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Sample records for atom probe field

  1. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  2. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  3. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles.

  4. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  5. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F.

    1994-10-01

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  6. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min/sup -1/ can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected.

  7. Probing dark excitons in atomically thin semiconductors via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Scuri, Giovanni; Wild, Dominik S.; High, Alexander A.; Dibos, Alan; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shu, Chi; de Greve, Kristiaan; Pistunova, Kateryna; Joe, Andrew Y.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers with a direct bandgap feature tightly bound excitons, strong spin-orbit coupling and spin-valley degrees of freedom. Depending on the spin configuration of the electron-hole pairs, intra-valley excitons of TMD monolayers can be either optically bright or dark. Dark excitons involve nominally spin-forbidden optical transitions with a zero in-plane transition dipole moment, making their detection with conventional far-field optical techniques challenging. Here, we introduce a method for probing the optical properties of two-dimensional materials via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). This coupling selectively enhances optical transitions with dipole moments normal to the two-dimensional plane, enabling direct detection of dark excitons in TMD monolayers. When a WSe2 monolayer is placed on top of a single-crystal silver film, its emission into near-field-coupled SPPs displays new spectral features whose energies and dipole orientations are consistent with dark neutral and charged excitons. The SPP-based near-field spectroscopy significantly improves experimental capabilities for probing and manipulating exciton dynamics of atomically thin materials, thus opening up new avenues for realizing active metasurfaces and robust optoelectronic systems, with potential applications in information processing and communication.

  8. Roles of Atomic Injection Rate and External Magnetic Field on Optical Properties of Elliptical Polarized Probe Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, R.; Asadpour, S. H.; Batebi, S.; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the optical properties of an open four-level tripod atomic system driven by an elliptically polarized probe field in the presence of the external magnetic field and compare its properties with the corresponding closed system. Our result reveals that absorption, dispersion and group velocity of probe field can be manipulated by adjusting the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of a single coherent field, magnetic field and cavity parameters i.e. the atomic exit rate from cavity and atomic injection rates. We show that the system can exhibit multiple electromagnetically induced transparency windows in the presence of the external magnetic field. The numerical result shows that the probe field in the open system can be amplified by appropriate choice of cavity parameters, while in the closed system with introduce appropriate phase difference between fields the probe field can be enhanced. Also it is shown that the group velocity of light pulse can be controlled by external magnetic field, relative phase of applied fields and cavity parameters. By changing the parameters the group velocity of light pulse changes from subluminal to superluminal light propagation and vice versa.

  9. Ion trajectories in atom probe field ion microscopy and gas field ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Castilho, C M C

    1999-01-01

    Trajectories of positive ions produced in a region close to a structured surface, modelled by spherical or spheroidal protrusions and kept at a positive electric potential with respect to a distant screen or detector are calculated. The results are discussed in comparison with similar practical situations produced by field ionization and field evaporation or desorption, such as those occurring in gas field ion sources, field ion microscopy and field desorption spectroscopy. (author)

  10. Interpretation of atom probe tomography data for the intermetallic TiAl+Nb by means of field evaporation simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2013-01-01

    In this paper simulations of the field evaporation process during field ion microscopy (FIM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are presented and compared with experimental data. The Müller-Schottky-model [1] was extended to include the local atomic arrangement on the evaporation process of atoms. This arrangement was described by the sum of the next-neighbor-binding-energies, which differ for an atom of type A, depending on how many A-A, B-B or A-B bonds are present. Thus simulations of APT-data of intermetallic phases become feasible. In this study simulations of L10-TiAl with additions of Nb are compared with experimental data. Certain artifacts, which appear for experimental data are treated as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Interpretation of atom probe tomography data for the intermetallic TiAl+Nb by means of field evaporation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, T; Al-Kassab, T

    2013-01-01

    In this paper simulations of the field evaporation process during field ion microscopy (FIM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are presented and compared with experimental data. The Müller-Schottky-model was extended to include the local atomic arrangement on the evaporation process of atoms. This arrangement was described by the sum of the next-neighbor-binding-energies, which differ for an atom of type A, depending on how many A-A, B-B or A-B bonds are present. Thus simulations of APT-data of intermetallic phases become feasible. In this study simulations of L1(0)-TiAl with additions of Nb are compared with experimental data. Certain artifacts, which appear for experimental data are treated as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on probe field propagation in the presence of control and coupling fields through a four-level N-type atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Khairul; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Ghosh, Arindam; Biswas, Debasish; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava

    2017-11-01

    The absorption features of a probe field propagating through a four-level N-type atomic system in the presence of two coherent radiation fields is studied analytically by using a density matrix formulation. The system has two ground levels and two excited levels. A weak probe laser couples the upper ground level to the lower excited level whereas a strong control field connects the lower ground level to the lower excited level. The coupling field acts between the upper ground level and the upper excited level. The transition parameters of the 87Rb D1 line have been used to simulate the probe response. The simulated probe absorption shows a gain-like structure depending on the relative field intensities. The spectral features of the probe response exhibit substantial differences under thermal averaging as compared to a Doppler-free condition. The splitting of simulated probe absorption can be explained by the dressed state model. Electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) is observed in the simulated probe response curve when the spontaneous decay of the population from the uppermost excited state to the lower ground state is absent.

  13. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  14. Modeling Atom Probe Tomography: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vurpillot, F., E-mail: francois.vurpillot@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray 76801 (France); Oberdorfer, C. [Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Lehrstuhl für Materialphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Improving both the precision and the accuracy of Atom Probe Tomography reconstruction requires a correct understanding of the imaging process. In this aim, numerical modeling approaches have been developed for 15 years. The injected ingredients of these modeling tools are related to the basic physic of the field evaporation mechanism. The interplay between the sample nature and structure of the analyzed sample and the reconstructed image artefacts have pushed to gradually improve and make the model more and more sophisticated. This paper reviews the evolution of the modeling approach in Atom Probe Tomography and presents some future potential directions in order to improve the method. - Highlights: • The basics of field evaporation. • The main aspects of Atom Probe Tomography modeling. • The intrinsic limitations of the current method and future potential directions to improve the understanding of tip to image ion projection.

  15. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  17. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-05-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures.

  18. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  19. Comparison of the quantitative analysis performance between pulsed voltage atom probe and pulsed laser atom probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Raabe, D

    2017-04-01

    The difference in quantitative analysis performance between the voltage-mode and laser-mode of a local electrode atom probe (LEAP3000X HR) was investigated using a Fe-Cu binary model alloy. Solute copper atoms in ferritic iron preferentially field evaporate because of their significantly lower evaporation field than the matrix iron, and thus, the apparent concentration of solute copper tends to be lower than the actual concentration. However, in voltage-mode, the apparent concentration was higher than the actual concentration at 40K or less due to a detection loss of matrix iron, and the concentration decreased with increasing specimen temperature due to the preferential evaporation of solute copper. On the other hand, in laser-mode, the apparent concentration never exceeded the actual concentration, even at lower temperatures (20K), and this mode showed better quantitative performance over a wide range of specimen temperatures. These results indicate that the pulsed laser atom probe prevents both detection loss and preferential evaporation under a wide range of measurement conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mining information from atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairney, Julie M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rajan, Krishna [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Haley, Daniel [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Choi, Pyuck-Pa [Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Felfer, Peter J.; Ringer, Simon P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Marceau, Ross K.W. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Technology Precinct, 75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial–chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or “mine” fundamental materials science information from that data. - Highlights: • Overview of the newest developments in techniques to extract information from atom probe data. • As well as reviewing existing approaches, improvements and new approaches are presented. • Techniques covered include tests for randomness, short range order and crystallography. • Methods for interfacial excess mapping and spectral decomposition are also covered.

  1. Encapsulation method for atom probe tomography analysis of nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larson, D.J.; Giddings, A.D.; Wub, Y.; Verheijen, M.A.; Prosa, T.J.; Roozeboom, F.; Rice, K.P.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Geiser, B.P.; Kelly, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    Open-space nanomaterials are a widespread class of technologically important materials that are generally incompatible with analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) due to issues with specimen preparation, field evaporation and data reconstruction. The feasibility of encapsulating such non-compact

  2. Microscopic techniques bridging between nanoscale and microscale with an atomically sharpened tip - field ion microscopy/scanning probe microscopy/ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Sasahara, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Over a hundred years an atomistic point of view has been indispensable to explore fascinating properties of various materials and to develop novel functional materials. High-resolution microscopies, rapidly developed during the period, have taken central roles in promoting materials science and related techniques to observe and analyze the materials. As microscopies with the capability of atom-imaging, field ion microscopy (FIM), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be cited, which have been highly evaluated as methods to ultimately bring forward the viewpoint of reductionism in materials science. On one hand, there have been difficulties to derive useful and practical information on large (micro) scale unique properties of materials using these excellent microscopies and to directly advance the engineering for practical materials. To make bridges over the gap between an atomic scale and an industrial engineering scale, we have to develop emergence science step-by-step as a discipline having hierarchical structures for future prospects by combining nanoscale and microscale techniques; as promising ways, the combined microscopic instruments covering the scale gap and the extremely sophisticated methods for sample preparation seem to be required. In addition, it is noted that spectroscopic and theoretical methods should implement the emergence science.Fundamentally, the function of microscope is to determine the spatial positions of a finite piece of material, that is, ultimately individual atoms, at an extremely high resolution with a high stability. To define and control the atomic positions, the STM and AFM as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have successfully demonstrated their power; the technological heart of SPM lies in an atomically sharpened tip, which can be observed by FIM and TEM. For emergence science we would like to set sail using the tip as a base. Meanwhile, it is significant

  3. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hinds, E.A., E-mail: Clare.Burrage@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Edmund.Copeland@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Ed.Hinds@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Cold Matter, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  4. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  5. Formation of field induced absorption in the probe response signal of a four-level V type atomic system a theoretical study

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Khairul; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A density matrix based analytical model is developed to study the coherent probe field propagation through a four-level V type system in presence of a coherent control field. The model allows coupling of the probe field from the upper ground level to both of the excited levels keeping the control field locked to a particular transition. The addition of an extra ground level to a conventional three-level V type system creates extra decay paths to the ground levels for the upper level population. A set of sixteen density matrix based equations are formed and then solved analytically under rotating wave approximation to study the probe response under steady state condition. The simulated probe absorption spectra shows absorption dip at the centre of a transparency window only under Doppler broadened condition although the conventional EIT window appears under Doppler free condition. The dependence of the field induced absorption signal on the Rabi frequency of the control field, population transfer rate among th...

  6. Nanoscale photoconductive switching effect applied to atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Normand, A.; Houard, J.; Blum, I.; Delaroche, F.; Vurpillot, F.

    2016-10-01

    By combining a laser pulse and a high-voltage (HV) pulse on the same sample, field evaporation of materials with poor electrical conductivity using ultra-short HV pulses is reported. Using a pump-probe setup, the shape of HV pulses experienced by surface atoms of the sample apex is experimentally observed. These results are in good agreement with classical models considering the temperature and free carriers produced by a laser pulse giving rise to local photoconduction.

  7. Time-of-flight atom probe measurements on Ni3Al and Co3W

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, W.A.; Bronsveld, P.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a VG FIM100 was taken into operation, consisting of a field-ion microscope (FIM), a time-of-flight atom probe (TOFAP) and an imaging atom probe. A tungsten specimen was used to calibrate the conversion of flight times to m/n values. The resulting relative mass resolution of the TOFAP

  8. Nanometer-scale isotope analysis of bulk diamond by atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, R.; Raatz, N.; Meijer, J.; Markham, M.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) combines field emission of atoms with mass spectrometry to reconstruct three-dimensional tomograms of materials with atomic resolution and isotope specificity. Despite significant recent progress in APT technology, application to wide-bandgap materials with strong

  9. Atom Probe Tomography and Its Application to Refractory Metal Nuggets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P. A.; Forman, L. V.; Reddy, S. M.; Rickard, W. D. A.; Saxey, D. W.; La Fontaine, A.; Yang, L.; Trimby, P. W.; Cairney, J.; Ringer, S.; Schaefer, B. F.

    2016-08-01

    Atom probe tomography is capable of achieving atomic resolution. This allows us to accurately measure the chemistry of refractory metal nuggets in situ, revealing nanometre scale variations in their chemistry and the presence of sulphur in the alloy.

  10. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  11. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  12. Gain and Absorption of a Probe Light in an Open Tripod Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng-Feng; Lin, Jin-Da; Deng, Jian-Liao; He, Hui-Juan; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2012-05-01

    We theoretically investigate an open four-level atomic system interacting with control, probe and microwave fields. When there is no repumping light and a microwave field is applied, the probe light can be absorbed or amplified, which has different features than those of a system whose populations are pumped into only one ground state. In this system the microwave field and the population distributions of the ground states can be used as switches to control the propagation of the probe light.

  13. Materials applications of an advanced 3-dimensional atom probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerezo, A; Gibuoin, D; Sijbrandij, SJ; Venker, FM; Warren, PJ; Wilde, J; Smith, GDW

    An advanced 3-dimensional atom probe system has been constructed, based on an optical position-sensitive atom probe (OPoSAP) detector with energy compensation using a reflectron lens. The multi-hit detection capability of the OPoSAP lends to significant improvements in the efficiency of the

  14. Two-probe STM experiments at the atomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Marek; Olszowski, Piotr; Zuzak, Rafal; Godlewski, Szymon; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2017-11-08

    Direct characterization of planar atomic or molecular scale devices and circuits on a supporting surface by multi-probe measurements requires unprecedented stability of single atom contacts and manipulation of scanning probes over large, nanometer scale area with atomic precision. In this work, we describe the full methodology behind atomically defined two-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments performed on a model system: dangling bond dimer wire supported on a hydrogenated germanium (0 0 1) surface. We show that 70 nm long atomic wire can be simultaneously approached by two independent STM scanners with exact probe to probe distance reaching down to 30 nm. This allows direct wire characterization by two-probe I-V characteristics at distances below 50 nm. Our technical results presented in this work open a new area for multi-probe research, which can be now performed with precision so far accessible only by single-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments.

  15. Two-probe STM experiments at the atomic level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmer, Marek; Olszowski, Piotr; Zuzak, Rafal; Godlewski, Szymon; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Direct characterization of planar atomic or molecular scale devices and circuits on a supporting surface by multi-probe measurements requires unprecedented stability of single atom contacts and manipulation of scanning probes over large, nanometer scale area with atomic precision. In this work, we describe the full methodology behind atomically defined two-probe scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments performed on a model system: dangling bond dimer wire supported on a hydrogenated germanium (0 0 1) surface. We show that 70 nm long atomic wire can be simultaneously approached by two independent STM scanners with exact probe to probe distance reaching down to 30 nm. This allows direct wire characterization by two-probe I-V characteristics at distances below 50 nm. Our technical results presented in this work open a new area for multi-probe research, which can be now performed with precision so far accessible only by single-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments.

  16. Manipulating collective quantum states of ultracold atoms by probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, Andrew Christopher James

    2015-01-01

    nature of the measurement interaction and backaction is yet to be realised. This dissertation is concerned with ultracold atoms and their control via fully quantum mechanical probes. Nonclassical, squeezed and entangled states of matter and single photon sources are important for fundamental studies...... and quantum technologies. By probing, the production of squeezed and entangled states of collective variables in a Bose-Einstein condensate is investigated. Thereafter, an atomic probe using the strong interactions between highly excited atomic states, manipulates the light-matter dynamics of an ultracold gas...

  17. An environmental transfer hub for multimodal atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Daniel E; Gerstl, Stephan S A; Chin, Jackson; Hirschi, Blake; Evans, James E

    2017-01-01

    Environmental control during transfer between instruments is required for samples sensitive to air or thermal exposure to prevent morphological or chemical changes prior to analysis. Atom probe tomography is a rapidly expanding technique for three-dimensional structural and chemical analysis, but commercial instruments remain limited to loading specimens under ambient conditions. In this study, we describe a multifunctional environmental transfer hub allowing controlled cryogenic or room-temperature transfer of specimens under atmospheric or vacuum pressure conditions between an atom probe and other instruments or reaction chambers. The utility of the environmental transfer hub is demonstrated through the acquisition of previously unavailable mass spectral analysis of an intact organic molecule made possible via controlled cryogenic transfer into the atom probe using the hub. The ability to prepare and transfer specimens in precise environments promises a means to access new science across many disciplines from untainted samples and allow downstream time-resolved in situ atom probe studies.

  18. An environmental transfer hub for multimodal atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Gerstl, Stephan S. A.; Chin, Jackson; Hirschi, Blake; Evans, James. E.

    2017-05-02

    Environmental control during transfer between instruments is required for specimens sensitive to air or thermal exposure to prevent morphological or chemical changes. Atom Probe Tomography is an expanding technique but commercial instruments remain limited to loading under ambient conditions. Here we describe a multifunctional environmental transfer hub allowing controlled cryogenic, atmospheric and vacuum transfer between an Atom Probe and other instruments containing separate chambers to allow downstream time-resolved in-situ studies.

  19. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  20. Understanding the Atomic-Scale Contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local...

  1. Improvements in three-dimensional atom probe design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, A.; Godfrey, T. J.; Hyde, J. M.; Sijbrandij, S. J.; Smith, G. D. W.

    1994-03-01

    An improved position-sensitive atom probe has been designed which uses a combination of a parallel timing system and a silicon photodiode array camera. The use of two separate data acquisition systems allows the two functions of accurate positioning and flight time determination to be divorced, thus removing the compromises which must be made when these functions are carried out with only a single detector. The resulting instrument is able to determine flight times and positions of impacts straightforwardly, even when multiple ions are evaporated on a single pulse, and should be capable of operating at evaporation rates close to that of a conventional probe-hole atom probe.

  2. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  3. Ultra-reduced phases in Apollo 16 regolith: Combined field emission electron probe microanalysis and atom probe tomography of submicron Fe-Si grains in Apollo 16 sample 61500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopon, Phillip; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Kelly, Thomas F.; Reinhard, David; Prosa, Ty J.; Fournelle, John

    2017-09-01

    The lunar regolith contains a variety of chemically reduced phases of interest to planetary scientists and the most common, metallic iron, is generally ascribed to space weathering processes (Lucey et al. ). Reports of silicon metal and iron silicides, phases indicative of extremely reducing conditions, in lunar samples are rare (Anand et al. ; Spicuzza et al. ). Additional examples of Fe-silicides have been identified in a survey of particles from Apollo 16 sample 61501,22. Herein is demonstrated the utility of low keV electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), using the Fe Ll X-ray line, to analyze these submicron phases, and the necessity of accounting for carbon contamination. We document four Fe-Si and Si0 minerals in lunar regolith return material. The new Fe-Si samples have a composition close to (Fe,Ni)3Si, whereas those associated with Si0 are close to FeSi2 and Fe3Si7. Atom probe tomography of (Fe,Ni)3Si shows trace levels of C (60 ppma and nanodomains enriched in C, Ni, P, Cr, and Sr). These reduced minerals require orders of magnitude lower oxygen fugacity and more reducing conditions than required to form Fe0. Documenting the similarities and differences in these samples is important to constrain their formation processes. These phases potentially formed at high temperatures resulting from a meteorite impact. Whether carbon played a role in achieving the lower oxygen fugacities—and there is evidence of nearby carbonaceous chondritic material—it remains to be proven that carbon was the necessary component for the unique existence of these Si0 and iron silicide minerals.

  4. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Duo [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan 430023 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  5. Quantum metrology to probe atomic parity violation

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, M.

    2009-01-01

    An entangled state prepared in the decoherence free sub-space together with a Ramsey type measurement can probe parity violation in heavy alkali ions like Ba+ or Ra+. Here we propose an experiment with Ba+ ions as an example to measure the small parity violating effect in this system.

  6. Surface Plasmon Polaritons Probed with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra; Panas, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optical mirror for cold rubidium atoms based on a repulsive dipole potential created by means of a modified recordable digital versatile disc. Using the mirror, we have determined the absolute value of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) intensity, reaching 90 times the intensity...

  7. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  8. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... characterization....

  9. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D; Schindler, H; Drenckhahn, D

    2000-01-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a ≈20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) i...

  10. A computational geometry framework for the optimisation of atom probe reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, Peter [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute for General Materials Properties, Department of Materials Science, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Cairney, Julie [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we present pathways for improving the reconstruction of atom probe data on a coarse (>10 nm) scale, based on computational geometry. We introduce a way to iteratively improve an atom probe reconstruction by adjusting it, so that certain known shape criteria are fulfilled. This is achieved by creating an implicit approximation of the reconstruction through a barycentric coordinate transform. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the compensation of trajectory aberrations and the iterative improvement of the reconstruction of a dataset containing a grain boundary. We also present a method for obtaining a hull of the dataset in both detector and reconstruction space. This maximises data utilisation, and can be used to compensate for ion trajectory aberrations caused by residual fields in the ion flight path through a ‘master curve’ and correct for overall shape deviations in the data. - Highlights: • An atom probe reconstruction can be iteratively improved by using shape constraints. • An atom probe reconstruction can be inverted using barycentric coordinate transforms. • Hulls for atom probe datasets can be obtained from 2D detector outlines that are co-reconstructed with the data. • Ion trajectory compressions caused by instrument-specific residual fields in the drift tube can be corrected.

  11. Cadherin interaction probed by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, W.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ness, W.; Raab, A.; Vestweber, D.; Schindler, H.; Drenckhahn, D.

    2000-04-01

    Single molecule atomic force microscopy was used to characterize structure, binding strength (unbinding force), and binding kinetics of a classical cadherin, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells as cis-dimerized full-length external domain fused to Fc-portion of human IgG. In physiological buffer, the external domain of VE-cadherin dimers is a 20-nm-long rod-shaped molecule that collapses and dissociates into monomers (V-shaped structures) in the absence of Ca2+. Trans-interaction of dimers is a low-affinity reaction (KD = 10-3-10-5 M, koff = 1.8 s-1, kon = 103-105 M-1·s-1) with relatively low unbinding force (35-55 pN at retrace velocities of 200-4,000 nm·s-1). Higher order unbinding forces, that increase with interaction time, indicate association of cadherins into complexes with cumulative binding strength. These observations favor a model by which the inherently weak unit binding strength and affinity of cadherin trans-interaction requires clustering and cytoskeletal immobilization for amplification. Binding is regulated by low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites (KD = 1.15 mM) with high cooperativity (Hill coefficient of 5.04). Local changes of free extracellular Ca2+ in the narrow intercellular space may be of physiological importance to facilitate rapid remodeling of intercellular adhesion and communication.

  12. Data mining for isotope discrimination in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Scott R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Bryden, Aaron [Ames National Laboratory, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Suram, Santosh K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Ions with similar time-of-flights (TOF) can be discriminated by mapping their kinetic energy. While current generation position-sensitive detectors have been considered insufficient for capturing the isotope kinetic energy, we demonstrate in this paper that statistical learning methodologies can be used to capture the kinetic energy from all of the parameters currently measured by mathematically transforming the signal. This approach works because the kinetic energy is sufficiently described by the descriptors on the potential, the material, and the evaporation process within atom probe tomography (APT). We discriminate the isotopes for Mg and Al by capturing the kinetic energy, and then decompose the TOF spectrum into its isotope components and identify the isotope for each individual atom measured. This work demonstrates the value of advanced data mining methods to help enhance the information resolution of the atom probe. - Highlights: ► Atom probe tomography and statistical learning were combined for data enhancement. ► Multiple eigenvalue decompositions decomposed a spectrum with overlapping peaks. ► The isotope of each atom was determined by kinetic energy discrimination. ► Eigenspectra were identified and new chemical information was identified.

  13. Development of atomic beam probe for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, M., E-mail: bertam@sze.hu [Széchenyi István University, EURATOM Association, Győr (Hungary); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Anda, G.; Aradi, M.; Bencze, A.; Buday, Cs.; Kiss, I.G.; Tulipán, Sz.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Havlícek, J.; Háček, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • ABP is newly developed diagnostic. • Unique measurement method for the determination of plasma edge current variations caused by different transient events such as ELMs. • The design process has been fruitfully supported by the physically motivated computer simulations. • Li-BES system has been modified accordingly to the needs of the ABP. -- Abstract: The concept and development of a new detection method for light alkali ions stemming from diagnostic beams installed on medium size tokamak is described. The method allows us the simultaneous measurement of plasma density fluctuations and fast variations in poloidal magnetic field, therefore one can infer the fast changes in edge plasma current. The concept has been worked out and the whole design process has been done at Wigner RCP. The test detector with appropriate mechanics and electronics is already installed on COMPASS tokamak. General ion trajectory calculation code (ABPIons) has also been developed. Detailed calculations show the possibility of reconstruction of edge plasma current density profile changes with high temporal resolution, and the possibility of density profile reconstruction with better spatial resolution compared to standard Li-BES measurement, this is important for pedestal studies.

  14. Atomic quantum superposition state generation via optical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Negretti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a protocol to prepare an atomic ensemble in a superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable states. The protocol relies on conditional measurements performed on a light field, which interacts with the atoms inside an optical cavity prior to detection, and we...

  15. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-Atom Transistor as a Precise Magnetic Field Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachymski, Krzysztof; Wasak, Tomasz; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Julienne, Paul S.; Negretti, Antonio; Calarco, Tommaso

    2018-01-01

    Feshbach resonances, which allow for tuning the interactions of ultracold atoms with an external magnetic field, have been widely used to control the properties of quantum gases. We propose a scheme for using scattering resonances as a probe for external fields, showing that by carefully tuning the parameters it is possible to reach a 10-5 G (or nT) level of precision with a single pair of atoms. We show that, for our collisional setup, it is possible to saturate the quantum precision bound with a simple measurement protocol.

  17. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaobin [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shi, Xuetao, E-mail: mrshixuetao@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ostrovidov, Serge [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Wu, Hongkai, E-mail: chhkwu@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry & Division of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Nakajima, Ken [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation. • The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. • AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring stem cell differentiation in a non-invasive manner. - Abstract: A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  18. Atomic force microscopy probing in the measurement of cell mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirmizis, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Dimitrios Kirmizis, Stergios LogothetidisDepartment of Physics, Laboratory for Thin Films-Nanosystems and Nanometrology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: Atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used incrementally over the last decade in cell biology. Beyond its usefulness in high resolution imaging, AFM also has unique capabilities for probing the viscoelastic properties of living cells in culture and, even more, mapping the spatial distribution of cell mechanical properties...

  19. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again kee...... beam finite elements and the optimizations are carried through with either SLP (Sequential Linear Programming) or MMA (Method of Moving Asymptotes) and similar results are obtained....

  20. Isotropic Broadband E-Field Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Szentpáli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An E-field probe has been developed for EMC immunity tests performed in closed space. The leads are flexible resistive transmission lines. Their influence on the field distribution is negligible. The probe has an isotropic reception from 100 MHz to 18 GHz; the sensitivity is in the 3 V/m–10 V/m range. The device is an accessory of the EMC test chamber. The readout of the field magnitude is carried out by personal computer, which fulfils also the required corrections of the raw data.

  1. Mapping energetics of atom probe evaporation events through first principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, Joaquín, E-mail: jperaltac@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Broderick, Scott R., E-mail: sbroderick@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States); Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Combinatorial Discovery, Iowa State University, 2220 Hoover Hall, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2230 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this work is to use atomistic modeling to determine accurate inputs into the atom probe tomography (APT) reconstruction process. One of these inputs is evaporation field; however, a challenge occurs because single ions and dimers have different evaporation fields. We have calculated the evaporation field of Al and Sc ions and Al–Al and Al–Sc dimers from an L1{sub 2}-Al{sub 3}Sc surface using ab initio calculations and with a high electric field applied to the surface. The evaporation field is defined as the electric field at which the energy barrier size is calculated as zero, corresponding to the minimum field that atoms from the surface can break their bonds and evaporate from the surface. The evaporation field of the surface atoms are ranked from least to greatest as: Al–Al dimer, Al ion, Sc ion, and Al–Sc dimer. The first principles results were compared with experimental data in the form of an ion evaporation map, which maps multi-ion evaporations. From the ion evaporation map of L1{sub 2}-Al{sub 3}Sc, we extract relative evaporation fields and identify that an Al–Al dimer has a lower evaporation field than an Al–Sc dimer. Additionally, comparatively an Al–Al surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as a dimer, while an Al–Sc surface dimer is more likely to evaporate as single ions. These conclusions from the experiment agree with the ab initio calculations, validating the use of this approach for modeling APT energetics. - Highlights: ► Calculated evaporation field of monomer and dimer atom probe evaporations. ► Determined relative evaporation fields using ion evaporation maps. ► Compared the experimental and calculated results and found that they agreed.

  2. Jobs in the Atomic Energy Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 1974

    1974-01-01

    According to a recent government survey, employment in privately-owned atomic energy facilities now exceeds employment in government facilities. In this field, engineers, scientists, technicians, and craft workers account for the highest proportion of total employment. (MW)

  3. Atomic focusing by quantum fields: Entanglement properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, I.G. da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, CEP 64049-550, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Frazão, H.M. [Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Profa. Cinobelina Elvas, CEP 64900-000, Bom Jesus, PI (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Nemes, M.C. [Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Peixoto de Faria, J.G. [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais, Av. Amazonas 7675, Belo Horizonte, MG 30510-000 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    The coherent manipulation of the atomic matter waves is of great interest both in science and technology. In order to study how an atom optic device alters the coherence of an atomic beam, we consider the quantum lens proposed by Averbukh et al. [1] to show the discrete nature of the electromagnetic field. We extend the analysis of this quantum lens to the study of another essentially quantum property present in the focusing process, i.e., the atom–field entanglement, and show how the initial atomic coherence and purity are affected by the entanglement. The dynamics of this process is obtained in closed form. We calculate the beam quality factor and the trace of the square of the reduced density matrix as a function of the average photon number in order to analyze the coherence and purity of the atomic beam during the focusing process.

  4. Gold-coated conducting-atomic force microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Neena Susan; Kulkarni, G U

    2005-04-01

    Some aspects of the performance of gold-coated conductive probes used in conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) technique are discussed. The resistance of the nanocontact between the gold-coated AFM tip and the graphite substrate has been monitored at various applied forces. For small forces (forces in the range 100-150 nN, beyond which the tip seems to undergo plastic deformation. The resistance of the nanocontact increased when current on the order of 100 microA was allowed to pass through, finally resulting in melting of the gold coating.

  5. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  6. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O., E-mail: o.dmitrieva@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Choi, P., E-mail: p.choi@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Gerstl, S.S.A. [Imago Scientific Instruments, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Ponge, D.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Iron Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. -- Research highlights: {yields} Changing the laser pulse energy in pulsed-laser atom probe could induce some changes in the analysis results of complex steels. {yields} Decreases in the evaporation fields and the ++/+ charge state ratios were detected with raising laser energy. {yields} Chemical composition of the intermetallic precipitates and the interface sharpness were not influenced by changing the laser energy.

  7. Interpreting atom probe data from chromium oxide scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Breen, Andrew; Stephenson, Leigh; Ceguerra, Anna V.; Yang, Limei [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dinh Nguyen, Thuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Young, David J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Cairney, Julie M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Picosecond-pulsed ultraviolet-laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was used to analyze protective, thermally grown chromium oxides formed on stainless steel. The influence of analysis parameters on the thermal tail observed in the mass spectra and the chemical composition is investigated. A new parameter termed “laser sensitivity factor” is introduced in order to quantify the effect of laser energy on the extent of the thermal tail. This parameter is used to compare the effect of increasing laser energy on thermal tails in chromia and chromite samples. Also explored is the effect of increasing laser energy on the measured oxygen content and the effect of specimen base temperature and laser pulse frequency on the mass spectrum. Finally, we report a preliminary analysis of molecular ion dissociations in chromia. - Highlights: • Chromium oxide scales are analyzed by picosecond-pulsed ultraviolet-laser assisted atom probe tomography. • The influence of laser energy, pulse frequency and temperature on thermal tail and composition is reported. • “Laser sensitivity factor”, a new thermal tail quantification parameter was introduced. • Ions dissociations in chromia during the analysis are discussed.

  8. Gold nanocone near-field scanning optical microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Monika; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Altoe, M Virginia P; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Kern, Dieter P

    2011-04-26

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy enables the simultaneous topographical and subdiffraction limited optical imaging of surfaces. A process is presented for the implementation of single individually engineered gold cones at the tips of atomic force microscopy cantilevers. These cantilevers act as novel high-performance optical near-field probes. In the fabrication, thin-film metallization, electron beam induced deposition of etch masks, and Ar ion milling are combined. The cone constitutes a well-defined highly efficient optical antenna with a tip radius on the order of 10 nm and an adjustable plasmon resonance frequency. The sharp tip enables high resolution topographical imaging. By controllably varying the cone size, the resonance frequency can be adapted to the application of choice. Structural properties of these sharp-tipped probes are presented together with topographical images recorded with a cone probe. The antenna functionality is demonstrated by gathering the near-field enhanced Raman signature of individual carbon nanotubes with a gold cone scanning probe.

  9. Probing an atomic gas confined in a nanocell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurin, I; Todorov, P; Hamdi, I; Yarovitski, A; Dutier, G; Sarkisyan, D; Saltiel, S; Gorza, M-P; Fichet, M; Bloch, D; Ducloy, M [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, UMR 7538 du CNRS et de l' Universite Paris 13, 99 Av JB Clement, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-01-01

    Since the recent realization of extremely thin vapour cells (local thickness: 20-1000 nm), we investigate the optical properties of these 1-D confined vapours. Aside from their interest for Doppler-free spectroscopy, nanocells offer a new tool to evaluate collisional shift and broadening, yielding an access to the open problem of collisions under confinement. It also allows probing of the atom-surface interaction in a range of unusual short distances. The experimental exploration of the distance dependence, normally evolving according to the z{sup -3} van der Waals (vW) dependence (z : the atom-surface distance), is worth doing because it could be affected by imperfections of the real surface, such as roughness, adsorbed impurities or charges. A detailed lineshape analysis is now under progress, with tight constraints imposed to the fitting by the twin information brought by simultaneous reflection and transmission spectra. Another issue is a possible resonant enhancement, susceptible to induce a repulsive vW, due to the coupling between atom excitation and a surface mode.

  10. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  11. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis of atom probe tomography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Chad M; Miller, Michael K

    2010-10-01

    The application of spectrum imaging multivariate statistical analysis methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA), to atom probe tomography (APT) data has been investigated. The mathematical method of analysis is described and the results for two example datasets are analyzed and presented. The first dataset is from the analysis of a PM 2000 Fe-Cr-Al-Ti steel containing two different ultrafine precipitate populations. PCA properly describes the matrix and precipitate phases in a simple and intuitive manner. A second APT example is from the analysis of an irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel. Fine, nm-scale Cu-enriched precipitates having a core-shell structure were identified and qualitatively described by PCA. Advantages, disadvantages, and future prospects for implementing these data analysis methodologies for APT datasets, particularly with regard to quantitative analysis, are also discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam S; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-07-17

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local contact potential difference does reflect the periodicity of the ionic crystal, but not the magnitude of its Madelung surface potential. The imaging mechanism relies on the induced polarization of the ions at the tip-surface interface owing to the modulation of the applied bias voltage. Our findings are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical expectations and experimental observations.

  14. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  15. Probing atomic Higgs-like forces at the precision frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Cédric; Ozeri, Roee; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel approach to probe new fundamental interactions using isotope shift spectroscopy in atomic clock transitions. As a concrete toy example we focus on the Higgs boson couplings to the building blocks of matter: the electron and the up and down quarks. We show that the attractive Higgs force between nuclei and their bound electrons, which is poorly constrained, might induce effects that are larger than the current experimental sensitivities. More generically, we discuss how new interactions between the electron and the neutrons, mediated via light new degrees of freedom, may lead to measurable nonlinearities in a King plot comparison between isotope shifts of two different transitions. Given state-of-the-art accuracy in frequency comparison, isotope shifts have the potential to be measured with sub-Hz accuracy, thus potentially enabling the improvement of current limits on new fundamental interactions. A candidate atomic system for this measurement requires two different clock transitions and four zero nuclear spin isotopes. We identify several systems that satisfy this requirement and also briefly discuss existing measurements. We consider the size of the effect related to the Higgs force and the requirements for it to produce an observable signal.

  16. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  17. The mystery of missing species in atom probe tomography of composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahka, M.; Xia, Y.; Kreuzer, H. J. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2015-08-10

    There is a serious problem in atom probe tomography of composite materials such as oxides that even from stoichiometric samples one observes non-stoichiometric ion yields. We present a quantitative model that explains the non-stoichiometry allowing a fit to experimental data of ion yields as a function of applied field to extract activation barriers and prefactors. The numbers are confirmed by density functional theory. We also show that for oxides the missing oxygen is thermally desorbed as neutral O{sub 2}, either directly or associatively. Finally, we suggest methods to improve the experimental setup.

  18. Probe Knots and Hopf Insulators with Ultracold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Kai; Duan, L.-M.

    2018-01-01

    Knots and links are fascinating and intricate topological objects. Their influence spans from DNA and molecular chemistry to vortices in superfluid helium, defects in liquid crystals and cosmic strings in the early universe. Here we find that knotted structures also exist in a peculiar class of three-dimensional topological insulators—the Hopf insulators. In particular, we demonstrate that the momentum-space spin textures of Hopf insulators are twisted in a nontrivial way, which implies the presence of various knot and link structures. We further illustrate that the knots and nontrivial spin textures can be probed via standard time-of-flight images in cold atoms as preimage contours of spin orientations in stereographic coordinates. The extracted Hopf invariants, knots, and links are validated to be robust to typical experimental imperfections. Our work establishes the existence of knotted structures in Hopf insulators, which may have potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processing. D.L.D., S.T.W. and L.M.D. are supported by the ARL, the IARPA LogiQ program, and the AFOSR MURI program, and supported by Tsinghua University for their visits. K.S. acknowledges the support from NSF under Grant No. PHY1402971. D.L.D. is also supported by JQI-NSF-PFC and LPS-MPO-CMTC at the final stage of this paper.

  19. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Linwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM. Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V. Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated.

  20. Probing resonant energy transfer in collisions of ammonia with Rydberg helium atoms by microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkova, V.; Hogan, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of experiments demonstrating the spectroscopic detection of Förster resonance energy transfer from NH3 in the X1A1 ground electronic state to helium atoms in 1sns 3S1 Rydberg levels, where n = 37 and n = 40. For these values of n, the 1sns 3S1 → 1snp 3PJ transitions in helium lie close to resonance with the ground-state inversion transitions in NH3 and can be tuned through resonance using electric fields of less than 10 V/cm. In the experiments, energy transfer was detected by direct state-selective electric field ionization of the 3S1 and 3PJ Rydberg levels and by monitoring the population of the 3DJ levels following pulsed microwave transfer from the 3PJ levels. Detection by microwave spectroscopic methods represents a highly state selective, low-background approach to probing the collisional energy transfer process and the environment in which the atom-molecule interactions occur. The experimentally observed electric-field dependence of the resonant energy transfer process, probed both by direct electric field ionization and by microwave transfer, agrees well with the results of calculations performed using a simple theoretical model of the energy transfer process. For measurements performed in zero electric field with atoms prepared in the 1s40s 3S1 level, the transition from a regime in which a single energy transfer channel can be isolated for detection to one in which multiple collision channels begin to play a role has been identified as the NH3 density was increased.

  1. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Kornyushin, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  2. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Rius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency.

  3. Novel dual-probes atomic force microscope for line width measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Gao, Sitian; Li, Wei; Shi, Yushu; Li, Qi; Li, Shi

    2017-11-01

    Dual-probe Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) can effectively eliminate the influence of the probe size on measurement of the line width, and realize true three-dimensional measurement. Novel dual-probe AFM consists of probe system, scanning system, alignment system and displacement measurement system. As displacement measurement system, the interferometers are added to the novel dual-probes AFM. In order to simplify the dual-probe AFM structure, self-sensing tuning fork probe is used. Measurement method has two steps: the first step is to align two probes and obtain the reference point; the second step is to scan two sides of measured line by two probes separately, and calculate the line width value according to the reference point. In the alignment of two probes, the alignment method is improved by using the edge alignment and the feedback scanning alignment.

  4. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Agostini, P.A. [SPAM, Gif Sur Yvette (France). Centre d`Etudes de Saclay; Kulander, K.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  6. Probing the conformal Calabrese-Cardy scaling with cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Unmuth-Yockey, J; Preiss, P M; Yang, Li-Ping; Tsai, S -W; Meurice, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that current experiments using cold bosonic atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices and designed to measure the second-order Renyi entanglement entropy S_2, can be used to verify detailed predictions of conformal field theory (CFT) and estimate the central charge c. We discuss the adiabatic preparation of the ground state at half-filling where we expect a CFT with c=1. This can be accomplished with a very small hoping parameter J, in contrast to existing studies with density one where a much larger J is needed. We provide two complementary methods to estimate and subtract the classical entropy generated by the experimental preparation and imaging processes. We compare numerical calculations for the classical O(2) model with a chemical potential on a 1+1 dimensional lattice, and the quantum Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian implemented in the experiments. S_2 is very similar for the two models and follows closely the Calabrese-Cardy scaling, (c/8)\\ln(N_s), for N_s sites with open boundary condi...

