7. Optimal Trajectories For Orbital Transfers Using Low And Medium Thrust Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Shannon S.

    1992-01-01

    For many problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well-known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs which will require more revolutions, thus making the low thrust transfer computational intensive. Here, we consider optimal low and medium thrust orbital transfers.

  8. Ground and excited states for exotic three-body atomic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasaneo G.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An Angular Correlated Configuration Interaction method is extended and applied to exotic threebody atomic systems with general masses. A recently proposed angularly correlated basis set is used to construct, simultaneously and with a single diagonalization, ground and excited states wave functions which: (i satisfy exactly Kato cusp conditions at the two-body coalescence points; (ii have only linear parameters; (iii show a fast convergency rate for the energy; (iv form an orthogonal set. The efficiency of the construction is illustrated by the study a variety of three-body atomic systems [m1− m2− m3z3+ ] with two negatively charged light particles, with 123 diverse masses m1− and m2−, and a heavy positively charged nucleus m3z3+. The calculated ground 11S and several excited n1,3S state energies are compared with those given in the literature, when available. We also present a short discussion on the critical charge necessary to get a stable three-body system supporting two electrons, an electron and a muon, or two muons.

  9. AToMS: A Ubiquitous Teleconsultation System for Supporting AMI Patients with Prehospital Thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. P. M. Correa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest population-based studies in the medical literature worldwide indicate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI patients still experience prolonged delay to be rescued, which often results in morbidity and mortality. This paper reports from a technological standpoint a teleconsultation and monitoring system named AToMS. This system addresses the problem of prehospital delivery of thrombolysis to AMI patients by enabling the remote interaction of the paramedics and a cardiologist available at a Coronary Care Unit (CCU. Such interaction allows the diagnosis of the patient eligibility to the immediate application of thrombolysis, which is meant to reduce the delay between the onset of symptoms and the eventual application of proper treatment. Such delay reduction is meant to increase the AMI patient's chances of survival and decrease the risks of postinfarction sequels. The teleconsultation is held with the support of wireless and mobile technologies, which also allows the cardiologist to monitor the patient while he/she is being taken to the nearest CCU. All exchanged messages among paramedics and cardiologists are recorded to render an auditable system. AToMS has been deployed in a first stage in the city of Rio de Janeiro, where the medical team involved in the project has conducted commissioned tests.

  10. An Archival Study of Atomic Constituents in Four Edge-on Debris Disk Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edward

    2017-08-01

    Debris disks around stars are thought to evolve from gas-rich protoplanetary disks and eventually lead to the formation of exoplanet systems. Millimeter, sub-millimeter and far IR observations tell us much about the nature of solid and molecular constituents, but UV absorptions in the spectra of stars central to edge-on disks reveal the nature of atomic gas constituents that lie within such systems. The debris disks around the stars Beta Pictoris and 49 Ceti have already been studied in some detail. We propose to expand the sample by studying four more such targets that were observed with STIS in the highest resolution echelle modes, and this investigation will significantly expand our understanding of intrinsically different systems or ones with different angles of inclination with respect to our sightline. We plan to measure element abundances, which should lead to insights on the composition of the orbiting material. Also, we expect to learn more about the local physical conditions by evaluating the relative populations of atoms in metastable electronic states and fine-structure levels of the ground states.

  11. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kain, V; Bracco, C; Fraser, M; Galleazzi, F; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Kosmicki, A; Maciariello, F; Meddahi, M; Nuiry, F X; Steele, G; Velotti, F

    2015-01-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  12. Changes to the Transfer Line Collimation System for the High-Luminosity LHC Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V. [CERN; Aberle, O. [CERN; Bracco, C. [CERN; Fraser, M. [CERN; Galleazzi, F. [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, E. [Fermilab; Kosmicki, A. [CERN; Maciariello, F. [CERN; Meddahi, M. [CERN; Nuiry, F. X. [CERN; Steele, G. [CERN; Velotti, F. [CERN

    2015-06-01

    The current LHC transfer line collimation system will not be able to provide enough protection for the high brightness beams in the high-luminosity LHC era. The new collimation system will have to attenuate more and be more robust than its predecessor. The active jaw length of the new transfer line collimators will therefore be 2.1 m instead of currently 1.2 m. The transfer line optics will have to be adjusted for the new collimator locations and larger beta functions at the collimators for absorber robustness reasons. In this paper the new design of the transfer line collimation system will be presented with its implications on transfer line optics and powering, maintainability, protection of transfer line magnets in case of beam loss on a collimator and protection of the LHC aperture.

  13. Interfacility transfers in a non-trauma system setting: an assessment of the Greek reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larentzakis Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality assessment of any trauma system involves the evaluation of the transferring patterns. This study aims to assess interfacility transfers in the absence of a formal trauma system setting and to estimate the benefits from implementing a more organized structure. Methods The 'Report of the Epidemiology and Management of Trauma in Greece' is a one year project of trauma patient reporting throughout the country. It provided data concerning the patterns of interfacility transfers. We compared the transferred patient group to the non transferred patient group. Information reviewed included patient and injury characteristics, need for an operation, Intensive Care Unit (ICU admittance and mortality. Analysis employed descriptive statistics and Chi-square test. Interfacility transfers were then assessed according to each health care facility's availability of five requirements; Computed Tomography scanner, ICU, neurosurgeon, orthopedic and vascular surgeon. Results Data on 8,524 patients were analyzed; 86.3% were treated at the same facility, whereas 13.7% were transferred. Transferred patients tended to be younger, male, and more severely injured than non transferred patients. Moreover, they were admitted to ICU more often, had a higher mortality rate but were less operated on compared to non transferred patients. The 34.3% of transfers was from facilities with none of the five requirements, whereas the 12.4% was from those with one requirement. Low level facilities, with up to three requirements transferred 43.2% of their transfer volume to units of equal resources. Conclusion Trauma management in Greece results in a high number of transfers. Patients are frequently transferred between low level facilities. Better coordination could lead to improved outcomes and less cost.

  14. Geometric data transfer between CAD systems: solid models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroszynski, Uri; Palstroem, Bjarne; Trostmann, Erik

    1989-01-01

    The first phase of the ESPRIT project CAD*I resulted in a specification for the exchange of solid models as well as in some pilot implementations of processors based on this specification. The authors summarize the CAD*I approach, addressing the structure of neutral files for solids, entities......, and attributes supporting three kinds of representations: facilities for the transfer of parametric designs; referencing library components; and other general mechanisms. They also describe the current state of the specification and processor implementations and include an example of a CAD*I neutral file....... Results from cycle and intersystem solid model transfer tests are presented, showing the practicality of the CAD*I proposal. B-rep model transfer results are discussed in some detail. The relationship of this work to standardization efforts is outlined...

  15. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-04-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir, are typically employed for this process. In recent years, iron-based catalysts have attracted considerable attention as a greener and more sustainable alternative since iron is earth abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic. In this work, a combination of iron disulfide with chelating bipyridine ligand was found to be effective for the transfer hydrogenation of a variety of ketones to the corresponding alcohols in the presence of a simple base. It provided a convenient and economical way to conduct transfer hydrogenation. A plausible role of sulfide next to the metal center in facilitating the catalytic reaction is demonstrated.

  16. Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Technicians at General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., (GA-ASI) facility at Adelanto, Calif., carefully install a turboprop engine to the rear fuselage of NASA's Altair aircraft during final assembly operations. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., is developing the Altair version of its Predator B unmanned reconnaissance aircraft under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. NASA plans to use the Altair as a technology demonstrator to validate a variety of command and control technologies for UAVs, as well as demonstrate the capability to perform a variety of Earth science missions. The Altair is designed to carry an 700-lb. payload of scientific instruments and imaging equipment for as long as 32 hours at up to 52,000 feet altitude. Eleven-foot extensions have been added to each wing, giving the Altair an overall wingspan of 86 feet with an aspect ratio of 23. It is powered by a 700-hp. rear-mounted TPE-331-10 turboprop engine, driving a three-blade propeller. Altair is scheduled to begin flight tests in the fourth quarter of 2002, and be acquired by NASA following successful completion of basic airworthiness tests in early 2003 for evaluation of over-the-horizon control, detect, see and avoid and other technologies required to allow UAVs to operate safely with other aircraft in the national airspace.

  17. Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra Gómez-Álvarez; Begoña Porta-Oltra; Marta Hernandez-Griso; Francisca Pérez-Labaña; Mónica Climente-Martí

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to assess the impact of two closed-system drug transfer device on the local and environmental contamination and preparation times in the process of preparation of parenteral chemotherapy compared to the standard system. Method...

  18. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  19. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)], E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2010-02-15

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate XX quantum spin models on one-dimensional lattices with open ends and different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: patterns that allow for perfect LDE in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi-long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence of edge impurities in lattices with single periodicity, it is possible to realize models endowed with nonvanishing LDE or QLDE. We then study how to realize models that optimize the robustness of QLDE at finite temperature and in the presence of imperfections using suitably engineered arrays of coupled optical cavities. For both cases the numerical estimates of the end-to-end entanglement in the actual physical systems are thoroughly compared with the analytical results obtained for the spin model systems. We finally introduce LDE-based schemes of long-distance quantum teleportation in linear arrays of coupled cavities, and show that they allow for high-fidelity and high success rates even at moderately high temperatures.

