WorldWideScience

Sample records for atom probe field

  1. Atom probe field ion microscopy characterizations of VVER steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) characterization of Soviet types 15Kh2MFA Cr-Mo-V (VVER 440) and 15Kh2NMFA Ni-Cr-Mo-V (VVER 1000) pressure vessel steels has been performed. Field ion microscopy has revealed that the lath boundaries in unirradiated VVER 440 and VVER 1000 steels are decorated with a thin film of brightly-imaging molybdenum carbonitride precipitates and some coarser vanadium carbides. Atom probe analysis has revealed significant enrichments of phosphorous at the lath boundaries

  2. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. PMID:26724469

  3. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  4. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory

  5. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  6. Fabrication of specimens of metamorphic magnetite crystals for field ion microscopy and atom probe microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K R; Martens, R L; Kelly, T F; Evans, N D; Miller, M K

    2001-10-01

    Field ion specimens have been successfully fabricated from samples of metamorphic magnetite crystals (Fe3O4) extracted from a polymetamorphosed, granulite-facies marble with the use of a focused ion beam. These magnetite crystals contain nanometer-scale, disk-shaped inclusions making this magnetite particularly attractive for investigating the capabilities of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) for geological materials. Field ion microscope images of these magnetite crystals were obtained in which the observed size and morphology of the precipitates agree with previous results. Samples were analyzed in the energy compensated optical position-sensitive atom probe. Mass spectra were obtained in which peaks for singly ionized 16O, 56Fe and 56FeO and doubly ionized 54Fe, 56Fe and 57Fe peaks were fully resolved. Manganese and aluminum were observed in a limited analysis of a precipitate in an energy compensated position sensitive atom probe. PMID:11770743

  7. Atom probe field-ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: field-ion microscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM), and liquid metal ion sources (LMIS). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles

  8. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  9. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications

  10. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is presented of: the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3He and 4He in tungsten

  11. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  12. INVESTIGATIONS OF SUPERCONDUCTING AND NON-SUPERCONDUCTING YBa2 Cu3 O7-x BY FIELD ION MICROSCOPY, ATOM-PROBE MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND FIELD ELECTRON EMISSION

    OpenAIRE

    Kellogg, G.; Brenner, S

    1988-01-01

    The structure and composition of superconducting and non-superconducting samples of YBa2Cu3O7-x were examined by field ion microscopy, atom-probe mass spectroscopy and field-electron emission techniques. Field ion microscope images from both types of material exhibited ring structures associated with atomic or multiatomic layers and uniform, layer-by-layer field evaporation was possible. Atom-probe mass spectra contained signals corresponding to atomic and molecular oxygen, all three metals, ...

  13. Interference Effects on the Probe Absorption in a Driven Three-Level Atomic System by a Coherent Pumping Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze the properties of weak probe absorption in a closed three-level atomic system driven by a coherent driving field. The effects of quantum interference from spontaneous emission on the refractive properties in a closed three-level atomic system driven by a coherent pumping field are included into the gain modeling. The density-matrix equations of motion are solved by following perturbation approach and the probe response function is constructed. The probe absorption is obtained by solving Maxwell's equation for propagation of the probe field of slowly varying amplitude. Analytical and numerical simulation of quantum interference effect between the spontaneous decay channels on the absorptive response of a weak probe field in a closed three-level atomic system driven by a coherent driving field, as well as the evolution of probe gain under coherent pumping mode is studied in laser-produced carbon and aluminum plasma with laser intensity > 1010W/cm2. (author)

  14. Atom Probe Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a lens-less point-projection microscopy that resolves individual atoms on the surface of a sharply pointed tip (radius of curvature R < 100 nm), at a magnification of the order of ⁓106. The specimen tip is pulsed to a positive potential V with respect to ground, thereby generating electric fields E ⁓ V/R of some 10 V/nm. Ions released from the apex due to field evaporation are sent flying to a position sensitive detector where they are identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Continuous removal of single atoms provides the possibility of a 3D elemental characterization of solids with sub-nm spatial resolution. The basic principles of the technique and some selected analytical applications will be discussed. (author)

  15. Atom probe field ion microscopy investigation of boron containing martensitic 9 Pct chromium steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, P.; Miller, M. K.; Babu, S. S.; David, S. A.; Cerjak, H.

    2000-03-01

    The chemical compositions of the ferrite matrix and various other phases in an Fe-0.17 C-9 Cr-1.55 Mo-0.27 V-0.015 N-0.01B (mass pct) steel in as-received and crept conditions were measured with atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM). The results showed the presence of some residual boron within the ferrite matrix. Analyses showed that boron was distributed within M23C6, M6C, MX, and Laves phases. Phosphor atoms were detected at the M23C6-ferrite interface in the crept condition. The results are compared to predictions from thermodynamic calculations.

  16. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography, covering the period 1993, includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field emission (FE), and field ion microscopy (FIM). Technique-oriented studies and applications are included. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references are listed alphabetically by authors, an Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included

  17. Study of defects, radiation damage and implanted gases in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of the field-ion microscope to image individual atoms has been applied, at Cornell University, to the study of fundamental properties of point defects in irradiated or quenched metals. The capability of the atom probe field-ion microscope to determine the chemistry - that is, the mass-to-charge ratio - of a single ion has been used to investigate the behavior of different implanted species in metals. A brief review is presented of: (1) the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; (2) the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and (3) the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3He and 4He atoms in tungsten. The paper is heavily referenced so that the reader can pursue his specific research interests in detail

  18. FIELD ION MICROSCOPE AND ATOM-PROBE STUDIES OF SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE TIPS

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, O.; K. Hattori; Katsuki, F.; Tomitori, M.

    1988-01-01

    Tungsten and platinum-iridium alloy tips were observed by field emission and ion microscopes and were atom-probe mass analyzed to examine the tip surfaces corroded by exposure to air and by immersion into aqueous solutions. Although the A-P analysis indicates that the corroded layer is less than monoatomic thick for both W and Pt-Ir, the FEM and FIM observation indicates that exposure to air and immersion into solutions often result in the formation of a small protrusion at the tip apex. The ...

  19. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min-1 can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected

  20. Attosecond XUV probing of strong field ionization dynamics from one- and two-electron 1D atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The probing of strong field ionization dynamics by a 250 attosecond XUV pulse is considered, first, for a one-electron 1D atom, and second, for a two-electron 1D atom. In the one-electron case, the XUV ionization yield as a function of time delay between the laser pulse and the XUV pulse is seen to reflect the time-dependence of the field-dressed neutral atomic population. The depletion of the ground state, and hence the dynamics of strong field ionization, can be inferred on sub-cycle timescales. Furthermore, it is suggested that this XUV probing also reveals the sub-cycle distortions of the atomic ground state near the peaks of the strong laser field. In the two electron case, both the neutral and singly-ionized populations in the strong field can be probed by the XUV pulse. The time-dependent yield of XUV ionization from the ionic population reflects the time-dependence of the ionization from the strong laser field. This shows directly the strong field ionization dynamics on sub-cycle timescales. (author)

  1. Interpretation of atom probe tomography data for the intermetallic TiAl+Nb by means of field evaporation simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2013-01-01

    In this paper simulations of the field evaporation process during field ion microscopy (FIM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are presented and compared with experimental data. The Müller-Schottky-model [1] was extended to include the local atomic arrangement on the evaporation process of atoms. This arrangement was described by the sum of the next-neighbor-binding-energies, which differ for an atom of type A, depending on how many A-A, B-B or A-B bonds are present. Thus simulations of APT-data of intermetallic phases become feasible. In this study simulations of L10-TiAl with additions of Nb are compared with experimental data. Certain artifacts, which appear for experimental data are treated as well. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Probing Matter-Field and Atom-Number Correlations in Optical Lattices by Global Nondestructive Addressing

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlowski, Wojciech; Mekhov, Igor B

    2014-01-01

    We show that light scattering from an ultracold gas reveals not only density correlations, but also matter-field interference at its shortest possible distance in an optical lattice, which defines key properties such as tunneling and matter-field phase gradients. This signal can be enhanced by concentrating probe light between lattice sites rather than at density maxima. As addressing between two single sites is challenging, we focus on global nondestructive scattering, allowing probing order parameters, matter-field quadratures and their squeezing. The scattering angular distribution displays peaks even if classical diffraction is forbidden and we derive generalized Bragg conditions. Light scattering distinguishes all phases in the Mott insulator - superfluid - Bose glass phase transition.

  3. Interference Effects on the Probe Absorption in a Driven Three-Level Atomic System by a Coherent Pumping Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the quantum interference effect on the weak probe absorption in a closed three-level V atomic system driven by a coherent driving field is shown to result from the twoquantum processes, constructive for the amplification channels and destructive for the absorption channel. A fourth state in the atom is coupled incoherently to the V system and acts as both an incoherent pumping reservoir and as a stationary, final state in perturbation theory. The application refers to Be-like carbon ions where non-linear pump process of the 1s22s5s(1Se) - 1s22p5s(1P0) transition is combined with the absorption or emission of a single probe photon corresponding to 1s22s5s(1Se) -1s22p7s(1P0) transition. The system is analyzed within the Rmatrix Floquet theory and codes results. (author)

  4. Atomic probes of new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Frugiuele, Claudia; Perez, Gilad; Schlaffer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Precise isotope shift spectroscopy in various atomic systems can provide a sensitive tool to constrain new physics, in particular new physics that couples to electrons and neutrons [1]. We present an analysis for estimating the reach of such measurements in the framework of effective field theory and various benchmark models for SM extensions: color neutral vector resonances, leptoquarks and the $750\\,\\textrm{GeV}$ scalar diphoton resonance. We also provide a comparison with the reach of the LHC, $e^+e^-$ colliders and $g-2$ of the electron. Isotope shift spectroscopy can compete and possibly even improve the sensitivity to probe a broad variety of Standard Model extensions.

  5. Broadband Rydberg Atom-Based Electric-Field Probe: From Self-Calibrated Measurements to Sub-Wavelength Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Christopher L; Jefferts, Steven; Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, David A; Miller, Stephanie A; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a fundamentally new approach for the measurement of electric (E) fields that will lead to the development of a broadband, direct SI-traceable, compact, self-calibrating E-field probe (sensor). This approach is based on the interaction of radio frequency (RF) fields with alkali atoms excited to Rydberg states. The RF field causes an energy splitting of the Rydberg states via the Autler-Townes effect and we detect the splitting via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In effect, alkali atoms placed in a vapor cell act like an RF-to-optical transducer, converting an RF E-field strength measurement to an optical frequency measurement. We demonstrate the broadband nature of this approach by showing that one small vapor cell can be used to measure E-field strengths over a wide range of frequencies: 1 GHz to 500 GHz. The technique is validated by comparing experimental data to both numerical simulations and far-field calculations for various frequencies. We also discuss various applications, in...

  6. Atom probe microanalysis: Principles and applications to materials problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical background and general introduction to field emission and field-ionization, field-ion microscopy, and the atom probe is given. Physical principles of field ion microscopy are explained, followed by interpretation of images. Types of atom probes are discussed, as well as the instrumentation used in atomic probe microanalysis. Methods of atom probe analysis and data representation are covered, along with factors affecting performance and statistical analysis of atom probe data. Finally, some case studies and special types of analyses are presented

  7. An atom probe field ion microscope investigation of the role of boron in precipitates and at grain boundaries in NiAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the high resolution analytical technique of Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM) has been used to characterize grain boundaries and the matrix of a stoichiometric NiAl alloy doped with 0.04 (100 wppm) and 0.12 at. % (300 wppm) boron. Field ion images revealed boron segregation to the grain boundaries. Atom probe elemental analysis of the grain boundaries measured a boron coverage of up to 30% of a monolayer. Extensive atom probe analyses also revealed a fine dispersion of nanoscale boride precipitates in the matrix. The boron segregation to the grain boundaries was found to correlate with the observed suppression of intergranular fracture. However, the decrease in ductility of boron-doped NiAl is attributed in part to the precipitation hardening effect of the boride phases

  8. Specimen Preparation and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy of BSCCO-2212 Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, D; Camus, P.; Vargas, J.; Kelly, T.; Miller, M

    1996-01-01

    Field ion specimens of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (BSCCO) high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials have been prepared using a combination of three different preparation techniques : the method of sharp shards, electropolishing and ion milling. Field ion microscopy (FIM) has demonstrated that samples which exhibit the "striped"-image contrast characteristic of HTS materials can be successfully fabricated using this combination. FIM images have been obtained which show the striped-image contrast much...

  9. Understanding of the field evaporation of surface modified oxide materials through transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Jae-Bok; Kwak, Chang-Min; Kim, Y.-T.; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of triggering the field evaporation of surface ions on the non-conductive materials enables improvement in the mass resolution in laser-pulsed atom probe tomography. This study addresses the influence of surface modification through metallic-capped layers, such as Co, Ni, and Ag, with surrounding bulk MgO tips on the physical mechanisms responsible for field evaporation and on the mass resolving power compared to uncapped bulk MgO. In particular, the field evaporation on the surface regions of Ag-capped bulk MgO tips during analysis was extensively observed by transmission electron microscopy to confirm the overall evaporation sequences occurring at the tip surface. We found that the introduction of such capping layers, especially for Ag-capping, controls both symmetric tip geometry at the surface of the specimens and the mass resolving power of ion species consisting of MgO materials. This implies the improvements in the symmetries of local field distributions and the isotropy of thermal heating across the tip surface. It reveals that Ag-capping with high thermal diffusivity promotes the compositional uniformities between the laser illumination side and the opposite side for MgO samples as well as the reduced fraction of multiple events for oxygen ions between both sides. Moreover, a variation in the thickness of the Ag-capping layer is an additional factor governing a thermal-assisted mechanism of MgO evaporation. Based on our findings, homogeneous thermal heat transfer for MgO emission along the tip axis by Ag-capping layers may be significant in potential methods for improvement.

  10. Pragmatic reconstruction methods in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data collected in atom probe tomography have to be carefully analysed in order to give reliable composition data accurately and precisely positioned in the probed volume. Indeed, the large analysed surfaces of recent instruments require reconstruction methods taking into account not only the tip geometry but also accurate knowledge of geometrical projection parameters. This is particularly crucial in the analysis of multilayers materials or planar interfaces. The current work presents a simulation model that enables extraction of the two main projection features as a function of the tip and atom probe instrumentation geometries. Conversely to standard assumptions, the image compression factor and the field factor vary significantly during the analysis. An improved reconstruction method taking into account the intrinsic shape of a sample containing planar features is proposed to overcome this shortcoming. -- Highlights: → Tomographic reconstructions in atom probe tomography. → Model of field evaporation in a 2D non-regular geometry with cylindrical symmetry. → Calculation of the field factor and of the image compression factor. → New algorithm of reconstruction for specimen composed of flat layer structures.

  11. Probing The Atomic Higgs Force

    CERN Document Server

    Delaunay, Cédric; Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach to probe Higgs boson couplings to the building blocks of matter: the electron and the up and down quarks, with precision measurement of isotope shifts in atomic clock transitions. We show that the attractive Higgs force between nuclei and their bound electrons induces measurable non-linearities in a King plot of two isotope shifts. We present an experimental method which, given state-of-the-art accuracy in frequency comparison, competes with and potentially surpasses the Large Hadron Collider in bounding the Higgs-to-light-fermion couplings. Better knowledge of the latter is an important test of the Standard Model which could lead, besides the establishment of new physics above the weak scale, to an alternative understanding of the flavor puzzle.

  12. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Tjing Loi, Shyeh [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The full tip has been imaged by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductive substrate close to specimen tip introduces extra image compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apex of the tip is far from a hemispherical shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work demonstrates a way to increase the FOV of APT.

  13. Atomic level analysis of biomolecules by the scanning atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing the unique features of the scanning atom probe (SAP) the binding states of the biomolecules, leucine and methionine, are investigated at atomic level. The molecules are mass analyzed by detecting a single atom and/or clustering atoms field evaporated from a specimen surface. Since the field evaporation is a static process, the evaporated clustering atoms are closely related with the binding between atoms forming the molecules. For example, many thiophene radicals are detected when polythiophene is mass analyzed by the SAP. In the present study the specimens are prepared by immersing a micro cotton ball of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in the leucine or methionine solution. The mass spectra obtained by analyzing the cotton balls exhibit singly and doubly ionized carbon ions of SWCNT and the characteristic fragments of the molecules, CH3, CHCH3, C4H7, CHNH2 and COOH for leucine and CH3, SCH3, C2H4, C4H7, CHNH2 and COOH for methionine.

  14. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry. PMID:26519815

  15. Characterization of duplex stainless steels by TEM [transmission electron microscopy], SANS [small-angle neutron scattering], and APFIM [atom-probe field ion microscopy] techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of complementary characterization of aged duplex stainless steels by advanced metallographic techniques, including transmission and high-voltage electron microscopies; small-angle neutron scattering; and atom-probe field ion microscopy. On the basis of the characterization, the mechanisms of aging embrittlement have been shown to be associated with the precipitation of Ni- and Si-rich G phase and Cr-rich α' in the ferrite, and M23C6 carbides on the austenite-ferrite phase boundaries. 19 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  16. Coaxial atomic force microscope probes for imaging with dielectrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Keith; Berezovsky, Jesse; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging using dielectrophoresis (DEP) with coaxial probes. DEP provides force contrast allowing coaxial probes to image with enhanced spatial resolution. We model a coaxial probe as an electric dipole to provide analytic formulas for DEP between a dipole, dielectric spheres, and a dielectric substrate. AFM images taken of dielectric spheres with and without an applied electric field show the disappearance of artifacts when imaging with DEP. Quantit...

  17. Atom probe tomography of lithium-doped network glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiwe, Gerd-Hendrik, E-mail: g_grei01@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido [Institute of Material Science, University of Stuttgart, Heisenberg Straße 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Li-doped silicate and borate glasses are electronically insulating, but provide considerable ionic conductivity. Under measurement conditions of laser-assisted atom probe tomography, mobile Li ions are redistributed in response to high electric fields. In consequence, the direct interpretation of measured composition profiles is prevented. It is demonstrated that composition profiles are nevertheless well understood by a complex model taking into account the electronic structure of dielectric materials, ionic mobility and field screening. Quantitative data on band bending and field penetration during measurement are derived which are important in understanding laser-assisted atom probe tomography of dielectric materials. - Highlights: • Atom probe tomography is performed on ion conducting glasses. • Redistribution of ions during the measurement is observed. • An electrostatic model is applied to describe the electric field and ion diffusion. • Measurement is conducted of the absolute temperature during laser pulses.

  18. Dynamic reconstruction for atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, Baptiste, E-mail: baptiste.gault@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Private Mail Bag 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J.; Stephenson, Leigh T.; Moody, Michael P.; Shrestha, Sachin L.; Marceau, Ross K.W.; Yao, Lan; Cairney, Julie M.; Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    Progress in the reconstruction for atom probe tomography has been limited since the first implementation of the protocol proposed by Bas et al. in 1995. This approach and those subsequently developed assume that the geometric parameters used to build the three-dimensional atom map are constant over the course of an analysis. Here, we test this assumption within the analyses of low-alloyed materials. By building upon methods recently proposed to measure the tomographic reconstruction parameters, we demonstrate that this assumption can introduce significant limitations in the accuracy of the analysis. Moreover, we propose a strategy to alleviate this problem through the implementation of a new reconstruction algorithm that dynamically accommodates variations in the tomographic reconstruction parameters. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variation of main reconstruction parameters, namely image compression and field factors, quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new protocol to build the tomographic reconstruction is proposed where reconstruction parameters are dynamically adjusted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrity of reconstructions obtained from the standard and dynamic reconstruction protocols compared.

  19. Imaging of microwave fields using ultracold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Boehi, Pascal; Haensch, Theodor W; Treutlein, Philipp; 10.1063/1.3470591

    2010-01-01

    We report a technique that uses clouds of ultracold atoms as sensitive, tunable, and non-invasive probes for microwave field imaging with micrometer spatial resolution. The microwave magnetic field components drive Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions whose frequency can be tuned with a static magnetic field. Readout is accomplished using state-selective absorption imaging. Quantitative data extraction is simple and it is possible to reconstruct the distribution of microwave magnetic field amplitudes and phases. While we demonstrate 2d imaging, an extension to 3d imaging is straightforward. We use the method to determine the microwave near-field distribution around a coplanar waveguide integrated on an atom chip.

  20. FIM AND ATOM-PROBE STUDY OF POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, T.; Y. Hasegawa; Nishi, T; T. Sakurai

    1987-01-01

    A field ion microscope makes it possible to observe the surface structures of metals and semiconductors at the atomic level and an atom-probe (FIM), which is a FIM with a mass spectrometer, has been widely used to study the chemical compositions of specimens. Some attempts were made previously to visualize polymers such as biological molecules. They are usually insulators and, thus, are difficult to be imaged by the FIM. Furthermore, molecules are known to decompose or desorb before a needed ...

  1. Geometry- and diffraction-independent ionization probabilities in intense laser fields: probing atomic ionization mechanisms with effective intensity matching

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, W A; English, E M L; Goodworth, T R J; Newell, W R; McKenna, J A; Suresh, M; Srigengan, B; Williams, I D; Turcu, I C E; Smith, J M; Divall, E J; Hooker, C J; Langley, A J

    2005-01-01

    We report a novel experimental technique for the comparison of ionization processes in ultrafast laser pulses irrespective of pulse ellipticity. Multiple ionization of xenon by 50 fs 790 nm, linearly and circularly polarized laser pulses is observed over the intensity range 10 TW/cm^2 to 10 PW/cm^2 using Effective Intensity Matching (EIM), which is coupled with Intensity Selective Scanning (ISS) to recover the geometry-independent probability of ionization. Such measurements, made possible by quantifying diffraction effects in the laser focus, are compared directly to theoretical predictions of multiphoton, tunnel and field ionization, and a remarkable agreement demonstrated. EIM-ISS allows the straightforward quantification of the probability of recollision ionization in a linearly polarized laser pulse. Furthermore, probability of ionization is discussed in terms of the Keldysh adiabaticity parameter, gamma, and the influence of the precursor ionic states present in recollision ionization is observed for th...

  2. Carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Shigenobu; Okawa, Takashi; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube atomic force microscope probe. Because the carbon nanotube are well known to have high aspect ratios, small tip radii and high stiffness, carbon nanotube probes have a long lifetime and can be applied for the observation deep trenches. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a well-controlled DC arc discharge method, because this method can make nanotubes to have straight shape and high crystalline. The nanotubes were aligned on the knife-edge using an alternating current electrophoresis technique. A commercially available Si probe was used for the base of the nanotube probe. The nanotube probe was fabricated by the SEM manipulation method. The nanotube was then attached tightly to the Si probe by deposition of amorphous carbon. We demonstrate the measurement of a fine pith grating that has vertical walls. However, a carbon nanotube has a problem that is called "Sticking". The sticking is a chatter image on vertical like region in a sample. We solved this problem by applying 2 methods, 1. a large cantilever vibration amplitude in tapping mode, 2. an attractive mode measurement. We demonstrate the non-sticking images by these methods.

  3. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  4. Probing Dark Energy with Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burrage, Clare; Hinds, E A

    2015-01-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  5. Spatial resolution in atom probe tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Baptiste; de Geuser, Frederic; La Fontaine, Alex; Stephenson, Leigh T; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses gaps in definitions and a lack of standard measurement techniques to assess the spatial resolution in atom probe tomography. This resolution is known to be anisotropic, being better in the depth than laterally. Generally the presence of atomic planes in the tomographic reconstruction is considered as being a sufficient proof of the quality of the spatial resolution of the instrument. Based on advanced spatial distribution maps, an analysis methodology that interrogates the local neighborhood of the atoms within the tomographic reconstruction, it is shown how both the in-depth and the lateral resolution can be quantified. The influences of the crystallography and the temperature are investigated, and models are proposed to explain the observed results. We demonstrate that the absolute value of resolution is specimenspecific.

  6. Max Auwaerter Price lecture: building and probing atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The control of the geometric, electronic, and magnetic properties of atomic-scale nanostructures is a prerequisite for the understanding and fabrication of new materials and devices. Two routes lead towards this goal: Atomic manipulation of single atoms and molecules by scanning probe microscopy, or patterning using self-assembly. Atomic manipulation has been performed since almost 20 years, but it has been difficult to answer the simple question: how much force does it take to manipulate atoms and molecules on surfaces? To address this question, we used a combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscope to simultaneously measure the force and the current between an adsorbate and a tip during atomic manipulation. We found that the force it takes to move an atom depends crucially on the binding between adsorbate and surface. Our results indicate that for moving metal atoms on metal surfaces, the lateral force component plays the dominant role. Measuring the forces during manipulation yielded the full potential energy landscape of the tip-sample interaction. Surprisingly, the potential energy barriers are comparable to diffusion barriers, which are obtained in the absence of a probe tip. Furthermore, we used the scanning tunneling microscope to assemble magnetic structures on a thin insulator. We found, that the spin of the atom is influenced by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the supporting surface which lifts the spin degeneracy of the ground state and enables the identification of individual atoms. The ground state of atoms with half-integer spin remains always degenerated at zero field due to Kramers theorem. We found that if these states differ by an orbital momentum of m = ±1 the localized spin is screened by the surrounding conducting electrons of the non-magnetic host and form a many-electron spin-singlet at sufficiently low temperature. (author)

  7. Formation of field induced absorption in the probe response signal of a four-level V type atomic system a theoretical study

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Khairul; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Bandyopadhyay, Amitava

    2016-01-01

    A density matrix based analytical model is developed to study the coherent probe field propagation through a four-level V type system in presence of a coherent control field. The model allows coupling of the probe field from the upper ground level to both of the excited levels keeping the control field locked to a particular transition. The addition of an extra ground level to a conventional three-level V type system creates extra decay paths to the ground levels for the upper level population. A set of sixteen density matrix based equations are formed and then solved analytically under rotating wave approximation to study the probe response under steady state condition. The simulated probe absorption spectra shows absorption dip at the centre of a transparency window only under Doppler broadened condition although the conventional EIT window appears under Doppler free condition. The dependence of the field induced absorption signal on the Rabi frequency of the control field, population transfer rate among th...

  8. Atomic physics in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses: Microwave Driven Multiphoton Excitation Dynamics in Rydberg Atoms; Nonadiabatic Geometric Phases of Multiphoton Transitions in Dissipative Systems and Spin-j Systems; and Nonperturbative Treatments of Atomic and Molecular Processes in Intense Laser Fields

  9. Atomic-scale observation of hydrogen-induced crack growth by atom-probe FIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation and propagation of a microcrack due to hydrogen in a Fe-0.29 wt.% Ti alloy was observed at the atomic scale by field ion microscopy. A microcrack (-20 nm in length) formed and became noticeably large when the tip was heated at 9500C in the presence of about 1 torr of Hg. Propagation was reported several times by reheating, until a portion of the tip ruptured and became detached from the tip. Compositional analysis, performed in situ using a high performance atom-probe, identified atomic hydrogen in quantity and some hydrogen molecules and FEH in the crack, but not elsewhere on the surface

  10. Manipulating collective quantum states of ultracold atoms by probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, Andrew Christopher James

    2015-01-01

    The field of cold gases has grown dramatically over the past few decades. The exquisite experimental control of their environment and properties has lead to landmark achievements, and has motivated the pursuit of quantum technologies with ultracold atoms. At the same time, the theory of...... measurements on quantum systems has grown into a well established field. Experimental demonstrations of nondestructive continuous measurements on individual quantum systems now occur in many laboratories. Such experiments with ultracold atoms have shown great progress, but the exploitation of the quantum...... nature of the measurement interaction and backaction is yet to be realised. This dissertation is concerned with ultracold atoms and their control via fully quantum mechanical probes. Nonclassical, squeezed and entangled states of matter and single photon sources are important for fundamental studies and...

  11. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  12. The emergence of local electrode/scanning atom probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Professor Nishikawa's idea of a scanning atom probe was first presented a little more than one decade ago. This concept spurred new thinking into the fundamentals of atom probe design. In the first five years after that presentation, three academic groups (Nishikawa et al., Kelly et al., and Cerezo et al.) built atom probes which incorporated his ideas. Over the ensuing 5 years, a commercial instrument based on these concepts, the local electrode atom probe or LEAP, was developed by Imago. This basic concept has enabled a major change in how atom probes may be utilized. In particular, the geometry of the specimen can take radically different forms and major performance improvements are possible. These changes have elevated the atom probe from a laboratory instrument to a viable commercial tool suitable for industrial applications. In this overview talk, a brief history of the scanning atom probe/local electrode atom probe will be given. The performance and application of the commercial atom probe which is based on Professor Nishikawa's basic concept will be described. Refs. 6 (author)

  13. Nanometer-scale isotope analysis of bulk diamond by atom probe tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schirhagl, R.; Raatz, N.; Meijer, J.; Markham, M.; Gerstl, S. S. A.; Degen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) combines field emission of atoms with mass spectrometry to reconstruct three-dimensional tomograms of materials with atomic resolution and isotope specificity. Despite significant recent progress in APT technology, application to wide-bandgap materials with strong covalen

  14. Microwave electric field sensing with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Daniel T.; Kunz, Paul D.; Meyer, David H.; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Atoms form the basis of precise measurement for many quantities (time, acceleration, rotation, magnetic field, etc.). Measurements of microwave frequency electric fields by traditional methods (i.e. engineered antennas) have limited sensitivity and can be difficult to calibrate properly. Highly-excited (Rydberg) neutral atoms have very large electric-dipole moments and many dipole allowed transitions in the range of 1 - 500 GHz. It is possible to sensitively probe the electric field in this range using the combination of two quantum interference phenomena: electromagnetically induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for very sensitive field amplitude, polarization, and sub-wavelength imaging measurements. These quantities can be extracted by measuring properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a warm rubidium vapor cell. Thus far, Rydberg microwave electrometry has relied upon the absorption of the probe laser. We report on our use of polarization rotation, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility, for measuring the properties of microwave frequency electric fields. Our simulations show that when a magnetic field is present and directed along the optical propagation direction a polarization rotation signal exists and can be used for microwave electrometry. One central advantage in using the polarization rotation signal rather than the absorption signal is that common mode laser noise is naturally eliminated leading to a potentially dramatic increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Scanning probe microscopy of oxide surfaces: atomic structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intersection of two fields, oxide surface science and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), has yielded considerable insight on atomic processes at surfaces. Oxide surfaces, especially those containing transition metals, offer a rich variety of structures and localized physical phenomena that are exploited in a wide range of applications. Nonlinear optics, superconductivity, ferroelectricity and chemical catalytic activity are but a few. Furthermore, the challenges and solutions associated with the chemistry of these surfaces and particularly the solutions to these problems have led to important understanding of tip-surface interactions that can inform SPM studies of all materials. Here, the development of understanding of the model systems TiO2 and SrTiO3 are considered in detail, to demonstrate the role of nonstoichiometry in surface structure evolution and the approach to interpreting structure at the atomic level. Then a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy, noncontact atomic force microscopy and theory are applied to a variety of oxide systems including Al2O3, NiO, ferroelectric BaTiO3, tungstates and molybdates. Recently developed sophisticated probes of local properties include spin-polarized tunneling, Fourier mapping of charge density waves, band gap mapping of superconductors and ultra fast imaging of atomic diffusion. The impact of these studies on our understanding of the behavior of oxides and of tip-surface interactions is summarized

  16. Soft-landing deposition of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurens, C.R; Rosu, M.F; Pleiter, F; Niesen, L

    1999-01-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass-separated using an isotope separa-tor, decelerated to 5 eV, and directly depos

  17. Investigation of Interfaces by Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Zoltán; Stender, Patrick; Chellali, Mohammed Reda; Schmitz, Guido

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the thermodynamic and transport properties of buried interfaces with atom probe tomography. Owing to the 3D subnanometer resolution and single atom sensitivity of the method, it is possible to obtain composition profiles with high accuracy both along or normal to the interfaces. We have shown that the width of the chemical interface between the Fe and Cr system follows the Cahn-Hilliard relation with a gradient energy coefficient of 1.86 × 10-22 J nm2. Sharpening of the Ni/Cu interface as a result of kinetic control was directly observed. We investigated the grain boundary and triple junction transport in Fe/Cr and Ni/Cu. Cr segregation enthalpy into Fe triple junctions was found to be 0.076 eV, which falls in between the surface (0.159 eV) and grain boundary (0.03 eV) segregation enthalpies. In the investigated 563 K to 643 K (290 °C to 370 °C) range, Ni transport is 200 to 300 times faster in the triple junctions of Cu than in the grain boundaries. The diffusion activation enthalpy in the triple junctions is two-thirds that of the grain boundaries (0.86 and 1.24 eV, respectively). These investigations have shown that triple junctions are defects in their own right with characteristic segregation and diffusion properties: They are preferred segregation sites and can be considered as a diffusion shortcut in the grain boundary network.

  18. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques

  19. Atomic war field Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive atomic weapons, results of a perfect and perfidious technology face each other in the centre of a possible crisis - in Europe. The strategists of the Warszhaw Pact and of Nato seem very optimistic, which they owe to their professions, the population's increasing fear of a war, however, can no longer be denied. Nervous military personnel, political and religions fanatics and perplexed politicians sit at the switches of fear - without a concept and without alternatives. Despite this alarming conditions, Nigel Calder who has investigated in the USA and in the USSR, and in Europe, managed to remain a calm spectator of the imminent apocalypse. Without compromises and clearly he analyses the nearly hopeless consequences resulting from the changed world-political situation, the tremendously fast development of the arms technology, and the crazy strategical doctrines in East and West and in the Third World. (orig./UA)

  20. Atomic physics in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: nonadiabatic geometric phases of multiphoton transitions; nonperturbative treatments of level shifts of excited states in strong fields; multiple high-order harmonic generation in intense laser fields; quantum fractal character of quasi-energy states in multi-color fields; complex- scaling Fourier-grid Hamiltonian method for intense-field multiphoton resonances; and microwave driven multiphoton excitation dynamics in Rydberg atoms: Fast Fourier transformation propagation method

  1. Reflections on the projection of ions in atom probe tomography

    CERN Document Server

    De Geuser, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    There are two main projections used to transform, and reconstruct, field ion micrographs or atom probe tomography data into atomic coordinates at the specimen surface and, subsequently, in three-dimensions. In this article, we present a perspective on the strength of the azimuthal equidistant projection in comparison to the more widely used and well-established point-projection, which underpins data reconstruction in the only commercial software package available currently. After an overview of the reconstruction methodology, we demonstrate that the azimuthal equidistant is not only more accurate, but also more robust with regards to errors on the parameters used to perform the reconstruction and is therefore more likely to yield more accurate tomographic reconstructions.

  2. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bin, E-mail: hanbin@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Takamizawa, Hisashi, E-mail: takamizawa.hisashi@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2145-2 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yano, Fumiko [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Kunimune, Yorinobu [Renesas Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., Ltd., 1120 Shimokuzawa, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio [Renesas Electronics Corporation, 751 Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan)

    2015-07-13

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs.

  3. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs

  4. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes in a...... characterization....

