WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric water transport

  1. Solar geoengineering, atmospheric water vapor transport, and land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Ken; Cao, Long

    2015-04-01

    This work, using the GeoMIP database supplemented by additional simulations, discusses how solar geoengineering, as projected by the climate models, affects temperature and the hydrological cycle, and how this in turn is related to projected changes in net primary productivity (NPP). Solar geoengineering simulations typically exhibit reduced precipitation. Solar geoengineering reduces precipitation because solar geoengineering reduces evaporation. Evaporation precedes precipitation, and, globally, evaporation equals precipitation. CO2 tends to reduce evaporation through two main mechanisms: (1) CO2 tends to stabilize the atmosphere especially over the ocean, leading to a moister atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean. This moistening of the boundary layer suppresses evaporation. (2) CO2 tends to diminish evapotranspiration, at least in most land-surface models, because higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations allow leaves to close their stomata and avoid water loss. In most high-CO2 simulations, these effects of CO2 which tend to suppress evaporation are masked by the tendency of CO2-warming effect to increase evaporation. In a geoengineering simulation, with the warming effect of CO2 largely offset by the solar geoengineering, the evaporation suppressing characteristics of CO2 are no longer masked and are clearly exhibited. Decreased precipitation in solar geoengineering simulations is a bit like ocean acidification - an effect of high CO2 concentrations that is not offset by solar geoengineering. Locally, precipitation ultimately either evaporates (much of that through the leaves of plants) or runs off through groundwater to streams and rivers. On long time scales, runoff equals precipitation minus evaporation, and thus, water runoff generated at a location is equal to the net atmospheric transport of water to that location. Runoff typically occurs where there is substantial soil moisture, at least seasonally. Locations where there is enough water to maintain

  2. Interannual and Interdecadal Variability of Atmospheric Water Vapor Transport in the Haihe River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jie; LIN Zhao-Hui; XIA Jun; TAO Shi-Yan

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal mean atmospheric precipitable water and water vapor transport over the Haihe River Basin (HRB) in North China with a focus on their interannual to interdecadal variability, and then the relationships of the interannual and interdecadal variability of the water cycle over the HRB to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena were investigated using the observational and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. There was a strong interdecadal variability for the water cycle (such as precipitation and water vapor transport) over the region, with an abrupt change occurring mostly in the mid 1970s. The intensity of the East Asian summer monsoon largely affected the atmospheric water vapor transport. Generally, the net meridional convergence of the water vapor flux over the region was relatively large before 1965, and it declined gradually from then on with a further notable decrease since mid 1970s. Zonal water vapor transport was similar to meridional, but with a much smaller magnitude and no noteworthy turning in the mid 1970s. Results also suggested that the wind field played an important role in the water vapor transport over the HRB before the mid 1960s, and the interdecadal variability of the water cycle (precipitation, water vapor transport, etc.) in the summer was related to the PDO; however, interannual variation of the water vapor transport could also be related to the ENSO phenomena.

  3. An atmospheric radiative-convective model with interactive water vapor transport and cloud development

    OpenAIRE

    HUMMEL, JOHN R.; KUHN, WILLIAM R.

    2011-01-01

    In the present generation of radiative-convective models, clouds are assigned specific levels or temperatures that do not change during the course of the calculations. In addition, a single water vapor distribution is used for the “mean atmosphere” instead of separate distributions for the clear sky and cloudy sky atmospheres. We present results from a one-dimensional radiative-convective model that includes interactive water vapor transport and predicts cloud altitudes and thicknesses. The ...

  4. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  5. Atmospheric water vapor transport: Estimation of continental precipitation recycling and parameterization of a simple climate model. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The advective transport of atmospheric water vapor and its role in global hydrology and the water balance of continental regions are discussed and explored. The data set consists of ten years of global wind and humidity observations interpolated onto a regular grid by objective analysis. Atmospheric water vapor fluxes across the boundaries of selected continental regions are displayed graphically. The water vapor flux data are used to investigate the sources of continental precipitation. The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: (1) advection from surrounding areas external to the region; and (2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. In a separate, but related, study estimates of ocean to land water vapor transport are used to parameterize an existing simple climate model, containing both land and ocean surfaces, that is intended to mimic the dynamics of continental climates.

  6. Influence of long-range transboundary transport on atmospheric water vapor mercury collected at the largest city of Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Tian, Lide; Guo, Junming; Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan; Sillanpää, Mika; Sun, Shiwei; Tripathee, Lekhendra

    2016-10-01

    Monsoon circulation is an important process that affects long-range transboundary transport of anthropogenic contaminants such as mercury (Hg). During the Indian monsoon season of 2013, a total of 92 and 26 atmospheric water vapor samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of the Tibet, for Hg and major ions analysis, respectively. The relatively low pH/high electronic conductivity values, together with the fact that NH4(+) in atmospheric water vapor was even higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa, indicated the effects of anthropogenic perturbations through long-range transboundary atmospheric transport. Concentrations of Hg in atmospheric water vapor ranged from 2.5 to 73.7ngL(-1), with an average of 12.5ngL(-1). The elevated Hg and major ions concentrations, and electronic conductivity values were generally associated with weak acidic samples, and Hg mainly loaded with anthropogenic ions such as NH4(+). The results of principal component analysis and trajectory analysis suggested that anthropogenic emissions from the Indian subcontinent may have largely contributed to the determined Hg in atmospheric water vapor. Furthermore, our study reconfirmed that below-cloud scavenging contribution was significant for precipitation Hg in Lhasa, and evaluated that on average 74.1% of the Hg in precipitation could be accounted for by below-cloud scavenging. PMID:27265735