  20. Development of platform to compare different wall heat transfer packages for system analysis codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Gil; Lee, Won Woong; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Gil [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    System thermal hydraulic (STH) analysis code is used for analyzing and evaluating the safety of a designed nuclear system. The system thermal hydraulic analysis code typically solves mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for multiple phases with sets of selected empirical constitutive equations to close the problem. Several STH codes are utilized in academia, industry and regulators, such as MARS-KS, SPACE, RELAP5, COBRA-TF, TRACE, and so on. Each system thermal hydraulic code consists of different sets of governing equations and correlations. However, the packages and sets of correlations of each code are not compared quantitatively yet. Wall heat transfer mode transition maps of SPACE and MARS-KS have a little difference for the transition from wall nucleate heat transfer mode to wall film heat transfer mode. Both codes have the same heat transfer packages and correlations in most region except for wall film heat transfer mode. Most of heat transfer coefficients calculated for the range of selected variables of SPACE are the same with those of MARS-KS. For the intervals between 500K and 540K of wall temperature, MARS-KS selects the wall film heat transfer mode and Bromley correlation but SPACE select the wall nucleate heat transfer mode and Chen correlation. This is because the transition from nucleate boiling to film boiling of MARS-KS is earlier than SPACE. More detailed analysis of the heat transfer package and flow regime package will be followed in the near future.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Surface Grafted Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and Poly(Carboxylic Acid)- Iron Particles via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Joko; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit

    2014-07-15

    This research relates to the preparation and characterization of surface grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(carboxylic acid)-micron-size iron particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface grafted polymers-iron particles result in multifunctional materials which can be used in biomedical applications. The functionalities consist of cell targeting, imaging, drug delivery, and immunological response. The multifunctional materials are synthesized in two steps. First, surface grafting is used to place polymer molecules on the iron particles surface. The second step, is conjugation of the bio-molecules onto the polymer backbone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of polymers on the iron particles. The thickness of the grafted polymers and glass transition temperature of the surface grafted polymers were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The covalent bond between grafted polymers and iron particles caused higher glass transition temperature as compared with non-grafted polymers. The ability to target the bio-molecule and provide fluorescent imaging was simulated by conjugation of rat immunoglobulin and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-rat. The fluorescence intensity was determined using flow cytometry and conjugated IgG-FITC anti-rat on iron particles which was imaged using a fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Surface Grafted Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and Poly(Carboxylic Acid)– Iron Particles via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Joko; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    This research relates to the preparation and characterization of surface grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(carboxylic acid)–micron-size iron particles via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The surface grafted polymers–iron particles result in multifunctional materials which can be used in biomedical applications. The functionalities consist of cell targeting, imaging, drug delivery, and immunological response. The multifunctional materials are synthesized in two steps. First, surface grafting is used to place polymer molecules on the iron particles surface. The second step, is conjugation of the bio-molecules onto the polymer backbone. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to confirm the presence of polymers on the iron particles. The thickness of the grafted polymers and glass transition temperature of the surface grafted polymers were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The covalent bond between grafted polymers and iron particles caused higher glass transition temperature as compared with non-grafted polymers. The ability to target the bio-molecule and provide fluorescent imaging was simulated by conjugation of rat immunoglobulin and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-rat. The fluorescence intensity was determined using flow cytometry and conjugated IgG-FITC anti-rat on iron particles which was imaged using a fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25382869

  3. Preparation of Mg(OH){sub 2} hybrid pigment by direct precipitation and graft onto cellulose fiber via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao, E-mail: wangxiao@dlpu.edu.cn [School of Textile and Materials Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, Liaoning Province (China); Zhang, Yue; Lv, Lihua; Cui, Yongzhu; Wei, Chunyan [School of Textile and Materials Engineering, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, Liaoning Province (China); Pang, Guibing [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, Liaoning Province (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorbed anionic dye molecules are conducive to preferential growth of (0 0 1) plane of Mg(OH){sub 2} crystal for Mg(OH){sub 2} pigments. • Uniform coverage of nanosized Mg(OH){sub 2} pigments on fiber surface is achieved via surface-initiated ATRP. • About 4 wt% of Mg(OH){sub 2} pigment on fiber surface shortens nearly half of burning time of cellulose. - Abstract: Mg(OH){sub 2} flame retardant hybrid pigment is synthesized through simultaneous solution precipitation and adsorption of anionic dyes (C.I. Acid Red 6). The Mg(OH){sub 2} hybrid pigment bearing vinyl groups after surface silane modification is immobilized onto the surface of bromo end-functional cellulose fiber by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The morphology and structure of Mg(OH){sub 2} pigments and cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are characterized. The thermal properties, flammability and color fastness of cellulose fibers grafted with modified pigments are measured. The results reveal that anionic dye molecules are adsorbed onto Mg(OH){sub 2} crystals and affect the formation of lamella-like Mg(OH){sub 2} crystals. The cellulose fiber grafted with modified Mg(OH){sub 2} hybrid pigment absorbs about four times heat more than original cellulose fiber with about 4% immobilization ratio of pigment, which shortens nearly half of afterflame time and afterglow time.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of TiO{sub 2}/Ag/polymer ternary nanoparticles via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Tae; Koh, Joo Hwan; Seo, Jin Ah [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Soo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hak, E-mail: jonghak@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-01

    We report on the novel ternary hybrid materials consisting of semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}), metal (Ag) and polymer (poly(oxyethylene methacrylate) (POEM)). First, a hydrophilic polymer, i.e. POEM, was grafted from TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique. These TiO{sub 2}-POEM brush nanoparticles were used to template the formation of Ag nanoparticles by introduction of a AgCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} precursor and a NaBH{sub 4} aqueous solution for reduction process. Successful grafting of polymeric chains from the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and the in situ formation of Ag nanoparticles within the polymeric chains were confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FT-IR spectroscopy also revealed the specific interaction of Ag nanoparticles with the C=O groups of POEM brushes. This study presents a simple route for the in situ synthesis of both metal and polymer confined within the semiconductor, producing ternary hybrid inorganic-organic nanomaterials.

  5. Preparation of a magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer by atom-transfer radical polymerization for the extraction of parabens from fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xiaoxiao; Piao, Chungying; Chen, Ligang

    2016-07-01

    A silica-based surface magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of parabens was prepared using a facile and general method that combined atom-transfer radical polymerization with surface imprinting technique. The prepared magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and physical property measurement. The isothermal adsorption experiment and kinetics adsorption experiment investigated the adsorption property of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer to template molecule. The four parabens including methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben were used to assess the rebinding selectivity. An extraction method, which used magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer as adsorbents coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of the four parabens in fruit juice samples was developed. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detections of the four parabens were 0.028, 0.026, 0.021, and 0.026 mg/L, respectively. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation ranging from 2.6 to 8.9% was obtained. In all three fortified levels, recoveries of parabens were in the range of 72.5-89.4%. The proposed method has been applied to different fruit juice samples including orange juice, grape juice, apple juice and peach juice, and satisfactory results were obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Self-assemblies of γ-CDs with pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA and endcapping via atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP were self-assembled with varying amounts of γ-CDs to prepare poly(pseudorotaxanes (PPRs. When the concentration of γ-CDs was lower, the central PEO segment served as a shell of the micelles and was preferentially bent to pass through the γ-CD cavity to construct double-chain-stranded tight-fit PPRs characterized by a channel-like crystal structure. With an increase in the amount of γ-CDs added, they began to accommodate the poly(methyl acrylate (PMA segments dissociated from the core of the micelles. When more γ-CDs were threaded and slipped over the segments, the γ-CDs were randomly distributed along the pentablock copolymer chain to generate single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs and showed no characteristic channel-like crystal structure. All the self-assembly processes of the pentablock copolymers resulted in the formation of hydrogels. After endcapping via in situ ATRP of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, these single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs were transformed into conformational identical polyrotaxanes (PRs. The structures of the PPRs and PRs were characterized by means of 1H NMR, GPC, 13C CP/MAS NMR, 2D 1H NOESY NMR, FTIR, WXRD, TGA and DSC analyses.

  7. Self-assemblies of γ-CDs with pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA and endcapping via atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Kong, Tao; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ai-ying

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pentablock copolymers PMA-PPO-PEO-PPO-PMA synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were self-assembled with varying amounts of γ-CDs to prepare poly(pseudorotaxanes) (PPRs). When the concentration of γ-CDs was lower, the central PEO segment served as a shell of the micelles and was preferentially bent to pass through the γ-CD cavity to construct double-chain-stranded tight-fit PPRs characterized by a channel-like crystal structure. With an increase in the amount of γ-CDs added, they began to accommodate the poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) segments dissociated from the core of the micelles. When more γ-CDs were threaded and slipped over the segments, the γ-CDs were randomly distributed along the pentablock copolymer chain to generate single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs and showed no characteristic channel-like crystal structure. All the self-assembly processes of the pentablock copolymers resulted in the formation of hydrogels. After endcapping via in situ ATRP of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), these single-chain-stranded loose-fit PPRs were transformed into conformational identical polyrotaxanes (PRs). The structures of the PPRs and PRs were characterized by means of 1H NMR, GPC, 13C CP/MAS NMR, 2D 1H NOESY NMR, FTIR, WXRD, TGA and DSC analyses. PMID:26732122

  8. Enhanced and selective adsorption of mercury ions on chitosan beads grafted with polyacrylamide via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Bai, Renbi; Liu, Changkun

    2005-12-06

    Enhanced and selective removal of mercury ions was achieved with chitosan beads grafted with polyacrylamide (chitosan-g-polyacrylamide) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads were found to have significantly greater adsorption capacities and faster adsorption kinetics for mercury ions than the chitosan beads. At pH 4 and with initial mercury concentrations of 10-200 mg/L, the chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads can achieve a maximum adsorption capacity of up to 322.6 mg/g (in comparison with 181.8 mg/g for the chitosan beads) and displayed a short adsorption equilibrium time of less than 60 min (compared to more than 15 h for the chitosan beads). Coadsorption experiments with both mercury and lead ions showed that the chitosan-g-polyacrylamide beads had excellent selectivity in the adsorption of mercury ions over lead ions at pH polyacrylamide beads can be effectively desorbed in a perchloric acid solution, and the regenerated beads can be reused almost without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  9. Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Magnetite Nanoparticles with Statistical Poly(tert-butyl acrylate-poly(poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharin Kanhakeaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presented the surface modification of magnetite nanoparticle (MNP with poly[(t-butyl acrylate-stat-(poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate] copolymers (P[(t-BA-stat-PEGMA] via a surface-initiated “grafting from” atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. Loading molar ratio of t-BA to PEGMA was systematically varied (100 : 0, 75 : 25, 50 : 50, and 25 : 75, resp. such that the degree of hydrophilicity of the copolymers, affecting the particle dispersibility in water, can be fine-tuned. The reaction progress in each step of the synthesis was monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The studies in the reaction kinetics indicated that PEGMA had higher reactivity than that of t-BA in the copolymerizations. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC indicated that the molecular weights of the copolymers increased with the increase of the monomer conversion. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that the particles were spherical with averaged size of 8.1 nm in diameter. Dispersibility of the particles in water was apparently improved when the copolymers were coated as compared to P(t-BA homopolymer coating. The percentages of MNP and the copolymer in the composites were determined via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and their magnetic properties were investigated via vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM.