  7. Blind deconvolution of time-of-flight mass spectra from atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.J.S., E-mail: larsj@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden); Thuvander, M.; Stiller, K. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Gothenburg, SE-412 96 (Sweden); Odén, M.; Hultman, L. [Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping SE-581 83 (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    A major source of uncertainty in compositional measurements in atom probe tomography stems from the uncertainties of assigning peaks or parts of peaks in the mass spectrum to their correct identities. In particular, peak overlap is a limiting factor, whereas an ideal mass spectrum would have peaks at their correct positions with zero broadening. Here, we report a method to deconvolute the experimental mass spectrum into such an ideal spectrum and a system function describing the peak broadening introduced by the field evaporation and detection of each ion. By making the assumption of a linear and time-invariant behavior, a system of equations is derived that describes the peak shape and peak intensities. The model is fitted to the observed spectrum by minimizing the squared residuals, regularized by the maximum entropy method. For synthetic data perfectly obeying the assumptions, the method recovered peak intensities to within ±0.33at%. The application of this model to experimental APT data is exemplified with Fe–Cr data. Knowledge of the peak shape opens up several new possibilities, not just for better overall compositional determination, but, e.g., for the estimation of errors of ranging due to peak overlap or peak separation constrained by isotope abundances. - Highlights: • A method for the deconvolution of atom probe mass spectra is proposed. • Applied to synthetic randomly generated spectra the accuracy was ±0.33 at. • Application of the method to an experimental Fe–Cr spectrum is demonstrated.

  8. Bunker probe: A plasma potential probe almost insensitive to its orientation with the magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costea, S; Fonda, B; Kovačič, J; Gyergyek, T; Schneider, B S; Schrittwieser, R; Ionita, C

    2016-05-01

    Due to their ability to suppress a large part of the electron current and thus measuring directly the plasma potential, ion sensitive probes have begun to be widely tested and used in fusion devices. For these probes to work, almost perfect alignment with the total magnetic field is necessary. This condition cannot always be fulfilled due to the curvature of magnetic fields, complex magnetic structure, or magnetic field reconnection. In this perspective, we have developed a plasma potential probe (named Bunker probe) based on the principle of the ion sensitive probe but almost insensitive to its orientation with the total magnetic field. Therefore it can be used to measure the plasma potential inside fusion devices, especially in regions with complex magnetic field topology. Experimental results are presented and compared with Ball-Pen probe measurements taken under identical conditions. We have observed that the floating potential of the Bunker probe is indeed little affected by its orientation with the magnetic field for angles ranging from 90° to 30°, in contrast to the Ball-Pen probe whose floating potential decreases towards that of a Langmuir probe if not properly aligned with the magnetic field.

  9. Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography of Deformed Minerals: A Zircon Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Piazolo, Sandra; Trimby, Patrick; Yang, Limei; Cairney, Julie M

    2017-04-01

    The application of atom probe tomography to the study of minerals is a rapidly growing area. Picosecond-pulsed, ultraviolet laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography has been used to analyze trace element mobility within dislocations and low-angle boundaries in plastically deformed specimens of the nonconductive mineral zircon (ZrSiO4), a key material to date the earth's geological events. Here we discuss important experimental aspects inherent in the atom probe tomography investigation of this important mineral, providing insights into the challenges in atom probe tomography characterization of minerals as a whole. We studied the influence of atom probe tomography analysis parameters on features of the mass spectra, such as the thermal tail, as well as the overall data quality. Three zircon samples with different uranium and lead content were analyzed, and particular attention was paid to ion identification in the mass spectra and detection limits of the key trace elements, lead and uranium. We also discuss the correlative use of electron backscattered diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to map the deformation in the zircon grains, and the combined use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and focused ion beam sample preparation to assist preparation of the final atom probe tip.

  10. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumtritt, H; Isheim, D; Senz, S; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2014-10-31

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  11. The effect orientation of features in reconstructed atom probe data on the resolution and measured composition of T1 plates in an A2198 aluminium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Maria A; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Artefacts in atom probe tomography can impact the compositional analysis of microstructure in atom probe studies. To determine the integrity of information obtained, it is essential to understand how the positioning of features influences compositional analysis. By investigating the influence of feature orientation within atom probe data on measured composition in microstructural features within an AA2198 Al alloy, this study shows differences in the composition of T1 (Al2CuLi) plates that indicates imperfections in atom probe reconstructions. The data fits a model of an exponentially-modified Gaussian that scales with the difference in evaporation field between solutes and matrix. This information provides a guide for obtaining the most accurate information possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fast-ion-beam laser probing of ion-source energy distributions and atomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Richard A., E-mail: rholt@uwo.ca; Rosner, S. David [University of Western Ontario, Physics and Astronomy Department (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Collinear fast-ion-beam laser spectroscopy is a very high resolution probe for measuring ion-beam energy distributions and atomic structure parameters of interest in nuclear physics, atomic physics, and astrophysics. We have used offline 10-keV beams of atomic ions and a CW laser system to study the behavior of a Penning ion source and to measure hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, atomic lifetimes, spontaneous-emission branching fractions, oscillator strengths, and absolute wavelengths of a variety of atomic species from the lanthanide and transition-metal groups.

  13. Dependence on relative magnitude of probe and coherent field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Dependence of amplification without inversion (AWI) on the relative strength of probe and coherent field Rabi frequencies has been studied in H2 and LiH molecules for three-level Λ configuration. We have derived exact analytical expressions for coherences and populations keeping all the orders of probe field ...

  14. An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope. Scanning probe Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1991-01-01

    An Evanescent Field Optical Microscope (EFOM) is presented, which employs frustrated total internal reflection on a highly localized scale by means of a sharp dielectric tip. The coupling of the evanescent field to the sub-micrometer probe as a function of probe-sample distance, angle of incidence

  15. Magnetic probe array with high sensitivity for fluctuating field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Yuki; Gota, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Kayoko; Ikeyama, Taeko; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2007-03-01

    A magnetic probe array is constructed to measure precisely the spatial structure of a small fluctuating field included in a strong confinement field that varies with time. To exclude the effect of the confinement field, the magnetic probes consisting of figure-eight-wound coils are prepared. The spatial structure of the fluctuating field is obtained from a Fourier analysis of the probe signal. It is found that the probe array is more sensitive to the fluctuating field with a high mode number than that with a low mode number. An experimental demonstration of the present method is attempted using a field-reversed configuration plasma, where the fluctuating field with 0.1% of the confinement field is successfully detected.

  16. Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    A recently developed high-field technique of atomic chains preparation has made it possible to attain the ultrahigh resolution of field-emission electron microscopy (FEEM), which can be used to direct imaging the intra-atomic electronic structure. By applying cryogenic FEEM, we are able to resolve the spatial configuration of atomic orbitals, which correspond to quantized states of the end atom in free-standing carbon atomic chains. Knowledge of the intra-atomic structure will make it possible to visualize generic aspects of quantum mechanics and also lead to approaches for a wide range of nanotechnological applications.

  17. Atom Probe Analysis of Ex Situ Gas-Charged Stable Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Daniel; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we report on the atom probe tomography analysis of two metallic hydrides formed by pressurized charging using an ex situ hydrogen charging cell, in the pressure range of 200-500 kPa (2-5 bar). Specifically we report on the deuterium charging of Pd/Rh and V systems. Using this ex situ system, we demonstrate the successful loading and subsequent atom probe analysis of deuterium within a Pd/Rh alloy, and demonstrate that deuterium is likely present within the oxide-metal interface of a native oxide formed on vanadium. Through these experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of ex situ hydrogen analysis for hydrides via atom probe tomography, and thus a practical route to three-dimensional imaging of hydrogen in hydrides at the atomic scale.

  18. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaporation mechanisms of MgO in laser assisted atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Mazumder, Baishakhi

    2011-05-01

    In this paper the field evaporation properties of bulk MgO and sandwiched MgO layers in Fe are compared using laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography. The comparison of flight time spectra gives an estimate of the evaporation times as a function of the wavelength and the laser energy. It is shown that the evaporation takes place in two steps on two different time scales in MgO. It is also shown that as long as the MgO layer is buried in Fe, the evaporation is dominated by the photon absorption in Fe layer at the tip apex. Eventually the evaporation process of MgO is discussed based on the difference between the bulk materials and the multilayer samples. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  1. Two-probe atomic-force microscope manipulator and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A A; Stolyarov, V S; Kononenko, O V

    2017-06-01

    We report on a manipulator based on a two-probe atomic force microscope (AFM) with an individual feedback system for each probe. This manipulator works under an upright optical microscope with 3 mm focal distance. The design of the microscope helps us tomanipulate nanowires using the microscope probes as a two-prong fork. The AFM feedback is realized based on the dynamic full-time contact mode. The applications of the manipulator and advantages of its two-probe design are presented.

  2. An atom in a multi-frequency laser emission field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delone, N.B.; Kovarskii, V.A.; Masalov, A.V.; Perelman, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the features of the interaction between a nonmonochromatic multi-frequency laser emission field and an isolated atom is given. The multi-photon excitation and non-linear ionization of the atom during the excitation of the atomic levels by the laser emission field are examined. Specific cases of the interaction between the atom and the field are examined in detail: the case of a broad laser emission laser spectrum (rapid field fluctuations) and the case of a narrow spectrum (slow fluctuation). The available experimental data relating to these problems are analyzed.

  3. Hidden Markov Model of atomic quantum jump dynamics in an optically probed cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, S.; Molmer, K.; Alt, W.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the quantum jumps of an atom interacting with a cavity field. The strong atom- field interaction makes the cavity transmission depend on the time dependent atomic state, and we present a Hidden Markov Model description of the atomic state dynamics which is conditioned in a Bayesian......, the atomic state is determined in a Bayesian manner from the measurement data, and we present an iterative protocol, which determines both the atomic state and the model parameters. As a new element in the treatment of observed quantum systems, we employ a Bayesian approach that conditions the atomic state...... manner on the detected signal. We suggest that small variations in the observed signal may be due to spatial motion of the atom within the cavity, and we represent the atomic system by a number of hidden states to account for both the small variations and the internal state jump dynamics. In our theory...

  4. Control of the millisecond spin lifetime of an electrically probed atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, William; Yang, Kai; Baumann, Susanne; Romming, Niklas; Choi, Taeyoung; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2017-04-01

    Electrical control and readout of magnetic states is an important goal in spintronics. But electrical access to quantum spin systems comes at the cost of coupling to electrodes, which reduces the spin lifetimes through relaxation to electron-hole pairs. Here we report an electrically probed single-atom spin that is long-lived thanks to engineering the coupling of individual iron atoms to the nearby metallic electrodes. Using spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, we show that the excited spin state of these atoms persists for more than ten milliseconds. The lifetime can be tuned by varying the distance to the microscope probe tip--acting as one electrode--and by changing the thickness of the insulating film which separates the atom from the underlying electrode. The cross-section for spin-flip scattering is so small that many thousands of electrons can probe the spin state projectively before it relaxes. Using all-electrical pump-probe spectroscopy, we measure the lifetime of the atom for different tip-atom distances and determine the intrinsic lifetime as a function of the insulator thickness. We explain the tuning of the spin lifetime in terms of the conductance to each of the electrodes, which provides a method to maximize the electrical readout signal for a given lifetime.

  5. Magnetic field modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phase-sensitive detection of the signal, thereby paving the way for very high sensitive measurement in the parts per billion (PPB) levels [4]. On the other hand, the saturation. FMS (SFMS) can be used as a very precise frequency reference in experiments involving laser-cooled atoms, frequency standards as in atomic clock, ...

  6. Atom probe tomography of thermally grown oxide scale on FeCrAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang, E-mail: fang.liu@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Thermally grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales formed on a FeCrAl alloy were successfully analyzed using pulsed green laser atom probe tomography. Two types of atom probe tomography specimens, the “thin oxide” type: a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (<100 nm) with underlying metal (1 μm), and the “thick oxide” type: only with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 μm), were prepared and analyzed. It was found that the thin oxide type yields poorer mass resolution due to a combined effect of laser absorption and thermal conduction effects. Application of a relatively low laser energy yields a better mass resolution and increased multiple events, however, more accurate quantification results. Although no other oxide phase than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is expected to form, some iron–oxygen and chromium–oxygen molecular ions were recorded at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/metal interface due to the large change in evaporation field over this zone. - Highlights: ► Thermally grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales formed on a FeCrAl alloy were successfully analyzed. ► Specimens with a thin oxide and underlying metal yield poorer mass resolution. ► Low laser energy yields a better mass resolution. ► Fe–O, Cr–O molecular ions were found at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/metal interface; this is an ion evaporation effect.

  7. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong, E-mail: qianyong86@163.com; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing, E-mail: xueqingqiu66@163.com

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are quantitatively probed by atomic force microscopy, which is fundamental but beneficial for understanding and optimizing the absorption-dispersion and catalytic degradation processes of lignin. - Highlights: • The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are measured using AFM. • The adhesion forces between lignin and metal oxides are larger than that in nonmetal systems. • Hydrogen bond plays an important role in lignin-inorganic oxides system. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO{sub 2} due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and SiO{sub 2} decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  8. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  9. Atomic hydrogen storage. [cryotrapping and magnetic field strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollam, J. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen, for use as a fuel or as an explosive, is stored in the presence of a strong magnetic field in exfoliated layered compounds such as molybdenum disulfide or an elemental layer material such as graphite. The compound is maintained at liquid temperatures and the atomic hydrogen is collected on the surfaces of the layered compound which are exposed during delamination (exfoliation). The strong magnetic field and the low temperature combine to prevent the atoms of hydrogen from recombining to form molecules.

  10. Single molecule probing of SNARE proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in force spectroscopy mode has recently emerged as a technique of choice for studying mechanical interactions between the proteins of the core Soluble N-ethylmalmeimide-sensitive fusion protein Attachment protein REceptor (SNARE) complex. In these experiments, the rupture force, extension, spontaneous dissociation times and interaction energy for SNARE protein-protein interactions can be obtained at the single molecule level. These measurements, which are complementary to results and conclusions drawn from other techniques, improve our understanding of the role of the SNARE complex in exocytosis. PMID:19161382

  11. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, S S [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, University of Bahrain, PO Box 32038 (Bahrain); Jarad, T M [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Puri, R R [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Theoretical Physics Division, Bombay 400085 (India); Bullough, R K [UMIST, Department of Mathematics, PO Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion ({approx}5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  12. Field-dependent atomic relaxation in a squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S. S.; Jarad, T. M.; Puri, R. R.; Bullough, R. K.

    2005-11-01

    The relaxation process of a single two-level atom driven by an intense resonant coherent field is studied in the presence of a broadband squeezed vacuum field. Generalized forms for the self-field operator and the field-dependent damping coefficients are derived. In the steady state, positive atomic inversion (~5%) is shown for some range of the phase of the squeezed vacuum field. The squeezing-induced enhanced and asymmetric coherence (i.e. non-zero dispersive atomic polarization) induces profound asymmetry in the side-bands of the Mollow fluorescent spectrum and the absorptive-dispersive spectra near the Rabi side-band frequencies. The case of two and three cooperative atoms, instead of a single atom, shows (i) positive atomic inversion in the steady state for larger interval of the squeeze phase parameter and more enhanced extrema for the atomic polarization components and (ii) the extra side peaks in the fluorescent spectrum become asymmetric and of dispersive-like profile. Dressed-state analysis in the single-atom case with the field-dependent decay process in the presence of the squeezed vacuum field is presented and shows that the inequality of the (field-dependent) decay rates of the dressed states leads to more positive inversion in the dressed states as compared with the normal vacuum case.

  13. Innovative Magnetic-Field Array Probe for TRUST Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    H- field; Probe Array; Counterfeit Detection; IC Trust . Introduction Counterfeiting is a huge flail that still continues to serve in the...Innovative Magnetic-Field Array Probe for TRUST Integrated Circuits   contains the RF-switch matrix and broad-band (BB) low noise amplifiers (LNAs...fabricated, tested and used for IC’s TRUST . Measurement setup has been proposed for system validation and of IC scanning surface. Validation test of the

  14. Point-by-point compositional analysis for atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Leigh T; Ceguerra, Anna V; Li, Tong; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nag, Soumya; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    This new alternate approach to data processing for analyses that traditionally employed grid-based counting methods is necessary because it removes a user-imposed coordinate system that not only limits an analysis but also may introduce errors. We have modified the widely used "binomial" analysis for APT data by replacing grid-based counting with coordinate-independent nearest neighbour identification, improving the measurements and the statistics obtained, allowing quantitative analysis of smaller datasets, and datasets from non-dilute solid solutions. It also allows better visualisation of compositional fluctuations in the data. Our modifications include:.•using spherical k-atom blocks identified by each detected atom's first k nearest neighbours.•3D data visualisation of block composition and nearest neighbour anisotropy.•using z-statistics to directly compare experimental and expected composition curves. Similar modifications may be made to other grid-based counting analyses (contingency table, Langer-Bar-on-Miller, sinusoidal model) and could be instrumental in developing novel data visualisation options.

  15. Note: Production of stable colloidal probes for high-temperature atomic force microscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditscherlein, L; Peuker, U A

    2017-04-01

    For the application of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy at high temperatures (>500 K), stable colloidal probe cantilevers are essential. In this study, two new methods for gluing alumina particles onto temperature stable cantilevers are presented and compared with an existing method for borosilicate particles at elevated temperatures as well as with cp-cantilevers prepared with epoxy resin at room temperature. The durability of the fixing of the particle is quantified with a test method applying high shear forces. The force is calculated with a mechanical model considering both the bending as well as the torsion on the colloidal probe.

  16. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...... (biofilm positive and biofilm negative strains) were analyzed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Force measurements performed using bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips disclosed similar adhesive properties for each strain. However, use of hydrophobic tips showed that hydrophobic forces...... are not the driving forces for adhesion of the four strains. Rather, the observation of sawtooth force–distance patterns on the surface of biofilm positive strains documents the presence of modular proteins such as Aap that may mediate cell adhesion. Treatment of two biofilm positive strains with two chemical...

  17. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  18. Probing Magnetic Fields of Early Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    How do magnetic fields form and evolve in early galaxies? A new study has provided some clever observations to help us answer this question.The Puzzle of Growing FieldsDynamo theory is the primary model describing how magnetic fields develop in galaxies. In this picture, magnetic fields start out as weak seed fields that are small and unordered. These fields then become ordered and amplified by large-scale rotation and turbulence in galaxy disks and halos, eventually leading to the magnetic fields we observe in galaxies today.Schematic showinghow to indirectly measure protogalactic magnetic fields. The measured polarization of a background quasar is altered by the fields in a foreground protogalaxy. Click for a closer look! [Farnes et al. 2017/Adolf Schaller/STSCI/NRAO/AUI/NSF]To test this model, we need observations of the magnetic fields in young protogalaxies. Unfortunately, we dont have the sensitivity to be able to measure these fields directly but a team of scientists led by Jamie Farnes (Radboud University in the Netherlands) have come up with a creative alternative.The key is to find early protogalaxies that absorb the light of more distant background objects. If a protogalaxy lies between us and a distant quasar, then magnetic fields of the protogalaxy if present will affect the polarization measurements of the background quasar.Observing Galactic Building BlocksTop: Redshift distribution for the background quasars in the authors sample. Bottom: Redshift distribution for the foreground protogalaxies the authors are exploring. [Farnes et al. 2017]Farnes and collaborators examined two types of foreground protogalaxies: Damped Lyman-Alpha Absorbers (DLAs) and Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs). They obtained polarimetric data for a sample of 114 distant quasars with nothing in the foreground (the control sample), 19 quasars with DLAs in the foreground, and 27 quasars with LLSs in the foreground. They then used statistical analysis techniques to draw conclusions about

  19. Probing atomic structure and Majorana wavefunctions in mono-atomic Fe chains on superconducting Pb surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Rémy; Kisiel, Marcin; Klinovaja, Jelena; Meier, Tobias; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Loss, Daniel; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the striking promise of quantum computation, Majorana bound states (MBSs) in solid-state systems have attracted wide attention in recent years. In particular, the wavefunction localisation of MBSs is a key feature and is crucial for their future implementation as qubits. Here we investigate the spatial and electronic characteristics of topological superconducting chains of iron atoms on the surface of Pb(110) by combining scanning tunnelling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that the Fe chains are mono-atomic, structured in a linear manner and exhibit zero-bias conductance peaks at their ends, which we interpret as signature for a MBS. Spatially resolved conductance maps of the atomic chains reveal that the MBSs are well localised at the chain ends (≲25 nm), with two localisation lengths as predicted by theory. Our observation lends strong support to use MBSs in Fe chains as qubits for quantum-computing devices.

  20. Probing electronic state at atomic scale on the surface of SrVO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Ryota; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2014-03-01

    Probing electronic structure of atomically well controlled surface of Perovskite-type 3d transition-metal oxides have been attracting much interest because of their intriguing emergent physical properties by heterostructure engineering. In this study, we have especially focused on SrVO3, where importance of correlation effects has been considered. We successfully obtained atomically flat surfaces of SrVO3, which gave us the great opportunity to visualize correlated electronic state at atomic scale by means of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Based on the experimental data, we discuss spectroscopic signature of many body effects on the surface of SrVO3 system.

  1. Probe for an atomic force microscope and method for making such a probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, A.G.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    De uitvinding heeft betrekking op een probe voor een magnetische kracht-microscoop, omvattende een in een wafervlak geplaatste beweegbare cantilever en een in hoofdzaak loodrecht op de cantilever geplaatste tip, waarbij de cantilever beweegbaar is en een trillingsrichting heeft in het wafervlak, en

  2. Probing Single Membrane Proteins by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, S.; Sapra, K. Tanuj; Müller, Daniel J.

    In this book chapter, we describe the working principle of the atomic force microscope (AFM), followed by the applications of AFM in high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. In the imaging mode, AFM allows observing the assembly of membrane proteins directly in native membranes approaching a resolution of ~0.5 nm with an outstanding signal-to-noise ratio. Conformational deviations of individual membrane proteins can be observed and their functional states directly imaged. Time-lapse AFM can image membrane proteins at work. In conjunction with high- resolution imaging, the use of the AFM as a single-molecule force spectroscope (SMFS) has gained tremendous importance in recent years. This combination allows to locate the inter- and intramolecular interactions of single membrane proteins. SMFS allows characterization of interactions that guide the folding of proteins and describe the parameters that lead to their destabilization, malfunction and misfolding. Moreover, it enables to measure the interactions established by ligand- and inhibitor-binding and in membrane protein assemblies. Because of its practical use in characterizing various parameters of membrane proteins in their native environment, AFM can be aptly described as a `lab on a tip' device.

  3. Modern Focused-Ion-Beam-Based Site-Specific Specimen Preparation for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 30 years after the first use of focused ion beam (FIB) instruments to prepare atom probe tomography specimens, this technique has grown to be used by hundreds of researchers around the world. This past decade has seen tremendous advances in atom probe applications, enabled by the continued development of FIB-based specimen preparation methodologies. In this work, we provide a short review of the origin of the FIB method and the standard methods used today for lift-out and sharpening, using the annular milling method as applied to atom probe tomography specimens. Key steps for enabling correlative analysis with transmission electron-beam backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography are presented, and strategies for preparing specimens for modern microelectronic device structures are reviewed and discussed in detail. Examples are used for discussion of the steps for each of these methods. We conclude with examples of the challenges presented by complex topologies such as nanowires, nanoparticles, and organic materials.

  4. Noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment with quartz tuning fork and carbon nanotube probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kageshima, M.; Jensenius, Henriette; Dienwiebel, M.

    2002-01-01

    A force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy in liquid environment was developed by combining a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) probe with a quartz tuning fork. Solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane surface were detected both in the frequency shift and dissipation. Due...

  5. Optical Measurements of Strong Radio-Frequency Fields Using Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Stephanie Anne

    There has recently been an initiative toward establishing atomic measurement standards for field quantities, including radio-frequency, millimeter-wave, and micro-wave electric fields. Current measurement standards are obtained using dipole antennas, which are fundamentally limited in frequency bandwidth (set by the physical size of the antenna) and accuracy (due to the metal perturbing the field during the measurement). Establishing an atomic standard rectifies these problems. My thesis work contributes to an ongoing effort towards establishing the viability of using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to perform atom-based measurements of radio-frequency (RF) fields over a wide range of frequencies and field strengths, focusing on strong-field measurements. Rydberg atoms are atoms with an electron excited to a high principal quantum number, resulting in a high sensitivity to an applied field. A model based on Floquet theory is implemented to accurately describe the observed atomic energy level shifts from which information about the field is extracted. Additionally, the effects due to the different electric field domains within the measurement volume are accurately modeled. Absolute atomic measurements of fields up to 296 V/m within a +/-0.35% relative uncertainty are demonstrated. This is the strongest field measured at the time of data publication. Moreover, the uncertainty is over an order of magnitude better than that of current standards. A vacuum chamber setup that I implemented during my graduate studies is presented and its unique components are detailed. In this chamber, cold-atom samples are generated and Rydberg atoms are optically excited within the ground-state sample. The Rydberg ion detection and imaging procedure are discussed, particularly the high magnification that the system provides. By analyzing the position of the ions, the spatial correlation g(2) (r) of Rydberg-atom distributions can be extracted. Aside from ion

  6. Probing parity nonconservation effects with laser cooled and trapped francium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Mukut; Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Collister, Robert; Dehart, Austin; Gorelov, Alexandre; Garcia, Eduardo; Gwinner, Gerald; Kossin, Michael; Livermore, David; Orozco, Luis; Pearson, Matt; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of parity nonconservation (PNC) effects in atomic systems test the Standard Model at low energies. We are developing an experiment to probe PNC effect in neutral francium atoms. Francium ions produced at the ISAC radioactive beam facility at TRIUMF are neutralized using a zirconium foil. The foil is momentarily heated and the released atoms are first trapped in a capture magneto optical trap (MOT). Then, the atoms are transported with about 50% efficiency to another MOT in a science chamber. In this chamber, in one experiment the 7S to 8S atomic transition will be probed using a laser beam, and in another experiment the ground state hyperfine transition will be probed using a microwave beam. In this talk I will report on recent developments towards the measurements. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work is also supported by NSERC from Canada, the DOE and NSF from the USA and CONACYT from Mexico.

  7. Atom-field entanglement in cavity QED: Nonlinearity and saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert; Cummings, Nick; Pedrotti, Leno M.; Rice, Perry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the degree of entanglement between an atom and a driven cavity mode in the presence of dissipation. Previous work has shown that in the limit of weak driving fields, the steady-state entanglement is proportional to the square of the driving intensity. This quadratic dependence is due to the generation of entanglement by the creation of pairs of photons or excitations. In this work we investigate the entanglement between an atom and a cavity in the presence of multiple photons. Nonlinearity of the atomic response is needed to generate entanglement, but as that nonlinearity saturates the entanglement vanishes. We posit that this is due to spontaneous emission, which puts the atom in the ground state and the atom-field state into a direct product state. An intermediate value of the driving field, near the field that saturates the atomic response, optimizes the atom-field entanglement. In a parameter regime for which multiphoton resonances occur, we find that entanglement recurs at those resonances. In this regime, we find that the entanglement decreases with increasing photon number. We also investigate, in the bimodal regime, the entanglement as a function of atom and/or cavity detuning. Here we find that there is evidence of a phase transition in the entanglement, which occurs at 2 ɛ /g ≥1 .

  8. Manipulating and probing microwave fields in a cavity by quantum non-demolition photon counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haroche, S; Dotsenko, I; Deleglise, S; Sayrin, C; Zhou, X; Gleyzes, S; Guerlin, C; Kuhr, S; Brune, M; Raimond, J-M [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Departement de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: haroche@lkb.ens.fr

    2009-12-15

    We perform quantum non-demolition (QND) photon counting on a microwave field trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity, employing circular Rydberg atoms as non-absorbing light probes. Beyond realizing fundamental tests of quantum measurement theory, we use this QND method to prepare non-classical Fock and Schroedinger cat states of the field and to reconstruct their Wigner functions. Monitoring the evolution of these functions provides a direct observation of the decoherence process. Quantum feedback procedures will enable us to steer the field towards target states and to protect them against decoherence.

  9. Manipulating and probing microwave fields in a cavity by quantum non-demolition photon counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroche, S.; Dotsenko, I.; Deléglise, S.; Sayrin, C.; Zhou, X.; Gleyzes, S.; Guerlin, C.; Kuhr, S.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J.-M.

    2009-12-01

    We perform quantum non-demolition (QND) photon counting on a microwave field trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity, employing circular Rydberg atoms as non-absorbing light probes. Beyond realizing fundamental tests of quantum measurement theory, we use this QND method to prepare non-classical Fock and Schrödinger cat states of the field and to reconstruct their Wigner functions. Monitoring the evolution of these functions provides a direct observation of the decoherence process. Quantum feedback procedures will enable us to steer the field towards target states and to protect them against decoherence.

  10. New probe plots Earth's gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2009-03-01

    A mission to make a very high-resolution map of the Earth's gravitational field will be launched this month by the European Space Agency (ESA). The €350m Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) will also produce a muchimproved model of the "geoid" - the gravitationally defined surface that Carl Friedrich Gauss described as the "mathematical figure of the Earth". GOCE, which will fly at an altitude of just 250 km, is expected to launch this month and operate for 20 months.

  11. Switching from subluminal to superluminal light propagation via a coherent pump field in a four-level atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Shangqi [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Educational Ministry of China, Changchun 130021 (China); Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wan Rengang; Kou Jun; Jiang Yun; Gao Jinyue [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Educational Ministry of China, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2009-12-15

    We theoretically investigate the influence of a coherent pump field on the propagation of a weak light pulse of a probe field in a four-level atomic system. Due to the modulation of the pump field, the light pulse can be manipulated from subluminal to superluminal with negligible distortion. This scheme can be realized in both the ultracold and Doppler-broadened atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the spectral linewidth with an anomalous dispersion is reduced by thermal averaging; therefore, one can obtain a larger negative group refractive index in room-temperature vapor than the largest value achieved in ultracold atomic gas.

  12. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, Mikhail, E-mail: cloudjyk@yandex.ru; Golubok, Alexander [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Kronverkskii pr. 49, St. Petersburg, 197101 (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Rizhskii pr. 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, Nikolai [Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov, Academic Lebedev str. 6, St. Petersburg, 194044 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  13. A First/Third-Order Probe Correction Technique for Spherical Near-Field Antenna Measurements Using Three Probe Orientations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2008-01-01

    A probe correction technique is described for spherical near-field antenna measurements based on sampling the near field for three probe orientations in each measurement direction. The technique applies to odd-order probes whose radiated field contains (significant) power only in the first (µ=±1......) and thirdorder (µ=±3) azimuthal spherical modes. The technique is ideally suited as an optional probe correction technique for high-accuracy measurements in existing measurement systems that employ a rectangular or square waveguide probe and the traditional first-order probe correction technique....

  14. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B

  15. Effects of methotrexate on the viscoelastic properties of single cells probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xiao, Xiubin; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-10-01

    Methotrexate is a commonly used anti-cancer chemotherapy drug. Cellular mechanical properties are fundamental parameters that reflect the physiological state of a cell. However, so far the role of cellular mechanical properties in the actions of methotrexate is still unclear. In recent years, probing the behaviors of single cells with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has contributed much to the field of cell biomechanics. In this work, with the use of AFM, the effects of methotrexate on the viscoelastic properties of four types of cells were quantitatively investigated. The inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of methotrexate on the proliferation of cells were observed by optical and fluorescence microscopy. AFM indenting was used to measure the changes of cellular viscoelastic properties (Young's modulus and relaxation time) by using both conical tip and spherical tip, quantitatively showing that the stimulation of methotrexate resulted in a significant decrease of both cellular Young's modulus and relaxation times. The morphological changes of cells induced by methotrexate were visualized by AFM imaging. The study improves our understanding of methotrexate action and offers a novel way to quantify drug actions at the single-cell level by measuring cellular viscoelastic properties, which may have potential impacts on developing label-free methods for drug evaluation.

  16. Application of atomic force microscopy in morphological observation of antisense probe labeled with magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Bai, Wei; Yang, Xueheng

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possibility of the c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probe labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as a target contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging whose morphology was observed with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and its efficiency was examined by MR imaging. Methods The c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probe labeled with SPIO was synthesized by a chemical cross-linking approach. Its morphology was observed with AFM. Results The chemical constitution of c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probes can be observed with AFM. The molecular structure of probes is easily visualized under AFM. Probes with diameters of 25–40 nm are in order, follow uniformity and the arrangement rule, can be separated from each other, and appear as cubes with a rugged surface morphology. Strong, low signals of the probes in transfected cells were observed by MR cellular imaging. Conclusions AFM is ideal for morphological observation and for analyzing the molecular structure of synthesized c-erbB2 oncogene antisense probes. PMID:18253092

  17. Dynamics of hollow atom formation in intense x-ray pulses probed by partial covariance mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasinski, L J; Zhaunerchyk, V; Mucke, M; Squibb, R J; Siano, M; Eland, J H D; Linusson, P; v d Meulen, P; Salén, P; Thomas, R D; Larsson, M; Foucar, L; Ullrich, J; Motomura, K; Mondal, S; Ueda, K; Osipov, T; Fang, L; Murphy, B F; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Schorb, S; Messerschmidt, M; Glownia, J M; Cryan, J P; Coffee, R N; Takahashi, O; Wada, S; Piancastelli, M N; Richter, R; Prince, K C; Feifel, R

    2013-08-16

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called "partial covariance mapping" to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  18. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Nicolosi, Valeria; Pennycook, Timothy J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S; Oxley, Mark P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-03-25

    Direct imaging and chemical identification of all the atoms in a material with unknown three-dimensional structure would constitute a very powerful general analysis tool. Transmission electron microscopy should in principle be able to fulfil this role, as many scientists including Feynman realized early on. It images matter with electrons that scatter strongly from individual atoms and whose wavelengths are about 50 times smaller than an atom. Recently the technique has advanced greatly owing to the introduction of aberration-corrected optics. However, neither electron microscopy nor any other experimental technique has yet been able to resolve and identify all the atoms in a non-periodic material consisting of several atomic species. Here we show that annular dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope optimized for low voltage operation can resolve and identify the chemical type of every atom in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride that contains substitutional defects. Three types of atomic substitutions were found and identified: carbon substituting for boron, carbon substituting for nitrogen, and oxygen substituting for nitrogen. The substitutions caused in-plane distortions in the boron nitride monolayer of about 0.1 A magnitude, which were directly resolved, and verified by density functional theory calculations. The results demonstrate that atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis of all radiation-damage-resistant atoms present in, and on top of, ultra-thin sheets has now become possible.

  19. Atom in a femtosecond bichromatic laser field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    color pulsed laser field of duration 2.12 fs consisting of a fundamental frequency ω and one of its harmonics. We study the ... restrictions need to be imposed on the type of laser pulse and that solutions can, in principle, be ... The electric field vector consists of a fundamental and its Фth harmonic, i.e.,. = 0(Ш). [ sin( Ш) +. 1. 4.

  20. Probing double Rydberg wave packets in a helium atom with fast single-cycle pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Robicheaux, F.

    2017-10-01

    Fully quantum and classical calculations on a helium atom with two excited, radially localized Rydberg wave packets are performed. The differences between classical and quantum methods are compared for a wide range of principal quantum numbers to study the validity of the classical method for low-lying states. The effects of fast terahertz single-cycle pulses on an atomic system with one or two Rydberg wave packets are also studied using classical equations of motion. These results suggest that single-cycle pulses can be used as time-resolved probes to detect motion of the wave packets and to investigate autoionization properties.

  1. Atom optics with Rydberg states in inhomogeneous electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsun, Oleg Anton

    Atom optics has become subject of intense investigation in recent years. Control of atomic motion is of great importance in atomic physics and applications like lithography or nanofabrication. Neutral atoms are not affected greatly by magnetic or electric field as they don't have a charge or large magnetic and electric moments. But by exciting a neutral atom to a high Rydberg state it is possible to increase its electric moment considerably. The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of creating atom optical elements for the beam of neutral atoms based on the polarizability of highly excited states in an electric field. First this work will present a review of the basic concepts that are used for atom optics and also a discussion of the progress to date in realizations of the neutral atom manipulation techniques. In our earlier experiments deflection and beam-splitting was demonstrated for a beam of neutral Lithium atoms excited in a three-step scheme [3.5, 3.6]. In later experiments, metastable Helium was excited from 23S state to the 33P state using lambda = 389 nm light, and then to the 25--30 S or D states using lambda = 785--815 nm light. Because this was a two-step excitation and it had the higher laser power in the last step, this method increased the percentage of excited atoms by a factor close to 103 compared to the Lithium experiment. Furthermore coherent excitation technique, Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Population Transfer (STIRAP), is investigated in this system, which allows a complete transfer of the atoms from 23S to the Rydberg states. STIRAP is also very tolerant of experimental imperfections such as intensity and frequency fluctuations, Doppler shifts, etc. and can be done with modest laser power. Efficient excitation enables us to do the following atom manipulations in inhomogeneous electric field [3.6, 4.42]. (1) Deflection and reflection; (2) Beam-splitting; (3) Collimation and focusing. Since

  2. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer; Hanson, Lars G.

    2014-01-01

    the magnetic field by real-time updating of the shim fields, based on synchronous field measurements with external probes1,2. A thorough analysis of how accurate such field measurements at few (e.g. 16) positions outside the head can reflect the spatially varying dynamic fields inside the head is currently......Purpose. Breathing induced dynamic B0 field perturbations in the head can lead to artefacts in ultra-high field MR by causing line broadening in spectroscopy and signal dropout, ghosting, displacement artifacts and blurring in imaging. It has recently been proposed to continuously stabilize...... lacking. In this study a comparison between scanner-acquired field maps of the head, and corresponding field probe measurements is presented both during in- and expiration. In addition, the field probe measurements have been used to perform real-time updating of the linear shim- settings. Methods. Setup...

  3. Phase decomposition and ordering in Ni-11.3 at.% Ti studied with atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2014-09-01

    The decomposition behavior of Ni-rich Ni-Ti was reassessed using Tomographic Atom Probe (TAP) and Laser Assisted Wide Angle Tomographic Atom Probe. Single crystalline specimens of Ni-11.3at.% Ti were investigated, the states selected from the decomposition path were the metastable γ″ and γ\\' states introduced on the basis of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the two-phase model for evaluation. The composition values of the precipitates in these states could not be confirmed by APT data as the interface of the ordered precipitates may not be neglected. The present results rather suggest to apply a three-phase model for the interpretation of SANS measurements, in which the width of the interface remains nearly unchanged and the L12 structure close to 3:1 stoichiometry is maintained in the core of the precipitates from the γ″ to the γ\\' state. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Atom probe microscopy of zinc isotopic enrichment in ZnO nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Ironside

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on atomic probe microscopy (APM of isotopically enriched ZnO nanorods that measures the spatial distribution of zinc isotopes in sections of ZnO nanorods for natural abundance natZnO and 64Zn and 66Zn enriched ZnO nanorods. The results demonstrate that APM can accurately quantify isotopic abundances within these nanoscale structures. Therefore the atom probe microscope is a useful tool for characterizing Zn isotopic heterostructures in ZnO. Isotopic heterostructures have been proposed for controlling thermal conductivity and also, combined with neutron transmutation doping, they could be key to a novel technology for producing p-n junctions in ZnO thin films and nanorods.

  5. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  6. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 4. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its Precursors. Subhashis Roy Sharanya Sur Kandaswamy Subramanian Arun Mangalam T. R. Seshadri Hum Chand. Review Article Volume 37 Issue 4 December 2016 Article ID 42 ...

  7. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  8. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hanson, L.G.

    : The experiments were performed on a 7T MRI system (Philips Healthcare, Best, NL) using a 32-channel Nova Medical head coil. Fourteen fluorine T/R NMR field probes3 were firmly distributed around the transmit/receive head coil. A stand-alone spectrometer4 digitized the field probe signals, and calculated field...... strength values from signal phase by linear fitting. Ahead of imaging, the field probe positions were determined for each subject, by applying known gradients in all three dimensions while measuring with the field probes. Experiments: Measurements were performed in 4 male subjects instructed to hold...... order correction is significantly better than the first order correction. This is not the case for subject 2. The figure illustrates the stabilization. It is seen that the corrected B0 maps fluctuate less in intensity over time compared to the uncorrected ones, and the field correction in the back...

  9. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hanson, L.G.

    the magnetic field by real-time updating of the shim fields, based on synchronous field measurements with external probes1,2. A thorough analysis of how accurate such field measurements at few (e.g. 16) positions outside the head can reflect the spatially varying dynamic fields inside the head is currently...... strength values from signal phase by linear fitting. Ahead of imaging, the field probe positions were determined for each subject, by applying known gradients in all three dimensions while measuring with the field probes. Experiments: Measurements were performed in 4 male subjects instructed to hold......Purpose. Breathing induced dynamic B0 field perturbations in the head can lead to artefacts in ultra-high field MR by causing line broadening in spectroscopy and signal dropout, ghosting, displacement artifacts and blurring in imaging. It has recently been proposed to continuously stabilize...