  7. Influence of physicochemical water characteristics in the transport of methane to the atmosphere at Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plínio Carlos Alvalá

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and decomposition of organic matter in water bodies can increase the potential emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. In this study, in a prospective and exploratory way, we evaluated the relationship between physicochemical characteristics of water on the transport of methane to the atmosphere at Rodrigo de Freitas lagoon, RJ. In 2011, campaigns were carried out in which 200 samples were collected for analysis of superficial methane emission and 30 water samples were collected to verify the dissolution of this gas in the water column, measuring simultaneously both the physicochemical water parameters along this column. The methane flow measurements showed that this lagoon is a source methane emission to the atmosphere with an average flux of 33 ± 10 mgCH4m-2d-1. The evaluation of limnological parameters that could affect the emission flux revealed that the water depth and temperature were the most influential factors in this process. A profile analysis of methane in the water column suggests the existence of a higher concentration of this gas in the region of the sedimentary strata at the bottom of the lagoon. However, the potential emission may not reach the surface, possibly due to the decrease in the rate of vertical diffusion of methane, as a result of the increase of pressure with depth and the presence of methanotrophic bacterias that consume methane throughout the water column.

  8. Atmospheric water vapor transport and recycling in Equatorial Central Africa through NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokam, Wilfried M.; Djiotang, Lucie A.T.; Mkankam, Francois K. [University of Yaounde 1, Laboratory for Environmental Modelling and Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2012-05-15

    The characteristics of the main components of the water cycle over Equatorial Central Africa (ECA) were analysed using the 32-year period, spanning from 1968 to 2000, of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Censearch (NCEP-) reanalysis project database. A special emphasis was given to identifying the causes of annual and interannual variability of water vapor flux and precipitation recycling. The results suggest that the first maximum of moisture convergence, during the rainy season MAM, comes from upper level moisture flux, related to the north component of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ-N). The second, and greatest, maximum in SON is found to be a consequence of low level moisture advection from the Atlantic Ocean. AEJ-N also drive the seasonal spatial pattern of moisture flux. The interannual variability of moisture flux is contributed mainly by the low level moisture advected from the Atlantic Ocean, underlying its crucial role for the regional climate. Studying the recycling ratio in ECA as a whole shows a low annual cycle whereas subregional scale analysis reveals high amplitude of the seasonal variation. Seasonal variability of the spatial gradient of precipitation recycling is regulated by both moisture flux direction and strength. The annual cycles of recycling ratio in the North and the South of ECA are regulated by both moisture transport and evapotranspiration. (orig.)

  9. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land−atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land−atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y−1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y−1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m−2⋅y−1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  10. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  11. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land‑atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land‑atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy‑1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy‑1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm‑2ṡy‑1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  12. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt Cṡy-1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt Cṡy-1, equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g Cṡm-2ṡy-1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  13. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chairman and contributors are members of the Working Group on Atmospheric Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension. This group examined the mathematical approaches for determining the direct and indirect pathways to man of releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. The dose-to-man limitations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Energy Research and Development Administration were presented. The present status of research was discussed, and recommendations for future work were made. Particular emphasis was placed on the need for additional experimental work to develop confidence limits leading to acceptable probability statements of critical pathways for determining the dose-to-man

  14. Heat and Water Transport in Soils and Across the Soil-Atmosphere Interface: Comparison of Model Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Smits, Kathleen; Mosthaf, Klaus;

    are limiting or by a critical threshold water pressure when soil water availability is limiting. The latter approach corresponds with the classical Richards equation with mixed boundary conditions. We formulated the different equations and identified assumptions behind simplified forms. Conditions for which......-phase flow two-component transport in the porous medium that is coupled with one-phase flow two-component transport in the free air to isothermal water flow in the porous with upper boundary conditions defined by a potential evaporation flux when available energy and transfer to the free air flow...

  15. Water-transporting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuthen, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Transport through lipids and aquaporins is osmotic and entirely driven by the difference in osmotic pressure. Water transport in cotransporters and uniporters is different: Water can be cotransported, energized by coupling to the substrate flux by a mechanism closely associated with protein. In the K(+)/Cl(-) and the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporters, water is entirely cotransported, while water transport in glucose uniporters and Na(+)-coupled transporters of nutrients and neurotransmitters takes place by both osmosis and cotransport. The molecular mechanism behind cotransport of water is not clear. It is associated with the substrate movements in aqueous pathways within the protein; a conventional unstirred layer mechanism can be ruled out, due to high rates of diffusion in the cytoplasm. The physiological roles of the various modes of water transport are reviewed in relation to epithelial transport. Epithelial water transport is energized by the movements of ions, but how the coupling takes place is uncertain. All epithelia can transport water uphill against an osmotic gradient, which is hard to explain by simple osmosis. Furthermore, genetic removal of aquaporins has not given support to osmosis as the exclusive mode of transport. Water cotransport can explain the coupling between ion and water transport, a major fraction of transepithelial water transport and uphill water transport. Aquaporins enhance water transport by utilizing osmotic gradients and cause the osmolarity of the transportate to approach isotonicity. PMID:20091162