  10. Fabrication of an SPR Sensor Surface with Antifouling Properties for Highly Sensitive Detection of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Using Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we modified a surface plasmon resonance immunosensor chip with a polymer using surface-initiated atom transfer polymerization (SI-ATRP for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. To immobilize a TNT analogue on the polymer, mono-2-(methacryloyloxyethylsuccinate (MES, which has a carboxyl group, was used in this study. However, the anti-TNT antibody may adsorb non-specifically on the polymer surface by an electrostatic interaction because MES is negatively charged. Therefore, a mixed monomer with MES and diethylaminoethylmethacrylate (DEAEM, which has a tertiary amino group and is positively charged, was prepared to obtain electroneutrality for suppressing the nonspecific adsorption. The detection of TNT was performed by inhibition assay using the polymer surface. To ensure high sensitivity to TNT, the affinity between the surface and the antibody was optimized by controlling the density of the initiator for ATRP by mixing two types of self-assembled monolayer reagents. As a result, a limit of detection of 5.7 pg/mL (ppt for TNT was achieved using the optimized surface.

  11. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate) grafted CdSe quantum dots by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization: Novel synthesis, characterization, properties, and cytotoxicity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Long Giang; Islam, Md. Rafiqul [Department of Imaging System Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Doh Chang [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, KAIST Institute for the Nanocentury (KINC), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kwon Taek, E-mail: ktlim@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Imaging System Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    A novel approach for the synthesis of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) grafted CdSe quantum dot (QDs) (PGMA-g-CdSe) was developed. The PGMA-g-CdSe nanohybrids were synthesized by the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate from the surface of the strategic initiator, CdSe-BrIB QDs prepared by the interaction of 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide (BrIB) and CdSe-OH QDs. The structure, morphology, and optical property of the PGMA-g-CdSe nanohybrids were analyzed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, XRD, TEM, and PL. The as-synthesized PGMA-g-CdSe nanohybrids having multi-epoxide groups were employed for the direct coupling of biotin via ring-opening reaction of the epoxide groups to afford the Biotin-f-PGMA-g-CdSe nanobioconjugate. The covalent immobilization of biotin onto PGMA-g-CdSe was confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, and EDX. Biocompatibility and imaging properties of the Biotin-f-PGMA-g-CdSe were investigated by MTT bioassay and PL analysis, respectively. The cell viability study suggested that the biocompatibility was significantly enhanced by the functionalization of CdSe QDs by biotin and PGMA.

  12. A combination of "thiol-ene" click chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization: Fabrication of boronic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for enrichment of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2018-04-01

    An efficient glycoproteins enrichment platform is one of vital preprocessing steps in biomarker research and in particular glycoproteomics. In this work, a well-defined boronic acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide nanocomposite (Fe3O4-GO@PAAPBA) was synthesized for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins from complex biological samples via a novel strategy based on the "thiol-ene" click chemistry and surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The initiator of ATRP was anchored to the surface of substrate through "thiol-ene" click reaction. The product Fe3O4-GO@PAAPBA was successfully synthesized in following SI-ATRP. The Fe3O4-GO@PAAPBA nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption capacity of Fe3O4-GO@PAAPBA towards ovalbumin (OVA) and transferrin (Trf) is 471mgg-1 and 450mgg-1, respectively. The nanocomposite also featured good selectivity to glycoproteins in the mixture of glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins at alkaline (pH 9.0) and physiological conditions (pH 7.4). Furthermore, it can be applied to extract glycoproteins directly from egg white samples. These results have indicated that Fe3O4-GO@PAAPBA was a potential affinity material in glycoprotein analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fine- and hyperfine structure investigations of even configuration system of atomic terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Elantkowska, M.; Ruczkowski, J.; Furmann, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this work a parametric study of the fine structure (fs) and the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even-parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented, based in considerable part on the new experimental results. Measurements on 134 spectral lines were performed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in a hollow cathode discharge lamp; on this basis, the hyperfine structure constants A and B were determined for 52 even-parity levels belonging to the configurations 4f85d6s2, 4f85d26s or 4f96s6p; in all the cases those levels were involved in the transitions investigated as the lower levels. For 40 levels the hfs was examined for the first time, and for the remaining 12 levels the new measurements supplement our earlier results. As a by-product, also preliminary values of the hfs constants for 84 odd-parity levels were determined (the investigations of the odd-parity levels system in the terbium atom are still in progress). This huge amount of new experimental data, supplemented by our earlier published results, were considered for the fine and hyperfine structure analysis. A multi-configuration fit of 7 configurations was performed, taking into account second-order of perturbation theory, including the effects of closed shell-open shell excitations. Predicted values of the level energies, as well as of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, are quoted in cases when no experimental values are available. By combining our experimental data with our own semi-empirical procedure it was possible to identify correctly the lower and upper level of the line 544.1440 nm measured by Childs with the use of the atomic-beam laser-rf double-resonance technique (Childs, J Opt Soc Am B 9;1992:191-6).

  14. Nonlinear optical and atomic systems at the interface of physics and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the interface between mathematics and physics, this book offers an introduction to the physics, the mathematics, and the numerical simulation of nonlinear systems in optics and atomic physics. The text covers a wide spectrum of current research on the subject, which is  an extremely active field in physics and mathematical physics, with a very broad range of implications, both for fundamental science and technological applications: light propagation in microstructured optical fibers, Bose-Einstein condensates, disordered systems, and the newly emerging field of nonlinear quantum mechanics.   Accessible to PhD students, this book will also be of interest to post-doctoral researchers and seasoned academics.

  15. Statistical wave scattering: from the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, P.A. [IFUNAM, 01000 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities whose classical dynamics is chaotic, although it can be applied to the propagation of microwaves through cavities of a similar shape. The model describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation for two-dimensional cavities. (Author)

  16. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1998-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  17. High precision X-ray spectroscopy in hydrogen-like fermionic and bosonic atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchert, G.L.; Anagnostopoulos, D.; Augsburger, M.; Belmiloud, D.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; Daum, M.; Egger, J.P.; El-Khoury, P.; Elble, M.; Frosch, R.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O.W.B. (and others)

    1998-11-15

    Some time after its formation an exotic atom may be considered a hydrogen-like system consisting of a nucleus and an exotic particle in a bound state. In this situation it is an ideal tool to study cascade properties, while for the innermost orbits it can be used to probe the interaction with the nucleus. From an extended series of experiments using high resolution X-ray spectroscopy for both aspects typical examples are reported and preliminary results are given: 1. To determine the complex scattering length in p-barH the 3D{yields}2P hyperfine transitions have been measured. 2. To determine the pion mass the 5 {yields} 4 transitions in {pi}{sup 14}N have been studied. In all cases a major contribution to the uncertainty originates from the calibration. Therefore a new method is proposed that will establish a universal set of high precision calibration lines for pionic, muonic and electronic systems.

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were ...

  19. A Microcontroller-Based Automatic Transfer Switching System for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Aguinaga, J. (2008), “Study of Transfer Switches”,. Unpublished MSc Thesis Report, Helsinki. University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, 102 pp. Akparibo, R. A. (2011), “A Solar Radiation. Tracker for Solar Energy Optimisation”,. Unpublished BSc Project Report, University of. Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, ...

  20. A state transfer principle for switching port-Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, A.J. van der; Camlibel, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Instantaneous charge/flux transfers may occur in switched electrical circuits when the switch configuration changes. Characterization of such state discontinuities is a classical issue in circuit theory which, typically, is based on the so-called charge and flux conservation principle. This paper

  1. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Munira [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  2. Electronic Data Transfer--A System That's Working in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The Electronic Data Transfer (EDT) network for Connecticut local school districts encompasses nine major databases and provides dozens of online data reports to network users. At a low cost and high degree of success, EDT has improved the data collection and reconciliation process at the state and local levels and generated a capacity for…

  3. The Characteristics of an Abstract System for the Transfer of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of real rights; contential abstraction; external abstraction; real agreement'; animus transferendi et accipiendi; consensualism; traditionalism; iusta causa traditionis; causa remota; causa immediate/causa efficiens; legal ground or reason for transfer; void obligatory agreement; bona fide third parties; rei vindicatio; Savigny ...

  4. Heat Transfer of Single and Binary Systems inPool Boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas J. Sultan; Balasim A. Abid

    2010-01-01

    The present research focuses on the study of the effect of mass transfer resistance on the rate of heat transfer in pool boiling. The nucleate pool boiling heat transfer coefficients for binary mixtures (ethanol-n-butanol, acetone-n-butanol, acetone-ethanol, hexane-benzene, hexane-heptane, and methanol-water) were measured at different concentrations of the more volatile components. The systems chosen covered a wide range of mixture behaviors.The experimental set up for the present investigat...