  10. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength...

  11. Atomization in the Acoustic Field of a Hartmann Whistle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Narayanan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The current work experimentally investigates the effect of Hartmann cavity acoustics on the atomization of droplet sprays. Initially, the experiments are conducted on a single droplet to understand its behavior in the sound field of a Hartmann whistle. The atomization studies on single droplet reveal that the existence of sound field causes the droplet to undergo large deformation and become irregular in shape. The degree of droplet deformation is quantified based on smaller circularity and larger Feret's diameter. The increase in cone angle of spray to a higher value in the presence of acoustics in comparison to its absence shows that the acoustics enhances the atomization. The stroboscopic visualization of sprays in the presence of acoustics further reveals the breakup of ligaments, large scatter as well as the formation of more number of droplets, indicating atomization enhancement.

  12. Monochromated STEM with a 30 meV-wide, atom-sized electron probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Carpenter, R W

    2013-02-01

    The origins and the recent accomplishments of aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) are reviewed. It is remembered that the successful correction of imaging aberrations of round lenses owes much to the successful correction of spectrum aberrations achieved in electron energy loss spectrometers 2-3 decades earlier. Two noteworthy examples of the types of STEM investigation that aberration correction has made possible are shown: imaging of single-atom impurities in graphene and analyzing atomic bonding of single atoms by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Looking towards the future, a new all-magnetic monochromator is described. The monochromator uses several of the principles pioneered in round lens aberration correction, and it employs stabilization schemes that make it immune to variations in the high voltage of the microscope and in the monochromator main prism current. Tests of the monochromator carried out at 60 keV have demonstrated energy resolution as good as 12 meV and monochromated probe size of ∼1.2 Å. These results were obtained in separate experiments, but they indicate that the instrument can perform imaging and EELS with an atom-sized probe <30 meV wide in energy, and that an improvement in energy resolution to 10 meV and beyond should be possible in the future.

  13. Suppression of probe background signals via B1 field inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jian; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-27

    A new approach combining a long pulse with the DEPTH sequence (Cory and Ritchey, Journal of Magnetic Resonance, 1988) greatly improves the efficiency for suppressing probe background signals arising from spinning modules. By applying a long initial excitation pulse in the DEPTH sequence, instead of a {pi}/2 pulse, the inhomogeneous B{sub 1} fields outside the coil can dephase the background coherence in the nutation frame. The initial long pulse and the following two consecutive EXORCYCLE {pi} pulses function complementarily and prove most effective in removing background signals from both strong and weak B{sub 1} fields. Experimentally, the length of the long pulse can be optimized around odd multiples of the {pi}/2 pulse, depending on the individual probe design, to preserve signals inside the coil while minimizing those from probe hardware. This method extends the applicability of the DEPTH sequence to probes with small differences in B{sub 1} field strength between the inside and outside of the coil, and can readily combine with well-developed double resonance experiments for quantitative measurement. In general, spin systems with weak internal interactions are required to attain efficient and uniform excitation for powder samples, and the principles to determine the applicability are discussed qualitatively in terms of the relative strength of spin interactions, r.f. power and spinning rate.

  14. Broadband X-ray Imaging in the Near-Field Region of an Airblast Atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danyu; Bothell, Julie; Morgan, Timothy; Heindel, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The atomization process has a close connection to the efficiency of many spray applications. Examples include improved fuel atomization increasing the combustion efficiency of aircraft engines, or controlled droplet size and spray angle enhancing the quality and speed of the painting process. Therefore, it is vital to understand the physics of the atomization process, but the near-field region is typically optically dense and difficult to probe with laser-based or intrusive measurement techniques. In this project, broadband X-ray radiography and X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging were performed in the near-field region of a canonical coaxial airblast atomizer. The X-ray absorption rate was enhanced by adding 20% by weight of Potassium Iodide to the liquid phase to increase image contrast. The radiographs provided an estimate of the liquid effective mean path length and spray angle at the nozzle exit for different flow conditions. The reconstructed CT images provided a 3D map of the time-average liquid spray distribution. X-ray imaging was used to quantify the changes in the near-field spray characteristics for various coaxial airblast atomizer flow conditions. Office of Naval Research.

  15. Microanalysis of welds using field ion microscope/atom probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadgil, V.J.; Kolster, B.H.; Kolster, B.H.

    1994-01-01

    Since transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was first applied to study metals and alloys, an extensive amount of knowledge has been obtained on microstructures that govern the strength, ductility toughness, workability, and other properties of materials. Particularly analytical transmission

  16. Role of geometry on the frequency spectra of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a specific technique that is used to determine elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials. The success of this technique is highly dependent on the accuracy of frequency spectra that must be measured for both noncontact and the case in which the tip is in contact with the sample of interest. Thus, choosing the right probe is crucial for accurate experiments. U-shaped probes also offer new opportunities for CR-AFM measurements because of certain specific modes that have tip motion parallel to the sample surface such that these resonances can access in-plane sample properties. However, analysis of the spectra from U-shaped probes is much more challenging due to these modes. The geometry of these probes is the main driver for the spectral response. Here, this influence on the resonance frequencies of the commercially fabricated U-shaped probe AN2-300 is evaluated with respect to geometry in terms of leg width, crossbeam width, and crossbeam length. Both noncontact and contact cases are examined with respect to variations of the nominal geometry. An energy distribution approach is also presented to assist with the identification of modes that have close resonances. Finally, this analysis allows recommendations to be made in order to minimize the convergence of multiple resonances for a specific range of measurement parameters.

  17. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Andre, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  18. Magnetic field dependence of the atomic collapse state in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, D.; Ramezani Masir, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics predicts that heavy atoms (Z > Zc ≈ 170 ) will undergo the process of atomic collapse where electrons sink into the positron continuum and a new family of so-called collapsing states emerges. The relativistic electrons in graphene exhibit the same physics but at a much lower critical charge (Zc ≈ 1 ) which has made it possible to confirm this phenomenon experimentally. However, there exist conflicting predictions on the effect of a magnetic field on atomic collapse. These theoretical predictions are based on the continuum Dirac–Weyl equation, which does not have an exact analytical solution for the interplay of a supercritical Coulomb potential and the magnetic field. Approximative solutions have been proposed, but because the two effects compete on similar energy scales, the theoretical treatment varies depending on the regime which is being considered. These limitations are overcome here by starting from a tight-binding approach and computing exact numerical results. By avoiding special limit cases, we found a smooth evolution between the different regimes. We predict that the atomic collapse effect persists even after the magnetic field is activated and that the critical charge remains unchanged. We show that the atomic collapse regime is characterized: (1) by a series of Landau level anticrossings and (2) by the absence of \\sqrt{B} scaling of the Landau levels with regard to magnetic field strength.

  19. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atoms in Strong Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Charles; Nayfeh, Munir

    1990-01-01

    This book collects the lectures given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Atoms in Strong Fields", which took place on the island of Kos, Greece, during the two weeks of October 9-21,1988. The designation "strong field" applies here to an external electromagnetic field that is sufficiently strong to cause highly nonlinear alterations in atomic or molecular struc­ ture and dynamics. The specific topics treated in this volume fall into two general cater­ gories, which are those for which strong field effects can be studied in detail in terrestrial laboratories: the dynamics of excited states in static or quasi-static electric and magnetic fields; and the interaction of atoms and molecules with intense laser radiation. In both areas there exist promising opportunities for research of a fundamental nature. An electric field of even a few volts per centimeter can be very strong on the atom­ ic scale, if it acts upon a weakly bound state. The study of Rydberg states with high reso­ lution laser spectroscop...

  20. Application of the iterative probe correction technique for a high-order probe in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    An iterative probe-correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements is examined. This technique has previously been shown to be well-suited for non-ideal first-order probes. In this paper, its performance in the case of a high-order probe (a dual-ridged horn) is examined....

  1. Atomic Force Microscope nanolithography on chromosomes to generate single-cell genetic probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal dissection provides a direct advance for isolating DNA from cytogenetically recognizable region to generate genetic probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization, a technique that became very common in cyto and molecular genetics research and diagnostics. Several reports describing microdissection methods (glass needle or a laser beam to obtain specific probes from metaphase chromosomes are available. Several limitations are imposed by the traditional methods of dissection as the need for a large number of chromosomes for the production of a probe. In addition, the conventional methods are not suitable for single chromosome analysis, because of the relatively big size of the microneedles. Consequently new dissection techniques are essential for advanced research on chromosomes at the nanoscale level. Results We report the use of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM as a tool for nanomanipulation of single chromosomes to generate individual cell specific genetic probes. Besides new methods towards a better nanodissection, this work is focused on the combination of molecular and nanomanipulation techniques which enable both nanodissection and amplification of chromosomal and chromatidic DNA. Cross-sectional analysis of the dissected chromosomes reveals 20 nm and 40 nm deep cuts. Isolated single chromosomal regions can be directly amplified and labeled by the Degenerate Oligonucleotide-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR and subsequently hybridized to chromosomes and interphasic nuclei. Conclusions Atomic force microscope can be easily used to visualize and to manipulate biological material with high resolution and accuracy. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH performed with the DOP-PCR products as test probes has been tested succesfully in avian microchromosomes and interphasic nuclei. Chromosome nanolithography, with a resolution beyond the resolution limit of light microscopy, could be useful to the

  2. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges and force field parameters is achieved by comparison against a customizable list of chemical fragments. While initially designed to complement the CHARMM simulation package and force fields by generating the necessary input topology and atom-type data files, MATCH can be expanded to any force field and program, and has core functionality that makes it extendable to other applications such as fragment-based property prediction. In the present work, we demonstrate the accurate construction of atomic parameters of molecules within each force field included in CHARMM36 through exhaustive cross validation studies illustrating that bond increment rules derived from one force field can be transferred to another. In addition, using leave-one-out substitution it is shown that it is also possible to substitute missing intra and intermolecular parameters with ones included in a force field to complete the parameterization of novel molecules. Finally, to demonstrate the robustness of MATCH and the coverage of chemical space offered by the recent CHARMM CGENFF force field (Vanommeslaeghe, et al., JCC., 2010, 31, 671–690), one million molecules from the PubChem database of small molecules are typed, parameterized and minimized. PMID:22042689

  3. Atomic and free electrons in a strong light field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1997-01-01

    This book presents and describes a series of unusual and striking strong-field phenomena concerning atoms and free electrons. Some of these phenomena are: multiphoton stimulated bremsstrahlung, free-electron lasers, wave-packet physics, above-threshold ionization, and strong-field stabilization in Rydberg atoms. The theoretical foundations and causes of the phenomena are described in detail, with all the approximations and derivations discussed. All the known and relevant experiments are described too, and their results are compared with those of the existing theoretical models.An extensive ge

  4. Atomic-scale sensing of the magnetic dipolar field from single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Paul, William; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; MacDonald, Andrew J.; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Willke, Philip; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    2017-05-01

    Spin resonance provides the high-energy resolution needed to determine biological and material structures by sensing weak magnetic interactions. In recent years, there have been notable achievements in detecting and coherently controlling individual atomic-scale spin centres for sensitive local magnetometry. However, positioning the spin sensor and characterizing spin-spin interactions with sub-nanometre precision have remained outstanding challenges. Here, we use individual Fe atoms as an electron spin resonance (ESR) sensor in a scanning tunnelling microscope to measure the magnetic field emanating from nearby spins with atomic-scale precision. On artificially built assemblies of magnetic atoms (Fe and Co) on a magnesium oxide surface, we measure that the interaction energy between the ESR sensor and an adatom shows an inverse-cube distance dependence (r-3.01±0.04). This demonstrates that the atoms are predominantly coupled by the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, which, according to our observations, dominates for atom separations greater than 1 nm. This dipolar sensor can determine the magnetic moments of individual adatoms with high accuracy. The achieved atomic-scale spatial resolution in remote sensing of spins may ultimately allow the structural imaging of individual magnetic molecules, nanostructures and spin-labelled biomolecules.

  5. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  6. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  7. Odd-order probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an odd-order probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements is defined. A probe correction technique for odd-order probes is then formulated and tested by computer simulations. The probe correction for odd-order probes is important, since a wide range of realistic antennas...

  8. Atom probe tomography studies of Al₂O₃ gate dielectrics on GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, Baishakhi, E-mail: bmazumder@engineering.ucsb.edu; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Liu, Xiang; Yeluri, Ramya; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    Atom probe tomography was used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of in situ Al₂O₃/GaN structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Al₂O₃ dielectrics grown at three different temperatures of 700, 900, and 1000 °C were analyzed and compared. A low temperature GaN cap layer grown atop Al₂O₃ enabled a high success rate in the atom probe experiments. The Al₂O₃/GaN interfaces were found to be intermixed with Ga, N, and O over the distance of a few nm. Impurity measurements data showed that the 1000 °C sample contains higher amounts of C (4 × 10¹⁹/cm³) and lower amounts of H (7 × 10¹⁹/cm³), whereas the 700 °C sample exhibits lower C impurities (<10¹⁷/cm³) and higher H incorporation (2.2 × 10²⁰/cm³). On comparing with Al₂O₃ grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), it was found that the MOCVD Al₂O₃/GaN interface is comparatively abrupt. Scanning transmission electron microscopy data showed that the 900 °C and 1000 °C MOCVD films exhibit polycrystalline nature, while the ALD films were found to be amorphous.

  9. Improved in situ spring constant calibration for colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Sean P.; Law, Bruce M.

    2010-11-01

    In colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface forces cannot be measured without an accurate determination of the cantilever spring constant. The effective spring constant k depends upon the cantilever geometry and therefore should be measured in situ; additionally, k may be coupled to other measurement parameters. For example, colloidal probe AFM is frequently used to measure the slip length b at solid/liquid boundaries by comparing the measured hydrodynamic force with Vinogradova slip theory (V-theory). However, in this measurement k and b are coupled, hence, b cannot be accurately determined without knowing k to high precision. In this paper, a new in situ spring constant calibration method based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and V-theory is presented and contrasted with two other popular spring constant determination methods. In this residuals calibration method, V-theory is fitted to the experimental force-distance data for a range of systematically varied spring constants where the only adjustable parameter in V-theory is the slip length b. The optimal spring constant k is that value where the residuals are symmetrically displaced about zero for all colloidal probe separations. This residual spring constant calibration method is demonstrated by studying three different liquids (n-decanol, n-hexadecane, and n-octane) and two different silane coated colloidal probe-silicon wafer systems (n-hexadecyltrichlorosilane and n-dodecyltrichlorosilane).

  10. Improved in situ spring constant calibration for colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, Sean P.; Law, Bruce M. [Department of Physics, Cardwell Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    In colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface forces cannot be measured without an accurate determination of the cantilever spring constant. The effective spring constant k depends upon the cantilever geometry and therefore should be measured in situ; additionally, k may be coupled to other measurement parameters. For example, colloidal probe AFM is frequently used to measure the slip length b at solid/liquid boundaries by comparing the measured hydrodynamic force with Vinogradova slip theory (V-theory). However, in this measurement k and b are coupled, hence, b cannot be accurately determined without knowing k to high precision. In this paper, a new in situ spring constant calibration method based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and V-theory is presented and contrasted with two other popular spring constant determination methods. In this residuals calibration method, V-theory is fitted to the experimental force-distance data for a range of systematically varied spring constants where the only adjustable parameter in V-theory is the slip length b. The optimal spring constant k is that value where the residuals are symmetrically displaced about zero for all colloidal probe separations. This residual spring constant calibration method is demonstrated by studying three different liquids (n-decanol, n-hexadecane, and n-octane) and two different silane coated colloidal probe-silicon wafer systems (n-hexadecyltrichlorosilane and n-dodecyltrichlorosilane).

  11. Using Jupiter's gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-03-23

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection.

  12. Dynamics of atomic clusters in intense optical fields of ultrashort ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atomic clusters; Coulomb explosion; few-cycle laser pulses; strong fields; cluster dynamics. 1. Introduction. A number of scientific and technological developments are responsible for the resurgence of interest in studi- es of light-matter interactions, particularly of how very intense light interacts with matter. The interest stems.

  13. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  14. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.

    2013-09-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing the atomic structure of amorphous Ta2O5 coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, R.; Borisenko, K. B.; Cockayne, D. J. H.; Hough, J.; MacLaren, I.; Rowan, S.

    2011-01-01

    Low optical and mechanical loss Ta2O5 amorphous coatings have a growing number of applications in precision optical measurements systems. Transmission electron microscopy is a promising way to probe the atomic structure of these coatings in an effort to better understand the causes of the observed mechanical and optical losses. Analysis of the experimental reduced density functions using a combination of reverse Monte Carlo refinements and density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations reveals that the structure of amorphous Ta2O5 consists of clusters with increased contribution from a Ta2O2 ring fragment.

  16. Analytic treatment of charge cloud overlaps: an improvement of the tomographic atom probe efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, P.; Bostel, A.; Grancher, G.; Deconihout, B.; Blavette, D.

    1996-03-01

    Although reliable position and composition data are obtained with the Tomographic Atom Probe, the procedure of position calculation by charge centroiding fails when the detector receives two or more ions with close spaced positions and the same mass-to-charge ratio. As the charge clouds of the ions overlap, they form a unique charge pattern on the multianode detector. Only one atom is represented and its position is biased. In order to estimate real positions, we have developed a correction method. The spatial distribution of charges inside a cloud issued from one impact is modelled by a Gaussian law. The particular properties of the Gaussian enable the calculation of exact positions of the two impacts of the overlapped charge patterns and charges of corresponding clouds. The calculation may be generalized for more than two overlapped clouds. The method was tested on a plane-by-plane analysis of a fully ordered Cu 3Au alloy performed on a (100) pole.

  17. Probing Primordial Magnetic Fields with 21-cm Line Observations of the High-redshift Intergalactic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopcic, Antonija; Gluscevic, V.; Hirata, C. M.; Mishra, A.; Venumadhav, T. N.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent magnetic fields with strengths of the order of 10^(-5) G are observed on scales of individual galaxies, including the Milky Way. They are thought to be organized and maintained by a dynamo mechanism. However, the nature and origin of the seed magnetic field, required for the dynamo effect to take place, are still unknown. Here, we propose a method of probing the magnetic field in the intergalactic medium before the Epoch of Reionization through observations of redshifted 21-cm radiation of neutral hydrogen. The 21-cm line is created during the spin-flip transition between the hyperfine levels of the hydrogen ground state. The upper hyperfine level is a triplet consisting of atomic states with three different projections of the total angular momentum vector. Anisotropic 21-cm radiation, resulting from perturbations in the high-redshift IGM, unevenly populates triplet sublevels. If an atom is located in an external magnetic field, it precesses between the three states; this causes an additional anisotropy in the 21-cm radiation, which could be imprinted in the 21-cm power spectrum. In order to evaluate the effect of the magnetic field, we need to consider in full detail all mechanisms that affect the distribution of atoms in hyperfine sublevels, such as the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the 21-cm radiation, optical pumping by Lyman-alpha photons, and spin-exchange in hydrogen-hydrogen collisions. Preliminary calculations suggest that this method could be sensitive to extremely weak magnetic fields, of the order of 10^(-17) G.

  18. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Ernst, W.E. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria); Holst, B. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: bodil@cantab.net

    2008-05-15

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  19. Probing buried carbon nanotubes within polymer-nanotube composite matrices by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi; Zhang, Wei-De; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) inside a polyamide-6 (PA6)–MW-CNT composite were visualized by atomic force microscopy (i) in a field-assisted intermittent contact and (ii) in the tunneling (TUNA) mode. Individual buried MW-CNTs were clearly discerned within the PA6 matrix. An average

  20. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie...

  1. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, B.; Henderson, H. B.; Gan, J.; Manuel, M. V.

    2015-04-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially, with high accuracy. However, it is known that compositional accuracy can be affected by experimental conditions. A study of the effect of laser energy, specimen base temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide (UO2). In laser-assisted mode, tip geometry and standing voltage also contribute to the evaporation behavior. In this investigation, it was determined that modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect the evaporation behavior as significantly as laser energy. It was also determined that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO2. Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser-assisted field evaporation characteristic and high laser energy induces thermal effects, negatively altering the evaporation behavior. The need for UO2 to be analyzed under moderate laser energies to produce accurate stoichiometry distinguishes it from other oxides. The following experimental conditions providing the best combination of mass resolving power, accurate stoichiometry, and uniform evaporation behavior: 50 K, 10 pJ laser energy, a detection rate of 0.003 atoms per pulse, and a 100 kHz repetition rate.

  2. Probing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate)/cell interactions by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalia, Becerra; Henry, Andrade; Betty, López; Marina, Restrepo Luz; Roberto, Raiteri

    2015-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based hydrogels have been proposed as cell culture supports in cell sheet engineering. Toward this goal, we characterized the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer thermo-sensitivity and the cell/copolymer interactions above and below the copolymer lower critical solution temperature. We did that by direct force measurements at different temperatures using an atomic force microscope with either a polystyrene or a glass microbead as probes. We used a copolymer-coated microbead to measure adhesion after a short contact time with a single fibroblast in culture. Statistical analysis of the maximum adhesion force and the mechanical work necessary to separate the probe from the cell surface confirmed the hydrophilic/hydrophobic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) as a function of temperature in the range 20-37°C and, consequently, a reversible increase/decrease in cell adhesion with the copolymer. As control experiments we measured interactions between uncoated microbeads with the copolymer hydrogel or cells as well as interaction of the Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) homopolymer with cells. These results show the potential of an assay based on atomic force microscopy for an in situ and quantitative assessment of cell/substrate interactions and support the use of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer as an efficient culture substrate in cell sheet engineering. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Microwave field measurement via Rabi resonances in Cs atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Huang, Xianhe; Ma, Jie; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a technique for measuring microwave (MW) field based on Rabi resonances induced by the interaction of atoms with a phase-modulated MW field. A theoretical model of field measurement is used to calculate Rabi frequency. Single-peak feature of the measurement model makes the technique a valuable tool for simple and fast field measurement. As an example, we use the technique to determine the MW field strength inside a Cs vapor cell in the X-band rectangular cavity for applied power in the range of -21 dBm to 20 dBm. The results show that this proposed technique is capable for detecting the field over a broad dynamical range.

  4. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@ua.ac.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Verbeeck, J. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Erni, R. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 72R0150, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bals, S. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Luysberg, M. [Institute of Solid State Research and Ernst Ruska Center for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Helmholtz Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  5. Hierarchical atom type definitions and extensible all-atom force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Yang, Chunwei; Cao, Fenglei; Li, Feng; Jing, Zhifeng; Chen, Long; Shen, Zhe; Xin, Liang; Tong, Sijia; Sun, Huai

    2016-03-15

    The extensibility of force field is a key to solve the missing parameter problem commonly found in force field applications. The extensibility of conventional force fields is traditionally managed in the parameterization procedure, which becomes impractical as the coverage of the force field increases above a threshold. A hierarchical atom-type definition (HAD) scheme is proposed to make extensible atom type definitions, which ensures that the force field developed based on the definitions are extensible. To demonstrate how HAD works and to prepare a foundation for future developments, two general force fields based on AMBER and DFF functional forms are parameterized for common organic molecules. The force field parameters are derived from the same set of quantum mechanical data and experimental liquid data using an automated parameterization tool, and validated by calculating molecular and liquid properties. The hydration free energies are calculated successfully by introducing a polarization scaling factor to the dispersion term between the solvent and solute molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  7. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  8. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. I. Computational predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Himmetoglu, Burak [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cococcioni, Matteo [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 and Theory and Simulations of Materials, National Centre for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) image simulations were performed for zone-axis-oriented light-element single crystals, using a multislice method adapted to include charge redistribution due to chemical bonding. Examination of these image simulations alongside calculations of the propagation of the focused electron probe reveal that the evolution of the probe intensity with thickness exhibits significant sensitivity to interatomic charge transfer, accounting for observed thickness-dependent bonding sensitivity of contrast in all ADF-STEM imaging conditions. Because changes in image contrast relative to conventional neutral atom simulations scale directly with the net interatomic charge transfer, the strongest effects are seen in crystals with highly polar bonding, while no effects are seen for nonpolar bonding. Although the bonding dependence of ADF-STEM image contrast varies with detector geometry, imaging parameters, and material temperature, these simulations predict the bonding effects to be experimentally measureable.

  9. Measurement and deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dot using an atomic force microscope with a nanopipette probe in liquid condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, So; Yamazaki, Koji; Iwata, Futoshi

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we developed novel techniques of nanometer-scale measurement and deposition using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a nanopipette in liquid condition. The nanopipette, filled with CuSO4 electrolyte solution, was employed as the AFM probe. Observation and deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dots were carried out using the nanopipette probe. In order to avoid drying of the nanopipette solution and clogging of the probe-edge aperture, Cu dots were deposited and measured in liquid condition. As for the measurement of the surface, the nanopipette probe was glued on a tuning fork quartz crystal resonator (TF-QCR) to detect a probe oscillation and vertically oscillated to use a method of frequency modulation in tapping-mode AFM. With regard to the deposition of nanometer-scale Cu dot, an electrode wire inside the electrolyte-filled nanopipette and conductive surface of Au coated glass slide were employed as the anode and cathode, respectively. By utilizing the probe-surface distance control during the deposition, nanometerscale Cu dot were successfully deposited on Au surface without the diffusion. Then, the deposited dots were observed by using the nanopipette probe. This technique of the local deposition in the liquid would be applicable for various fields such as fabrication of micro/nanometer-scale devices and arrangement of biological samples.

  10. Non-Hydrogenic Rydberg Atoms in Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    P. A., DANDO; T. S., MONTEIRO; W., JANS; W., SCHWEIZER; Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London; Lehrstuhl fur Theoretische Astrophysik, University Tubingen

    1994-01-01

    The classical and quantal dynamics of non-hydrogenic Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields are investigated. Previous attempts to infer classical behaviour from quantum properties produced conflicting results: at low scaled energies (ε=-0.5) the nearest-neighbour statistics (NNS) were found to be at the chaotic (Wigner) limit while quantum phase-space distributions suggested a high degree of regularity. Here the classical limit is investigated directly by solving the equations of motion of the Dia...

  11. Iterative probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    An iterative probe correction technique is presented to correct for the errors caused by the application of the traditional first-order probe correction for nonideal first-order probes in spherical near-field antenna measurements. The technique may be applied, with certain restrictions, for more...... general probes as well....

  12. Zeeman Effect in Sulfur Monoxide: a Probe to Observe Magnetic Fields in Star Forming Regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, Jose; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. We decided to investigate the ability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via Zeeman effect. The Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions has been investigated by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation source. To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O_2 has been carried out. An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions.

  13. New probe of magnetic fields in the prereionization epoch. I. Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Oklopčić, Antonija; Gluscevic, Vera; Mishra, Abhilash; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a method of measuring extremely weak magnetic fields in the intergalactic medium prior to and during the epoch of cosmic reionization. The method utilizes the Larmor precession of spin-polarized neutral hydrogen in the triplet state of the hyperfine transition. This precession leads to a systematic change in the brightness temperature fluctuations of the 21-cm line from the high-redshift universe, and thus the statistics of these fluctuations encode information about the magnetic field the atoms are immersed in. The method is most suited to probing fields that are coherent on large scales; in this paper, we consider a homogenous magnetic field over the scale of the 21-cm fluctuations. Due to the long lifetime of the triplet state of the 21-cm transition, this technique is naturally sensitive to extremely weak field strengths, of order 10-19 G at a reference redshift of ˜20 (or 10-21 G if scaled to the present day). Therefore, this might open up the possibility of probing primordial magnetic fields just prior to reionization. If the magnetic fields are much stronger, it is still possible to use this method to infer their direction, and place a lower limit on their strength. In this paper (Paper I in a series on this effect), we perform detailed calculations of the microphysics behind this effect, and take into account all the processes that affect the hyperfine transition, including radiative decays, collisions, and optical pumping by Lyman-α photons. We conclude with an analytic formula for the brightness temperature of linear-regime fluctuations in the presence of a magnetic field, and discuss its limiting behavior for weak and strong fields.

  14. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  15. A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide by rationally altering the susceptible H-atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuanqiang; Nguyen, Khac Hong; Zhang, Yintang; Zhang, Guan; Fan, Shengnan; Li, Fen; Guo, Chao; Lu, Yuanyuan; Song, Xiaoqing; Qu, Peng; Liu, You-Nian; Xu, Maotian

    2018-01-01

    A highly selective and ratiometric fluorescent probe for cyanide was rationally designed and synthesized. The probe comprises a fluorophore unit of naphthalimide and a CN- acceptor of methylated trifluoroacetamide group. For these previous reported trifluoroacetamide derivative-based cyanide chemosensors, the H-atom of amide adjacent to trifluoroacetyl group is susceptible to be attacked by various anions (CN- itself, F-, AcO-, et al.) and even the solvent molecule, which resulted in the bewildered reaction mechanism and poor selectivity of the assay. In this work, the susceptible H-atom of trifluoroacetamide was artfully substituted by alkyl group. Thus a highly specific fluorescent probe was developed for cyanide sensing. Upon the nucleophilic addition of cyanide anion to the carbonyl of trifluoroacetamide moiety of the probe, the ICT process of the probe was significantly enhanced and leading to a remarkable red shift in both absorption and emission spectra of the probe. This fluorescent assay showed a linear range of 1.0-80.0µM and a LOD (limit of detection) of 0.23µM. All the investigated interference have no influence on the sensing behavior of the probe toward cyanide. Moreover, by coating on TLC plate, the probe can be utilized for practical detection of trace cyanide in water samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  17. Analysis of deuterium in V-Fe5at.% film by atom probe tomography (APT)

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2011-09-01

    V-Fe5at.% 2 and 10-nm thick single layered films were prepared by ion beam sputtering on W substrate. They were loaded with D from gas phase at 0.2 Pa and at 1 Pa, respectively. Both lateral and depth D distribution of these films was investigated in detail by atom probe tomography. The results of analysis are in good agreement between the average deuterium concentration and the value, expected from electromotive force measurement on a similar flat film. An enrichment of deuterium at the V/W interface was observed for both films. The origin of this D-accumulation was discussed in respect to electron transfer, mechanical stress and misfit dislocations. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  19. Rydberg atoms in low-frequency fields : fundamental aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürtler, Andreas Stefan

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate highly excited atoms, so-called Rydberg atoms, in oscillating fields with frequencies from the megahertz to the terahertz domain. The strong interaction of Rydberg atoms with external fields is used to establish a connection between the ionization of Rydberg atoms by

  20. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  1. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Emily M.; Reddy, Steven M.; Saxey, David W.; Snoeyenbos, David R.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The 207Pb/206Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages. PMID:27617295

  2. Practical aspects of spherical near-field antenna measurements using a high-order probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2006-01-01

    Two practical aspects related to accurate antenna pattern characterization by probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with a high-order probe are examined. First, the requirements set by an arbitrary high-order probe on the scanning technique are pointed out. Secondly, a channel...... balance calibration procedure for a high-order dual-port probe with non-identical ports is presented, and the requirements set by this procedure for the probe are discussed....

  3. Quantitative imaging of electrospun fibers by PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy using etched scanning probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlanda, Adrian; Rebis, Janusz; Kijeńska, Ewa; Wozniak, Michal J; Rozniatowski, Krzysztof; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-05-01

    Electrospun polymeric submicron and nanofibers can be used as tissue engineering scaffolds in regenerative medicine. In physiological conditions fibers are subjected to stresses and strains from the surrounding biological environment. Such stresses can cause permanent deformation or even failure to their structure. Therefore, there is a growing necessity to characterize their mechanical properties, especially at the nanoscale. Atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool for the visualization and probing of selected mechanical properties of materials in biomedical sciences. Image resolution of atomic force microscopy techniques depends on the equipment quality and shape of the scanning probe. The probe radius and aspect ratio has huge impact on the quality of measurement. In the presented work the nanomechanical properties of four different polymer based electrospun fibers were tested using PeakForce Quantitative NanoMechanics atomic force microscopy, with standard and modified scanning probes. Standard, commercially available probes have been modified by etching using focused ion beam (FIB). Results have shown that modified probes can be used for mechanical properties mapping of biomaterial in the nanoscale, and generate nanomechanical information where conventional tips fail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ordering and site occupancy of D03 ordered Fe3Al-5 at%Cr evaluated by means of atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Rademacher, Thomas W.

    2011-05-01

    Addition of ternary elements to the D03 ordered Fe3Al intermetallic phase is a general approach to optimise its mechanical properties. To understand the physical influences of such additions the determination of the probability of site occupancies of these additions on the lattice site and ordering parameters is of high interest. Some common experimental techniques such as X-ray diffraction or Atom Location by Channelling Enhanced Microanalysis (ALCHEMI) are usually applied to explore this interplay. Unfortunately, certain published results are partly inconsistent, imprecise or even contradictory. In this study, these aspects are evaluated systematically by atom probe tomography (APT) and a special data analysis method. Additionally, to account for possible field evaporation effects that can falsify the estimation of site occupancy and induce misinterpretations, APT evaporation sequences were also simulated. As a result, chromium occupies most frequently the next nearest neighbour sites of Al atoms and local ordering parameters could be achieved. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  6. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  7. Probing new spin-independent interactions through precision spectroscopy in atoms with few electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Cédric; Frugiuele, Claudia; Fuchs, Elina; Soreq, Yotam

    2017-12-01

    The very high precision of current measurements and theory predictions of spectral lines in few-electron atoms allows us to efficiently probe the existence of exotic forces between electrons, neutrons and protons. We investigate the sensitivity to new spin-independent interactions in transition frequencies (and their isotopic shifts) of hydrogen, helium and some heliumlike ions. We find that present data probe new regions of the force-carrier couplings to electrons and neutrons around the MeV mass range. We also find that, below few keV, the sensitivity to the electron coupling in precision spectroscopy of helium and positronium is comparable to that of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Finally, we interpret our results in the dark-photon model where a new gauge boson is kinetically mixed with the photon. There, we show that helium transitions, combined with the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron, provide the strongest indirect bound from laboratory experiments above 100 keV.

  8. 3D Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Neutron-irradiated SA508 Gr.4N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun; Lee, Gyeong Geun; Jin, Hyung Ha; Chang, Kun Ok [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Chan Sun [Myongi University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The embrittlement is induced by the formation of radiation defects (so-called 'matrix damage') and/or of radiation induced precipitates. Cu-rich precipitates (CRP) have been observed in Cu-bearing RPV steels. In case of Cu free, high Mn (and Ni and Si) containing RPV steels such as SA508 Gr.3 (1.4Mn-0.9Ni-0.15Cr-0.2C-0.002P in wt.%), Mn-Ni-rich precipitates (MNP) are reported to form at low temperature and high neutron fluence. These MNPs are believed to have long incubation time. But once nucleated, they rapidly grow to large volume fractions and mechanical properties deteriorate abruptly, e.g., increase in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. For such reasons, MNPs are denoted as late blooming phases (LBP). MNPs are often observed in RPV steels with Mn content of -1 wt.% and similar or lower Ni content. Atom probe experiments of neutron irradiated SA508 Gr.3, which has a composition of, showed Mn, Ni, Si, and P atoms are formed MNPs and segregated at dislocation lines.

  9. Probing the accuracy and precision of Hirshfeld atom refinement withHARtinterfaced withOlex2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugel, Malte; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Hupf, Emanuel; Overgaard, Jacob; Hathwar, Venkatesha R; Macchi, Piero; Turner, Michael J; Howard, Judith A K; Dolomanov, Oleg V; Puschmann, Horst; Iversen, Bo B; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Grabowsky, Simon

    2018-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a novel X-ray structure refinement technique that employs aspherical atomic scattering factors obtained from stockholder partitioning of a theoretically determined tailor-made static electron density. HAR overcomes many of the known limitations of independent atom modelling (IAM), such as too short element-hydrogen distances, r ( X -H), or too large atomic displacement parameters (ADPs). This study probes the accuracy and precision of anisotropic hydrogen and non-hydrogen ADPs and of r ( X -H) values obtained from HAR. These quantities are compared and found to agree with those obtained from (i) accurate neutron diffraction data measured at the same temperatures as the X-ray data and (ii) multipole modelling (MM), an established alternative method for interpreting X-ray diffraction data with the help of aspherical atomic scattering factors. Results are presented for three chemically different systems: the aromatic hydro-carbon rubrene (orthorhombic 5,6,11,12-tetra-phenyl-tetracene), a co-crystal of zwitterionic betaine, imidazolium cations and picrate anions (BIPa), and the salt potassium hydrogen oxalate (KHOx). The non-hydrogen HAR-ADPs are as accurate and precise as the MM-ADPs. Both show excellent agreement with the neutron-based values and are superior to IAM-ADPs. The anisotropic hydrogen HAR-ADPs show a somewhat larger deviation from neutron-based values than the hydrogen SHADE-ADPs used in MM. Element-hydrogen bond lengths from HAR are in excellent agreement with those obtained from neutron diffraction experiments, although they are somewhat less precise. The residual density contour maps after HAR show fewer features than those after MM. Calculating the static electron density with the def2-TZVP basis set instead of the simpler def2-SVP one does not improve the refinement results significantly. All HARs were performed within the recently introduced HARt option implemented in the Olex2 program. They are easily launched

  10. Probing the accuracy and precision of Hirshfeld atom refinement with HARt interfaced with Olex2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Fugel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR is a novel X-ray structure refinement technique that employs aspherical atomic scattering factors obtained from stockholder partitioning of a theoretically determined tailor-made static electron density. HAR overcomes many of the known limitations of independent atom modelling (IAM, such as too short element–hydrogen distances, r(X—H, or too large atomic displacement parameters (ADPs. This study probes the accuracy and precision of anisotropic hydrogen and non-hydrogen ADPs and of r(X—H values obtained from HAR. These quantities are compared and found to agree with those obtained from (i accurate neutron diffraction data measured at the same temperatures as the X-ray data and (ii multipole modelling (MM, an established alternative method for interpreting X-ray diffraction data with the help of aspherical atomic scattering factors. Results are presented for three chemically different systems: the aromatic hydrocarbon rubrene (orthorhombic 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyltetracene, a co-crystal of zwitterionic betaine, imidazolium cations and picrate anions (BIPa, and the salt potassium hydrogen oxalate (KHOx. The non-hydrogen HAR-ADPs are as accurate and precise as the MM-ADPs. Both show excellent agreement with the neutron-based values and are superior to IAM-ADPs. The anisotropic hydrogen HAR-ADPs show a somewhat larger deviation from neutron-based values than the hydrogen SHADE-ADPs used in MM. Element–hydrogen bond lengths from HAR are in excellent agreement with those obtained from neutron diffraction experiments, although they are somewhat less precise. The residual density contour maps after HAR show fewer features than those after MM. Calculating the static electron density with the def2-TZVP basis set instead of the simpler def2-SVP one does not improve the refinement results significantly. All HARs were performed within the recently introduced HARt option implemented in the Olex2 program. They are easily

  11. Short-channel field-effect transistors with 9-atom and 13-atom wide graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, Juan Pablo; Fairbrother, Andrew; Borin Barin, Gabriela; Shi, Wu; Lee, Kyunghoon; Wu, Shuang; Yong Choi, Byung; Braganza, Rohit; Lear, Jordan; Kau, Nicholas; Choi, Wonwoo; Chen, Chen; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Dumslaff, Tim; Narita, Akimitsu; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fischer, Felix; Zettl, Alex; Ruffieux, Pascal; Yablonovitch, Eli; Crommie, Michael; Fasel, Roman; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2017-09-21

    Bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons and graphene nanoribbon heterostructures have promising electronic properties for high-performance field-effect transistors and ultra-low power devices such as tunneling field-effect transistors. However, the short length and wide band gap of these graphene nanoribbons have prevented the fabrication of devices with the desired performance and switching behavior. Here, by fabricating short channel (L ch ~ 20 nm) devices with a thin, high-κ gate dielectric and a 9-atom wide (0.95 nm) armchair graphene nanoribbon as the channel material, we demonstrate field-effect transistors with high on-current (I on > 1 μA at V d = -1 V) and high I on /I off ~ 10(5) at room temperature. We find that the performance of these devices is limited by tunneling through the Schottky barrier at the contacts and we observe an increase in the transparency of the barrier by increasing the gate field near the contacts. Our results thus demonstrate successful fabrication of high-performance short-channel field-effect transistors with bottom-up synthesized armchair graphene nanoribbons.Graphene nanoribbons show promise for high-performance field-effect transistors, however they often suffer from short lengths and wide band gaps. Here, the authors use a bottom-up synthesis approach to fabricate 9- and 13-atom wide ribbons, enabling short-channel transistors with 10(5) on-off current ratio.