  16. Hydrologic, Water-Quality, Sediment Transport, and Bulk Atmospheric-Deposition Data, Guanella Pass Area, Colorado, October 1, 1994, through September 30, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrology and water quality of streams and lakes in the Guanella Pass area could be affected by the proposed reconstruction of the existing road over Guanella Pass between Georgetown and Grant, Colo. Data were collected during water years 1995 through 1997 (October 1, 1994, through September 30, 1997) that describe the preconstruction hydrology, water quality, sediment transport, and bulk atmospheric deposition in the Guanella Pass study area with most data being collected primarily during water years 1996-97. Data were collected at 17 stream sites, 7 road-runoff sites, 10 ground-water sites, 3 lake sites, 1 reservoir site, 2 snow-precipitation sites, and 4 bulk atmospheric-deposition sites. Data include onsite measurements of streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, barometric pressure, and dissolved oxygen; concentrations of major ions, nutrients, and trace elements; organic carbon and trace organic compounds; suspended-sediment concentration and particle-size analyses; field measurement and depth profiles, and chlorophyll concentrations in lakes and reservoirs; trace element, nutrient, and trace organic (semi-volatiles, PCBs, and insecticides) analyses of lake and reservoir bottom sediment; and bulk atmospheric deposition rates of solids. Daily values for streamflow, maximum and minimum water temperature, specific conductance, and suspended sediment were computed at seven streamflow-monitoring stations located along South Clear Creek, Leavenworth Creek, Duck Creek, Geneva Creek, and Deer Creek.

  17. Tagging Water Sources in Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tagging of water sources in atmospheric models allows for quantitative diagnostics of how water is transported from its source region to its sink region. In this presentation, we review how this methodology is applied to global atmospheric models. We will present several applications of the methodology. In one example, the regional sources of water for the North American Monsoon system are evaluated by tagging the surface evaporation. In another example, the tagged water is used to quantify the global water cycling rate and residence time. We will also discuss the need for more research and the importance of these diagnostics in water cycle studies.

  18. Water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: Upscaling from rhizosphere to root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Perelman, Adi; Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Root water and nutrient uptake are among the most important processes considered in numerical models simulating water content and fluxes in the subsurface, as they control plant growth and production as well as water flow and nutrient transport out of the root zone. Root water uptake may lead to salt accumulation at the root-soil interface, resulting in rhizophere salt concentrations much higher than in the bulk soil. This salt accumulation is caused by soluble salt transport towards the roots by mass flow through the soil, followed by preferential adsorption of specific nutrients by active uptake, thereby excluding most other salts at the root-soil interface or in the root apoplast. The salinity buildup can lead to large osmotic pressure gradients across the roots thereby effectively reducing root water uptake. The initial results from rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system) show that sodium concentration is decreasing with distance from the root, compared with the bulk that remained more stable. When transpiration rate was decreased under high salinity levels, sodium concentration was more homogenous compared with low salinity levels. Additionally, sodium and gadolinium distributions were measured nondestructively around tomato roots using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique could also observe the root structure and water content around single roots. Results from the MRI confirm the solutes concentration pattern around roots and its relation to their initial concentration. We conclude that local water potentials at the soil-root interface differ from bulk potentials. These relative differences increase with decreasing root density, decreasing initial salt concentration and increasing transpiration rate. Furthermore, since climate may significantly influence plant response to salinity a dynamic climate-coupled salinity reduction functions are critical in while using macroscopic numerical models.

  19. Water-transporting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transport through lipids and aquaporins is osmotic and entirely driven by the difference in osmotic pressure. Water transport in cotransporters and uniporters is different: Water can be cotransported, energized by coupling to the substrate flux by a mechanism closely associated with protein...... is not clear. It is associated with the substrate movements in aqueous pathways within the protein; a conventional unstirred layer mechanism can be ruled out, due to high rates of diffusion in the cytoplasm. The physiological roles of the various modes of water transport are reviewed in relation to epithelial...

  20. Water transport in brain:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Hamann, Steffan; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cotransporters transport water in addition to their normal substrates, although the precise mechanism is debated; both active and passive modes of transport have been suggested. The magnitude of the water flux mediated by cotransporters may well be significant: both...... the number of cotransporters per cell and the unit water permeability are high. For example, the Na(+)-glutamate cotransporter (EAAT1) has a unit water permeability one tenth of that of aquaporin (AQP) 1. Cotransporters are widely distributed in the brain and participate in several vital functions: inorganic......(+)-lactate cotransporters. We have previously determined water transport capacities for these cotransporters in model systems (Xenopus oocytes, cell cultures, and in vitro preparations), and will discuss their role in water homeostasis of the astroglial cell under both normo- and pathophysiologal situations. Astroglia...