  5. Estimation of the reconstruction parameters for Atom Probe Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gault, Baptiste; Stephenson, Leigh T; Moody, Michael P; Muddle, Barry C; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    The application of wide field-of-view detection systems to atom probe experiments emphasizes the importance of careful parameter selection in the tomographic reconstruction of the analysed volume, as the sensitivity to errors rises steeply with increases in analysis dimensions. In this paper, a self-consistent method is presented for the systematic determination of the main reconstruction parameters. In the proposed approach, the compression factor and the field factor are determined using geometrical projections from the desorption images. A 3D Fourier transform is then applied to a series of reconstructions and, comparing to the known material crystallography, the efficiency of the detector is estimated. The final results demonstrate a significant improvement in the accuracy of the reconstructed volumes.

  6. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  7. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole;

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  8. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress for the period Sept. 15, 1992 to Sept. 14, 1993 is discussed. Semiclassical methods that will allow much faster and more accurate three-dimensional atom--surface scattering calculations, both elastic and inelastic, are being developed. The scattering of He atoms from buckyballs is being investigated as a test problem. Somewhat more detail is given on studies of He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations of He+ and Ar+ ion sputtering of Pt surfaces are also being done. He atom scattering from Xe overlayers on metal surfaces and the thermalized dissociation of H2 on Cu(110) are being studied. (R.W.R.) 64 refs

  9. Rydberg atoms in magnetic and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter examines highly excited atoms in the presence of a uniform field, magnetic or electric. It discusses Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields; Rydberg atoms in electric fields; and Rydberg atoms in crossed fields. It reviews present knowledge of this subject which is of great theoretical interest and which has recently benefited from laser spectroscopy

  10. Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaogang Hong; Wendong Xu; Xiaogang Li; Chengqiang Zhao; Xiaodong Tang

    2009-01-01

    Field enhancement effect of metal probe in evanescent field, induced by using a multi-layers structure for exciting surface plasmon resonance (SPR), is analyzed numerically by utilizing two-dimensional (2D) TM wave finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this letter, we used a fundamental mode Gaussian beam to induce evanescent field, and calculated the electric intensity. The results show that compared with the nonmetal probe, the metal probe has a larger field enhancement effect, and its scattering wave induced by field enhancement has a bigger decay coefficient. The field enhancement effect should conclude that the metal probe has an important application in nanolithography.

  11. Probing Modified Gravity with Atom-Interferometry: a Numerical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Schlogel, Sandrine; Fuzfa, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Refined constraints on chameleon theories are calculated for atom-interferometry experiments, using a numerical approach consisting in solving for a four-region model the static and spherically symmetric Klein-Gordon equation for the chameleon field. By modeling not only the test mass and the vacuum chamber but also its walls and the exterior environment, the method allows to probe new effects on the scalar field profile and the induced acceleration of atoms. In the case of a weakly perturbing test mass, the effect of the wall is to enhance the field profile and to lower the acceleration inside the chamber by up to one order of magnitude. In the thin-shell regime, significant deviations from the analytical estimations are found, even when measurements are realized in the immediate vicinity of the test mass. Close to the vacuum chamber wall, the acceleration becomes negative and potentially measurable. This prediction could be used to discriminate between fifth-force effects and systematic experimental uncerta...

  12. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device

  13. Understanding the Atomic-Scale Contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam S.; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a noncontact atomic force microscope simulator including a Kelvin module. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and contact potential difference contrasts were reported. The local...

  14. Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Nony, Laurent; Foster, Adam; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a non-contact Atomic Force Microscope/KPFM simulator. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and Contact Potential Difference (CPD) contrasts were reported. The local CPD do...

  15. Probing a Bose-Einstein Condensate with an Atom Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Döring, D.; Robins, N. P.; Figl, C.; Close, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    A pulsed atom laser derived from a Bose-Einstein condensate is used to probe a second target condensate. The target condensate scatters the incident atom laser pulse. From the spatial distribution of scattered atoms, one can infer important properties of the target condensate and its interaction with the probe pulse. As an example, we measure the s-wave scattering length that, in low energy collisions, describes the interaction between the |F=1,m_F=-1> and |F=2,m_F=0> hyperfine ground states ...

  16. Atom probe analysis of Sn in Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have extensively used atom-probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) for microanalyses of a heat-treated Zircaloy-4 and Zr-Sn alloys containing 0.6 or 1.39 wt% Sn and clarified as to whether Sn is fully dissolved or not in the α-Zr matrix. It is found that Sn dissolves in the matrix of both Zircaloy-4 and Zr-0.6 wt% Sn alloy upon annealing at 723 K. For Zr-1.39 wt% Sn alloy, after annealing for more than 200 h, the symptom of phase separation has been found. The distribution of Sn in the matrix is changed from the α-quenched state, and local regions enriched with Sn are formed in the matrix. (orig.)

  17. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted. PMID:19775815

  18. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K., E-mail: koji.inoue@hs3.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.jp [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yano, F.; Nishida, A. [MIRAI-Selete, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Takamizawa, H. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Tsunomura, T. [MIRAI-Selete, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  19. Measurement of the Gravity-Field Curvature by Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rosi, G; Sorrentino, F; Menchetti, M; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the gravity-field curvature based on three conjugated atom interferometers. Three atomic clouds launched in the vertical direction are simultaneously interrogated by the same atom interferometry sequence and used to probe the gravity field at three equally spaced positions. The vertical component of the gravity-field curvature generated by nearby source masses is measured from the difference between adjacent gravity gradient values. Curvature measurements are of interest in geodesy studies and for the validation of gravitational models of the surrounding environment. The possibility of using such a scheme for a new determination of the Newtonian constant of gravity is also discussed.

  20. Surface forces studied with colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Giesbers, M.

    2001-01-01

    Forces between surfaces are a determining factor for the performance of natural as well as synthetic colloidal systems, and play a crucial role in industrial production processes. Measuring these forces is a scientific and experimental challenge and over the years several techniques have been developed to measure the interaction between surfaces directly as a function of their separation distance. Colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (colloidal probe AFM) offers the possibility to study su...

  1. ATOM PROBE STUDY OF TITANIUM BASE ALLOYS : PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Menand, A.; Chambreland, S.; Martin, C

    1986-01-01

    Two different titanium base alloys, Ti46 Al54 and Ti88.8 Cu2.3, Al8.9, have been studied by atom probe microanalysis. A precipitate of Ti2 Al was analysed in the binary alloys. Micro-analysis of Ti Cu Al alloy revealed the presence of Copper enriched zones. The study has also exhibited a penetration of Hydrogen in the samples, probably due to preparation technique. The results demonstrate the feasibility of studies on titanium base alloys by mean of atom probe.

  2. Semiconductor studies by radioactive probe atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a growing number of experimental techniques that have in common the usage of radioactive isotopes for the characterization of semiconductors. These techniques deliver atomistic information about identity, formation, lattice environment, and electronic structure, as well as dynamics of defects and defect complexes. The results obtained by different hyperfine techniques are discussed in context with the study of intrinsic and extrinsic defects, i.e. of vacancies or self-interstitials and dopant or impurity atoms, respectively. In addition, the employment of electrical and optical techniques in combination with radioactive isotopes is presented

  3. Langmuir probes in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the absence of a magnetic field the I-V characteristic of an electrode in a plasma (a Langmuir probe) is predicted and observed to be the sum of an approximately constant ion saturation current Iisat and an electron current which grows exponentially up to a saturation level Iesat ∼ Iisat√(mi/me). The ion saturation current is the product of ion charge, ion density, sound speed, and effective probe area. The effective area will be greater than the surface area by an amount dependent on the sheath thickness, which scales according to the Child-Langmuir law with the Debye length and the 3/4 power of the potential drop. When the sheath thickness is not negligible compared to the probe dimensions, the voltage dependence of the sheath will prevent saturation of the ion current. In the strong magnetic fields of fusion devices, the effective area is commonly taken to be the area projected along the field, not the full surface area. Sheath effects are generally neglected because the high density results in a small Debye length and the high power density dictates the use of large probes. Additional corrections (but less than a factor of two) are made to the saturation currents due to density depletion and kinetic distribution function effects. For the case of pin-type probes, which have a fairly large area with a steep field angle, this picture appears adequate, but flush-mounted probes often show a very different behavior. (author) 6 refs., 2 figs

  4. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again kee...

  5. Superposition of Stationary Wave Fields Via Atom Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizbullah; Ali, khan Anwar; Khan, Naveed; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Amin Bacha, Bakht

    2015-03-01

    We investigate one-dimensional position microscopy of a three-level atom moving through a stationary wave region under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency. The precise position information of an atom is observed on the resonance absorption and dispersion distribution spectrum of a weak probe field. Single and multiple localization peaks are observed in specific directions of the corresponding wave numbers and phase of the standing wave fields. The strength of space-independent Rabi frequency reduces the position uncertainty in the localized peaks without disturbing the probability of the atom. In a hot atomic medium the localized probability of an atom is reduced which depends upon the temperature of that medium. Our results provide useful applications in the development of laser cooling, atom nanolithography and Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. TEM [transmission electron microscopy], APFIM [atom-probe field ion microscopy], and SANS [small-angle neutron scattering] examination of aged duplex stainless steel components from some decommissioned reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cast stainless steels, composed of duplex phases of austenite and ferrite, are used extensively in nuclear reactors because of their superior strength, weldability, resistance to stress corrosion cracking, and soundness of casting. For example, cast stainless steels are used for primary coiling pipes of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and valves and pump casings of PWRs and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the structural integrity of which is vital for safe operation of the reactors. In the present investigation, microstructural characteristics of several long-term-aged field components from two decommissioned reactors have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom-probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques to establish the embrittlement mechanisms for the reactor-aged material. The results have then been compared to those of the laboratory-aged specimens obtained for the temperature range between 300 and 450 degree C. The chemical compositions and ferrite contents of the reactor components are listed. KRB BWR (located in Gundremmingen, Federal Republic of Germany) had been in service for ∼12 yr, and the Shippingport PWR (near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) had operated for ∼22 yr

  7. Data mining for isotope discrimination in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ions with similar time-of-flights (TOF) can be discriminated by mapping their kinetic energy. While current generation position-sensitive detectors have been considered insufficient for capturing the isotope kinetic energy, we demonstrate in this paper that statistical learning methodologies can be used to capture the kinetic energy from all of the parameters currently measured by mathematically transforming the signal. This approach works because the kinetic energy is sufficiently described by the descriptors on the potential, the material, and the evaporation process within atom probe tomography (APT). We discriminate the isotopes for Mg and Al by capturing the kinetic energy, and then decompose the TOF spectrum into its isotope components and identify the isotope for each individual atom measured. This work demonstrates the value of advanced data mining methods to help enhance the information resolution of the atom probe. - Highlights: ► Atom probe tomography and statistical learning were combined for data enhancement. ► Multiple eigenvalue decompositions decomposed a spectrum with overlapping peaks. ► The isotope of each atom was determined by kinetic energy discrimination. ► Eigenspectra were identified and new chemical information was identified

  8. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Dicken, Quinten G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-02-29

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces using atom probe tomography. Embedding the protein ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualize atomic distributions and distinguish organic-organic and organic-inorganic interfaces. The sample preparation method can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  9. Effect of Laser Power on Atom Probe Tomography of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Diercks, D.

    2011-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is an emerging analytical method that has the potential to produce nm-scale spatial resolution of atom positions with ppm-level detection limits. Until recently, APT has been limited to analysis of conducting samples due to the high pulsed electrical fields previously required. The recent development of laser-assisted APT now allows much lower laser powers to be used, opening the door to analysis of geologic minerals. The potential applications are many, ranging from diffusion profiles to the distribution of nano-phases to grain boundary chemical properties. We reported the first analysis of natural olivine using APT last year (Parman et al, 2010). While the spatial resolution was good (nm-scale), the accuracy of the compositional analysis was not. Two of the primary barriers to accurate ion identification in APT are: 1) Specimen overheating - This is caused by the interaction of the laser with the low thermal conductivity insulating specimens. Ions are assumed to have left the surface of the sample at the time the laser is pulsed during the analysis (laser pulse width = 12 ps). If the laser power is too high, the surface remains heated for an appreciable time (greater than 5 ns in some cases) after the laser pulse, causing atoms to field evaporate from the surface well after the laser pulse. Since they hit the detector later than the atoms that were released during the pulse, they are interpreted to be higher mass. Thus overheating appears in the analysis as a smearing of mass/charge peaks to higher mass/charge ratios (thermal tails). For well separated peaks, this is not a substantial problem, but for closely spaced peaks, overheating causes artificial mass interferences. 2) Molecular evaporation or clustering - This is also caused by overheating by the laser. Ideally, atoms are field evaporated individually from the surface of the cylindrical specimen. However, if the absorbed energy is high enough, clusters of atoms will be formed

  10. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  11. Cold atoms: A field enabled by light

    CERN Document Server

    Fallani, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Besides being a source of energy, light can also cool gases of atoms down to the lowest temperatures ever measured, where atomic motion almost stops. The research field of cold atoms has emerged as a multidisciplinary one, highly relevant, e.g., for precision measurements, quantum gases, simulations of many-body physics, and atom optics. In this focus article, we present the field as seen in 2015, and emphasise the fundamental role in its development that has been played by mastering.

  12. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  13. THE ATOM PROBE ANALYSIS OF A CAST DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Godfrey, T.; G. Smith

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe analysis is reported of a low Mo CF8 duplex stainless steel aged for 105,000h at 280°C, 3,000h or 70,000h at 300°C, or 3,000h at 400°C. Definite evidence for a spinodal reaction in the α phase has been found at all the temperatures studied. This reaction process is most regular and pronounced in the material aged at 400°C but is detectable after the other heat treatments. No evidence of G-phase precipitation is apparent from the FIM micrographs, but statistical analysis of the atom...

  14. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  16. Atomic quantum superposition state generation via optical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Negretti, Antonio;

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a protocol to prepare an atomic ensemble in a superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable states. The protocol relies on conditional measurements performed on a light field, which interacts with the atoms inside an optical cavity prior to detection, and we...

  17. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  18. H atom probes of radiation chemistry: Solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H atoms are ubiquitous in radiation chemistry. Radiolysis of most substances yield H atoms and studies of the mechanisms of their production are as old as the field of radiation chemistry. The problem is that study or products does not easily reveal the chemical mechanisms involved even with the clever use of isotopes. Time-resolved pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to study formation and decay kinetics of spin-polarized mobile H atoms in radiolysis of wet fused silica containing ∼ 1,200 ppm of SiOH groups. Two reactions of H atoms can be distinguished: a slow component corresponding to scavenging of H atoms by metastable paramagnetic centers and a fast component which is ascribed to a reaction of a short-lived small polaron (intrinsic hole) with H atoms

  19. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: A simple, automated method using Voronoi cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, P., E-mail: peter.felfer@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ceguerra, A.V., E-mail: anna.ceguerra@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, S.P., E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. - Highlights: • Cluster analysis of atom probe data can be significantly simplified by using the Voronoi cell volumes of the atomic distribution. • Concentration fields are defined on a single atomic basis using Voronoi cells. • All parameters for the analysis are determined by optimizing the separation probability of bulk atoms vs clustered atoms.

  20. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: A simple, automated method using Voronoi cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. - Highlights: • Cluster analysis of atom probe data can be significantly simplified by using the Voronoi cell volumes of the atomic distribution. • Concentration fields are defined on a single atomic basis using Voronoi cells. • All parameters for the analysis are determined by optimizing the separation probability of bulk atoms vs clustered atoms

  1. Challenges in the study of Fe/MgO/Fe interfaces using 3D Atom Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, CORIA UMR CNRS 6614, UFR Sciences Site du Madrillet, Avenue de l' Université, B.P. 12 76801, Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Purohit, Viswas, E-mail: vishwas.purohit@gmail.com [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, CORIA UMR CNRS 6614, UFR Sciences Site du Madrillet, Avenue de l' Université, B.P. 12 76801, Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Department of Plasma Physics, Alliance College of Engineering and Design, Chikkahagade Cross, Chandapura, Anekal Main Road, Anekal, Bangalore 562106, Karnataka (India); Gruber, M.; Vella, A.; Vurpillot, F.; Deconihout, B. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, CORIA UMR CNRS 6614, UFR Sciences Site du Madrillet, Avenue de l' Université, B.P. 12 76801, Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France)

    2015-08-31

    Detailed interface studies were conducted on two Fe/MgO/Fe systems having different thicknesses of MgO layers, using a laser assisted 3D atom probe. In conjunction with a detailed 3D reconstruction, the system exhibited an additional oxide formation at the interface between MgO and Fe of the multilayer structure. This oxide formation was found to be independent of the laser wavelength, laser fluence and the thickness of the intermediate layers. By using numerical simulations of field evaporation of two layers having two different evaporation fields, we discuss the possible oxidation mechanisms. - Highlights: • MgO layers (4, 32 nm) between Fe layers were analysed using a laser assisted atom probe. • Varying field evaporation voltages responsible for interfacial oxide layer (bottom) • Numerical simulation used to determine the phenomena taking place at the interfaces • Lasers of wavelengths 515 nm and 343 nm were used for this study.

  2. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes

  3. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A., E-mail: jaturner@unl.edu [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  4. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  5. Sensitivity of atom interferometry to ultralight scalar field dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the use of atom interferometry as a tool to search for Dark Matter (DM) composed of ultra-light scalar fields. Previous work on ultra-light DM detection using accelerometers has considered the possibility of equivalence principle violating effects whereby gradients in the dark matter field can directly produce relative accelerations between media of differing composition. In atom interferometers, we find that time-varying phase signals from oscillatory, or dilaton-like, DM can also arise due to changes in the atom rest mass that can occur between light-pulses throughout the interferometer sequence as well as changes in the earth's gravitational field. We estimate that several orders of magnitude of unexplored phase space for light DM fields can be probed with our proposed method.

  6. Overcoming challenges in the study of nitrided microalloyed steels using atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrided steels are widely used in the engineering field due to their superior hardness and other attractive properties. Atom probe tomography (APT) was employed to study two Nb-microalloyed CASTRIP steels with different N contents. A major challenge of using APT to study this group of materials is the presence of tails after Fe peaks in the mass spectra, which overestimates the composition for alloying elements such as Nb and Cu in the steels. One important factor that contributes to the tails is believed to be delayed field evaporation from Fe2+. This artefact of the mass spectrum was observed to be the most severe when voltage pulsing was used. The application of laser pulses with energy ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 nJ successfully reduced the tails and lead to better compositional measurement accuracy. Spatial resolution in the z-direction (along the tip direction) was observed to be less affected by changing laser energy but deteriorates in x–y direction with increasing laser energy. This investigation suggests that pulsed-laser atom probe with ∼0.4 nJ laser energy can be used to study this group of materials with improved mass resolution while still maintaining high spatial resolution. -- Highlights: ► Degradation of mass resolution in the nitrided steel using voltage pulsed atom probe was identified. ► The origin of the degradation was explored and considered to be associated with delayed evaporation. ► The artifact caused by mass resolution degradation was successfully removed by the application of laser pulsed atom probe. ► The effect of laser energy on mass resolution, composition measurement and spatial resolution was investigated. ► Laser energy ∼0.4 nJ was recommended to study this group of materials using laser pulsed atom probe.

  7. Probing charges on the atomic scale by means of atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Albrecht, F.; Repp, J.; Fleischmann, M.; Scheer, M.; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 7 (2015), "076101-1"-"076101-5". ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Kelvin probe force microscopy * atomic force microscopy * bond polarity * surface dipole * adsorbates on surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.512, year: 2014

  8. A FIM-atom probe investigation of the bainite transformation in CrMo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain a better understanding of the role played by Cr and Mo in the bainite transformation a Field-Ion Microscope - Atom Probe was constructed in order to study the distribution of the alloying elements near various types of boundaries on atomic scale. The distribution of alloying elements measured with this instrument is not so smooth on atomic scale as suggested by microprobe analysis. In a coherent twin boundary, formed during the bainite transformation, a depletion of the substitutionals Cr and Mo and an enhancement of the C content is observed, which is in accordance with the atomic model of a B.C.C. twin. In the twin plane the interstitial sites are even larger than the F.C.C. octahedral sites and this plane can act as an effective sink for the carbon atoms from bainitic ferrite. The depletion of Cr and Mo from the twin plane is due to interface coherency. (Auth.)

  9. Electromagnetically induced transparency with cold Rydberg atoms: Superatom model beyond the weak-probe approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Mou; Yan, Dong; Tian, Xue-Dong; Cui, Cui-Li; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2014-03-01

    We present an improved superatom model for examining nonlinear optical responses of cold Rydberg atoms in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). By going beyond the weak-probe approximation, we find that several higher-order collective states should be included to correctly describe the coherent Rydberg excitation of superatoms. Otherwise, numerical results based on the simple ladder system of superatoms will contribute wrong predictions on light intensity and photon correlation of the transmitted probe field. In particular, a great photon-bunching effect will be improperly expected somewhere out of the EIT window in one dilute atomic sample. The essence of this improved superatom model lies in that it can provide reliable predictions on the nonlinear Rydberg-EIT phenomena even in dense atomic samples and may be extended to realize lossless conditional light interactions in appropriate multilevel systems exhibiting dipole blockade.

  10. Electrons and atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several non-linear effects that show up when electrons and atoms interact with strong laser fields are considered. Thomson scattering, electron potential scattering in the presence of a laser beam, atomic ionization by strong laser fields, the refraction of electrons by laser beams and the Kapitza-Dirac effect are discussed. (Author)

  11. Probe Gain without Probe field in a V-type System with an External Field Coupling Two Upper Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yan-Feng; YANG Wen-Xing; YU Xiao-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    We report a new coherence and interference phenomenon in a V-type system with an external field coupling two upper levels. It is found that the probe gain can be generated even when no probe field is applied to the system,we attribute this result to the existence of the external field. By comparing with the conventional probe gain, the probe gain without the probe field is enhanced greatly because of the absence of the population inversion term.

  12. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess.

  13. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, S K; Felfer, P J; Araullo-Peters, V J; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Cairney, J M

    2013-09-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. PMID:23485412

  14. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess

  15. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  16. Design of cantilever probes for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2000-01-01

    A cantilever beam used in an Atomic Force Microscope is optimized with respect to two different objectives. The first goal is to maximize the first eigenfrequency while keeping the stiffness of the probe constant. The second goal is to maximize the tip angle of the first eigenmode while again...... keeping the stiffness constant. The resulting design of the beam from the latter optimization gives almost the same result as when maximizing the first eigenfrequency. Adding a restriction on the second eigenfrequency result in a significant change of the optimal design. The beam is modelled with 12 DOF...

  17. ATOM PROBE MICROANALYSIS OF WELD METAL IN A SUBMERGED ARC WELDED CHROMIUM-MOLYBDENUM STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Josefsson, B.; Kvist, A.; Andrén, H.

    1987-01-01

    A submerged arc welded 2.25Cr - 1Mo steel has been investigated using electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. The bainitic microstructure of the as-welded steel consisted of ferrite and martensite. During heat treatment at 690°C the martensite transformed to ferrite and cementite and needle-shaped (Cr,Mo)2C carbides precipitated. Together with a substantial decrease in dislocation density, this resulted in an improvement of the toughness.

  18. Interface study of FeMgOFe magnetic tunnel junctions using 3D Atom Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumder, B; Vella, A; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B

    2011-01-01

    A detailed interface study was conducted on a Fe/MgO/Fe system using laser assisted 3D atom probe. It exhibits an additional oxide formation at the second interface of the multilayer structure independent of laser wavelength, laser fluence and the thickness of the tunnel barrier. We have shown with the help of simulation that this phenomena is caused by the field evaporation of two layers having two different evaporation

  19. Towards an accurate volume reconstruction in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinke, Daniel; Oberdorfer, Christian; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-06-01

    An alternative concept for the reconstruction of atom probe data is outlined. It is based on the calculation of realistic trajectories of the evaporated ions in a recursive refinement process. To this end, the electrostatic problem is solved on a Delaunay tessellation. To enable the trajectory calculation, the order of reconstruction is inverted with respect to previous reconstruction schemes: the last atom detected is reconstructed first. In this way, the emitter shape, which controls the trajectory, can be defined throughout the duration of the reconstruction. A proof of concept is presented for 3D model tips, containing spherical precipitates or embedded layers of strongly contrasting evaporation thresholds. While the traditional method following Bas et al. generates serious distortions in these cases, a reconstruction with the proposed electrostatically informed approach improves the geometry of layers and particles significantly. PMID:27062338

  20. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-02-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  1. Atom probe tomography simulations and density functional theory calculations of bonding energies in Cu3Au

    KAUST Repository

    Boll, Torben

    2012-10-01

    In this article the Cu-Au binding energy in Cu3Au is determined by comparing experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results to simulations. The resulting bonding energy is supported by density functional theory calculations. The APT simulations are based on the Müller-Schottky equation, which is modified to include different atomic neighborhoods and their characteristic bonds. The local environment is considered up to the fifth next nearest neighbors. To compare the experimental with simulated APT data, the AtomVicinity algorithm, which provides statistical information about the positions of the neighboring atoms, is applied. The quality of this information is influenced by the field evaporation behavior of the different species, which is connected to the bonding energies. © Microscopy Society of America 2012.

  2. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  3. Kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudnikov, O. N., E-mail: llf@laser.nsc.ru [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Taichenachev, A. V. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation); Tumaikin, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Yudin, V. I. [Novosibirsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The kinetics of atoms in a bichromatic field is considered. Analytic solutions are obtained for the force, friction coefficient, and diffusion coefficient in the model of a two-level atom without limitations imposed on the intensity of light fields. This effect is observed in the domain of global minima and maxima of the optical potential (i.e., at points where the relative phase of two standing waves is Greek-Phi-Symbol = 0, {pi}/2.

  4. A computational geometry framework for the optimisation of atom probe reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfer, Peter; Cairney, Julie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present pathways for improving the reconstruction of atom probe data on a coarse (>10nm) scale, based on computational geometry. We introduce a way to iteratively improve an atom probe reconstruction by adjusting it, so that certain known shape criteria are fulfilled. This is achieved by creating an implicit approximation of the reconstruction through a barycentric coordinate transform. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the compensation of trajectory aberrations and the iterative improvement of the reconstruction of a dataset containing a grain boundary. We also present a method for obtaining a hull of the dataset in both detector and reconstruction space. This maximises data utilisation, and can be used to compensate for ion trajectory aberrations caused by residual fields in the ion flight path through a 'master curve' and correct for overall shape deviations in the data. PMID:27449275

  5. Atomic focusing by quantum fields: Entanglement properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, I.G. da [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, CEP 64049-550, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Frazão, H.M. [Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Profa. Cinobelina Elvas, CEP 64900-000, Bom Jesus, PI (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Nemes, M.C. [Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, Belo Horizonte, MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Peixoto de Faria, J.G. [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais, Av. Amazonas 7675, Belo Horizonte, MG 30510-000 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    The coherent manipulation of the atomic matter waves is of great interest both in science and technology. In order to study how an atom optic device alters the coherence of an atomic beam, we consider the quantum lens proposed by Averbukh et al. [1] to show the discrete nature of the electromagnetic field. We extend the analysis of this quantum lens to the study of another essentially quantum property present in the focusing process, i.e., the atom–field entanglement, and show how the initial atomic coherence and purity are affected by the entanglement. The dynamics of this process is obtained in closed form. We calculate the beam quality factor and the trace of the square of the reduced density matrix as a function of the average photon number in order to analyze the coherence and purity of the atomic beam during the focusing process.

  6. Atomic focusing by quantum fields: Entanglement properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coherent manipulation of the atomic matter waves is of great interest both in science and technology. In order to study how an atom optic device alters the coherence of an atomic beam, we consider the quantum lens proposed by Averbukh et al. [1] to show the discrete nature of the electromagnetic field. We extend the analysis of this quantum lens to the study of another essentially quantum property present in the focusing process, i.e., the atom–field entanglement, and show how the initial atomic coherence and purity are affected by the entanglement. The dynamics of this process is obtained in closed form. We calculate the beam quality factor and the trace of the square of the reduced density matrix as a function of the average photon number in order to analyze the coherence and purity of the atomic beam during the focusing process.

  7. Photoelectron imaging, probe of the dynamics: from atoms... to clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concerns the study of the deexcitation of clusters and atoms by photoelectron imaging. The first part is dedicated to thermionic emission of a finite size system. A 3-dimensional imaging setup allows us to measure the time evolution of the kinetic energy spectrum of electrons emitted from different clusters (Wn-, Cn-, C60). Then we have a direct access to the fundamental quantities which characterize this statistical emission: the temperature of the finite heat bath and the decay rate. The second part concerns the ionization of atomic Rydberg states placed in a static electric field. We performed the first experiment of photoionization microscopy which allows us to obtain a picture which is the macroscopic projection of the electronic wave function. Then we have access to the detail of the photoionization and particularly to the quantum properties of the electron usually confined at the atomic scale. (author)

  8. Atomic force microscope probe-based nanometric scribing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaturization of machine components is recognized by many as a significant technological development for a vast spectrum of products. An atomic force microscope (AFM) probe that can exert forces onto a variety of engineering materials is used to perform mechanical scribing at the nanoscale. The success of nanomechanical machining at such fine scales is based on the understanding of microstructural machining mechanics. This paper investigates the cutting behaviour in the nanoscale of a chromium workpiece by using a retrofitted commercial AFM with an acoustic emission sensor, in order to scratch the surface and measure forces. The calibration procedure for acquiring the forces is discussed. The cutting force model, which incorporates the flow stress and friction coefficient in the nano-scale machining, is also presented

  9. Investigation on nanocomposite magnets by three-dimensional atom probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhanyong; ZHOU Bangxin; NI Jiansen; XU Hui

    2006-01-01

    With the fast development in nano materials, to obtain the detailed microstructure information, microscopes with much higher resolution than the conventional ones are required. A three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP), an instrument with nearatomic resolutions of about 0.06 and 0.2 nm in depth and transverse direction, respectively, has been employed to map out the elemental distribution of some conductive materials within a nano-scale volume.This instrument is fit to analyze the elemental distribution in nano materials and nano precipitation in common materials. 3DAP is applied to investigate the microstructure of Nd2Fe14B/α-Fe nanocomposite magnets. B, Fe-enriched, Zr-enriched and Nd,Fe-enriched clusters have been found, which cannot be identified by any other instrument.

  10. Quantum beats in the field ionization of Rydberg atoms in the presence of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Hastings, Hannah; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    By exciting a coherent superposition and varying its phase evolution, quantum beats in the selective field ionization of Rydberg atoms have been observed. Here, we present a study exploring the effect of electric and magnetic fields on quantum beats. Beginning with a single excited state, a coherent superposition is created by a short electric field pulse in the presence of a static magnetic field. The resulting quantum beats are then observed in the field ionization spectrum. Additionally, millimeter-wave spectroscopy is used to probe the state populations in this superposition. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  11. Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Nony, Laurent; Bocquet, Franck; Loppacher, Christian; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.036802

    2009-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the origin of the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is presented. Atomistic simulations of the tip-sample interaction force field have been combined with a non-contact Atomic Force Microscope/KPFM simulator. The implementation mimics recent experimental results on the (001) surface of a bulk alkali halide crystal for which simultaneous atomic-scale topographical and Contact Potential Difference (CPD) contrasts were reported. The local CPD does reflect the periodicity of the ionic crystal, but not the magnitude of its Madelung surface potential. The imaging mechanism relies on the induced polarization of the ions at the tip-surface interface owing to the modulation of the applied bias voltage. Our findings are in excellent agreement with previous theoretical expectations and experimental observations.

  12. Probe knots and Hopf insulators with ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Kai; Duan, Lu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Knots and links are fascinating and intricate topological objects that have played a prominent role in physical and life sciences. Their influence spans from DNA and molecular chemistry to vortices in superfluid helium, defects in liquid crystals and cosmic strings in the early universe. Here, we show that knotted structures also exist in a peculiar class of three dimensional topological insulators--the Hopf insulators. In particular, we demonstrate that the spin textures of Hopf insulators in momentum space are twisted in a nontrivial way, which implies various knot and link structures. We further illustrate that the knots and nontrivial spin textures can be probed via standard time-of-flight images in cold atoms as preimage contours of spin orientations in stereographic coordinates. The extracted Hopf invariants, knots, and links are validated to be robust to typical experimental imperfections. Our work establishes the existence of knotted structures in cold atoms and may have potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processings. We thank X.-J. Liu and G. Ortiz for helpful discussions. S.T.W., D.L.D., and L.M.D. are supported by the NBRPC 2011CBA00300, the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI program. K.S. acknowledges support from NSF under Grant No. PHY1402971.

  13. Scanning probeatomic force microscopy: new developments and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have widened the spectrum of possible investigations that can be performed at a nanometric level at the surfaces of materials. They range, for instance, from physical properties such as surface potential and electric field topological determination to chemical, nanomechanical, catalytic and spectroscopic analysis in air in liquid or in a gaseous environment. After a brief introduction to new SPM technological developments, we present recent achievements in the characterisation and application of nanomorphology, electrostatic surface potential, dielectric properties, shear force microscopy and radiofrequency measurements, scanning microwave microscopy, nanomechanical properties mapping, frequency modulation SPM in air, liquid, vacuum, and finally high-speed SPM

  14. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Li; Dong, Ri-Chang; Deng, Jian-Liao; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere under the influence of a diffuse laser field have been systematically investigated. A pronounced dispersionlike structure centered at the light-shifted pump frequency is observed with a subnatural linewidth. In particular, two clearly resolved absorption resonances on the 5 S1 /2(F =2 ) →5 P3 /2(F'=3 ) transitions occur with variable probe beam intensity, which is consistent with our proposed theoretical model. Based on the two absorption resonances,we measure the dependence of light shifts, from which we can directly extract the effective Rabi frequency in a diffuse laser field, on the probe laser intensity, pump laser intensity, and pump laser detuning. Our work helps to identify the physical mechanisms behind these spectral features and is beneficial for studying the corresponding effect in a cold sample.

  15. The FIELDS experiment for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S.; Spp/Fields Team

    2010-12-01

    Many of our basic ideas on the plasma physics of acceleration, energy flow, and dissipation, and structure of the solar wind have never been rigorously confronted by direct experimental measurements in the region where these processes are actually occurring. Although Alfven waves, shocks, and magnetic reconnection are often invoked as heating mechanisms, there have never been any direct measurements of Alfvenic waves nor the associated Poynting flux nor any measurements of ion or electron kinetic energy flux in the region from 10 R_s to 30 R_s where the final stages of wind acceleration are believed to occur. The radial profiles of both slow and fast solar wind acceleration are based on remote-sensing measurements and have been obtained for only a few selected events. Thus, the spatial radial and perpendicular scales of the acceleration process have been averaged by line-of-sight effects and the possibility of intense localized acceleration cannot be ruled out. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission calls for the high quality fields and particles measurements required to solve the coronal heating and wind acceleration problem. The SPP 'FIELDS' experiment measures the electric and magnetic fields fundamental to the plasma physics of the structured and turbulent solar wind, flux ropes, collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection. FIELDS will make the first-ever measurements of the DC/Low-Frequency electric field inside of 1 AU allowing for in situ, high cadence measurements of the Poynting vector, the Elsasser variables, and E/B diagnostics of the wave spectrum to fce in the solar wind. SPP/FIELDS measures the radio wave (type III and II) signatures of microflares, energized electrons, and CME propagation. SPP/ FIELDS measures the plasma electron density to ~2% accuracy and the core electron temperature to ~5-10% accuracy more than 90% of the time at perihelion. FIELDS will also measure the in situ density fluctuation spectrum and structures at a very high cadence (

  16. Probe spectrum of multilevel atoms in a damped, weakly driven two-mode cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the probe spectrum for multilevel atoms in a damped, weakly driven cavity supporting two degenerate orthogonally polarized modes. One mode is weakly driven by a linearly polarized external field. The atoms, initially prepared in a mF=0 hyperfine ground state, couple to the driven mode by making a ΔmF=0 transition and to the orthogonally polarized mode by making ΔmF=±1 transitions to other hyperfine sublevels. We compare probe spectra, the intensity of the driven mode, the undriven mode, and the atomic excitation probability as a function of the detuning of the driving laser from the cavity resonance for three- and four-level atomic models. In both cases the spectrum of the driven mode is a vacuum Rabi doublet familiar from the driven, damped Jaynes-Cummings model. The undriven mode spectrum is a triplet with the maximum on resonance for the three-level model while the four-level model has a four-peaked spectrum. We discuss the role of strong coupling to the undriven mode in accounting for the qualitative difference between the models.