  12. Pulsed-voltage atom probe tomography of low conductivity and insulator materials by application of ultrathin metallic coating on nanoscale specimen geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adineh, Vahid R; Marceau, Ross K W; Chen, Yu; Si, Kae J; Velkov, Tony; Cheng, Wenlong; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel approach for analysis of low-conductivity and insulating materials with conventional pulsed-voltage atom probe tomography (APT), by incorporating an ultrathin metallic coating on focused ion beam prepared needle-shaped specimens. Finite element electrostatic simulations of coated atom probe specimens were performed, which suggest remarkable improvement in uniform voltage distribution and subsequent field evaporation of the insulated samples with a metallic coating of approximately 10nm thickness. Using design of experiment technique, an experimental investigation was performed to study physical vapor deposition coating of needle specimens with end tip radii less than 100nm. The final geometries of the coated APT specimens were characterized with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and an empirical model was proposed to determine the optimal coating thickness for a given specimen size. The optimal coating strategy was applied to APT specimens of resin embedded Au nanospheres. Results demonstrate that the optimal coating strategy allows unique pulsed-voltage atom probe analysis and 3D imaging of biological and insulated samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Model Analysis of a Complex Tuning Fork Probe and Its Application in Bimodal Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electromechanical coupling model was built to quantitatively analyze the tuning fork probes, especially the complex ones. A special feature of a novel, soft tuning fork probe, that the second eigenfrequency of the probe was insensitive to the effective force gradient, was found and used in a homemade bimodal atomic force microscopy to measure power dissipation quantitatively. By transforming the mechanical parameters to the electrical parameters, a monotonous and concise method without using phase to calculate the power dissipation was proposed.

  14. Atom probe tomography study of alloying element distributions in Zr alloys and their oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Motta, Arthur T.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed study of alloying element distributions in the metal and oxygen rich regions of corroded Zr alloys and of the phases formed ahead of the oxide front was conducted using atom probe tomography (APT). A consistent sequence of sub-oxide phases is observed ahead of the ZrO2 oxide front, consisting of (i) a thin layer of equiatomic ZrO (occasionally slightly over and under stoichiometric) (ii) saturated solid solution Zr(O)sat, and (iii) a slowly decreasing oxygen profile into the metal. The results also show that the distribution of the alloying elements in the metal is more inhomogeneous than previously thought and that in the oxygen-rich phases enhanced segregation is observed, compared to the metal. the stable oxide ZrO2 (which is in contact with water), the equiatomic suboxide ZrO (both slightly sub and superstoichiometric, denoted here ZrO1+x and ZrO1-x), a saturated solution of constant oxygen content at about 30% O, denoted Zr(O)sat, and an undersaturated solid solution of O in Zr, denoted Zr(O), the oxygen content of which decreases with distance from the oxide-metal interface. As stated above, the field evaporation behavior of these phases is drastically different, resulting in characteristic ions being evaporated from each phase. As a result, the phases can be identified both by atomic concentrations and by the nature of the ionic species evaporating from each phase. The latter method was also used to visualize the distribution of phases within needles. For example, it was found in the present study that oxygen was evaporated as O+, O2+, ZrO2+, ZrO3+, ZrO2+,ZrO22+,ZrO3+ with occasional instances of ZrO23+ and ZrO33+ observed. Zr ions (Zr2+, Zr3+) become significant in the Zr(O)sat phase. O2+ is only observed in the oxide (ZrO2) phase, so it is considered a marker for that phase. ZrO2+ and ZrO22+ are present both in the ZrO2 and ZrO1+x phases but absent in the ZrO1-x, Zr(O)sat and Zr(O) phase. the equiatomic ZrO phase (observed as both ZrO1+x and Zr

  15. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Garolera, Blai [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica,11501-2060 San José (Costa Rica); Torrents, Genís [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-01-27

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  16. Near-field hyperspectral quantum probing of multimodal plasmonic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuche, A.; Berthel, M.; Kumar, U.; Colas des Francs, G.; Huant, S.; Dujardin, E.; Girard, C.; Drezet, A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum systems, excited by an external source of photons, display a photodynamics that is ruled by a subtle balance between radiative or nonradiative energy channels when interacting with metallic nanostructures. We apply and generalize this concept to achieve a quantum probing of multimodal plasmonic resonators by collecting and filtering the broad emission spectra generated by a nanodiamond (ND) hosting a small set of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers attached at the apex of an optical tip. Spatially and spectrally resolved information on the photonic local density of states (ph-LDOS) can be recorded with this technique in the immediate vicinity of plasmonic resonators, paving the way for a complete near-field optical characterization of any kind of nanoresonators in the single photon regime.

  17. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  18. Probing photospheric magnetic fields with new spectral line pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, H. N.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The magnetic line ratio (MLR) method has been extensively used in the measurement of photospheric magnetic field strength. It was devised for the neutral iron line pair at 5247.1 Å and 5250.2 Å (5250 Å pair). Other line pairs as well-suited as this pair have not been reported in the literature. Aims: The aim of the present work is to identify new line pairs useful for the MLR technique and to test their reliability. Methods: We used a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic 3D MHD simulation representing the quiet Sun atmosphere to synthesize the Stokes profiles. Then, we applied the MLR technique to the Stokes V profiles to recover the fields in the MHD cube both at original resolution and after degrading with a point spread function. In both these cases, we aim to empirically represent the field strengths returned by the MLR method in terms of the field strengths in the MHD cube. Results: We have identified two new line pairs that are very well adapted to be used for MLR measurements. The first pair is in the visible, Fe I 6820-6842 Å, whose intensity profiles have previously been used to measure stellar magnetic fields, and the other pair is in the infrared (IR), Fe I 15 534-15 542 Å. The lines in these pairs reproduce the magnetic fields in the MHD cube rather well and, in fact, somewhat better than the original 5250 Å pair. Conclusions: The newly identified line pairs complement the old pairs. The lines in the new IR pair, because of their higher Zeeman sensitivity, are ideal for the measurement of weak fields. The new visible pair works best above 300 G. The new IR pair, due to its large Stokes V signal samples more fields in the MHD cube than the old IR pair at 1.56 μm, even in the presence of noise, and hence likely also on the real Sun. Owing to their low formation heights (100-200 km above τ5000 = 1), both the new line pairs are well suited for probing magnetic fields in the lower photosphere.

  19. Applications of a versatile modelling approach to 3D atom probe simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdorfer, Christian; Eich, Sebastian Manuel; Lütkemeyer, Martin; Schmitz, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The article addresses application examples of a flexible simulation approach, which is based on an irregular mesh of Voronoi cells. The detailed atomic structure of APT field emitters is represented by Wigner-Seitz cells. In this way, arbitrary crystal structures can be modelled. The electric field results from the solution of the Poisson equation. The evaporation sequence of atoms from the emitter surface is enabled by calculation of the field-induced force, which acts on the surface cells. Presented examples show simulated field desorption maps of a cubic fcc structure in comparison to the close-packed hcp structure. Additionally, the desorption maps of the cubic sc, bcc, and fcc lattices in orientation are presented. The effect of inhomogeneous evaporation conditions on the emitter apex curvature is demonstrated. Reconstructions derived from the simulation of Σ5 GBs differently inclined with respect to the emitter axis are analyzed. Finally, the stress exerted on an embedded nano-particle during the simulated evaporation with inhomogeneous evaporation thresholds is estimated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to- Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; Winter, D A Matthijs De; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new,superior materials for various applications,including oil and gas conversion pro- cesses.Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub- nm length

  1. Atomic XAFS as a Tool To Probe the Reactivity of Metal Oxide Catalysts: Quantifying Metal Oxide Support Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Airaksinen, S.M.K.; Krause, A.O.I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Koningsberger, D.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073704342

    2007-01-01

    The potential of atomic XAFS (AXAFS) to directly probe the catalytic performances of a set of supported metal oxide catalysts has been explored for the first time. For this purpose, a series of 1 wt % supported vanadium oxide catalysts have been prepared differing in their oxidic support material

  2. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  3. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Lenk, Steve; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many devices. Driven by the thermally actuated piezoresistive cantilever technology, we have developed a prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform which is able to image, inspect, align, and pattern features down to the single digit nanoregime. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric-field based current-controlled scanning probe lithography. In particular, individual patterning tests are carried out on calixarene by using our developed table-top SPL system. We have demonstrated the application of a step-and-repeat SPL method including optical as well as atomic force microscopy-based navigation and alignment. The closed-loop lithography scheme was applied to sequentially write positive and negative tone features. Due to the integrated unique combination of read-write cycling, each single feature is aligned separately with the highest precision and inspected after patterning. This routine was applied to create a pattern step by step. Finally, we have demonstrated the patterning over larger areas, over existing topography, and the practical applicability of the SPL processes for lithography down to 13-nm pitch patterns. To enhance the throughput capability variable beam diameter electric field, current-controlled SPL is briefly discussed.

  4. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-28

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  5. Individual carbon nanotube probes and field emitters fabrication and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guangyu

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in 1999, they have attracted much attention due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties and potential applications. Yet their nanosize makes the study of individual CNTs easier said than done. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with nanotube cores have been synthesized with conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The single multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) sticks out as a tip of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up the individual CNT tips, focused ion beam (FIB) technique is applied to cut and adhere the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first adhered on a micro-manipulator with the FIB welding function. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on any geometry of solid samples such as conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) silicon tips. The procedures developed for the FIB assisted individual CNT tip fabrication will be described in detail. Because of their excellent electrical and stable chemical properties, individual CNTs are potential candidates as electron guns for electron based microscopes to produce highly coherent electron beams. Due to the flexibility of the FIB fabrication, the individual CNT tips can be easily fabricated on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission (FE) experimentation. Another promising application for individual CNT tips is as AFM probes. The high aspect ratio and mechanical resilience make individual CNTs ideal for scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tips. Atomic force microscopy with nanotube tips allows us to image relatively deep features of the sample surface at near nanometer resolution. Characterization of AFM with individual CNT tips and field emission properties of single CNT emitters will be studied and presented.

  6. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects...... of field interpolation from these probes into the brain which is implicit in such methods. Measurements and simulations were performed to quantify how well B0-fluctuations in the brain due to body and breathing motion are reflected in external field probe measurements. Methods: Field probe measurements...... were compared with scanner acquired B0-maps from experiments with breathing and shoulder movements. A realistic simulation of B0-fluctuations caused by breathing was performed, and used for testing different sets of field probe positions. Results: The B0-fluctuations were well reflected in the field...

  7. Development of an electric field application system with transparent electrodes towards the electron EDM measurement with laser-cooled Fr atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Kato, Ko; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. This work is supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  8. Compact First-Order Probe for Spherical Near-Field Antenna Measurements at P-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel compact P-band dual-linearly polarized firstorder probe for spherical near-field (SNF) antenna measurements is presented. The probe covers the bandwidth 421- 444 MHz with more than 9 dBi directivity and parasitic |μ| ≠ 1 spherical modes suppressed below -35 dB. The height of the probe...

  9. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitters, Jason L; Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  10. Very high-accuracy calibration of radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission of the Europ......In this paper, very high-accuracy calibration of the radiation pattern and gain of a near-field probe is described. An open-ended waveguide near-field probe has been used in a recent measurement of the C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Antenna Subsystem for the Sentinel 1 mission...

  11. Laser source of neutral atoms for collective field particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykovskiy, Yu.A.; Mironov, V.E.; Sarantsev, V.P.; Sil' nov, S.M.; Sotnichenko, E.A.; Ter-Martirosyan, Z.A.; Shestakov, B.A.

    1984-03-01

    Laser sources for collective-field particle accelerators, of ions of almost all chemical elements, operate in deep vacuum (10/sup -8/ -10/sup -9/ torr) and in a strong alternating magnetic field (up to 20 kOe, 50 Hz). Under such conditions a laser source is required to deliver an atom flux of 10/sup 11/ -10/sup 12/ in pulses of 10-100 ms duration from a target to electron rings. Such a laser source has been designed for the collective-field heavy-ion accelerator at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research. It consists of a laser, focusing lens, and conical target of the material whose atoms are to be extracted. The equipment is laid out with the compressor tube mounted on a support inside the vacuum chamber and the laser source in front of the window on the extension of the compressor tube axis. This construction can be modified for large electron rings, with axicon optics that reshape the incoming laser beam into an annular beam for electron rings with radii longer than 8 cm or by moving the laser source from the axial location to a peripheral location relative to the compressor tube for electron rings with radii of 30-35 cm. These three variants of such a laser source were evaluated in an experimental test stand, with a Q-switched YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser (wavelength lambda = 1.06 ..mu..m) emitting radiation pulses of 0.06 J energy and 10 ns duration, and with lead, aluminum, iron, or copper used as target material. The results of measurements, accurate within 20%, indicate that the laser source is most effective with lead targets and least effective with copper targets. 9 references, 9 figures.

  12. Coupled atomic wires in a synthetic magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budich, J. C.; Elben, A.; ŁÄ cki, M.; Sterdyniak, A.; Baranov, M. A.; Zoller, P.

    2017-04-01

    We propose and study systems of coupled atomic wires in a perpendicular synthetic magnetic field as a platform to realize exotic phases of quantum matter. This includes (fractional) quantum Hall states in arrays of many wires inspired by the pioneering work [C. L. Kane et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 036401 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.036401], as well as Meissner phases and vortex phases in double wires. With one continuous and one discrete spatial dimension, the proposed setup naturally complements recently realized discrete counterparts, i.e., the Harper-Hofstadter model and the two-leg flux ladder, respectively. We present both an in-depth theoretical study and a detailed experimental proposal to make the unique properties of the semicontinuous Harper-Hofstadter model accessible with cold-atom experiments. For the minimal setup of a double wire, we explore how a subwavelength spacing of the wires can be implemented. This construction increases the relevant energy scales by at least an order of magnitude compared to ordinary optical lattices, thus rendering subtle many-body phenomena such as Lifshitz transitions in Fermi gases observable in an experimentally realistic parameter regime. For arrays of many wires, we discuss the emergence of Chern bands with readily tunable flatness of the dispersion and show how fractional quantum Hall states can be stabilized in such systems. Using for the creation of optical potentials Laguerre-Gauss beams that carry orbital angular momentum, we detail how the coupled atomic wire setups can be realized in nonplanar geometries such as cylinders, disks, and tori.

  13. Effects of Optical Dopants and Laser Wavelength on Atom Probe Tomography Analyses of Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Du, Jincheng

    2017-10-02

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a novel analytical microscopy method that provides three dimensional elemental mapping with sub-nanometer spatial resolution and has only recently been applied to insulating glass and ceramic samples. In this paper, we have studied the influence of the optical absorption in glass samples on APT characterization by introducing different transition metal optical dopants to a model borosilicate nuclear waste glass (international simple glass). A systematic comparison is presented of the glass optical properties and the resulting APT data quality in terms of compositional accuracy and the mass spectra quality for two APT systems: one with a green laser (532 nm, LEAP 3000X HR) and one with a UV laser (355 nm, LEAP 4000X HR). These data were also compared to the study of a more complex borosilicate glass (SON68). The results show that the analysis data quality such as compositional accuracy and total ions collected, was clearly linked to optical absorption when using a green laser, while for the UV laser optical doping aided in improving data yield but did not have a significant effect on compositional accuracy. Comparisons of data between the LEAP systems suggest that the smaller laser spot size of the LEAP 4000X HR played a more critical role for optimum performance than the optical dopants themselves. The smaller spot size resulted in more accurate composition measurements due to a reduced background level independent of the material’s optical properties.

  14. Compact metal probes: a solution for atomic force microscopy based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R D; Sheremet, E; Müller, S; Gordan, O D; Villabona, A; Schulze, S; Hietschold, M; Zahn, D R T

    2012-12-01

    There are many challenges in accomplishing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and obtaining a proper tip is probably the greatest one. Since tip size, composition, and geometry are the ultimate parameters that determine enhancement of intensity and lateral resolution, the tip becomes the most critical component in a TERS experiment. However, since the discovery of TERS the cantilevers used in atomic force microscopy (AFM) have remained basically the same: commercial silicon (or silicon nitride) tips covered by a metallic coating. The main issues of using metal-coated silicon cantilevers, such as wearing off of the metal layer or increased tip radius, can be completely overcome by using all-metal cantilevers. Until now in TERS experiments such probes have only been used in a scanning tunneling microscope or in a tuning fork-based shear force microscope but not in AFM. In this work for the first time, we show the use of compact silver cantilevers that are fully compatible with contact and tapping modes in AFM demonstrating their superb performance in TERS experiments.

  15. Probing the local structure of doped manganites using the atomic pair distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffen, T.; Billinge, S. J. L.

    We have used atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis based on neutron powder diffraction data to investigate the local structure of the colossal magnetoresistant manganite La0.75Ca0.25MnO3 as a function of temperature. In the doping range 0.17materials show a metal-to-insulator transition, transforming from a ferromagnetic metal (FM) at low temperature to a paramagnetic insulator (PI). We can probe the charge distribution of the sample using the PDF by searching for evidence of Jahn-Teller (JT) distorted octahedra, implying the presence of Mn3+ ions. A two-phase model based on the local structures of the FM and PI phases was used to refine the experimental PDFs quantitatively. We observe the co-existence of both phases over a wide temperature range: approximately 10% of the localized JT phase (PI) is present even at the lowest temperature (T=20K), whereas at room temperature nearly half of the sample remains in the delocalized (FM) phase.

  16. Atom Probe Tomography Examination of Carbon Redistribution in Quenched and Tempered 4340 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Amy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Michael K. [ORNL; Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Robert D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-07

    Quenching and tempering produces a wide range of mechanical properties in medium carbon, low alloyed steels - Study fragmentation behavior as a function of heat-treatment. Subtle microstructural changes accompany the mechanical property changes that result from quenching and tempering - Characterize the location and distribution of carbon and alloying elements in the microstructure using atom probe tomography (APT). Perform complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tempering influences the mechanical properties and fragmentation of quenched 4340 (hemi-shaped samples). APT revealed carbon-enriched features that contain a maximum of {approx}12-14 at.% carbon after quenching to RT (the level of carbon is perhaps associated with the extent of autotempering). TEM confirmed the presence of twinned martensite and indicates {var_epsilon} ({eta}) transition carbides after oil quenching to RT. Tempering at 325 C resulted in carbon-enriched plates (> 25 at.% C) with no significant element partitioning (transition carbides?). Tempering at 450 C and 575 C resulted in cementite ({approx} 25 at.% C) during late stage tempering; Cr, Mn, Mo partitioned to cementite and Si partitioned to ferrite. Tempering at 575 C resulted in P segregation at cementite interfaces and the formation of Cottrell atmospheres.

  17. Isotopic analysis of individual refractory metal nuggets using atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, L.; Bland, P.; Schaefer, B. F.; Saxey, D. W.; Reddy, S.; Fougerouse, D.; William, R. D. A.; Forman, L. V.; Trimby, P.; La Fontaine, A.; Yang, L.; Cairney, J.; Ringer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Sub-micrometre metallic alloys of the highly siderophile elements, known as refractory metal nuggets (RMNs), can be found in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. There has been some suggestion that these grains may have a pre-solar origin, however their <1 µm size has meant that isotopic analysis of individual grains has not previously been possible. Atom probe microscopy has sufficient spatial resolution to quantify the isotopic compositions, across the entire mass range, of small sample volumes (<0.02 µm3) with high sensitivity and precision. We present analyses of four individual RMNs from the same refractory inclusion within the ALH 77307 meteorite. The results indicate that these RMNs have significant isotopic deviations from solar relative isotope abundances and therefore preserve a pre-solar isotopic signature. All RMNs exhibit large p-process enrichments in 98Ru and depletions in s-process 186Os. Two RMNs have a similar isotopic signature, suggesting formation in the same stellar environment. This similarity between two RMNs indicates that there may be a significant contribution of material to our solar system from a single source. The other two RMNs are isotopically dissimilar. Finally, three of the RMNs plot on a 187Re -187Os isochron from which we can derive a galactic age of 12.5 Ga ±1.8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first direct determination of the age of the Milky Way through physical analysis of non-solar material.

  18. Nanoscale Stoichiometric Analysis of a High-Temperature Superconductor by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Stella; London, Andrew J; Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David; Speller, Susannah; Grovenor, Chris R M; Danaie, Mohsen; Moody, Michael P; Edmondson, Philip D; Bagot, Paul A J

    2017-04-01

    The functional properties of the high-temperature superconductor Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ (Y-123) are closely correlated to the exact stoichiometry and oxygen content. Exceeding the critical value of 1 oxygen vacancy for every five unit cells (δ>0.2, which translates to a 1.5 at% deviation from the nominal oxygen stoichiometry of Y7.7Ba15.3Cu23O54-δ ) is sufficient to alter the superconducting properties. Stoichiometry at the nanometer scale, particularly of oxygen and other lighter elements, is extremely difficult to quantify in complex functional ceramics by most currently available analytical techniques. The present study is an analysis and optimization of the experimental conditions required to quantify the local nanoscale stoichiometry of single crystal yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) samples in three dimensions by atom probe tomography (APT). APT analysis required systematic exploration of a wide range of data acquisition and processing conditions to calibrate the measurements. Laser pulse energy, ion identification, and the choice of range widths were all found to influence composition measurements. The final composition obtained from melt-grown crystals with optimized superconducting properties was Y7.9Ba10.4Cu24.4O57.2.

  19. Inversion symmetry breaking of atomic bound states in strong and short laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stooß, Veit; Ott, Christian; Blättermann, Alexander; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In any atomic species, the spherically symmetric potential originating from the charged nucleus results in fundamental symmetry properties governing the structure of atomic states and transition rules between them. If atoms are exposed to external electric fields, these properties are modified giving rise to energy shifts such as the AC Stark-effect in varying fields and, contrary to this in a constant (DC) electric field for high enough field strengths, the breaking of the atomic symmetry which causes fundamental changes in the atom's properties. This has already been observed for atomic Rydberg states with high principal quantum numbers. Here, we report on the observation of symmetry breaking effects in Helium atoms for states with principal quantum number n=2 utilizing strong visible laser fields. These findings were enabled by temporally resolving the dynamics better than the sub-optical cycle of the applied laser field, utilizing the method of attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS). We ident...

  20. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  1. A Survey of the Rapidly Emerging Field of Nanotechnology: Potential Applications for Scientific Instruments and Technologies for Atmospheric Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    The field of Nanotechnology is well funded worldwide and innovations applicable to Solar System Exploration are emerging much more rapidly than thought possible just a few years ago. This presentation will survey recent innovations from nanotechnololgy with a focus on novel applications to atmospheric entry science and probe technology, in a fashion similar to that presented by Arnold and Venkatapathy at the previous workshop forum at Lisbon Portugal, October 6-9, 2003. Nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that builds systems, devices and materials from the bottom up, atom by atom, and in so doing provides them with novel and remarkable macro-scale performance. This technology has the potential to revolutionize space exploration by reducing mass and simultaneously increasing capability. Thermal, Radiation, Impact Protective Shields: Atmospheric probes and humans on long duration deep space missions involved in Solar System Exploration must safely endure 3 significant hazards: (i) atmospheric entry; (ii) radiation; and (iii) micrometeorite or debris impact. Nanostructured materials could be developed to address all three hazards with a single protective shield, which would involve much less mass than a traditional approach. The concept can be ready in time for incorporation into NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle, and possible entry probes to fly on the Jupiter Icy Moons

  2. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  3. Morphology and current-voltage characteristics of nanostructured pentacene thin films probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, S; Le, Q T; Watkins, N J; Yan, L; Gao, Y

    2001-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the growth modes (on SiO2, MoS2, and Au substrates) and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of organic semiconductor pentacene. Pentacene films grow on SiO2 substrate in a layer-by-layer manner with full coverage at an average thickness of 20 A and have the highest degree of molecular ordering with large dendritic grains among the pentacene films deposited on the three different substrates. Films grown on MoS2 substrate reveal two different growth modes, snowflake-like growth and granular growth, both of which seem to compete with each other. On the other hand, films deposited on Au substrate show granular structure for thinner coverages (no crystal structure) and dendritic growth for higher coverages (crystal structure). I-V measurements were performed with a platinum tip on a pentacene film deposited on a Au substrate. The I-V curves on pentacene film reveal symmetric tunneling type character. The field dependence of the current indicates that the main transport mechanism at high field intensities is hopping (Poole-Frenkel effect). From these measurements, we have estimated a field lowering coefficient of 9.77 x 10(-6) V-1/2 m1/2 and an ideality factor of 18 for pentacene.

  4. Characterization of nano-sized precipitates in a Mn-based lean maraging steel by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, J.; Ponge, D.; Raabe, D.; Choi, P.; Dmitrieva, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    We present atom probe tomography results of a precipitation-hardened Mn-based maraging steel (9 Mn, 1.9 Ni, 0.6 Mo, 1.1 Ti, 0.33 Al; in at.%). The alloy is characterized by the surprising effect that both, strength and total elongation increase upon aging. The material reveals a high ultimate tensile strength (UTS) up to 1 GPa and good ductility (total elongation (TE) of up to 15% in a tensile test) depending on aging conditions. We map the evolution of the precipitates after 450 C aging treatment using atom probe tomography in terms of chemical composition and size distribution. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Probing Deviations From Traditional Colloid Filtration Theory by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R. S.; Reno, M. D.; Altman, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the physical and chemical mechanisms controlling colloid attachment and detachment. Colloid filtration theory (CFT) has been ubiquitously employed to describe particle advection, dispersion, and deposition in saturated media and predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance from the source. Colloid depositional behavior can be further understood through consideration of Derjaguin Landau Verwey Overbeek (DLVO) interactions. Recent studies give evidence for significant deviations from traditional CFT in the presence of repulsive DLVO interactions. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism to explain the observed deviations. This work reports on attempts to quantify the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy. The colloid probe technique is used to directly measure the force of interaction between a single carboxylate modified polystyrene latex microsphere and a model collector surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength. Systematic variations in the size of the microsphere and the ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions yield force measurements that are compared to theoretical predictions and the experimental results of others. The importance of proper sample characterization and cleaning in obtaining meaningful measurements is emphasized. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  6. Atom probe tomography investigation of lath boundary segregation and precipitation in a maraging stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuvander, Mattias, E-mail: mattias.thuvander@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Andersson, Marcus [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); R and D Centre, Sandvik Materials Technology, SE-811 81 Sandviken (Sweden); Stiller, Krystyna [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Lath boundaries in a maraging stainless steel of composition 13Cr–8Ni–2Mo–2Cu–1Ti–0.7Al–0.3Mn–0.2Si–0.03C (at%) have been investigated using atom probe tomography following aging at 475 °C for up to 100 h. Segregation of Mo, Si and P to the lath boundaries was observed already after 5 min of aging, and the amount of segregation increases with aging time. At lath boundaries also precipitation of η-Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R, in contact with each other, takes place. These co-precipitates grow with time and because of coarsening the area number density decreases. After 100 h of aging a ∼5 nm thick film-like precipitation of a Mo-rich phase was observed at the lath boundaries. From the composition of the film it is suggested that the phase in question is the quasicrystalline R′ phase. The film is perforated with Cu-rich 9R and η-Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Al) co-precipitates. Not all precipitate types present in the matrix do precipitate at the lath boundaries; the Si-containing G phase and γ′-Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Al, Si) and the Cr-rich α′ phase were not observed at the lath boundaries. - Highlights: ► Lath boundaries in a maraging steel were analyzed by APT. ► Segregation of Mo, Si and P was measured. ► Precipitation of η-Ni{sub 3}(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R was observed. ► After 100 h of aging a quasicrystalline Mo-rich film was observed.

  7. Determination of Gamma-Prime Site Occupancies in Nickel Superalloys Using Atom Probe Tomography and X-Ray Diffraction (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    atom probe results from the same alloy that indicate that chromium prefers the aluminum sublattice sites. Modeling studies indicate cobalt has no...sublattice sites while cobalt is likely to occupy both the aluminum and nickel sublattice sites. The x-ray results on the chromium occupancy disagree with...experimental results also indicate that chromium prefers the nickel sublattice sites while cobalt is likely to occupy both the aluminum and nickel

  8. Power-Law Stress and Creep Relaxations of Single Cells Measured by Colloidal Probe Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiratsuka, Shinichiro; Mizutani, Yusuke; Toda, Akitoshi; Fukushima, Norichika; Kawahara, Koichi; Tokumoto, Hiroshi; Okajima, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    We measured stress and creep relaxations of mouse fibroblast cells arranged and cultured on a microarray, by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). A hydrophobic monolayer coating of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS) on the surface of colloidal silica beads significantly reduced the adhesion force of live cells, compared with untreated beads. The rheological behaviors of cells were estimated by averaging several relaxation curves of cells measured by the AFM. Longer-time tailing of...

  9. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sîretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid–liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to

  10. Piezoelectric tuning fork probe for atomic force microscopy imaging and specific recognition force spectroscopy of an enzyme and its ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makky, Ali; Viel, Pascal; Chen, Shu-wen Wendy; Berthelot, Thomas; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Piezoelectric quartz tuning fork has drawn the attention of many researchers for the development of new atomic force microscopy (AFM) self-sensing probes. However, only few works have been done for soft biological materials imaging in air or aqueous conditions. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the efficiency of the AFM tuning fork probe to perform high-resolution imaging of proteins and to study the specific interaction between a ligand and its receptor in aqueous media. Thus, a new kind of self-sensing AFM sensor was introduced to realize imaging and biochemical specific recognition spectroscopy of glucose oxidase enzyme using a new chemical functionalization procedure of the metallic tips based on the electrochemical reduction of diazonium salt. This scanning probe as well as the functionalization strategy proved to be efficient respectively for the topography and force spectroscopy of soft biological materials in buffer conditions. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Placement of field probes for stabilization of breathing-induced B0-fluctuations in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Hanson, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: B0-fluctuations induced by breathing and body motion lead to artifacts for certain brain imaging sequences at ultra-high field (7T). A promising solution is to monitor the B0-fluctuations during the scan using external field probes, and update the shim currents in real-time (1). It ...... SNR. Here, we provide a simulation of breathing-induced B0-fluctuations inside and around the head and use this simulated field to test different sets of probe positions. We also formulate two optimization problems to guide placement of the field probes....

  12. Electric field and temperature measurement using ultra wide bandwidth pigtailed electro-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Maxime; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Duvillaret, Lionel; Paupert, Alain; Lasserre, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    We present pigtailed electro-optic probes that allow a simultaneous measurement of high frequency electric fields and temperature using a unique laser probe beam. This has been achieved by the development of a novel probe design associated with a fully automated servo-controlled optical bench, initially developed to stabilize the electric field sensor response. The developed electro-optic probes present a stable response in outdoors conditions over a time duration exceeding 1 h, a frequency bandwidth from kHz to tens of GHz with a sensitivity of 0.7 Vm(-1)Hz(-(1/2)), and a temperature accuracy of 40 mK.

  13. Probing the properties of quantum matter; an experimental study in three parts using ultracold atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bons, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    The three experiments described in this thesis investigate fundamental properties of ultracold atoms. Using laser cooling and evaporative cooling, a dilute gas of sodium atoms is cooled to ~100 nK. Under these circumstances a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) forms, where millions of atoms collapse

  14. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  15. Light distribution analysis of optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers using FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B H; Yang, L J; Wang, Y [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin, 150001 (China)], E-mail: richelaw@163.com

    2009-09-01

    Optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers overcomes the diffraction limit of conventional optical tweezers, utilizing strong mechanical forces and torque associated with highly enhanced electric fields to trap and manipulate nano-scale particles. Near-field evanescent wave generated at optical fibre probe decays rapidly with the distance that results a significant reduced trapping volume, thus it is necessary to analyze the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to characterize the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. In terms of the distribution patterns, depolarization and polarization, the near-field distributions in longitudinal sections and cross-sections of tapered metal-coated optical fibre probe are calculated. The calculation results reveal that the incident polarized wave becomes depolarized after exiting from the nano-scale aperture of probe. The near-field distribution of the probe is unsymmetrical, and the near-field distribution in the cross-section vertical to the incident polarized wave is different from that in the cross-section parallel to the incident polarized wave. Moreover, the polarization of incident wave has a great impact on the light intensity distribution.

  16. Plasmon Enhanced Optical Near-field Probing of Metal Nanoaperture Surface Emitting Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Jiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2004-12-13

    We demonstrate a metal nano-aperture GaAs vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) for sub-wavelength optical near-filed probing, which exhibits the strong plasmon enhancement of both optical near-fields and voltage signals with forming a metal nano-particle in the nano-aperture. The threshold current is as low as 300microA, which shows a potential of nano-probing with low power consumption. We achieved the first demonstration of a plasmon enhanced VCSEL near-field probe. The spatial resolutions of the VCSEL probe with 400 nm and 200 nm apertures are 240nm and 130 nm, respectively. The enhancement factors of the optical near-field and voltage signal with a Au particle are 1.8 and 2, respectively. Our FDTD simulation shows that localized plasmon with a Au particle is very helpful for increasing optical near-field intensity and signal voltage in the VCSEL nano-probing.

  17. Experimental Investigation Of Segregation Of Carbon Atoms Due To Sub-Zero Cryogenic Treatment In Cold Work Tool Steel By Mechanical Spectroscopy And Atom Probe Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present mechanical spectroscopy of cold work tool steel subjected to sub-zero cryogenic soaking treatment to reveal the carbon segregation and the subsequent carbides refinement. The maximum of Snoek-Köster (SK peak height was obtained in the sample subjected to soaking 1h at −130°C cryogenic treatment. The SK peak height is reduced with prolonging the soaking time. The results indicate that an increase in the height of SK peak is connected with an increase in dislocation density and the number of segregated carbon atoms in the vicinity of dislocations or twin planes after martensite transformation at −130°C which is confirmed by corresponding TEM and atom probe tomography measurement. Hence, it is suggested that the isothermal martensite, formed during the cryogenic soaking treatment decreases (APT the height of SK peak.

  18. A three-axis atomic magnetometer for temperature-dependence measurements of fields in a magnetically shielded environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenfeng; Liu, Gang; Li, Rujie; Quan, Wei; Jiang, Liwei; Duan, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    High performance spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) gyroscopes require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. These fields are usually sensitive to temperature. In this paper, a three-axis atomic magnetometer to measure the temperature dependence of fields inside the magnetic shields for a SERF gyroscope prototype is constructed and tested. Based on a three-beam configuration, three-axis vector capability is obtained by a cross-modulation scheme of the magnetic field components along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the relevant probe signals. The relative temperature dependence of magnetic fields inside the prototype shields is measured to be 0.03 -0.12~K-1 . The results are useful for estimating the necessary precision of temperature control in both a SERF gyroscope and its fundamental physics applications.

  19. Computational code in atomic and nuclear quantum optics: Advanced computing multiphoton resonance parameters for atoms in a strong laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Gurskaya, M. Yu; Ignatenko, A. V.; Smirnov, A. V.; Serga, I. N.; Svinarenko, A. A.; Ternovsky, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    The consistent relativistic energy approach to the finite Fermi-systems (atoms and nuclei) in a strong realistic laser field is presented and applied to computing the multiphoton resonances parameters in some atoms and nuclei. The approach is based on the Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism, multiphoton resonance lines moments technique and advanced Ivanov-Ivanova algorithm of calculating the Green’s function of the Dirac equation. The data for multiphoton resonance width and shift for the Cs atom and the 57Fe nucleus in dependence upon the laser intensity are listed.

  20. Analysis of atomic distribution in as-fabricated Zircaloy-2 claddings by atom probe tomography under high-energy pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawabe, T., E-mail: sawabe@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Sonoda, T.; Kitajima, S. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Kameyama, T. [Tokai University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kitakaname 4-1-1, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The properties of second-phase particles (SPPs) in Zircaloy-2 claddings are key factors influencing the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The chemical compositions of Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs were investigated by means of pulsed laser atom probe tomography. In order to prevent specimen fracture and to analyse wide regions of the specimen, the pulsed laser energy was increased to 2.0 nJ. This gave a high yield of average of 3 × 10{sup 7} ions per specimen. The Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} SPPs contained small amounts of Ni and Si atoms, while in Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs almost all the Si was concentrated and the ratio of Zr: (Fe + Ni + Si) was 2:1. Atomic concentrations of the Zr-matrix and the SPPs were identified by two approaches: the first by using all the visible peaks of the mass spectrum and the second using the representative peaks with the natural abundance of the corresponding atoms. It was found that the change in the concentration between the Zr-matrix and the SPPs can be estimated more accurately by the second method, although Sn concentration in the Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs is slightly overestimated.

  1. Berry phases in the three-level atoms driven by quantized light fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with the calculation of the exact Berry phase for the Ξ-type atom [24]. The fourth section is about the V-type atom [24]. The final section is the conclusion. 2. Method to derive the Berry phase. In the semiclassical theory, the Hamiltonian for a two-level atom interacting with a time-dependent classical field can be written as [17].

  2. Phase collapse and revival of a 1-mode Bose-Einstein condensate induced by an off-resonant optical probe field and superselection rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, L. G. E.; Prataviera, G. A.; de Oliveira, M. C.

    2018-02-01

    Phase collapse and revival for Bose-Einstein condensates are nonlinear phenomena appearing due to atomic collisions. While it has been observed in a general setting involving many modes, for one-mode condensates its occurrence is forbidden by the particle number superselection rule (SSR), which arises because there is no phase reference available. We consider a single mode atomic Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with an off-resonant optical probe field. We show that the condensate phase revival time is dependent on the atom-light interaction, allowing optical control on the atomic collapse and revival dynamics. Incoherent effects over the condensate phase are included by considering a continuous photo-detection over the probe field. We consider conditioned and unconditioned photo-counting events and verify that no extra control upon the condensate is achieved by the probe photo-detection, while further inference of the atomic system statistics is allowed leading to a useful test of the SSR on particle number and its imposition on the kind of physical condensate state.

  3. Kelvin-probe studies of n-conductive organic field-effect transistors during operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luettich, Franziska; Graaf, Harald; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Optical Spectroscopy and Molecular Physics, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Lehmann, Daniel; Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Semiconductor Physics, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We report on our investigations of the structural and electronic properties of n-conductive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). For this purpose we employed the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KPFM) in dual frequency mode. This study facilitates the determination of the local potential in the channel of active OFETs. We studied the influence of insulator treatment on the electrical potential and field distribution within the channel using a self-assembled monolayer of N-octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). For the investigated OFETs we used air-stable and electron conducting N,N{sup '}-bis(n-octyl)-dicyanoperylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI-8CN{sub 2}). It appears that the insulator treatment improves the performance even if the surface topography did not change. These results can lead to a better understanding of the charge transport and injection and pave the way towards the optimisation of the electronical properties of active organic devices (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Fictitious magnetic field gradients in optical microtraps as an experimental tool for interrogating and manipulating cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Bernhard; Clausen, Christoph; Dareau, Alexandre; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Optical microtraps provide a strong spatial confinement for laser-cooled atoms. They can, e.g., be realized with strongly focused trapping light beams or the optical near fields of nano-scale waveguides and photonic nanostructures. Atoms in such traps often experience strongly spatially varying AC Stark shifts which are proportional to the magnetic quantum number of the respective energy level. These inhomogeneous fictitious magnetic fields can cause a displacement of the trapping potential that depends on the Zeeman state. Hitherto, this effect was mainly perceived as detrimental. However, it also provides a means to probe and to manipulate the motional state of the atoms in the trap by driving transitions between Zeeman states. Furthermore, by applying additional real or fictitious magnetic fields, the state-dependence of the trapping potential can be controlled. Here, using laser-cooled atoms that are confined in a nanofiber-based optical dipole trap, we employ this control in order to tune the microwave c...

  5. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    Jan 11, 2014 ... Conventional mass spectrometric techniques have serious limitations to probe this ionization dynamics. We have ... Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India; TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500 075, India ...

  6. Association of atoms into universal dimers using an oscillating magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson; Braaten, Eric

    2015-03-13

    In a system of ultracold atoms near a Feshbach resonance, pairs of atoms can be associated into universal dimers by an oscillating magnetic field with a frequency near that determined by the dimer binding energy. We present a simple expression for the transition rate that takes into account many-body effects through a transition matrix element of the contact. In a thermal gas, the width of the peak in the transition rate as a function of the frequency is determined by the temperature. In a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate of atoms, the width is determined by the inelastic scattering rates of a dimer with zero-energy atoms. Near an atom-dimer resonance, there is a dramatic increase in the width from inelastic atom-dimer scattering and from atom-atom-dimer recombination. The recombination contribution provides a signature for universal tetramers that are Efimov states consisting of two atoms and a dimer.