  1. Monitoring and modeling of water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system of poplar trees to evaluate the effectiveness of phytoremediation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Mario; Di Fiore, Paola; Speranza, Giuseppe; Sica, Benedetto; Romano, Nunzio

    2015-04-01

    This work is part of a series of studies being carried out within the EU-Life+ project ECOREMED (Implementation of eco-compatible protocols for agricultural soil remediation in Litorale Domizio-Agro Aversano NIPS). The project refers to Litorale Domitio-Agro Aversano that has been identified as National Interest Priority Site (NIPS) and includes some polluted agricultural land belonging to more than 61 municipalities in the Naples and Caserta provinces of the Campania Region. The major aim of the project is to define an operating protocol for agriculture-based bioremediation of contaminated agricultural soils, also including the use of plant extracting pollutants to be used as biomasses for renewable energy production. This contribution specifically address the question of evaluating the effectiveness of phytoremediation actions selected by the project in the pilot area of Trentola-Ducenta and will provide some preliminary results of monitoring and modeling activities. A physical and hydraulic characterization has been carried out in this area where poplar trees were planted. Monitoring of water flow, root water uptake and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere is under way with reference to two trees using capacitance soil moisture and matric potential sensors located at three different soil depths, whereas plant water status and evapotranspiration fluxes are indirectly estimated using fast-responding stem dendrometers.

  2. Terrestrial atmosphere, water and astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coradini M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Primitive life, defined as a chemical system capable to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and also capable to evolve, originated about 4 billion years ago from the processing of organic molecules by liquid water. Terrestrial atmosphere played a key role in the process by allowing the permanent presence of liquid water and by participating in the production of carbon-based molecules. Water molecules exhibit specific properties mainly due to a dense network of hydrogen bonds. The carbon-based molecules were either home made in the atmosphere and/or in submarine hydrothermal systems or delivered by meteorites and micrometeorites. The search for possible places beyond the earth where the trilogy atmosphere/water/life could exist is the main objective of astrobiology. Within the Solar System, exploration missions are dedicated to Mars, Europa, Titan and the icy bodies. The discovery of several hundreds of extrasolar planets opens the quest to the whole Milky Way.

  3. Global Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with Interactive Atmospheric Transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Stone, Peter H.; Marotzke, Jochem

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) and SST gradient, using parameterizations based on baroclinic stability theory. The ocean-atmosphere heat and freshwater exchanges are calculated as residuals of the steady-state atmospheric budgets.Owing to the ocean component's weak heat transport, the model has too strong a meridional SST gradient when driven with observed atmospheric meridional transports. When the latter are made interactive, the conveyor belt circulation collapses. A flux adjustment is introduced in which the efficiency of the atmospheric transports is lowered to match the too low efficiency of the ocean component.The feedbacks between the THC and both the atmospheric heat and moisture transports are positive, whether atmospheric transports are interactive in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere, or both. However, the feedbacks operate differently in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because the Pacific THC dominates in the Southern Hemisphere, and deep water formation in the two hemispheres is negatively correlated. The feedbacks in the two hemispheres do not necessarily reinforce each other because they have opposite effects on low-latitude temperatures. The model is qualitatively similar in stability to one with conventional `additive' flux adjustment, but quantitatively more stable.

  4. Modeling stomatal conductance in the earth system: linking leaf water-use efficiency and water transport along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.; Williams, M.; Fisher, R. A.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-09-01

    The Ball-Berry stomatal conductance model is commonly used in earth system models to simulate biotic regulation of evapotranspiration. However, the dependence of stomatal conductance (gs) on vapor pressure deficit (Ds) and soil moisture must be empirically parameterized. We evaluated the Ball-Berry model used in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and an alternative stomatal conductance model that links leaf gas exchange, plant hydraulic constraints, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPA). The SPA model simulates stomatal conductance numerically by (1) optimizing photosynthetic carbon gain per unit water loss while (2) constraining stomatal opening to prevent leaf water potential from dropping below a critical minimum. We evaluated two optimization algorithms: intrinsic water-use efficiency (ΔAn /Δgs, the marginal carbon gain of stomatal opening) and water-use efficiency (ΔAn /ΔEl, the marginal carbon gain of transpiration water loss). We implemented the stomatal models in a multi-layer plant canopy model to resolve profiles of gas exchange, leaf water potential, and plant hydraulics within the canopy, and evaluated the simulations using leaf analyses, eddy covariance fluxes at six forest sites, and parameter sensitivity analyses. The primary differences among stomatal models relate to soil moisture stress and vapor pressure deficit responses. Without soil moisture stress, the performance of the SPA stomatal model was comparable to or slightly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model in flux tower simulations, but was significantly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model when there was soil moisture stress. Functional dependence of gs on soil moisture emerged from water flow along the soil-to-leaf pathway rather than being imposed a priori, as in the CLM Ball-Berry model. Similar functional dependence of gs on Ds emerged from the ΔAn/ΔEl optimization, but not the ΔAn /gs optimization. Two parameters (stomatal efficiency and root hydraulic

  5. Terrestrial atmosphere, water and astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Coradini M.; Brack A.

    2010-01-01

    Primitive life, defined as a chemical system capable to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and also capable to evolve, originated about 4 billion years ago from the processing of organic molecules by liquid water. Terrestrial atmosphere played a key role in the process by allowing the permanent presence of liquid water and by participating in the production of carbon-based molecules. Water molecules exhibit specific properties mainly due to a dense network of hydrogen bon...