  17. Investigating atomic contrast in atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy on ionic systems using functionalized tips

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Leo; Schuler, Bruno; Mohn, Fabian; Moll, Nikolaj; Pavliček, Niko; Steurer, Wolfram; Scivetti, Ivan; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Persson, Mats; Meyer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) have become important tools for nanotechnology; however, their contrast mechanisms on the atomic scale are not entirely understood. Here we used chlorine vacancies in NaCl bilayers on Cu(111) as a model system to investigate atomic contrast as a function of applied voltage, tip height, and tip functionalization. We demonstrate that the AFM contrast on the atomic scale decisively depends on both the tip termin...

  18. Role of the resistivity of insulating field emitters on the energy of field-ionised and field-evaporated atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, L; Silaeva, E P; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B; Cadel, E; Blum, I; Vella, A

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of laser atom probe analyses, it is important to understand all the physical processes induced by the combination of the high electrical field and the femtosecond laser beam during field evaporation. New information can be accessed from the energy of evaporated surface atoms or field-ionised atoms of an imaging gas. In order to study the ions energy, we combine La-APT and FIM analyses in a new experimental setup equipped with electrostatic lenses. We report measurements for semiconductors and oxides and we study the influence of the illumination conditions (laser power and wavelength), the evaporation rate, the sample geometry and the tip preparation processes. The results are discussed taking into account the resistive properties of non-metallic samples and the photo-stimulated conductivity. This work clarifies the role of the laser and DC field in the energy deficit of field evaporated ions. PMID:25484362

  19. Soft-landing ion deposition of isolated radioactive probe atoms on surfaces : A novel method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurens, CR; Rosu, MF; Pleiter, F; Niesen, L

    1997-01-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass separated using an isotope separator, decelerated to 5 eV, and directly deposi

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, {approximately}10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching.

  1. Hydrogen atoms in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energies and wave functions of the 14 lowest states of a Hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field are calculated, using a variational scheme. The equivalence between the atomic problem and the problems related with excitons and impurities in semiconductors in the presence of a strong magnetic field are shown. The calculations of the energies and wave functions have been divided in two regions: the first, for the magnetic field ranging between zero and 109G; in the second the magnetic field ranges between 109 and 1011G. The results have been compared with those obtained by previous authors. The computation time necessary for the calculations is small. Therefore this is a convenient scheme to obtain the energies and wave functions for the problem. Transition probabilities, wavelengths and oscillator strengths for some allowed transitions are also calculated. (Author)

  2. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  3. Momentum distributions of selected rare-gas atoms probed by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses. The...... calculations are performed by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation, and focal-volume effects are taken into account by appropriately averaging the results. The resulting momentum distributions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental...

  4. E-field dependence of the ac Stark effect probed by a bichromatic laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we demonstrate, through numerical calculations, the possibility of determining the field dependence of the ac Stark effect through the interaction of an atom (or molecule) with a bichromatic ultrafast laser field. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for a single active electron confined to move in a square-well potential distorted by an intense Stark field in combination with a perturbative probe field which connects a pair of levels through photon absorption. The aim is to determine the field parameters that allow the dependence of the dynamic shift of the optically connected levels on the Stark field to be mapped out in real time. The calculations show that this can be achieved when the duration of the probe field is at least as short as the half-cycle period of the Stark field. An experimental realization of the proposed measurement scheme and its limitations are discussed. It is also possible, in principle, to adopt the ac Stark effect to determine the absolute phase of the carrier wave of an ultrafast laser pulse. (author)

  5. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Linwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM. Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V. Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated.

  6. Correlated ion analysis and the interpretation of atom probe mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques are presented for extracting information from atom probe mass spectra by investigating correlations within multiple-ion detector events. Analyses of this kind can provide insights into the origins of noise, the shape of mass peaks, or unexpected anomalies within the spectrum. Data can often be recovered from within the spectrum noise by considering the time-of-flight differences between ions within a multiple event. Correlated ion detection, particularly when associated with shifts in ion energies, may be used to probe the phenomenon of molecular ion dissociation, including the questions of data loss due to ion pile-up or the generation of neutrals in the dissociation process. -- Research Highlights: → Multiple-ion detection events may contain information not seen in the mass spectrum. → Analysis of multiple events can yield information on molecular ion dissociation. → Neutral species may be generated by dissociation subsequent to field evaporation.

  7. Probe integrated scattering cross sections in the analysis of atomic resolution HAADF STEM images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical basis for using a probe-position integrated cross section (PICS) for a single column of atoms as an effective way to compare simulation and experiment in high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is described, and the use of PICS in order to make quantitative use of image intensities is evaluated. It is based upon the calibration of the detector and the measurement of scattered intensities. Due to the predominantly incoherent nature of HAADF STEM, it is found to be robust to parameters that affect probe size and shape such as defocus and source coherence. The main imaging parameter dependencies are on detector angle and accelerating voltage, which are well known. The robustness to variation in other parameters allows for a quantitative comparison of experimental data and simulation without the need to fit parameters. By demonstrating the application of the PICS to the chemical identification of single atoms in a heterogeneous catalyst and in thin, layered-materials, we explore some of the experimental considerations when using this approach. - Highlights: • Probe-position integrated cross section (PICS) used to quantitatively compare experimental images of HAADF STEM to simulations. • Theoretical treatment based on the object function approximation is presented. • PICS shown to be robust to experimental parameters. • Considerations for accuracy of experimental analysis and simulations discussed. • Application of PICS analysis to low dimensional, beam sensitive samples show excellent agreement between experiment and simulations

  8. Wideband scalable probe for Spherical Near-Field Antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a design of an open-boundary quad-ridged horn to be used as a wideband scalable dual-linearly polarized probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements. With a new higher-order probe correction technique developed at the Technical University of Denmark, the probe will enable...... high-accuracy wideband antenna measurements at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at frequencies down to 400 MHz....

  9. Shaping the lens of the atom probe: Fabrication of site specific, oriented specimens and application to grain boundary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The random sampling provided by classical atom probe sample preparation methods is one of the major factors limiting the types of problems that can be addressed using this powerful technique. A focused ion beam enables not only site-specific preparation, but can also be used to give the specimen, which acts as the lens in an atom probe experiment, a specific shape. In this paper we present a technique that uses low accelerating voltages (10 and 5 kV) in the focused ion beam (FIB) to reproducibly produce specimens with selected grain boundaries <100 nm from the tip at any desired orientation. These tips have a high rate of successfully running in the atom probe and no Ga contamination within the region of interest. This technique is applied to the analysis of grain boundaries in a high purity iron wire and a strip-cast steel. Lattice resolution is achieved around the boundary in certain areas. Reconstruction of these datasets reveals the distribution of light and heavy elements around the boundary. Issues surrounding the uneven distribution of certain solute elements as a result of field-induced diffusion are discussed. -- Research highlights: → Damage free site specific samples can be made using FIB. → Crystallographic relationships across grain boundaries can be obtained from field desorption patterns. → Lattice resolution can be achieved at grain boundaries for matrix atoms. → Field evaporation artifacts are observed at grain boundaries for solute atoms.

  10. A new probe for measuring small electric fields in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A dipolar double probe has been developed for in situ measurements of small electric fields in laboratory plasmas. The probe measures dc to ac electric fields (f values between 0 and 20 MHz) with high sensitivity (Emin about 10 microV/cm) and responds to both space charge electric fields and inductive electric fields. Using voltage-to-frequency conversion, the probe signal is obtained free of errors and loading effects by a transmission line. Various examples of useful applications for the new probe are presented, such as measurements of dc ambipolar fields, ac space-charge fields of ion acoustic waves, ac inductive fields of whistler waves, and mixed inductive and space-charge electric fields in current-carrying magnetoplasmas.

  11. A Nanostructual Microwave Probe Used for Atomic Force Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Y; Kobayashi, T; Soyama, H

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop a new structure microwave probe, the fabrication of AFM probe on the GaAs wafer was studied. A waveguide was introduced by evaporating Au film on the top and bottom surfaces of the GaAs AFM probe. A tip having 8 micrometers high, and curvature radius about 50 nm was formed. The dimensions of the cantilever are 250x30x15 micrometers. The open structure of the waveguide at the tip of the probe was introduced by using FIB fabrication. AFM topography of a grating sample was measured by using the fabricated GaAs microwave probe. The fabricated probe was found having nanometer scale resolution, and microwave emission was detected successfully at the tip of the probe by approaching Cr-V steel and Au wire samples.

  12. Probing dark energy with an atom interferometer in an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Matthew; Haslinger, Philipp; Hamilton, Paul; Mueller, Holger; Khoury, Justin; Elder, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    If dark energy -- which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe -- consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a ``fifth force'' between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms can evade such tests by suppressing this force in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Our experiments constrain these dark energy models using atoms in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber as probes to expose the screened fields. Using a cesium matter wave interferometer in an optical cavity, we set stringent bounds on coupling screened theories to matter. A further 4 to 5 orders of magnitude would completely rule out chameleon and f(R) theories. I will describe this first tabletop dark energy search, and present the hundredfold boost in sensitivity we have since achieved.

  13. Muonium as a probe of hydrogen-atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muonium is a light isotope of hydrogen and can be used as a tracer substitute for hydrogen to investigate liquid-phase hydrogen-atom reactions not amenable to study by more conventional means. The residual polarization method of muon spin rotation is illustrated by an investigation of the reaction of muonium with sodium thiosulphate in aqueous solution. The rate constant has been determined directly from measurements of muonium decay rates in very dilute solutions, ksub(M) =(1.5 +-0.4) x 1010 dm3 mol-1 s-1. Possible reaction mechanisms have been explored by analysis of the field and concentration dependence of the diamagnetic signal amplitude in concentrated solutions. The conclusion is that hydrogen atoms react with thiosulphate, probably first forming a radical adduct HSSO32- which decomposes in 1 ns or less to give HS- + SO3-, or possibly H+ + .S- + SO32-. The consequences of time-dependent rate constants on the residual-polarization analysis are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  14. Atom probe characterization of yttria particles in ODS Eurofer steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels exhibit higher temperature and radiation resistance than conventionally produced ferritic/martensitic steels. Such behaviour, as believed, is mainly caused by presence of highly dispersed and extremely stable oxide particles with sizes of few nanometers. It was shown that the most promising oxide additive was yttria (Y2O3) and as mechanical parameters were strongly depended on size and number density of formed peculiarities it is required to reduce their dimensions to few nanometers and drastically increase their number. At present, considerable effort is focused on investigation of behaviour and properties of such particles. Recent studies of Eurofer ODS steel (9%-CrWVTa) by SANS and PoAS revealed the presence of high number density structural peculiarities with size approximately one nanometer. At the same time, previous studies by TEM identified only high number of small (5-10 nm) Y2O3 particles. So, the purpose of this work was to look into this material by means of tomographic atom probe and find out the chemistry and origin of peculiarities with sizes less than 5 nm. These investigations revealed fine (∼ 2 nm) particles that were enriched not only in yttrium and oxygen but also in vanadium and nitrogen. Concentration of vanadium in them is approximately at the same level as yttrium. Moreover, some particles were found to be enriched in only three or even two elements mentioned above. However, total concentration of chemical elements in these particles is considerably less than that of iron. Estimated number density for detected particles is (1 / 5) x 1023 m-3. (author)

  15. The study of quantitativeness in atom probe analysis of alloying elements in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitativeness in atom probe analysis of dilute solute alloying elements in steel was systematically investigated. The samples of binary Fe-Si, Fe-Ti, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Mn and Fe-Mo alloys were prepared for present study. The apparent compositions of alloying elements were examined by three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) under various experimental conditions. The temperature dependence of the apparent compositions varied largely with the alloys, which indicated that the degree of preferential evaporation or retention varied with the alloying elements. Furthermore, the analysis direction dependence of the apparent Mn composition was examined in the Fe-Mn alloy. The experimental results indicated that the order of the field evaporation rate of elements in steel was Cu>Cr>Mn∼Mo>Fe>Ti∼Si. The field evaporability of alloying elements in steel was discussed in terms of the solution enthalpy of the alloying elements and the phase types of the binary Fe alloys.

  16. Attosecond probing of state-resolved ionization and superpositions of atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses in the extreme ultraviolet are used to probe strong field ionization and to initiate electronic and vibrational superpositions in atoms and small molecules. Few-cycle 800 nm pulses produce strong-field ionization of Xe atoms, and the attosecond probe is used to measure the risetimes of the two spin orbit states of the ion on the 4d inner shell transitions to the 5p vacancies in the valence shell. Step-like features in the risetimes due to the subcycles of the 800 nm pulse are observed and compared with theory to elucidate the instantaneous and effective hole dynamics. Isolated attosecond pulses create massive superpositions of electronic states in Ar and nitrogen as well as vibrational superpositions among electronic states in nitrogen. An 800 nm pulse manipulates the superpositions, and specific subcycle interferences, level shifting, and quantum beats are imprinted onto the attosecond pulse as a function of time delay. Detailed outcomes are compared to theory for measurements of time-dynamic superpositions by attosecond transient absorption. Supported by DOE, NSF, ARO, AFOSR, and DARPA.

  17. A Tuning Fork with a Short Fibre Probe Sensor for a Near-FieldScanning Optical Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沛; 鲁拥华; 章江英; 明海; 谢建平; 黄建文; 高宗圣; 蔡定平

    2002-01-01

    We report on a tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope. The method demonstrates how to fabricate the short fibre probe. This tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe can provide stable and high Q at the tapping frequency of the tuning fork, and can give high-quality near-field scanning optical microscope and atomic force microscope images of samples. We present the results of using the tapping-mode tuning fork with a short fibre probe sensor for a near-field scanning optical microscope performed on an eight-channel silica waveguide.

  18. Plasma diagnostics with Langmuir probes in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical model of plasma diagnostics with Langmuir probe in a strong magnetic field is presented. The model considers the geometry and the shape of the probe, which have been neglected in previous approximate studies of this problem. Although the plasma is strongly disturbed by the probe and plasma density and potential are locally changed, the unperturbed plasma density, η0, the electron temperature, Te, and the unknown cross-field diffusion coefficient, can be determined from certain parts of the measured I-V characteristics of the probe. (author)

  19. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  20. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Papenbrock, T

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband $E2$ transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  1. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband E2 transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalent to the theory of a charged particle on the sphere subject to a magnetic monopole field.

  2. Atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field STEM images of Si(011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kotaka, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Hashimoto, I.; Shiojiri, M.

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic atomic-resolution incoherent high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of [011]-orientated Si have been experimentally obtained by a through-focal series. Artificial bright spots appear at positions where no atomic columns exist along the electron beam, in some experimental images. Image simulation, based on the Bloch wave description by the Bethe method, reproduces the through-focal experimental images. It is shown that atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images, which are greatly influenced by the Bloch wave field depending on the incident electron beam probe, cannot always be interpreted intuitively as the projected atomic images. It is also found that the atomic-resolution HAADF STEM images can be simply explained using the relations to the probe functions without the need for complex dynamical simulations.

  3. Test of Nonlocality with an Atom-Field Entangled State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the test of nonlocality with atom-field entanglement. An atom is sent through a cavity filled with a coherent field with a small amplitude. The dispersive interaction leads to atom-field entanglement.Then the field is driven by a classical current. The Bell inequality can be tested by the joint measurement of the parity of the field and the atomic state.

  4. Design and construction of a broad-band electric field probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a broad-band electric field probe based on a resistive film diode antenna on RT/Duroid substrate to measure the electric RF/MW fields as constructed at the National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) are described in this paper. A square law diode detector with a matching circuit and also low pass filter have been used to produce a dc current proportional to the square RF voltage across the resistive antenna gap. A double-strip coplanar waveguide has also been designed to transfer this dc current to an amplifier with an output signal showing the electric field intensity in one direction. By using three mutually orthogonal resistive antennas, an isotropic electric field probe was made. All parts of this probe have been completely modeled and solved by the MATLAB computer program to determine the optimum values of the elements of the probe. The frequency response of the probe has also been theoretically found to be flat in the range 0.8 to 3 GHz. It was found to be quite satisfactory compared with those of similar probes commercially available. The probe is being used routinely in practice. (author)

  5. Field measuring probe for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field probe developed for measuring the field in SSC dipole magnets is an adaptation of the rotating tangential coil system in use at Brookhaven for several years. Also known as the MOLE, it is a self-contained room-temperature mechanism that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet with regular stops to measure the local field. Several minutes are required to measure the field at each point. The probe measures the multipole components of the field as well as the field angle relative to gravity. The sensitivity of the coil and electronics is such that the field up to the full 6.6 T excitation of the magnet as well as the field when warm with only 0.01 T excitation can be measured. Tethers are attached to both ends of the probe to carry electrical connections and to supply dry nitrogen to the air motors that rotate the tangential windings as well as the gravity sensor. A small computer is attached to the probe for control and for data collection, analysis and storage. Digital voltmeters are used to digitize the voltages from the rotating coil and several custom circuits control motor speeds in the probe. The overall diameter of the probe is approximately 2 cm and its length is 2.4 m; the field sensitive windings are 0.6 m in length

  6. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Kornyushin, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  7. Cage motion of a probe atom in a vacancy complex in Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perturbation function of a Cd probe atom bound in a hydrogen-decorated vacancy complex in Pt is found to exhibit dynamical relaxation at 294 K, as measured by the technique of perturbed γ-γ angular correlations. Based on other characteristics of the complex, a model is proposed for the structure of the complex. In the undecorated state, it consists of a probe atom at the center of a tetrahedron of vacancies in the fcc structure. In the decorated state at low temperature, the probe atom returns to one of the four vacant lattice sites. The relaxation at room temperature is attributed to motion of the probe atom in a cage formed by the four vacant sites. (orig.)

  8. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography investigation of magnetic FePt nanoclusters: First experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folcke, E.; Larde, R. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Le Breton, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.lebreton@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Gruber, M.; Vurpillot, F. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Universite de Rouen, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Shield, J.E.; Rui, X. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, N104 WSEC, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Patterson, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI 54751 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix were studied by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated experiments were conducted to study the artefacts of the analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In FePt nanoclusters, Fe and Pt are present in equiatomic proportions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FePt nanoclusters are homogeneous, no core-shell structure is observed. - Abstract: FePt nanoclusters dispersed in a Cr matrix have been investigated by laser-assisted atom probe tomography. The results were analysed according to simulated evaporation experiments. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions reveal the presence of nanoclusters roughly spherical in shape, with a size in good agreement with previous transmission electron microscopy observations. Some clusters appear to be broken up after the evaporation process due to the fact that the Cr matrix has a lower evaporation field than Fe and Pt. It is thus shown that the observed FePt nanoclusters are chemically homogeneous. They contain Fe and Pt in equiatomic proportions, with no core-shell structure observed.

  9. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    OpenAIRE

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-01-01

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase distribution using the aberration-corrected optics of an scanning transmission electron microscope. The required phase di...

  10. Effective field theory for deformed atomic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Papenbrock, T.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective field theory (EFT) for a model-independent description of deformed atomic nuclei. In leading order this approach recovers the well-known results from the collective model by Bohr and Mottelson. When higher-order corrections are computed, the EFT accounts for finer details such as the variation of the moment of inertia with the band head and the small magnitudes of interband $E2$ transitions. For rotational bands with a finite spin of the band head, the EFT is equivalen...

  11. The effect orientation of features in reconstructed atom probe data on the resolution and measured composition of T1 plates in an A2198 aluminium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Maria A; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Artefacts in atom probe tomography can impact the compositional analysis of microstructure in atom probe studies. To determine the integrity of information obtained, it is essential to understand how the positioning of features influences compositional analysis. By investigating the influence of feature orientation within atom probe data on measured composition in microstructural features within an AA2198 Al alloy, this study shows differences in the composition of T1 (Al2CuLi) plates that indicates imperfections in atom probe reconstructions. The data fits a model of an exponentially-modified Gaussian that scales with the difference in evaporation field between solutes and matrix. This information provides a guide for obtaining the most accurate information possible. PMID:25896290

  12. Controlled polarization rotation of an optical field in multi-Zeeman-sublevel atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Bo; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yanxu; Wang, Hai; Xiao, Min; Peng, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, the phenomenon of polarization rotation of a weak, linearly-polarized optical (probe) field in an atomic system with multiple three-level electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) sub-systems. The polarization rotation angle can be controlled by a circularly-polarized coupling beam, which breaks the symmetry in number of EIT subsystems seen by the left- and right-circularly-polarized components of the weak probe beam. A large polariz...

  13. Development and field practical performance of smart array probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, NEL developed the transmit-receive type ECT array probe for steam generator (SG) tubing, called 'X-probe', in cooperation with foreign firms. Recently NEL has developed the advanced ECT array probe, 'Smart Array Probe', characterized with a significantly improved resolution for circumferential cracks. The doubled channels in the circumferential mode have greatly improved the circumferential resolution of Smart Array Probe. With all the circumferential mode channels on the same circle, there is no need for axial position correction of inspection data. This report describes both the field practical performance and the compliance assessment to a Japanese SG-ECT guideline 'JEAG4208' of Smart Array ECT System, composed of Smart Array Probe, pusher-in-tester 'OMNI-200', and NEL's ECT Analysis System. (author)

  14. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  15. Surface potential investigation on single wall carbon nanotubes by Kelvin probe force microscopy and atomic force microscope potentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface potentials of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) connecting two metallic electrodes have been investigated by both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM) and atomic force microscope potentiometry (AFMP). By comparing the surface potential measurements obtained by both methods, we also studied the major factors affecting the potential measurements of the SWNTs, such as the surroundings, stray electric fields, and the effect of the AFM tip size, which can be larger than the SWNT diameter. In this study, we used KFM based on non-contact AFM and AFMP using the point-by-point contact mode in which the AFM tip worked as a voltage probe

  16. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed a comprehensive study of the effects of phase/frequency fluctuations in the incident laser field on the fluorescence intensity from the 3S1/2 (F = 2, MF = 2) to 3P3/2 (F = 3, MF = 3) transition to atomic sodium. The experiments were carried out in an atomic beam apparatus with a laser driving field on which well-characterized synthesized phase-fluctuations were imposed. The mean fluorescence intensity and the fluctuations in the intensity were measured as a function of detuning of the driving field from the resonance frequency of the transition, and for several different laser powers and bandwidths of laser noise. Power spectra of the intensity fluctuations were measured for a wide range of parameters and the effects of correlated amplitude and phase fluctuations were probed. Detailed comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental measurements were carried out, and a theoretical model was developed to include the effects of residual Doppler broadening and the nonuniform spatial intensity profile of the driving laser. Experimental investigations of effects of laser phase-noise on degenerate four- wave-mixing have been started

  17. Probing angular momentum coherence in a twin-atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    de Carvalho, Carlos R; Impens, François; Robert, J; Medina, Aline; Zappa, F; Faria, N V de Castro

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use a double longitudinal Stern-Gerlach atom interferometer in order to investigate quantitatively the angular momentum coherence of molecular fragments. Assuming that the dissociated molecule has a null total angular momentum, we investigate the propagation of the corresponding atomic fragments in the apparatus. We show that the envisioned interferometer enables one to distinguish unambiguously a spin-coherent from a spin-incoherent dissociation, as well as to estimate the purity of the angular momentum density matrix associated with the fragments. This setup, which may be seen as an atomic analogue of a twin-photon interferometer, can be used to investigate the suitability of molecule dissociation processes -- such as the metastable hydrogen atoms H($2^2 S$)-H($2^2 S$) dissociation - for coherent twin-atom optics.

  18. Understanding proton-conducting perovskite interfaces using atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel R.

    Proton-conducting ceramics are under intense scientific investigation for a number of exciting applications, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, hydrogen separation membranes, membrane reactors, and sensors. However, commercial application requires deeper understanding and improvement of proton conductivity in these materials. It is well-known that proton conductivity in these materials is often limited by highly resistive grain boundaries (GBs). While these conductivity-limiting GBs are still not well understood, it is hypothesized that their blocking nature stems from the formation of a positive (proton-repelling) space-charge zone. Furthermore, it has been observed that the strength of the blocking behavior can change dramatically depending on the fabrication process used to make the ceramic. This thesis applies laser-assisted atom probe tomography (LAAPT) to provide new insights into the GB chemistry and resulting space-charge behavior of BaZr0.9Y0.1O 3--delta (BZY10), a prototypical proton-conducting ceramic. LAAPT is an exciting characterization technique that allows for three-dimensional nm-scale spatial resolution and very high chemical resolution (up to parts-per-million). While it is challenging to quantitatively apply LAAPT to complex, multi-cation oxide materials, this thesis successfully develops a method to accurately quantify the stoichiometry of BZY10 and maintain minimal quantitative cationic deviation at a laser energies of approximately 10--20 pJ. With the analysis technique specifically optimized for BZY10, GB chemistry is then examined for BZY10 samples prepared using four differing processing methods: (1) spark plasma sintering (SPS), (2) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction followed by high-temperature annealing (HT), (3) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction with NiO used as a sintering aid (SSR-Ni), and (4) solid-state reactive sintering directly from BaCO3, ZrO2, and Y2O3

  19. The resistive switching in TiO2 films studied by conductive atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanmin Du; Amit Kumar; Hui Pan; Kaiyang Zeng; Shijie Wang; Ping Yang; Andrew Thye Shen Wee

    2013-01-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of TiO2 thin films were investigated using conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The as-prepared TiO2 thin films were modulated into higher and lower resistance states by applying a local electric field. We showed that the resistive switching results from charge injection and release assisted by electro-migration of oxygen ions. An integrated model combined with filamentary and interfacial effects was utiliz...

  20. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials

  1. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue; Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  2. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue, E-mail: rodrigue.larde@univ-rouen.fr; Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Avenue de l' Université, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine [Groupe d' étude de la Matière Condensée (GEMAC), CNRS Université de Versailles St Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), UMR 6252 CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, 14050 Caen (France)

    2015-12-07

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  3. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  4. Atomic resolution imaging at 2.5 GHz using near-field microwave microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jonghee; Long, Christian J.; Yang, Haitao; Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Atomic resolution imaging is demonstrated using a hybrid scanning tunneling/near-field microwave microscope (microwave-STM). The microwave channels of the microscope correspond to the resonant frequency and quality factor of a coaxial microwave resonator, which is built in to the STM scan head and coupled to the probe tip. We find that when the tip-sample distance is within the tunneling regime, we obtain atomic resolution images using the microwave channels of the microwave-STM. We attribute...

  5. Light-induced nonlinear dynamics in a vector atomic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the interaction of an atomic quantum gas with laser fields. The quantum gas is described as a multi-component vector quantum field with each component corresponding to the different internal electronic states of atoms. By employing the vector quantum field theory, we show that there exists a many-body nonlinear interaction between atoms in the atomic field due to photon exchange. This nonlinearity can be controlled by adjusting the laser parameters. We discuss two examples of how to manipulate the atomic field by the light-induced nonlinear interaction. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  6. Evaporation mechanisms of MgO in laser assisted atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Mazumder, Baishakhi

    2011-05-01

    In this paper the field evaporation properties of bulk MgO and sandwiched MgO layers in Fe are compared using laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography. The comparison of flight time spectra gives an estimate of the evaporation times as a function of the wavelength and the laser energy. It is shown that the evaporation takes place in two steps on two different time scales in MgO. It is also shown that as long as the MgO layer is buried in Fe, the evaporation is dominated by the photon absorption in Fe layer at the tip apex. Eventually the evaporation process of MgO is discussed based on the difference between the bulk materials and the multilayer samples. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Probing the Planck Scale in Low-Energy Atomic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Bluhm, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Experiments in atomic physics have exceptional sensitivity to small shifts in energy in an atom, ion, or bound particle. They are particularly well suited to search for unique low-energy signatures of new physics, including effects that could originate from the Planck scale. A number of recent experiments have used CPT and Lorentz violation as a candidate signal of new physics originating from the Planck scale. A discussion of these experiments and their theoretical implications is presented.

  8. Aspects of probe correction for odd-order probes in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey N.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Probe correction aspects for the spherical near-field antenna measurements are investigated. First, the spherical mode analyses of the radiated fields of several antennas are performed. It is shown that many common antennas are essentially so-called odd-order antennas. Second, the errors caused by...

  9. Electroweak Probes and Nuclear Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kubodera, K.

    2001-01-01

    There is growing interest in nuclear physics applications of effective field theory. I give a brief account of some of the latest developments in this area. I also describe interplay between this new approach and the traditional nuclear physics approach.

  10. Probing Strong Field Gravity Through Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Choptuik, Matthew W; Pretorius, Frans

    2015-01-01

    This article is an overview of the contributions numerical relativity has made to our understanding of strong field gravity, to be published in the book "General Relativity and Gravitation: A Centennial Perspective", commemorating the 100th anniversary of general relativity.

  11. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas M Levinson; Bolte, Erin E.; Miller, Carrie S.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes like binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and quantify that sensitivity, allowing local electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-co...

  12. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Nicholas M.; Bolte, Erin E.; Miller, Carrie S.

    2011-01-01

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes like binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and quantify that sensitivity, allowing local electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-containing biological systems without chemical modification. PMID:21809829

  13. IMPROVED FABRICATION METHOD FOR CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE OF ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY(AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; GUO Liqiu; ZHAO Qingliang

    2006-01-01

    An improved arc discharge method is developed to fabricate carbon nanotube probe of atomic force microscopy (AFM) here. First, silicon probe and carbon nanotube are manipulated under an optical microscope by two high precision microtranslators. When silicon probe and carbon nanotube are very close, several tens voltage is applied between them. And carbon nanotube is divided and attached to the end of silicon probe, which mainly due to the arc welding function.Comparing with the arc discharge method before, the new method here needs no coat silicon probe with metal film in advance, which can greatly reduce the fabrication's difficulty. The fabricated carbon nanotube probe shows good property of higher aspect ratio and can more accurately reflect the true topography of silicon grating than silicon probe. Under the same image drive force, carbon nanotube probe had less indentation depth on soft triblock copolymer sample than silicon probe. This showed that carbon nanotube probe has lower spring constant and less damage to the scan sample than silicon probe.

  14. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca+ [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed

  15. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  16. Atomic stabilization in superintense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic stabilization is a highlight of superintense laser-atom physics. A wealth of information has been gathered on it; established physical concepts have been revised in the process; points of contention have been debated. Recent technological breakthroughs are opening exciting perspectives of experimental study. With this in mind, we present a comprehensive overview of the phenomenon. We discuss the two forms of atomic stabilization identified theoretically. The first one, 'quasistationary (adiabatic) stabilization' (QS), refers to the limiting case of plane-wave monochromatic radiation. QS characterizes the fact that ionization rates, as calculated from single-state Floquet theory, decrease with intensity (possibly in an oscillatory manner) at high values of the field. We present predictions for QS from various forms of Floquet theory: high frequency (that has led to its discovery and offers the best physical insight), complex scaling, Sturmian, radiative close coupling and R-matrix. These predictions all agree quantitatively, and high-accuracy numerical results have been obtained for hydrogen. Predictions from non-Floquet theories are also discussed. Thereafter, we analyse the physical origin of QS. The alternative form of stabilization, 'dynamic stabilization' (DS), is presented next. This expresses the fact that the ionization probability at the end of a laser pulse of fixed shape and duration does not approach unity as the peak intensity is increased, but either starts decreasing with the intensity (possibly in an oscillatory manner), or flattens out at a value smaller than unity. We review the extensive research done on one-dimensional models, that has provided valuable insights into the phenomenon; two- and three-dimensional models are also considered. Full three-dimensional Coulomb calculations have encountered severe numerical handicaps in the past, and it is only recently that a comprehensive mapping of DS could be made for hydrogen. An adiabatic

  17. Electric field sensing near the surface microstructure of an atom chip using cold Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, J D; Martin, J D D

    2012-01-01

    The electric fields near the heterogeneous metal/dielectric surface of an atom chip were measured using cold atoms. The atomic sensitivity to electric fields was enhanced by exciting the atoms to Rydberg states that are 10^8 times more polarizable than the ground state. We attribute the measured fields to charging of the insulators between the atom chip wires. Surprisingly, it is observed that these fields may be dramatically lowered with appropriate voltage biasing, suggesting configurations for the future development of hybrid quantum systems.

  18. Probing electric fields within organic transistors by nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Paulo B.; Motti, Silvia G.; Gomes, Douglas J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are important building blocks in many organic devices, but further improvements in their performance will require a detailed knowledge of their operation mechanism. Thus mapping the electric fields in OFETs, both in the active organic layer and inside the gate dielectric, will allow a direct comparison with theoretical OFET models and guide advances in device engineering. The nonlinear optical processes of sum-frequency generation (SFG) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) may be used to probe electric fields in OFETs. With a proper choice of pump wavelength, SHG can selectively probe the field component along the OFET channel, inside the organic semiconductor. In contrast, SFG may probe the field within any organic material by selecting a specific molecular vibration and monitoring the field-enhanced SFG signal. Here we investigate OFETs fabricated with a polythiophene derivative (P3HT) on silicon substrates and with the insulating polymer PMMA for the dielectric layer. Both the strength and sign of the electric field in PMMA can be determined, yielding a direct probe of charge accumulation along the OFET channel. An extension of this technique to map the spatial distribution of accumulated charge along the channel will also be discussed. Work funded by FAPESP and CNPq (Brazil).

  19. Distributed force probe bending model of critical dimension atomic force microscopy bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Fu, Joseph; Silver, Rick M.