  7. Investigation of olivine and orthopyroxene grain boundaries by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, M.; Skemer, P. A.; Bachhav, M.; Dong, Y.; Marquis, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate chemical analysis at grain boundaries is challenging by traditional microscopic techniques, especially for poor conducting geological samples. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a unique technique that can elucidate chemistry and 3-D distribution of elements within a sample volume at the sub-nanometer length scale. With advances in laser and sample preparation techniques in the last decade, APT is now successfully applied to a wide range of poor conducting materials like metal oxides, ceramics, and biological minerals. In this study, we apply the APT technique to investigate the grain boundary chemistry of orthopyroxene (opx) and olivine. These minerals are the most abundant in the upper mantle and their grain boundaries may be important geochemical reservoirs in Earth. Moreover, physical properties such as grain boundary diffusivity, conductivity, and mobility, are likely influenced by the presence or absence of impurities. Single crystals of opx and olivine grains, separated from a San Carlos xenolith, were deformed at 1 GPa and 1500 K. Plastic deformation promoted dynamic recrystallization, creating new grain boundaries within a chemically homogeneous medium. Needle shaped specimens of opx-opx and olivine-olivine grain boundaries were prepared using standard lift out techniques and a dual beam focused ion beam (FIB). APT analyses were performed in laser mode with laser energy of 50 pJ/pulse, repetition rate of 200 kHz, and detection rate of 1%. A 3-D distribution of elements was reconstructed and 1-D profiles across the grain boundary have been calculated. Fe, Al, and Ca show enrichments at the grain boundaries for both phases, consistent with previous studies that used STEM/EDX or EPMA techniques. Although qualitatively similar, the spatial resolution of the APT method is significantly better than other methods, and our data show that the grain-boundary enrichment of minor elements in both olivine and pyroxene compositions is limited to a region no greater

  8. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide. A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims: We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods: We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (i.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results: An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N,J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N,J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N,J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. The complete list of measured Zeeman components is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  9. Plasmonic near-field probes: a comparison of the campanile geometry with other sharp tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wei; Staffaroni, Matteo; Bokor, Jeffrey; Salmeron, Miquel B; Yablonovitch, Eli; Cabrini, Stefano; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Schuck, P James

    2013-04-08

    Efficient conversion of photonic to plasmonic energy is important for nano-optical applications, particularly imaging and spectroscopy. Recently a new generation of photonic/plasmonic transducers, the 'campanile' probes, has been developed that overcomes many shortcomings of previous near-field probes by efficiently merging broadband field enhancement with bidirectional coupling of far- to near-field electromagnetic modes. In this work we compare the properties of the campanile structure with those of current NSOM tips using finite element simulations. Field confinement, enhancement, and polarization near the apex of the probe are evaluated relative to local fields created by conical tapered tips in vacuum and in tip-substrate gap mode. We show that the campanile design has similar field enhancement and bandwidth capabilities as those of ultra-sharp metallized tips, but without the substrate and sample restrictions inherent in the tip-surface gap mode operation often required by those tips. In addition, we show for the first time that this campanile probe structure also significantly enhances the radiative rate of any dipole emitter located near the probe apex, quantifying the enhanced decay rate and demonstrating that over 90% of the light radiated by the emitter is "captured" by this probe. This is equivalent to collecting the light from a solid angle of ~3.6 pi. These advantages are crucial for performing techniques such as Raman and IR spectroscopy, white-light nano-ellipsometry and ultrafast pump-probe studies at the nanoscale.

  10. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio, E-mail: ogino-toshio-rx@ynu.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Local hydrophobicity of phase-separated sapphire (0001) surfaces was investigated. • These surfaces are featured by coexistence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. • Each domain was characterized by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy in water. • Both domains can be distinguished by adhesive forces of the probe to the surfaces. • Characterization in aqueous environment is important in bio-applications of sapphire. - Abstract: Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  11. Measurement of the magnetic field profile in the atomic fountain clock FoCS-2 using Zeeman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenoges, Laurent; Di Domenico, Gianni; Stefanov, André; Jallageas, Antoine; Morel, Jacques; Südmeyer, Thomas; Thomann, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    We report the evaluation of the second-order Zeeman shift in the continuous atomic fountain clock FoCS-2. Because of its continuous operation and geometrical constraints, the methods used in pulsed fountains are not applicable. We use here time-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy to probe the magnetic field profile in the clock. Pulses of ac magnetic excitation allow us to spatially resolve the Zeeman frequency and to evaluate the Zeeman shift with a relative uncertainty smaller than 5× {{10}-16} .

  12. Application of colloid probe atomic force microscopy to the adhesion of thin films of viscous and viscoelastic silicone fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Cheneler, David; Andrews, James W; Avery, Andrew R; Zhang, Zhibing; Ward, Michael C L; Adams, Michael J

    2011-09-20

    The adhesive characteristics of thin films (0.2-2 μm) of linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) liquids with a wide range of molecular weights have been measured using an atomic force microscope with a colloid probe (diameters 5 and 12 μm) for different separation velocities. The data were consistent with a residual film in the contact region having a thickness of ∼6 nm following an extended dwell time before separation of the probe. It was possible to estimate the maximum adhesive force as a function of the capillary number, Ca, by applying existing theoretical models based on capillary interactions and viscous flow except at large values of Ca in the case of viscoelastic fluids, for which it was necessary to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model. The compliance of the atomic force microscope colloid beam was an important factor in governing the retraction velocity of the probe and therefore the value of the adhesive force, but the inertia of the beam and viscoelastic stress overshoot effects were not significant in the range of separation velocities investigated. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. Neutral Atom Lithography With Multi-Frequency Laser Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Daniel S; Janes, David B

    2006-01-01

    In this final report we describe our efforts in exposing self-assembled molecular monolayers to a beam of neutral sodium atoms and chemically etching the resulting substrate and characterization of the resulting surface...

  14. Plasmon Enhanced Optical Near-field Probing of Metal Nanoaperture Surface Emitting Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiro Hashizume; Fumio Koyama

    2004-01-01

    ...) for sub-wavelength optical near-filed probing, which exhibits the strong plasmon enhancement of both optical near-fields and voltage signals with forming a metal nano-particle in the nano-aperture...

  15. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, D. A., E-mail: david.walsh@stfc.ac.uk; Snedden, E. W. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jamison, S. P. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  16. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, D. A.; Snedden, E. W.; Jamison, S. P.

    2015-05-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  17. Theory and practice of the FFT/matrix inversion technique for probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with high-order probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2010-01-01

    A complete antenna pattern characterization procedure for spherical near-field antenna measurements employing a high-order probe and a full probe correction is described. The procedure allows an (almost) arbitrary antenna to be used as a probe. Different measurement steps of the procedure...... and the associated data processing are described in detail, and comparison to the existing procedure employing a first-order probe is made. The procedure is validated through measurements....

  18. Photoelectron imaging, probe of the dynamics: from atoms... to clusters; Imagerie de photoelectrons, sonde de la dynamique: des atomes... aux agregats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine, F

    2003-06-15

    This thesis concerns the study of the deexcitation of clusters and atoms by photoelectron imaging. The first part is dedicated to thermionic emission of a finite size system. A 3-dimensional imaging setup allows us to measure the time evolution of the kinetic energy spectrum of electrons emitted from different clusters (W{sub n}{sup -}, C{sub n}{sup -}, C{sub 60}). Then we have a direct access to the fundamental quantities which characterize this statistical emission: the temperature of the finite heat bath and the decay rate. The second part concerns the ionization of atomic Rydberg states placed in a static electric field. We performed the first experiment of photoionization microscopy which allows us to obtain a picture which is the macroscopic projection of the electronic wave function. Then we have access to the detail of the photoionization and particularly to the quantum properties of the electron usually confined at the atomic scale. (author)

  19. Effect of the tip state during qPlus noncontact atomic force microscopy of Si(100) at 5 K: Probing the probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, Adam; Jarvis, Sam; Danza, Rosanna; Moriarty, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now regularly produces atomic-resolution images on a wide range of surfaces, and has demonstrated the capability for atomic manipulation solely using chemical forces. Nonetheless, the role of the tip apex in both imaging and manipulation remains poorly understood and is an active area of research both experimentally and theoretically. Recent work employing specially functionalised tips has provided additional impetus to elucidating the role of the tip apex in the observed contrast. We present an analysis of the influence of the tip apex during imaging of the Si(100) substrate in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at 5 K using a qPlus sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Data demonstrating stable imaging with a range of tip apexes, each with a characteristic imaging signature, have been acquired. By imaging at close to zero applied bias we eliminate the influence of tunnel current on the force between tip and surface, and also the tunnel-current-induced excitation of silicon dimers, which is a key issue in scanning probe studies of Si(100). A wide range of novel imaging mechanisms are demonstrated on the Si(100) surface, which can only be explained by variations in the precise structural configuration at the apex of the tip. Such images provide a valuable resource for theoreticians working on the development of realistic tip structures for NC-AFM simulations. Force spectroscopy measurements show that the tip termination critically affects both the short-range force and dissipated energy.

  20. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon films: insulation material for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemair, Justyna; Balu, Balamurali; Moon, Jong-Seok; Hess, Dennis W; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2008-07-01

    Pinhole-free insulation of micro- and nanoelectrodes is the key to successful microelectrochemical experiments performed in vivo or in combination with scanning probe experiments. A novel insulation technique based on fluorocarbon insulation layers deposited from pentafluoroethane (PFE, CF3CHF2) plasmas is presented as a promising electrical insulation approach for microelectrodes and combined atomic force microscopy-scanning electrochemical microscopy (AFM-SECM) probes. The deposition allows reproducible and uniform coating, which is essential for many analytical applications of micro- and nanoelectrodes such as, e.g., in vivo experiments and SECM experiments. Disk-shaped microelectrodes and frame-shaped AFM tip-integrated electrodes have been fabricated by postinsulation focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The thin insulation layer for combined AFM-SECM probes renders this fabrication technique particularly useful for submicro insulation providing radius ratios of the outer insulation versus the disk electrode (RG values) suitable for SECM experiments. Characterization of PFE-insulated AFM-SECM probes will be presented along with combined AFM-SECM approach curves and imaging.

  1. Atom probe tomography study on Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} hetero-epitaxial film on Ge substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Terasawa, Kengo; Yamaha, Takashi; Nakatsuka, Osamu [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Izunome, Koji; Kashima, Kazuhiko [Technology, GlobalWafers Japan Corp. Ltd., 6-861-5 Higashiko, Seiro, Niigata 957-0197 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Physical Analysis Technology Center, Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the incorporation of C atoms into a ternary alloy Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} epitaxial film on Ge substrates on a sub-nanometer scale by using atom probe tomography. Periodic atom distributions from individual (111) atomic planes were observed both in the Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film and at the Ge substrates. Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. They also demonstrated a clear positive correlation in their distributions. Substitutional C atoms were only incorporated into the film when an Sn atom beam was applied onto the substrates under film growth conditions. - Highlights: • Incorporation of C atoms into epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y} film was studied. • Individual (111) atomic planes were observed by atom probe tomography. • Sn/C atoms had non-uniform distributions in the film. • Clear positive correlation in Sn/C atoms distributions was obtained.

  2. Versatile variable temperature and magnetic field scanning probe microscope for advanced material research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Oh; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Yeonghoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Son, Donghyeon; Lee, Jhinhwan

    2017-10-01

    We have built a variable temperature scanning probe microscope (SPM) that covers 4.6 K-180 K and up to 7 T whose SPM head fits in a 52 mm bore magnet. It features a temperature-controlled sample stage thermally well isolated from the SPM body in good thermal contact with the liquid helium bath. It has a 7-sample-holder storage carousel at liquid helium temperature for systematic studies using multiple samples and field emission targets intended for spin-polarized spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study on samples with various compositions and doping conditions. The system is equipped with a UHV sample preparation chamber and mounted on a two-stage vibration isolation system made of a heavy concrete block and a granite table on pneumatic vibration isolators. A quartz resonator (qPlus)-based non-contact atomic force microscope (AFM) sensor is used for simultaneous STM/AFM operation for research on samples with highly insulating properties such as strongly underdoped cuprates and strongly correlated electron systems.

  3. Mg I as a probe of the solar chromosphere - The atomic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a complete atomic model for Mg I line synthesis, where all the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. It is shown how the computed profiles at 4571 A and 5173 A are influenced by the choice of these parameters and the number of levels included in the model atom. In addition, observed profiles of the 5173 A b2 line and theoretical profiles for comparison (based on a recent atmospheric model for the average quiet sun) are presented.

  4. Sodium distribution in solar-grade Cu2ZnSnS4 layers using atom-probe tomographic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shin; Asahi, Ryoji; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Ohishi, Kei-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of alkali doping on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) photovoltaic cells, we studied compositional distributions in CZTS layers using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The segregation of Na at a concentration of approximately 1 at. % was observed predominantly at CZTS grain boundaries. The concentration of Na in the interior of the CZTS grains was below the detection limit (approximately 40 ppm). Na ions may exist as sulfide compounds at CZTS grain boundaries, independent of the presence of oxygen.

  5. Long-term thermal stability of nanoclusters in ODS-Eurofer steel: An atom probe tomography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilnyk, K. D.; Pradeep, K. G.; Choi, P.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Raabe, D.

    2017-08-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened materials are important candidates for several high-temperature structural applications in advanced nuclear power plants. Most of the desirable mechanical properties presented by these materials are due to the dispersion of stable nanoparticles in the matrix. Samples of ODS-Eurofer steel were annealed for 4320 h (6 months) at 800 °C. The material was characterized using atom probe tomography in both conditions (prior and after heat treatment). The particles number density, size distribution, and chemical compositions were determined. No significant changes were observed between the two conditions indicating a high thermal stability of the Y-rich nanoparticles at 800 °C.

  6. Nanofabrication technique based on localized photocatalytic reactions using a TiO2-coated atomic force microscopy probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Iio, Naohiro; Furukawa, Hiromi; Nagai, Moeto

    2017-02-01

    We performed a fundamental study on the photocatalytic degradation of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules immobilized on titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films under ultraviolet irradiation. The films were prepared by the electrochemical anodization of Ti thin films sputtered on silicon substrates. We also confirmed that the photocurrent arising from the photocatalytic oxidation of DNA molecules can be detected during this process. We then demonstrated an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanofabrication technique by employing TiO2-coated AFM probes to penetrate living cell membranes under near-physiological conditions for minimally invasive intracellular delivery.

  7. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: probing atomic structure in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R; Reiche, Helmut M; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  8. Complementary use of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the examination of plastic accommodation in nanocrystalline bainitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, F.G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); Yen, Hung-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Miller, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6136 (United States); Yang, Jer-Ren [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Cornide, J.; Garcia-Mateo, C. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, Madrid E-28040 (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    A displacive transformation involves the motion of a glissile interface. As in work hardening, its motion can be halted by defects such as dislocations, stacking faults or twins in the austenite. The defects are created when the shape deformation accompanying bainite growth is accommodated by plastic relaxation of the surrounding austenite. The growing plate stops when it collides with the austenite grain boundary. Because transformation from strong austenite leads to fine plates, alloys can be designed such that the bainite transformation is suppressed to low temperatures (125-350 deg. C), leading to a nanoscale bainitic microstructure. Complementary high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography have provided new experimental evidence on the accommodation of transformation strain, a subject critically relevant to understanding the atomic mechanisms controlling bainitic ferrite growth.

  9. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  10. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  11. Resonance enhancement of two photon absorption by magnetically trapped atoms in strong rf-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Applying a many mode Floquet formalism for magnetically trapped atoms interacting with a polychromatic rf-field, we predict a large two photon transition probability in the atomic system of cold 87Rb atoms. The physical origin of this enormous increase in the two photon transition probability is due to the formation of avoided crossings between eigen-energy levels originating from different Floquet sub-manifolds and redistribution of population in the resonant intermediate levels to give rise to the resonance enhancement effect. Other exquisite features of the studied atom-field composite system include the splitting of the generated avoided crossings at the strong field strength limit and a periodic variation of the single and two photon transition probabilities with the mode separation frequency of the polychromatic rf-field. This work can find applications to characterize properties of cold atom clouds in the magnetic traps using rf-spectroscopy techniques.

  12. Microminiature Hall Probes for Applications at Pulsed Magnetic Fields up to 87 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, O. A.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Uhlarz, M.; Skourski, Y.; Palewski, T.; Wosnitza, J.

    2010-04-01

    Microminiature Hall probes (MHP) may be used as magnetic field transducers, with virtually no change of sensitivity with temperature, for applications at room and cryogenic temperatures. The probes have a nominal active sensing area from 90×90 μm down to 20×20 μm and are based on Sn-doped n-InSb/i-GaAs MBE-grown heterostructures. MHPs were intensively tested in static (up to 14 T) and pulsed magnetic fields and shown to be appropriate for various applications in the temperature range 2-300 K and in pulsed magnetic fields up to 87 T. The latest version of these probes, with overall cross-section thickness-width dimensions of 150×750 μm, are the smallest encapsulated Hall probes currently available and can be placed in areas not previously accessible to commercial packaged or unpackaged sensors.

  13. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  14. Spontaneous excitation of a circularly accelerated atom coupled with vacuum Dirac field fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing [Institute of Physics and Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Hu, Jiawei [Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Yu, Hongwei, E-mail: hwyu@hunnu.edu.cn [Institute of Physics and Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Center for Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China)

    2015-02-15

    We study the spontaneous excitation of a circularly accelerated atom coupled with vacuum Dirac field fluctuations by separately calculating the contribution to the excitation rate of vacuum fluctuations and a cross term which involves both vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction, and demonstrate that although the spontaneous excitation for the atom in its ground state would occur in vacuum, such atoms in circular motion do not perceive a pure thermal radiation as their counterparts in linear acceleration do since the transition rates of the atom do not contain the Planckian factor characterizing a thermal bath. We also find that the contribution of the cross term that plays the same role as that of radiation reaction in the scalar and electromagnetic fields cases differs for atoms in circular motion from those in linear acceleration. This suggests that the conclusion drawn for atoms coupled with the scalar and electromagnetic fields that the contribution of radiation reaction to the mean rate of change of atomic energy does not vary as the trajectory of the atom changes from linear acceleration to circular motion is not a general trait that applies to the Dirac field where the role of radiation reaction is played by the cross term. - Highlights: • Spontaneous excitation of a circularly accelerated atom is studied. • The atom interacts with the Dirac field through nonlinear coupling. • A cross term involving vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction contributes. • The atom in circular motion does not perceive pure thermal radiation. • The contribution of the cross term changes as the atomic trajectory varies.

  15. Probing Magnetic Fields with Square Kilometre Array and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    by local structures like the local magnetized bubble (Sun & Reich 2010; Haverkorn et al. 2015). The observations which lead to the .... (vertical to Galactic plane) field in the diffuse ISM. The discovery of Fermi bubbles ...... Kothes, R., Brown, J.-A. 2009, in: IAU Symposium, Vol. 259, Cosmic Magnetic Fields: From. Planets, to ...

  16. Laser-Assisted Field Evaporation and Three-Dimensional Atom-by-Atom Mapping of Diamond Isotopic Homojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Samik; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-02-10

    It addition to its high evaporation field, diamond is also known for its limited photoabsorption, strong covalent bonding, and wide bandgap. These characteristics have been thought for long to also complicate the field evaporation of diamond and make its control hardly achievable on the atomistic-level. Herein, we demonstrate that the unique behavior of nanoscale diamond and its interaction with pulsed laser lead to a controlled field evaporation thus enabling three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping of diamond (12)C/(13)C homojunctions. We also show that one key element in this process is to operate the pulsed laser at high energy without letting the dc bias increase out of bounds for diamond nanotip to withstand. Herein, the role of the dc bias in evaporation of diamond is essentially to generate free charge carriers within the nanotip via impact ionization. The mobile free charges screen the internal electric field, eventually creating a hole rich surface where the pulsed laser is effectively absorbed leading to an increase in the nanotip surface temperature. The effect of this temperature on the uncertainty in the time-of-flight of an ion, the diffusion of atoms on the surface of the nanotip, is also discussed. In addition to paving the way toward a precise manipulation of isotopes in diamond-based nanoscale and quantum structures, this result also elucidates some of the basic properties of dielectric nanostructures under high electric field.

  17. Analysis of compositional uniformity in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N thin films using atom probe tomography and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; Huang, Li; Porter, Lisa M.; Davis, Robert F., E-mail: rfd@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Schreiber, Daniel K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Calculated frequency distributions of atom probe tomography reconstructions (∼80 nm field of view) of very thin Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (0.18 ≤ x ≤ 0.51) films grown via metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on both (0001) GaN/AlN/SiC and (0001) GaN/sapphire heterostructures revealed homogeneous concentrations of Al and chemically abrupt Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN interfaces. The results of scanning transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction corroborated these results and revealed that neither superlattice ordering nor phase separation was present at nanometer length scales.

  18. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (Pmagnetic antisense probe and SK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear.

  19. Electro-optic probe measurements of electric fields in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Mushiake, T.; Kawazura, Y.; Osawa, R.; Fujinami, K.; Yano, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-02-01

    The direct measurements of high-frequency electric fields in a plasma bring about significant advances in the physics and engineering of various waves. We have developed an electro-optic sensor system based on the Pockels effect. Since the signal is transmitted through an optical fiber, the system has high tolerance for electromagnetic noises. To demonstrate its applicability to plasma experiments, we report the first result of measurement of the ion-cyclotron wave excited in the RT-1 magnetosphere device. This study compares the results of experimental field measurements with simulation results of electric fields in plasmas.

  20. Probing the Quantum States of a Single Atom Transistor at Microwave Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe Carlo; Hile, Samuel James; House, Matthew Gregory; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2017-03-28

    The ability to apply gigahertz frequencies to control the quantum state of a single P atom is an essential requirement for the fast gate pulsing needed for qubit control in donor-based silicon quantum computation. Here, we demonstrate this with nanosecond accuracy in an all epitaxial single atom transistor by applying excitation signals at frequencies up to ≈13 GHz to heavily phosphorus-doped silicon leads. These measurements allow the differentiation between the excited states of the single atom and the density of states in the one-dimensional leads. Our pulse spectroscopy experiments confirm the presence of an excited state at an energy ≈9 meV, consistent with the first excited state of a single P donor in silicon. The relaxation rate of this first excited state to the ground state is estimated to be larger than 2.5 GHz, consistent with theoretical predictions. These results represent a systematic investigation of how an atomically precise single atom transistor device behaves under radio frequency excitations.

  1. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  2. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  3. Probing magnetic fields with Square Kilometre array and its precursors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    48

    2016-11-16

    e.g., various types ... stars like our Sun, the interstellar medium of nearby spiral galaxies and the intracluster medium of galaxy ... from galaxies control the magnitude and structure of magnetic fields in galactic halos and could be.

  4. Terahertz diffraction enhanced transparency probed in the near field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, A.; van Hoof, N.; Bhattacharya, A.; Mennes, C.; J. Gomez Rivas,

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in metamaterials allows to engineer structures which transmit narrow spectral ranges of radiation while exhibiting a large group index. Implementation of this phenomenon frequently calls for strong near-field coupling of bright (dipolar) resonances to dark

  5. A scanning probe mounted on a field-effect transistor: Characterization of ion damage in Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kumjae; Lee, Hoontaek; Sung, Min; Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Hyunjung; Moon, Wonkyu

    2017-10-01

    We have examined the capabilities of a Tip-On-Gate of Field-Effect Transistor (ToGoFET) probe for characterization of FIB-induced damage in Si surface. A ToGoFET probe is the SPM probe which the Field Effect Transistor(FET) is embedded at the end of a cantilever and a Pt tip was mounted at the gate of FET. The ToGoFET probe can detect the surface electrical properties by measuring source-drain current directly modulated by the charge on the tip. In this study, a Si specimen whose surface was processed with Ga+ ion beam was prepared. Irradiation and implantation with Ga+ ions induce highly localized modifications to the contact potential. The FET embedded on ToGoFET probe detected the surface electric field profile generated by schottky contact between the Pt tip and the sample surface. Experimentally, it was shown that significant differences of electric field due to the contact potential barrier in differently processed specimens were observed using ToGOFET probe. This result shows the potential that the local contact potential difference can be measured by simple working principle with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The numerical multiconfiguration self-consistent field approach for atoms; Der numerische Multiconfiguration Self-Consistent Field-Ansatz fuer Atome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiehler, Johannes

    1995-12-15

    The dissertation uses the Multiconfiguration Self-Consistent Field Approach to specify the electronic wave function of N electron atoms in a static electrical field. It presents numerical approaches to describe the wave functions and introduces new methods to compute the numerical Fock equations. Based on results computed with an implemented computer program the universal application, flexibility and high numerical precision of the presented approach is shown. RHF results and for the first time MCSCF results for polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of various states of the atoms He to Kr are discussed. In addition, an application to interpret a plasma spectrum of gallium is presented. (orig.)

  7. A New Method for Analyzing Near-Field Faraday Probe Data in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for analyzing near-field Faraday probe data obtained from Hall thrusters. Traditional methods spawned from far-field Faraday probe analysis rely on assumptions that are not applicable to near-field Faraday probe data. In particular, arbitrary choices for the point of origin and limits of integration have made interpretation of the results difficult. The new method, called iterative pathfinding, uses the evolution of the near-field plume with distance to provide feedback for determining the location of the point of origin. Although still susceptible to the choice of integration limits, this method presents a systematic approach to determining the origin point for calculating the divergence angle. The iterative pathfinding method is applied to near-field Faraday probe data taken in a previous study from the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall thrusters. Since these two thrusters use centrally mounted cathodes the current density associated with the cathode plume is removed before applying iterative pathfinding. A procedure is presented for removing the cathode plume. The results of the analysis are compared to far-field probe analysis results. This paper ends with checks on the validity of the new method and discussions on the implications of the results.

  8. Differential Absorption Lidar Mapping of Atmospheric Atomic Mercury in Italian Geothermal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edner, H.; Ragnarson, P.; Svanberg, S.; Wallinder, E.; de Liso, A.; Ferrara, R.; Maserti, B. E.

    1992-03-01

    Results from extensive lidar measurements on atmospheric atomic mercury in Italian geothermal fields are reported. A mobile differential absorption lidar system operating on the 254-nm mercury resonance line with a measuring range of about 1 km was used in mineralized as well as nonmineralized areas. Measurements were performed at geothermal power stations and in an unexploited field with natural surface geothermic manifestations. Atomic mercury concentrations ranging from 2 to 1000 ng/m3 were mapped. The high Italian geothermal mercury concentrations are in strong contrast to the recent lidar finding of the absence of atomic mercury in Icelandic geothermal fields.

  9. The dynamics of coupled atom and field assisted by continuous external pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlak, G.; Hernandez, J.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad Autonoma de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Starostenko, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Electronica, Sistemas y Mecatronica, Universidad de las Americas, 72820 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The dynamics of a coupled system comprising a two-level atom and cavity field assisted by a continuous external classical field (driving Jaynes-Cummings model) is studied. When the initial field is prepared in a coherent state, the dynamics strongly depends on the algebraic sum of both fields. If this sum is zero (the compensative case) in the system, only the vacuum Rabi oscillations occur. The results with dissipation and external field detuning from the cavity field are also discussed. (Author)

  10. Valley-dependent gauge fields for ultracold atoms in square optical superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Mei, Feng; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize the valley-dependent gauge fields for ultracold fermionic atoms trapped in a state-dependent square optical lattice. Our scheme relies on two sets of Raman laser beams to engineer the hopping between adjacent sites populated by two-component fermionic atoms. One set of Raman beams is used to realize a staggered π-flux lattice, where low-energy atoms near two inequivalent Dirac points should be described by the Dirac equation for spin-1/2 particles. Another set of laser beams with proper Rabi frequencies is added to further modulate the atomic hopping parameters. The hopping modulation will give rise to effective gauge potentials with opposite signs near the two valleys, mimicking the interesting strain-induced pseudogauge fields in graphene. The proposed valley-dependent gauge fields are tunable and provide an alternative route to realize an uncommon type of quantum Hall effects and atomic devices.

  11. Effects of airfoil-probe tubes on the flow field of a compressor cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongwei; Jin, Chao; Zhao, Lianpeng; Ma, Rong

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effects of airfoil-probe tubes and its installment position on the flow field of the compressor cascade, and find out the mechanism that how the airfoil-probes affect the aerodynamic characteristics of the compressor cascade, this paper performed both numerical and experimental works on the same compressor cascade. The experiment mainly focused on the cases of low Mach number (Ma = 0.1), and cases with different Mach numbers (0.1, 0.3, 0.7) and different incidence angles (-5, 0, 5) are investigated by the numerical method. The case without the airfoil-probe tube was referenced as the baseline, and other three cases with the airfoil-probe tubes installed in different chordwise positions (30%, 50%, 70% of the chord length) were studied. The diameter of the airfoil-probe tube is 3mm, which is configured as 300% amplification of some particular airfoil-probe according to the geometrical similarity principle. The results show that the airfoil-probe tubes have a negative influence on the flow capacity of the cascade at all investigation points. The separations and the large scale streamwise vortices that induced by the airfoil-probe tube on the pressure side cause most the losses at the high Mach number. The influence of the airfoil-probe tube on the flow field in the vicinity of the pressure side surface is local separation at the low Mach number. The airfoil-probe tubes also have a clearly effect on the leakage flow. It decreases the mass flow of the leakage flow and weakens the intensity of the leakage vortex, but enlarges the influence area. The total pressure loss of the case that the tube is installed at the half chordwise position is generally lower than other cases especially at the high Mach number, it can even decrease the losses compared with the basic case.

  12. Noise squeezing of fields that bichromatically excite atoms in a cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingchao; Hu, Xiangming; Rao, Shi; Xu, Jun

    2016-11-14

    It is well known that bichromatic excitation on one common transition can tune the emission or absorption spectra of atoms due to the modulation frequency dependent non-linearities. However little attention has been focused on the quantum dynamics of fields under bichromatic excitation. Here we present dissipative effects on noise correlations of fields in bichromatic interactions with atoms in cavities. We first consider an ensemble of two-level atoms that interacts with the two cavity fields of different frequencies and considerable amplitudes. By transferring the atom-field nonlinearities to the dressed atoms we separate out the dissipative interactions of Bogoliubov modes with the dressed atoms. The Bogoliubov mode dissipation establishes stable two-photon processes of two involved fields and therefore leads to two-mode squeezing. As a generalization, we then consider an ensemble of three-level Λ atoms for cascade bichromatic interactions. We extract the Bogoliubov-like four-mode interactions, which establish a quadrilateral of the two-photon processes of four involved fields and thus result in four-mode squeezing.

  13. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-29

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices.

  14. Probing intergalactic magnetic fields with simulations of electromagnetic cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves Batista, Rafael [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics; Saveliev, Andrey [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Keldysh Inst. of Applied Mathematics; Sigl, Guenter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Vachaspati, Tanmay [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-12-15

    We determine the effect of intergalactic magnetic fields on the distribution of high energy gamma rays by performing three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the development of gamma-ray-induced electromagnetic cascades in the magnetized intergalactic medium. We employ the so-called ''Large Sphere Observer'' method to efficiently simulate blazar gamma ray halos. We study magnetic fields with a Batchelor spectrum and with maximal left- and right-handed helicities. We also consider the case of sources whose jets are tilted with respect to the line of sight. We verify the formation of extended gamma ray halos around the source direction, and observe spiral-like patterns if the magnetic field is helical. We apply the Q-statistics to the simulated halos to extract their spiral nature and also propose an alternative method, the S-statistics. Both methods provide a quantative way to infer the helicity of the intervening magnetic fields from the morphology of individual blazar halos for magnetic field strengths B>or similar 10{sup -15} G and magnetic coherence lengths L{sub c}>or similar 100 Mpc. We show that the S-statistics has a better performance than the Q-statistics when assessing magnetic helicity from the simulated halos.

  15. Terahertz diffraction enhanced transparency probed in the near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Alexei; van Hoof, Niels; Bhattacharya, Arkabrata; Mennes, Christiaan; Gomez Rivas, Jaime

    2017-08-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in metamaterials allows to engineer structures which transmit narrow spectral ranges of radiation while exhibiting a large group index. Implementation of this phenomenon frequently calls for strong near-field coupling of bright (dipolar) resonances to dark (multipolar) resonances in the metamolecules comprising the metamaterials. The sharpness and contrast of the resulting transparency windows thus depends strongly on how closely these metamolecules can be placed to one another, placing constraints on fabrication capabilities. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that the reliance on near-field interaction strength can be relaxed, and the magnitude of the electromagnetic-induced transparency enhanced, by exploiting the long-range coupling between metamolecules in periodic lattices. By placing dolmen structures resonant at THz frequencies in a periodic lattice, we show a significant increase of the transparency window when the in-plane diffraction is tuned to the resonant frequency of the metamolecules, as confirmed by direct mapping of the THz near-field amplitude across a lattice of dolmens. Through the direct interrogation of the dark resonance in the near field, we show the interplay of near- and far-field couplings in optimizing the response of planar dolmen arrays via diffraction-enhanced transparency.

  16. Fundamental insights into the radium uptake into barite by atom probe tomography and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Juliane

    2017-10-01

    -of-the-art high-resolution microscopy techniques was used to answer the questions regarding (1) the internal microstructure of the initial barite (2) the role of this internal microstructure during the Ra uptake and (3) t he changes in the Ra distribution within the barite. This study comprises the first characterization of barite by atom probe tomography (APT). By combining APT and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods, pores covering the size range from a few nanometers to a few micrometers were identified in the SL barite. The pores were organized in layers parallel to the outer crystal faces. High resolution chemical analysis indicated that the pores contain a solution of water and sodium chloride. By focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, it was revealed that open macropores of several micrometers size are present as well within the SL barite. These partially connected macropores are distributed within the complete barite particles. Therefore, the macropores provide a direct pathway for Ra-containing aqueous fluid to enter the SL barite particles by diffusion within the aqueous solution. In addition, pores were also identified in the AL barite by TEM characterization. The entrapment of solution during mineral precipitation is known for several minerals at high supersaturation. As barite only precipitates at high supersaturation, nanoscale fluid inclusions as well as macropores probably were entrapped during the particle growth by precipitation. A microstructure similar to the one of the barite type used in this study was previously reported for other barites. In Ra-free reference experiment, no microstructural changes were noted over recrystallization times of up to 898 days. In prior studies, three different stages of Ra uptake were described based on macroscopic results. Ra-containing barite samples from all three stages were characterized to understand the role of the internal barite microstructure. At the beginning, the nano-scale fluid inclusions disappeared

  17. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO2 probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  18. [Transmission efficiency analysis of near-field fiber probe using FDTD simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Dai, Song-Tao; Wang, Huai-Yu; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2011-10-01

    A fiber probe is the key component of near-field optical technology which is widely used in high resolution imaging, spectroscopy detection and nano processing. How to improve the transmission efficiency of the fiber probe is a very important problem in the application of near-field optical technology. Based on the results of 3D-FDTD computation, the dependence of the transmission efficiency on the cone angle, the aperture diameter, the wavelength and the thickness of metal cladding is revealed. The authors have also made a comparison between naked probe and the probe with metal cladding in terms of transmission efficiency and spatial resolution. In addition, the authors have discovered the fluctuation phenomena of transmission efficiency as the wavelength of incident laser increases.

  19. Tuning Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Thiago L; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Oliveira, Bruno S; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Ribeiro, Douglas S; Rabelo, Cassiano; Rodrigues, Wagner N; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-06-23

    A reproducible route for tuning localized surface plasmon resonance in scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes is presented. The method is based on the production of a focused-ion-beam milled single groove near the apex of electrochemically etched gold tips. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are employed to obtain highly spatially and spectroscopically resolved maps of the milled probes, revealing localized surface plasmon resonance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. By changing the distance L between the groove and the probe apex, the localized surface plasmon resonance energy can be fine-tuned at a desired absorption channel. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is applied as a test platform, and the results prove the reliability of the method to produce efficient scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes.

  20. Automation of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) I: bond perception and atom typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanommeslaeghe, K; MacKerell, A D

    2012-12-21

    Molecular mechanics force fields are widely used in computer-aided drug design for the study of drug-like molecules alone or interacting with biological systems. In simulations involving biological macromolecules, the biological part is typically represented by a specialized biomolecular force field, while the drug is represented by a matching general (organic) force field. In order to apply these general force fields to an arbitrary drug-like molecule, functionality for assignment of atom types, parameters, and charges is required. In the present article, which is part I of a series of two, we present the algorithms for bond perception and atom typing for the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF). The CGenFF atom typer first associates attributes to the atoms and bonds in a molecule, such as valence, bond order, and ring membership among others. Of note are a number of features that are specifically required for CGenFF. This information is then used by the atom typing routine to assign CGenFF atom types based on a programmable decision tree. This allows for straightforward implementation of CGenFF's complicated atom typing rules and for equally straightforward updating of the atom typing scheme as the force field grows. The presented atom typer was validated by assigning correct atom types on 477 model compounds including in the training set as well as 126 test-set molecules that were constructed to specifically verify its different components. The program may be utilized via an online implementation at https://www.paramchem.org/ .

  1. Probing High Temperature Superconductors with Magnetometry in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The objective of this research is to investigate the high-field magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity without loss. A technique known as high-resolution torque magnetometry that was developed to directly measure the magnetization of high temperature superconductors. This technique was implemented using the 65 Tesla pulsed magnetic field facility that is part of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This research addressed unanswered questions about the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity, determine the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors, and shed light on the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity and on potential applications of these materials in areas such as energy generation and power transmission. Further applications of the technology resolve the novel physical phenomena such as correlated topological insulators, and spin liquid state in quantum magnets.

  2. Direct Measurements of Terahertz Meta-atoms with Near-Field Emission of Terahertz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serita, Kazunori; Darmo, Juraj; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2017-09-01

    We present the direct measurements of terahertz meta-atoms, an elementary unit of metamaterials, by using locally generated terahertz waves in the near-field region. In contrast to a conventional far-field terahertz spectroscopy or imaging, our technique features the localized emission of coherent terahertz pulses on a sub-wavelength scale, which has a potential for visualizing details of dynamics of each meta-atom. The obtained data show the near-field coupling among the meta-atoms and the impact of the electric field distribution from the excited meta-atom to neighbor meta-atoms. The observable LC resonance response is enhanced with an increase of numbers of meta-atoms. Furthermore, our approach also has a potential for visualizing the individual mode of meta-atom at different terahertz irradiation spots. These data can help us to understand the important role of the meta-atom in metamaterials and develop the novel terahertz components and devices such as active terahertz metamaterial and compact, high-sensitive bio-sensor devices.

  3. Near-field optical microscope using a silicon-nitride probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, N.F.; Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Tack, R.G.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1993-01-01

    Operation of an alternative near-field optical microscope is presented. The microscope uses a microfabricated silicon- nitride probe with integrated cantilever, as originally developed for force microscopy. The cantilever allows routine close contact near-field imaging o­n arbitrary surfaces without

  4. Shot noise as a probe of spin-polarized transport through single atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burtzlaff, Andreas; Weismann, Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Single atoms on Au(111) surfaces have been contacted with the Au tip of a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The shot noise of the current through these contacts has been measured up to frequencies of 120 kHz and Fano factors have been determined to characterize the transport channels...

  5. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Quantum Dots Measured with Scanning Probe Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314075674

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (LT-STM/STS and AFM) studies on colloidal semiconductor and graphene quantum dots (g-QDs). These nanostructures are interesting because they show tunable electrical and optical properties

  6. Near-field probing of photonic crystal directional couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a photonic crystal directional with a size of ~20 x 20 mm2 fabricated in silicon-on-insulator material. Using a scanning near-field optical microscope we demonstrate a high coupling efficiency for TM polarized light at telecom wavelengths...

  7. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using mu-distortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2014-01-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about $10^4$ and $10^6$ injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called $\\mu$-distortion. We can calculate the correlation $\\langle\\mu T......\\rangle$ of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy $T$ of the CMB to search for a correlation $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ between the magnetic field $B$ and the curvature perturbation $\\zeta$; knowing the $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since......_{\\text{NL}}$). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise $S/N\\approx 1.0 \\times b_{\\text{NL}} (\\tilde B_\\mu/10\\text{ nG})^2$, where $\\tilde B_\\mu$ is the magnetic field's strength on $\\mu$-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with $b...

  8. Single-molecule probes in organic field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolet, Aurélien Armel Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to study charge transport phenomena in organic materials. This is done optically by means of single-molecule spectroscopy in a field-effect transistor based on a molecular crystal. We present (in Chapter 2) a fundamental requirement for single-molecule spectroscopy

  9. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in SiO2/SiN/SiO2 stacks using atom probe tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorinobu Kunimune

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that it is possible to reproducibly quantify hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer of a SiO2/SiN/SiO2 (ONO stack structure using ultraviolet laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT. The concentration of hydrogen atoms detected using APT increased gradually during the analysis, which could be explained by the effect of hydrogen adsorption from residual gas in the vacuum chamber onto the specimen surface. The amount of adsorbed hydrogen in the SiN layer was estimated by analyzing another SiN layer with an extremely low hydrogen concentration (<0.2 at. %. Thus, by subtracting the concentration of adsorbed hydrogen, the actual hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer was quantified as approximately 1.0 at. %. This result was consistent with that obtained by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, which confirmed the accuracy of the APT quantification. The present results indicate that APT enables the imaging of the three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen atoms in actual devices at a sub-nanometer scale.

  10. Reply to ``Comment on `Imaging the atomic orbitals of carbon atomic chains with field-emission electron microscopy' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovskij, I. M.; Sadanov, E. V.; Mazilova, T. I.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Velicodnaja, O. A.