  6. Transport properties in the Jovian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolsi, L.

    1978-01-01

    Transport properties in a Jupiter-like atmosphere (89 mol % hydrogen and 11 mol % helium) are obtained by using the method of the kinetic theory of gases. The transport collision integrals are calculated by fitting various two-body semiempirical interaction potentials for which the collision integrals are tabulated to ab initio quantum mechanical calculations of the two-body interactions. The collision integrals are used to calculate the binary diffusion coefficients, viscosity, and 'total' thermal conductivity of the pure gases and the gas mixtures at 1-atm pressure from 1000 K to 25,000 K.

  7. Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Land transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uherek, Elmar; Halenka, Tomas; Borken-Kleefeld, Jens; Balkanski, Yves; Berntsen, Terje; Borrego, Carlos; Gauss, Michael; Hoor, Peter; Juda-Rezler, Katarzyna; Lelieveld, Jos; Melas, Dimitrios; Rypdal, Kristin; Schmid, Stephan

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from land transport, and from road transport in particular, have significant impacts on the atmosphere and on climate change. This assessment gives an overview of past, present and future emissions from land transport, of their impacts on the atmospheric composition and air quality, on human health and climate change and on options for mitigation. In the past vehicle exhaust emission control has successfully reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. This contributed to improved air quality and reduced health impacts in industrialised countries. In developing countries however, pollutant emissions have been growing strongly, adversely affecting many populations. In addition, ozone and particulate matter change the radiative balance and hence contribute to global warming on shorter time scales. Latest knowledge on the magnitude of land transport's impact on global warming is reviewed here. In the future, road transport's emissions of these pollutants are expected to stagnate and then decrease globally. This will then help to improve the air quality notably in developing countries. On the contrary, emissions of carbon dioxide and of halocarbons from mobile air conditioners have been globally increasing and are further expected to grow. Consequently, road transport's impact on climate is gaining in importance. The expected efficiency improvements of vehicles and the introduction of biofuels will not be sufficient to offset the expected strong growth in both, passenger and freight transportation. Technical measures could offer a significant reduction potential, but strong interventions would be needed as markets do not initiate the necessary changes. Further reductions would need a resolute expansion of low-carbon fuels, a tripling of vehicle fuel efficiency and a stagnation in absolute transport volumes. Land transport will remain a key sector in climate change mitigation during the next decades.

  8. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  9. Conversion of elemental iodine during atmospheric transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre the conversion of elemental iodine during the transport in the atmosphere from the source point to the place of deposition is studied. For this reason the short living I-123 is released in form of elemental iodine in 50 m release height. In a distance of 200 to 1000 m downwind air samples are taken with a tripartite filter system. Each part of the filter system is measured with a Ge(Li) detector seperately at the end of sampling. After the evaluation of the experiments until now in the average about 50% of the elemental iodine is transformed into other iodine species. (orig./HP)

  10. The STARTWAVE atmospheric water database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morland

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The STARTWAVE (STudies in Atmospheric Radiative Transfer and Water Vapour Effects project aims to investigate the role which water vapour plays in the climate system, and in particular its interaction with radiation. Within this framework, an ongoing water vapour database project was set up which comprises integrated water vapour (IWV measurements made over the last ten years by ground-based microwave radiometers, Global Positioning System (GPS receivers and sun photometers located throughout Switzerland at altitudes between 330 and 3584 m. At Bern (46.95° N, 7.44° E tropospheric and stratospheric water vapour profiles are obtained on a regular basis and integrated liquid water, which is important for cloud characterisation, is also measured. Additional stratospheric water vapour profiles are obtained by an airborne microwave radiometer which observes large parts of the northern hemisphere during yearly flight campaigns. The database allows us to validate the various water vapour measurement techniques. Comparisons between IWV measured by the Payerne radiosonde with that measured at Bern by two microwave radiometers, GPS and sun photometer showed instrument biases within ±0.5 mm. The bias in GPS relative to sun photometer over the 2001 to 2004 period was –0.8 mm at Payerne (46.81° N, 6.94° E, 490 m, which lies in the Swiss plains north of the Alps, and +0.6 mm at Davos (46.81° N, 9.84° E, 1598 m, which is located within the Alps in the eastern part of Switzerland. At Locarno (46.18° N, 8.78° E, 366 m, which is located on the south side of the Alps, the bias is +1.9 mm. The sun photometer at Locarno was found to have a bias of –2.2 mm (13% of the mean annual IWV relative to the data from the closest radiosonde station at Milano. This result led to a yearly rotation of the sun photometer instruments between low and high altitude stations to improve the calibrations. In order to demonstrate the capabilites of the database for studying

  11. Osmotic water transport in aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Beitz, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    molecules give rise to no water transport. Accordingly, the rate of water transport is proportional to the reflection coefficient σ, while the solute permeability, P(S), is proportional to 1 - σ. The model was tested in aquaporins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. A variety of aquaporin channel...... sizes and geometries were obtained with the two aquaporins AQP1 and AQP9 and mutant versions of these. Osmotic water transport was generated by adding 20 mM of a range of different-sized osmolytes to the outer solution. The osmotic water permeability and the reflection coefficient were measured......Abstract  We test a novel, stochastic model of osmotic water transport in aquaporins. A solute molecule present at the pore mouth can either be reflected or permeate the pore. We assume that only reflected solute molecules induce osmotic transport of water through the pore, while permeating solute...