    2013-04-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology technique. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, small and flexible probes, often 15 to 20 nm in diameter, are used. Recent studies have reported uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements. To understand the source of these variations, tip-sample interactions between high aspect ratio features and small flexible probes, and their influence on measurement bias, should be carefully studied. Using theoretical and experimental procedures, one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) models of cylindrical probe bending relevant to carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM probes were developed and tested. An earlier 1-D bending model was refined, and a new 2-D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Contributions from several factors were considered, including: probe misalignment, CNT tip apex diameter variation, probe bending before snapping, and distributed van der Waals-London force. A method for extracting Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe-bending data was developed. Comparison of the new 2-D model with 1-D single point force (SPF) model revealed a difference of about 28% in probe bending. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1-D SPF and 2-D DF models was found. The results suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and can partially explain the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe variation. New 2-D and three-dimensional CD-AFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  20. Atomic correlations and cavity field decoherence in a strongly driven micromaser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a micromaser where a classical field strongly drives the atoms while they cross the cavity, remarkable atom-atom correlations show up at steady state, which vanish much faster than dissipative decay. Hence we consider atom pair correlation measurements in which the detection of the first probe atom prepares a mesoscopic superposition state of the cavity field, that entangles with a second probe atom. The conditional probabilities for the latter atomic detection provide a description of the decoherence of the superposition state, occurring in an open system in the presence of pumping, driving, dissipative, and thermal effects. The decoherence rate scales as the squared interaction time, that sets the separation in phase space between the superposition components, whereas the quantum coherence is unaffected by the atomic pumping. Hence we further investigate the system when the cavity is not pumped. Starting the correlation measurements from a thermal state, we can describe the effect of temperature on decoherence. Starting from a vacuum state, the superposition states are maximally separated Schroedinger cat states, whose decoherence can thus be monitored

  1. Atomic resolution in noncontact AFM by probing cantilever frequency shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yong Xie

    2007-01-01

    Rutile TiO2(001) quantum dots (or nano-marks) in different shapes were used to imitate uncleaved material surfaces or materials with rough surfaces. By numerical integration of the equation of motion of cantilever for silicon tip scanning along the [110] direction over the rutile TiO2 (001) quantum dots in ultra high vacuum (UHV), scanning routes were explored to achieve atomic resolution from frequency shift image. The tip-surface interaction forces were calculated from Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential by the Hamaker summation method. The calculated results showed that atomic resolution could be achieved by frequency shift image for TiO2 (001) surfaces of rhombohedral quantum dot scanning in a vertical route, and spherical cap quantum dot scanning in a superposition route.

  2. Nitride semiconductors studied by atom probe tomography and correlative techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices fabricated from nitride semiconductors include blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). To design efficient devices, the structure and composition of the constituent materials must be well-characterised. Traditional microscopy techniques used to examine nitride semiconductors include transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This thesis describes the study of nitride semiconductor materials using these tradi...

  3. Entanglement properties between two atoms in the binomial optical field interacting with two entangled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘堂昆; 张康隆; 陶宇; 单传家; 刘继兵

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the degree of entanglement between two atoms in a system of the binomial optical field interacting with two arbitrary entangled atoms is investigated. The influence of the strength of the dipole–dipole interaction between two atoms, probabilities of the Bernoulli trial, and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the atomic entanglement are discussed. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state. Moreover, if and only if the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the entanglement evolution is not affected by the parameters, and the degree of entanglement is always kept as 1.

  4. Hidden Markov Model of atomic quantum jump dynamics in an optically probed cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, S.; Molmer, K.; Alt, W.;

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the quantum jumps of an atom interacting with a cavity field. The strong atom- field interaction makes the cavity transmission depend on the time dependent atomic state, and we present a Hidden Markov Model description of the atomic state dynamics which is conditioned in a Bayesian...... manner on the detected signal. We suggest that small variations in the observed signal may be due to spatial motion of the atom within the cavity, and we represent the atomic system by a number of hidden states to account for both the small variations and the internal state jump dynamics. In our theory......, the atomic state is determined in a Bayesian manner from the measurement data, and we present an iterative protocol, which determines both the atomic state and the model parameters. As a new element in the treatment of observed quantum systems, we employ a Bayesian approach that conditions the atomic...

  5. Influence of the wavelength on the spatial resolution of pulsed-laser atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gault, B. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Private Mail Bag 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Chen, Y. M.; Hono, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Moody, M. P.; Ringer, S. P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ohkubo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-11-01

    Modern atom probes typically incorporate an ultrafast pulsed-laser source with wavelength ranging from infrared (IR) to ultraviolet (UV) depending on the specific instrument. In order to estimate the influence of the wavelength on the accuracy of the technique, the achievable in-depth spatial resolution has been measured for atom probe analyses of the same pure W specimen using three different wavelengths and across a range of laser pulse energies. UV illumination is shown to yield superior spatial resolution to both IR and visible (green) wavelengths. We propose that this improvement relates to a faster decay of temperature enabled by light absorption confined to the near apex region.

  6. Photoabsorption by atoms in external fields near the ionization threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expression is obtained for the photoabsorption cross section of atoms near the ionization threshold in an external static magnetic field. The results satisfactorily describe quasi-Landau resonances observed experimentally in the photoabsorption by hydrogen atoms in a magnetic field. A similar expression is obtained for the photoabsorption in an electric field

  7. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  8. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  9. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J., E-mail: vicente.araullopeters@gmail.com [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. - Highlights: • A new analysis method was designed that determines if reconstructed planes are present in atom probe data. • The location, orientation, and planar spacing of these planes are obtained. • This method was applied to simulated, aluminium alloy and silicon data where the extent of planes was shown to vary considerably. • This method can be used to examine atom probe reconstruction quality.

  10. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. - Highlights: • A new analysis method was designed that determines if reconstructed planes are present in atom probe data. • The location, orientation, and planar spacing of these planes are obtained. • This method was applied to simulated, aluminium alloy and silicon data where the extent of planes was shown to vary considerably. • This method can be used to examine atom probe reconstruction quality

  11. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong;

    2011-01-01

    (biofilm positive and biofilm negative strains) were analyzed using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Force measurements performed using bare hydrophilic silicon nitride tips disclosed similar adhesive properties for each strain. However, use of hydrophobic tips showed that hydrophobic forces are not......Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...

  12. Atomic-scale investigations of grain boundary segregation in astrology with a three dimensional atom-probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blavette, D. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut Universitaire de France (France); Letellier, L. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Duval, P. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique; Guttmann, M. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Electronique]|[Institut de Recherches de la Siderurgie Francaise (IRSID), 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    1996-08-01

    Both conventional and 3D atom-probes were applied to the investigation of grain-boundary (GB) segregation phenomena in two-phase nickel base superalloys Astroloy. 3D images as provided by the tomographic atom-probe reveal the presence of a strong segregation of both boron and molybdenum at grain-boundaries. Slight carbon enrichment is also detected. Considerable chromium segregation is exhibited at {gamma}`-{gamma}` grain-boundaries. All these segregants are distributed in a continuous manner along the boundary over a width close to 0.5 nm. Experiments show that segregation occurs during cooling and more probably between 1000 C and 800 C. Boron and molybdenum GB enrichments are interpreted as due to an equilibrium type-segregation while chromium segregation is thought to be induced by {gamma}` precipitation at GB`s and stabilised by the presence of boron. No segregation of zirconium is detected. (orig.)

  13. Preparation of entangled atomic states through simultaneous nonresonant atom-field interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Mei-Feng

    2006-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating a three-atom maximal entanglement W state. It is based on the simultaneous nonresonant interaction of atoms with a single-mode cavity field. Our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field, so the cavity field in our scheme can be initially in thermal states.

  14. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement. PMID:26724066

  15. Probing electronic and structural properties of single molecules on the atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis work, a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study single atoms and molecules on thin insulating films. We show that noncontact-AFM can yield important additional information for these systems, which had previously been studied only with STM. In particular, we demonstrate that the charge states of single gold adatoms can be detected with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Furthermore, it is descr...

  16. Single-atom aided probe of the decoherence of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, H. T.; Bose, S.

    2008-01-01

    We study a two-level atom coupled to a Bose-Einstein condensate. We show that the rules governing the decoherence of mesoscopic superpositions involving different classical-like states of the condensate can be probed using this system. This scheme is applicable irrespective of whether the condensate is initially in a coherent, thermal or more generally in any mixture of coherent states. The effects of atom loss and finite temperature to the decoherence can therefore be studied. We also discus...

  17. Spin-polarized nuclei as probes of electromagnetic field distributions on solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments using thermal beams of nuclear-spin-polarized alkali atoms adsorbed on hot metal surfaces show that polarized nuclei are sensitive probes of surface electromagnetic field distributions. The high polarization of the probe beams, when coupled with the efficiency of atomic physics techniques used for monitoring the polarization of desorbed particles, makes possible a variety of interesting spin-relaxation experiments on single-crystal surfaces, including nuclear magnetic resonance. Extension of the current experimental method to semiconductor and insulator surfaces at arbitrary temperatures appears to be straightforward. The information from spin-polarized nuclear surface spectroscopy (SPNSS) will allow detailed tests of charge-density profiles now available in self-consistent surface structure calculations. (Auth.)

  18. Near-Field Photothermal Heating with a Plasmonic Nanofocusing Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Dong, Biqing; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2016-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructures support plasmon resonances—collective oscillation of charge carriers at optical frequencies—and serve as effective tools to create bright light sources at the nanoscale. These sources are useful in broad application areas including, super-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, nanolithography, and near-field optomechanical transducers. The feasibility of these applications relies on efficient conversion of free-space propagating light to plasmons. Recently, we demonstrated a hybrid nanofocusing scheme for efficient coupling of light to plasmons at the apex of a scanning probe. In the approach, free-space light is coupled to propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the tapered shaft of the scanning probe. The SPPs propagate adiabatically towards the probe tip where they are coupled to localized plasmons (LSPs). The nanofocusing scheme was explored in a near-field scanning optical microscope for super-resolution imaging, near-field transduction of nanomechanical vibrations, and local detection of ultrasound. Owing to the strong concentration of light at the probe, significant heating of the tip and a sample positioned in the optical near-field is expected. This paper investigates the local heating produced by the plasmonic nanofocusing probe under steady-state conditions using the tip-enhanced Raman scattering approach. In addition, a finite element model is explored to study the coupling of free propagating light to LSPs, and to estimate the temperature rise expected in a halfspace heated by absorption of the LSPs. This study has implications for exploring the plasmonic nanofocusing probe in heat-assisted nanofabrication and fundamental studies of nanoscale heat transport in materials.

  19. Mapping and correcting respiration-induced field changes in the brain using fluorine field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer; Hanson, Lars G.;

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Breathing induced dynamic B0 field perturbations in the head can lead to artefacts in ultra-high field MR by causing line broadening in spectroscopy and signal dropout, ghosting, displacement artifacts and blurring in imaging. It has recently been proposed to continuously stabilize...... the magnetic field by real-time updating of the shim fields, based on synchronous field measurements with external probes1,2. A thorough analysis of how accurate such field measurements at few (e.g. 16) positions outside the head can reflect the spatially varying dynamic fields inside the head is currently...... lacking. In this study a comparison between scanner-acquired field maps of the head, and corresponding field probe measurements is presented both during in- and expiration. In addition, the field probe measurements have been used to perform real-time updating of the linear shim- settings. Methods. Setup...

  20. Analytical relativistic self-consistent-field calculations for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new second-order representation of the Dirac equation is presented. This representation which is exact for a hydrogen atom is applied to approximate analytical self-consistent-field calculations for atoms. Results are given for the rare-gas atoms from helium to radon and for lead. The results compare favorably with numerical Dirac-Hartree-Fock solutions

  1. Atomic resolution probe for allostery in the regulatory thin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael R; Lehman, Sarah J; Tardiff, Jil C; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-03-22

    Calcium binding and dissociation within the cardiac thin filament (CTF) is a fundamental regulator of normal contraction and relaxation. Although the disruption of this complex, allosterically mediated process has long been implicated in human disease, the precise atomic-level mechanisms remain opaque, greatly hampering the development of novel targeted therapies. To address this question, we used a fully atomistic CTF model to test both Ca(2+)binding strength and the energy required to remove Ca(2+)from the N-lobe binding site in WT and mutant troponin complexes that have been linked to genetic cardiomyopathies. This computational approach is combined with measurements of in vitro Ca(2+)dissociation rates in fully reconstituted WT and cardiac troponin T R92L and R92W thin filaments. These human disease mutations represent known substitutions at the same residue, reside at a significant distance from the calcium binding site in cardiac troponin C, and do not affect either the binding pocket affinity or EF-hand structure of the binding domain. Both have been shown to have significantly different effects on cardiac function in vivo. We now show that these mutations independently alter the interaction between the Ca(2+)ion and cardiac troponin I subunit. This interaction is a previously unidentified mechanism, in which mutations in one protein of a complex indirectly affect a third via structural and dynamic changes in a second to yield a pathogenic change in thin filament function that results in mutation-specific disease states. We can now provide atom-level insight that is potentially highly actionable in drug design. PMID:26957598

  2. Study of responsiveness of near-field terahertz imaging probes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berta, Milan; Kužel, Petr; Kadlec, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 15 (2009), 15550/1-15550/6. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : microwave simulations * terahertz spectroscopy * near-field probe Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.083, year: 2009

  3. Evaporation mechanisms of MgO in laser assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the field evaporation properties of bulk MgO and sandwiched MgO layers in Fe are compared using laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography. The comparison of flight time spectra gives an estimate of the evaporation times as a function of the wavelength and the laser energy. It is shown that the evaporation takes place in two steps on two different time scales in MgO. It is also shown that as long as the MgO layer is buried in Fe, the evaporation is dominated by the photon absorption in Fe layer at the tip apex. Eventually the evaporation process of MgO is discussed based on the difference between the bulk materials and the multilayer samples. -- Research Highlights: →Field evaporation properties of bulk MgO are compared with thin film. →MgO sandwiched between Fe layers. →Evaporation process in two steps in two different time scales. →The change in the thickness of the MgO layer(from 4 to 32nm) does not change the evaporation behavior.

  4. ATOM-PROBE RESULTS SUPPORT THE SKELETON MODEL FOR WC-Co

    OpenAIRE

    Henjered, A.; Hellsing, M.; Andrén, H.; Nordén, H.

    1984-01-01

    WC/WC boundaries in WC-Co type cemented carbides have been analysed with the atom-probe instrument. The boundaries contained about half a monolayer of cobalt (or Co + Cr) and can therefore be described as grain boundaries with cobalt segregation. The results support the "continuous skeleton" mode1 of WC-Co.

  5. A variable-width harmonic probe for multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Xia, Qi, E-mail: qxia@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment of Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Yangjun [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Michael Yu, E-mail: qxia@mail.hust.edu.cn, E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575 (Singapore)

    2015-02-16

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simultaneously measure topography and material properties of specimens, it is highly desirable that the higher order resonance frequencies of the cantilever probe are assigned to be integer harmonics of the excitation frequency. The harmonic resonances are essential for significant enhancement of the probe's response at the specified harmonic frequencies. In this letter, a structural optimization technique is employed to design cantilever probes so that the ratios between one or more higher order resonance frequencies and the fundamental natural frequency are ensured to be equal to specified integers and, in the meantime, that the fundamental natural frequency is maximized. Width profile of the cantilever probe is the design variable in optimization. Thereafter, the probes were prepared by modifying a commercial probe through the focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The resonance frequencies of the FIB fabricated probes were measured with an AFM. Results of the measurement show that the optimal design of probe is as effective as design prediction.

  6. Preparation of Entangled Atomic States Through Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the generation of two-atom maximally entangled states and multi-atom maximally entangled states of W class. The scheme is based on the simultaneous resonant interaction of atoms with a single-mode cavity field. It does not require accurate adjustment of the interaction time. The time needed to complete the generation does not increase with the number of the atom.

  7. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V. [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan and CNRS UMR 8537, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K. [Attocube systems AG, Koeniginstrasse 11A RGB, Munich 80539 (Germany); Dantelle, G. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique and CNRS UMR 7643, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud and CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  8. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  9. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces. PMID:26605698

  10. High resolution field imaging with atomic vapor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the development of imaging techniques in atomic vapor cells. This is a relatively unexplored area, despite the ubiquitous use of imaging in experiments with ultracold atoms. Our main focus is in high resolution imaging of microwave near fields, for which there is currently no satisfactory established technique. We detect microwave fields through Rabi oscillations driven by the microwave on atomic hyperfine transitions. The technique can be easily modified to also i...

  11. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  12. High-efficiency one-dimensional atom localization via two parallel standing-wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new scheme of high-efficiency one-dimensional (1D) atom localization via measurement of upper state population or the probe absorption in a four-level N-type atomic system. By applying two classical standing-wave fields, the localization peak position and number, as well as the conditional position probability, can be easily controlled by the system parameters, and the sub-half-wavelength atom localization is also observed. More importantly, there is 100% detecting probability of the atom in the subwavelength domain when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. The proposed scheme may open up a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 1D atom localization. (paper)

  13. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Ringer, Simon P; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. PMID:25747179

  14. Errors of first-order probe correction for higher-order probes in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Pivnenko, Sergiy; Breinbjerg, Olav

    An investigation is performed to study the error of the far-field pattern determined from a spherical near-field antenna measurement in the case where a first-order (mu=+-1) probe correction scheme is applied to the near-field signal measured by a higher-order probe....

  15. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Wang, Michael Yu, E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117575 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  16. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement

  17. The resistive switching in TiO2 films studied by conductive atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanmin Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The resistive switching characteristics of TiO2 thin films were investigated using conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. The as-prepared TiO2 thin films were modulated into higher and lower resistance states by applying a local electric field. We showed that the resistive switching results from charge injection and release assisted by electro-migration of oxygen ions. An integrated model combined with filamentary and interfacial effects was utilized to elucidate the experimentally observed phenomenon.

  18. Conductive transparent fiber probes for shear-force atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New conductive transparent (CT) probes that can inject currents into nanometer-sized regions and collect light from them have been developed for shear-force atomic force microscopy (SF-AFM) of partially isolative regions. The CT probe consists of a straight elastic silica fiber with one end tapered to a point. The taper is coated with an indium-tin-oxide film as a transparent electrode, and the probe apex has a nanometer-scale radius. The essential feature of the CT probes is coaxial nickel plating on the shaft of the isolative silica fiber, which is adjusted to obtain suitable elasticity for smooth shear-force feedback as well as for supplying currents to the transparent electrode. Experimental results clarified that nickel thickness between 0.5 and 15 μm on 20 mm-long fibers makes resistance low enough for supplying current to the probe apex and also makes the Q curves smooth enough for shear-force feedback. Clear SF-AFM and current images were successfully obtained for a sample containing both conductive and isolative regions. The CT probes for SF-AFM can expand applications of probe-current-induced luminescence measurements to samples that contain highly resistive and isolative regions, for which scanning tunneling microscopy cannot be applied

  19. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Andrew [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX13PH, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont. L8S4L8 (Canada); Ceguerra, Anna V. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Xie, Kelvin Y. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Du, Sichao [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P., E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. - Highlights: ► The need to deconvolute molecular ions within atom probe data is discussed. ► Two algorithms to separate the constituent atoms of molecular ions are proposed. ► The algorithms developed are tested on simulated and experimental data. ► Nearest neighbour distributions are used to highlight the improvements.

  20. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. - Highlights: ► The need to deconvolute molecular ions within atom probe data is discussed. ► Two algorithms to separate the constituent atoms of molecular ions are proposed. ► The algorithms developed are tested on simulated and experimental data. ► Nearest neighbour distributions are used to highlight the improvements

  1. Odd-order probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an odd-order probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements is defined. A probe correction technique for odd-order probes is then formulated and tested by computer simulations. The probe correction for odd-order probes is important, since a wide range of realistic antennas...

  2. Trapping atoms in the vacuum field of a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Schön, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to find ways to trap an atom in a cavity. In contrast to other approaches we propose a method where the cavity is basically in the vacuum state and the atom in the ground state. The idea is to induce a spatial dependent AC Stark shift by irradiating the atom with a weak laser field, so that the atom experiences a trapping force. The main feature of our setup is that dissipation can be strongly suppressed. We estimate the lifetime of the atom as well as the trapping potential parameters and compare our estimations with numerical simulations.

  3. Energy levels of light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Thirumalai, Anand

    2014-01-01

    In this review article we provide an overview of the field of atomic structure of light atoms in strong magnetic fields. There is a very rich history of this field which dates back to the very birth of quantum mechanics. At various points in the past significant discoveries in science and technology have repeatedly served to rejuvenate interest in atomic structure in strong fields, broadly speaking, resulting in three eras in the development of this field; the historical, the classical and the modern eras. The motivations for studying atomic structure have also changed significantly as time progressed. The review presents a chronological summary of the major advances that occurred during these eras and discusses new insights and impetus gained. The review is concluded with a description of the latest findings and the future prospects for one of the most remarkably cutting-edge fields of research in science today.

  4. Cold and Ultracold Rydberg Atoms in Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, T; Schmelcher, P

    2009-01-01

    Cold Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields possess unique properties which open the pathway for an intriguing many-body dynamics taking place in Rydberg gases consisting of either matter or anti-matter systems. We review both the foundations and recent developments of the field in the cold and ultracold regime where trapping and cooling of Rydberg atoms have become possible. Exotic states of moving Rydberg atoms such as giant dipole states are discussed in detail, including their formation mechanisms in a strongly magnetized cold plasma. Inhomogeneous field configurations influence the electronic structure of Rydberg atoms, and we describe the utility of corresponding effects for achieving tightly trapped ultracold Rydberg atoms. We review recent work on large, extended cold Rydberg gases in magnetic fields and their formation in strongly magnetized ultracold plasmas through collisional recombination. Implications of these results for current antihydrogen production experiments are pointed out, and ...

  5. Multiphoton resonance ionization for hydrogen atom in laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Schroedinger equation of hydrogen atom in laser field is expanded by Floquet wave and can be solved by the iterative method. The atomic ionization by laser field is a complex eigenvalue problem, which is formed from differential equation and boundary condition. Then the formula of the multiphoton resonance ionization in a linear polarization laser field was obtained and it is compared with the experiment

  6. Probing ultrafast thermalization with field-free molecular alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Houzet, Julien; Gateau, Julien; Hertz, Edouard; Billard, Franck; Lavorel, Bruno; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Boulet, Christian; Faucher, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The rotation-translation thermalization of CO2 gas is investigated 500 ps after its preheating by a nonresonant short and intense laser pulse. The temperature of thermalization is optically determined with two additional short laser pulses enabling a field-free molecular alignment process and its probing, respectively. The measurements are performed for various intensities of the preheat pulse, leading to the observation of different temperatures which are in very good agreement with classica...

  7. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    OpenAIRE

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garolera, Blai; Torrents, Genis

    2015-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops...

  8. Characterization of microfabricated probes for combined atomic force and high-resolution scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Maurizio R; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Akiyama, Terunobu; Engel, Andreas; deRooij, Nico F; Staufer, Urs

    2006-08-01

    A combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscope probe is presented. The probe is electrically insulated except at the very apex of the tip, which has a radius of curvature in the range of 10-15 nm. Steady-state cyclic voltammetry measurements for the reduction of Ru(NH3)6Cl3 and feedback experiments showed a distinct and reproducible response of the electrode. These experimental results agreed with finite element simulations for the corresponding diffusion process. Sequentially topographical and electrochemical studies of Pt lines deposited onto Si3N4 and spaced 100 nm apart (edge to edge) showed a lateral electrochemical resolution of 10 nm. PMID:16878880

  9. Robust operation and performance of integrated carbon nanotubes atomic force microscopy probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a complete characterization of carbon nanotubes-atomic force microscopy (CNT-AFM) probes to evaluate the cantilever operation and advanced properties originating from the CNTs. The fabrication consists of silicon probes tip-functionalized with multiwalled CNTs by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A dedicated methodology has been defined to evaluate the effect of CNT integration into the Si cantilevers. The presence of the CNTs provides enhanced capability for sensing and durability, as demonstrated using dynamic and static modes, e.g. imaging, indentation and force/current characterization.

  10. Development of atomic radical monitoring probe and its application to spatial distribution measurements of H and O atomic radical densities in radical-based plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic radicals such as hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) play important roles in process plasmas. In a previous study, we developed a system for measuring the absolute density of H, O, nitrogen, and carbon atoms in plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a compact light source using an atmospheric pressure microplasma [microdischarge hollow cathode lamp (MHCL)]. In this study, we developed a monitoring probe for atomic radicals employing the VUVAS with the MHCL. The probe size was 2.7 mm in diameter. Using this probe, only a single port needs to be accessed for radical density measurements. We successfully measured the spatial distribution of the absolute densities of H and O atomic radicals in a radical-based plasma processing system by moving the probe along the radial direction of the chamber. This probe allows convenient analysis of atomic radical densities to be carried out for any type of process plasma at any time. We refer to this probe as a ubiquitous monitoring probe for atomic radicals.

  11. Ultralow Magnetic Fields and Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, J. C.; Lockhart, J. M.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D. O.; Taber, M. A.

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout system employs a dc SQUID to measure the London moment generated by the superconducting gyro rotor in order to resolve sub-milliarcsecond changes in the gyro spin direction. In addition to a low residual dc magnetic field, attenuation of external field variation is required to be 1012 at the gyro positions. We discuss the measurement of the dc magnetic field and ac attenuation factor and the performance of the readout system

  12. Pigtailed electro-optic probes for vectorial electric field mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzecha, Adriana; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Ruaro, Mickael; Duvillaret, Lionel; Lassere, Jean-Louis

    2010-04-01

    Electro-optic measurement (EO) constitutes an efficient technique to characterize electrical (E) fields : indeed, the Pockel's effect properties (linear modification of refractive indices of some non-centrosymetric crystals induced by the E-field)1 leads to a vectorial measurement. Thus, it allows to map the E-field vector and its transient evolution, either in free space or inside guiding structures. Pigtailed EO sensors are naturally becoming a reliable and consistent mean of characterization for many applications, e.g. high power microwaves (HPM), electromagnetic interference (EMI), on chip diagnostic, bio-electromagnetism (e.g. influence of mobile phones on the human body). Even if these non-invasive sensors provide a greater temporal and spatial resolution (femtosecond and sub-millimeter, respectively) than commonly used sensors (antennas, bolometers), it remains temperature dependant and quite low sensitive. EO probes are based on the modification of a laser beam (either its polarization, phase or amplitude) crossing an EO crystal. We demonstrate here the last developments and improvements for EO probes as well as for whole EO setups, exploiting polarization state or amplitude modulation. The sensor is constituted by a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber carrying the beam to the crystal and taking it back once modulated, gradient index lense(s) managing the shape of the beam, half or quarter wave plate controlling the input and output polarizations and a crystal (either anisotropic: LiTaO3, LiNb03, DAST, KTP or isotropic : ZnTe, InP) converting the E-field into a modulation. Our probes are fully dielectric and cylindrically shaped (length ~ 1 cm and diameter ~ 2-3 mm). The setup is made of a 1.5 μm DFB laser, some photodiodes (low and high speed) added with a polarization state analyser arrangement in case of EO probes based on polarization state modulation scheme. The measurement bench is fully automated and compensate/measure the temperature deviation

  13. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Ceguerra, Anna V; Xie, Kelvin Y; Du, Sichao; Ringer, Simon P

    2013-09-01

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. PMID:23522847

  14. ATOMS INTERACTING WITH ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS, MULTIPHOTON IONIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mainfray, G

    1982-01-01

    The non linear interaction between an intense laser radiation and atoms leads to ionization through the absorption of N photons from the laser radiation via laser-induced virtual states. The multiphoton ionization rate varies as a function of the laser intensity I as IN. We discuss the two most important effects which govern multiphoton ionization processes : resonance effects and laser-coherence effects. In a moderate laser intensity range (107 - 109 W cm-2) corresponding to the two, three o...

  15. Using Jupiter's gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection. PMID:27005472

  16. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges ...

  17. Probing Charges on the Atomic Scale by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, F; Repp, J; Fleischmann, M; Scheer, M; Ondráček, M; Jelínek, P

    2015-08-14

    Kelvin probe force spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge distribution of individual molecules with polar bonds. Whereas this technique represents the charge distribution with moderate resolution for large tip-molecule separations, it fails for short distances. Here, we introduce a novel local force spectroscopy technique which allows one to better disentangle electrostatic from other contributions in the force signal. It enables one to obtain charge-related maps at even closer tip-sample distances, where the lateral resolution is further enhanced. This enhanced resolution allows one to resolve contrast variations along individual polar bonds. PMID:26317733

  18. Optical probing of sample heating in scanning near-field experiments with apertured probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used the inherent thermochromism of conjugated polymers to investigate substrate heating effects in scanning near-field experiments with metal-coated 'apertured' probes. Chemically etched and pulled fibers were used to provide near-field excitation of fully converted films of poly(p-phenylene vinylene), PPV, and of poly(4,4'-diphenylene diphenylvinylene). We detect no significant blueshift of the photoluminescence spectra generated with near-field excitation, in comparison to those collected with far-field excitation. We conclude that polymer heating in the region contributing to the luminescence is less than 40 K. We also demonstrate that thermolithography of the PPV precursor is not significant by comparing UV (325 nm) and red (670 nm) illumination

  19. Phase decomposition and ordering in Ni-11.3 at.% Ti studied with atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kassab, T; Kompatscher, M; Kirchheim, R; Kostorz, G; Schönfeld, B

    2014-09-01

    The decomposition behavior of Ni-rich Ni-Ti was reassessed using Tomographic Atom Probe (TAP) and Laser Assisted Wide Angle Tomographic Atom Probe. Single crystalline specimens of Ni-11.3 at.% Ti were investigated, the states selected from the decomposition path were the metastable γ″ and γ' states introduced on the basis of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the two-phase model for evaluation. The composition values of the precipitates in these states could not be confirmed by APT data as the interface of the ordered precipitates may not be neglected. The present results rather suggest to apply a three-phase model for the interpretation of SANS measurements, in which the width of the interface remains nearly unchanged and the L12 structure close to 3:1 stoichiometry is maintained in the core of the precipitates from the γ″ to the γ' state. PMID:24981213

  20. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinke, Nicolai ten; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  1. Phase decomposition and ordering in Ni-11.3 at.% Ti studied with atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2014-09-01

    The decomposition behavior of Ni-rich Ni-Ti was reassessed using Tomographic Atom Probe (TAP) and Laser Assisted Wide Angle Tomographic Atom Probe. Single crystalline specimens of Ni-11.3at.% Ti were investigated, the states selected from the decomposition path were the metastable γ″ and γ\\' states introduced on the basis of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the two-phase model for evaluation. The composition values of the precipitates in these states could not be confirmed by APT data as the interface of the ordered precipitates may not be neglected. The present results rather suggest to apply a three-phase model for the interpretation of SANS measurements, in which the width of the interface remains nearly unchanged and the L12 structure close to 3:1 stoichiometry is maintained in the core of the precipitates from the γ″ to the γ\\' state. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effect of atomization gas pressure variation on gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a computational fluid flow model was adopted to investigate the effect of varying atomization gas pressure (P0) on the gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization. The influence of P0 on static pressure and velocity magnitude of the central axis of the flow field was also examined. The numerical results indicate that the maximum gas velocity within the gas field increases with increasing P0. The aspiration pressure (ΔP) is found to decrease as P0 increases at a lower atomization gas pressure. However, at a higher atomization gas pressure increasing P0 causes the opposite: the higher atomization gas pressure, the higher aspiration pressure. The alternation of ΔP is caused by the variations of stagnation point pressure and location of Mach disk, while hardly by the location of stagnation point. A radical pressure gradient is formed along the tip of the delivery tube and increases as P0 increases.

  3. A new probe of magnetic fields in the pre-reionization epoch: I. Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Gluscevic, Vera; Mishra, Abhilash; Hirata, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method of measuring extremely weak magnetic fields in the inter galactic medium prior to and during the epoch of cosmic reionization. The method utilizes the Larmor precession of spin-polarized neutral hydrogen in the triplet state of the hyperfine transition. The resulting change in the brightness temperature fluctuations encodes information about the magnetic field the atoms are immersed in. The method is most suited to probing fields that are coherent on large scales. Due to the long lifetime of the triplet state of the 21-cm transition, this technique is naturally sensitive to extremely weak field strengths, of order $10^{-19}$ G (or $10^{-21}$ G if scaled to the present day). Therefore, this might open up the possibility of probing primordial magnetic fields just prior to reionization. Moreover, such measurements are unaffected by later magnetic fields since 21-cm observations preserve redshift information. If the magnetic fields are much stronger, it is still possible to recover information...

  4. Bow-tie optical antenna probes for single-emitter scanning near-field optical microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Farahani, Javad N.; Eisler, Hans-Jürgen; Pohl, Dieter W; Pavius, Michaël; Flückiger, Philippe; Gasser, Philippe; Hecht, Bert

    2007-01-01

    A method for the fabrication of bow-tie optical antennas at the apex of pyramidal Si3N4 atomic force microscopy tips is described. We demonstrate that these novel optical probes are capable of sub-wavelength imaging of single quantum dots at room temperature. The enhanced and confined optical near-field at the antenna feed gap leads to locally enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of single quantum dots. Photoluminescence quenching due to the proximity of metal is found to be insignificant. The met...

  5. Probing the internal solar magnetic field through g-modes

    CERN Document Server

    Rashba, T I; Turck-Chièze, S; Valle, J W F

    2006-01-01

    The observation of g-mode candidates by the SoHO mission opens the possibility of probing the internal structure of the solar radiative zone (RZ) and the solar core more directly than possible via the use of the p-mode helioseismology data. We study the effect of rotation and RZ magnetic fields on g-mode frequencies. Using a self-consistent static MHD magnetic field model we show that a 1% g-mode frequency shift with respect to the Solar Seismic Model (SSeM) prediction, currently hinted in the GOLF data, can be obtained for magnetic fields as low as 300 kG, for current measured modes. On the other hand, we also argue that a similar shift for the case of the low order g-mode candidate frequencies can not result from rotation effects nor from central magnetic fields, unless these exceed 8 MG.

  6. Atomic force microscope based Kelvin probe measurements : application to an electrochemical reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Böhmisch, Mathias; Burmeister, Frank; Rettenberger, Armin; Zimmermann, Jörg; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul

    1997-01-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was utilized as a Kelvin probe to determine work functions of several metals and semiconductors quantitarively. Most of the experimental data show excellent agreement with published values measured by photoemission. Variations in work functions as low as 5 mV could be detected with a typical lateral resolution of 20 nm. This method allowed us to analyze and explain the energetics of an electrochemical reaction on the surface of WSe2, which could be in situ ind...

  7. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For...

  8. Atom-probe tomography of tribological boundary films resulting from boron-based oil additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Baik, Sung-Il; Bertolucci-Coelho, Leonardo; Mazzaferro, Lucca; Ramirez, Giovanni; Erdemir, Ali; Seidman, D K

    2016-01-15

    Correlative characterization using atom-probe tomography (APT) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on a tribofilm formed during sliding frictional testing with a fully formulated engine oil, which also contains a boron-based additive. The tribofilm formed is ~15 nm thick and consists of oxides of iron and compounds of B, Ca, P, and S, which are present in the additive. This study provides strong evidence for boron being embedded in the tribofilm, which effectively reduces friction and wear losses.