    2010-03-01

    In our recent paper [I. M. Mikhailovskij, E. V. Sadanov, T. I. Mazilova, V. A. Ksenofontov, and O. A. Velicodnaja, Phys. Rev. B 80, 165404 (2009)], we have presented evidence for field emission from individual orbitals of self-standing carbon chains, which can be used for real-space imaging of the end-atom orbitals with a field-emission electron microscope (FEEM). In this reply to the preceding Comment, we refer to the issues brought up there, which concern the viewpoint that the observed spontaneous mutual transformations of FEEM patterns have been attributed to the ligand-induced symmetry breaking by calling attention to the role of hydrogen atoms unavoidable in most nanostructured carbon materials.

  11. Field ionization of helium in a supersonic beam: Kinetic energy of neutral atoms and probability of their field ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holst, B.; Piskur, J. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Allegaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Kostrobiy, P.P.; Markovych, B.M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Lviv National University of Technology, Stefan Bandera Str. 12, UA-79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Suchorski, Y., E-mail: yuri.suchorski@imc.tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-04-15

    High detection efficiency combined with spatial resolution on a nm-scale makes the field ionization process a promising candidate for spatially resolved neutral particles detection. The effective cross-sectional area {sigma}{sub eff} can serve as a measure for the effectiveness of such a field ion detector. In the present contribution, we combine quantum-mechanical calculations of the field-modified electron density distribution near the tungsten tip surface and of the resulting local field distributions, performed using the functional integration method, with a classical treatment of the atom trajectories approaching the tip in order to calculate the {sigma}{sub eff} values for ionization of free He atoms over an apex of a tungsten field emitter tip. The calculated values are compared with experimental data for supersonic He atomic beams at two different temperatures 95 and 298 K.

  12. Light-Matter Interaction Atoms and Molecules in External Fields and Nonlinear Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Wendell T

    2006-01-01

    This book draws together the principal ideas that form the basis of atomic, molecular, and optical science and engineering. It covers the basics of atoms, diatomic molecules, atoms and molecules in static and electromagnetic fields and nonlinear optics. Exercises and bibliographies supplement each chapter, while several appendices present such important background information as physics and math definitions, atomic and molecular data, and tensor algebra. Accessible to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, or researchers who have been trained in one of the conventional curricula of physic

  13. Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korajac, Arman; Habibović, Dino; Čerkić, Aner; Busuladžić, Mustafa; Milošević, Dejan B.

    2017-10-01

    Electron-atom potential scattering assisted by a bichromatic (two-component) elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed in the frame of the S-matrix theory. The second Born approximation is applied in the expansion of the S-matrix element. The first term in the expansion corresponds to the single scattering, while the second term in the expansion corresponds to the double scattering of electrons on atomic targets. The double scattering is possible in the presence of a laser field. The electron that has scattered on an atomic target may be driven back by the laser field and scatter again on the same atom. The double-scattered electrons may have considerably higher energies than those that scattered only once. We have investigated the dependence of the energy spectrum on various laser-field and incident electron parameters. The calculated electron energy spectra show the plateau-like structures with abrupt cutoffs. These cutoffs are explained by a classical analysis.

  14. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  15. A new united atom force field for adsorption of alkenes in zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, B.; Smit, B.; Rey, F.; Valencia, S.; Calero, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new united atom force field was developed that accurately describes the adsorption properties of linear alkenes in zeolites. The force field was specifically designed for use in the inhomogeneous system and therefore a truncated and shifted potential was used. With the determined force field, we

  16. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  17. Superdirective narrowband first-order probe versus wideband higher-order probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements at P-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of the wideband 400-1200 MHz higher-order probe and the narrowband 431 MHz first-order probe, in terms of their advantages and disadvantages for spherical near-field antenna measurements at P-band, is presented. The comparison is based on the experimental data and focused...... on pattern shape and other electrical characteristics, work efforts related to physical handling, probe calibrations, and post processing....

  18. Rotational symmetry breaking in the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3 probed by upper-critical field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Nikitin, A M; Araizi, G K; Huang, Y K; Matsushita, Y; Naka, T; de Visser, A

    2016-06-28

    Recently it was demonstrated that Sr intercalation provides a new route to induce superconductivity in the topological insulator Bi2Se3. Topological superconductors are predicted to be unconventional with an odd-parity pairing symmetry. An adequate probe to test for unconventional superconductivity is the upper critical field, Bc2. For a standard BCS layered superconductor Bc2 shows an anisotropy when the magnetic field is applied parallel and perpendicular to the layers, but is isotropic when the field is rotated in the plane of the layers. Here we report measurements of the upper critical field of superconducting SrxBi2Se3 crystals (Tc = 3.0 K). Surprisingly, field-angle dependent magnetotransport measurements reveal a large anisotropy of Bc2 when the magnet field is rotated in the basal plane. The large two-fold anisotropy, while six-fold is anticipated, cannot be explained with the Ginzburg-Landau anisotropic effective mass model or flux flow induced by the Lorentz force. The rotational symmetry breaking of Bc2 indicates unconventional superconductivity with odd-parity spin-triplet Cooper pairs (Δ4-pairing) recently proposed for rhombohedral topological superconductors, or might have a structural nature, such as self-organized stripe ordering of Sr atoms.

  19. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  20. Systematic approaches for targeting an atom-probe tomography sample fabricated in a thin TEM specimen: Correlative structural, chemical and 3-D reconstruction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Sung-Il; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N

    2018-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) is a unique analysis tool that enables true three-dimensional (3-D) analyses with sub-nano scale spatial resolution. Recent implementations of the local-electrode atom-probe (LEAP) tomograph with ultraviolet laser pulsing have significantly expanded the research applications of APT. The small field-of-view of a needle-shaped specimen with a less than 100 nm diam. is, however, a major limitation for analyzing materials. The systematic approaches for site-specific targeting of an APT nanotip in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) of a thin sample are introduced to solve the geometrical limitations of a sharpened APT nanotip. In addition to "coupling APT to TEM", the technique presented here allows for targeting the preparation of an APT tip based on TEM observation of a much larger area than what is captured in the APT tip. The correlative methods have synergies for not only high-resolution structural analyses but also for obtaining chemical information. Chemical analyses in a TEM, both energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), are performed and compared with the APT chemical analyses of a carbide phase (M 7 C 3 ) precipitate at a grain boundary in a Ni-based alloy. Additionally, a TEM image of a sharpened APT nanotip is utilized for calculation of the detection area ratio of an APT nanotip by comparison with a TEM image for precise tomographic reconstructions. A grain-boundary/carbide precipitate triple junction is used to attain precise positioning of an APT nanotip in an analyzed TEM specimen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  2. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnaser, Hubert, E-mail: gnaser@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institut für Oberflächen- und Schichtanalytik GmbH (IFOS), Trippstadter Strasse 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Radny, Tobias [Fachbereich Physik and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar{sup +} ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1×10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} to 3×10{sup 18} cm{sup −2} and ion flux densities f of (0.4−2)×10{sup 14} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3–1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of P{sub n} cluster ions was observed, with n≤11. - Highlights: • Nanodot formation on InP surfaces under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation. • Atom probe tomography of InP: influence of laser pulse energy. • Compositional analysis of individual nanodots with nm spatial resolution. • Abundant emission of P{sub n} cluster ions (n≤11).

  3. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... the Pt(100) surface will lift the reconstruction, a single graphene layer is observed to act as an effective coating, protecting the reactive surface from O2 exposure and thus preserving the reconstruction underneath the graphene layer in O2 pressures as high as 104 mbar. A similar protective effect...

  4. Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar Ali, Abu; Ziauddin

    2018-02-01

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is revisited via the input probe field intensity. A strongly interacting Rydberg atomic medium ensemble is considered in a cavity, where atoms behave as superatoms (SAs) under the dipole blockade mechanism. Each atom in the strongly interacting Rydberg atomic medium (87 Rb) follows a three-level cascade atomic configuration. A strong control and weak probe field are employed in the cavity with the ensemble of Rydberg atoms. The features of the reflected and transmitted probe light are studied under the influence of the input probe field intensity. A transparency peak (cavity EIT) is revealed at a resonance condition for small values of input probe field intensity. The manipulation of the cavity EIT is reported by tuning the strength of the input probe field intensity. Further, the phase and group delay of the transmitted and reflected probe light are studied. It is found that group delay and phase in the reflected light are negative, while for the transmitted light they are positive. The magnitude control of group delay in the transmitted and reflected light is investigated via the input probe field intensity.

  5. Survival of metastable hydrogen atoms passing through crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, J.; Miniatura, C.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Baudon, J. (Paris-13 Univ., 93 - Villetaneuse (FR)); Bocvarski, V. (Belgrade Univ. (YU) Inst. Za Fiziku); Lorent, V. (Louvain Univ., Louvain-La-Neuve (BE). Inst. de Physique)

    1989-08-01

    In the present experiment, the motional electric field responsible for the quenching (and polarization) of metastable hydrogen atoms passing through a magnetic field, is compensated, for a prescribed atomic velocity, by a static electric field. The resulting continuous velocity selection has been tested over a wide range of velocities ((5/40) km/s). The relative velocity dispersion ranges from 5% at 40 km/s, to 22% at 5 km/s. As is confirmed by a calculation, the resolution is mainly determined by the quality of the matching of the two field profiles.

  6. Determining the photocurrent of spherical probes from one-sonde-shading electric field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenovski, Simeon; Smirnova, Ninel; Todorieva, Lyudmila; Lukarski, Hristo; Stanev, Georgi

    2018-01-01

    We propose a method for determining the saturation photoelectron current density of spherical probes, designed for measuring the electric field by the double-probe technique. Shading of only one of the probes causes specific changes in the electric field, and using the potential difference ΔV between the two probes created by the shading we obtain an analytical expression for the photocurrent density. We derive this expression in two different ways: directly, from the potential difference; and after calculating the resistance of the plasma layer around the probe. In both cases the value of the photocurrent is determined from the ion current. Data for the concentration and the plasma temperature is needed to determine the ion current. We considered two limiting forms of its collection: (1) SAL-sheath area limited case (thin layer); (2) OML-orbital motion limited case (thick layer). We validate the method using data from Intercosmos Bulgaria - 1300 satellite. The photocurrent density is calculated for two shading-of-the-probe instances. The values we obtain are significantly larger than the ones from laboratory measurements, but close to the photocurrent values deduced from other space experiments.

  7. Analysis of Omni-directivity Error of Electromagnetic Field Probe using Isotropic Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartansky Rene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript analyzes the omni-directivity error of an electromagnetic field (EM probe and its dependence on frequency. The global directional characteristic of a whole EM probe consists of three independent directional characteristics of EM sensors - one for each coordinate. The shape of particular directional characteristics is frequency dependent and so is the shape of the whole EM probe’s global directional characteristic. This results in systematic error induced in the measurement of EM fields. This manuscript also contains quantitative formulation of such errors caused by the shape change of directional characteristics for different types of sensors depending on frequency and their mutual arrangement.

  8. Dynamics of Radiation and Atoms in Ultrahigh Intensity Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    excitation in strong and ultrastrong optical frequency fields. Advances in laser technology continue to push the boundaries of this interaction in...possible ultrastrong magnetic fields and the electron cyclotron frequency in the bound state can create dynamics, such as is the case for `cycloatoms...promise of increasing the returning rescattering electron energy led to advances in the production of HHG. In addition to (e,2e) and HHG rescattering

  9. Structure and orbital ordering of ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} probed by atomic resolution electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela; Engelmayer, Johannes; Loosdrecht, Paul H.M. van [II. Physikalisches Institut, Koeln Univ. (Germany); Jin, Lei; Jia, Chun-Lin [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-5) and Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Hensling, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-7), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Orbital ordering has been less investigated in epitaxial thin films, due to the difficulty to evidence directly the occurrence of this phenomenon in thin film samples. Atomic resolution electron microscopy enabled us to observe the structural details of the ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films. The transition to orbital ordering of epitaxial layers as thin as ∼4 nm was probed by temperature-dependent Raman scattering spectroscopy of multilayer samples. From the occurrence and temperature dependence of the 700 cm{sup -1} Raman active mode it can be inferred that the structural phase transition associated with orbital ordering takes place in ultrathin LaVO{sub 3} films at about 130 K. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Chemical gradients across phase boundaries between martensite and austenite in steel studied by atom probe tomography and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O.; Ponge, D.; Inden, G.; Millan, J.; Choi, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Sietsma, J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty 3mE, Dept. MSE, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Partitioning at phase boundaries of complex steels is important for their properties. We present atom probe tomography results across martensite/austenite interfaces in a precipitation-hardened maraging-TRIP steel (12.2 Mn, 1.9 Ni, 0.6 Mo, 1.2 Ti, 0.3 Al; at.%). The system reveals compositional changes at the phase boundaries: Mn and Ni are enriched while Ti, Al, Mo and Fe are depleted. More specific, we observe up to 27 at.% Mn in a 20 nm layer at the phase boundary. This is explained by the large difference in diffusivity between martensite and austenite. The high diffusivity in martensite leads to a Mn flux towards the retained austenite. The low diffusivity in the austenite does not allow accommodation of this flux. Consequently, the austenite grows with a Mn composition given by local equilibrium. The interpretation is based on DICTRA and mixed-mode diffusion calculations (using a finite interface mobility).

  11. The limit of time resolution in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy by a pump-probe approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Spielhofer, Andreas; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) routinely achieves structural information in the sub-nm length scale. Measuring time resolved properties on this length scale to understand kinetics at the nm scale remains an elusive goal. We present a general analysis of the lower limit for time resolution in AFM. Our finding suggests that the time resolution in AFM is ultimately limited by the well-known thermal limit of AFM and not as often proposed by the mechanical response time of the force sensing cantilever. We demonstrate a general pump-probe approach using the cantilever as a detector responding to the averaged signal. This method can be applied to any excitation signal such as electrical, thermal, magnetic or optical. Experimental implementation of this method allows us to measure a photocarrier decay time of ˜1 ps in low temperature grown GaAs using a cantilever with a resonant frequency of 280 kHz.

  12. Probing Strong-field General Relativity with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Frans

    We are on the verge of a new era in astrophysics as a world-wide effort to observe the universe with gravitational waves takes hold---ground based laser interferometers (Hz to kHz), pulsar timing (micro to nano Hz), measurements of polarization of the cosmic microwave background (sub-nano Hz), and the planned NASA/ESA mission LISA (.1 mHz to .1 Hz). This project will study the theoretical nature of gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by two sources in the LISA band, namely supermassive-black-hole (SMBH) binary mergers, and extreme-mass-ratio-inspirals (EMRI's)---the merger of a stellar mass black hole, neutron star, or white dwarf with a SMBH. The primary goal will be to ascertain how well LISA, by observing these sources, could answer the following related questions about the fundamental nature of strong-field gravity: Does Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) describe the geometry of black holes in the universe? What constraints can GW observations of SMBH mergers and EMRIs place on alternative theories of gravity? If there are deviations from GR, are there statistics that could give indications of a deviation if sources are detected using a search strategy based solely on GR waveforms? The primary reasons for focusing on LISA sources to answer these questions are (a) binary SMBH mergers could be detected by LISA with exquisitely high signal-to- noise, allowing enough parameters of the system to be accurately extracted to perform consistency checks of the underlying theory, (b) EMRIs will spend numerous orbits close to the central black hole, and thus will be quite sensitive to even small near-horizon deviations from GR. One approach to develop the requisite knowledge and tools to answer these questions is to study a concrete, theoretically viable alternative to GR. We will focus on the dynamical variant of Chern-Simons modified gravity (CSMG), which is interesting for several reasons, chief among which are (1) that CSMG generically arises in both string

  13. Indirect modulation of nonmagnetic probes for force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-02-15

    Frequency-dependent changes for phase and amplitude images are demonstrated with test platforms of organosilane ring patterns, using force modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with an alternate instrument configuration. The imaging setup using indirect magnetic modulation (IMM) is based on indirect oscillation of soft, nonmagnetic cantilevers, with spring constants coating is not required to drive the periodic oscillation of the tip. The instrument configuration for IMM may not be practical for intermittent imaging modes, which often work best with stiff cantilevers. However, indirect actuation provides an effective approach for imaging with low force setpoints and is well-suited for dynamic AFM modes using continuous contact imaging.

  14. Probing many-body dynamics on a 51-atom quantum simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernien, Hannes; Schwartz, Sylvain; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Omran, Ahmed; Pichler, Hannes; Choi, Soonwon; Zibrov, Alexander S; Endres, Manuel; Greiner, Markus; Vuletić, Vladan; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2017-11-29

    Controllable, coherent many-body systems can provide insights into the fundamental properties of quantum matter, enable the realization of new quantum phases and could ultimately lead to computational systems that outperform existing computers based on classical approaches. Here we demonstrate a method for creating controlled many-body quantum matter that combines deterministically prepared, reconfigurable arrays of individually trapped cold atoms with strong, coherent interactions enabled by excitation to Rydberg states. We realize a programmable Ising-type quantum spin model with tunable interactions and system sizes of up to 51 qubits. Within this model, we observe phase transitions into spatially ordered states that break various discrete symmetries, verify the high-fidelity preparation of these states and investigate the dynamics across the phase transition in large arrays of atoms. In particular, we observe robust many-body dynamics corresponding to persistent oscillations of the order after a rapid quantum quench that results from a sudden transition across the phase boundary. Our method provides a way of exploring many-body phenomena on a programmable quantum simulator and could enable realizations of new quantum algorithms.

  15. Probing deviations from traditional colloid filtration theory by atomic forces microscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Marissa Devan

    2005-12-01

    Colloid transport through saturated media is an integral component of predicting the fate and transport of groundwater contaminants. Developing sound predictive capabilities and establishing effective methodologies for remediation relies heavily on our ability to understand the pertinent physical and chemical mechanisms. Traditionally, colloid transport through saturated media has been described by classical colloid filtration theory (CFT), which predicts an exponential decrease in colloid concentration with travel distance. Furthermore, colloid stability as determined by Derjaguin-Landau-Veney-Overbeek (DLVO) theory predicts permanent attachment of unstable particles in a primary energy minimum. However, recent studies show significant deviations from these traditional theories. Deposition in the secondary energy minimum has been suggested as a mechanism by which observed deviations can occur. This work investigates the existence of the secondary energy minimum as predicted by DLVO theory using direct force measurements obtained by Atomic Forces Microscopy. Interaction energy as a function of separation distance between a colloid and a quartz surface in electrolyte solutions of varying ionic strength are obtained. Preliminary force measurements show promise and necessary modifications to the current experimental methodology have been identified. Stringent surface cleaning procedures and the use of high-purity water for all injectant solutions is necessary for the most accurate and precise measurements. Comparisons between direct physical measurements by Atomic Forces Microscopy with theoretical calculations and existing experimental findings will allow the evaluation of the existence or absence of a secondary energy minimum.

  16. Pyrenyl Derivative with a Four-Atom Linker That Can Probe the Local Polarity of Pyrene-Labeled Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Shiva; Duhamel, Jean

    2016-02-04

    The fluorescent probe 1-pyrenemethoxyethanol (PyMeEGOH) was designed to replace commercially available 1-pyrenebutanol (PyButOH) as an alternative fluorescent label to probe the internal dynamics and interior polarity of macromolecules by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. While excimer formation and sensitivity to solvent polarity are two well-recognized properties of pyrene, much less known is that these properties are often mutually exclusive when a 1-pyrenebutyl derivative is used to prepare pyrene-labeled macromolecules (PyLMs). As the sensitivity of pyrene to solvent polarity is a result of its symmetry, attaching a butyl group to pyrene breaks the symmetry of pyrene, so that the 1-pyrenebutyl derivatives are much less sensitive to the polarity of their environment compared to unmodified pyrene. This report demonstrates that replacement of a methylene group in the β-position of PyButOH by an oxygen atom, such as in PyMeEGOH, restores the sensitivity of this pyrene derivative to the polarity of its local environment to the same level as that of molecular pyrene without impeding pyrene excimer formation upon incorporation into PyLMs.

  17. Atom Probe Tomography Unveils Formation Mechanisms of Wear-Protective Tribofilms by ZDDP, Ionic Liquid, and Their Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Sang, Xiahan; Leonard, Donovan N; Qu, Jun; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2017-07-12

    The development of advanced lubricant additives has been a critical component in paving the way for increasing energy efficiency and durability for numerous industry applications. However, the formation mechanisms of additive-induced protective tribofilms are not yet fully understood because of the complex chemomechanical interactions at the contact interface and the limited spatial resolution of many characterizing techniques currently used. Here, the tribofilms on a gray cast iron surface formed by three antiwear additives are systematically studied; a phosphonium-phosphate ionic liquid (IL), a zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), and an IL+ZDDP combination. All three additives provide excellent wear protection, with the IL+ZDDP combination exhibiting a synergetic effect, resulting in further reduced friction and wear. Atom probe tomography (APT) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to interrogate the subnm chemistry and bonding states for each of the tribofilms of interest. The IL tribofilm appeared amorphous and was Fe, P, and O rich. Wear debris particles having an Fe-rich core and an oxide shell were present in this tribofilm and a transitional oxide (Fe2O3)-containing layer was identified at the interface between the tribofilm and the cast iron substrate. The ZDDP+IL tribofilm shared some of the characteristics found in the IL and ZDDP tribofilms. Tribofilm formation mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the observations made at the atomic level.

  18. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A., E-mail: rao28@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering.

  19. High sensitivity detection of protein molecules picked up on a probe of atomic force microscope based on the fluorescence detection by a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takafumi; Afrin, Rehana; Arakawa, Hideo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2004-07-02

    We developed a method to detect and identify proteins on a probe of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with a high sensitivity. Due to a low background noise of the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope employed as a detecting system, we were able to achieve a high enough sensitivity to detect zeptomole orders of protein molecules immobilized on the tip. Several different methods to immobilize protein molecules to AFM-probes were tested, meant for a wide range of applications of this method. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different proteins were clearly distinguished by immunofluorescence microscopy on the probe using their specific antibodies.

  20. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-08

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  1. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  2. Probing nucleic acid-ion interactions with buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Max; Herschlag, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The ion atmosphere of nucleic acids directly affects measured biochemical and biophysical properties. However, study of the ion atmosphere is difficult due to its diffuse and dynamic nature. Standard techniques available have significant limitations in sensitivity, specificity, and directness of the assays. Buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy (BE-AES) was developed to overcome many of the limitations of previously available techniques. This technique can provide a complete accounting of all ions constituting the ionic atmosphere of a nucleic acid at thermodynamic equilibrium. Although initially developed for the study of the ion atmosphere of nucleic acids, BE-AES has also been applied to study site-bound ions in RNA and protein. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Near-field deformation of a liquid interface by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortagne, C.; Chireux, V.; Ledesma-Alonso, R.; Ogier, M.; Risso, F.; Ondarçuhu, T.; Legendre, D.; Tordjeman, Ph.

    2017-07-01

    We experiment the interaction between a liquid puddle and a spherical probe by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for a probe radius R ranging from 10 nm to 30 μ m . We have developed a new experimental setup by coupling an AFM with a high-speed camera and an inverted optical microscope. Interaction force-distance curves (in contact mode) and frequency shift-distance curves (in frequency modulation mode) are measured for different bulk model liquids for which the probe-liquid Hamaker constant Hp l is known. The experimental results, analyzed in the frame of the theoretical model developed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 106104 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.106104 and Phys. Rev. E 85, 061602 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.061602, allow to determine the "jump-to-contact" critical distance dmin below which the liquid jumps and wets the probe. Comparison between theory and experiments shows that the probe-liquid interaction at nanoscale is controlled by the liquid interface deformation. This work shows a very good agreement between the theoretical model and the experiments and paves the way to experimental studies of liquids at the nanoscale.

  4. Investigation of space charge in low-density polyethylene using a field probe technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M. Salah; Hansen, Bo Svarrer

    1988-01-01

    A test method that uses a capacitive field probe to investigate the space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is described. Specimens of 7-mm thickness were stressed under 100 kV DC at room temperature and for different time periods. The results indicate that the LDPE insulation...

  5. Compact First-Order Probe for Spherical Near-Field Antenna Measurements at Low Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for designing compact and lightweight first-order probes for spherical near-field antenna measurements at frequencies below 1 GHz that exploit first-order properties of electrically small self-resonant radiators combined into superdirective endfire arrays are established theoretically...... is just 343 mm above a 720-mm circular ground plane and weighs about 5 kg....

  6. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  7. ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT IN ROD-DISCONTINUED PLANE AIR GAPS USING DISTRIBUTED CAPACITY PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khechekhouche

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental carried out investigations aimed at elucidating the effect of earth discontinuity on the breakdown voltage of short rod-plane air gap (80 to160 mm under negative lightning impulses (-1.2/50ms.We also carried out investigations on electric field measurement on the surface of a discontinuous plane of a rod-plane air gap arrangement. For this purpose, we used a probe with distributed capacity, under negative lightning applied impulse voltage. The probe is incorporated on the same level of plane surface.The interface locally reinforces the electric field. The electric field increases at the interface may lead to a discharge between the high voltage rode and the interface. In the vicinity of the interface, we observe a kind of discontinuity in the evolution of the electric field intensity. This one becomes greater than the value obtained in the case of gaps with homogeneous plane earth.

  8. ELECTRIC FIELD MEASUREMENT IN ROD-DISCONTINUED PLANE AIR GAPS USING DISTRIBUTED CAPACITY PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khechekhouche

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present experimental carried out investigations aimed at elucidating the effect of earth discontinuity on the breakdown voltage of short rod-plane air gap (80 to 160 mm under negative lightning impulses (-1.2/50s. We also carried out investigations on electric field measurement on the surface of a discontinuous plane of a rod-plane air gap arrangement. For this purpose, we used a probe with distributed capacity, under negative lightning applied impulse voltage. The probe is incorporated on the same level of plane surface. The interface locally reinforces the electric field. The electric field increases at the interface may lead to a discharge between the high voltage rode and the interface. In the vicinity of the interface, we observe a kind of discontinuity in the evolution of the electric field intensity. This one becomes greater than the value obtained in the case of gaps with homogeneous plane earth.

  9. Parametric Amplification of Coupled Atomic and Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. G.; Meystre, P.

    One of the earliest and still most important spin-offs of the invention of the laser is without a doubt nonlinear optics. Following the pioneering experiments carried out by P. A. Franken and his students [1], N. Bloembergen, Y. R. Shen and their collaborators made a series of crucial advances that led to the rapid development of the field [2]. In the early days, it was generally understood that what made nonlinear optics possible was the high optical powers provided by lasers. For such fields, a classical description of the light fields was clearly sufficient. Yet, a few visionaries insisted on a fully quantum mechanical description of radiation in the analysis of nonlinear optical phenomena such as parametric amplification. A central character in these developments was R. J. Glauber, who, together with his students, developed many of the tools, and much of the early quantum theory of nonlinear optics [3,4]. One of his students was Dan Walls, who upon his return to New Zealand after spe nding a short time in Germany developed one of the leading schools of quantum optics in the world.

  10. A Polarizable Atomic Multipole-Based Force Field for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Anionic Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huiying; Peng, Xiangda; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Guohui

    2017-12-31

    In all of the classical force fields, electrostatic interaction is simply treated and explicit electronic polarizability is neglected. The condensed-phase polarization, relative to the gas-phase charge distributions, is commonly accounted for in an average way by increasing the atomic charges, which remain fixed throughout simulations. Based on the lipid polarizable force field DMPC and following the same framework as Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for BiomoleculAr (AMOEBA) simulation, the present effort expands the force field to new anionic lipid models, in which the new lipids contain DMPG and POPS. The parameters are compatible with the AMOEBA force field, which includes water, ions, proteins, etc. The charge distribution of each atom is represented by the permanent atomic monopole, dipole and quadrupole moments, which are derived from the ab initio gas phase calculations. Many-body polarization including the inter- and intramolecular polarization is modeled in a consistent manner with distributed atomic polarizabilities. Molecular dynamics simulations of the two aqueous DMPG and POPS membrane bilayer systems, consisting of 72 lipids with water molecules, were then carried out to validate the force field parameters. Membrane width, area per lipid, volume per lipid, deuterium order parameters, electron density profile, electrostatic potential difference between the center of the bilayer and water are all calculated, and compared with limited experimental data.

  11. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation of Two Qubit Atoms Interacting with the Coherent State Optical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2017-10-01

    Using the three criterions of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord, we investigate the quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with the coherent state optical field. We discuss the influence of different photon number of the mean square fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord between two atoms when the two atoms are initially in specific three states. The results show that different photon number of the mean square fluctuations can lead to different effects of quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics.

  12. Electron correlation dynamics of strong-field double ionization of atoms below recollision threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yunquan; Gong Qihuang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ye Difa; Liu Jie [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100084 Beijing (China); Rudenko, A; Tschuch, S; Duerr, M; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Siegel, M; Morgner, U, E-mail: yunquan.liu@pku.edu.cn [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    In recent combined experimental and theoretical study we have explored nonsequential double ionization of neon and argon atoms in the infrared light field (800nm) below the recollision threshold. We find that the two-electron correlation dynamics depends on atomic structure- 'side-by-side emission' (correlation) for Ne and 'back-to-back emission' (anticorrelation) for argon atoms. This can be explained theoretically within our three dimensional classical model calculation including tunnelling effect. The multiple recollisions as well as recollision-induced-excitation-tunnelling (RIET) effect dominate the anticorrelation of argon, whereas the laser-assisted instantaneous recollision dominates the correlation of neon.

  13. Multiconfigurational self-consistent field calculations of nuclear shieldings using London atomic orbitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruud, Kenneth; Helgaker, Trygve; Kobayashi, Rika

    1994-01-01

    to corresponding individual gauges for localized orbitals (IGLO) results. The London results show better basis set convergence than IGLO, especially for heavier atoms. It is shown that the choice of active space is crucial for determination of accurate nuclear shielding constants.......Nuclear shielding calculations are presented for multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions using London atomic orbitals (gauge invariant atomic orbitals). Calculations of nuclear shieldings for eight molecules (H2O, H2S, CH4, N2, CO, HF, F2, and SO2) are presented and compared...

  14. Three-dimensional imaging of trapped cold atoms with a light field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gordon E; Marciniak, Michael A; Burke, John H

    2017-11-01

    This research images trapped atoms in three dimensions, utilizing light field imaging. Such a system is of interest in the development of atom interferometer accelerometers in dynamic systems where strictly defined focal planes may be impractical. In this research, a light field microscope was constructed utilizing a Lytro Development Kit micro lens array and sensor. It was used to image fluorescing rubidium atoms in a magneto optical trap. The three-dimensional (3D) volume of the atoms is reconstructed using a modeled point spread function (PSF), taking into consideration that the low magnification (1.25) of the system changed typical assumptions used in the optics model for the PSF. The 3D reconstruction is analyzed with respect to a standard off-axis fluorescence image. Optical axis separation between two atom clouds is measured to a 100 μm accuracy in a 3 mm deep volume, with a 16 μm in-focus standard resolution with a 3.9 mm by 3.9 mm field of view. Optical axis spreading is observed in the reconstruction and discussed. The 3D information can be used to determine properties of the atom cloud with a single camera and single image, and can be applied anywhere 3D information is needed but optical access may be limited.

  15. Probing tethered targets of a single biomolecular complex with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Xingfei; Jia, Si Si; Fan, Youjie; Hu, Jun; Li, Bin

    2013-12-01

    DNA origami shows tremendous promise as templates for the assembly of nano-components and detection of molecular recognition events. So far, the method of choice for evaluating these structures has been atomic force microscopy (AFM), a powerful tool for imaging nanoscale objects. In most cases, tethered targets on DNA origami have proven to be highly effective samples for investigation. Still, while maximal assembly of the nanostructures might benefit from the greatest flexibility in the tether, AFM imaging requires a sufficient stability of the adsorbed components. The balance between the tether flexibility and sample stability is a major, poorly understood, concern in such studies. Here, we investigated the dependence of the tethering length on molecular capture events monitored by AFM. In our experiments, single biotin molecules were attached to DNA origami templates with various linker lengths of thymidine nucleotides, and their interaction with streptavidin was observed with AFM. Our results show that the streptavidin-biotin complexes are easily detected with short tethered lengths, and that their morphological features clearly change with the tethering length. We identify the functionally useful tether lengths for these investigations, which are also expected to prove useful in the construction and further application of DNA origami in bio-nanotechnology studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  17. Model-independent measurement of the charge density distribution along an Fe atom probe needle using off-axis electron holography without mean inner potential effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, V., E-mail: v.migunov@fz-juelich.de; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons (ER-C) and Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); London, A. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Farle, M. [Fakultät für Physik and Center of Nanointegration (CeNIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-04-07

    The one-dimensional charge density distribution along an electrically biased Fe atom probe needle is measured using a model-independent approach based on off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Both the mean inner potential and the magnetic contribution to the phase shift are subtracted by taking differences between electron-optical phase images recorded with different voltages applied to the needle. The measured one-dimensional charge density distribution along the needle is compared with a similar result obtained using model-based fitting of the phase shift surrounding the needle. On the assumption of cylindrical symmetry, it is then used to infer the three-dimensional electric field and electrostatic potential around the needle with ∼10 nm spatial resolution, without needing to consider either the influence of the perturbed reference wave or the extension of the projected potential outside the field of view of the electron hologram. The present study illustrates how a model-independent approach can be used to measure local variations in charge density in a material using electron holography in the presence of additional contributions to the phase, such as those arising from changes in mean inner potential and specimen thickness.

  18. Nanostructural evolution of Cr-rich precipitates in a Cu-Cr-Zr alloy during heat treatment studied by 3 dimensional atom probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatakeyama, Masahiko; Toyama, Takeshi; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructural evolution of Cr (Cr-rich) precipitates in a Cu-0.78%Cr-0.13%Zr alloy has been studied after aging and overaging (reaging) by laser assisted local electrode 3 dimensional atom probe (Laser-LEAP). This material is a candidate for the first wall and divertor components of future fusion...

  19. Probing the nanoadhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to titanium implant surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Sebastian; Donos, Nikolaos; Spratt, Dave; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    As titanium (Ti) continues to be utilized in great extent for the fabrication of artificial implants, it is important to understand the crucial bacterium-Ti interaction occurring during the initial phases of biofilm formation. By employing a single-cell force spectroscopy technique, the nanoadhesive interactions between the early-colonizing Streptococcus sanguinis and a clinically analogous smooth Ti substrate were explored. Mean adhesion forces between S. sanguinis and Ti were found to be 0.32±0.00, 1.07±0.06, and 4.85±0.56 nN for 0, 1, and 60 seconds contact times, respectively; while adhesion work values were reported at 19.28±2.38, 104.60±7.02, and 1,317.26±197.69 aJ for 0, 1, and 60 seconds, respectively. At 60 seconds surface delays, minor-rupture events were modeled with the worm-like chain model yielding an average contour length of 668±12 nm. The mean force for S. sanguinis minor-detachment events was 1.84±0.64 nN, and Poisson analysis decoupled this value into a short-range force component of -1.60±0.34 nN and a long-range force component of -0.55±0.47 nN. Furthermore, a solution of 2 mg/mL chlorhexidine was found to increase adhesion between the bacterial probe and substrate. Overall, single-cell force spectroscopy of living S. sanguinis cells proved to be a reliable way to characterize early-bacterial adhesion onto machined Ti implant surfaces at the nanoscale.

  20. Field-ion microscopy of quantum oscillations of linear carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazilova, Tatjana I; Mikhailovskij, Igor M; Ksenofontov, Vjacheslav A; Sadanov, Evgenij V

    2009-02-01

    Field ion microscopic imaging of monatomic carbon chains near the ground quantum states and the visualization of their two-dimensional wave functions were demonstrated. Quantum motions with the frequency proportional to the electric field are detected and analyzed with subangstrom lateral resolution. Electric fields above 10(10) V/m can be used for control of a transverse vibration mode of atomic chains in the terahertz spectral range.

  1. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  2. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  3. Probed adhesion force of living lung cells with a tip-modified atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-En; Sivashanmugan, Kundan; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Lin, Ying-Yi; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Liu, Bernard Haochih; Yan, Jun-Jer; Yeh, Ming-Hong

    2016-12-19

    The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix play an important role in bio-microenvironment activities. Herein, atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure the interaction between Au and Ag nanoparticle (NP) clusters on the surface of human fetal lung cells. Using (3-mercapto-propyl) triethoxysilane (MPTMS), NP clusters were grafted onto the apex of AFM tip, and then, the adhesion force between the tip and the cell was analyzed. The measured adhesion force increased from 92 pN for AFM tip to 332 pN for that modified with MPTMS. The increase is most probably contributed by the nonspecific interactions between the apex of the modified AFM tip and the surface of the cells. The adhesion forces between the surface of NPs clusters grafted AFM tip and that of lung cells were dramatically reduced as NPs clusters were replaced by MPTMS. For the former, as the Au NPs cluster was applied, the adhesion force reached to 122 pN, whereas it significantly augmented with the addition of the cluster's size and dimension on the AFM tip. For the case of Ag cluster grafted on AFM tip, its adhesion force with the surface of the cells significantly lowered and reduced to 56 pN. Presumably, the electrostatic or van der Waals force between the two surfaces results in the variation of measurements. It is also very likely that the cell-surface interactions are probably varied by the nature of the contact surfaces, like the force-distance of attraction. The result is significant for understanding the the nature of the interactions between the surface of NPs and the membrane of lung cells.

  4. Recent Advances in the Design of Electro-Optic Sensors for Minimally Destructive Microwave Field Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Whitaker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review recent design methodologies for fully dielectric electro-optic sensors that have applications in non-destructive evaluation (NDE of devices and materials that radiate, guide, or otherwise may be impacted by microwave fields. In many practical NDE situations, fiber-coupled-sensor configurations are preferred due to their advantages over free-space bulk sensors in terms of optical alignment, spatial resolution, and especially, a low degree of field invasiveness. We propose and review five distinct types of fiber-coupled electro-optic sensor probes. The design guidelines for each probe type and their performances in absolute electric-field measurements are compared and summarized.

  5. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  6. An esophageal probe for measuring three-dimensional electric fields during external cardiac defibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, David A; de Jongh Curry, Amy L

    2012-03-01

    External defibrillation is a common treatment for the cardiac arrhythmia atrial fibrillation. Electrode placement has been shown to affect defibrillation efficacy and required energy levels. We suggest investigating the relationship between esophageal electric fields (EEFs) and atrial defibrillation thresholds to determine the feasibility of creating patient-specific electrode placements using EEFs. This study presents the design and implementation of an esophageal probe (EP) that accurately measures three-dimensional electric fields. The root-mean-square error of the EP was 1.69% as determined by measurements performed in an electrolytic tank. The EP also performed well during in vivo testing in a pig. There was a strong positive relationship between EEF(2)s and applied energy during defibrillation strength shocks. The EEF measurements were also repeatable, with less than 4.24% difference between repeated shocks. This is the first description of a probe designed specifically for measuring electric fields in the esophagus.

  7. Detection of surface-plasmon evanescent fields using a metallic probe tip covered with fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wakamatsu, T; Shinbo, K; Kato, K; Kaneko, F

    1999-01-01

    A new experimental system has been constructed to detect evanescent fields of metal surface plasmons (SPs) using a metallic probe tip covered with fluorescence cadmium sulfide (CdS). The evanescent fields of the SPs sensitive to the metal interfaces were observed as fluorescent light from CdS on the tip. No additional lock-in detection technique with a vibrating probe tip is necessary in the system, in spite of the scattered light enhanced by SP due to the surface roughness. The fluorescent light measured for the Al film sample shows exponential decay with distance from the sample surface, indicating that the SP evanescent fields are detected with our apparatus. (10 refs).

  8. Scanning probe microscopy and field emission schemes for studying electron emission from polycrystalline diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Chubenko, Oksana; Baturin, Stanislav S.; Baryshev, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The letter introduces a diagram that rationalizes tunneling atomic force microscopy (TUNA) observations of electron emission from polycrystalline diamonds as described in recent publications. The direct observations of electron emission from grain boundary sites by TUNA could indeed be evidence of electrons originating from grain boundaries under external electric fields. At the same time, from the diagram it follows that TUNA and field emission schemes are complimentary rather than equivalen...

  9. Entanglement of a nonlinear two two-level atoms interacting with deformed fields in Kerr medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Khalek, S.; El-Saman, Y. S.; Abdel-Aty, M.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the entanglement dynamics between two two-level atoms interacting with two coherent fields in two spatially separated cavities which are filled with a Kerr-like medium. We examine the effect of nonlinear medium on the dynamical properties of entanglement and atomic occupation probabilities in the case of even and odd deformed coherent states. The results show that the deformed fields play important roles in the evolution of entanglement. Also, the results demonstrate that entanglement sudden death, sudden birth and long-distance can be controlled by the deformation and nonlinear parameters.