  5. Ferromagnetism and Half-Metallicity in Atomically Thin Holey Nitrogenated Graphene Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Pathak, Biswarup

    2017-09-06

    Metal-free half-metallicity has been the subject of immense research focus in the field of spintronic devices. By using density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, atomically thin holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based systems are studied for possible spintronic applications. Ferromagnetism is observed in all the C-doped holey nitrogenated graphene. Interestingly, the holey nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) based system shows strong half-metallicity with a Curie temperature of approximately 297 K when a particular C-doping concentration is reached. It shows a strong half-metallicity compared with any metal-free systems studied to date. Thus, such carbon nitride based systems can be used for a 100 % spin polarized current. Furthermore, such C-doped systems show excellent dynamical, thermal, and mechanical properties. Thus, we predict a metal-free planar ferromagnetic half-metallic holey nitrogenated graphene based system for room-temperature spintronic devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Computer expert system for spectral line simulation and selection in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengyuan; Ying, Hai; Wang, Xiaoru; Huang, Benli

    1996-07-01

    This paper is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta, Part B (SAB). This hardcopy text, comprising the main body and an appendix, is accompanied by a disk with programs, data files and a brief manual. The main body discusses purpose, design principle and usage of the computer software for the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) expert system. The appendix provides a brief instruction on the manipulation of the demonstration program and relevant information on accessing the diskette. The computer software of the expert system has been developed in C++ language to simulate spectra and to select analytical lines in ICP-AES. This expert system is based on a comprehensive model of non-LTE ICP-AES, which includes expertise in plasma discharges, analyte ionization and excitation, and spectral-line shapes. The system also provides several databases in which essential elemental and spectral data are stored. A logic reasoning engine is utilized for selection of the best analytical line with a main criterion of minimizing the true detection limit. The system is user-friendly with pop-up menus, an editor for database operation, and a graphic interface for the display of simulated spectra. The system can simulate spectra and predict spectral interferences with good accuracy.

  7. Resonant two-photon absorption and electromagnetically induced transparency in open ladder-type atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Han Seb; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2013-03-25

    We have experimentally and theoretically studied resonant two-photon absorption (TPA) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the open ladder-type atomic system of the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 0, 1, 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 1, 2, 3) transitions in (87)Rb atoms. As the coupling laser intensity was increased, the resonant TPA was transformed to EIT for the 5S(1/2) (F = 1)-5P(3/2) (F' = 2)-5D(5/2) (F″ = 3) transition. The transformation of resonant TPA into EIT was numerically calculated for various coupling laser intensities, considering all the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S(1/2)-5P(3/2)-5D(5/2) transition. From the numerical results, the crossover from TPA to EIT could be understood by the decomposition of the spectrum into an EIT component owing to the pure two-photon coherence and a TPA component caused by the mixed term.

  8. PUMP DESIGN AND COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFURIC ACID TRANSFER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNG-SIK CHOI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a newly designed sulfuric acid transfer system for the sulfur-iodine (SI thermochemical cycle. The proposed sulfuric acid transfer system was evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis for investigating thermodynamic/hydrodynamic characteristics and material properties. This analysis was conducted to obtain reliable continuous operation parameters; in particular, a thermal analysis was performed on the bellows box and bellows at amplitudes and various frequencies (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz. However, the high temperatures and strongly corrosive operating conditions of the current sulfuric acid system present challenges with respect to the structural materials of the transfer system. To resolve this issue, we designed a novel transfer system using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon® as a bellows material for the transfer of sulfuric acid. We also carried out a CFD analysis of the design. The CFD results indicated that the maximum applicable temperature of PTFE is about 533 K (260 °C, even though its melting point is around 600 K. This result implies that the PTFE is a potential material for the sulfuric acid transfer system. The CFD simulations also confirmed that the sulfuric acid transfer system was designed properly for this particular investigation.

  9. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  10. Transferability of coarse-grained force field for nCB liquid crystal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Guo, Hongxia

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the transferability of the coarse-grained (CG) force field originally developed for the liquid crystal (LC) molecule 5CB ( Zhang et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 2075 - 2089 ) was investigated by its homologues 6CB and 8CB molecules. Note that, to construct the 5CB CG force field, we combined the structure-based and thermodynamic quantities-based methods and at the same time attempted to use several fragment molecular systems to derive the CG nonbonded interaction parameters. The resultant 5CB CG force field exhibits a good transferability to some extent. For example, not only the experimental densities, the local packing of atom groups, and the antiparallel arrangements of nearest neighboring molecules, but also the unique LC mesophases as well as the nematic-isotropic phase transition temperatures of 6CB and 8CB were reproduced. Meanwhile, the limitations of this 5CB CG force field were also observed, such as the phase transition from nematic to smectic was postponed to the lower temperature and the resulting smectic phase structure is single-layer-like instead of partially interdigitated bilayer-like as observed in underlying atomistic model. Apparently, more attention should be paid when applying a CG force field to the state point which is quite different from which the force field is explicitly parametrized for. The origin of the above limitations can be potentially traced back to the inherent simplifications and some approximations often adopted in the creation process of CG force field, for example, choosing symmetric CG potentials which do not explicitly include electrostatic interactions and are parametrized by reproducing the target properties of the specific nematic 5CB phase at 300 K and 1 atm, as well as using soft nonbonded potential and excluding torsion barriers. Moreover, although by construction this CG force field could inevitably incorporate both thermodynamic and local structural information on the nematic 5CB phase, the

  11. Sustainable management after irrigation system transfer: experiences in Colombia: the RUT irrigation district

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobo, N.U.

    2006-01-01

    This book is focused in the formulation of a framework for the sustainable management of the irrigation systems transferred to the users organizations by the government. It describes the experience of the irrigation management transfer in Colombia, the impacts from a technical, social, environment

  12. Structural and medium effects on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with intramolecular hydrogen bonded phenols. The interplay between hydrogen-bonding and acid-base interactions on the hydrogen atom transfer reactivity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Amorati, Riccardo; Menichetti, Stefano; Viglianisi, Caterina; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-07-03

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded 2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (1) and 4-methoxy-2-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (2) and with 4-methoxy-3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenol (3) has been carried out. In acetonitrile, intramolecular hydrogen bonding protects the phenolic O-H of 1 and 2 from attack by CumO(•) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) exclusively occurs from the C-H bonds that are α to the piperidine nitrogen (α-C-H bonds). With 3 HAT from both the phenolic O-H and the α-C-H bonds is observed. In the presence of TFA or Mg(ClO4)2, protonation or Mg(2+) complexation of the piperidine nitrogen removes the intramolecular hydrogen bond in 1 and 2 and strongly deactivates the α-C-H bonds of the three substrates. Under these conditions, HAT to CumO(•) exclusively occurs from the phenolic O-H group of 1-3. These results clearly show that in these systems the interplay between intramolecular hydrogen bonding and Brønsted and Lewis acid-base interactions can drastically influence both the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The possible implications of these findings are discussed in the framework of the important role played by tyrosyl radicals in biological systems.

  13. Energy transfer rate in double-layer graphene systems: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, B., E-mail: b_bahrami@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vazifehshenas, T., E-mail: t-vazifeh@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    We theoretically investigate the energy transfer phenomenon in a double-layer graphene (DLG) system. We use the balance equation approach in linear regime and random phase approximation screening function to obtain energy transfer rates at different electron temperatures, densities and interlayer spacings. We find that the rate of energy transfer in the DLG is qualitatively similar to that obtained in the double-layer two-dimensional electron gas but its values are an order of magnitude greater. Also, at large electron temperature differences between two graphene layers, the electron density dependence of energy transfer is significantly different, particularly in case of unequal electron densities.

  14. Multicomutation flow system for manganese speciation by solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz, Anna; Sołtys, Monika; Kurys, Ewa; Domagała, Karolina; Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Walas, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    In the paper an application of solid phase extraction technique for speciation analysis of manganese in water samples with the use of flame atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. Two types of sorbents, activated silica gel and Dowex 1 × 4, were used respectively for simultaneously Mn2 + and MnO42 - retention and preconcentration. The whole procedure was realized in multicomutation flow system. Different conditions like: type and concentration of eluent, sample pH and loading time were tested during the study. Under appropriate conditions, it was possible to obtained enrichment factors of 20 and 16 for Mn(II) and Mn(VII), respectively. Precision of the procedure was close to 4% (measured as relative standard deviation), whereas the detection limit (3σ) was 1.4 μg·L- 1 for Mn(II) and 4.8 μg·L- 1 for Mn(VII).

  15. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, E.; Monasterio, P. R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-01

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  16. Guiding ultraslow weak-light bullets with Airy beams in a coherent atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of guiding stable ultraslow weak-light bullets by using Airy beams in a cold, lifetime-broadened four-level atomic system via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We show that under EIT condition the light bullet with ultraslow propagating velocity and extremely low generation power formed by the balance between diffraction and nonlinearity in the probe field can be not only stabilized but also steered by the assisted field. In particular, when the assisted field is taken to be an Airy beam, the light bullet can be trapped into the main lobe of the Airy beam, propagate ultraslowly in longitudinal direction, accelerate in transverse directions, and move along a parabolic trajectory. We further show that the light bullet can bypass an obstacle when guided by two sequential Airy beams. A technique for generating ultraslow helical weak-light bullets is also proposed.

  17. Dispersion in a four level N-scheme atomic system with co- and counter- propagating beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. P.; Narducci, F. A.

    2012-03-01

    We motivate the study of an 'N-scheme' atomic system for the case of a bi-directional probe field. We derive the equations of motion. The equations were expanded in order of the counter-propagating field strength over the co-propagating field strength. We solve the equations numerically in steady state in a perturbative manner. The zeroth order solutions describe the dispersion and absorption of the co-propagating field, while the first order solutions describe the dispersion and absorption of the counter-propagating field. We investigate the solutions in two temperature regimes for a variety of field strengths. Regimes of similar dispersion for the co- and counter-propagating fields were found, as well as regimes of opposite behavior. In most cases, absorption of the fields is still a problem.