  9. Atom probe study of chromium oxide spinels formed during intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe microscopy has been used to study the inhomogeneous nature of chromium oxide spinels in intergranular corrosion of a 253 MA austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air. The results indicate that the non-continuous character of the spinel layers originates from nanoscale phases such as iron-rich oxides along the chromite grain boundaries and silicate particles. Their role in the rate of intergranular corrosion is discussed

  10. Influence of atomic force microscope (AFM) probe shape on adhesion force measured in humidity environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳丽; 涂育松; 谭惠丽

    2014-01-01

    In micro-manipulation, the adhesion force has very important influence on behaviors of micro-objects. Here, a theoretical study on the effects of humidity on the adhesion force is presented between atomic force microscope (AFM) tips and substrate. The analysis shows that the precise tip geometry plays a critical role on humidity depen-dence of the adhesion force, which is the dominant factor in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments. For a blunt (paraboloid) tip, the adhesion force versus humidity curves tends to the apparent contrast (peak-to-valley corrugation) with a broad range. This paper demonstrates that the abrupt change of the adhesion force has high correla-tion with probe curvatures, which is mediated by coordinates of solid-liquid-vapor contact lines (triple point) on the probe profiles. The study provides insights for further under-standing nanoscale adhesion forces and the way to choose probe shapes in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments.

  11. Resistance of single polyaniline fibers and their junctions measured by double-probe atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Rintaro; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of polyaniline (PANI) fibers are of our interest as a component of network materials. Using a multiple-probe atomic force microscope with tuning fork probes, we investigated the resistance of single PANI fibers and their cross-point junction where the fibers contact each other. The resistivity of single PANI fibers was measured to be on the order of 10 Ω cm, and the contact resistance between PANI fibers was on the order of GΩ. The resistances through single cross-point junctions between two PANI fibers were very much dependent on the experimental condition, that is, the cross-point junction is stabilized or destabilized by physically placing the probes onto the two fibers. This suggests the nanomechanical instability of the cross-point junctions and a possibility to construct strain-responsive PANI fiber networks.

  12. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle-the graviton-that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms 'feeling' laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials-both Abelian and non-Abelian-in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms. PMID:25422950

  13. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles.

  14. Photon "mass" and atomic levels in a superstrong magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Vysotsky, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of atomic levels originating from the lowest Landau level in a superstrong magnetic field is analyzed. The influence of the screening of the Coulomb potential on the values of critical nuclear charge is studied.

  15. Hyperfine field at grain boundary atoms in iron nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron nanocrystallites of ball-milled iron powder, partially crystallized melt quenched amorphous alloys and polycrystalline multilayers were studied. The change in the hyperfine field at iron atoms due to grain boundaries does not exceed the experimental linewidth

  16. Comparison of atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, A. J.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Santra, S.; Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Sundar, C. S.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2014-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels owe part of their high temperature stability to the nano-scale oxides they contain. These yttrium-titanium oxides are notoriously difficult to characterise since they are embedded in a magnetic-ferritic matrix and often atom probe tomography on the same material to explore the kind of information that can be gained on the character of the oxide particles. The influence of chromium in these alloys is of interest, therefore two model ODS steels Fe-(14Cr)-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 are compared. TEM is shown to accurately measure the size of the oxide particles and atom probe tomography is necessary to observe the smallest sub-1.5 nm particles. Larger Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 structured particles were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the smallest oxides remain difficult to index. Chemical data from energy-filtered TEM agreed qualitatively with the atom probe findings. It was found that the majority of the oxide particles exhibit an unoxidised chromium shell which may be responsible for reducing the ultimate size of the oxide particles.

  17. The Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Wang, Dennis; Rich, Nathan; Carter, Michael T.; Chua, Damien H.; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Morrill, Jeff S.; Lynch, Sean; Thurn, Adam; Van Duyne, Peter; Hagood, Robert; Clifford, Greg; Grey, Phares J.; Velli, Marco; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre; Mazy, Emanuel; Bothmer, Volker; Rodmann, Jens

    2015-02-01

    The Wide-field Imager for Solar PRobe Plus (WISPR) is the sole imager aboard the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018. SPP will be a unique mission designed to orbit as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. WISPR employs a 95∘ radial by 58∘ transverse field of view to image the fine-scale structure of the solar corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. WISPR is the smallest heliospheric imager to date yet it comprises two nested wide-field telescopes with large-format (2 K × 2 K) APS CMOS detectors to optimize the performance for their respective fields of view and to minimize the risk of dust damage, which may be considerable close to the Sun. The WISPR electronics are very flexible allowing the collection of individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or the summing of multiple images to increase the signal-to-noise when the spacecraft is further from the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large-scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  18. Sensitivity of atom interferometry to ultralight scalar field dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Geraci, Andrew A.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the use of atom interferometry as a tool to search for Dark Matter (DM) composed of ultra-light scalar fields. Previous work on ultra-light DM detection using accelerometers has considered the possibility of equivalence principle violating effects whereby gradients in the dark matter field can directly produce relative accelerations between media of differing composition. In atom interferometers, we find that time-varying phase signals from oscillatory, or dilaton-like, DM can also...

  19. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3...

  20. PROBING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS USING Lyα CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 h –1 Mpc) as compared to the usual ΛCDM theory. Matter power spectra over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Lyα clouds. In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Lyα clouds. We simulate the line-of-sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Lyα opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Lyα opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bound of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field strength for a range of nearly scale-invariant models, corresponding to a magnetic field power spectrum index n ≅ –3.

  1. Atomic diffusion in strain fields near solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annihilation reactions between mobile self-interstitial defects and complexes of vacancies with 111In probe solutes in Au were studied. Measurements were made using the technique of perturbed angular correlations of gamma rays (PAC). Au samples were doped with complexes and plastically deformed at a low temperature to generate fluxes of self-interstitials. Changes in the concentrations of monovacancy (1V) to tetravacancy (4V) complexes induced by annihilation reactions were measured. These are now analysed using a system of coupled first-order equations in order to obtain interstitial annihilation cross sections of the complexes and the fractional amounts of different interstitial clusters in the flux. Relative cross sections obtained for Au are 1.0(1), 3.3(3), 1.2(2) and 7.5(2.5), respectively, for 1V to 4V complexes. The large increase in the cross sections with vacancy number is attributed to a progressive relaxation of the dilatational strain surrounding the oversized In solute as more vacancies are trapped. Also obtained from the analysis are values 0.34(5), 0.66(7), 0.0(1) and 0.0(2), respectively, for the fractions of mobile 1I to 4I clusters in deformed Au, indicating that di-interstitials are produced more readily than mono-interstitials during plastic deformation. (orig.)

  2. Electron Affinity Calculations for Atoms: Sensitive Probe of Many-Body Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-electron correlations and core-polarization interactions are crucial for the existence and stability of most negative ions. Therefore, they can be used as a sensitive probe of many-body effects in the calculation of the electron affinities (EAs) of atoms. The importance of relativistic effects in the calculation of the EAs of atoms has recently been assessed to be insignificant up to Z of 85. Here we use the complex angular momentum (CAM) methodology wherein is embedded fully the electron-electron correlations, to investigate core-polarization interactions in low-energy electron elastic scattering from the atoms In, Sn, Eu, Au and At through the calculation of their EAs. For the core-polarization interaction we use the rational function approximation of the Thomas-Fermi potential, which can be analytically continued into the complex plane. The EAs are extracted from the large resonance peaks in the CAM calculated low-energy electron-atom scattering total cross sections and compared with those from measurements and sophisticated theoretical methods. It is concluded that when the electron-electron correlations and core polarization interactions (both major many-body effects) are accounted for adequately the importance of relativity on the calculation of the EAs of atoms can be assessed. Even for the high Z (85) At atom relativistic effects are estimated to contribute a maximum of 3.6% to its EA calculation.

  3. Probing Primordial Magnetic Fields Using Ly-alpha Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Kanhaiya L

    2012-01-01

    From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 Mpc/h) as compared to the usual LCDM theory. Matter power spectrum over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Ly-alpha clouds, In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Ly-alpha clouds. We simulate the line of sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Ly-alpha opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Ly-alpha opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bounds of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field streng...

  4. Dynamical properties of moving atom–atom entanglement and entanglement between two atoms with optical field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Abdel-Khalek; S H A Halawani

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information technology largely relies on a sophisticated and fragile resource, called quantum entanglement, which exhibits a highly nontrivial manifestation of the coherent superposition of the states of composite quantum systems. In this paper, we study the interaction between the general and even coherent fields with moving and stationary two two-level atoms. In this regard, this paper investigates the von Neumann entropy and the atoms–field tangle as a measure of entanglement between the general and even coherent fields with the two atoms. Also, the entanglement between the two atoms using concurrence and negativity during time evolution is discussed. This paper examines the effects of multiphoton transitions and initial state setting on the entanglement for the system under consideration. Finally, the results demonstrate an important phenomenon such as the sudden death and birth of entanglement when the two atoms are initially in entangled states.

  5. Electrostatic simulations of a local electrode atom probe: The dependence of tomographic reconstruction parameters on specimen and microscope geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing, E-mail: sloi5113@uni.sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste, E-mail: gaultb@mcmaster.ca [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S4L8 (Canada); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Larson, David J.; Geiser, Brian P. [Cameca Instruments Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    We electrostatically model a local electrode atom probe microscope using the commercial software IES LORENTZ 2D v9.0 to investigate factors affecting the reconstruction parameters. We find strong dependences on the specimen geometry and voltage, and moderate dependences on the tip-aperture separation, which confirm that the current approach to atom probe reconstruction overlooks too many factors. Based on our data, which are in excellent agreement with known trends and experimental results, we derive a set of empirical relations which predict the values of the reconstruction parameters. These may be used to advance current reconstruction protocols by enabling the parameters to be adjusted as the specimen geometry changes. - Highlights: ► We perform electrostatic modelling of a LEAP for wires, microtips, and nanowires. ► Reconstruction parameters depend strongly on specimen geometry. ► The chamber has a non-zero-field and specimen/MCP voltages affect ion trajectories. ► k{sub f} is cubically related to ξ as previously shown. ► Derived empirical relations predict values in excellent agreement with experiment.

  6. Propagation of the electromagnetic field in fully coated near-field optical probes

    OpenAIRE

    Vaccaro, L; Aeschimann, L.; Staufer, U.; Herzig, Hans-Peter; Dändliker, René

    2007-01-01

    Fully metal-coated near-field optical probes, based on a cantilever design, have been studied theoretically and experimentally. Numerical simulations prove that these structures allow nonzero modal emission of the electromagnetic field through a 60-nm-thick metallic layer, that is opaque when deposited on flat substrates. The far-field intensity patterns recorded experimentally correspond to the ones calculated for the fundamental and first excited LP modes. Moreover, this study demonstrates ...

  7. CHEMISORPTION OF CO AND METHANATION ON Rh SURFACES AT LOW TEMPERATURE AND LOW PRESSURE, AN ATOM-PROBE FIM STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    W. Liu; Ren, D.; Bao, C.; Tsong, T.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed-laser imaging atom-probe and high resolution voltage pulsed atom-probe were employed to study the chemisorption behavior of CO on rhodium surfaces at low temperature and low pressure. The results are consistent and interesting. Our results support dissociative chemisorption on stepped surfaces of Rh and the effect of the surface structures. We also carried out methanation on Rh surfaces under adverse conditions and identified the intermediates of methanation with an isotope exchange te...

  8. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength is...

  9. High-energy electroproduction in an atomic field

    CERN Document Server

    Krachkov, P A

    2016-01-01

    The differential cross section of high-energy electroproduction in the electric field of heavy atoms is derived. The result is obtained with the exact account of the atomic field by means of the quasiclassical approximation to the wave functions in the external field. The Coulomb corrections substantially modify the differential cross section compared with the Born result. They lead to the azimuth asymmetry in the differential cross section for the polarized incoming electron. The Coulomb corrections to the total cross section are obtained in the leading logarithmic approximation.

  10. Exact wave functions for atomic electron interacting with photon fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Sheng Guo

    2013-01-01

    Many nonlinear quantum optical physics phenomena need more accurate wave functions and corresponding energy or quasienergy levels to account for. An analytic expression of wave functions with corresponding energy levels for an atomic electron interacting with a photon field is presented as an exact solution to the SchrSdinger-like equation involved with both atomic Coulomb interaction and electron-photon interaction. The solution is a natural generalization of the quantum-field Volkov states for an otherwise free electron interacting with a photon field. The solution shows that an N- level atom in light form stationary states without extra energy splitting in addition to the Floquet mechanism. The treatment developed here with computing codes can be conveniently transferred to quantum optics in classical-field version as research tools to benefit the whole physics community.

  11. Spectroscopy of cesium Rydberg atoms in strong radio-frequency fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yuechun; Li, Jingkui; Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    We study Rydberg atoms modulated by strong radio-frequency (RF) fields with a frequency of 70 MHz. The Rydberg atoms are prepared in a room temperature cesium cell, and their level structure is probed using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). As the RF field increases from the weak- into the strong-field regime, the range of observed RF-induced phenomena progresses from AC level shifts through increasingly pronounced and numerous RF-modulation sidebands to complex state-mixing and level-crossings with high-l hydrogen-like states. Weak anharmonic admixtures in the RF field generate clearly visible modifications in the Rydberg-EIT spectra. A Floquet analysis is employed to model the Rydberg spectra, and good agreement with the experimental observations is found. Our results show that all-optical spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in vapor cells can serve as an antenna-free, atom-based and calibration-free technique to measure and map RF electric fields and to analyze their higher-harmonic contents.

  12. Effect of Transverse Magnetic Fields on Cold-Atom Nonlinear Magneto-Optical Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David; Kunz, Paul; Fatemi, Fredrik; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    We investigate nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) in cold atoms in the presence of a transverse magnetic field where alignment-to-orientation conversion (AOC) dominates. The AOC mechanism, which relies on AC-Stark shifts generated by a strong, off-resonant probe beam, significantly alters the NMOR resonance. When an additional magnetic field is present, parallel to the electric field of the light, a nested feature within this NMOR resonance manifests. Unlike similar features observed with lower optical power in warm vapors, attributed to optical pumping through nearby hyperfine levels, this feature is due solely to the AOC mechanism. Using numerical simulations, a perturbative solution, and experimental observations we characterize the feature with respect to optical power, optical polarization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic field direction. These results shed further light on the AOC mechanism common to NMOR-based experiments and we demonstrate a potential application to measure transverse DC magnetic fields and spatial gradients.

  13. Measurements of sub photon cavity fields by atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two neighbouring levels of a Rydberg atom coupled to a high quality-factor microwave cavity are an excellent tool for the study of matter-wave interactions at the most basic level. The system is so simple (a two-level atom coupled to a single mode of the field) that most phenomena can be described analytically. In this work we study dispersive effects of the non-resonant atom-cavity interaction. We have measured the linear dependence of the atomic energy level-shifts on the average photon number in the cavity. Light shifts induced by an average microwave field intensity weaker than a single photon have been observed. It has also been possible to measure the residual shift of one of the two levels of the atomic transition in the absence of an injected field: a Lamb shift due to a single mode of the field. A sensitive measurement of these energy shifts is performed by an interferometric method: the Ramsey separated oscillatory fields technique. Future experiments, in a situation of very weak field relaxation, are proposed. The quantum behavior of the field will then be dominant and it shall be possible to perform a Quantum Non-Demolition measurement of the photon number: since the interaction is non-resonant, the atoms can neither absorb nor emit photons in the cavity. The performed experiments demonstrate the sensitivity of the apparatus and set the stage for future non-demolition measurements and for the study of 'mesoscopic' Schroedinger cat states of the field, on the boundary between classical and quantum worlds. (author)

  14. Non-conservation of energy arising from atomic dipole interactions and its effects on light field and coupled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董传华

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between coupled atoms and a single mode of a quantized electromagnetic field, which involve the terms originating from the dipole interactions, are discussed. In the usual Jaynes Cummings model for coupled atoms,the terms of non-conservation of energy originating from dipole interactions are neglected, however, we take them into consideration in this paper. The effects of these terms on the evolutions of quantum statistic properties and squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole moments and atomic population inversion are investigated. It has been shown that the coupling between atoms modulates these evolutions of fields and atoms. The terms of non-conservation of energy affect these evolutions of fields and atoms slightly. They also have effects on the squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole and atomic population inversions. The initial states of atoms also affect these properties.

  15. Non—conservation of energy arising from atomic dipole interactions and its effects on light field and coupled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongChuan-Hua

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between coulpled atoms and a single mode of a quantized electromagnetic field, which involve the terms originating from the dipole interactions, are discussed. In the usual Jaynes-Cummings model for coupled atoms, the terms of non-conservation of energy originating from dipole interactions are neglected, however, we take them into consideration in this paper. The effects of these terms on the evolutions of quantum statistic properties and squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole moments and atomic population inversion are investigated. It has been shown that the coupling between atoms modulates these evolutions of fields and atoms. The terms of non-conservation of energy affect these evolutions of field and atoms slightly. They also have effects on the squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole and atomic population inversions. The initial states of atoms also affect these properties.

  16. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  17. Applying computational geometry techniques for advanced feature analysis in atom probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present new methods for feature analysis in atom probe tomography data that have useful applications in materials characterisation. The analysis works on the principle of Voronoi subvolumes and piecewise linear approximations, and feature delineation based on the distance to the centre of mass of a subvolume (DCOM). Based on the coordinate systems defined by these approximations, two examples are shown of the new types of analyses that can be performed. The first is the analysis of line-like-objects (i.e. dislocations) using both proxigrams and line-excess plots. The second is interfacial excess mapping of an InGaAs quantum dot. - Highlights: • Computational geometry is used to detect and analyse features within atom probe data. • Limitations of conventional feature detection are overcome by using atomic density gradients. • 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D features can be analysed by using Voronoi tessellation for spatial binning. • New, robust analysis methods are demonstrated, including line and interfacial excess mapping

  18. Atom probe tomography of stress corrosion crack tips in SUS316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Quantitative study of 3D features such as grain boundary oxides and Ni enrichment. • Features can be related to their distance from the crack tip. • Local measurement of compositions in very small volumes and specific regions. • Complementary analytical TEM data was recorded to correlate to APT results. • Both matrix elements (Fe, Cr, Ni) and oxygen diffuse along the grain boundary. - Abstract: Novel atom probe tomography (APT) data of an intergranular stress corrosion crack tip has been acquired. Using APT for stress corrosion cracking research, very small, localized features and their distribution around the crack tip can be studied in 3D. This work details the development of a technique for the preparation of atom probe needles. Initial characterization via analytical transmission electron microscopy provides with a complementary analysis and accurately locates features that can be correlated with the reconstructed APT data. Ni enrichment and intergranular oxidation ahead of the crack tip have been studied with APT in 3D and with near-atomic resolution

  19. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  20. Improved in situ spring constant calibration for colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface forces cannot be measured without an accurate determination of the cantilever spring constant. The effective spring constant k depends upon the cantilever geometry and therefore should be measured in situ; additionally, k may be coupled to other measurement parameters. For example, colloidal probe AFM is frequently used to measure the slip length b at solid/liquid boundaries by comparing the measured hydrodynamic force with Vinogradova slip theory (V-theory). However, in this measurement k and b are coupled, hence, b cannot be accurately determined without knowing k to high precision. In this paper, a new in situ spring constant calibration method based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and V-theory is presented and contrasted with two other popular spring constant determination methods. In this residuals calibration method, V-theory is fitted to the experimental force-distance data for a range of systematically varied spring constants where the only adjustable parameter in V-theory is the slip length b. The optimal spring constant k is that value where the residuals are symmetrically displaced about zero for all colloidal probe separations. This residual spring constant calibration method is demonstrated by studying three different liquids (n-decanol, n-hexadecane, and n-octane) and two different silane coated colloidal probe-silicon wafer systems (n-hexadecyltrichlorosilane and n-dodecyltrichlorosilane).

  1. Nonequilibrium Atom-Dielectric Forces Mediated by a Quantum Field

    OpenAIRE

    Behunin, Ryan Orson; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give a first principles microphysics derivation of the nonequilibrium forces between an atom, treated as a three dimensional harmonic oscillator, and a bulk dielectric medium modeled as a continuous lattice of oscillators coupled to a reservoir. We assume no direct interaction between the atom and the medium but there exist mutual influences transmitted via a common electromagnetic field. By employing concepts and techniques of open quantum systems we introduce coarse-grainin...

  2. Atom probe study of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum, a metal with excellent physical, chemical and high-temperature properties, is an interesting material for applications in lighting-technology, high performance electronics, high temperature furnace construction and coating technology. However, its applicability as a structural material is limited because of the poor oxidation resistance at high temperatures and a brittle-to-ductile transition around room temperature, which is influenced by the grain size and the content of interstitial impurities at the grain boundaries. Due to the progress of the powder metallurgical production during the last decades, the amount of impurities in the current quality of molybdenum has become so small that surface sensitive techniques are not applicable anymore. Therefore, the atom probe, which allows the detection of small amounts of impurities as well as their location, seems to be a more suitable technique. However, a site-specific specimen preparation procedure for grain boundaries in refractory metals with a dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope is still required. The present investigation describes the development and successful application of such a site-specific preparation technique for grain boundaries in molybdenum, which is significantly improved by a combination with transmission electron microscopy. This complimentary technique helps to improve the visibility of grain boundaries during the last preparation steps and to evidence the presence of grain and subgrain boundaries without segregants in atom probe specimens. Furthermore, in industrially processed and recrystallized molybdenum sheets grain boundary segregation of oxygen, nitrogen and potassium is successfully detected close to segregated regions which are believed to be former sinter pores. - Highlights: • First study of grain boundary segregation in molybdenum by atom probe • Site-specific preparation technique by FIB and TEM successfully developed • Grain boundary segregation of

  3. Theoretical Femtosecond Physics Atoms and Molecules in Strong Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical femtosecond physics is a new field of research. Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers of up to atomic field strengths are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. Laser-matter interaction is treated on a nonperturbative level in the book using approximate and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically. Physical phenomena, ranging from ionization of atoms to the ionization and dissociation of molecules and the control of chemical reactions are presented and discussed. Theoretical background for experiments with strong and short laser pulses is given. Several exercises are included in the main text. Some detailed calculations are performed in the appendices.

  4. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy [Corrigendum

    OpenAIRE

    Lee SY; Zaske AM; Novellino T; Danila D; Ferrari M.; Conyers J; Decuzzi P

    2014-01-01

    Lee SY, Zaske AM, Novellino T, et al. Probing the mechanical properties of TNF-α stimulated endothelial cell with atomic force microscopy. Int J Nanomedicine. 2011;6:179–195.The authors apologize that the referencing for Table 1 on page 186 was incorrect, the following corrections should be noted:   8 should be 4240 should be 4318 should be 4442 should be 45  9 should be 4612 should be 4729 should be 4844 should be 4923 should be 5036 should be 1637 should be 18Read th...

  5. Local electrode atom probe analysis of silicon nanowires grown with an aluminum catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local electrode atom probe (LEAP) tomography of Al-catalyzed silicon nanowires synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method is presented. The concentration of Al within the Al-catalyzed nanowire was found to be 2 × 1020 cm−3, which is higher than the expected solubility limit for Al in Si at the nanowire growth temperature of 550 °C. Reconstructions of the Al contained within the nanowire indicate a denuded region adjacent to the Al catalyst/Si nanowire interface, while Al clusters are distributed throughout the rest of the silicon nanowire. (paper)

  6. Initial study on Z-phase strengthened 9-12% Cr steels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; Andren, Hans-Olof [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure of two different types of Z-phase strengthened experimental steels, CrNbN-based or CrTaN-based, was investigated. Both steels underwent aging at 650 C for relatively short period of time, 24 hours or 1005 hours. Atom probe tomography was used to study the chemical composition of the matrix and precipitates, and the size and number density of the small precipitates. Both steels contain Laves phase at prior austenite grain boundaries and martensitic lath boundaries. The CrTaN-based steel was found more promising due to its finer and more densely distributed precipitates after 1005 hour aging. (orig.)

  7. Influence of supersaturated carbon on the diffusion of Ni in ferrite determined by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kresse, T.

    2013-09-01

    In patented and cold-drawn pearlitic steel wires dissociation of cementite occurs during mechanical deformation. In this study the influence of the carbon decomposition on the diffusion of nickel in ferrite is investigated by means of atom probe tomography. In the temperature range 423-523 K we observed a much smaller activation energy of Ni diffusion than for self-diffusion in body-centered cubic iron, indicating an increased vacancy density owing to enhanced formation of vacancy-carbon complexes. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atoms in Strong Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Charles; Nayfeh, Munir

    1990-01-01

    This book collects the lectures given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Atoms in Strong Fields", which took place on the island of Kos, Greece, during the two weeks of October 9-21,1988. The designation "strong field" applies here to an external electromagnetic field that is sufficiently strong to cause highly nonlinear alterations in atomic or molecular struc­ ture and dynamics. The specific topics treated in this volume fall into two general cater­ gories, which are those for which strong field effects can be studied in detail in terrestrial laboratories: the dynamics of excited states in static or quasi-static electric and magnetic fields; and the interaction of atoms and molecules with intense laser radiation. In both areas there exist promising opportunities for research of a fundamental nature. An electric field of even a few volts per centimeter can be very strong on the atom­ ic scale, if it acts upon a weakly bound state. The study of Rydberg states with high reso­ lution laser spectroscop...

  9. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced. PMID:19167824

  10. Probing atomic-scale friction on reconstructed surfaces of single-crystal semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryl, M.; Budzioch, J.; Krok, F.; Wojtaszek, M.; Kolmer, M.; Walczak, L.; Konior, J.; Gnecco, E.; Szymonski, M.

    2012-02-01

    Friction force microscopy (FFM) investigations have been performed on reconstructed (001) surfaces of InSb and Ge in an ultrahigh vacuum. On the c(8×2) reconstruction of InSb(001) atomic resolution is achieved under superlubric conditions, and the features observed in the lateral force images are precisely reproduced by numerical simulations, taking into account possible decorations of the probing tip. On the simultaneously acquired (1×3) reconstruction a significant disorder of the surface atoms is observed. If the loading force increases, friction becomes much larger on this reconstruction compared to the c(8×2) one. In FFM images acquired on the Ge(001)(2×1) characteristic substructures are resolved within the unit cells. In such a case, a strong dependence of the friction pattern on the scan direction is observed.

  11. Design of the probe for low-field pulsed NMR instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probe is the most sensitive and important component in the low-field pulsed NMR instrument. Compared with other kinds of probes used in NMR instruments, the probe made with solenoid can get high Q(quality factor) value and uniform magnetic field. Based on the analysis of the probe's circuit, a theoretic formula is obtained, according to which, one high-quality probe is designed with solenoid. The selection of the high-quality components and the probe's testing method are also introduced in detail. (authors)

  12. Control of scattering from probes for near-field antenna measurements by use of skirt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, A.; Pivnenko, Sergiy; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach to reducing the multiple reflections between the test antenna and the probe in near-field antenna measurements is proposed. Instead of absorbers, this approach makes use of a skirt on the probe to shield against the mounting structure behind the probe.......A novel approach to reducing the multiple reflections between the test antenna and the probe in near-field antenna measurements is proposed. Instead of absorbers, this approach makes use of a skirt on the probe to shield against the mounting structure behind the probe....

  13. Ionization of atoms by lasers and electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ring dye laser was monitored 5890 A line by a sodium fluorescence cell. The laser was orthogonally directed to interact with a sodium effusive atomic beam. Light radiation from a lamp shifted the excited sodium to near continuum level. The highly excited states are more susceptible to an external field, thus shifting the highly external atoms to the continuum level. The interaction of the electric field causes an increase of two orders of magnitude as compared to two photonionization only. The high signal recorded was due to the probability of the ionization cross section approaching the excited cross section which is several orders of magnitude higher

  14. The numerical multiconfiguration self-consistent field approach for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation uses the Multiconfiguration Self-Consistent Field Approach to specify the electronic wave function of N electron atoms in a static electrical field. It presents numerical approaches to describe the wave functions and introduces new methods to compute the numerical Fock equations. Based on results computed with an implemented computer program the universal application, flexibility and high numerical precision of the presented approach is shown. RHF results and for the first time MCSCF results for polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of various states of the atoms He to Kr are discussed. In addition, an application to interpret a plasma spectrum of gallium is presented. (orig.)

  15. Probing the Earth's core with magnetic field observations from Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Christopher; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Gillet, Nicolas; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth. In this contribution we present a new high resolution model of the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, derived from a dataset that includes more two years of observations from the Swarm mission. Resulting inferences regarding the underlying core flow, its dynamics, and the nature of the geodynamo process will be discussed. The CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model, covering the interval 1999-2016, is derived from magnetic data collected by the three Swarm missions, as well as the earlier CHAMP and Oersted satellites, and monthly means data collected from 160 ground observatories. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting both scalar and vector field differences along-track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. The internal part of the model consists of a spherical harmonic (SH) expansion, time-dependent for degrees 20 and below. The model coefficients are estimated using a regularized, iteratively reweighted, least squares scheme involving Huber weights. At Earth's surface, CHAOS-6 shows evidence for positive acceleration of the field intensity in 2015 over a broad area around longitude 90deg E that is also seen at ground observatories such as Novosibirsk. At the core surface, we are able to map the secular variation (linear trend in the magnetic field) up to SH degree 16. The radial field acceleration at the core surface in 2015 is found be largest at low latitudes under the India-South East Asia region and under the region of northern South America, as well as at high northern latitudes under Alaska and Siberia. Surprisingly, there is also evidence for some acceleration in the central Pacific region, for example

  16. Probing {N}=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garolera, Blai; Torrentsa, Genís

    2016-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian {N}=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of {N}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  17. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    CERN Document Server

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

    2015-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  18. Magnetic domain and domain-wall imaging of submicron Co dots by probing the magnetostrictive response using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to image the domains and domain walls of small ferromagnetic entities using atomic force microscopy (AFM), with a nonmagnetic AFM probe, has been developed. Exciting the sample in an external ac magnetic field, the distribution of magnetostrictive response at the surface is detected. By this technique, the domains and domain walls of submicron Co dots have been imaged with a 1 nm lateral resolution. In elliptical Co dots with a 350-nm-long axis on a triangular lattice array with 400 nm periodicity, we find evidence for two domains with opposite magnetization orientation across a wall. The domain-wall width in these dots is found to be about 35 nm. Furthermore, we observe a ferromagnetic alignment of the domains in the neighboring dots, which suggests a magnetostatic interaction among the dots. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  19. Oxygen concentration of Eu1Ba2Cu3O7-x in vacuum: An atom probe study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom Probe mass analysis, at 85 K, using a wide-angle instrument was used to measure the oxygen content and metallic stoichiometry of the near-surface region of the superconducting ceramic oxide Eu1Ba2Cu3O7-x (x≅0.1) after vacuum exposure at room temperature. Routine specimen preparation, handling, and field-ion imaging produced a specimen which had already lost oxygen such that its measured surface oxygen content corresponded to x=0.73 and the metallic stoichiometry of the surface was not the expected 1:2:3 but was enhanced in Ba and Eu. The specimen was subsequently exposed to vacuum for up to 80 h at room temperature and no additional loss of oxygen was detected. It was concluded that either (1) a stoichiometric low-oxygen surface also would not have lost oxygen or (2) the nonstoichiometric layer forms a barrier for subsequent oxygen loss

  20. Oxygen concentration of EuBa2Cu307-x in vacuum: an atom probe study II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom Probe mass analysis using a wide acceptance angle instrument was used to measure the oxygen content and metallic stoichiometry of the near-surface region of the superconducting ceramic oxide EuBa2Cu307-x (x≅0.1) after exposure at 85K and room temperature in vacuum. An oxygen depleted layer formed by H2 imaging must be removed before bulk concentrations are obtained. Room temperature holding in vacuum overnight then depletes the surface of oxygen to a depth of greater than 4 layers (1.2 nm). However, after holding the specimen at 85K for up to 3h either with or without an applied field, no detectable loss of oxygen occurred. Therefore, for short time vacuum exposures at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, no oxygen loss is expected, however, significant oxygen loss occurs for 18h vacuum exposures at room temperature

  1. Combined atom-probe and electron microscopy characterization of fine scale structures in aged primary coolant pipe stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capabilities and complementary nature of atom probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) for the characterization of fine-scale microstructures are illustrated by examination of the changes that occur after long term thermal aging of cast CF 9 and CF 8M duplex stainless steels. In material aged at 300 or 4000C for up to 70,000 h, the ferrite had spinodally decomposed into a modulated fine-scaled interconnected network consisting of an iron-rich α phase and a chromium-enriched α' phase with periodicities of between 2 and 9 nm. G-phase precipitates 2 to 10 nm in diameter were also observed in the ferrite at concentrations of more than 10/sup 21/ m/sup -3/. The reported degradation in mechanical properties is most likely a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  2. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, P P; Miniati, F; Lilly, S J; Short, M B; Higdon, D M

    2007-01-01

    Faraday rotation (RM) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive to cosmological and evolutionary effects as $z$ increases beyond $\\sim $1 because of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth in the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors, $d$N/$dz$. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RM's of high latitude quasars extending out to $z\\sim $3.7 we find that the distribution of RM broadens with redshift in the 20 $-$ 80 rad m$^{-2}$ range range, despite the (1 +$z$)$^{-2}$ wavelength dilution expected in the observed Faraday rotation. Our results indicate that the Universe becomes increasingly ``Faraday-opaque'' to sources beyond $z \\sim$ 2, that is, as $z$ increases progressively fewer sources are found with a ``small'' RM in the observer's frame. This is in contrast to sources at $z \\la$1. They suggest that the environments of galaxies were significantly magnetized at high redshifts, with magnetic field strengths that w...

  3. Simulation of near-field scanning optical microscopy using a plasmonic gap probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masahiro; Katayama, Kiyofumi

    2006-10-01

    Imaging by near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) with a plasmonic gap probe (PGP) is simulated to confirm the operation of the recently proposed PGP. The simulations demonstrate that the probe works in illumination, collection-reflection and collection mode, and that is it not necessary to vibrate the probe tip in order to remove background noise. The resolution of the scanned image is also shown to be approximately equal to the diameter of the probe tip. Furthermore, the throughput of the probe is much higher than conventional aperture probes providing similar resolution. The proposed probe thus has the advantages of both aperture probes and scattering probes, and is expected to have excellent characteristics for use as a scanning probe for NSOM.

  4. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Liu, Hongwei; Yao, Lan [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ceguerra, Anna V. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. - Highlights: ► Probing pristine semiconductor NWs from growth substrate has been demonstrated. ► Analyzing the full diameter of a nanowire has been achieved. ► A spatial resolution better than 0.17 nm in depth has been obtained for GaAs. ► An enhanced SNR 100:2 has been achieved.

  5. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. - Highlights: ► Probing pristine semiconductor NWs from growth substrate has been demonstrated. ► Analyzing the full diameter of a nanowire has been achieved. ► A spatial resolution better than 0.17 nm in depth has been obtained for GaAs. ► An enhanced SNR 100:2 has been achieved

  6. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging local modulation of strain field in a hetero interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suhyun, E-mail: u98kim@surface.phys.titech.ac.jp; Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum [Memory Analysis Science and Engineering Group, Samsung Electronics, San #16 Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oshima, Yoshifumi [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    We present an innovative method for characterizing the strain field in three dimensions in a hetero interface. Largely defocused probe scanning transmission electron microscopy (LDP-STEM) was employed for imaging the inhomogeneous strain field in a germanium (Ge) layer deposited on a silicon (Si) substrate. In the LDP-STEM image, Ge-atomic columns that are relaxed or strained to the Si substrate in the Si/Ge hetero interface were observed to be distinguishable, allowing for the qualitative characterization of the coherency of the crystal growth. Our results revealed that the strain field is locally modulated along the in-plane direction in the Si/Ge hetero interface.