  10. Mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model of a three-level atom interacting with two quantized fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosov, Boyan T.; Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model describes the ultrastrong interaction of a two-level atom coupled to a single quantized bosonic mode. As compared to the Jaynes-Cummings model, in the Rabi model the absorption and emission processes do not need to satisfy energy conservation and the usual rotating wave approximation (RWA) breaks down. As a result, the atom-field dynamics in the Hilbert space splits into two independent parity chains, exhibiting a collapse-revival pattern and exact periodic dynamics in the limit of degenerate atomic levels. Here we introduce a mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model by considering a three-level atom interacting with two quantized bosonic fields, in which the RWA is made for one transition (with a weak atom-field coupling) but not for the other one (with an ultrastrong atom-field coupling). As a result, we show that the field in the weak coupled atomic transition can be used as a tool to control the atom-field dynamics of the other (strong coupled) transition, thus realizing an effective two-level quantum Rabi model with a controllable field. In particular, a periodic temporal dynamics of the atom-field state can be realized by appropriate tuning of the weak control field, even for non-degenerate atomic levels. A photonic simulator of the mixed Rabi Jaynes-Cummings model, based on light transport in evanescently coupled optical waveguide lattices, is also briefly discussed.

  11. Accurate and balanced anisotropic Gaussian type orbital basis sets for atoms in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Trickey, S B

    2017-12-28

    In high magnetic field calculations, anisotropic Gaussian type orbital (AGTO) basis functions are capable of reconciling the competing demands of the spherically symmetric Coulombic interaction and cylindrical magnetic (B field) confinement. However, the best available a priori procedure for composing highly accurate AGTO sets for atoms in a strong B field [W. Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 022504 (2014)] yields very large basis sets. Their size is problematical for use in any calculation with unfavorable computational cost scaling. Here we provide an alternative constructive procedure. It is based upon analysis of the underlying physics of atoms in B fields that allow identification of several principles for the construction of AGTO basis sets. Aided by numerical optimization and parameter fitting, followed by fine tuning of fitting parameters, we devise formulae for generating accurate AGTO basis sets in an arbitrary B field. For the hydrogen iso-electronic sequence, a set depends on B field strength, nuclear charge, and orbital quantum numbers. For multi-electron systems, the basis set formulae also include adjustment to account for orbital occupations. Tests of the new basis sets for atoms H through C (1 ≤ Z ≤ 6) and ions Li + , Be + , and B + , in a wide B field range (0 ≤ B ≤ 2000 a.u.), show an accuracy better than a few μhartree for single-electron systems and a few hundredths to a few mHs for multi-electron atoms. The relative errors are similar for different atoms and ions in a large B field range, from a few to a couple of tens of millionths, thereby confirming rather uniform accuracy across the nuclear charge Z and B field strength values. Residual basis set errors are two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the electronic correlation energies in multi-electron atoms, a signal of the usefulness of the new AGTO basis sets in correlated wavefunction or density functional calculations for atomic and molecular systems in an external strong B

  12. Frequency-tunable microwave field detection in an atomic vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    We use an atomic vapor cell as a frequency tunable microwave field detector operating at frequencies from GHz to tens of GHz. We detect microwave magnetic fields from 2.3 GHz to 26.4 GHz, and measure the amplitude of the σ+ component of an 18 GHz microwave field. Our proof-of-principle demonstration represents a four orders of magnitude extension of the frequency tunable range of atomic magnetometers from their previous dc to several MHz range. When integrated with a high-resolution microwave imaging system [Horsley et al., New J. Phys. 17, 112002 (2015)], this will allow for the complete reconstruction of the vector components of a microwave magnetic field and the relative phase between them. Potential applications include near-field characterisation of microwave circuitry and devices, and medical microwave sensing and imaging.

  13. The Self-Similarity of the Near-Field Liquid Region from an Airblast Atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothell, Julie; Li, Danyu; Morgan, Timothy; Aliseda, Alberto; Machicoane, Nathanael; Kastengren, Alan; Heindel, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The atomization process in liquid gas coaxial injectors has been the subject of intense investigation that has identified multiple break-up regimes for the liquid jet and the dominant instabilities that determine the final liquid droplet size distribution. There are, however, many unknowns in the basic physics and practical applications of this atomizer configuration including the liquid gas interface dynamics in the presence of swirl as well as injection rate fluctuations. This study uses advanced X-ray imaging to characterize the complex, two-phase system in the near-field region of a canonical coaxial airblast atomizer. The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used to collect time resolved measurements of the liquid volume fraction in the flow. The resulting data, containing quantitative information about the interface dynamics and phenomena controlling droplet break-up, was analyzed to improve the understanding of the natural mechanisms that drive the atomization process. In the analysis, self-similarity models are used to relate the upstream liquid flow structures to the downstream atomization at various flow conditions. These self-similarity models show great potential in characterizing complex liquid flow in the near-field region of the atomizer. Office of Naval Research and Argonne National Laboratory.

  14. Gold-decorated highly ordered self-organized grating-like nanostructures on Ge surface: Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, Safiul Alam; Kumar, Mohit; Singh, Ranveer; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghose, Debabrata; Som, Tapobrata

    2016-10-28

    Nanoarchitecture by atomic manipulation is considered to be one of the emerging trends in advanced functional materials. It has a gamut of applications to offer in nanoelectronics, chemical sensing, and nanobiological science. In particular, highly ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures fabricated by self-organization methods are in high demand for their high aspect ratios and large number of applications. An efficient way of fabricating semiconductor nanostructures is by molecular beam epitaxy, where atoms are added to a crystalline surface at an elevated temperature during growth, yielding the desired structures in a self-assembled manner. In this article, we offer a room temperature process, in which atoms are sputtered away by ion impacts. Using gold ion implantation, the present study reports on the formation of highly ordered self-organized long grating-like nanostructures, with grooves between them, on a germanium surface. The ridges of the patterns are shown to have flower-like protruding nanostructures, which are mostly decorated by gold atoms. By employing local probe microscopic techniques like Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy, we observe a spatial variation in the work function and different nanoscale electrical conductivity on the ridges of the patterns and the grooves between them, which can be attributed to gold atom decorated ridges. Thus, the architecture  presented offers the advantage of using the patterned germanium substrates as periodic arrays of conducting ridges and poorly conducting grooves between them.

  15. Theory and computation of few-electron atoms in intense laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, L

    2001-01-01

    experimental peak laser intensity measurement. At 780 nm preliminary results of a comparable calculation of double-ionization are given. In anticipation of a high intensity, high frequency radiation source becoming available in Germany by 2003, a calculation at 14 nm has also been performed. Momentum distributions have revealed the new process of double-electron above threshold ionization. In this process both electrons absorb excess photons during double-ionization. The study of the helium atom-exposed to an intense laser field forms the topic of this thesis. In the context of laser-atom interactions, a laser is said to be intense if the force it exerts on an electron in an atomic orbital is comparable to the force experienced by that electron due to the binding atomic potential. The electronic response of the helium atom to an intense laser field is governed by the interactions of the two electrons between themselves, with the nucleus and with the field. The problem therefore is the fundamental three-body p...

  16. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna

    2015-05-19

    The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T 1 Al 2 CuLi / θ ′ Al 2 Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al 2 Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T 1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al 2 CuLi) in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al 2 CuLi) stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T 1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T 1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  17. A model for oxidation-driven surface segregation and transport on Pt-alloys studied by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, P. A. J.; Kreuzer, H. J.; Cerezo, A.; Smith, G. D. W.

    2011-08-01

    Using a purpose-built 3D atom probe, we have previously shown that exposure to oxidising gases (NO, N2O, O2) induces Rh surface segregation in Pt-Rh alloys, the extent of which is strongly dependent on treatment temperature, crystallographic plane and the presence of ternary alloy additions. In this paper, the segregation trends identified on three different crystallographic surfaces of Pt-Rh are analysed using thermodynamic and kinetic arguments. The segregation model we present is generic for diffusion on alloy surfaces in the presence of active gases. From it we obtain activation energies and diffusion coefficients for the processes of metal-oxide species diffusion both perpendicular to and laterally across the surface. Using these we propose a simple model for the interaction of chemically active gases with the surfaces of such alloys. Applying this understanding to sequential oxidation/reduction treatments would in principle allow improved control of the surface composition of alloy catalysts. Related applications of this model include optimisation of core-shell catalyst nanoparticles.

  18. An Atom Probe Study of κ-carbide Precipitation in Austenitic Lightweight Steel and the Effect of Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, L. N.; Van Aken, D. C.; Medvedeva, J.; Isheim, D.; Medvedeva, N.; Song, K.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of phosphorus on κ-carbide precipitation and alloy partitioning in an austenitic Fe-30Mn-9Al-1Si-0.9C-0.5Mo cast steel was studied utilizing a combination of transmission electron microscopy, 3D atom probe tomography, X-ray diffraction, and first-principles atomistic modeling. Increasing the amount of phosphorus from 0.006 to 0.043 wt pct P increased the kinetics of the initial ordering reaction. Specimens from the high-phosphorus steel showed some degree of short-range ordering of Fe-Al-C that took place during the quench. It was shown that phosphorus increases both the size and volume fraction of κ-carbide during aging. However, the distribution of phosphorus appears to be homogeneous, and thus long-range diffusion of phosphorus was not responsible for the observed increase in hardening. It is shown that phosphorus encourages the initial short-range ordering into the E21 structure of κ-carbide and also accelerates spinodal decomposition associated with carbon and aluminum diffusions.

  19. Characterization of Precipitation in Al-Li Alloy AA2195 by means of Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Khushaim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of the commercial alloy AA2195 was investigated on the nanoscale after conducting T8 tempering. This particular thermomechanical treatment of the specimen resulted in the formation of platelet-shaped T1Al2CuLi/θ′Al2Cu precipitates within the Al matrix. The electrochemically prepared samples were analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for chemical mapping. The θ′ platelets, which are less than 2 nm thick, have the stoichiometric composition consistent with the expected Al2Cu equilibrium composition. Additionally, the Li distribution inside the θ′ platelets was found to equal the same value as in the matrix. The equally thin T1 platelet deviates from the formula (Al2CuLi in its stoichiometry and shows Mg enrichment inside the platelet without any indication of a higher segregation level at the precipitate/matrix interface. The deviation from the (Al2CuLi stoichiometry cannot be simply interpreted as a consequence of artifacts when measuring the Cu and Li concentrations inside the T1 platelet. The results show rather a strong hint for a true lower Li and Cu contents, hence supporting reasonably the hypothesis that the real chemical composition for the thin T1 platelet in the T8 tempering condition differs from the equilibrium composition of the thermodynamic stable bulk phase.

  20. Quantum Otto engine of a two-level atom with single-mode fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhui; Wu, Zhaoqi; He, Jizhou

    2012-04-01

    We establish a quantum Otto engine (QOE) of a two-level atom, which is confined in a one-dimensional (1D) harmonic trap and is coupled to single-mode radiation fields. Besides two adiabatic processes, the QOE cycle consists of two isochoric processes, along one of which the two-level atom as the working substance interacts with a single-mode radiation field. Based on the semigroup approach, we derive the time for completing any adiabatic process and then present a performance analysis of the heat engine model. Furthermore, we generalize the results to the performance optimization for a QOE of a single two-level atom trapped in a 1D power-law potential. Our result shows that the efficiency at maximum power output is dependent on the trap exponent θ but is independent of the energy spectrum index σ.

  1. Effect of atom- and group-based truncations on biomolecules simulated with reaction-field electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boris

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the reaction-field method of electrostatics is tested in molecular dynamics simulations of protein human interleukin-4 and a short DNA fragment in explicit solvent. Two truncation schemes are considered: one based on the position of atomic charges in water molecules and the other on the position of groups of charges. The group-based truncation leads to the melting of the DNA double helix. In contrast, the atom-based truncation maintains the helical structure intact. Similarly for the protein, the group-based truncation leads to an unfolding at pH 2 while the atom-based truncation produces stable trajectories at low and normal pH, in agreement with experiment. Artificial repulsion between charged residues associated with the group-based truncation is identified as the microscopic reason behind unfolding of the protein. Implications of different truncation schemes in reaction-field simulations of biomolecules are discussed. PMID:21311933

  2. Variational Monte Carlo calculations of lithium atom in strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doma, S. B., E-mail: sbdoma@alexu.edu.eg [Alexandria University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Shaker, M. O.; Farag, A. M. [Tanta University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); El-Gammal, F. N., E-mail: famta-elzahraa4@yahoo.com [Menofia University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The variational Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the ground state and some excited states of the lithium atom and its ions up to Z = 10 in the presence of an external magnetic field regime with γ = 0–100 arb. units. The effect of increasing field strength on the ground state energy is studied and precise values for the crossover field strengths were obtained. Our calculations are based on using accurate forms of trial wave functions, which were put forward in calculating energies in the absence of magnetic field. Furthermore, the value of Y at which ground-state energy of the lithium atom approaches to zero was calculated. The obtained results are in good agreement with the most recent values and also with the exact values.

  3. Laser-induced reversion of δ′ precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna Saeed Amin

    2016-06-14

    The influence of tuning the laser pulse energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction, and composition of δ\\' precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser pulse energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser pulse energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of δ\\' solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A simple model for atomic layer doped field-effect transistor (ALD-FET) electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora R, M.E. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Unidad Aguascalientes. Juan de Montoro 207, Zona Centro, 20000 Aguascalientes (Mexico); Gaggero S, L.M. [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Av. Preparatoria 301, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    We propose a simple potential model based on the Thomas-Fermi approximation to reproduce the main properties of the electronic structure of an atomic layer doped field effect transistor. Preliminary numerical results for a Si-based ALD-FET justify why bound electronic states are not observed in the experiment. (Author)

  5. Refined OPLS All-Atom Force Field for Saturated Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers at Full Hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciejewski, A.; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M.; Cramariuc, O.

    2014-01-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model ...

  6. Coherent phase control of excitation of atoms by bichromatic laser radiation in an electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astapenko, VA

    A new method for coherent phase control of excitation of atoms in a discrete spectrum under the action of bichromatic laser radiation with the frequency ratio 1 : 2 is analysed. An important feature of this control method is the presence of a electrostatic field, which removes the parity selection

  7. High-magnetic-field-assisted scattering of electrons with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy [Laban Hrad Vidyapith, AD-369, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2007-04-28

    We have investigated quantum mechanically the scattering of electrons off atomic hydrogen in a strong magnetic field. Elastic, inelastic, backward and total scattering cross sections are reported. Near-resonance behaviour of the system is analysed. Results are presented after evaluating and summing all-order Born series under suitable physical conditions.

  8. Electric field as a switching tool for magnetic states in atomic-scale nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negulyaev, N N; Stepanyuk, V S; Hergert, W; Kirschner, J

    2011-01-21

    One of the most promising candidates for the construction of ultrahigh-density storage media is low-dimensional atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures exhibiting magnetic bi- or multistability. Here we propose a novel route of locally controlling and switching magnetism in such nanostructures. Our ab initio studies reveal that externally applied electric field can be used for this purpose.

  9. Ternary logic implemented on a single dopant atom field effect silicon transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, M.; Mol, J.A.; Verduijn, J.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Rogge, S.; Levine, R.D.; Remacle, F.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an experimental proof of principle for a ternary multiplier realized in terms of the charge state of a single dopant atom embedded in a fin field effect transistor (Fin-FET). Robust reading of the logic output is made possible by using two channels to measure the current flowing through

  10. Most Typical 12 Resonant Perturbation of the Hydrogen Atom by Weak Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K.; Lukina, O. V.; Sadovskii, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    We study a perturbation of the hydrogen atom by small homogeneous static electric and magnetic fields in a specific mutual alignment with angle approximately pi/3 which results in the 12 resonance of the linearized Keplerian n-shell approximation. The bifurcation diagram of the classical integrable

  11. Influence of atoms with high ionization potentials on a discharge in crossed E and H fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A.; Timchenko, N.N.; Khripunov, B.I.; Shapkin, V.V.

    1980-11-01

    We consider processes connected with the separation of elements in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge with a plasma gun discharge in crossed E and H fields. We analyze the influence of atoms with high ionization potentials on the separation parameters, the value of the transverse ion current, and the separation coefficient. We not the role played by the radial electric field in the gas ionization processes and in the resulting growth of ion acoustic instabilities.

  12. Regularity and Chaos in the Hydrogen Atom Highly Excited with a Strong Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amdouni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the relativistic corrections on the energy spectra are analyzed. Effective simulations based on manipulations of operators in the Sturmian basis are developed. Discrete and continuous energy spectra of a hydrogen atom with realistic nucleus mass in a strong magnetic field are computed. The transition from regularity to chaos in diamagnetic problem with the effect of the nucleus recoil energy is explored. Anticrossing of energy levels is observed for strong magnetic field.

  13. Thresholds to Chaos and Ionization for the Hydrogen Atom in Rotating Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Chandre, C.; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T.

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the classical phase space of the hydrogen atom in crossed magnetic and circularly polarized microwave fields in the high frequency regime, using the Chirikov resonance overlap criterion and the renormalization map. These methods are used to compute thresholds to large scale chaos and to ionization. The effect of the magnetic field is a strong stabilization of a set of invariant tori which bound the trajectories and prevent stochastic ionization. In order to ionize, larger amplitude...

  14. The Optical Chirality Flux as a Useful Far-Field Probe of Chiral Near Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Poulikakos, Lisa V; McPeak, Kevin M; Burger, Sven; Niegemann, Jens; Hafner, Christian; Norris, David J

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the interaction between chiral matter and highly twisted light, quantities that can help characterize chiral electromagnetic fields near nanostructures are needed. Here, by analogy with Poynting's theorem, we formulate the time-averaged conservation law of optical chirality in lossy dispersive media and identify the optical chirality flux as an ideal far-field observable for characterizing chiral optical near fields. Bounded by the conservation law, we show that it provides precise information, unavailable from circular dichroism spectroscopy, on the magnitude and handedness of highly twisted fields near nanostructures.

  15. Using Jupiter’s gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection. PMID:27005472

  16. Dust as probe for horizontal field distribution in low pressure gas discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Peter; Reyes, Jorge C; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2014-01-01

    Using dust grains as probes in gas discharge plasma is a very promising, but at the same time very challenging method, as the individual external control of dust grains has to be solved. We propose and demonstrate the applicability of the RotoDust experiment, where the well controlled centrifugal force is balanced by the horizontal confinement field in plane electrode argon radio frequency gas discharges. We have reached a resolution of 0.1 V/cm for the electric field. This technique is used to verify numerical simulations and to map symmetry properties of the confinement in dusty plasma experiments using a glass box.

  17. Probes and Tests of Strong-Field Gravity with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psaltis Dimitrios

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron stars and black holes are the astrophysical systems with the strongest gravitational fields in the universe. In this article, I review the prospect of using observations of such compact objects to probe some of the most intriguing general relativistic predictions in the strong-field regime: the absence of stable circular orbits near a compact object and the presence of event horizons around black-hole singularities. I discuss the need for a theoretical framework, within which future experiments will provide detailed, quantitative tests of gravity theories. Finally, I summarize the constraints imposed by current observations of neutron stars on potential deviations from general relativity.

  18. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  19. Multisensor Capacitance Probes for Simultaneously Monitoring Rice Field Soil-Water- Crop-Ambient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brinkhoff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multisensor capacitance probes (MCPs have traditionally been used for soil moisture monitoring and irrigation scheduling. This paper presents a new application of these probes, namely the simultaneous monitoring of ponded water level, soil moisture, and temperature profile, conditions which are particularly important for rice crops in temperate growing regions and for rice grown with prolonged periods of drying. WiFi-based loggers are used to concurrently collect the data from the MCPs and ultrasonic distance sensors (giving an independent reading of water depth. Models are fit to MCP water depth vs volumetric water content (VWC characteristics from laboratory measurements, variability from probe-to-probe is assessed, and the methodology is verified using measurements from a rice field throughout a growing season. The root-mean-squared error of the water depth calculated from MCP VWC over the rice growing season was 6.6 mm. MCPs are used to simultaneously monitor ponded water depth, soil moisture content when ponded water is drained, and temperatures in root, water, crop and ambient zones. The insulation effect of ponded water against cold-temperature effects is demonstrated with low and high water levels. The developed approach offers advantages in gaining the full soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in a single robust sensor.

  20. Single atom microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  1. Double tuning a single input probe for heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy at low field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadanki, Sasidhar; Colon, Raul D.; Moore, Jay; Waddell, Kevin W.

    2012-10-01

    Applications of PASADENA in biomedicine are continuing to emerge due to recent demonstrations that hyperpolarized metabolic substrates and the corresponding reaction products persist sufficiently long to be detected in vivo. Biomedical applications of PASADENA typically differ from their basic science counterparts in that the polarization endowed by addition of parahydrogen is usually transferred from nascent protons to coupled storage nuclei for subsequent detection on a higher field imaging instrument. These pre-imaging preparations usually take place at low field, but commercial spectrometers capable of heteronuclear pulsed NMR at frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz are scarce though, in comparison to single channel consoles in that field regime. Reported here is a probe circuit that can be used in conjunction with a phase and amplitude modulation scheme we have developed called PANORAMIC (Precession And Nutation for Observing Rotations At Multiple Intervals about the Carrier), that expands a single channel console capability to double or generally multiple resonance with minimal hardware modifications. The demands of this application are geared towards uniform preparation, and since the hyperpolarized molecules are being detected externally at high field, detection sensitivity is secondary to applied field uniformity over a large reaction volume to accommodate heterogeneous chemistry of gas molecules at a liquid interface. The probe circuit was therefore configured with a large (40 mL) Helmholtz sample coil for uniformity, and double-tuned to the Larmor precession frequencies of 13C/1H (128/510 kHz) within a custom solenoidal electromagnet at a static field of 12 mT. Traditional (on-resonant) as well as PANORAMIC NMR signals with signal to noise ratios of approximately 75 have been routinely acquired with this probe and spectrometer setup from 1024 repetitions on the high frequency channel. The proton excitation pulse width was 240 μs at 6.31 W

  2. Studying nearest neighbor correlations by atom probe tomography (APT) in metallic glasses as exemplified for Fe40Ni40B20 glassy ribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Shariq, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    A next nearest neighbor evaluation procedure of atom probe tomography data provides distributions of the distances between atoms. The width of these distributions for metallic glasses studied so far is a few Angstrom reflecting the spatial resolution of the analytical technique. However, fitting Gaussian distributions to the distribution of atomic distances yields average distances with statistical uncertainties of 2 to 3 hundredth of an Angstrom. Fe 40Ni40B20 metallic glass ribbons are characterized this way in the as quenched state and for a state heat treated at 350 °C for 1 h revealing a change in the structure on the sub-nanometer scale. By applying the statistical tool of the χ2 test a slight deviation from a random distribution of B-atoms in the as quenched sample is perceived, whereas a pronounced elemental inhomogeneity of boron is detected for the annealed state. In addition, the distance distribution of the first fifteen atomic neighbors is determined by using this algorithm for both annealed and as quenched states. The next neighbor evaluation algorithm evinces a steric periodicity of the atoms when the next neighbor distances are normalized by the first next neighbor distance. A comparison of the nearest neighbor atomic distribution for as quenched and annealed state shows accumulation of Ni and B. Moreover, it also reveals the tendency of Fe and B to move slightly away from each other, an incipient step to Ni rich boride formation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  4. Sub-natural $N$-type Resonance in Cesium Atomic Vapor: splitting in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Slavov, D; Sarkisyan, D; Mirzoyan, R; Krasteva, A; Wilson-Gordon, A D; Cartaleva, S

    2013-01-01

    The sub-natural-width $N$-type resonance in {\\Lambda}-system, on the $D_2$ line of Cs atoms is studied for the first time in the presence of a buffer gas (neon) and the radiations of two continuous narrow band diode lasers. $L$ = 1 cm long cell is used to investigate $N$-type process. The $N$-type resonance in a magnetic field for $^{133}$Cs atoms is shown to split into seven or eight components, depending on the magnetic field and laser radiation directions. The results obtained indicate that levels $F_g$ = 3, 4 are initial and final in the N resonance formation. The experimental results with magnetic field agree well with the theoretical curves.

  5. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shoujun [Berkeley, CA; Lowery, Thomas L [Belmont, MA; Budker, Dmitry [El Cerrito, CA; Yashchuk, Valeriy V [Richmond, CA; Wemmer, David E [Berkeley, CA; Pines, Alexander [Berkeley, CA

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  6. Coherent scattering of an atom in the field of a standing wave under conditions of initial quantum correlation of subsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trubilko, A. I., E-mail: trubilko.andrey@gmail.com [St. Petersburg University of State Fire Service of the Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Coherent scattering of a two-level atom in the field of a quantized standing wave of a micromaser is considered under conditions of initial quantum correlation between the atom and the field. Such a correlation can be produced by a broadband parametric source. The interaction leading to scattering of the atom from the nonuniform field occurs in the dispersion limit or in the wing of the absorption line of the atom. Apart from the quantized field, the atom simultaneously interacts with two classical counterpropagating waves with different frequencies, which are acting in the plane perpendicular to the atom’s propagation velocity and to the wavevector of the standing wave. Joint action of the quantized field and two classical waves induces effective two-photon and Raman resonance interaction on the working transition. The effective Hamiltonian of the interaction is derived using the unitary transformation method developed for a moving atom. A strong effect is detected, which makes it possible to distinguish the correlated initial state of the atom and the field in the scattering of atom from the state of independent systems. For all three waves, scattering is not observed when systems with quantum correlation are prepared using a high-intensity parametric source. Conversely, when the atom interacts only with the nonuniform field of the standing wave, scattering is not observed in the case of the initial factorized state.

  7. Aspects of the theory of atoms and coherent matter and their interaction with electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Halvor Moell

    2002-07-01

    In the present work I have outlined and contributed to the time-dependent theory of the interaction between atoms and electromagnetic fields and the theory of Bose-Einstein condensates. New numerical methods and algorithms have been developed and applied in practice. Calculations have exhibited certain new dynamical features. All these calculations are in a regime where the applied field is of the same magnitude as the atomic field. In the case of BEC we have investigated the use of time-dependent methods to calculate the excitation frequencies. We also investigated the possibility of nonlinear coupling for a scissors mode and found no such contributions to damping which is consistent with other studies . Special emphasis has also been paid to the gyroscopic motion of rotating BEC where several models were investigated. Briefly, the main conclusions are: (1) Rydberg wave packets appear for direct excitations of Rydberg atoms for long pulses. (2) The survival of just a few states is decided by symmetry of the Hamiltonian. (3) For few cycle intense pulses classical and quantum mechanics show remarkable similarity. (4) Time-dependent methods for finding excitation frequencies have been shown to be very efficient. (5) New dynamical features is shown in gyroscopic motion of BEC. (6) It was shown that no nonlinear mixing of scissors modes occur in the standard Gross-Pitaevskii regime. As mentioned in the introduction, this work is a part of very active research fields and new progress is constantly reported. Thus, the present work cannot be concluded as a closed loop. The fast development of grid based numerical solutions for atoms in intense fields will surely make great contribution to solve many of today's problems. It is a very important area of research to understand both nonperturbative atomic response and highly nonlinear optics. In the field of Bose-Einstein condensation the new experimental achievements constantly drive the field forward. The new

  8. Influence of the Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of CeO2 and UO2 for Characterization with UV-Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billy Valderrama; H.B. Henderson; C. Yablinsky; J. Gan; T.R. Allen; M.V. Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  9. Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy in PCR product analysis by peptide nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Danfeng; Yu, Fang; Kim, Junyoung; Scholz, Judith; Nielsen, Peter E; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-14

    Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) was recently developed for PCR product analysis, which allowed for real-time monitoring of hybridization processes and for the detection of trace amounts of PCR products, with a detection limit of 100 fmol on the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe surface, and 500 fmol on the DNA probe surface. By selectively labeling the strands of PCR-amplified DNA, it was shown that the heat denaturation process in combination with the application of low-salt condition substantially reduced the interference from the antisense strands and thus simplified the surface hybridization. Furthermore, SPFS was demonstrated to be capable of quantitatively discriminating the difference induced by single nucleotide substitution, even within one minute of contact time.

  10. Shannon entropy as an indicator of atomic avoided crossings in strong parallel magnetic and electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Férez, R; Dehesa, J S

    2003-09-12

    Avoided crossings are the most distinctive atomic spectroscopic features in the presence of magnetic and electric fields. We point out the role of Shannon's information entropy as an indicator or predictor of these phenomena by studying the dynamics of some excited states of hydrogen in the presence of parallel magnetic and electric fields. Moreover, in addition to the well-known energy level repulsion, it is found that Shannon's entropy manifests the informational exchange of the involved states as the magnetic field strength is varied across the narrow region where an avoided crossing occurs.

  11. Magnetic-field-mediated hybridization of ultracold atoms and a nanostring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, Andrei; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Leblanc, Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Through nanofabrication, mechanical elements can be engineered with vibration frequencies near the hyperfine and Zeeman resonances in an atomic system. By including magnetic elements as part of this mechanical object, we can couple the vibrational modes of the oscillator to the spin states of the atoms. The nanostring design offers new options for creating magnetic fields using dc and ac currents. Here, we consider and compare different ways to provide magnetic coupling between this mechanical motion and the spin states of an ultracold 87 Rb gas, and discuss methods of manipulating the quantum state of a mechanical oscillator using cold atoms, such as mechanical cooling. Finally, we discuss our progress towards the experimental realization of this system, including a system for optically transferring at cold 87 Rb gas from a remote 3D MOT, and constructing a versatile load-lock type UHV system for rapidly prototyping new devices.

  12. Probing the atomic structure of amorphous Ta2O5 mirror coatings for advanced gravitational wave detectors using transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, R.; Borisenko, K. B.; Cockayne, D. J. H.; Hough, J.; MacLaren, I.; Rowan, S.

    2010-07-01

    Advanced generations of ground-based gravitational wave detectors will use ultra-low-loss amorphous dielectric multilayer mirror coatings in order to minimise thermal noise, a limiting factor in detector sensitivity. Transmission electron microscopy is a promising way to probe the atomic structure of these coatings in an effort to better understand the causes of the observed mechanical loss (internal friction) and hence thermal noise.

  13. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  14. Electric field measurements on Cluster: comparing the double-probe and electron drift techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Eriksson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The four Cluster satellites each carry two instruments designed for measuring the electric field: a double-probe instrument (EFW and an electron drift instrument (EDI. We compare data from the two instruments in a representative sample of plasma regions. The complementary merits and weaknesses of the two techniques are illustrated. EDI operations are confined to regions of magnetic fields above 30 nT and where wave activity and keV electron fluxes are not too high, while EFW can provide data everywhere, and can go far higher in sampling frequency than EDI. On the other hand, the EDI technique is immune to variations in the low energy plasma, while EFW sometimes detects significant nongeophysical electric fields, particularly in regions with drifting plasma, with ion energy (in eV below the spacecraft potential (in volts. We show that the polar cap is a particularly intricate region for the double-probe technique, where large nongeophysical fields regularly contaminate EFW measurments of the DC electric field. We present a model explaining this in terms of enhanced cold plasma wake effects appearing when the ion flow energy is higher than the thermal energy but below the spacecraft potential multiplied by the ion charge. We suggest that these conditions, which are typical of the polar wind and occur sporadically in other regions containing a significant low energy ion population, cause a large cold plasma wake behind the spacecraft, resulting in spurious electric fields in EFW data. This interpretation is supported by an analysis of the direction of the spurious electric field, and by showing that use of active potential control alleviates the situation.

  15. IShTAR ICRF antenna field characterization in vacuum and plasma by using probe diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usoltceva Mariia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RF sheath physics is one of the key topics relevant for improvements of ICRF heating systems, which are present on nearly all modern magnetic fusion machines. This paper introduces developement and validation of a new approach to understanding general RF sheath physics. The presumed reason of enhanced plasma-antenna interactions, parallel electric field, is not measured directly, but proposed to be obtained from simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics® Modeling Software. Measurements of RF magnetic field components with B-dot probes are done on a linear device IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement and then compared to simulations. Good resulting accordance is suggested to be the criterion for trustworthiness of parallel electric field estimation as a component of electromagnetic field in modeling. A comparison between simulation and experiment for one magnetic field component in vacuum has demonstrated a close match. An additional complication to this ICRF antenna field characterization study is imposed by the helicon antenna which is used as a plasma ignition tool in the test arrangement. The plasma case, in contrast to the vacuum case, must be approached carefully, since the overlapping of ICRF antenna and helicon antenna fields occurs. Distinguishing of the two fields is done by an analysis of correlation between measurements with both antennas together and with each one separately.

  16. IShTAR ICRF antenna field characterization in vacuum and plasma by using probe diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoltceva, Mariia; Ochoukov, Roman; D'Inca, Rodolphe; Jacquot, Jonathan; Crombé, Kristel; Kostic, Ana; Heuraux, Stéphane; Faudot, Eric; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2017-10-01

    RF sheath physics is one of the key topics relevant for improvements of ICRF heating systems, which are present on nearly all modern magnetic fusion machines. This paper introduces developement and validation of a new approach to understanding general RF sheath physics. The presumed reason of enhanced plasma-antenna interactions, parallel electric field, is not measured directly, but proposed to be obtained from simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics® Modeling Software. Measurements of RF magnetic field components with B-dot probes are done on a linear device IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) and then compared to simulations. Good resulting accordance is suggested to be the criterion for trustworthiness of parallel electric field estimation as a component of electromagnetic field in modeling. A comparison between simulation and experiment for one magnetic field component in vacuum has demonstrated a close match. An additional complication to this ICRF antenna field characterization study is imposed by the helicon antenna which is used as a plasma ignition tool in the test arrangement. The plasma case, in contrast to the vacuum case, must be approached carefully, since the overlapping of ICRF antenna and helicon antenna fields occurs. Distinguishing of the two fields is done by an analysis of correlation between measurements with both antennas together and with each one separately.

  17. AUTOMATED FORCE FIELD PARAMETERIZATION FOR NON-POLARIZABLE AND POLARIZABLE ATOMIC MODELS BASED ONAB INITIOTARGET DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Roux, Benoît

    2013-08-13

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on atomistic models are increasingly used to study a wide range of biological systems. A prerequisite for meaningful results from such simulations is an accurate molecular mechanical force field. Most biomolecular simulations are currently based on the widely used AMBER and CHARMM force fields, which were parameterized and optimized to cover a small set of basic compounds corresponding to the natural amino acids and nucleic acid bases. Atomic models of additional compounds are commonly generated by analogy to the parameter set of a given force field. While this procedure yields models that are internally consistent, the accuracy of the resulting models can be limited. In this work, we propose a method, General Automated Atomic Model Parameterization (GAAMP), for generating automatically the parameters of atomic models of small molecules using the results from ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculations as target data. Force fields that were previously developed for a wide range of model compounds serve as initial guess, although any of the final parameter can be optimized. The electrostatic parameters (partial charges, polarizabilities and shielding) are optimized on the basis of QM electrostatic potential (ESP) and, if applicable, the interaction energies between the compound and water molecules. The soft dihedrals are automatically identified and parameterized by targeting QM dihedral scans as well as the energies of stable conformers. To validate the approach, the solvation free energy is calculated for more than 200 small molecules and MD simulations of 3 different proteins are carried out.

  18. Recovery of the Earth's Gravity Field Based on Spaceborne Atom-interferometry and Its Accuracy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic gravity gradiometer has been successfully applied as a core sensor in satellite gravity gradiometric mission GOCE, and its observations are used to recover the Earth's static gravity field with a degree and order above 200. The lifetime of GOCE has been over, and the next generation satellite gravity gradiometry with higher resolution is urgently required in order to recover the global steady-state gravity field with a degree and order of 200~360. High potential precision can be obtained in space by atom-interferometry gravity gradiometer due to its long interference time, and thus the atom-interferometry-based satellite gravity gradiometry has been proposed as one of the candidate techniques for the next satellite gravity gradiometric mission. In order to achieve the science goal for high resolution gravity field measurement in the future, a feasible scheme of atom-interferometry gravity gradiometry in micro-gravity environment is given in this paper, and the gravity gradient measurement can be achieved with a noise of 0.85mE/Hz1/2. Comparison and estimation of the Earth's gravity field recovery precision for different types of satellite gravity gradiometry is discussed, and the results show that the satellite gravity gradiometry based on atom-interferometry is expected to provide the global gravity field model with an improved accuracy of 7~8cm in terms of geoid height and 3×10-5 m/s2 in terms of gravity anomaly respectively at a degree and order of 252~290.

  19. Cold Atom Interferometers Used In Space (CAIUS) for Measuring the Earth's Gravity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraz, O.; Luca, M.; Siemes, C.; Haagmans, R.; Silvestrin, P.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decades, it has been shown that atomic quantum sensors are a newly emerging technology that can be used for measuring the Earth's gravity field. There are two ways of making use of that technology: One is a gravity gradiometer concept and the other is in a low-low satellite-to-satellite ranging concept. Whereas classical accelerometers typically suffer from high noise at low frequencies, Cold Atom Interferometers are highly accurate over the entire frequency range. We recently proposed a concept using cold atom interferometers for measuring all diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor and the full spacecraft angular velocity in order to achieve better performance than the GOCE gradiometer over a larger part of the spectrum, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures in the gravity field better than today. This concept relies on a high common mode rejection, which relaxes the drag free control compare to GOCE mission, and benefits from a long interaction time with the free falling clouds of atoms due to the micro gravity environment in space as opposed to the 1-g environment on-ground. Other concept is also being studied in the frame of NGGM, which relies on the hybridization between quantum and classical techniques to improve the performance of accelerometers. This could be achieved as it is realized in frequency measurements where quartz oscillators are phase locked on atomic or optical clocks. This technique could correct the spectrally colored noise of the electrostatic accelerometers in the lower frequencies. In both cases, estimation of the Earth gravity field model from the instruments has to be evaluated taking into account different system parameters such as attitude control, altitude of the satellite, time duration of the mission, etc. Miniaturization, lower consumptions and upgrading Technical Readiness Level are the key engineering challenges that have to be faced for these space quantum technologie.

  20. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  1. Minimal Basis Iterative Stockholder: Atoms in Molecules for Force-Field Development

    CERN Document Server

    Verstraelen, Toon; Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Vanduyfhuys, Louis; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic partial charges appear in the Coulomb term of many force-field models and can be derived from electronic structure calculations with a myriad of atoms-in-molecules (AIM) methods. More advanced models have also been proposed, using the distributed nature of the electron cloud and atomic multipoles. In this work, an electrostatic force field is defined through a concise approximation of the electron density, for which the Coulomb interaction is trivially evaluated. This approximate "pro-density" is expanded in a minimal basis of atom-centered s-type Slater density functions, whose parameters are optimized by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence of the pro-density from a reference electron density, e.g. obtained from an electronic structure calculation. The proposed method, Minimal Basis Iterative Stockholder (MBIS), is a variant of the Hirshfeld AIM method but it can also be used as a density-fitting technique. An iterative algorithm to refine the pro-density is easily implemented with a linear-sca...

  2. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-09-18

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  3. Intensive probing of clear air convective fields by radar and instrumented drone aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Clear air convective fields were probed in three summer experiments (1969, 1970, and 1971) on an S-band monopulse tracking radar at Wallops Island, Virginia, and a drone aircraft with a takeoff weight of 5.2 kg, wingspan of 2.5 m, and cruising glide speed of 10.3 m/sec. The drone was flown 23.2 km north of the radar and carried temperature, pressure/altitude, humidity, and vertical and airspeed velocity sensors. Extensive time-space convective field data were obtained by taking a large number of RHI and PPI pictures at short intervals of time. The rapidly changing overall convective field data obtained from the radar could be related to the meteorological information telemetered from the drone at a reasonably low cost by this combined technique.

  4. Analytic description of elastic electron-atom scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.; Zheltukhin, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    An analytic description of laser-assisted electron-atom scattering (LAES) in an elliptically polarized field is presented using time-dependent effective range (TDER) theory to treat both electron-laser and electron-atom interactions nonperturbatively. Closed-form formulas describing plateau features in LAES spectra are derived quantum mechanically in the low-frequency limit. These formulas provide an analytic explanation for key features of the LAES differential cross section. For the low-energy region of the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes the Kroll-Watson formula to the case of elliptic polarization. For the high-energy (rescattering) plateau in the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes prior results for a linearly polarized field valid for the high-energy end of the rescattering plateau [Flegel , J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/42/24/241002 42, 241002 (2009)] and confirms the factorization of the LAES cross section into three factors: two field-free elastic electron-atom scattering cross sections (with laser-modified momenta) and a laser field-dependent factor (insensitive to the scattering potential) describing the laser-driven motion of the electron in the elliptically polarized field. We present also approximate analytic expressions for the exact TDER LAES amplitude that are valid over the entire rescattering plateau and reduce to the three-factor form in the plateau cutoff region. The theory is illustrated for the cases of e-H scattering in a CO2-laser field and e-F scattering in a midinfrared laser field of wavelength λ=3.5μm, for which the analytic results are shown to be in good agreement with exact numerical TDER results.