  18. Implementation of dose management system at radiation protection board of Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasford, F; Amoako, J K; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Sosu, E K; Otoo, F; Asiedu, G O

    2012-01-01

    The dose management system (DMS) is a computer software developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency for managing data on occupational exposure to radiation sources and intake of radionuclides. It is an integrated system for the user-friendly storage, processing and control of all existing internal and external dosimetry data. The Radiation Protection Board (RPB) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission has installed, customised, tested and using the DMS as a comprehensive DMS to improve personnel and area monitoring in the country. Personnel dose records from the RPBs database from 2000 to 2009 are grouped into medical, industrial and education/research sectors. The medical sector dominated the list of monitored institutions in the country over the 10-y period representing ∼87 %, while the industrial and education/research sectors represent ∼9 and ∼4 %, respectively. The number of monitored personnel in the same period follows a similar trend with medical, industrial and education/research sectors representing ∼74, ∼17 and ∼9 %, respectively. Analysis of dose data for 2009 showed that there was no instance of a dose above the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, however, 2.7 % of the exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv. The highest recorded individual annual dose and total collective dose in all sectors were 4.73 mSv and 159.84 man Sv, respectively. Workers in the medical sector received higher individual doses than in the other two sectors, and average dose per exposed worker in all sectors is 0.25 mSv.

  19. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.

    This research follows a multifaceted approach, from theory to practice, to the investigation and development of novel helium plasmas, sample introduction systems, and diagnostic techniques for atomic and mass spectrometries. During the period January 1994 - December 1994, four major sets of challenging research programs were addressed that each included a number of discrete but complementary projects: (1) The first program is concerned with fundamental and analytical investigations of novel atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPS) that are suitable for the atomization-excitation-ionization of elements, especially those possessing high excitation and ionization energies, for the purpose of enhancing sensitivity and selectivity of analytical measurements. (2) The second program includes simulation and computer modeling of He ICPS. The aim is to ease the hunt for new helium plasmas by predicting their structure and fundamental and analytical properties, without incurring the enormous cost for extensive experimental studies. (3) The third program involves spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of plasma discharges to instantly visualize their prevailing structures, to quantify key fundamental properties, and to verify predictions by mathematical models. (4) The fourth program entails investigation of new, low-cost sample introduction systems that consume micro- to nanoliter quantity of sample solution in plasma spectrometries. A portion of this research involves development and applications of novel diagnostic techniques suitable for probing key fundamental properties of aerosol prior to and after injection into high-temperature plasmas. These efforts, still in progress, collectively offer promise of solving singularly difficult analytical problems that either exist now or are likely to arise in the future in the various fields of energy generation, environmental pollution, material science, biomedicine and nutrition.

  20. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria, E-mail: maria.berdova@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore [STMicroelectronics, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, 20126, Milano (Italy); Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me or Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and ozone for potential applications in microelectromechanical systems. • ALD HfO{sub 2} protects aluminum substrates from degradation in moist environment and at the same time retains good reflectance properties of the underlying material. • The resistance of hafnium dioxide to moist environment is independent of chosen precursors. - Abstract: This work presents the investigation of HfO{sub 2} deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO{sub 2} films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO{sub 2} films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80–90% to 76–85% in 400–800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO{sub 2} films grown with Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and no shift (remained in the range of 68–83%) for films grown from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me.

  1. Quantum correlations between each two-level system in a pair of atoms and general coherent fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdel-Khalek

    Full Text Available The quantitative description of the quantum correlations between each two-level system in a two-atom system and the coherent fields initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs is considered. Specifically, we consider two atoms locally interacting with PLPCSs and take into account the different terms of interactions, the entanglement and quantum discord are studied including the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects. Using the monogamic relation between the entanglement of formation and quantum discord in tripartite systems, we show that the control and preservation of the different kinds of quantum correlations greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical quantities. Finally, we explore the link between the dynamical behavior of quantum correlations and nonclassicality of the fields with and without atomic motion effect. Keywords: Quantum correlations, Monogamic relation, Coherent states, Power-law potentials, Wehrl entropy

  2. Surface polyPEGylation of Eu3+ doped luminescent hydroxyapatite nanorods through the combination of ligand exchange and metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Heng, Chunning; Huang, Qiang; Mao, Liucheng; Huang, Hongye; Hui, Junfeng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    The Eu3+ doped luminescent hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanorods with uniform size and morphology can be synthesized by hydrothermal route. However, these HAp nanorods are coated by hydrophobic oleylamine, which makes them difficult to be dispersed in aqueous solution and impede their biomedical applications. In this work, Eu3+ doped luminescent polymers functionalized HAp nanorods were prepared through the combination of ligand exchange reaction and metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. In this procedure, the amino group functionalized HAp nanorods were first prepared by ligand exchange reaction using adenosine monophosphate (AMP) as ligand. Then the Br-containing initiators (HAp-Br) were introduced onto the surface of HAp-AMP nanorods through the amidation reaction. Finally, polymers functionalized HAp nanorods were prepared by metal free ATRP method using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) as monomer and 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH) as organic photocatalyst. The properties of these obtained HAp nanocomposites (HAP-polyPEGMA nanorods) were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis in detail. The cell imaging of these HAP-polyPEGMA nanorods was examined using laser scanning confocal microscope to evaluate their biomedical applications. We demonstrated for the first time that hydrophobic luminescent HAp nanorods can be functionalized with polyPEGMA through the combination of ligand exchange reaction and metal free surface initiated ATRP. As compared with the traditional ATRP, the metal free ATRP can overcome the toxic and fluorescence quenching effects of metal catalysts such as copper ions. More importantly, the strategy described in this work should also be utilized for fabrications of many other luminescent polymer nanocomposites due to its good monomer adoptability.

  3. Synthesis of multirecognition magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer by atom transfer radical polymerization and its application in magnetic solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Jin; Zheng, Chao; Lan, Yao-Han; Chi, Shuai-Shuai; Dong, Qian; Liu, Hao-Long; Peng, Chao; Dong, Lin-Yi; Xu, Liang; Wang, Xian-Hua

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we reported an effective method for the synthesis of a multirecognition magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), using 2,4-diamino-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazine as pseudo-template. The resulting MMIP was characterized in detail by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetic analysis (TGA), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). These results indicated the successful synthesis of MMIP with sufficient thermal stability and magnetic properties. The adsorption experiments were carried out to evaluate the specific selectivity of MMIP related to the spatial structure of target molecules. The MMIP exhibited multirecognition ability and excellent binding capability for melamine (MEL), cyromazine (CYR), triamterene (TAT), diaveridine (DVD), and trimethoprim (TME), and the apparent maximum number of binding sites (Q max) was 77.5, 75.2, 72.5, 69.9, and 70.4 μmol g-1, respectively. The multirecognition MMIP not only possessed adequate magnetic responsiveness for fast separation but also avoided the risk of template leakage on trace component analysis. Therefore, it was suitable for serving as a magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) adsorbent. MSPE coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis was applied to enrich and separate five target molecules from three samples. Recoveries for all target molecules ranged from 81.6 to 91.5% with relative standard deviations of no more than 4.1% (n = 3). Graphical abstract Multirecognition property of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer prepared with pseudo template.

  4. Atomic vapor density monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewall, N.; Harris, W.; Beeler, R.; Wooldridge, J.; Chen, H.L.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents information on the Atomic Vapor Density Monitor (AVDM) system that measures the density of a vapor by measuring the absorption of light from a swept-wavelength laser that passes through an atomic vapor stream.

  5. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J Anibal

    2017-07-17

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  6. Immobilization of single argon atoms in nano-cages of two-dimensional zeolite model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Mengen; Akter, Nusnin; Kestell, John D.; Boscoboinik, Alejandro M.; Kim, Taejin; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Lu, Deyu; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal

    2017-07-01

    The confinement of noble gases on nanostructured surfaces, in contrast to bulk materials, at non-cryogenic temperatures represents a formidable challenge. In this work, individual Ar atoms are trapped at 300 K in nano-cages consisting of (alumino)silicate hexagonal prisms forming a two-dimensional array on a planar surface. The trapping of Ar atoms is detected in situ using synchrotron-based ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atoms remain in the cages upon heating to 400 K. The trapping and release of Ar is studied combining surface science methods and density functional theory calculations. While the frameworks stay intact with the inclusion of Ar atoms, the permeability of gasses (for example, CO) through them is significantly affected, making these structures also interesting candidates for tunable atomic and molecular sieves. These findings enable the study of individually confined noble gas atoms using surface science methods, opening up new opportunities for fundamental research.

  7. Development of a combined atomic force microscopy and side-view imaging system for mechanotransduction research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beicker, Kellie N.

    Key metrics for understanding cell response to mechanical stimuli include rearrangement of the cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal structure, induced strains and biochemical distributions; however, structural information during applied stress is limited by our ability to image cells under load. In order to study the mechanics of single cells and subcellular components under load, I have developed a unique imaging system that combines an atomic force microscope (AFM) with both vertical light-sheet (VLS) illumination and a new imaging technique called PRISM - Pathway Rotated Imaging for Sideways Microscopy. The combined AFM and PRISM system facilitates the imaging of cell deformation in the direction of applied force with accompanying pico-Newton resolution force measurements. The additional inclusion of light-sheet microscopy improves the signal-to-noise ratio achieved by illumination of only a thin layer of the cell. This system is capable of pico-newton resolution force measurements with simultaneous side-view high frame rate imaging for single-molecule and single-cell force studies. Longer-term goals for this instrument are to investigate how external mechanical stimuli, specifically single-molecule interactions, alter gene expression, motility, and differentiation. The overall goal of my dissertation work is to design a tool useful for mechanobiology studies of single cells. This requires the design and implementation of PRISM and VLS systems that can be coupled to the standard Asylum AFM on inverted optical microscope. I also examine the strategy and implementation of experimental procedures and data analysis pipelines for single-cell and single-molecule force spectroscopy. These goals can be broken down as follows: • Performed single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments. • Performed single-cell force spectroscopy experiments. • Constructed and characterized the side-view microscopy system. • Applied combined AFM and side-vew microscopy system.