  7. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J., E-mail: manish.butte@stanford.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  8. Ionization of an atom by an external electrostatic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization of the hydrogen atom by an external electrostatic field is reconsidered by taking into account the interaction of the system with the measuring apparatus. The result obtained shows a dependence of the life-time on the frequency of the measurements. (author)

  9. Clustering in atomic nuclei: a mean field perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the physics of clustering in atomic nucleus as seen from a mean field perspective will be discussed. Special attention is paid to phenomena involving octupole deformation like the α structure of 20Ne or the emission of heavy clusters. The stabilizing role of spin for cluster-like highly deformed states is also discussed in the case of 36 Ar

  10. Atomic Beam Laser Spectrometer for In-field Isotopic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Actinide Analytical Chemistry Group

    2016-06-22

    This is a powerpoint presentation for the DTRA quarterly program review that goes into detail about the atomic beam laser spectrometer for in-field isotopic analysis. The project goals are the following: analysis of post-detonation debris, determination of U and Pu isotopic composition, and fieldable prototype: < 2ft3, < 1000W.

  11. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this program was to make quantitative measurements of the effects of higher-order phase/frequency correlations in a laser beam on nonlinear optical absorption processes in atoms. The success of this program was due in large part to a unique experimental capability for modulating the extracavity beam of a stabilized (approx-lt 200 kHz) continuous-wave laser with statistically-well-characterized stochastic phase (or frequency) fluctuations, in order to synthesize laser bandwidths to ∼20 MHz (depending on noise amplitude), with profiles variable between Gaussian and Lorentzian (depending on noise bandwidth). Laser driven processes investigated included the following: (1) the optical Autler-Towns effect in the 3S1/2 (F = 2, MF = 2) → 3P3/2 (F = 3, MF = 3) two- level Na resonance, using a weak probe to the 4D5/2 level; (2) the variance and spectra of fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the two-level Na resonance; (3) the Hanle effect in the 1S0 - 3P1, transition at λ = 555.6 nm in 174 Yb; (4) absorption (and gain) of a weak probe, when the probe is a time-delayed replica of the resonant (with the two-level Na transition) pump laser; and (5) four-wave-mixing in a phase-conjugate geometry, in a sodium cell, and, finally, in a diffuse atomic sodium beam. The experimental results from these several studies have provided important confirmation of advanced theoretical methods

  12. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  13. Combining structural and chemical information at the nanometer scale by correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many cases, the three-dimensional reconstructions from atom probe tomography (APT) are not sufficiently accurate to resolve crystallographic features such as lattice planes, shear bands, stacking faults, dislocations or grain boundaries. Hence, correlative crystallographic characterization is required in addition to APT at the exact same location of the specimen. Also, for the site-specific preparation of APT tips containing regions of interest (e.g. grain boundaries) correlative electron microscopy is often inevitable. Here we present a versatile experimental setup that enables performing correlative focused ion beam milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and APT under optimized characterization conditions. The setup was designed for high throughput, robustness and practicability. We demonstrate that atom probe tips can be characterized by TEM in the same way as a standard TEM sample. In particular, the use of scanning nanobeam diffraction provides valuable complementary crystallographic information when being performed on atom probe tips. This technique enables the measurement of orientation and phase maps as known from electron backscattering diffraction with a spatial resolution down to one nanometer. - Highlights: • Atom probe tips can be characterized in TEM like any standard TEM sample. • In principal all TEM techniques can be performed on atom probe tips. • Scanning NBD enables the measurement of orientation maps on AP tips with a lateral spatial resolution of 2 nm or better. • Grain orientations can be measured by NBD even in the topmost 10 nm of an AP tip

  14. Slowing the probe field in the second window of double-double electromagnetically induced transparency

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Hessa M.; Sanders, Barry C

    2015-01-01

    For Doppler-broadened media operating under double-double electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions, we devise a scheme to control and reduce the probe-field group velocity at the center of the second transparency window. We derive numerical and approximate analytical solutions for the width of EIT windows and for the group velocities of the probe field at the two distinct transparency windows, and we show that the group velocities of the probe field can be lowered by judiciou...

  15. Controlled polarization rotation of an optical field in multi-Zeeman-sublevel atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Li, S; Peng, K C; Wang, B; Wang, H; Xiao, M; Yang, X; Han, Yanxu; Li, Shujing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Hai; Xiao, Min; Yang, Xudong

    2006-01-01

    We investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, the phenomenon of polarization rotation of a weak, linearly-polarized optical (probe) field in an atomic system with multiple three-level electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) sub-systems. The polarization rotation angle can be controlled by a circularly-polarized coupling beam, which breaks the symmetry in number of EIT subsystems seen by the left- and right-circularly-polarized components of the weak probe beam. A large polarization rotation angle (up to 45 degrees) has been achieved with a coupling beam power of only 15 mW. Detailed theoretical analyses including different transition probabilities in different transitions and Doppler-broadening are presented and the results are in good agreements with the experimentally measured results.

  16. Controlled polarization rotation of an optical field in multi-Zeeman-sublevel atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, the phenomenon of polarization rotation of a weak, linearly polarized optical (probe) field in an atomic system with multiple three-level electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) subsystems. The polarization rotation angle can be controlled by a circularly polarized coupling beam, which breaks the symmetry in number of EIT subsystems seen by the left and right circularly polarized components of the weak probe beam. A large polarization rotation angle (up to 45 deg. ) has been achieved with a coupling beam power of only 15 mW. Detailed theoretical analyses including different transition probabilities in different transitions and Doppler-broadening are presented and the results are in good agreements with the experimentally measured results

  17. Iterative probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2005-01-01

    An iterative probe correction technique is presented to correct for the errors caused by the application of the traditional first-order probe correction for nonideal first-order probes in spherical near-field antenna measurements. The technique may be applied, with certain restrictions, for more...

  18. Practical aspects of spherical near-field antenna measurements using a high-order probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2006-01-01

    Two practical aspects related to accurate antenna pattern characterization by probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with a high-order probe are examined. First, the requirements set by an arbitrary high-order probe on the scanning technique are pointed out. Secondly, a channel...

  19. 39Ar as a probe of the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb is proposed. Recent studies on the thermal-neutron fluence of the Hiroshima atomic bomb have suggested a systematic discrepancy from DS86. On the other hand most of the neutron dose for human was due to fast-neutrons, which is a basis of the radiation-risk estimation. Therefore, a direct measurement of the fast-neutron fluence has been required. This paper points out that the 39Ar produced by the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction would be a unique probe to estimate the fast-neutron fluence of the atomic bomb. This is because the half life of 39Ar is 269 years, which is sufficiently long to exist for a period of 50 years after the explosion, and the threshold of the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction is 1 MeV. The feasibility of the 39Ar method is discussed in this report. (author)

  20. Analysis of medical device materials with the local electrode atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As medical technology advances towards microsurgical and minimally invasive techniques, there is a drive to produce ever-smaller devices that demand higher material performance and hence enhanced nano and micro-scale control of material structure. These devices are made from stainless steel alloys, Nitinol, titanium, CoCrMo, and non-metals such as pyrolytic carbon and silicon. These applications are made possible due to suitable physical and mechanical properties, good corrosion resistance in biological environments, reasonable biocompatibility, and good manufacturability. With respect to the metals, the nano-structure and composition of the material surface, typically an oxide, is especially critical since biological responses and corrosion occur at the material-environment interface. Thus, there is an increasing need to understand the 3-D structure and composition of metallic biomaterials at the atomic scale. Three-dimensional atom probe microscopy can uniquely provide such atomic-level structural information. In the present study several of these medical device materials were examined. These include a 316L stainless steel alloy which is widely used in implanted spinal fixation devices, bone screws, cardiovascular and neurological stents, a cast CoCrMo acetabular hip cup of a Cormet metal-on-metal Hip Resurfacing System (Corin Group, Cirencester, England) that was rejected for clinical use, Nitinol wires specimens such as are used for stents and guide wires, and low temperature pyrolytic carbon as used in clinical heart valve prosthetics. (author)

  1. Imaging Microwave and DC Magnetic Fields in a Vapor-Cell Rb Atomic Clock

    CERN Document Server

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Bandi, Thejesh; Horsley, Andrew; Treutlein, Philipp; Mileti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    We report on the experimental measurement of the DC and microwave magnetic field distributions inside a recently-developed compact magnetron-type microwave cavity, mounted inside the physics package of a high-performance vapor-cell atomic frequency standard. Images of the microwave field distribution with sub-100 $\\mu$m lateral spatial resolution are obtained by pulsed optical-microwave Rabi measurements, using the Rb atoms inside the cell as field probes and detecting with a CCD camera. Asymmetries observed in the microwave field images can be attributed to the precise practical realization of the cavity and the Rb vapor cell. Similar spatially-resolved images of the DC magnetic field distribution are obtained by Ramsey-type measurements. The T2 relaxation time in the Rb vapor cell is found to be position dependent, and correlates with the gradient of the DC magnetic field. The presented method is highly useful for experimental in-situ characterization of DC magnetic fields and resonant microwave structures,...

  2. Nonlocality and purity in atom-field coupling system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Xin; Huang Guang-Ming; Li Gao-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    The effects of initial field state and thermal environment on quantum nonlocality and linear entropy in an atomfield coupling system are investigated. We found that if the cavity is lossless and the reservoir is in vacuum, the atom-field state can exhibit quantum nonlocality periodically and the linear entropies of the atom and the field also oscillate periodically with a period the same as that of quantum nonlocality. And if the cavity dissipation is very weak and the average photon number of the reservoir is very small, the quantum nonlocality will be lost and the linear entropies of the atom and the field oscillate with a decreasing amplitude. The rapidity of the loss of the quantum nonlocality depends on the amplitude of the initial squeezed coherent state, the cavity damping constant κ and the average photon number N of the thermal reservoir. The stronger the field and the larger the constant κ and the average photon number N could be, the more rapidly the nonlocality decreases.

  3. Adsorbate Electric Fields on a Cryogenic Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, K S; Hufnagel, C; Dumke, R

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of electric fields originating from adsorbates deposited on a cryogenic atom chip as it is cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency we measure the field strength versus distance from a 1 mm square of YBCO patterned onto a YSZ chip substrate. We find a localized and stable dipole field at room temperature and attribute it to a saturated layer of chemically adsorbed rubidium atoms on the YBCO. As the chip is cooled towards 83 K we observe a change in sign of the electric field as well as a transition from a localized to a delocalized dipole density. We relate these changes to the onset of physisorption on the chip surface when the van der Waals attraction overcomes the thermal desorption mechanisms. Our findings suggest that, through careful selection of substrate materials, it may be possible to reduce the electric fields caused by atomic adsorption on chips, opening up experiments to controlled Rydberg-surface co...

  4. Trapping and cooling cesium atoms in a speckle field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of two experiments where cold cesium atoms are trapped in a speckle field. In the first experiment, a YAG laser creates the speckle pattern and induces a far-detuned dipole potential which is a nearly-conservative potential. Localization of atoms near the intensity maxima of the speckle field is observed. In a second experiment we use two counterpropagating laser beams tuned close to a resonance line of cesium and in the lin perpendicular to lin configuration, one of them being modulated by a holographic diffuser that creates the speckle field. Three-dimensional cooling is observed. Variations of the temperature and of the spatial diffusion coefficient with the size of a speckle grain are presented. (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen atom in 2s state in a laser field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučić Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen atom in the 2s state exposed to a linearly polarized laser field is studied by using the non-perturbative non-Hermitian Floquet theory. The electronic density of the quasi-energy H(2s state versus the electron coordinate is analyzed. We conclude that the decay of an atom in a low-intensity non-resonant laser field occurs from the asymptotically distant part of the initial state. On the other hand, the process of electron emission in a resonant laser field is governed by the excited-bound-statepart of the resonance wave function. With an increase in the intensity and by increasing the degree of excitation of the initial state not too high, the electron is ionized at smaller distances from the nucleus. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171020

  6. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  7. Localisation of atomic populations in the optical radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of two-dimensional spatial localisation of atomic populations under the influence of the travelling wave fields in the tripod-configuration of quantum states is studied for the first time. Three travelling waves propagating in the same plane at an angle of 120° to each other form a system of standing waves under the influence of which atomic populations are localised. The size of the region of spatial localisation of the populations, in principle, can be hundredths of a wavelength of optical radiation. (quantum optics)

  8. Strong field atomic physics in the mid-infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine strong field atomic physics in a wavelength region (3-4 microns) where very little work has previously been done. The soft photon energy allows the exploration of one-electron atoms with low binding energies (alkali metals). We find that photoionization spectra differ from rare gas studies at shorter wavelengths due to more complex ion core potentials. Harmonic generation is studied, and we find that harmonic bandwidths are consistent with theory and the possibility of compression to pulse widths much shorter than that of the driving pulse. Harmonic yields in the visible and UV are sufficient for a complete study of their amplitude and phase characteristics.

  9. Advanced electric-field scanning probe lithography on molecular resist using active cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Marcus; Aydogan, Cemal; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Ahmad, Ahmad; Angelov, Tihomir; Reum, Alexander; Ishchuk, Valentyn; Krivoshapkina, Yana; Hofer, Manuel; Lenk, Steve; Atanasov, Ivaylo; Holz, Mathias; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2015-07-01

    The routine "on demand" fabrication of features smaller than 10 nm opens up new possibilities for the realization of many devices. Driven by the thermally actuated piezoresistive cantilever technology, we have developed a prototype of a scanning probe lithography (SPL) platform which is able to image, inspect, align, and pattern features down to the single digit nanoregime. Here, we present examples of practical applications of the previously published electric-field based current-controlled scanning probe lithography. In particular, individual patterning tests are carried out on calixarene by using our developed table-top SPL system. We have demonstrated the application of a step-and-repeat SPL method including optical as well as atomic force microscopy-based navigation and alignment. The closed-loop lithography scheme was applied to sequentially write positive and negative tone features. Due to the integrated unique combination of read-write cycling, each single feature is aligned separately with the highest precision and inspected after patterning. This routine was applied to create a pattern step by step. Finally, we have demonstrated the patterning over larger areas, over existing topography, and the practical applicability of the SPL processes for lithography down to 13-nm pitch patterns. To enhance the throughput capability variable beam diameter electric field, current-controlled SPL is briefly discussed.

  10. Real-Time Near-Field Terahertz Imaging with Atomic Optical Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; de Melo, Natalia R; Kondo, Jorge M; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) near-field imaging is a flourishing discipline [1], with applications from fundamental studies of beam propagation [2,3] to the characterisation of metameterials [4,5] and waveguides [6,7]. Beating the diffraction limit typically involves rastering structures or detectors with length scale shorter than the radiation wavelength; in the THz domain this has been achieved using a number of techniques including scattering tips [8,9] and apertures [10]. Alternatively, mapping THz fields onto an optical wavelength and imaging the visible light removes the requirement for scanning a local probe, speeding up image collection times [11,12]. Here we report THz to optical conversion using a gas of highly excited `Rydberg' atoms. By collecting THz-induced optical fluorescence we demonstrate a real-time image of a THz standing wave and we use well-known atomic properties to calibrate the THz field strength. The mono-atomic gas does not distort the THz field and offers the potential to immerse structures wit...

  11. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, P. P.; Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Short, M. B.; Higdon, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    Faraday rotation (rotation measure [RM]) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive to cosmological and evolutionary effects as z increases beyond ~1 because of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth in the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors, dN/dz. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RMs of high-latitude quasars extending out to z ~ 3.7, we find that the distribution of RM broadens with redshift in the 20-80 rad m-2 range, despite the (1 + z)-2 wavelength dilution expected in the observed Faraday rotation. Our results indicate that the universe becomes increasingly "Faraday-opaque" to sources beyond z ~ 2; that is, as z increases, progressively fewer sources are found with a "small" RM in the observer's frame. This is in contrast to sources at zlesssim 1. They suggest that the environments of galaxies were significantly magnetized at high redshifts, with magnetic field strengths that were at least as strong within a few Gyr of the big bang as at the current epoch. We separately investigate a simple unevolving toy model in which the RM is produced by Mg II absorber systems, and find that it can approximately reproduce the observed trend with redshift. An additional possibility is that the intrinsic RM associated with the radio sources was much higher in the past, and we show that this is not a trivial consequence of the higher radio luminosities of the high-redshift sources.

  12. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  13. Strong-field atomic ionization in an elliptically polarized laser field and a constant magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylyuk, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the quasistationary quasienergy state (QQES) formalism, the tunneling and multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions subjected to a perturbation by a high intense laser radiation field of an arbitrary polarization and a constant magnetic field are considered. On the basis of the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Green's function for the electron moving in an arbitrary laser field and crossed constant electric and magnetic fields, the integral equation for the complex quasienergy and the energy spectrum of the ejected electron are derived. Using the "imaginary-time" method, the extremal subbarrier trajectory of the photoelectron moving in a nonstationary laser field and a constant magnetic field are considered. Within the framework of the QQES formalism and the quasiclassical perturbation theory, ionization rates when the Coulomb interaction of the photoelectron with the parent ion is taken into account at arbitrary values of the Keldysh parameter are derived. The high accuracy of rates is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. Simple analytical expressions for the ionization rate with the Coulomb correction in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes in the case of an elliptically polarized laser beam propagating at an arbitrary angle to the constant magnetic field are derived and discussed. The limits of small and large magnetic fields and low and high frequency of a laser field are considered in details. It is shown that in the presence of a nonstationary laser field perturbation, the constant magnetic field may either decrease or increase the ionization rate. The analytical consideration and numerical calculations also showed that the difference between the ionization rates for an s electron in the case of right- and left-elliptically polarized laser fields is especially significant in the multiphoton regime for not-too-high magnetic fields and decreases as the magnetic field increases. The paper

  14. Probing strong field ionization of solids with a Thomson parabola spectrometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malay Dalui; T Madhu Trivikram; Ram Gopal; M Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Intense ultrashort laser pulses are known to generate high-density, high-temperature plasma from any substrate. Copious emission of hot electrons, from a solid substrate, results in strong electrostatic field that accelerates the ions with energies ranging from a few eV to MeV. Ion spectrometry from laser–plasma is convolved with multiple atomic systems, several charge states and a broad energy spread. Conventional mass spectrometric techniques have serious limitations to probe this ionization dynamics. We have developed an imaging ion spectrometer that measures charge/mass-resolved ion kinetic energies over the entire range. Microchannel plate (MCP) is used as the position-sensitive detector to perform online and single shot measurements. The wellresolved spectrum even for the low-energy ions, demonstrates that the spectral width is limited by the space-charge repulsion for the ions generated in the hot dense plasma.

  15. Guiding Neutral Atoms with Two Current-Carrying Wires and a Vertical Bias Field on the Atom Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Min; YAN Bo; LI Xiao-Lin; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2008-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the guiding of neutral atoms with two parallel microfabricated current-carrying wires on the atom chip and a verticai magnetic bias field.The atoms are guided along a magnetic field minimum parallel to the current-carrying wires and confined in the other two directions.We describe in detail how the precooled atoms are efficiently loaded into the two-wire guide.

  16. A versatile variable field module for field and angular dependent scanning probe microscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hongxue; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart; Hodgson, Jim; Rutgers, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a versatile variable field module (VFM) with capability of both field and angular dependent measurements up to 1800 Oe for scanning probe system. The magnetic field strength is changed by adjusting the distance between a rare earth magnet and the probe tip and is monitored in-situ by a built-in Hall sensor. Rotating the magnet allows the field vector to change from the horizontal to vertical direction and makes it possible to do angular dependent measurements. The capability of the VFM system is demonstrated by degaussing a floppy disk media with increasing magnetic field. Angular dependent measurements clearly show the evolution of magnetic domain structures, with a completely reversible magnetic force microscopy phase contrast observed when the magnetic field is rotated by 180{\\deg}. A further demonstration of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic switching of CoFe2O4 pillars in CoFe2O4-BiFeO3 nanocomposites was presented and discussed.

  17. Hyperfine field on Fe, Rh, Cd and Sn nucleus probes in chromium host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sirousi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available   The incommensurate spin -density –wave magnetism of Cr has attracted great interest since its discovery via neutron scattering. Although the existence of spin- density –wave has been confirmed by experiment but the calculations which have been carried out have not been able to predict the correct ground state magnetic phase for chromium yet. To predict the magnetic hyperfine field at nucleus of different impurities in Cr host, we calculated the hyperfine field on Cd, Sn, Rh and Fe probes in the first step. Our calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory, using the full-potential-linearized augmented plane-wave method. We used a supercell constructed from 8 bcc unit cells with impurity concentratin of 6.25 % and to analysise the supercell size effect on different magnetic quantities we repeated our calculation using a supercell with 54 atoms. The result of this effort showed that the magnetic hyperfine field and magnetic moment of nearesrt Cr is very little influenced by the size of supercell, so we can calculate the magnetic hyperfine field if it’s quantity is known in different alloys. we showed that the local properties such as hyperfine field, are calculated with acceptable accuracy by using small supercells. Meanwhile, we studied the structural and magnetic properties of different alloys and showed that the Fe alloy has two defferent magnetic phase.

  18. Near-field aperture-probe as a magnetic dipole source and optical magnetic field detector

    CERN Document Server

    Denkova, Denitza; Silhanek, Alejandro V; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2014-01-01

    Scanning near-field field optical microscopy (SNOM) is a technique, which allows sub-wavelength optical imaging of photonic structures. While the electric field components of light can be routinely obtained, imaging of the magnetic components has only recently become of interest. This is so due to the development of artificial materials, which enhance and exploit the typically weak magnetic light-matter interactions to offer extraordinary optical properties. Consequently, both sources and detectors of the magnetic field of light are now required. In this paper, assisted by finite-difference time-domain simulations, we suggest that the circular aperture at the apex of a metal coated hollow-pyramid SNOM probe can be approximated by a lateral magnetic dipole source. This validates its use as a detector for the lateral magnetic near-field, as illustrated here for a plasmonic nanobar sample. Verification for a dielectric sample is currently in progress. We experimentally demonstrate the equivalence of the reciproc...

  19. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Youngji; Hong, Jong Wook; Lee, Hyunsoo; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-03-01

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry.

  20. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry. (paper)

  1. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, José; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod’homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; i Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-01-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 10...

  2. Impact of dynamic specimen shape evolution on the atom probe tomography results of doped epitaxial oxide multilayers: Comparison of experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and sideways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was compared with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-simulation comparison explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction, leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the importance of comparing experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using APT to study oxide heterostructure interfaces

  3. A new probe of magnetic fields in the pre-reionization epoch: II. Detectability

    CERN Document Server

    Gluscevic, Vera; Fang, Xiao; Hirata, Christopher; Oklopcic, Antonija; Mishra, Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    In the first paper of this series, we proposed a novel method to probe large-scale intergalactic magnetic fields during the cosmic Dark Ages, using 21-cm tomography. This method relies on the effect of spin alignment of hydrogen atoms in a cosmological setting, and on the effect of magnetic precession of the atoms on the statistics of the 21-cm brightness-temperature fluctuations. In this paper, we forecast the sensitivity of future tomographic surveys to detecting magnetic fields using this method. For this purpose, we develop a minimum-variance estimator formalism to capture the characteristic anisotropy signal using the two-point statistics of the brightness-temperature fluctuations. We find that, depending on the reionization history, and subject to the control of systematics from foreground subtraction, an array of dipole antennas in a compact-grid configuration with a collecting area slightly exceeding one square kilometer can achieve a $1\\sigma$ detection of $\\sim$$10^{-21}$ Gauss comoving (scaled to p...

  4. Influence of atomic motion on the population and dipole squeezing of a cascade three-level atom in cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ai-Dong; Zhang Shou

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical property of a cascade three-level atom is investigated in the condition of atomic motion. The influence of atomic motion on the population and dipole squeezing is discussed. The results show that atomic motion makes the amplitude of atomic population be steady and increasing the parameter ep which denotes the atomic motion and the structure of field mode can shorten the period of collapse-revivals. By choosing an appropriate paramenter ep, we can obtain a dipole squeezed atom of long standing.

  5. Hierarchical atom type definitions and extensible all-atom force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Yang, Chunwei; Cao, Fenglei; Li, Feng; Jing, Zhifeng; Chen, Long; Shen, Zhe; Xin, Liang; Tong, Sijia; Sun, Huai

    2016-03-15

    The extensibility of force field is a key to solve the missing parameter problem commonly found in force field applications. The extensibility of conventional force fields is traditionally managed in the parameterization procedure, which becomes impractical as the coverage of the force field increases above a threshold. A hierarchical atom-type definition (HAD) scheme is proposed to make extensible atom type definitions, which ensures that the force field developed based on the definitions are extensible. To demonstrate how HAD works and to prepare a foundation for future developments, two general force fields based on AMBER and DFF functional forms are parameterized for common organic molecules. The force field parameters are derived from the same set of quantum mechanical data and experimental liquid data using an automated parameterization tool, and validated by calculating molecular and liquid properties. The hydration free energies are calculated successfully by introducing a polarization scaling factor to the dispersion term between the solvent and solute molecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26537332

  6. Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, Petko; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The velocity distribution of atoms in a thermal gas is usually described through a Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of energy, and assumes isotropy. As a consequence, the probability for an atom to leave the surface under an azimuth angle {\\theta} should evolve as cos {\\theta}, in spite of the fact that there is no microscopic basis to justify such a law. The contribution of atoms moving at a grazing incidence towards or from the surface, i.e. atoms with a small normal velocity, here called "slow" atoms, reveals essential in the development of spectroscopic methods probing a dilute atomic vapor in the vicinity of a surface, enabling a sub-Doppler resolution under a normal incidence irradiation. The probability for such "slow" atoms may be reduced by surface roughness and atom-surface interaction. Here, we describe a method to observe and to count these slow atoms relying on a mechanical discrimination, through spatially separated pump and probe beams. We also report on our experimental progresses toward such a g...

  7. Gentle and fast atomic force microscopy with a piezoelectric scanning probe for nanorobotics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel dual tip nanomanipulation atomic force microscope (AFM) platform operating in ambient conditions is presented. The system is equipped with a high frequency quartz piezoelectric self-sensing scanning probe for fast imaging and a passive cantilever for manipulation. The system is validated by imaging and selective pushing/pulling of gold colloid beads (diameters from 80 to 180 nm). This provides a more compact integration compared to an external optical lever and avoids several of its drawbacks such as optical interference and noise, and recalibration in the case of a moving cantilever and a fixed laser source and photodiode sensor. Moreover, as the quartz oscillator exhibits oscillation amplitudes in the sub-picometer range with a resonant frequency in the megahertz range, this dynamic force sensor is ideal for fast AFM imaging. Experiments show an increase by five times in imaging speed compared to a classical AFM system. (paper)

  8. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys at the most atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  9. On low temperature bainite transformation characteristics using in-situ neutron diffraction and atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakha, Khushboo, E-mail: krakha@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia); Beladi, Hossein; Timokhina, Ilana [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia); Xiong, Xiangyuan [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kabra, Saurabh; Liss, Klaus-Dieter [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, The Bragg Institute, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Hodgson, Peter [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2014-01-01

    In-situ neutron diffraction was employed to monitor the evolution of nano-bainitic ferrite during low temperature isothermal heat treatment of austenite. The first 10 peaks (austenite, γ and ferrite, α) were monitored during austenization, homogenisation, rapid cooling and isothermal holding at 573 K. Changes in the α-110 and γ-111 peaks were analysed to determine the volume fraction changes and hence the kinetics of the phase transformation. Asymmetry and broadening in the α-200 and γ-200 peaks were quantified to lattice parameter changes due to carbon redistribution as well as the effects of size and dislocation density. Atom Probe Tomography was then used to confirm that, despite the presence of 1.5 mass% Si, carbide formation was evident. This carbide formation is the cause of poor ductility, which is lower than expected in such steels.

  10. Self-consistent determination of line-width and probe shape using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-consistent method for determining line-width and probe shape using an atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed. Through acquisition of three images in which one tip images the other, and each tip images the sample a least-squares determination of the shapes of both tips, and the parameters that define the line-width standard can be determined. Application of the self-consistent method produces measurements that can be made traceable to the definition of the metre through appropriate calibration of the AFM. A comparison between the line-width determined by the method and a calibrated line-width standard shows good agreement. Sources of uncertainty specific to the self-consistent method are discussed. (paper)

  11. Graphene Coatings: Probing the Limits of the One Atom Thick Protection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Andersen, Mie; Balog, Richard; Lægsgaard, Erik; Hofmann, Philip; Besenbacher, Flemming; Hammer, Bjørk; Stensgaard, Ivan; Hornekær, Liv

    2012-01-01

    against CO is observed at CO pressures below 106 mbar. However, at higher pressures CO is observed to intercalate under the graphene coating layer, thus lifting the reconstruction. The limitations of the coating effect are further tested by exposure to hot atomic hydrogen. While the coating can withstand......The limitations of graphene as an effective corrosion-inhibiting coating on metal surfaces, here exemplified by the hex-reconstructed Pt(100) surface, are probed by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations. While exposure of small molecules directly onto...... these extreme conditions for a limited amount of time, after substantial exposure, the Pt(100) reconstruction is lifted. Annealing experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the basal plane of the graphene stays intact and point to a graphene-mediated mechanism for the H...

  12. Analysis of deuterium in V-Fe5at.% film by atom probe tomography (APT)

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2011-09-01

    V-Fe5at.% 2 and 10-nm thick single layered films were prepared by ion beam sputtering on W substrate. They were loaded with D from gas phase at 0.2 Pa and at 1 Pa, respectively. Both lateral and depth D distribution of these films was investigated in detail by atom probe tomography. The results of analysis are in good agreement between the average deuterium concentration and the value, expected from electromotive force measurement on a similar flat film. An enrichment of deuterium at the V/W interface was observed for both films. The origin of this D-accumulation was discussed in respect to electron transfer, mechanical stress and misfit dislocations. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.podesta@mi.infn.it; Milani, Paolo [CIMaINa and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  14. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an atomic beam apparatus, we have carried out comprehensive measurements of fluorescence intensity, and fluctuations (variance) in the fluorescence intensity, from the 3S1/2 (F = 2, MF = 2) → 3P3/2 (F = 3, MF = 3) transition in atomic sodium, in a laser driving field on which well-characterized synthesized phase fluctuations have been imposed. These data are taken as a function of detuning of the laser from exact resonance with the transition, and for laser fields modulated with characteristically different bandwidths and amplitudes of phase noise. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions of recently developed theoretical treatments. The methods are being extended to experimental studies of the role of phase fluctuations in four-wave mixing. 4 refs., 1 fig

  15. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, S; Rojhirunsakool, T; Nandwana, P; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-12-01

    The analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered γ' precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr (at%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within γ' precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes. PMID:25952611

  16. The probe gain with and without inversion in a four-level atomic model: light amplification at a short wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴金辉; 王登攀; 张惠芳; 肖志宏; 高锦岳

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new four-level atomic model for achieving light amplification at a short wavelength, where direct incoherent pumping into the top level is avoided by the advantage of coherent pumping. In this model, the lower level of the probe transition is an excited state but not the usual ground state. By analytical as well as numerical calculations, we find that the probe gain, either with or without population inversion, which depends on the relation between spontaneous decay rates γ42 and γ21, can be achieved with proper parameters. We note that the Raman scattering gain always plays an important role in achieving the probe amplification.

  17. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; F. S. Mozer; Bale, S.D.; M. Ludlam; Turin, P.; Harvey, P. R.; Hochmann, R.; Harps, K.; Dalton, G.; McCauley, J.; Rachelson, W.; Gordon, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal ...

  18. Electric field and temperature measurement using ultra wide bandwidth pigtailed electro-optic probes

    OpenAIRE

    Bernier, Maxime; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Duvillaret, Lionel; Paupert, Alain; Lasserre, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    7 pages, 7 figures, 19 références bibliographique dont 4 internes au laboratoire International audience We present pigtailed electro-optic probes that allow a simultaneous measurement of high frequency electric fields and temperature using a unique laser probe beam. This has been achieved by the development of a novel probe design associated with a fully automated servo-controlled optical bench, initially developed to stabilize the electric field sensor response. The developed electro-o...

  19. Photoionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field has been studied. • Oscillatory structures appear in the electron probability density distributions. • This study can guide the experimental research on the photoionization microscopy. - Abstract: The ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom in a magnetic field has been studied on the basis of a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. The photoionization microscopy interference patterns of the photoelectron probability density distribution on a given detector plane are calculated at different scaled energies. We find that due to the interference effect of different types of electron trajectories arrived at a given point on the detector plane, oscillatory structures appear in the electron probability density distributions. The oscillatory structure of the interference pattern, which contains the spatial component of the electronic wave function, evolves sensitively on the scaled energy, through which we gain a deep understanding on the probability density distribution of the electron wave function. This study provides some reference values for the future experiment research on the photoionization microscopy of the Rydberg atom in the presence of magnetic field

  20. The dynamic properties of the two-level entangled atom in an optical field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an optical field and one of the entangled atoms is analyzed in detail in this paper. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of the two-level entangled atom are manifested. The properties of the action are dependent on the initial state of the atom. After detecting the atom out of the field, we can obtain the state of the other atom moving in the field. It is shown that the state of the atom out of the field influences the dynamic properties of the atom in the field.

  1. Complementary use of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the investigation of steels nanostructured by severe plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of bulk nanostructured materials are often controlled by atomic-scale features such as segregation along defects or composition gradients. Here we discuss the complementary use of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography to obtain a full description of nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of both techniques are highlighted on the basis of experimental data collected in severely deformed steels with a special emphasis on carbon spatial distribution.

  2. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs

  3. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Carraz, Olivier; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  4. Ordering and site occupancy of D03 ordered Fe3Al-5 at%Cr evaluated by means of atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Rademacher, Thomas W.

    2011-05-01

    Addition of ternary elements to the D03 ordered Fe3Al intermetallic phase is a general approach to optimise its mechanical properties. To understand the physical influences of such additions the determination of the probability of site occupancies of these additions on the lattice site and ordering parameters is of high interest. Some common experimental techniques such as X-ray diffraction or Atom Location by Channelling Enhanced Microanalysis (ALCHEMI) are usually applied to explore this interplay. Unfortunately, certain published results are partly inconsistent, imprecise or even contradictory. In this study, these aspects are evaluated systematically by atom probe tomography (APT) and a special data analysis method. Additionally, to account for possible field evaporation effects that can falsify the estimation of site occupancy and induce misinterpretations, APT evaporation sequences were also simulated. As a result, chromium occupies most frequently the next nearest neighbour sites of Al atoms and local ordering parameters could be achieved. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-02-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.