  5. Probing the Near-Field of Second-Harmonic Light around Plasmonic Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Bernd; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-08

    We introduce a new concept that enables subwavelength polarization-resolved probing of the second-harmonic near-field distribution of plasmonic nanostructures. As a local sensor, this method utilizes aluminum nanoantennas, which are resonant to the second-harmonic wavelength and which allow to efficiently scatter the local second-harmonic light to the far-field. We place these sensors into the second-harmonic near-field generated by plasmonic nanostructures and carefully vary their position and orientation. Observing the second-harmonic light resonantly scattered by the aluminum nanoantennas provides polarization-resolved information about the local second-harmonic near-field distribution. We then investigate the polarization-resolved second-harmonic near-field of inversion symmetric gold dipole nanoantennas. Interestingly, we find strong evidence that the second-harmonic dipole is predominantly oriented perpendicular to the gold nanoantenna long axis, although the excitation laser is polarized parallel to the nanoantennas. We believe that our investigations will help to disentangle the highly debated origin of the second-harmonic response of inversion symmetric plasmonic structures. Furthermore, we believe that our new method, which enables the measurement of local nonlinear electric fields, will find widespread implementation and applications in nonlinear near-field optical microscopy.

  6. Full-field parallel interferometry coherence probe microscope for high-speed optical metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrani, A; Abdulhalim, I

    2015-06-01

    Parallel detection of several achromatic phase-shifted images is used to obtain a high-speed, high-resolution, full-field, optical coherence probe tomography system based on polarization interferometry. The high enface imaging speed, short coherence gate, and high lateral resolution provided by the system are exploited to determine microbump height uniformity in an integrated semiconductor chip at 50 frames per second. The technique is demonstrated using the Linnik microscope, although it can be implemented on any polarization-based interference microscopy system.

  7. Escape factors for thermionic cathodes in atomic gases in a wide electric field range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, M. S.; Naidis, G. V.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M.; Stojkovic, A.

    2006-07-01

    An approximate analytical expression is obtained for the escape factors for thermionically emitting cathodes in atomic gases that is uniformly valid at all values of the reduced electric field. This expression is used for evaluation of the escape factors in neon, helium and mercury. An independent evaluation is performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical results are in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations, both for reflecting and non-reflecting cathodes.

  8. Escape factors for thermionic cathodes in atomic gases in a wide electric field range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal); Naidis, G V [Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Petrovic, Z Lj [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Stojkovic, A [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2006-07-21

    An approximate analytical expression is obtained for the escape factors for thermionically emitting cathodes in atomic gases that is uniformly valid at all values of the reduced electric field. This expression is used for evaluation of the escape factors in neon, helium and mercury. An independent evaluation is performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical results are in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations, both for reflecting and non-reflecting cathodes.

  9. Strong-coupling theory of two-level atoms in periodic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata; Wreszinski

    2000-03-06

    We present a new convergent strong-coupling expansion for two-level atoms in external periodic fields, free of secular terms. As a first application, we show that the coherent destruction of tunneling is a third-order effect. We also present an exact treatment of the high-frequency region, and compare it with the theory of averaging. The qualitative frequency spectrum of the transition probability amplitude contains an effective Rabi frequency.

  10. Role of incoherent pumping field on absorption-dispersion properties of probe pulse in a graphene nanostructure under external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Hamedi, H. R.; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of weak probe light based on quantum coherence and interference in Landau-quantized graphene nanostructure driven by two coherent fields and incoherent pumping field is investigated. The linear dynamical properties of the graphene by means of density matrix method and perturbation theory are discussed. It is found that under certain condition and for appropriate choosing the parameters of the medium, the absorption, dispersion, group index of the weak probe light can be controlled. Moreover, it is shown that by means of incoherent pumping field the superluminal light propagation in the system is accompanied by amplification to make sure that the probe field is amplified as it passes through the system. Moreover, it is observed that the probe amplification can be obtained in the presence or absence of population inversion by properly choosing of system's parameters. We hope that these results may have useful in the future quantum communicational system and networks.

  11. Intense Plasma Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz Probe Science with Ultrafast Lasers for Solid State Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0029 Intense Plasma-Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz probe science with ultrafast lasers for Solid State Physics ...Plasma-Waveguide Terahertz Sources for High-Field THz probe science with ultrafast lasers for Solid State Physics , 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT... Physics Matter Probe 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17.  LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18.  NUMBER OF PAGES  11  19a.  NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  12. Bose–Einstein condensation in a vapor of sodium atoms in an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Pei-Lin, E-mail: youpeli@163.com

    2016-06-15

    Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) at normal temperature (T=343K) has been observed because an electric field was first applied. There are two ways to achieve phase transition: lower the temperature of Bose gas or increase its density. This article provides more appropriate method: increase the voltage. In theory, 3s and 3p states of sodium are not degenerate, but Na may be polar atom doesnot conflict with quantum mechanics because it is hydrogen-like atom. Our innovation lies in we applied an electric field used for the orientation polarization. Na vapor was filled in a cylindrical capacitor. In order to determine the polarity of sodium, we measured the capacitance at different temperatures. If Na is non-polar atom, its capacitance should be independent of temperature because the nucleus of atom is located at the center of the electron cloud. But our experiment shows that its capacitance is related to temperature, so Na is polar atom. In order to achieve Na vapor phase transition, we measured the capacitance at different voltages. From the entropy of Na vapor S=0, the critical voltage V{sub c}=68volts. When Vatoms are in random orientation S>0; when V>V{sub c}, the atoms become aligned with the field S<0, phase transition occurred. When V=390 volts »V{sub c}, the capacitance decreased from C=1.9C{sub 0} to C≈C{sub 0} (C{sub 0} is the vacuum capacitance), this result implies that almost all the Na atoms (more than 98%) are aligned with the field, Na vapor entered quasi-vacuum state. We create a BEC with 2.506×10{sup 17} atoms, condensate fraction reached 98.9%. This is BEC in momentum space. Our experiment shows that if a Bose gas enters quasi-vacuum state, this also means that it underwent phase transition and generates BEC. Therefore, quasi-vacuum state of alkali gas is essentially large-scale BEC. This is an unexpected discovery. BEC and vacuum theory are two unrelated research areas, but now they are closely linked together. The maximum

  13. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  14. Quantum averaging and resonances: two-level atom in a one-mode classical laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amniat-Talab

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available   We use a nonperturbative method based on quantum averaging and an adapted from of resonant transformations to treat the resonances of the Hamiltonian of a two-level atom interacting with a one-mode classical field in Floquet formalism. We illustrate this method by extraction of effective Hamiltonians of the system in two regimes of weak and strong coupling. The results obtained in the strong-coupling regime, are valid in the whole range of the coupling constant for the one-photon zero-field resonance.

  15. Probing and modeling of carrier motion in organic devices by electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Manaka, Takaaki; Taguchi, Dai

    2014-10-01

    By probing dielectric polarization originating from dipoles and electrons in materials, we can study dynamical carrier behaviors in materials and also in devices. Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement allows us to directly probe orientational dipolar motion in monolayers, while electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement allows dynamical electron and hole transport in solids to be probed directly. By probing nonlinear polarization induced in solids by coupling with incident electromagnetic waves of laser beam and dc electric field that originate from moving carriers, long-range carrier motion is visualized. Experiments using a time-resolved EFISHG technique reveal carrier transfer in organic devices such as organic field-effect transistors, organic light-emitting diodes, organic memory devices, and organic solar cells, and thus enable us to model the carrier transport mechanism. We anticipate that this novel technique using EFISHG can be a powerful tool for studying carrier behaviors in organic devices as well as in organic materials.

  16. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  17. Large-area field-ionization detector for the study of Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. C. L.; Piñeiro, A. M.; Roeder, E. E.; Rutbeck-Goldman, H. J.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here the development and characterization of a micro-channel plate (MCP) based detector designed for the efficient collection and detection of Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms for use in a time-of-flight apparatus. The designed detector collects Rydberg atoms over a large area (˜4 times greater than the active area of the MCP), ionizing incident atoms and then collecting and focusing the freed positrons onto the MCP. Here we discuss the function, design, and optimization of the device. The detector has an efficiency for Rydberg Ps that is two times larger than that of the γ-ray scintillation detector based scheme it has been designed to replace, with half the background signal. In principle, detectors of the type described here could be readily employed for the detection of any Rydberg atom species, provided a sufficient field can be applied to achieve an ionization rate of ≥108/s. In such cases, the best time resolution would be achieved by collecting ionized electrons rather than the positive ions.

  18. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  19. Design Considerations for a Portable Raman Probe Spectrometer for Field Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be a viable method for explosives detection. Currently most forensic Raman systems are either large, powerful instruments for laboratory experiments or handheld instruments for in situ point detection. We have chosen to examine the performance of certain benchtop Raman probe systems with the goal of developing an inexpensive, portable system that could be used to operate in a field forensics laboratory to examine explosives-related residues or samples. To this end, a rugged, low distortion line imaging dispersive Raman spectrograph was configured to work at 830 nm laser excitation and was used to determine whether the composition of thin films of plastic explosives or small (e.g., ≤10 μm particles of RDX or other explosives or oxidizers can be detected, identified, and quantified in the field. With 300 mW excitation energy, concentrations of RDX and PETN can be detected and reconstructed in the case of thin Semtex smears, but further work is needed to push detection limits of areal dosages to the ~1 μg/cm2 level. We describe the performance of several probe/spectrograph combinations and show preliminary data for particle detection, calibration and detection linearity for mixed compounds, and so forth.

  20. The optical properties of a weak probe field in a graphene ensemble under Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheli, Ali; Hamedi, H. R.; Sahrai, M.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the coherent manipulation of certain optical properties in graphene under Raman excitation by using a density-matrix approach. It is shown that the absorption and dispersion, the group velocity, and the transmission coefficient of the probe field can be efficiently controlled through proper adjustment of the intensity and frequency detuning of the control field. In addition, the optical bistability (OB) behavior is explored for the proposed system. It is found that the bistable threshold intensity and related hysteresis loop of OB can be controlled by the parameters of the system. The results obtained may be used in real experiments for the development of new types of nanoelectronic devices used for the realization of all-optical switching processes.

  1. Precision X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms as a probe of low-energy kaon-nucleus interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the exotic atoms where one atomic 1s electron is replaced by a K−, the strong interaction between the K− and the nucleus introduces an energy shift and broadening of the low-lying kaonic atomic levels which are determined by only the electromagnetic interaction. By performing X-ray spectroscopy for Z = 1,2 kaonic atoms, the SIDDHARTA experiment determined with high precision the shift and width for the 1s state of K− p and the 2p state of kaonic helium-3 and kaonic helium-4. These results provided unique information of the kaon-nucleus interaction in the low energy limit.

  2. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Concept Scientific Instruments, ZA de Courtaboeuf, 2 rue de la Terre de Feu, 91940 Les Ulis (France); Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Chrétien, Pascal; Schneegans, Olivier; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.houze@geeps.centralesupelec.fr [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delprat, Sophie [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); UPMC, Université Paris 06, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Bouzehouane, Karim; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Tatay, Sergio [Molecular Science Institute, University of Valencia, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Geffroy, Bernard [Lab. Physique des Interfaces et Couches minces (PICM), UMR 7647 CNRS-École polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lab. d' Innovation en Chimie des Surfaces et Nanosciences (LICSEN), NIMBE UMR 3685 CNRS-CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2016-06-13

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  3. Principle of A Nadir Field of View Instrument For A Solar Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A.; Moreau, T.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Louarn, P.

    The Nadir Field of View Instrument proposed for Solar Probe is a new category of device well adapted to explore in situ the solar atmosphere as close as 3Rsun from the surface of the Sun. In this extreme near-solar environment, abundant UV fluxes and high ambiant temperatures create a serious problem, which has led investigators to implement a thermal shield for the protection of the spacecraft and scientific pay- load. In the shield shadow, the nadir sector is not viewed by the instruments. To cover this essential part of field-of-view, we have designed an instrument, which enables the measurement of ion and electron velocity distribution functions in the solar direction, with no internal parts under direct solar illumination and incorporating a complete thermal shield. This instrument consists of an electrostatic deflection system specially designed to operate outside of the "occulted cone", a magnetic field free drift tube to transport safely particles inside the shadow thermal shield, a quadri-spherical (E/q) analyzer, and a channel electron multiplier block for particle detection. Charged parti- cles enter through the pin-hole, then are deflected by the electric field produced inside the deflector section. Particle in the proper energy-per-charge and angular ranges are selected and then detected at the image plane. The cylindrically symmetric deflector allows one to measure simultaneously all azimuthal angles from +20°to -20°with a 5° resolution. Since only 2 scans of energy and polar angle are needed to accomplish a 3D spectra on a non-spinning spacecraft, a high spatial and temporal resolution will be achieved; this resolution is sufficient to resolve filamentary structure in the corona. We present here the instrument concept intended for use in harsh environment and, extensive numerical computations which shown how we observe the solar wind from 60Rsun totheclosestapproachat4Rsun,consistentwiththerequirementsofasolar probe mission.

  4. Charge-imaging field-effect transistors for scanned probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lester Hao-Lin

    This thesis presents experiments on integrating a charge-imaging field-effect transistor onto a scanned probe microscopy cantilever to make a moveable charge-imager. Such an imager would be used for imaging the spatial distribution of electric charge in semiconductor heterostructures and devices. Learning about the spatial distribution of charge yields knowledge about electrical transport at the microscopic level. The information gained from measuring the spatial distribution of charge increases with improvements in the spatial resolution and charge sensitivity of the charge-imaging probes. So, the goal is to devise a charge-imager with sub-micron spatial resolution and single-electron charge sensitivity. To achieve high spatial resolution and excellent charge sensitivity, the charge-imaging field-effect transistors are made with a quantum point contact geometry. The charge response is confined to a disc with full width half-maximum comparable to its channel width, and the charge noise spectrum reaches values "1 e/Hz½ at 30 kHz. Their low power dissipation (deflections of the cantilever to map the sample topography. The strain-sensing field-effect transistors have a white noise value for the deflection noise of 0.5 nm/Hz½ at 10 kHz. This thesis describes the fabrication and characterization of charge-imaging field-effect transistors and scanned microscopy cantilevers with integrated strain-sensing transistors. The transistors and cantilevers were fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure using electron-beam lithography and were characterized at liquid Helium temperatures. Possible future experiments include demonstrating the charge-imaging FET's sensitivity to single electrons, creating a charge- and topography-imaging cantilever, and directly measuring the electron distributions in nanostructures.

  5. Probing magnetic field strength using multi-frequency polarized synchrotron intensity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zekun; Lazarian, Victor; Yuen, Ka Ho; Sun, Bangzheng; Hu, Yue; Lazarian, Alex

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new method in probing the line-of-sight (LOS) component of magnetic field strength using multi-frequency polarized synchrotron intensity gradients (pSIGs). This work is based on the recent advancements on the velocity gradient technique (VGT) that gradients of velocity and synchrotron intensity observables can reliably tell the direction of magnetic field. When Faraday rotation(FR) is taken into account, the direction of pSIGs are modified with respect to the strength of LOS density-weighted magnetic field strength and the emission frequency. By comparing the alignment of multi-frequency pSIGs to that with minimal FR effect, we show that the LOS field strength is linearly correlated to the changing rate of the relative alignment measure. While synchrotron polarization carries similar effect under FR, we show that our recipe can only be applied to pSIGs. We test our method on diffuse media and self-gravitating molecular cloud and obtain a reasonably accurate magnetic field strength measure compared to Zeeman measurement.

  6. Low-Drift Coherent Population Trapping Clock Based on Laser-Cooled Atoms and High-Coherence Excitation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochi; Ivanov, Eugene; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A.

    2017-11-01

    A compact cold-atom coherent population trapping clock in which laser-cooled atoms are interrogated with highly coherent coherent population trapping fields under free fall is presented. The system achieves fractional frequency instability at the level of 3 ×10-13 on the time scale of an hour. The clock may lend itself to portable applications since the atoms typically fall only 1.6 mm during the typical interrogation period of 18 ms.

  7. On the dynamics of excited atoms in time dependent electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerre, Morten

    2004-06-01

    This thesis is composed of seven scientific publications written in the period 2001-2004. The focus has been set on Rydberg atoms of hydrogen and lithium in relatively weak electromagnetic fields. Such atoms have been studied extensively during many years, both experimentally and theoretically, They are relatively easy to handle in the laboratory. Their willingness to react to conventional field sources and their long lifetimes, are two reasons for this. Much new insight into fundamental quantum mechanics has been extracted from such studies. By exciting a non-hydrogenic ground state atom or molecule into a highly excited state, many properties of atomic hydrogen are adopted. In many cases the dynamics of such systems can be accurately described by the hydrogenic theory, or alternatively by some slightly modified version like quantum defect theory. In such theories the Rydberg electron(s) of the non-hydrogenic Rydberg system is treated like it is confined in a modified Coulomb potential, which arises from the non-hydrogenic core. defined by the non-excited electrons and the nucleus. The more heavily bound core electrons are less influenced from external perturbations than the excited electrons, giving rise to the so-called frozen-core approximation. where the total effect of the core electrons is put into a modified Coulomb potential. A major part of this thesis has been allocated to the study of core effects in highly excited states of lithium. In collaboration with time experimental group of Erik Horsdal-Pedersen at Aarhus University, we have considered several hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic aspects of such states, when exposed to weak slowly varying electromagnetic fields. The dynamics was restricted to one principal shell (intrashell). Two general features were observed, either the hydrogenic theory applied or alternatively, in case of massive deviation, the dynamics was accurately described by quantum defect theory, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of such

  8. Corresponding aspects of strong-field multiquantum processes and ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, K.; Gibson, G.; Jara, H.; Luk, T.S.; McIntyre, I.A.; McPherson, A.; Rosman, R.; Solem, J.C.; Rhodes, C.K. (Lab. for Atomic, Molecular, and Radiation Physics, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, P.O. Box 4348, Chicago, IL (US))

    1988-10-01

    Corresponding aspects of multiphoton processes and ion-atom collisions are explored. With a simple model, a set of relationships is derived which relate the radiative power, frequency, and pulse width governing multiphoton coupling to the corresponding variables of ion charge, collisional velocity, and impact parameter involved in collisional reactions. Comparisons of spectral data in the extreme ultraviolet region for Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe produced by collisional excitation and subpicosecond ultraviolet laser irradiation indicate approximate conformance with the expectations stemming from this analysis. These results suggest that, for ultraviolet radiation, this approach may be useful in understanding the gross features of the strong-field multiquantum interaction over the range of intensity spanning from --10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/ to --10/sup 21/ W/cm/sup 2/. Collisional data on transfer ionization occurring in ion-atom collisions are also used to estimate the conditions under which multiphoton processes should be appreciably influenced by multielectron motions.

  9. Perfect Precision Detecting Probability Of An Atom Via Sgc Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    This letter investigates a scheme of high efficient two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via scanning probe absorption in a Y-type four-level atomic scheme with two orthogonal standing waves. It is shown that because of the position dependent atom-field interaction, the spatial probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined via monitoring the probe absorption and gain spectra. The impact of different controlling parameters of the system on 2D localization is studied. We find that owning the effect of spontaneously generated coherence (SGC), the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of detecting the atom within the sub-wavelength domain of the two orthogonal standing waves reaches to hundred percent. Phase controlling of position dependent probe absorption is then discussed. The presented scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or atom nanolithography via high precision and high resolution atom localization.

  10. Optical imaging of nanosized structures by using plasmonically excited cascade near-field coupling with a carbon nanotube probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Tachizaki, Takehiro; Nakata, Toshihiko

    2017-10-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) overcomes the diffraction limit, thereby realizing a spatial resolution far beyond the wavelength of light used. However, NSOM still has a problem in repeatable imaging at the high spatial resolution and high contrast with conventional aperture or apertureless probes that are needed for practical applications. Here, we describe an optical imaging technique based on plasmonically excited cascade near-field coupling that has the potential to achieve single-nanometer spatial resolution with high imaging repeatability. This technique makes use of a plasmon waveguide coupled with a high-stiffness carbon nanotube optical probe. Through the action of surface plasmon polaritons, the input far-field light is converted into an optical near field that is used as an excitation source. This excitation near field is strongly enhanced and concentrated on the probe tip such that it generates a second near field as a nanosized probe spot on the apex of the tip. Extremely high-resolution optical imaging is accomplished by scanning the sample surface with the probe spot. At a wavelength of 850 nm, a 5-nm-wide metallic striped pattern on a cross-sectional superlattice sample was clearly resolved as a permittivity distribution.

  11. Electrochemically assisted localized etching of ZnO single crystals in water using a catalytically active Pt-coated atomic force microscopy probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kota; Sasano, Junji; Nagai, Moeto

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a nanofabrication technique based on the electrochemically assisted chemical dissolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals in water at room temperature using a catalytically active Pt-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe. Fabricated grooves featured depths and widths of several tens and several hundreds of nanometers, respectively. The material removal rate of ZnO was dramatically improved by controlling the formation of hydrogen ions (H+) on the surface of the catalytic Pt-coated probe via oxidation of H2O molecules; this reaction can be enhanced by applying a cathodic potential to an additional Pt-wire working electrode in a three-electrode configuration. Consequently, ZnO can be dissolved chemically in water as a soluble Zn2+ species via a reaction with H+ species present in high concentrations in the immediate vicinity of the AFM tip apex.

  12. Thermal ion imagers and Langmuir probes in the Swarm electric field instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Buchert, S. C.; Eriksson, A. I.; Gill, R.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Öhlen, L.; Smith, M.; Moffat, B.

    2017-02-01

    The European Space Agency's three Swarm satellites were launched on 22 November 2013 into nearly polar, circular orbits, eventually reaching altitudes of 460 km (Swarm A and C) and 510 km (Swarm B). Swarm's multiyear mission is to make precision, multipoint measurements of low-frequency magnetic and electric fields in Earth's ionosphere for the purpose of characterizing magnetic fields generated both inside and external to the Earth, along with the electric fields and other plasma parameters associated with electric current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Electric fields perpendicular to the magnetic field B→ are determined through ion drift velocity v→i and magnetic field measurements via the relation E→⊥=-v→i×B→. Ion drift is derived from two-dimensional images of low-energy ion distribution functions provided by two Thermal Ion Imager (TII) sensors viewing in the horizontal and vertical planes; v→i is corrected for spacecraft potential as determined by two Langmuir probes (LPs) which also measure plasma density ne and electron temperature Te. The TII sensors use a microchannel-plate-intensified phosphor screen imaged by a charge-coupled device to generate high-resolution distribution images (66 × 40 pixels) at a rate of 16 s-1. Images are partially processed on board and further on the ground to generate calibrated data products at a rate of 2 s-1; these include v→i, E→⊥, and ion temperature Ti in addition to electron temperature Te and plasma density ne from the LPs.

  13. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  14. Measurement of a strong atomic hyperfine field allowing the determination of nuclear g-factors in (sub)nanosecond states

    CERN Document Server

    Vyvey, K; Cottenier, S; Balabanski, D L; Coulier, N; Coussement, R; Georgiev, G; Lépine-Szily, A; Ternier, S; Teughels, S

    2001-01-01

    An extension of the time-integrated atomic decoupling technique to measure g-factors of (sub)nanosecond isomers and/or the magnetic hyperfine field induced by highly excited atomic electrons on nuclei recoiling into vacuum is discussed. A high average field B sub h sub f =1080 sub - sub 1 sub 7 sub 5 sup + sup 2 sup 7 sup 0 T and an average atomic spin J=2.7(2) is deduced using the known magnetic moment of a 4.05(7) mu s isomer in sup 6 sup 9 Ge. Such high magnetic fields allow g-factor measurements of (sub)nanosecond states. Ab initio calculations show that the combination of a high average magnetic hyperfine field and a high average atomic spin is only possible if a considerable fraction of the ions is in a metastable excited state.

  15. Intrinsic decoherence in the interaction of two fields with a two-level atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez-Amaro, R. [Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Mexico (Mexico); INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Escudero-Jimenez, J.L. [INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Moya-Cessa, H.

    2009-06-15

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom and two fields, one of them classical. We obtain an effective Hamiltonian for this system by using a method recently introduced that produces a small rotation to the Hamiltonian that allows to neglect some terms in the rotated Hamiltonian. Then we solve a variation of the Schroedinger equation that models decoherence as the system evolves through intrinsic mechanisms beyond conventional quantum mechanics rather than dissipative interaction with an environment. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  17. QMQSAR: utilization of a semiempirical probe potential in a field-based QSAR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Steve; Merz, Kenneth M; Lauri, Giorgio; Ianni, James C

    2005-01-15

    A semiempirical quantum mechanical approach is described for the creation of molecular field-based QSAR models from a set of aligned ligand structures. Each ligand is characterized by a set of probe interaction energy (PIE) values computed at various grid points located near the surface of the ligand. Single-point PM3 calculations afford these PIE values, which represents a pool of independent variables from which multilinear regression models of activity are built. The best n-variable fit is determined by constructing an initial regression using standard forward stepwise selection, followed by refinement using a simulated annealing technique. The resulting fit provides an easily interpreted 3D physical model of ligand binding affinity. Validation against three literature datasets demonstrates the ability of the semiempirical potential to model critical binding interactions in diverse systems.

  18. Probing whole cell currents in high-frequency electrical fields: identification of thermal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapinski, Michael; Manus, Stephan; Fertig, Niels; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2008-01-18

    An open-end coaxial probe is combined with a planar patch-clamp system to apply electric fields with GHz frequencies during conventional patch-clamp measurements. The combination of pulsed microwave irradiation and lock-in detection allows for the separation of fast and slow effects and hence facilitates the identification of thermal effects. The setup and the influence of radiation on the patch-clamp current are thoroughly characterized. For the independent optical verification of heating effects, a temperature microscopy technique is applied with high spatial, temporal and temperature resolution. It is shown that the effect of radiation at GHz frequencies on whole cell currents is predominantly thermal in nature in the case of RBL cells with an endogenous K(ir) 2.1 channel.

  19. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  20. XUV Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Probing Laser-Perturbed Dipole Polarization in Single Atom, Macroscopic, and Molecular Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-Ting Liao; Arvinder Sandhu

    2017-01-01

    We employ an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse to impulsively excite dipole polarization in atoms or molecules, which corresponds to coherently prepared superposition of excited states. A delayed near infrared (NIR) pulse then perturbs the fast evolving polarization, and the resultant absorbance change is monitored in dilute helium, dense helium, and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) molecules. We observe and quantify the time-dependence of various transient phenomena in helium atoms,includinglaser-indu...

  1. Simultaneous Use of Cs and Rb Rydberg Atoms for Independent RF Electric Field Measurements via Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, Matt T; Holloway, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) with cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) Rydberg atoms in the same vapor cell with coincident (overlapping) optical fields. Each atomic system can detect radio frequency (RF) electric (E) field strengths through modification of the EIT signal (Autler-Townes (AT) splitting), which leads to a direct SI traceable RF E-field measurement. We show that these two systems can detect the same the RF E-field strength simultaneously, which provides a direct in situ comparison of Rb and Cs RF measurements in Rydberg atoms. In effect, this allows us to perform two independent measurements of the same quantity in the same laboratory, providing two different immediate and independent measurements. This gives two measurements that helps rule out systematic effects and uncertainties in this E-field metrology approach, which are important when establishing an international measurement standard for an E-field strength and is a necessary step for this method to...

  2. Field programmable gate array based reconfigurable scanning probe/optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Derek B; Lawrence, A J; Dzegede, Zechariah K; Hiester, Justin C; Kim, Cliff; Sánchez, Erik J

    2011-10-01

    The increasing popularity of nanometrology and nanospectroscopy has pushed researchers to develop complex new analytical systems. This paper describes the development of a platform on which to build a microscopy tool that will allow for flexibility of customization to suit research needs. The novelty of the described system lies in its versatility of capabilities. So far, one version of this microscope has allowed for successful near-field and far-field fluorescence imaging with single molecule detection sensitivity. This system is easily adapted for reflection, polarization (Kerr magneto-optical (MO)), Raman, super-resolution techniques, and other novel scanning probe imaging and spectroscopic designs. While collecting a variety of forms of optical images, the system can simultaneously monitor topographic information of a sample with an integrated tuning fork based shear force system. The instrument has the ability to image at room temperature and atmospheric pressure or under liquid. The core of the design is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) data acquisition card and a single, low cost computer to control the microscope with analog control circuitry using off-the-shelf available components. A detailed description of electronics, mechanical requirements, and software algorithms as well as examples of some different forms of the microscope developed so far are discussed.

  3. Galaxy Transformation as probed by Morphology and Velocity Fields of Distant Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Bodo

    2005-07-01

    We seek to obtain ACS imaging of four distant {0.3images. The velocity field and the morphology in restframe-UV light will reveal possible transformation mechanisms affecting not only the stellar populations but also the mass distribution of the galaxies. Additionally, it will be possible to pin down the nature of the interaction {e.g. tidally or ram-pressure induced}. This assessment gets supported by our N-body/SPH simulations {including star formation} of different interaction processes that allow the direct comparison of structural and kinematical characteristics at each time step with the observations on an individual basis taking into account all observational constraints for a given galaxy. All together, we will be able to explore the relative efficiency of the various proposed transformation phenomena. In the case of non-disturbed spirals, a rotation curve can be extracted from the full 2D velocity field with unprecedented quality, from which the maximum rotation speed can be derived with high confidence. In combination with accurate size and luminosity determinations from the ACS images, we will be able to establish the Tully-Fisher and Fundamental Plane relations of cluster spiral members at cosmological epochs. At these distances cluster assembly is predicted to peak and we can probe the galaxies' luminosity, size and mass evolution with robust methods. Together with our already existing sample of 200 distant {z<=1} spiral galaxies in the field, we will put strong constraints on current theories of galaxy formation and evolution in different environments.

  4. Photo-excited charge collection spectroscopy probing the traps in field-effect transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Im, Seongil; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Solid state field-effect devices such as organic and inorganic-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been expected to promote advances in display and sensor electronics. The operational stabilities of such TFTs are thus important, strongly depending on the nature and density of charge traps present at the channel/dielectric interface or in the thin-film channel itself. This book contains how to characterize these traps, starting from the device physics of field-effect transistor (FET). Unlike conventional analysis techniques which are away from well-resolving spectral results, newly-introduced photo-excited charge-collection spectroscopy (PECCS) utilizes the photo-induced threshold voltage response from any type of working transistor devices with organic-, inorganic-, and even nano-channels, directly probing on the traps. So, our technique PECCS has been discussed through more than ten refereed-journal papers in the fields of device electronics, applied physics, applied chemistry, nano-devices and materia...

  5. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  6. Comparative studies of density-functional approximations for light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Zhang, Liang; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-08-01

    For a wide range of magnetic fields, 0≤B≤2000 a.u., we present a systematic comparative study of the performance of different types of density-functional approximations in light atoms (2≤Z≤6). Local, generalized-gradient approximation (GGA; semilocal), and meta-GGA ground-state exchange-correlation (xc) functionals are compared on an equal footing with exact-exchange, Hartree-Fock (HF), and current-density-functional-theory (CDFT) approximations. Comparison also is made with published quantum Monte Carlo data. Though all approximations give qualitatively reasonable results, the exchange energies from local and GGA functionals are too negative for large B. Results from the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof ground-state GGA and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) ground-state meta-GGA functionals are very close. Because of confinement, self-interaction error in such functionals is more severe at large B than at B =0, hence self-interaction correction is crucial. Exact exchange combined with the TPSS correlation functional results in a self-interaction-free (xc) functional, from which we obtain atomic energies of comparable accuracy to those from correlated wave-function methods. Specifically for the B and C atoms, we provide beyond-HF energies in a wide range of B fields. Fully self-consistent CDFT calculations were done with the Vignale-Rasolt-Geldart (VRG) functional in conjunction with the PW92 xc functional. Current effects turn out to be small, and the vorticity variable in the VRG functional diverges in some low-density regions. This part of the study suggests that nonlocal, self-interaction-free functionals may be better than local approximations as a starting point for CDFT functional construction and that some basic variable other than the vorticity could be helpful in making CDFT calculations practical.

  7. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via phase-sensitive absorption spectra in a four-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duo; Yu, Rong; Sun, Zhaoyu; Ding, Chunling; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new scheme for highly efficient three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a coherently driven closed-loop four-level atomic system via measuring the probe absorption of the weak field. Due to the spatially dependent atom–field interaction, the absorption spectra of the weak probe laser field carry the information about the atomic position. By solving the density-matrix equations of motion and properly modulating the system parameters such as the probe detuning, the relative phase of three driving fields, and the intensity of the control and microwave fields, we can realize high-precision and high-resolution 3D atom localization. Furthermore, we can find the atom at a certain position with 100% probability under appropriate conditions, and then we employ the dressed-state analysis to explain qualitatively the reason of high-precision 3D atom localization.

  8. Biomolecular Force Field Parameterization via Atoms-in-Molecule Electron Density Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Payne, Mike C; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-05-10

    Molecular mechanics force fields, which are commonly used in biomolecular modeling and computer-aided drug design, typically treat nonbonded interactions using a limited library of empirical parameters that are developed for small molecules. This approach does not account for polarization in larger molecules or proteins, and the parametrization process is labor-intensive. Using linear-scaling density functional theory and atoms-in-molecule electron density partitioning, environment-specific charges and Lennard-Jones parameters are derived directly from quantum mechanical calculations for use in biomolecular modeling of organic and biomolecular systems. The proposed methods significantly reduce the number of empirical parameters needed to construct molecular mechanics force fields, naturally include polarization effects in charge and Lennard-Jones parameters, and scale well to systems comprised of thousands of atoms, including proteins. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by computing free energies of hydration, properties of pure liquids, and the relative binding free energies of indole and benzofuran to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme.

  9. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM).

  10. Near?Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ? 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)?A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50?m...

  11. Features of the scattering of focused terahertz radiation from the probe of a terahertz near-field microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhin, V. N.; Samoylov, L. L.; Khor'kov, D. P.

    2013-02-01

    The scattering of pulsed terahertz radiation from metallic probes in the form of thin cylinders and cones with a small opening angle, which are used in apertureless terahertz near-field microscopes, has been investigated. The extrema of the waveform of pulsed terahertz radiation scattered from a free probe are linearly shifted with a change in the vertical position of the probe, and the spectral distribution is characterized by an inversely proportional frequency dependence. In the presence of a reflecting surface under the probe, when new excitation and detection directions appear, the spectrum of scattered terahertz radiation does not differ from the spectrum of the incident radiation. The experimental data are in mutual agreement with the theoretical results obtained within the model of the generation of diffraction edge waves at the interface of inhomogeneous excitation between the excitation region and shadow region.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  13. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  14. A multi-channel capacitive probe for electrostatic fluctuation measurement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Stone, Douglas R; Triana, Joseph C; Almagri, Abdulgader F; Fiksel, Gennady; Ding, Weixing; Sarff, John S; McCollam, Karsten J; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2017-02-01

    A 40-channel capacitive probe has been developed to measure the electrostatic fluctuations associated with the tearing modes deep into Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac component of the plasma potential via the voltage induced on stainless steel electrodes capacitively coupled with the plasma through a thin annular layer of boron nitride (BN) dielectric (also serves as the particle shield). When bombarded by the plasma electrons, BN provides a sufficiently large secondary electron emission for the induced voltage to be very close to the plasma potential. The probe consists of four stalks each with ten cylindrical capacitors that are radially separated by 1.5 cm. The four stalks are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid so that at each radial position, there are four electrodes forming a square grid. Every two adjacent radial sets of four electrodes form a cube. The fluctuating electric field can be calculated by the gradient of the plasma potential fluctuations at the eight corners of the cube. The probe can be inserted up to 15 cm (r/a = 0.7) into the plasma. The capacitive probe has a frequency bandwidth from 13 Hz to 100 kHz, amplifier-circuit limit, sufficient for studying the tearing modes (5-30 kHz) in the MST reversed-field pinch.

  15. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  16. Study of helium and beryllium atoms with strong and short laser field; Etude des atomes d'helium et de beryllium en champ laser intense et bref

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulan, St

    2004-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of the interaction between a two-active electron atom and an intense (10{sup 14} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and ultrashort (from a few 10{sup -15} to a few 10{sup -18} s) laser field. In the first part, we describe the current experimental techniques able to produce a coherent radiation of high power in the UV-XUV regime and with femtosecond time duration. A theoretical model of a laser pulse is defined with such characteristics. Then, we develop a numerical approach based on B-spline functions to describe the atomic structure of the two-active electron system. A spectral non perturbative method is proposed to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation. We focalize our attention on the description of the atomic double continuum states. Finally, we expose results on the double ionization of helium and beryllium atoms with intense and short laser field. In particular, we present total cross section calculations and ejected electron energy distributions in the double continuum after one- and two-photon absorption. (author)

  17. Probing/Manipulating the Interfacial Atomic Bonding between High k Dielectrics and InGaAs for Ultimate CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    10.1039/C4CE00734D 2014 3. “III-V Compound Semiconductor Transistors – From Planar to Nanowire Structures”, H. Riel, L.-E. Wernersson, M. Hong, J...extract interface state densities at atomic-layer-deposited high-k dielectric/III-V heterostructures ”, Y. T. Fanchiang, Y. K. Su, K. S. Chen, Y. C

  18. OPEN CLUSTERS AS PROBES OF THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD. I. CLUSTER PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoq, Sadia; Clemens, D. P., E-mail: shoq@bu.edu, E-mail: clemens@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Stars in open clusters are powerful probes of the intervening Galactic magnetic field via background starlight polarimetry because they provide constraints on the magnetic field distances. We use 2MASS photometric data for a sample of 31 clusters in the outer Galaxy for which near-IR polarimetric data were obtained to determine the cluster distances, ages, and reddenings via fitting theoretical isochrones to cluster color–magnitude diagrams. The fitting approach uses an objective χ{sup 2} minimization technique to derive the cluster properties and their uncertainties. We found the ages, distances, and reddenings for 24 of the clusters, and the distances and reddenings for 6 additional clusters that were either sparse or faint in the near-IR. The derived ranges of log(age), distance, and E(B−V) were 7.25–9.63, ∼670–6160 pc, and 0.02–1.46 mag, respectively. The distance uncertainties ranged from ∼8% to 20%. The derived parameters were compared to previous studies, and most cluster parameters agree within our uncertainties. To test the accuracy of the fitting technique, synthetic clusters with 50, 100, or 200 cluster members and a wide range of ages were fit. These tests recovered the input parameters within their uncertainties for more than 90% of the individual synthetic cluster parameters. These results indicate that the fitting technique likely provides reliable estimates of cluster properties. The distances derived will be used in an upcoming study of the Galactic magnetic field in the outer Galaxy.

  19. Probing the z > 6 universe with the first Hubble frontier fields cluster A2744

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Observatoire de Sauverny, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Richard, Johan [CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Ch. André, 69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France); Clement, Benjamin; Egami, Eiichi [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85721 (United States); Ebeling, Harald [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Jauzac, Mathilde [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4041 South Africa (South Africa); Jullo, Eric; Limousin, Marceau [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, 13388, Marseille (France); Laporte, Nicolas [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Natarajan, Priyamvada [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields program combines the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with the gravitational lensing of massive galaxy clusters to probe the distant universe to an unprecedented depth. Here, we present the results of the first combined HST and Spitzer observations of the cluster A-2744. We combine the full near-infrared data with ancillary optical images to search for gravitationally lensed high-redshift (z ≳ 6) galaxies. We report the detection of 15 I {sub 814} dropout candidates at z ∼ 6-7 and one Y {sub 105} dropout at z ∼ 8 in a total survey area of 1.43 arcmin{sup 2} in the source plane. The predictions of our lens model also allow us to identify five multiply imaged systems lying at redshifts between z ∼ 6 and z ∼ 8. Thanks to constraints from the mass distribution in the cluster, we were able to estimate the effective survey volume corrected for completeness and magnification effects. This was in turn used to estimate the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function (LF) at z ∼ 6-8. Our LF results are generally in agreement with the most recent blank field estimates, confirming the feasibility of surveys through lensing clusters. Although based on a shallower observations than what will be achieved in the final data set including the full Advanced Camera for Survey observations, the LF presented here goes down to M {sub UV} ∼–18.5, corresponding to 0.2L {sup *} at z ∼ 7 with one identified object at M {sub UV} ∼–15 thanks to the highly magnified survey areas. This early study forecasts the power of using massive galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes and its complementarity to blank fields.

  20. Manipulation of p-wave scattering of cold atoms in low dimensions using the magnetic field vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Tan, Shina; Jiang, Kaijun

    2014-06-27

    It is well known that the magnetic Feshbach resonances of cold atoms are sensitive to the magnitude of the external magnetic field. Much less attention has been paid to the direction of such a field. In this work we calculate the scattering properties of spin polarized fermionic atoms in reduced dimensions, near a p-wave Feshbach resonance. Because of the spatial anisotropy of the p-wave interaction, the scattering has a nontrivial dependence on both the magnitude and the direction of the magnetic field. In addition, we identify an inelastic scattering process which is impossible in the isotropic-interaction model; the rate of this process depends considerably on the direction of the magnetic field. Significantly, an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled pair of identical fermions may be produced during this inelastic collision. This work opens a new method to manipulate resonant cold atomic interactions.