  8. Optimization and Control of Lumped Transmitting Coil-Based in Motion Wireless Power Transfer Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Nazmul

    2015-01-01

    Wireless inductive power transfer systems are the only viable option for transferring energy to a moving vehicle. In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in in-motion vehicle charging. The dominant technology thus far for in motion charging is elongated tracks, creating a constant eld for the moving vehicle. This technology suers from high volt ampere ratings and lower efficiency of 70%. On the other hand, stationary charging systems can demonstrate efficiency up to 95%. This...

  9. Vent System Analysis for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage Transfer Ground Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A

    2013-01-01

    To test and validate key capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements such as large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots, NASA is leading the efforts to develop and design the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) payload. The primary objectives of CPST payload are to demonstrate: 1) in-space storage of cryogenic propellants for long duration applications; and 2) in-space transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Ground Test Article (GTA) is a technology development version of the CPST payload. The GTA consists of flight-sized and flight-like storage and transfer tanks, liquid acquisition devices, transfer, and pressurization systems with all of the CPST functionality. The GTA is designed to perform integrated passive and active thermal storage and transfer performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a vacuum environment. The GTA storage tank is designed to store liquid hydrogen and the transfer tank is designed to be 5% of the storage tank volume. The LH2 transfer subsystem is designed to transfer propellant from one tank to the other utilizing pressure or a pump. The LH2 vent subsystem is designed to prevent over-pressurization of the storage and transfer tanks. An in-house general-purpose computer program was utilized to model and simulate the vent subsystem operation. The modeling, analysis, and the results will be presented in the final paper.

  10. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  11. [The design of data transfer protocol for home and community tele-medical system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinsong; Liang, Feixue; Deng, Qinkai

    2011-09-01

    This article describes a design of physiological signal storage format and transfer protocol for the tele-medical system between home and community. The protocol is based on ASCII character, with frames as its basic structure. There are two kinds of frames: control frames and data frames. Control frames can start and stop data transfer, confirm the order, and ask for start. There are seven kinds of data frames, according to the different data types. Data is transferred in data frames. The protocol described in this article is simple and extensible. The design target has been accomplished in real system.

  12. Hydrogen-atom transfer in reactions of organic radicals with [Co-II(por)](center dot) (por = porphyrinato) and in subsequent addition of [Co(H)(por)] to olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, B.; Dzik, W.I.; Li, S.; Wayland, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms for hydrogen-atom transfer from the cyanoisopropyl radical C-center dot(CH3)(2)CN to [Co-II(por)](center dot) (yielding [Co-III(H)(por)] and CH2=C(CH3)(CN); por = porphyrinato) and the insertion of vinyl acetate (CH2=CHOAc) into the Co-H bond of [Co(H)(por)] (giving

  13. Gas stream in Algol. [mass transfer in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugier, H.; Chen, K.-Y.

    1977-01-01

    Additional absorption features in the red wings of the Mg II resonance lines near 2800 A are found in observations of Algol made from the Copernicus satellite. The absorption features were clearly seen only during a part of the primary eclipse, in the phase interval 0.90-0.03. The observations are interpreted as being produced by a stream of matter flowing from Algol B in the direction of Algol A. The measured Doppler shifts of the features give the value of 150 km/s as the characteristic velocity of matter in the stream. The mass transfer connected with the stream is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the -13th power solar mass per year.

  14. Orthognathic positioning system: intraoperative system to transfer virtual surgical plan to operating field during orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alvaro A

    2013-05-01

    To introduce the concept and use of an occlusal-based "orthognathic positioning system" (OPS) to be used during orthognathic surgery. The OPS consists of intraoperative occlusal-based devices that transfer virtual surgical planning to the operating field for repositioning of the osteotomized dentoskeletal segments. The system uses detachable guides connected to an occlusal splint. An initial drilling guide is used to establish stable references or landmarks. These are drilled on the bone that will not be repositioned adjacent to the osteotomy line. After mobilization of the skeletal segment, a final positioning guide, referenced to the drilled landmarks, is used to transfer the skeletal segment according to the virtual surgical planning. The OPS is digitally designed using 3-dimensional computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and manufactured with stereolithographic techniques. Virtual surgical planning has improved the preoperative assessment and, in conjunction with the OPS, the execution of orthognathic surgery. The OPS has the possibility to eliminate the inaccuracies commonly associated with traditional orthognathic surgery planning and to simplify the execution by eliminating surgical steps such as intraoperative measuring, determining the condylar position, the use of bulky intermediate splints, and the use of intermaxillary wire fixation. The OPS attempts precise translation of the virtual plan to the operating field, bridging the gap between virtual and actual surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxygen atom transfer from {mu}-Oxo-bis[1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(trifluoromethyl)ph-thalocya ninato]diiron(III) : evidence for an Fe(IV)=O intermediate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Chemical Engineering

    1998-01-01

    The dimeric [(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) (1) (FPc is the dianion of 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(trifluoromethyl)phthalocyanine) has been shown to transfer its -oxo atom quantitatively to trimethylphosphine and triphenylphosphine. In the case of triphenylphosphine a base such as 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) or pyridine (py) is needed to induce the oxygen atom transfer. The reaction of 1 with MeIm at -40 C and below gives [(MeIm)(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) (4), which disproportionates to give (MeIm)2(FPc)Fe (5) and (FPc)Fe=O (6) at higher temperatures. The oxo atom of 6 has been shown to transfer to triphenylphosphine. Similarly, 6 is generated by the disproportionation of 1 with py. It has also been generated by the oxidation of 1 with t-butyl hydroperoxide. [(FPc)Fe]2({mu}-O) catalyzes the oxidation of hydrocarbons by iodosylbenzene. With stilbenes, styrenes, cyclohexenes and butenes as substrates, both epoxidations and alkyl C-H bond oxidations have been observed. The epoxidation of cis-stilbene leads to a mixture of cis- and trans-stilbene oxides, indicating that epoxidation of cis-stilbene, and possibly other olefins as well, proceeds through a non-concerted mechanism.

  16. Preoperational test report, cross-site transfer system integrated test (POTR-007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacquet, E.A.

    1998-04-02

    This report documents the results obtained during the performance of Preoperational Test POTP-007, from December 12, 1997 to March 27, 1998. The main objectives were to demonstrate the operation of the following Cross-Site Transfer System components: Booster pumps P-3125A and P-3125B interlocks and controls, both local and remote; Booster pump P-3125A and P-3125B and associated variable speed drives VSD-1 and VSD-2 performance in both manual and automatic modes; and Water filling, circulation, venting and draining of the transfer headers (supernate and slurry line). As described in reference 1, the following components of the Cross-Site Transfer System that would normally be used during an actual waste transfer, are not used in this specific test: Water Flush System; Valving and instrumentation associated with the 241-SY-A valve pit jumpers; and Valving and instrumentation associated with the 244-A lift station.

  17. Available transfer capability evaluation and enhancement using various FACTS controllers: Special focus on system security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkateswara Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, because of the deregulation of the power industry the continuous increase of the load increases the necessity of calculation of available transfer capability (ATC of a system to analyze the system security. With this calculation, the scheduling of generator can be decided to decrease the system severity. Further, constructing new transmission lines, new substations are very cost effective to meet the increasing load and to increase the transfer capability. Hence, an alternative way to increase the transfer capability is use of flexible ac transmission system (FACTS controllers. In this paper, SSSC, STACOM and UPFC are considered to show the effect of these controllers in enhancing system ATC. For this, a novel current based modeling and optimal location strategy of these controllers are presented. The proposed methodology is tested on standard IEEE-30 bus and IEEE-57 bus test systems with supporting numerical and graphical results.

  18. Determination of mercury by multisyringe flow injection system with cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, L.O. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Elsholz, O. [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Lohbruegger Kirchstrasse 65, 21033 Hamburg (Germany); Forteza, R. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Cerda, V. [Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa km.7.5, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)]. E-mail: victor.cerda@uib.es

    2006-07-28

    A new software-controlled time-based multisyringe flow injection system for mercury determination by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. Precise known volumes of sample, reducing agent (1.1% SnCl{sub 2} in 3% HCl) and carrier (3% HCl) are dispensed into a gas-liquid separation cell with a multisyringe burette coupled with one three-way solenoid valve. An argon flow delivers the reduced mercury to the spectrometer. The optimization of the system was carried out testing reaction coils and gas-liquid separators of different design as well as changing parameters, such as sample and reagents volumes, reagent concentrations and carrier gas flow rate, among others. The analytical curves were obtained within the range 50-5000 ng L{sup -1}. The detection limit (3{sigma} {sub b}/S) achieved is 5 ng L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.4%, evaluated from 16 successive injections of 250 ng L{sup -1} Hg standard solution. The injection and sample throughput per hour were 44 and 11, respectively. This technique was validated by means of solid and water reference materials with good agreement with the certified values and was successfully applied to fish samples.

  19. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1997-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  20. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  1. Optomechanically induced transparency in multi-cavity optomechanical system with and without one two-level atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Amjad; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-Shui

    2016-06-28

    We analytically study the optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) in the N-cavity system with the Nth cavity driven by pump, probing laser fields and the 1st cavity coupled to mechanical oscillator. We also consider that one atom could be trapped in the ith cavity. Instead of only illustrating the OMIT in such a system, we are interested in how the number of OMIT windows is influenced by the cavities and the atom and what roles the atom could play in different cavities. In the resolved sideband regime, we find that, the number of cavities precisely determines the maximal number of OMIT windows. It is interesting that, when the two-level atom is trapped in the even-labeled cavity, the central absorptive peak (odd N) or dip (even N) is split and forms an extra OMIT window, but if the atom is trapped in the odd-labeled cavity, the central absorptive peak (odd N) or dip (even N) is only broadened and thus changes the width of the OMIT windows rather than induces an extra window.