  6. Growth rate model and doping metrology by atom probe tomography in silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.H.; Larde, R.; Cadel, E.; Pareige, P. [Groupe de Physique des Materiaux, Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Av. de l' Universite, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Xu, T.; Grandidier, B.; Nys, J.P.; Stievenard, D. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Departement ISEN, 41 bd Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France)

    2011-03-15

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with different surface number density are fabricated using Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) method by controlling the catalyst droplet number density with in-situ evaporation. For comparison, another type of SiNWs is fabricated by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) method. To study these two types of SiNWs a general growth rate model is presented. The fit curves from this model are consistent with our experimental data. In both growing conditions the SiNW growth rate as a function of their diameter are compared and discussed. The p-type SiNWs have also been prepared by adding diborane into precursor. The doping metrology in an individual SiNW is realized by laser assisted Atom Probe Tomography (APT). We have shown that the doping atoms (e.g. B) can incorporate into SiNW and an accurate quantification can be given (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  8. Influence of the virtual photon field on the squeezing properties of an atom laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jian-Gang; Sun Chang-Yong; Wen Ling-Hua; Liang Bao-Long

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the squeezing properties of an atom laser without rotating-wave approximation in the system of a binomial states field interacting with a two-level atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. It discusses the influences of atomic eigenfrequency, the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms, parameter of the binomial states field and virtual photon field on the squeezing properties. The results show that two quadrature components of an atom laser can be squeezed periodically. The duration and the degree of squeezing an atom laser have something to do with the atomic eigenfrequency and the parameter of the binomial states field, respectively. The collapse and revival frequency of atom laser fluctuation depends on the interaction intensity between the optical field and atoms. The effect of the virtual photon field deepens the depth of squeezing an atom laser.

  9. Effect of an external radiation field on the properties of the atoms and cavity field in the two-atom Tavis-Cummings model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠纯; 王琪; 张永生; 郭光灿

    2005-01-01

    We study the properties of atoms and cavity field in the two-atom Tavis-Cummings model where the two atoms interact with each other and are also driven by an external classical field. We consider the special case that the cavity is initially in a coherent state. The atomic inversion, the average photons number and the Mandel parameter in the driven Tavis-Cummings model are given and analysed numerically. We pay special attention to the dynamical behaviour of the atoms and the cavity field modified by the external field.

  10. Nonadiabatic tunneling ionization of atoms in elliptically polarized laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically investigate the nonadiabatic effects in strong field tunneling ionization of atoms in elliptically polarized laser fields by solving the 3D time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE). Comparing our TDSE results with those of two semi-classical methods, i.e., the quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo simulation (QTMC) and the Coulomb-corrected strong field approximation (CCSFA), we confirm the existence of the nonadiabatic effects with its fingerprint in the nonzero initial lateral velocity at the tunneling exit in the laser polarization plane. Our study shows that these nonadiabatic initial lateral momentum effects become significant in high ellipticity or circularly polarized laser field. These results indicate that the calibration of the experimental laser intensity in this situation should be performed nonadiabatically, which may strongly affect the results of the real tunneling time delay measurements. (paper)

  11. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially with high accuracy. Due to its ability to spatially characterize chemistry in non-conducting materials, such as oxides, provides the opportunity to characterize stoichiometry, which strongly is tied to material performance. However, accuracy has been correlated with instrument run parameters. A systematic study of the effect of laser energy, temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of a model oxide, uranium dioxide (UO2). Modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect its evaporation behavior as laser energy. It was discovered that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO2. Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser assisted field evaporation and high laser energy produces thermal effects in the evaporation behavior. Laser energy had the greatest impact on evaporation and the optimal instrument condition for UO2 was determined to be 50K, 10 pJ laser energy, 0.3% detection rate, and a 100 kHz repetition rate. These conditions provide the best combination of mass resolution, accurate stoichiometry, and evaporation behavior.

  12. Theoretical femtosecond physics atoms and molecules in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of atoms and molecules interacting with pulsed or continuous wave lasers up to atomic field strengths on the order of 10^16 W/cm² are leading to an understanding of many challenging experimental discoveries. This book deals with the basics of femtosecond physics and goes up to the latest applications of new phenomena. The book presents an introduction to laser physics with mode-locking and pulsed laser operation. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is discussed both analytically and numerically. The basis for the non-perturbative treatment of laser-matter interaction in the book is the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The light field is treated classically, and different possible gauges are discussed. Physical phenonema, ranging from Rabi-oscillations in two-level systems to the ionization of atoms, the generation of high harmonics, the ionization and dissociation of molecules as well as the control of chemical reactions are pre...

  13. General Atomic's superconducting high field test facility and initial performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic has established a high field test facility whose primary mission is to investigate the J-B-T and stability performance margins of commercial NbTi superconductor in the 10 tesla, 4.20K region. This work is part of the overall DOE/MFE/MAGNETIC SYSTEMS effort to provide an adequate technological base for construction of superconducting toroidal field coils for the next generation of large tokamak fusion devices. The principal components of the facility are the coil/cryostat assembly, the helium refrigerator-liquefier/compressor system, and the gaseous helium recovery and storage system. The epoxy impregnated, layer wound main background field coil generates 8 tesla within its 40 cm diameter bore. The insert background field coil was layer wound with cooling channels provided by ''barber pole'' mylar conductor insulation. Ten tesla is generated within its 22 cm bore. The initial performance of the facility will be discussed. Future testing calls for operating test coils with implanted heating elements to simulate mechanically induced perturbations. The normal zone growth and recovery behavior will be observed for various disturbance energies. This data will then be compared with results obtained from the transient recovery analysis developed at General Atomic

  14. Artificial Staggered Magnetic Field for Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2011-03-01

    Uniform magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature, but this is not the case for staggered magnetic fields. In this talk, I will discuss an experimental set-up for cold atoms recently proposed by us, which allows for the realization of a ``staggered gauge field'' in a 2D square optical lattice. If the lattice is loaded with bosons, it may be described by an effective Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, with complex and anisotropic hopping coefficients. A very rich phase diagram emerges: besides the usual Mott-insulator and zero-momentum condensate, a new phase with a finite momentum condensate becomes the ground-state at strong gauge fields. By using the technique of Feshbach resonance, the dynamics of a coherent superposition of a vortex-carrying atomic condensate and a conventional zero-momentum molecular condensate can also be studied within the same scheme. On the other hand, if the lattice is loaded with fermions, a highly tunable, graphene-like band structure can be realized, without requiring the honeycomb lattice symmetry. When the system is loaded with a mixture of bosons and two-species fermions, several features of the high-Tc phase diagram can be reproduced. A dome-shaped unconventional superconducting region arises, surrounded by a non-Fermi liquid and a Fermi liquid at low and high doping, respectively. We acknowledge financial support from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  15. Atom probe tomography of the austenite-ferrite interphase boundary composition in a model alloy Fe-C-Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tomographic atom probe analysis has been developed to study the interfacial conditions during isothermal austenite transformation to ferrite at 700 deg. C in an Fe-C-Mn model alloy. The interfacial conditions lead to different alloying element profiles across the interface, and a comparison is made between this experimental result and the DICTRA software predictions under the various conditions

  16. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., PO Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Sun, X. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  17. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer

  18. Electric field and temperature measurement using ultra wide bandwidth pigtailed electro-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Maxime; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Duvillaret, Lionel; Paupert, Alain; Lasserre, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    We present pigtailed electro-optic probes that allow a simultaneous measurement of high frequency electric fields and temperature using a unique laser probe beam. This has been achieved by the development of a novel probe design associated with a fully automated servo-controlled optical bench, initially developed to stabilize the electric field sensor response. The developed electro-optic probes present a stable response in outdoors conditions over a time duration exceeding 1 h, a frequency bandwidth from kHz to tens of GHz with a sensitivity of 0.7 Vm(-1)Hz(-(1/2)), and a temperature accuracy of 40 mK. PMID:18449315

  19. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  20. Electric field-induced direct delivery of proteins by a nanofountain probe

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Owen Y.; Ho, Andrea M.; Rim, Jee E.; Kohli, Punit; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2008-01-01

    We report nanofabrication of protein dot and line patterns using a nanofountain atomic force microscopy probe (NFP). Biomolecules are continuously fed in solution through an integrated microfluidic system, and deposited directly onto a substrate. Deposition is controlled by application of an electric potential of appropriate sign and magnitude between the probe reservoir and substrate. Submicron dot and line molecular patterns were generated with resolution that depended on the magnitude of t...

  1. Solute atom migration in GH4169 superalloy under electrostatic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wang; Lei Wang; Yang Liu; Xiu Song; Bei-jiang Zhang; Jin-hui Du

    2013-01-01

    Electric field treatment (EFT) was applied on GH4169 alloy during aging at 500-800◦C to investigate the microstructure and property variation of the alloy under the action of EFT. The results demonstrate that the short-distance diff usion of Al, Ti, and Nb atoms can be accelerated by EFT, which results in the coarsening ofγ ? andγ ?? phases. Meanwhile, lattice distortion can be caused by the segregation of Fe and Cr atoms, owing to the vacancy flows migrating toward the charged surfaces of the alloy. Therefore, the alloy is hardened by the application of EFT, even if the strength of the alloy is partly reduced, which is caused by precipitation coarsening.

  2. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Bernd [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Kleinpoppen, Hans

    2013-07-01

    , until today, hardly to perform. Therefore, much attention is paid to the results of state-of-the-art experiments providing detailed information on the process, and their comparison to the related theoretical approaches, just to mention relativistic multi-configurational Dirac-Fock, convergent close-coupling, Breit-Pauli R-matrix, or relativistic distorted wave approaches, as well as Green's operator methods. This book has been written in honor of Herbert Walther and his major contribution to the field but even to stimulate advanced Bachelor and Master students by demonstrating that obviously nowadays atomic and molecular scattering physics yields and gives a much exciting appreciation for further advancing the field.

  3. Perfect/complete scattering experiments. Probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Therefore, much attention is paid to the results of state-of-the-art experiments providing detailed information on the process, and their comparison to the related theoretical approaches, just to mention relativistic multi-configurational Dirac-Fock, convergent close-coupling, Breit-Pauli R-matrix, or relativistic distorted wave approaches, as well as Green's operator methods. This book has been written in honor of Herbert Walther and his major contribution to the field but even to stimulate advanced Bachelor and Master students by demonstrating that obviously nowadays atomic and molecular scattering physics yields and gives a much exciting appreciation for further advancing the field.

  4. Rydberg atoms in low-frequency fields : fundamental aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürtler, Andreas Stefan

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate highly excited atoms, so-called Rydberg atoms, in oscillating fields with frequencies from the megahertz to the terahertz domain. The strong interaction of Rydberg atoms with external fields is used to establish a connection between the ionization of Rydberg atoms by ra

  5. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  6. Placement of field probes for stabilization of breathing-induced B0-fluctuations in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Hanson, Lars G.;

    Introduction: B0-fluctuations induced by breathing and body motion lead to artifacts for certain brain imaging sequences at ultra-high field (7T). A promising solution is to monitor the B0-fluctuations during the scan using external field probes, and update the shim currents in real-time (1). It is...... a fundamental challenge, however, that the B0 measurements are spatially sparse (e.g. 16 probes), and performed outside the brain. Typically, the field is modelled by a linear combination of the spatial shim fields that the scanner can produce (such as spherical harmonics up to 3rd order), and the...... coefficients for these spatial terms are determined by least square fitting to the field probe measurements. The probes must be placed carefully to ensure that the spherical harmonics can be distinguished using these few samples, and they must be placed close to the head so that the spatial field model is...

  7. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    calculate the self consistent field intensity at the site of a probe dipole scanning over resonantly interacting object dipoles and show that the intensity distribution deviates from that existing in the absence of a probe. I demonstrate that this difference increases with an increase in the polarizability...... of the probe dipole, resulting eventually in a completely different intensity distribution, The calculations also show that the perturbation of the intensity distribution due to the presence of a probe decreases with an increase in the probe-sample distance. In order to evaluate the degree of...... perturbation, I suggest comparing the images obtained at different probe-sample distances, Finally I formulate a simple rule of thumb that allows one to roughly estimate the probe-sample coupling when imaging localized elicitations....

  8. Tomographic atom probe characterization of the microstructure of a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steel after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, chemical analyses using Atom Probe Tomography were performed on a bolt made of cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steel, extracted from the internal structures of a pressurized water reactor after 17 years of reactor service. The irradiation temperature of these samples was 633 K and the irradiation dose was estimated to 12 dpa (7.81 x 1025 neutrons.m-2, E > 1 MeV). The samples were analysed with a laser assisted tomographic atom probe. These analyses have shown that neutron irradiation has a strong effect on the intragranular distribution of solute atoms. A high number density (6 x 1023 m-3) of Ni-Si enriched and Cr-Fe depleted clusters was detected after irradiation. Mo and P segregations at the interfaces of these clusters were also observed. Finally, Si enriched atmospheres were seen

  9. Study of the interaction of atoms with strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three aspects of the interactions of atoms with high intensity laser fields were treated. All three were motivated by experiment. The first investigation was prompted by a recent experiment (Kruit et al. 1983) involving multiphoton ionization of Xe. In this experiment it was found that the photoelectron energy spectrum contained peaks that corresponded to the absorption of more than the minimum number of photons required to ionize the atom. A model approximation here showed good qualitative agreement with experiment. An experiment (Grove et al. 1977) designed to test a theoretical calculation of the dynamical Stark effect stimulated the second part of this thesis, namely: a study of how an adiabatically and near-adiabatically changing field intensity affects the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a two-level atom. It was found that there is an asymmetry in the spectrum for off-resonance excitation produced because the field turn-on repopulates the dressed state that is depopulated by spontaneous emission. The third part of this thesis was based on an experiment (Granneman and Van der Wiel 1976) that attempted to verify a perturbation calculation of the two-photon ionization cross section of Cs. A discrepancy of four orders of magnitude near a minimum in the cross section was found between theory and experiment. To explain this discrepancy it was suggested (Armstrong and Beers 1977) that the effective order of nonlinearity (k) for this process varied significantly around the minimum. This study involves a perturbation calculation of k. It was found that k varies rapidly around the minimum, and that this variation should be experimentally observable for laser intensities of the order of tens of GW cm-2

  10. Large Enhancement of Probe Amplification with Population Inversion in a Four-Level Atomic System with Vacuum-Induced Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; YANG Wen-Xing; LUO Jin-Ming; PENG Ju-Cun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss and analyze theoretically probe absorption-amplification response in a four-level coherent atomic system with vacuum-induced coherence via changing the sign of the parameter f, with f denoting the ratio of a pair of dipole moments associated with a doublet of closely upper hyperfine sublevels. We find that the amplitude of the probe amplification for the case f = -1 can be about one order of magnitude larger than that achievable for the case f = 1. In addition, with respect to the case f = -1 the probe amplification can be maintained all the time with weak incoherent pumping for a wide range of the probe detuning.

  11. Sub-Wavelength Imaging and Field Mapping via EIT and Autler-Townes Splitting In Rydberg Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Christopher L; Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, David A; Miller, Stephanie A; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique for measuring radio-frequency (RF) electric field strengths with sub-wavelength resolution. We use Rydberg states of rubidium atoms to probe the RF field. The RF field causes an energy splitting of the Rydberg states via the Autler-Townes effect, and we detect the splitting via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We use this technique to measure the electric field distribution inside a glass cylinder with applied RF fields at 17.04 GHz and 104.77 GHz. We achieve a spatial resolution of $\\bf{\\approx}$100 $\\bf{\\mu}$m, limited by the widths of the laser beams utilized for the EIT spectroscopy. We numerically simulate the fields in the glass cylinder and find good agreement with the measured fields. Our results suggest that this technique could be applied to image fields on a small spatial scale over a large range of frequencies, up into the sub-THz regime.

  12. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impack 41-J shifts and the corresponding fluences are 192 deg C at 5.0 x 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 deg C at 6.0 x 1023 n/m2 (1 MeV) for unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ∼2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  13. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel–manganese–silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ∼2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese–nickel–silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density

  14. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A; Tucker, Julie D; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2016-06-24

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe-Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe-Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100-10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni-Mn-Si-Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni-Mn-Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core-shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby-Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30-36). PMID:27181108

  15. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α‧) phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α‧ interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36). ).

  16. Gauge fields for ultra-cold Ytterbium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinner, Sebastian [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zuerich, Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gerbier, Fabrice; Beugnon, Jerome; Dalibard, Jean [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-07-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices can serve as model systems for condensed matter physics. In our project we plan to investigate the rich physics of fractional quantum Hall phases. I first briefly explain the core of the planned experiment, i.e. the implementation of a strong U(1)-like gauge field on cold Ytterbium atoms confined in a two-dimensional square lattice. The second part focuses on the laser cooling of Yb. It consists of Zeeman slowing of an atomic beam using the strong singlet transition at 399 nm and subsequent magneto-optical trapping using the green intercombination line at 556 nm. Both laser wavelengths are produced via the technique of second-harmonic generation. As a showcase I treat the generation of the 556 nm light relying on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a 2 W fiber laser at 1112 nm. The output power of 1.2 W corresponds to 80% efficiency and suggests an alternative to dye lasers.

  17. Near-field fluorescence thermometry using highly efficient triple-tapered near-field optical fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T.; Taguchi, Y.; Saiki, T.; Nagasaka, Y.

    2012-12-01

    A novel local temperature measurement method using fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN) has been developed. Fluor-NOTN enables nanoscale temperature measurement in situ by detecting the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of CdSe quantum dots (QDs). In this paper, we report a novel triple-tapered near-field optical fiber probe that can increase the temperature measurement sensitivity of Fluor-NOTN. The performance of the proposed probe was numerically evaluated by the finite difference time domain method. Due to improvements in both the throughput and collection efficiency of near-field light, the sensitivity of the proposed probe was 1.9 times greater than that of typical double-tapered probe. The proposed shape of the triple-tapered core was successfully fabricated utilizing a geometrical model. The detected signal intensity of dried layers of QDs was greater by more than two orders than that of auto-fluorescence from the fiber core. In addition, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the QDs and its temperature dependence were successfully measured by the fabricated triple-tapered near-field optical fiber probe. These measurement results verified the capability of the proposed triple-tapered near-field optical fiber probe to improve the collection efficiency of near-field fluorescence.

  18. Quasistatic limit of the strong-field approximation describing atoms in intense laser fields: Circular polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, J H

    2010-01-01

    In the recent work of Vanne and Saenz [Phys. Rev. A 75, 063403 (2007)] the quasistatic limit of the velocity gauge strong-field approximation describing the ionization rate of atomic or molecular systems exposed to linearly polarized laser fields was derived. It was shown that in the low-frequency limit the ionization rate is proportional to the laser frequency (for a constant intensity of the laser field). In the present work I show that for circularly polarized laser fields the ionization rate is proportional to higher powers of the laser frequency for hydrogenic atoms. The new analytical expressions for asymptotic ionization rates (which become accurate in the quasistatic limit) contain no summations over multiphoton contributions. For very low laser frequencies (optical or infrared), these expressions usually remain with an order-of-magnitude agreement with the velocity gauge strong-field approximation.

  19. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  20. Atom Probe Tomography Examination of Carbon Redistribution in Quenched and Tempered 4340 Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Amy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miller, Michael K. [ORNL; Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Robert D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-07

    Quenching and tempering produces a wide range of mechanical properties in medium carbon, low alloyed steels - Study fragmentation behavior as a function of heat-treatment. Subtle microstructural changes accompany the mechanical property changes that result from quenching and tempering - Characterize the location and distribution of carbon and alloying elements in the microstructure using atom probe tomography (APT). Perform complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tempering influences the mechanical properties and fragmentation of quenched 4340 (hemi-shaped samples). APT revealed carbon-enriched features that contain a maximum of {approx}12-14 at.% carbon after quenching to RT (the level of carbon is perhaps associated with the extent of autotempering). TEM confirmed the presence of twinned martensite and indicates {var_epsilon} ({eta}) transition carbides after oil quenching to RT. Tempering at 325 C resulted in carbon-enriched plates (> 25 at.% C) with no significant element partitioning (transition carbides?). Tempering at 450 C and 575 C resulted in cementite ({approx} 25 at.% C) during late stage tempering; Cr, Mn, Mo partitioned to cementite and Si partitioned to ferrite. Tempering at 575 C resulted in P segregation at cementite interfaces and the formation of Cottrell atmospheres.

  1. Diffusivity and solubility of Cu in a reactor pressure vessel steel studied by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusivity and solubility limit of Cu in A533B steel, which is used in reactor pressure vessels, were studied by atom probe tomography (APT). Cu-A533B steel diffusion couples were annealed at temperatures of 550, 600, and 700°C, and the resulting Cu concentration profiles were measured. At the temperature of 700°C, the diffusivity of Cu in A533B steel was about 3 times higher than that in pure Fe, whereas at the temperature of 550°C, the diffusivity of Cu in A533B steel is almost closer to that in pure Fe. The solubility limit of Cu in A533B steel was similar to pure Fe. APT was also used to study the effect of the grain boundary (GB) diffusion. The results indicated that no Cu segregation occurred at GB near the Cu/A533B steel interface, which may imply that GB diffusion of Cu was not effective in A533B steel. (author)

  2. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  3. Thermal stability of TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings studied by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Povstugar, Ivan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Kostka, Aleksander; Raabe, Dierk

    2011-05-01

    This study is about the microstructural evolution of TiAlN/CrN multilayers (with a Ti:Al ratio of 0.75:0.25 and average bilayer period of 9 nm) upon thermal treatment. Pulsed laser atom probe analyses were performed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The layers are found to be thermally stable up to 600 °C. At 700 °C TiAlN layers begin to decompose into Ti- and Al-rich nitride layers in the out-of-plane direction. Further increase in temperature to 1000 °C leads to a strong decomposition of the multilayer structure as well as grain coarsening. Layer dissolution and grain coarsening appear to begin at the surface. Domains of AlN and TiCrN larger than 100 nm are found, together with smaller nano-sized AlN precipitates within the TiCrN matrix. Fe and V impurities are detected in the multilayers as well, which diffuse from the steel substrate into the coating along columnar grain boundaries. PMID:21146308

  4. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  5. Atom probe tomography analysis of high dose MA957 at selected irradiation temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Nathan A. [University of California at Berkeley, 3117 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stergar, Erich [University of California at Berkeley, 3117 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); SCK-CEN, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hosemann, Peter [University of California at Berkeley, 3117 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are meritable structural materials for nuclear reactor systems due to the exemplary resistance to radiation damage and high temperature creep. Summarized in this work are atom probe tomography (APT) investigations on a heat of MA957 that underwent irradiation in the form of in-reactor creep specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility–Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF–MOTA) for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. The oxide precipitates appear stable under irradiation at elevated temperature over extended periods of time. Nominally, the precipitate chemistry is unchanged by the accumulated dose; although, evidence suggests that ballistic dissolution and reformation processes are occurring at all irradiation temperatures. At 412 °C–109 dpa, chromium enrichments – consistent with the α′ phase – appear between the oxide precipitates, indicating radiation induced segregation. Grain boundaries, enriched with several elements including nickel and titanium, are observed at all irradiation conditions. At 412 °C–109 dpa, the grain boundaries are also enriched in molecular titanium oxide (TiO)

  6. Characterization of designed cobaltacarborane porphyrins using conductive probe atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venetia D. Lyles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins have unique chemical and electronic properties and thus provide useful model structures for studies of nanoscale electronic properties. The rigid planar structures and -conjugated backbones of porphyrins convey robust electrical characteristics. For our investigations, cobaltacarborane porphyrins were synthesized using a ring-opening zwitterionic reaction to produce isomers with selected arrangements of carborane clusters on each macrocycle. Experiments were designed to investigate how the molecular structure influences the self-organization, surface assembly, and conductive properties of three molecular structures with 2, 4, or 8 cobaltacarborane substituents. Current versus voltage (I-V spectra for designed cobaltacarborane porphyrins deposited on conductive gold substrates were acquired using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM. Characterizations with CP-AFM provide capabilities for obtaining physical measurements and structural information with unprecedented sensitivity. We found that the morphology of cobaltacarborane porphyrin structures formed on surfaces depends on a complex interplay of factors such as the solvent used for dissolution, the nature of the substrate, and the design of the parent molecule. The conductive properties of cobaltacarborane porphyrins were observed to change according to the arrangement of cobaltacarborane substituents. Specifically, the number and placement of the cobaltacarborane ligands on the porphyrin macrocycle affect the interactions that drive porphyrin self-assembly and crystallization. Interestingly, coulombic staircase I-V profiles were detected for a porphyrin with two cobaltacarborane substituents.

  7. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Hui, E-mail: xiehui@hit.edu.cn; Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng [The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2 Yikuang, 150080 Harbin (China); Sun, Lining [The State Key Laboratory of Robotics and Systems, Harbin Institute of Technology, 2 Yikuang, 150080 Harbin (China); Robotics and Microsystems Center, Soochow University, 215021 Suzhou (China)

    2014-12-15

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method.

  8. Effect of Virtual Photon Exchange on the Interaction of Light Field with N Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Mai-Lin; ZHAO Lin

    2003-01-01

    Under no rotating wave approximation and including the effect of dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms, exact squeezing properties for the output optical field and the atomic field are obtained. It is shown that an atom laser keeping squeezed all the time can be generated, though the input optical field is at the coherent state or vacuum state.

  9. The contribution of atom probe tomography to the understanding of nuclear material evolution under thermal or irradiation ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of materials are strongly linked to their structure at nanometer scale. In order to optimize material properties or to anticipate the evolution of these properties during ageing in given conditions, the first step is to characterize their microstructure at this very fine scale and to understand the mechanisms governing its long term evolution. This is particularly the case for nuclear materials which are submitted to severe conditions such as corrosive environment, mechanical stress, high temperature and neutron irradiation. In order to ensure nuclear plant long term operation (up to 60 years) with reliable and safe conditions and to develop materials for next generations of reactors, the mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during thermal or irradiation ageing have to be understood. Atom probe Tomography (APT) is one of the suitable tools to study these phenomena (phase transformations, segregations...). The Groupe de Physique des Matériaux (GPM) works on the ageing of nuclear materials since more than 20 years. A combination of characterization tools (APT, scanning and transmission electron microscopies - SEM and TEM) and modeling tools (Monte Carlo, Phase field ..) is generally used. The interest of APT, coupled with other experimental or theoretical tools, (i) to identify the microstructural features responsible of the degradation of the properties of nuclear materials in service conditions, (ii) to understand basic mechanisms at the formation and evolution of these features and (iii) to develop new materials will be shown through several examples (irradiation ageing of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and internal structures steels, ferritic-martensitic steels for future reactors...). One of the challenges for the investigation of irradiation effects in nuclear materials is to be able to characterize the nanostructure of radioactive samples. The project GENESIS, led by the GPM, aims to develop and experimental platform (APT, TEM

  10. Electroless silver plating for metallization of near-field optical fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang'an; Xu, Lina; Gu, Ning

    2007-10-01

    By using mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), electroless silver plating is developed for the metallization of near-field optical fiber probes. This method has the advantages of controllability, no pinholes, convenience, low cost, and smooth tip surface. The metallized probes are characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS).

  11. High-resolution apertureless near-field optical imaging using gold nanosphere probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Zee Hwan; Leone, Stephen R

    2006-10-12

    An apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (ANSOM) that utilizes the enhanced field around a gold nanosphere, which is attached to the end of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, is used to image the local dielectric constant of the patterned metallic surfaces and local electric field around plasmonic nanosphere samples. A colloidal gold nanosphere (approximately 50 nm diameter) is linked to the extremity of the conventional etched-silicon probe. The scattering of laser radiation (633 or 532 nm) is modulated by the oscillating nanosphere-functionalized silicon tip, and the scattered radiation is detected. The approach curve (scattering intensity as a function of the tip-sample distance), the polarization dependence (scattering intensity as a function of the excitation polarization direction), and ANSOM image contrast confirm that the spherical nanosphere attached to the silicon tip acts as a point dipole that interacts with the sample surface via a dipole-dipole coupling, in which the dipole created by the field at the tip interacts with its own image dipole in the sample. The image obtained with the nanoparticle functionalized tip provides a dielectric map of the sample surface with a spatial resolution better than 80 nm. In addition, we show that the functionalized tip is capable of imaging the local electric field distribution above the plasmonic nanosphere samples. Overall, the result shows that high-resolution ANSOM is possible without the aid of the lightning-rod effect. With an improved tip-fabrication method, we believe that the method can provide a versatile high-resolution chemical imaging that is not available from usual forms of ANSOM. PMID:17020365

  12. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-28

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  13. Development of an electric field application system with transparent electrodes towards the electron EDM measurement with laser-cooled Fr atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Kato, Ko; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. This work is supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  14. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe–Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marceau, R.K.W., E-mail: r.marceau@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia); Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Ceguerra, A.V.; Breen, A.J. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Ringer, S.P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe–18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D0{sub 3} ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity. - Highlights: • Short-range-order (SRO) is quantitatively evaluated using atom probe tomography data. • Chemical species-specific SRO parameters have been calculated. • The accuracy of this method is tested against simulated D0{sub 3} ordered data. • Imperfect spatial resolution combined with finite detector efficiency causes a randomising effect. • Lattice rectification of the data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated to improve information sensitivity.

  15. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe–Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe–18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D03 ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity. - Highlights: • Short-range-order (SRO) is quantitatively evaluated using atom probe tomography data. • Chemical species-specific SRO parameters have been calculated. • The accuracy of this method is tested against simulated D03 ordered data. • Imperfect spatial resolution combined with finite detector efficiency causes a randomising effect. • Lattice rectification of the data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated to improve information sensitivity

  16. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  17. Slowing and cooling molecules and neutral atoms by time-varying electric field gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Maddi, Jason A.; Dinneen, Timothy P.; Gould, Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A method of slowing, accelerating, cooling, and bunching molecules and neutral atoms using time-varying electric field gradients is demonstrated with cesium atoms in a fountain. The effects are measured and found to be in agreement with calculation. Time-varying electric field gradient slowing and cooling is applicable to atoms that have large dipole polarizabilities, including atoms that are not amenable to laser slowing and cooling, to Rydberg atoms, and to molecules, especially polar molec...

  18. Sharing my fifteen years experiences in the research field of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guha T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was developed by Binnig and his coworkers in the year 1986. He was awarded Nobel Prize in physics for this work in 1986 in sharing with Rohrer and Ruska. Rationale to develop AFM: Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM, the precursor to AFM is efficient in imaging electrically conducting specimen at atomic resolution. The impetus for development of AFM came to Binnig’s mind because of relatively poor efficiency of STM to image electrically non-conducting biological samples. He wondered why the surfaces be always imaged with a current but not with a force. He thought if small forces of interactions between a probe tip atoms and specimen surface atoms could be detected and amplified then imaging of biological specimen would be possible at a very high resolution. AFM working Principle: AFM is a Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM by which imaging is realized by interaction of a probe with sample surface without any beam (light, electron and lens system. The probe is attached to a soft and sensitive cantilever and either specimen is scanned by probe or specimen scans itself under a stationary probe. Probe’s spring constant must be small and the deflection must be measurable along with high resonance frequency. The most commonly associated force with AFM is called Vander Waals force. Three modes of working are contact mode, non contact mode and tapping mode. In contact zone, the probe tip attached with cantilever is held less than a few A˚ from the sample surface and the inter-atomic force between the atoms of probe tip and sample surface is repulsive. In non-contact zone, the probe tip is held at a distance of 100s of A˚ from the sample surface and the inter-atomic force here is long range Vander Waals interaction and is attractive in nature. AFM is also called Scanning Force Microscope because the force of interaction between probe tip atoms and surface atoms is amplified to generate a signal voltage which modulates video

  19. Relative Response of Electric Field Probes to Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation – Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation (RFR) is emitted by many apparatuses such as cellular GSM base stations, radars and avionics systems. According to major safety standards, such as ICNIRP 1998, assessment of human exposure to pulsed RFR requires the evaluation of both peak and average electric field amplitudes. Since there is no practical way of measuring the peak field, one can rely on average field measurements, and calculate the peak field by dividing the average field by the RFR duty cycle. RFR safety measurements are usually performed with wideband electric field meters. Two major kinds of electric field probes (EFP) are commercially available for these meters, based on two different physical principles. Thermocouple based devices are designated to measure the field true RMS, regardless of the pulse shape. However, thermocouple probes have many disadvantages (i.e. high susceptibility to ambient temperature, vulnerability to high fields, limited sensitivity and narrow dynamic range); therefore they are not commonly used. As opposed to thermocouples, diode probes are much less vulnerable to these disadvantages. Thus, these probes are used for most commercial electric field meters and safety measurements. Consequently, diode probes which are known to be not suitable for pulsed RFR measurements are practically used in most cases. Hence, we find it essential to assess the response of commercial EFP to pulsed RFR. In a series of experiments, we exposed EFPs to pulsed RFR and examined their response under different pulse parameters

  20. Theory and practice of the FFT/matrix inversion technique for probe-corrected spherical near-field antenna measurements with high-order probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund;

    2010-01-01

    A complete antenna pattern characterization procedure for spherical near-field antenna measurements employing a high-order probe and a full probe correction is described. The procedure allows an (almost) arbitrary antenna to be used as a probe. Different measurement steps of the procedure and the...... associated data processing are described in detail, and comparison to the existing procedure employing a first-order probe is made. The procedure is validated through measurements....

  1. Atom probe tomography evidence for uniform incorporation of Bi across the growth front in GaAs1-xBix/GaAs superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weixin; Ronsheim, Paul A.; Wood, Adam W.; Forghani, Kamran; Guan, Yingxin; Kuech, Thomas F.; Babcock, Susan E.

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of Bi atoms in a GaAs1-xBix/GaAs superlattice grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was studied using atom probe tomography (APT). The Bi distribution in the growth direction deduced from APT agreed quantitatively with the complex Bi concentration profile that was discovered using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy in a previous study. More importantly, APT revealed the Bi atom distribution in the growth planes at near atomic resolution. Bi nearest neighbor distribution and concentration frequency distribution analysis of the APT data indicated a statistically random distribution of Bi atoms in 1-2 nm thick layers oriented perpendicular to the growth direction. These results provide evidence that Bi is incorporated homogeneously across the growth front even when the concentration profile in the growth direction is complex. They also suggest that MOVPE growth conditions can promote uniform Bi distribution within GaAs1-xBix layers, opening a path for application of these materials in the optoelectronic devices for which they show much promise.

  2. The Level-split of the Two-level Entangled Atom in an Optical Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhuoliang; HUANG Ting; GUO Guangcan; YI Youming

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a two-level entangled atom in an optical field with circular polarization is studied in this paper. The interaction of an optical field and one of the entangled atoms is analyzed in detail. A general solution of the SchrAo¨Gdinger equation about the motion of the entangled atom is obtained. The properties of the action are dependent on the initial state of the atom. By detecting the entangled atom out of the field, we can obtain the state of the other atom moving in the field. It is shown that the state of the atom out of the field will influence the energies of the split-levels of the atom in the field.