  12. Students' Conceptions of Water Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundgren, Carl-Johan; Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang; Schonborn, Konrad J.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding diffusion of water into and out of the cell through osmosis is fundamental to the learning and teaching of biology. Although this process is thought of as occurring directly across the lipid bilayer, the majority of water transport is actually mediated by specialised transmembrane water-channels called aquaporins. This study…

  13. Water Transport through Multinanopores Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Li; GUO Hong-Kai; ZUO Guang-Hong; WAN Rong-Zheng; FANG Hai-Ping

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the influence of correlation between water molecules transport through the neighbouring nanopores,whose centres are at a distance of only 6.2A,using the molecular dynamics simulations.Water molecule distribution in nanopore and average water flow are obtained.It is found that the average water molecule number and water flow are slightly different between a system made of the neighbouring nanopores and a system of a single pore.This indicates that transport of water chains in neighbouring pores do no show significant influence each other.These findings should be helpful in designing efficient artificial membrane made of nanopores and providing an insight into effects of the biological channel structure on the water permeation.

  14. Modelling Ballast Water Transport

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Babu, M.T.; Vethamony, P.

    , pipelines, water intake, marine outfall and single point moorings associated with refineries. Some of the coastal areas are natural habitats for rich vegetation, especially mangroves. Fig. 1. Gulf of Kachchh: bathymetry and morphological features...

  15. Global thermohaline circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with interactive atmospheric transports

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Stone, P.; Marotzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-...

  16. Mercury-cycling in surface waters and in the atmosphere - species analysis for the investigation of transformation and transport properties of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The river Elbe has been one of the most contaminated rivers with regard to mercury for many years. In 1991 a length-profile has been measured for mercury and methylmercury (CH3Hg+) from Obristvi, Czech Republic, to the German bight. Total mercury has been measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The organo mercury compounds have been separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) connected on-line to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) by a continuous flow-system. Total mercury up to 120 mg Hg+/kg and CH3Hg+ concentrations up to 130 μg CH3Hg+/kg could be detected in special sites. The formation of CH3Hg+ in sediments can be caused besides the methylation of mercury, by sulphate reducing or methanogenic bacteria and transmethylation reactions with organometals. Atmospheric mercury concentrations have been measured at three different European sites. Samples have been collected on gold-coated glass balls or on quartz wool, respectively. After thermal desorption mercury has been determined using the two step amalgamation technique with AFS detection. Compared to natural background concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM), slightly increased levels could be detected at a rural site in Germany. This increase can probably be explained by long-range transport processes. Within the vicinity of a inactivated mercury production plant high concentrations of up to 13.5 ng/m3 particle associated mercury (Hgpart) have been detected. Consequently, dry deposition of mercury in the particulate form can intensify the total deposition flux close to Hg-emitting sources. (orig.)

  17. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line...

  18. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-boar...

  19. Water transport in desert alluvial soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe storage of radioactive waste buried in an arid alluvial soil requires extensive site characterization of the physical process influencing moisture movement which could act as a transport medium for the migration of radionuclides. The field portion of this study included an infiltration plot instrumented with thermocouple psychrometers and neturon moisture probe access holes. Baseline information shows a zone of higher moisture content at approximately 1.5 m (5 ft) in depth. A sprinkler system simulated a 500-year precipitation event. Results revealed water penetrated the soil to 0.9 m (2.9 ft). Due to the low moisture content, vapor transport was primarily responsible for water movement at this depth. Temperature gradients are substantially responsible for vapor transport by preferentially sorting water-vapor molecules from the surrounding air by using the soil as a molecular sieve. Adsorbed and capillary water vapor pressure increases in response to a temperature increase and releases additional water to the soil pore atmosphere to be diffused away

  20. Weakened atmospheric energy transport feedback in cold glacial climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cvijanovic

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric energy transport during Northern Hemisphere cooling and warming from present day (PD and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM conditions is investigated using sea surface temperature anomalies derived from a freshwater hosing experiment. The present day climate shows enhanced sensitivity of the atmospheric energy transport compared to that of the LGM suggesting an ability of the PD atmosphere to reorganize more easily and thereby dampen temperature anomalies that may arise from changes in the oceanic transport. The increased PD sensitivity relative to that of the LGM is due mainly to a stronger dry static energy transport response which, in turn, is driven chiefly by larger changes in the transient eddy heat flux. In comparison, changes in latent heat transport play a minor role in the overall transport sensitivity.