  2. A taxonomy for teaching transfer skills in the Danish VET system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Vibe

    2011-01-01

    The educational system is grounded in the belief that you can teach people in one setting — the school — in order that they will be able to perform in other settings outside school. The vital process of applying knowledge and skills acquired in an educational situation to working life is known...... as ‘transfer’. The transfer process poses a continual challenge to all spheres of education and training, for while transfer is positively influenced by identical elements shared by the training and transfer situations, more often than not, the two are markedly dissimilar. This discussion is confined...... to the transfer process solely within the specialised vocational and education and training (VET) stream in Denmark. The existence of many identical elements in both training and transfer situations is known as ‘near transfer’, and is most readily achieved when training is conducted within company premises...

  3. Robustness of Three-Phase Contactless Power Transfer System for Horizontal Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Neba, Yasuhiko; Ishizaka, Kouichi; Itoh, Ryozo

    This paper presents a model of a three-phase contactless power transfer system with short gap between the primary and secondary armatures. The model of the system is derived from typical equivalent circuit equations of a three-phase induction motor. On the basis of this model, robustness of the system for the horizontal displacement between the primary and secondary armatures is proved.

  4. 41 CFR 101-39.105-1 - Transfers from discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... discontinued or curtailed fleet management systems. 101-39.105-1 Section 101-39.105-1 Public Contracts and... AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.1-Establishment, Modification, and Discontinuance of Interagency Fleet Management Systems § 101-39.105-1 Transfers from...

  5. Finite quantal systems -- from semiconductor quantum dots to cold atoms in traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Stephanie M.

    2007-03-01

    Many-body systems that are set rotating may form vortices, characterized by rotating motion around a central cavity. This is familiar to us from every-day life: you can observe vortices while stirring your coffee, or watching a hurricane. In quantum physics, vortices are known to occur in superconducting films and rotating bosonic He-4 or fermionic He-3 liquids, and recently became a hot topic in the research on cold atoms in traps. Here we show that the rotation of trapped particles with a repulsive interaction may lead to vortex formation regardless of whether the particles are bosons or fermions. The exact many-particle wave function provides evidence that the mechanism is very similar in both cases. We discuss the close relation between rotating BECs and quantum dots at strong magnetic fields. The vortices can stick to particles to form composite particles, but also occur without association to any particular particle. In quantum dots we find off-electron vortices that are localized, giving rise to charge deficiency or holes in the density, with rotating currents around them. The vortex formation is observable in the energetics of the system. ``Giant vortices'' may form in anharmonic potentials. Here, the vortices accumulate at the trap center, leading to large cores in the electron and current densities. Turning from single traps to periodic lattices, we comment upon the analogies between optical lattices with cold fermionic atoms, and regular arrays of few-electron quantum dots. Trapping a few (N shell structure in the quantum wells determines the magnetism, leading to a systematic sequence of non-magnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states. M. Toreblad et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 090407 (2004); H. Saarikoski, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 116802 (2004) , Phys. Rev. B 71, 035421 (2005); M. Manninen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 106405 (2005); E. R"as"anen, et al., Phys. Rev. B 73, 235324 (2006); M. Koskinen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 066802 (2003

  6. Concepts to Automate Fluid Transfer Capability of Low Impact Docking System (LIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Lukens, Scott; Robertson, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    The capability to transfer mass between spacecraft is necessary for many mission scenarios. Docking and berthing operations have enabled fluid, electrical, crew and equipment transfers to some degree on all manned space operations since the Gemini program. The Apollo program performed some sophisticated docking maneuvers to land men on the moon and return them safely to Earth. These programs primarily transferred crew, equipment, and pressurized atmosphere between docked spacecraft. The International Space Station (ISS) U.S. modules are connected by Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) portals. They provide many feed-through ports for electrical, and fluid transfer between modules, as well as a large diameter crew and equipment tunnel. Fluid and electrical jumpers are manually installed after the CBM sealing surfaces have been securely mated to maintain the pressurized cabin environment. CBM berthing and subsequent fluid transfer capability requires a lengthy manual process involving an active interface that mates with a passive half. The Androgynous Peripheral Attach System (MAS) a Russian technology that docked the Russian Zarya module to Unity, or Node 1, is a more complex system that also is capable of fuel transfer, enabling refueling of the Russian re-boost engines on ISS. For several years, a Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) has been under development at Johnson Space Center (JSC). This docking technology has a requirement to be androgynous in order to allow the fabrication of a single configuration that can dock with all other LIDS units. It is desired to make electrical and fluid coupling mating an automated process to enable routine docking and undocking operations to support future exploration missions. It is envisioned that modular design and vehicle assembly will require an efficient LIDS for fuel, electrical, crew, and equipment transfer. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has joined the LIDS development effort and plans to employ fluid transfer concepts

  7. An efficient wireless power transfer system with security considerations for electric vehicle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen; Chau, K. T., E-mail: ktchau@eee.hku.hk; Liu, Chunhua; Qiu, Chun; Lin, Fei [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a secure inductive wireless power transfer (WPT) system for electric vehicle (EV) applications, such as charging the electric devices inside EVs and performing energy exchange between EVs. The key is to employ chaos theory to encrypt the wirelessly transferred energy which can then be decrypted by specific receptors in the multi-objective system. In this paper, the principle of encrypted WPT is first revealed. Then, computer simulation is conducted to validate the feasibility of the proposed system. Moreover, by comparing the WPT systems with and without encryption, the proposed energy encryption scheme does not involve noticeable power consumption.

  8. An Effective Experimental Optimization Method for Wireless Power Transfer System Design Using Frequency Domain Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangyeong Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an experimental optimization method for a wireless power transfer (WPT system. The power transfer characteristics of a WPT system with arbitrary loads and various types of coupling and compensation networks can be extracted by frequency domain measurements. The various performance parameters of the WPT system, such as input real/imaginary/apparent power, power factor, efficiency, output power and voltage gain, can be accurately extracted in a frequency domain by a single passive measurement. Subsequently, the design parameters can be efficiently tuned by separating the overall design steps into two parts. The extracted performance parameters of the WPT system were validated with time-domain experiments.

  9. Preoperational test report, cross-site transfer water flush system (POTP-001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, G.L.

    1998-02-20

    This report documents the results of the testing performed per POTP-001, for the Cross-Site Transfer Water Flush System. (HNF-1552, Rev. 0) The Flush System consists of a 47,000 gallon tank (302C), a 20 hp pump, two 498kW heaters, a caustic addition pump, various valves, instruments, and piping. The purpose of this system is to provide flush water at 140 F, 140gpm, and pH 11-12 for the Cross-Site Transfer System operation.

  10. Visualization of Natural Convection Heat Transfer on a Single Sphere using the Electroplating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Young; Chung, Bum Jin [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The natural convective flows on outer sphere rise along surface. At top of sphere, the flows are lifted-up plume shape. For laminar flows, the local heat transfer shows maximum at the bottom of sphere and a monotonic decreases as flows approached to the top. The laminar natural convection heat transfer on a single sphere has been studied experimentally and numerically by several researchers. However, relatively less study has been performed for turbulent flows as it requires large facilities to achieve high Rayleigh numbers. The flows, which occur transition, is hard to experiment because of unstable. This study tried measurement of heat transfer and visualization external natural convection on a single sphere. The basic idea is that the plating patterns of copper on the sphere in mass transfer system will reveal the amount of heat transfer according to angular distance from the bottom. This study simulated natural convection on a single sphere and performed a mass transfer experiment using heat and mass transfer analogy concept. For visualization experiment, streak form plating pattern was observed. In this case, it seems that turbulence sets on the top of sphere and increases local heat transfer.

  11. Quantification of ion or atom transfer phenomena in materials implanted by nuclear methods; Quantification de phenomenes de transferts ioniques ou atomiques dans des materiaux implantes par la mise en oeuvre de methodes nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudadesse, Hassane [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1998-05-18

    Knowledge of transfer of the constituents of a system from regions of higher to lower concentration is of interest for implanted bio-materials. It allows determining the rate at which this material is integrated in a living material. To evaluate the ossification kinetics and to study the bio-functionality in corals of Ca and Sr, irradiations with a 10{sup 13} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} was performed, followed by the examination of changes in the localization of these elements. By using PIXE analysis method the distribution of Ca, P, Sr, Zn and Fe in the implant, bone and bone-implant interfaces were determined. Thus, it was shown that resorption of coral in sheep is achieved in 5 months after implantation and is identical to the cortical tissues 4 months after implantation in animals as for instance in hares. We have analyzed the tissues from around the prostheses extracted from patients. The samples were calcined and reduced to powder weighting some milligrams. We have adopted for this study the PIXE analysis method. The samples were irradiated by a proton beam of 3 MeV and about 400 {mu}m diameter. The results show the presence of the elements Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni or Zn according to the type of the implanted prosthesis. This dispersal of the metallic ions and atoms contaminate the tissues. The transfer factors translate the exchanges between bone and the implanted material. The solvatation phenomenon and the electric charge equilibrium explain the transfer order of cations Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} and of the anion PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. We have also determined these factors for the elements Ti, Cr and Ni. An original technique to study the bone bio-functionality was used. Use of phosphate derivatives labelled by {sup 99m}Tc allows obtaining information about the fixation of radioactive tracer. It was found that only after the eighth month at the implantation the neo-formed bone fixes the MDP (methyl diphosphate) labelled by {sup 99m}Tc in a similar way as in the

  12. Parametric studies of electric propulsion systems for orbit transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvi, R.; Fujita, T.