  3. Development of three dimensional magnetic field probe with signal conditioning electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional magnetic field probes have been constructed and calibrated to measure self-generated magnetic field in laser produced plasma. The magnetic probe was made on the 3.2 mm Teflon cube where twisted copper wire of Gauge 40 wounded on it. Each axis having two loops with 5 turns which are connected in opposite direction to reduce the stray noise. Coil area, number of turns, self-inductance and shielding are carefully optimized to achieve the accurate measurement of magnetic field with reduced noise level. A separate differential amplifier with variable gain is designed and developed for the amplification of the each axis signal. The calibration of the probe is carried out with the known field of Helmholtz coil. Details of technical aspect, optimization, and performance tests of the developed probe are briefly described. (author)

  4. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, D. A., E-mail: david.walsh@stfc.ac.uk; Snedden, E. W. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jamison, S. P. [Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, STFC Daresbury National Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-04

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  5. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort THz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, David A; Jamison, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse, and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators.

  6. The time resolved measurement of ultrashort terahertz-band electric fields without an ultrashort probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-resolved detection of ultrashort pulsed THz-band electric field temporal profiles without an ultrashort laser probe is demonstrated. A non-linear interaction between a narrow-bandwidth optical probe and the THz pulse transposes the THz spectral intensity and phase information to the optical region, thereby generating an optical pulse whose temporal electric field envelope replicates the temporal profile of the real THz electric field. This optical envelope is characterised via an autocorrelation based FROG (frequency resolved optical gating) measurement, hence revealing the THz temporal profile. The combination of a narrow-bandwidth, long duration, optical probe, and self-referenced FROG makes the technique inherently immune to timing jitter between the optical probe and THz pulse and may find particular application where the THz field is not initially generated via ultrashort laser methods, such as the measurement of longitudinal electron bunch profiles in particle accelerators

  7. Entropy evolution properties in a system of two entangled atoms interacting with light field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Tang-Kun; Wang Ji-Suo; Feng Jian; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    In the paper, we use the field entropy as a measurement of the degree of entanglement between the light field and the atoms of the system which is composed of two dipole-dipole interacting two-level atoms initially in an entangled state interacting with the single mode coherent field in a Kerr medium. The influence of the coupling constant of dipole-dipole interaction between atoms and the coupling strength of the kerr medium with the light field and the intensity of the atoms with the light field becomes weaker. The degree of entanglement only changes slightly with the change of the coupling constant of dipole-dipole interaction between atoms.

  8. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all

  9. Photoassociation of Atomic BEC within Mean-Field Approximation:Exact Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Wei; JING Hui; ZHAN Ming-Sheng; XU Jing-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We propose an exactly solvable method to study the coherent two-colour photoassociation of an atomic BoseEinstein condensate,by linearizing the bilinear atom-molecule coupling,which allows su to conveniently probe the quantum dynamics and statistics of the system.By preparing different initial states of the atomic condensate,we can observe very different quantum statistical properties of the system by exactly calculating the quadraturesqueezed and mode-correlated functions.

  10. Comparison of TALIF and catalytic probes for the determination of nitrogen atom density in a nitrogen plasma afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density of neutral nitrogen atoms in a glass reactor was measured by two absolute methods: two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) and catalytic probes. The source of N atoms was nitrogen plasma created in a quartz tube by surfatron microwave generator operating at 2.45 GHz and adjustable output power up to 300 W. The TALIF measurements were performed using a dye laser which was pumped by a YAG laser. At the exit of the dye laser, the beam frequency was doubled through a KDP crystal and then mixed in a BBO crystal. The wavelength of the output laser beam was chosen at 206.65 nm so two-photon absorption was suitable to excite nitrogen atoms from the ground state to the 5d 2D state. Absolute N density was determined by using calibration with krypton. Simultaneously, the N atom density was measured with a fiber optics catalytic probe (FOCP) with a well-activated iron catalytic tip. Measurements were performed by both methods at nitrogen flows between 0.2 and 2 l min-1, and discharge powers between 60 and 300 W. At rather high nitrogen flows, the N atom density increased monotonically with increasing discharge power, while at lower flow saturation was observed. TALIF showed somewhat higher values than FOCP which was attributed to the accuracy of both methods. The main advantage of TALIF is a broader detection range, while FOCP is an extremely simple and inexpensive technique.

  11. Probing Atomic Structure and Majorana Wavefunctions in Mono-Atomic Fe-chains on Superconducting Pb-Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlak, Remy; Klinovaja, Jelena; Meier, Tobias; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Loss, Daniel; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the striking promise of quantum computation, Majorana bound states (MBSs) in solid-state systems have attracted wide attention in recent years. In particular, the wavefunction localization of MBSs is a key feature and crucial for their future implementation as qubits. Here, we investigate the spatial and electronic characteristics of topological superconducting chains of iron atoms on the surface of Pb(110) by combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that the Fe chains are mono-atomic, structured in a linear fashion, and exhibit zero-bias conductance peaks at their ends which we interprete as signature for a Majorana bound state. Spatially resolved conductance maps of the atomic chains reveal that the MBSs are well localized at the chain ends (below 25 nm), with two localization lengths as predicted by theory. Our observation lends strong support to use MBSs in Fe chains as qubits for quantum computing devices.

  12. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer H.;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects of fi...

  13. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-14

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces. PMID:27030282

  14. Investigation of material property influenced stoichiometric deviations as evidenced during UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography in fluorite oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, 100 Rhines Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Yablinsky, Clarissa A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 921 ERB, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gan, Jian [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 921 ERB, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Manuel, Michele V., E-mail: mmanuel@mse.ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, 100 Rhines Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) and uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  15. Investigation of material property influenced stoichiometric deviations as evidenced during UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography in fluorite oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors

  16. Effects of a uniform acceleration on atom-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Jamir; Passante, Roberto; Rizzuto, Lucia; Spagnolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We review some quantum electrodynamical effects related to the uniform acceleration of atoms in vacuum. After discussing the energy level shifts of a uniformly accelerated atom in vacuum, we investigate the atom-wall Casimir-Polder force for accelerated atoms, and the van der Waals/Casimir-Polder interaction between two accelerated atoms. The possibility of detecting the Unruh effect through these phenomena is also discussed in detail.

  17. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  18. Atom probe characterization of nano-scaled features in irradiated Eurofer and ODS Eurofer steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outstanding performance of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels at high temperatures and up to high doses allowed to consider them as potential candidates for fusion and fission power plants. At the same time their mechanical parameters strongly correlate with number density of oxide particles and their size. It is believed that fine particles are formed at the last stage of sophisticated production procedures and play a crucial role in higher heat- and radiation resistance in comparison with conventional materials. However, due to their small size - only few nanometers, characterization of such objects requires considerable efforts. Recent study of ODS steel by tomographic atom probe, the most appropriate technique in this case, shown considerable stability of these particles under high temperatures and ion-irradiation. However, these results were obtained for 12/14% Cr with addition of 0.3% Y2O3 and titanium which is inappropriate in case of ODS Eurofer 97 and possibility to substitute neutron by ion irradiation is still under consideration. In this work effect of neutron irradiation on nanostructure behaviour of ODS Eurofer are investigated. Irradiation was performed on research reactor BOR-60 in SSC RF RIAR (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) up to 30 dpa at 280 deg. C and 580 deg. C. Recent investigation of unirradiated state revealed high number density of nano-scaled features (nano-clusters) even without addition of Ti in steel. It was shown that vanadium played significant role in nucleation process and core of nano-clusters was considerably enriched with it. In irradiated samples solution of vanadium in matrix was observed while the size of particles stayed practically unchanged. Also no nitrogen was detected in these particles in comparison with unirradiated state where bond energy of N with V was considered to be high as VN2+ ions were detected on mass-spectra. (author)

  19. Atom probe tomography investigation of lath boundary segregation and precipitation in a maraging stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lath boundaries in a maraging stainless steel of composition 13Cr–8Ni–2Mo–2Cu–1Ti–0.7Al–0.3Mn–0.2Si–0.03C (at%) have been investigated using atom probe tomography following aging at 475 °C for up to 100 h. Segregation of Mo, Si and P to the lath boundaries was observed already after 5 min of aging, and the amount of segregation increases with aging time. At lath boundaries also precipitation of η-Ni3(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R, in contact with each other, takes place. These co-precipitates grow with time and because of coarsening the area number density decreases. After 100 h of aging a ∼5 nm thick film-like precipitation of a Mo-rich phase was observed at the lath boundaries. From the composition of the film it is suggested that the phase in question is the quasicrystalline R′ phase. The film is perforated with Cu-rich 9R and η-Ni3(Ti, Al) co-precipitates. Not all precipitate types present in the matrix do precipitate at the lath boundaries; the Si-containing G phase and γ′-Ni3(Ti, Al, Si) and the Cr-rich α′ phase were not observed at the lath boundaries. - Highlights: ► Lath boundaries in a maraging steel were analyzed by APT. ► Segregation of Mo, Si and P was measured. ► Precipitation of η-Ni3(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R was observed. ► After 100 h of aging a quasicrystalline Mo-rich film was observed

  20. Thermal stability of TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings studied by atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is about the microstructural evolution of TiAlN/CrN multilayers (with a Ti:Al ratio of 0.75:0.25 and average bilayer period of 9 nm) upon thermal treatment. Pulsed laser atom probe analyses were performed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The layers are found to be thermally stable up to 600 oC. At 700 oC TiAlN layers begin to decompose into Ti- and Al-rich nitride layers in the out-of-plane direction. Further increase in temperature to 1000 oC leads to a strong decomposition of the multilayer structure as well as grain coarsening. Layer dissolution and grain coarsening appear to begin at the surface. Domains of AlN and TiCrN larger than 100 nm are found, together with smaller nano-sized AlN precipitates within the TiCrN matrix. Fe and V impurities are detected in the multilayers as well, which diffuse from the steel substrate into the coating along columnar grain boundaries. -- Research Highlights: → TiAlN/CrN multilayer coating is stable in vacuum at temperatures up to 600 oC. → TiAlN layers start to decompose at 700 oC in Al- and Ti-rich layers (not spinodally). → Decomposition of TiAlN/CrN is not uniform and more severe in the surface region. → Fe and V intensively diffuse from the substrate into TiAlN/CrN coating at 1000 oC.

  1. A New Pseudospectral Method for Calculations of Hydrogen Atom in Arbitrary External Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hao-Xue; LI Bai-Wen1

    2002-01-01

    A new pseudospectral method was introduced to calculate wavefunctions and energy levels of hydrogen atom in arbitrary potential. Some results of hydrogen atom in uniform magnetic fields were presented, high accuracy of results was obtained with simple calculations, and our calculations show very fast convergence. It suggests a new methodfor calculations of hydrogen atom in external fields.

  2. THE EXACT SOLUTION OF A TWO-LEVEL ATOM MOVING IN A QUANTIZED TRAVELLING LIGHT FIELD AND A GRAVITATIONAL FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹旭波; 许晶波; 高孝纯; 符建

    2001-01-01

    We adopt a dynamical algebraic approach to study the system of a two-level atom moving in a quantized travelling light field and a gravitational field with a multiphoton interaction. The exact solution of the system is obtained and used to discuss the influence of the gravitational field on the collapses and revivals of atomic population, sub-Poissonian statistics.

  3. Preparation of Multicomponent Schr(o)dinger Cat States Through Resonant Atom-Field Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A simple method is presented for generating multicomponent Schrodinger cat states through resonant atom-field interactions. In the scheme n two-level atoms, initially in ground states, are sent through a resonant cavity filled with a strong coherent field sequentially. Then state-selective measurements are performed on the atoms. The detections of the atoms in ground states collapse the cavity field onto a superposition of 2n coherent states. This is the first way for producing superpositions of many coherent states through resonant atom-field interaction.

  4. Inversion symmetry breaking of atomic bound states in strong and short laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Stooß, Veit; Ott, Christian; Blättermann, Alexander; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In any atomic species, the spherically symmetric potential originating from the charged nucleus results in fundamental symmetry properties governing the structure of atomic states and transition rules between them. If atoms are exposed to external electric fields, these properties are modified giving rise to energy shifts such as the AC Stark-effect in varying fields and, contrary to this in a constant (DC) electric field for high enough field strengths, the breaking of the atomic symmetry which causes fundamental changes in the atom's properties. This has already been observed for atomic Rydberg states with high principal quantum numbers. Here, we report on the observation of symmetry breaking effects in Helium atoms for states with principal quantum number n=2 utilizing strong visible laser fields. These findings were enabled by temporally resolving the dynamics better than the sub-optical cycle of the applied laser field, utilizing the method of attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS). We ident...

  5. A Guided Mode View on Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy Measurements of Optical Magnetic Fields with Slit Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffer, Remco; Hammer, Manfred; Ivanova, O. V.; Hoekstra, Hugo J.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) experiments with slit metal coated probes claim to measure the out-of-plane optical magnetic field around a dielectric sample waveguide [1]. The observations can also be explained by mode overlap calculations.

  6. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  7. Estimating field-scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Amber M.; Helgason, Warren D.; Ireson, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological, and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to field scale, integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field-scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth-scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a 2-year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 500 m × 500 m study area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field-scale surface soil moisture, but measurements represented less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (a) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time-stable neutron probe monitoring location, (b) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (c) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.005 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.014 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. Based upon its observed performance and its minimal data requirements, it is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  8. Quantum entanglement between the two-mode fields and atomic entropy squeezing in the system of a moving atom interacting with two-mode entangled coherent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Yan; Li Yong-Ping

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the entropy squeezing of a moving two-level atom interacting with the two-mode entangled coherent field via two-photon transition by using an entropic uncertainty relation and the degree of entanglement between the two-mode fields by using quantum relative entropy. The results obtained from numerical calculation indicate that the squeezed period, the duration of entropy squeezing and the maximal squeezing can be controlled by appropriately choosing the intensity of the light field, the atomic motion and the field-mode structure. The atomic motion leads to the periodic recovery of the initial maximal degree of entanglement between the two-mode fields. Moreover, there exists a corresponding relation between the time evolution properties of the atomic entropy squeezing and those of the entanglement between the two-mode fields.

  9. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed

  10. Atom probe tomographic study of elemental segregation at grain boundaries for a peak-aged Al–Zn–Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Atom probe tomography is used to characterize the solute segregation at GBs. •Mg segregates at GBs within 3 nm for a peak-aged Al–Zn–Mg alloy. •Zn does not segregate at GBs. •MgZn2 precipitates are not the H trapping sites, but Mg2Si precipitates are. •Clusters containing Zn, H and oxides have been found at GBs. -- Abstract: Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the element segregation at the grain boundary (GB) for a peak-aged Al–Zn–Mg alloy with high stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility. The results show that Mg segregates along the GB with a peak concentration of 1.38 at.% and width of 3 nm. Zn does not segregate at GB. However, segregation of Zn and H atoms at oxide-containing clusters on GB has been observed. APT atom maps also reveal that Mg2Si is the H trapping site, but MgZn2 is not

  11. Identification of Radiation-Induced Segregation in Ion-irradiated Stainless Steel 316 using Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Chang, Kunok; Kwon, Junhyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Various kinds of defects are produced by the irradiation of energetic particles onto a structural material. The defect fluxes such as mobile vacancies and self-interstitial atoms cause the diffusion of the solute atoms in the matrix. The preferential interaction of the solute with defects induces the enrichment or depletion of the solutes at the defect sinks such as the grain boundaries, and surfaces. These phenomena are generally known as radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are generally used as basic analysis techniques to obtain a concentration profile of RIS arising from irradiation. However, the resolution of EDS is limited due to beam broadening, and the overlapping of the probed volume with the matrix prohibits a quantitative analysis of the concentration changes. In the current work, we introduced atom probe tomography (APT) to analyze RIS in SS 316. Various types of radiation-induced defects were identified and the compositional characteristics were quantitatively provided from a wide view point. The measured concentrations were compared with values in the literature. This work can provide a fundamental understanding of the RIS behavior in ion-irradiated SS 316. In this study, an APT analysis of RIS in ion-irradiated SS316 was performed. Various types of irradiation defects were observed. Si atoms are located at the core structures of dislocation loops and clusters.

  12. Probing the properties of quantum matter; an experimental study in three parts using ultracold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bons, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    The three experiments described in this thesis investigate fundamental properties of ultracold atoms. Using laser cooling and evaporative cooling, a dilute gas of sodium atoms is cooled to ~100 nK. Under these circumstances a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) forms, where millions of atoms collapse into the lowest energy state of the system and share a macroscopic wavefunction. The experiments are done in an ultrahigh vacuum and the atoms are manipulated remotely using laser beams, magnetic fiel...

  13. Tunnelling of Two-Level Atoms in Two-Photon Mazer:Atomic Coherence Effect and Statistics of Cavity Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小灵; 杜四德; 周鲁卫; 汪启胜; 陈灏

    2004-01-01

    Tunnelling of a two-level atom is investigated in the two-photon mazer when the atom is initially prepared in a coherent superposition state and the cavity in various quantum states. For a strong coherent field, the tunnelling exhibits more regular oscillations but less remarkable switch effect than that in the one-photon mazer. It is discovered that in the presence of atomic coherence, the transmission probabilities in the ultracold regime are significantly different when the cavity field is initially in coherent, squeezed vacuum, even cat and odd cat states,respectively.

  14. Noncontact atomic force and Kelvin probe force microscopy on MgO(100) and MgO(100)-supported Ba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chi Lun; Sasahara, Akira; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Atomically-flat MgO(100) surfaces were prepared by sputtering and annealing. Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) were used to characterize the MgO(100) surfaces. The NC-AFM images revealed the presence of point defects on an atomically-resolved surface. The surface potential at these point defects, as well as features such as step edges and deposited Ba nanoparticles were mapped using KPFM. The Kelvin images show that the surface potential increases at the point defects and at the step edges. On the other hand, a decrease in the potential was found over Ba nanoparticles which can be explained by electron charge transfer from the Ba to the MgO.

  15. A New Method for Analyzing Near-Field Faraday Probe Data in Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for analyzing near-field Faraday probe data obtained from Hall thrusters. Traditional methods spawned from far-field Faraday probe analysis rely on assumptions that are not applicable to near-field Faraday probe data. In particular, arbitrary choices for the point of origin and limits of integration have made interpretation of the results difficult. The new method, called iterative pathfinding, uses the evolution of the near-field plume with distance to provide feedback for determining the location of the point of origin. Although still susceptible to the choice of integration limits, this method presents a systematic approach to determining the origin point for calculating the divergence angle. The iterative pathfinding method is applied to near-field Faraday probe data taken in a previous study from the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall thrusters. Since these two thrusters use centrally mounted cathodes the current density associated with the cathode plume is removed before applying iterative pathfinding. A procedure is presented for removing the cathode plume. The results of the analysis are compared to far-field probe analysis results. This paper ends with checks on the validity of the new method and discussions on the implications of the results.

  16. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Camera, Stefano; Moscardini, Lauro

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual g...

  17. Entanglement Swapping and Disentanglement via an Entangled State of Atoms Interacting with a Cavity Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘堂昆; 王继锁; 冯健; 詹明生

    2002-01-01

    We consider entanglement swapping and disentanglement schemes via an entangled state of three two-level atoms interacting with a coherent field. When a two-level atom C, entangled with two other two-level atoms A and B,is injected into a high-Q cavity and atoms A and B are far away from the cavity, the entanglement swapping or disentanglement can be realized by carrying out the measurement on the atom C and by selecting an appropriate interaction time of atom C with the coherent field.

  18. Charge states of high Z atoms in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a numerical solution of the Thomas-Fermi atom in the presence of a static electric field as a model of the adiabatic response of a heavy atom in the presence of a strong laser field. In this semiclassical approach, we calculate the resulting charge state of the atom and its induced dipole moment after the field is turned on. Due to the scaling properties of the Thomas-Fermi approach, the resulting total atomic charge and dipole moment can be expressed as a universal function of the field. We compare our results with recent ionization experiments performed on noble gases using laser fields. 7 refs., 5 figs

  19. Experimental Investigation Of Segregation Of Carbon Atoms Due To Sub-Zero Cryogenic Treatment In Cold Work Tool Steel By Mechanical Spectroscopy And Atom Probe Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present mechanical spectroscopy of cold work tool steel subjected to sub-zero cryogenic soaking treatment to reveal the carbon segregation and the subsequent carbides refinement. The maximum of Snoek-Köster (SK peak height was obtained in the sample subjected to soaking 1h at −130°C cryogenic treatment. The SK peak height is reduced with prolonging the soaking time. The results indicate that an increase in the height of SK peak is connected with an increase in dislocation density and the number of segregated carbon atoms in the vicinity of dislocations or twin planes after martensite transformation at −130°C which is confirmed by corresponding TEM and atom probe tomography measurement. Hence, it is suggested that the isothermal martensite, formed during the cryogenic soaking treatment decreases (APT the height of SK peak.

  20. Probing the nanoadhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to titanium implant surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguayo S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Aguayo,1 Nikolaos Donos,2 Dave Spratt,3 Laurent Bozec11Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, 2Periodontology Unit, 3Division of Microbial Diseases, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, London, UKAbstract: As titanium (Ti continues to be utilized in great extent for the fabrication of artificial implants, it is important to understand the crucial bacterium–Ti interaction occurring during the initial phases of biofilm formation. By employing a single-cell force spectroscopy technique, the nanoadhesive interactions between the early-colonizing Streptococcus sanguinis and a clinically analogous smooth Ti substrate were explored. Mean adhesion forces between S. sanguinis and Ti were found to be 0.32±0.00, 1.07±0.06, and 4.85±0.56 nN for 0, 1, and 60 seconds contact times, respectively; while adhesion work values were reported at 19.28±2.38, 104.60±7.02, and 1,317.26±197.69 aJ for 0, 1, and 60 seconds, respectively. At 60 seconds surface delays, minor-rupture events were modeled with the worm-like chain model yielding an average contour length of 668±12 nm. The mean force for S. sanguinis minor-detachment events was 1.84±0.64 nN, and Poisson analysis decoupled this value into a short-range force component of -1.60±0.34 nN and a long-range force component of -0.55±0.47 nN. Furthermore, a solution of 2 mg/mL chlorhexidine was found to increase adhesion between the bacterial probe and substrate. Overall, single-cell force spectroscopy of living S. sanguinis cells proved to be a reliable way to characterize early-bacterial adhesion onto machined Ti implant surfaces at the nanoscale.Keywords: atomic force microscopy, biophysics, bacterial adhesion, dental implants, titanium

  1. Seeing the corona with the solar probe plus mission: the wide-field imager for solar probe+ (WISPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Carter, Michael T.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Chua, Damien H.; Van Duyne, Peter; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre L. P. M.; Bothmer, Volker; Rodman, Jens; Lamy, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018, will orbit between the Sun and Venus with diminishing perihelia reaching as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. In addition to a suite of in-situ probes for the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particles, SPP will be equipped with an imager. The Wide-field Imager for the Solar PRobe+ (WISPR), with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will image the fine-scale coronal structure of the corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. Given the tight mass constrains of the mission, WISPR incorporates an efficient design of two widefield telescopes and their associated focal plane arrays based on novel large-format (2kx2k) APS CMOS detectors into the smallest heliospheric imaging package to date. The flexible control electronics allow WISPR to collect individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or sum several of them to increase the signal-to-noise during the outbound part of the orbit. The use of two telescopes minimizes the risk of dust damage which may be considerable close to the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  2. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  3. Field emission to control tip-sample distance in magnetic probe recording

    OpenAIRE

    Fèbre, Le, AJ; Lüttge, R Regina; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, JC

    2007-01-01

    An integrated method using field-emission to control the tip-sample distance for non-contact magnetic probe recording is presented, adopting the exponential relation between current and electric field as feedback. I/V characteristics that correspond well to field emission theory are measured using a probe coated with a 100 nm conductive diamond layer. By using feedback to control the tip-sample distance at constant current, the distance was increased by 2.8 nm per volt applied bias. The metho...

  4. Contrast analysis of near-field scanning microscopy using a metal slit probe at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozokido, Tatsuo; Ishino, Manabu; Seto, Ryosuke; Bae, Jongsuck

    2015-09-01

    We describe an analytical method for investigating the signal contrast obtained in near-field scanning microscopy using a metal slit probe. The probe has a slit-like aperture at the open end of a rectangular or a parallel plate waveguide. In our method, the electromagnetic field around the metal slit aperture at the probe tip is calculated from Maxwell's equations in the Fourier domain in order to derive the electrical admittance of a sample system consisting of layered dielectrics as seen from the probe tip. A simple two-port electrical circuit terminated by this admittance is then established to calculate the complex reflection coefficient of the probe as a signal. The validity of the method is verified at millimeter wavelengths by a full-wave high frequency 3-D finite element modeler and also by experiment. The signal contrast when varying the short dimension of the slit aperture, the separation between the probe tip and the sample, and the sample thickness are successfully explained in terms of the variation in the product of the admittance and the characteristic impedance of the waveguide at the probe tip. In particular, the cause of the local minimum in the signal intensity when varying the separation is clarified.

  5. Probe-Corrected Phaseless Planar Near-FieldAntenna Measurements at 60 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Alvarez, Javier; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2015-01-01

    A phase retrieval method based on an iterativeFourier technique is tested together with the application of probecorrection of the retrieved results; to the best of our knowledgethis the first experimental demonstration of probe correction inphaseless near-field antenna measurements. The obtained...... resultsindicate good agreement with a measured reference patternwithin the region of validity when the probe correction isapplied after performing the phase retrieval from a pair ofuncorrected probe signals. Additional improvements are obtainedby introducing spatial filtering at the aperture of the antennaunder...

  6. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices. PMID:25631924

  7. Probing Intergalactic Magnetic Fields with Simulations of Electromagnetic Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Sigl, Guenter; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-01-01

    We determine the effect of intergalactic magnetic fields on the distribution of high energy gamma rays by performing three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the development of gamma-ray-induced electromagnetic cascades in the magnetized intergalactic medium. We employ the so-called 'Large Sphere Observer' method to efficiently simulate blazar gamma ray halos. We study magnetic fields with a Batchelor spectrum and with maximal left- and right-handed helicities. We also consider the case of sources whose jets are tilted with respect to the line of sight. We verify the formation of extended gamma ray halos around the source direction, and observe spiral-like patterns if the magnetic field is helical. We apply the $Q$-statistics to the simulated halos to extract their spiral nature and also propose an alternative method, the $S$-statistics. Both methods provide a quantative way to infer the helicity of the intervening magnetic fields from the morphology of individual blazar halos for magnetic field strengths...

  8. Probing dairy gel microstructure with a non-invasive technique: Pulsed field gradient NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Mariette, F.; Le Feuteun, S.

    2010-01-01

    By studying the diffusion of probe molecules of various sizes, information can be obtained on the microstructure of a sample at different length scales. The diffusion of poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) measured by pulsed field gradient (PFG)-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance is probably the most widely used method to perform these investigations. PFG-NMR is a very powerful and nondestructive technique to determine self-diffusion coefficients, and PEG molecules selected as probes offer several advantag...

  9. Electrostatic collector’s field investigations with the help of electronic probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. V. Derenovsky

    1966-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the possibility of practical use of probe beam method is considered. I t ’s shown how to find out space charge field distribution in microwave tubes collectors using results of probe beam measurements of investigated space of the collectors cross-sections. Such investigations are necessary in special collector system design for microwave tubes of high efficiency.

  10. Investigation of Vehicles as Probes Using Global Positioning System and Cellular Phone Tracking: Field Operational Test

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Y. B. Youngbin; Cayford, Randall

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the first phase of the location technology evaluation for probe vehicles. Two technologies were evaluated, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and the cellular phone tracking technology developed by US Wireless. Although GPS has shown great potential for vehicle probes, much of the previous research is theoretical in nature. Very little work has been done in the areas of experimental research, implementation or deployment. Most of the field tests were anecdotal; a systemati...

  11. Inhomogeneous distribution of manganese atoms in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films on InP revealed by three-dimensional atom probe investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchitomi, Naotaka, E-mail: uchitomi@nagaokaut.ac.jp; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kato, Takahiro; Toyota, Hideyuki [Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Atomic-scale Mn distributions in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films grown on InP substrates have been studied by applying three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscopy. It is found that Mn atoms in cross-sectional 3DAP maps show the presence of inhomogeneities in Mn distribution, which is characteristic patterns of a spinoidal decomposition phase with slightly high and low concentration regions. The high Mn concentration regions are expected to be coherently clustered MnAs in the zinc-blende structure, resulting in the formation of Mn-As random connecting patterns. The origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn on InP can be well explained by the formation of atomic-scale magnetic clustering by spinoidal decomposition without breaking the continuity of the zinc-blende structure, which has been suggested by previous theoretical works. The lattice-matching between magnetic epi-layers and substrates should be one of the most important factors to avoid the formation of secondary hexagonal MnAs phase precipitates in preparing ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films.

  12. Clustering Effects Under Irradiation in Fe-0.1%Cu Alloy : An Atomic Scale Investigation with the Tomographic Atom Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Pareige, P.; Welzel, S; Auger, P.

    1996-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of displacement cascades on the evolution of the microstructure of ferritic low copper supersaturated materials, analyses by 3D atomic tomography of neutron, electron and self ion irradiated Fe-0.1%Cu, were performed. This alloy was chosen because of its low copper concentration, close to that of french pressure vessel steels. The comparison of the microstructure evolutions in these irradiated specimens reveals the appearance of tiny copper "clusters" or "agg...

  13. On the applicability range of the iterative probe correction technique in spherical near-field antenna measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Tommi; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    An iterative probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements is examined. This technique has previously been shown to be ideally-suited for non-ideal first-order probes. In this paper its performance for other probes is examined.......An iterative probe correction technique for spherical near-field antenna measurements is examined. This technique has previously been shown to be ideally-suited for non-ideal first-order probes. In this paper its performance for other probes is examined....

  14. Collapse-revival dynamics and atom-field entanglement in the non-resonant Dicke model

    CERN Document Server

    Alvermann, A; Fehske, H; 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.043803

    2012-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of atomic and field coherent states in the non-resonant Dicke model. At weak coupling an initial product state evolves into a superposition of multiple field coherent states that are correlated with the atomic configuration. This process is accompanied by the buildup and decay of atom-field entanglement and leads to the periodic collapse and revival of Rabi oscillations. We provide a perturbative derivation of the underlying dynamical mechanism that complements the rotating wave approximation at resonance. The identification of two different time scales explains how the dynamical signatures depend on the sign of detuning between the atomic and field frequency, and predicts the generation of either atomic or field cat states in the two opposite cases. We finally discuss the restrictions that the buildup of atom-field entanglement during the collapse of Rabi oscillations imposes on the validity of semi-classical approximations that neglect entanglement.

  15. Development of thin hall probes for field measurement of SACLA in-vacuum undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In SACLA, the minimum gap of the undulator is planned to be narrowed from 3.5 mm to 2.5 mm in order to upgrade the laser performance. It is expected that the laser pulse energy is enhanced and the wavelength tunability is expanded without changing the electron beam energy. In order to close the gap less than 2.5 mm in the near future for further upgrade, it is required to miniaturize the hall probe. For this reason, a one-dimensional thin hall probe with the thickness of 0.5 mm was developed. Using this probe, the magnetic field of the in-vacuum undulator for SACLA was measured at the gap below 4.0 mm. The standard deviation of the phase error estimated with the measured field distribution at the gap of 4.0 mm was found to be 5.4 degrees which is close to 5.7 degrees estimated with the standard hall probe currently used for the undulator field measurement at SPring-8. Although this result shows that the developed hall probe reproduces the measurement with the existing probe, we have found that the reproducibility was not perfect at the gap of 3.5 mm. The reason for this discrepancy may possibly be attributable to that the hall-voltage offset was not adequately compensated. (author)

  16. Innovation and optimization of a method of pump-probe polarimetry with pulsed laser beams in view of a precise measurement of parity violation in atomic cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While Parity Violation (PV) experiments on highly forbidden transitions have been using detection of fluorescence signals; our experiment uses a pump-probe scheme to detect the PV signal directly on a transmitted probe beam. A pulsed laser beam of linear polarisation ε1 excites the atoms on the 6S-7S cesium transition in a colinear electric field E || k(ex). The probe beam (k(pr) || k(ex)) of linear polarisation ε2 tuned to the transition 7S-6P(3/2) is amplified. The small asymmetry (∼ 10-6) in the gain that depends on the handedness of the tri-hedron (E, ε1, ε2) is the manifestation of the PV effect. This is measured as an E-odd apparent rotation of the plane of polarization of the probe beam; using balanced mode polarimetry. New criteria of selection have been devised, that allow us to distinguish the true PV-signal against fake rotations due to electromagnetic interferences, geometrical effects, polarization imperfections, or stray transverse electric and magnetic fields. These selection criteria exploit the symmetry of the PV-rotation - linear dichroism - and the revolution symmetry of the experiment. Using these criteria it is not only possible to reject fake signals, but also to elucidate the underlying physical mechanisms and to measure the relevant defects of the apparatus. The present signal-to-noise ratio allows embarking in PV measurements to reach the 10% statistical accuracy. A 1% measurement still requires improvements. Two methods have been demonstrated. The first one exploits the amplification of the asymmetry at high gain - one major advantage provided by our detection method based on stimulated emission. The second method uses both a much higher incident intensity and a special dichroic component which magnifies tiny polarization rotations. (author)

  17. The spherical probe electric field and wave experiment. [Cluster mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, G.; Aggson, T.; Bostrom, R.; Block, L. P.; Cattell, C.; Decreau, P. M. E.; Egeland, A.; Falthammar, C.-G.; Grard, R. J. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure the electric field and density fluctuations with sampling rates up to 40,000 samples/sec. The description includes Langmuir sweeps that can be made to determine the electron density and temperature, the study of nonlinear processes that result in acceleration of plasma, and the analysis of large scale phenomena where all four spacecraft are needed.

  18. Fictitious magnetic field gradients in optical microtraps as an experimental tool for interrogating and manipulating cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Bernhard; Clausen, Christoph; Dareau, Alexandre; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Optical microtraps provide a strong spatial confinement for laser-cooled atoms. They can, e.g., be realized with strongly focused trapping light beams or the optical near fields of nano-scale waveguides and photonic nanostructures. Atoms in such traps often experience strongly spatially varying AC Stark shifts which are proportional to the magnetic quantum number of the respective energy level. These inhomogeneous fictitious magnetic fields can cause a displacement of the trapping potential that depends on the Zeeman state. Hitherto, this effect was mainly perceived as detrimental. However, it also provides a means to probe and to manipulate the motional state of the atoms in the trap by driving transitions between Zeeman states. Furthermore, by applying additional real or fictitious magnetic fields, the state-dependence of the trapping potential can be controlled. Here, using laser-cooled atoms that are confined in a nanofiber-based optical dipole trap, we employ this control in order to tune the microwave c...

  19. Superdirective narrowband first-order probe versus wideband higher-order probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements at P-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of the wideband 400-1200 MHz higher-order probe and the narrowband 431 MHz first-order probe, in terms of their advantages and disadvantages for spherical near-field antenna measurements at P-band, is presented. The comparison is based on the experimental data and focused on p...... pattern shape and other electrical characteristics, work efforts related to physical handling, probe calibrations, and post processing....

  20. Emission Spectra of a Moving Atom in an Electromagnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Tao; FENG Xun-Li; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    The emission spectra of a two-level atom moving in an electromafneric fiekd are studied We find that there that there is a shift in the peak position and that each peak splits into double peaks The shit is duble peaks The shift is duc to the detuning indced by the atomic mition and the splitting is casused by the atomic energy change due of photons