  1. Gravitational Condensation of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2015-01-01

    Devices that collect water from the atmospheric air using condensation are well-known. They operate in a manner very similar to that of a dehumidifier: air is passed through a cooled coil, making water to condense. This is the most common technology in use. Here, we present a device that can collect a large amount of water (more than 1m 3 /s) from the atmospheric air using gravitational condensation. Another novelty of this device is that it consumes little electricity. In addition, the new t...

  2. Atmospheric transport and deposition of Indonesian volcanic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Pfeffer

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model study has been performed to investigate the transport and atmospheric loss rates of emissions from Indonesian volcanoes and the sensitivity of these emissions to meteorological conditions and the solubility of the released emissions. Two experiments were conducted: 1 volcanic sulfur released as primarily SO2 and oxidation to SO42− determined by considering the major tropospheric chemical reactions; and 2 PbCl2 released as an infinitely soluble passive tracer. The first experiment was used to calculate SO2 loss rates from each active volcano resulting in an annual mean loss rate for all volcanoes of 1.1×10−5 s−1, or an e-folding rate of approximately 1 day. SO2 loss rate was found to vary seasonally, be poorly correlated with wind speed, and uncorrelated with temperature or relative humidity. The variability of SO2 loss rates is found to be correlated with the variability of wind speeds, suggesting that it is much more difficult to establish a ''typical'' SO2 loss rate for volcanoes that are exposed to inconsistent winds. Within an average distance of 69 km away from the active Indonesian volcanoes, 53% of SO2 is lost due to conversion to SO42−, 42% due to dry deposition, and 5% is lost due to lateral transport away from the dominant direction of plume travel. The solubility of volcanic emissions in water is shown to have a major influence on their atmospheric transport and deposition. High concentrations of PbCl2 are predicted to be deposited near to the volcanoes while volcanic S travels further away until removal from the atmosphere primarily via the wet deposition of H2SO4. The ratio of the concentration of PbCl2 to SO2 is found to exponentially decay at increasing distance from the volcanoes

  3. Meridional Transport in the Atmospheres of Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Soto, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    As we continue to discover terrestrial exoplanets, many with orbital and planetary characteristics drastically different from anything encountered in our solar system, we are likely to encounter 'exotic' atmospheric transport processes. As an example, we show an analysis of meridional transport from simulations Mars. These simulations provide insight into the differences in meridional transport between Earth and Mars, particularly through the role of a condensation flow. The differences between Earth and Mars are a reminder that there may be a wide variety of meridional transport processes at work across the range of observed terrestrial planets.

  4. Effect of Atmospheric Ions on Interfacial Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Kurt Kung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atmospheric positivity on the electrical properties of interfacial water was explored. Interfacial, or exclusion zone (EZ water was created in the standard way, next to a sheet of Nafion placed horizontally at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Positive atmospheric ions were created from a high voltage source placed above the chamber. Electrical potential distribution in the interfacial water was measured using microelectrodes. We found that beyond a threshold, the positive ions diminished the magnitude of the negative electrical potential in the interfacial water, sometimes even turning it to positive. Additionally, positive ions produced by an air conditioner were observed to generate similar effects; i.e., the electrical potential shifted in the positive direction but returned to negative when the air conditioner stopped blowing. Sometimes, the effect of the positive ions from the air conditioner was strong enough to destroy the structure of interfacial water by turning the potential decidedly positive. Thus, positive air ions can compromise interfacial water negativity and may explain the known negative impact of positive ions on health.

  5. Model analyses of atmospheric mercury: present air quality and effects of transpacific transport on the United States

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lei; X.-Z. Liang; D. J. Wuebbles; Tao, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury is a toxic air and water pollutant that is of significant concern because of its effects on human health and ecosystems. A mechanistic representation of the atmospheric mercury cycle is developed for the state-of-the-art global climate-chemistry model, CAM-Chem (Community Atmospheric Model with Chemistry). The model simulates the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in three forms: elemental mercury (Hg(0)), reactive mercury (Hg(II...

  6. Model analyses of atmospheric mercury: present air quality and effects of transpacific transport on the United States

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lei; Liang, X.-Z.; D. J. Wuebbles; Tao, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury is a toxic air and water pollutant that is of significant concern because of its effects on human health and ecosystems. A mechanistic representation of the atmospheric mercury cycle is developed for the state-of-the-art global climate-chemistry model, CAM-Chem (Community Atmospheric Model with Chemistry). The model simulates the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in three forms: elemental mercury (Hg(0)), react...

  7. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    CERN Document Server

    Knietzsch, Marc-Andre; Lunkeit, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized earthlike aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is put on the Lorenz energy cycle and the atmospheric mean meridional circulation. The latter is analysed by means of the Kuo-Eliassen equation. The atmospheric heat transport compensates the imposed oceanic heat transport changes to a large extent in conjunction with significant modification of the general circulation. Up to a maximum about 3PW, an increase of the oceanic heat transport leads to an increase of the global mean near surface temperature and a decrease of its equator-to-pole gradient. For larger transports, the gradient is reduced further but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. A larger oceanic heat transport leads to a reduction of all reservoirs and conversions of the Lorenz energy cycl...