    1988-01-01

    The present parametric tradeoff study for OTV electric propulsion systems encompasses ammonia and hydrogen arcjets as well as Xe-ion propulsion systems with performance characteristics currently being projected for 1993 operation. In all cases, the power source is a nuclear-electric system with 30 kg/kW(e) specific mass, and the mission involves the movement of payloads from lower orbits to GEO. Attention is given to payload capabilities and associated propellant requirements. Mission trip time is identified as the key parameter for selection; while arcjets are preferable for shorter trip times, ion propulsion is more advantageous for longer trip times due to reduced propellant mass fraction.

  13. Open quantum spin systems in semiconductor quantum dots and atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwager, Heike

    2012-07-04

    In this Thesis, we study open quantum spin systems from different perspectives. The first part is motivated by technological challenges of quantum computation. An important building block for quantum computation and quantum communication networks is an interface between material qubits for storage and data processing and travelling photonic qubits for communication. We propose the realisation of a quantum interface between a travelling-wave light field and the nuclear spins in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a cavity. Our scheme is robust against cavity decay as it uses the decay of the cavity to achieve the coupling between nuclear spins and the travelling-wave light fields. A prerequiste for such a quantum interface is a highly polarized ensemble of nuclear spins. High polarization of the nuclear spin ensemble is moreover highly desirable as it protects the potential electron spin qubit from decoherence. Here we present the theoretical description of an experiment in which highly asymmetric dynamic nuclear spin pumping is observed in a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot. The second part of this Thesis is devoted to fundamental studies of dissipative spin systems. We study general one-dimensional spin chains under dissipation and propose a scheme to realize a quantum spin system using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice in which both coherent interaction and dissipation can be engineered and controlled. This system enables the study of non-equilibrium and steady state physics of open and driven spin systems. We find, that the steady state expectation values of different spin models exhibit discontinuous behaviour at degeneracy points of the Hamiltonian in the limit of weak dissipation. This effect can be used to dissipatively probe the spectrum of the Hamiltonian. We moreover study spin models under the aspect of state preparation and show that dissipation drives certain spin models into highly entangled state. Finally, we study a spin chain with

  14. Postings and transfers in the Ghanaian health system: a study of health workforce governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwamie, Aku; Asiamah, Miriam; Schaaf, Marta; Agyepong, Irene Akua

    2017-09-15

    Decision-making on postings and transfers - that is, the geographic deployment of the health workforce - is a key element of health workforce governance. When poorly managed, postings and transfers result in maldistribution, absenteeism, and low morale. At stake is managing the balance between organisational (i.e., health system) and individual (i.e., staff preference) needs. The negotiation of this potential convergence or divergence of interests provides a window on practices of postings and transfers, and on the micro-practices of governance in health systems more generally. This article explores the policies and processes, and the interplay between formal and informal rules and norms which underpin postings and transfers practice in two rural districts in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight district managers and 87 frontline staff from the district health administration, district hospital, polyclinic, health centres and community outreach compounds across two districts. Interviews sought to understand how the postings and transfers process works in practice, factors in frontline staff and district manager decision-making, personal experiences in being posted, and study leave as a common strategy for obtaining transfers. Differential negotiation-spaces at regional and district level exist and inform postings and transfers in practice. This is in contrast to the formal cascaded rules set to govern decision-making authority for postings and transfers. Many frontline staff lack policy clarity of postings and transfers processes and thus 'test' the system through informal staff lobbying, compounding staff perception of the postings and transfers process as being unfair. District managers are also challenged with limited decision-space embedded in broader policy contexts of systemic hierarchy and resource dependence. This underscores the negotiation process as ongoing, rather than static. These findings point to

  15. Evaluation of acrylate-based block copolymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization as matrices for paclitaxel delivery from coronary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Robert E; Schwarz, Marlene; Ranade, Shrirang; Chan, A Ken; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sumerlin, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Acrylate-based block copolymers, synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) processes, were evaluated as drug delivery matrices for the controlled release of paclitaxel from coronary stents. The polymers were multiblock copolymers consisting of poly(butyl acrylate) or poly(lauryl acrylate) soft blocks and hard blocks composed of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(isobornyl acrylate), or poly(styrene) homo- or copolymers. Depending on the ratio of hard to soft blocks in the copolymers, coating formulations were produced that possessed variable elastomeric properties, resulting in stent coatings that maintained their integrity when assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of overexpanded stents. In vitro paclitaxel release kinetics from coronary stents coated with these copolymers typically showed an early burst followed by sustained release behavior, which permitted the elution of the majority of the paclitaxel over a 10-day time period. It was determined that neither the nature of the polyacrylate (n-butyl or lauryl) nor that of the hard block appeared to affect the release kinetics of paclitaxel at a loading of 25% drug by weight, whereas some effects were observed at lower drug loading levels. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis indicated that the paclitaxel was at least partially miscible with the poly(n-butyl acrylate) phase of those block copolymers. The copolymers were also evaluated for sterilization stability by exposing both the copolymer alone and copolymer/paclitaxel coated stents to e-beam radiation at doses of 1-3 times the nominal dose used for medical device sterilization (25 kGy). It was found that the copolymers containing blocks bearing quaternary carbons within the polymer backbone were less stable to the radiation and showed a decrease in molecular weight as determined by gel-permeation chromatography. Conversely, those without quaternary carbons showed no significant change in molecular weight when

  16. Surface polyPEGylation of Eu{sup 3+} doped luminescent hydroxyapatite nanorods through the combination of ligand exchange and metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Heng, Chunning [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Shaanxi R& D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, School of Chemical and Engineering, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Huang, Qiang; Mao, Liucheng; Huang, Hongye [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Hui, Junfeng [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Shaanxi R& D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, School of Chemical and Engineering, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and The Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Surface modification of HAp nanorods through the combination of ligand exchange reaction and metal free SI-ATRP. • HAp-polyPEGMA displayed high water dispersibility, good biocompatibility and biological imaging capability. • Metal free ATRP can overcome the toxic and fluorescence quenching effects of metal catalysts of conventional ATRP. - Abstract: The Eu{sup 3+} doped luminescent hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanorods with uniform size and morphology can be synthesized by hydrothermal route. However, these HAp nanorods are coated by hydrophobic oleylamine, which makes them difficult to be dispersed in aqueous solution and impede their biomedical applications. In this work, Eu{sup 3+} doped luminescent polymers functionalized HAp nanorods were prepared through the combination of ligand exchange reaction and metal free surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. In this procedure, the amino group functionalized HAp nanorods were first prepared by ligand exchange reaction using adenosine monophosphate (AMP) as ligand. Then the Br-containing initiators (HAp-Br) were introduced onto the surface of HAp-AMP nanorods through the amidation reaction. Finally, polymers functionalized HAp nanorods were prepared by metal free ATRP method using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) as monomer and 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH) as organic photocatalyst. The properties of these obtained HAp nanocomposites (HAP-polyPEGMA nanorods) were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis in detail. The cell imaging of these HAP-polyPEGMA nanorods was examined using laser scanning confocal microscope to evaluate their biomedical applications. We demonstrated for the first time that hydrophobic luminescent HAp nanorods can be functionalized with polyPEGMA through the combination of ligand exchange reaction and metal free surface

  17. Atomic imaging in EBCO superconductor films by an X-ray holography system using a toroidally bent graphite analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekioka, Tsuguhisa; Hayashi, Kouichi; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Yukio; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Terasawa, Mititaka; Mitamura, Tohru; Iwase, Akihiro; Michikami, Osamu

    2005-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new technique enabling the determination of the three-dimensional local atomic structure around a certain element. This method has been applied to analyze the local structure around Cu in 300 nm thin films of EuBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) (EBCO) epitaxially grown on MgO (100) substrate, using the newest system for XFH measurement and high-brilliance synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. Here, the results of a study on the irradiation effect on the local atomic structure of EBCO superconductor with XFH measurements are presented.

  18. Atomic imaging in EBCO superconductor films by an X-ray holography system using a toroidally bent graphite analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekioka, Tsuguhisa; Mitamura, Tohru [Hyogo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Hayashi, Kouichi; Matsubara, Eiichiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Takahashi, Yukio; Hayashi, Tetsutaro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science; Terasawa, Mititaka [Hyogo Univ. (Japan). Lab. of Advanced Science and Tech. for Industry (LASTI); Iwase, Akihiro [Osaka Prefecture Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Tech.; Michikami, Osamu [Iwate Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    2005-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new technique enabling the determination of the three-dimensional local atomic structure around a certain element. This method has been applied to analyze the local structure around Cu in 300 nm thin films of EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (EBCO) epitaxially grown on MgO (100) substrate, using the newest system for XFH measurement and high-brilliance synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. Here, the results of a study on the irradiation effect on the local atomic structure of EBCO superconductor with XFH measurements are presented. (orig.)

  19. A Versatile High-Vacuum Cryo-transfer System for Cryo-microscopy and Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacke, Sebastian; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Nüsse, Harald; Wepf, Roger Albert; Klingauf, Jürgen; Reichelt, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic microscopy methods have gained increasing popularity, as they offer an unaltered view on the architecture of biological specimens. As a prerequisite, samples must be handled under cryogenic conditions below their recrystallization temperature, and contamination during sample transfer and handling must be prevented. We present a high-vacuum cryo-transfer system that streamlines the entire handling of frozen-hydrated samples from the vitrification process to low temperature imaging for scanning transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A template for cryo-electron microscopy and multimodal cryo-imaging approaches with numerous sample transfer steps is presented. PMID:26910419

  20. Thickness and local field effects on energy transfer rate in coupled quantum wells system: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazifehshenas, T.; Bahrami, B. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-fard, T., E-mail: taha@udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the dependence of energy transfer rate in Double-Quantum-Well system on the well thickness by using the balance equation formalism. Also, by including the local field correction in our calculations through the zero- and finite-temperature Hubbard approximations, we study the effect of the short-range interactions on the energy transfer phenomenon. Calculations consider both the static and dynamic screening approximations. Our numerical results predict that the energy transfer rate increases considerably by increasing the layers' thicknesses and by taking into account the short-range interactions, as well.