  8. Meridional transport in the Venusian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, Thomas; Mota Machado, Pedro; Peralta, Javier; Marcq, Emmanuel; Helbert, Joern; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric superrotation on Venus and to a lesser extent, on Titan, is thought to be maintained by opposing transfers of angular momentum between the mean meridional circulation and large-scale planetary waves. The details of this transfer depend on the presence of wave-generating dynamical instabilities and on the strength and direction of the meridional flow. Observational constraints have been gathered over the course of the Venus Express mission. The upper cloud exhibits global meridional motions which are consistent with the upper branch of a Hadley cell circulation (Sánchez-Lavega et al., 2008 ; Hueso et al., 2012). Peralta et al. (2012) determined the meridional structure for the amplitude of the diurnal tide affecting the meridional component of the wind, while VMC cloud-tracked features allowed to detect a diurnal component peaking in the early afternoon (Khatuntsev et al., 2013).New measurements of the meridional flow were simultaneously gathered by VEx/VIRTIS-M and CFHT/ESPaDOnS from the ground with a significant temporal and spatial overlap in April 2014. A symmetrical, poleward meridional Hadley flow is evidenced at cloud top in both hemispheres peaking at v = 22.5 ± 15.5 ms-1 at 9-10am near 40°N-S with a sharp drop poleward of 50° (Machado et al., submitted).The lower cloud meridional motions are less organized with some cloud features moving with intense northwards and southwards motions up to v = ±15 m s-1 but, on average, with almost null global meridional motions at all latitudes. Due to the unfavourable viewing geometry and poor UV contrast of polar clouds, only a fraction of the total wind measurements have been reported for the polar regions. Existing data indicate a circumpolar circulation close to solid-body rotation. The VEM instrument on board VERITAS (Smrekar et al., 2016 ; Helbert et al., 2016) will allow for a comprehensive study of lower cloud climatology spanning at least one Venusian year. Three filter bands of VEM at 1.195, 1

  9. The westerly fluctuation and water vapor transport over the Qilian-Heihe valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Keli; CHENG; Guodong; XIAO; Honglang

    2004-01-01

    The westerly fluctuation and the atmospheric water vapor transport over the Qilian-Heihe valley are analyzed and the results show that, in the water vapor transport stream field from Jun to September, this valley is in the westerly stream and the water vapor comes from westerlies water transport via the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. The net water vapor transport is less net import and different from most areas of the northwest China. The interannual changes in water vapor transport over the valley arise from the westerly fluctuation, and have a positive relationship to the interannual changes in westerly wind speed. The cold air actions from the Mongol low pressure are the primary system that controls the westerly water vapor transport. Its action chain is that, the Mongol low pressure is strengthened → the circulation meridionality will be increased → the cold air will move southwards → the westerly will be stronger → the wind convergence of direction and speed will be stronger → the water vapor convergence transport will be increased → the local water vapor content will be increased. The interannual changes in atmospheric water vapor transport over the valley rely mainly on the convergence transport, but the effect of advection transport is less. The interannual changes of strong or weak westerly affect mainly the convergence transport, and then make the atmospheric water vapor net transport increase or decrease over the Qilian-Heihe valley.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Atmosphere Water Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2011-07-04

    Understanding and quantifying the interaction of the atmosphere with underlying water surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of scientific fields such as water resources management, climate studies of ocean-atmosphere exchange, and regional weat

  11. Burning water: the water footprint of biofuel-based transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The trend towards substitution of conventional transport fuels by biofuels requires additional water. The EU aims to replace 10 percent of total transport fuels by biofuels by 2020. This study calculates the water footprint (WF) of different transport modes using bio-ethanol, biodiesel or bio-electricity and of European transport if 10 percent of transport fuels is replaced by bio-ethanol. We compare results for Europe with similar goals for other regions (Africa, Asia, Latin America, the for...

  12. The Martian atmospheric water cycle as viewed from a terrestrial perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that the conditions of temperature and pressure that characterize the atmosphere of Mars are similar to those found in the Earth's stratosphere. Of particular significance is the fact that liquid water is unstable in both environments. Thus, it is expected that terrestrial studies of the dynamical behavior of stratospheric water should benefit the understanding of water transport on Mars as well.

  13. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-A. Knietzsch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized earthlike aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is put on the Lorenz energy cycle and the atmospheric mean meridional circulation. The latter is analysed by means of the Kuo–Eliassen equation. The atmospheric heat transport compensates the imposed oceanic heat transport changes to a large extent in conjunction with significant modification of the general circulation. Up to a maximum about 3 PW, an increase of the oceanic heat transport leads to an increase of the global mean near-surface temperature and a decrease of its equator-to-pole gradient. For larger transports, the gradient is reduced further but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. A larger oceanic heat transport leads to a reduction of all reservoirs and conversions of the Lorenz energy cycle but of different relative magnitude for the individual components. The available potential energy of the zonal mean flow and its conversion to eddy available potential energy are affected most. Both the Hadley and Ferrel cell show a decline for increasing oceanic heat transport, with the Hadley cell being more sensitive. Both cells exhibit a poleward shift of their maxima, and the Hadley cell broadens for larger oceanic transports. The partitioning, by means of the Kuo–Eliassen equation, reveals that zonal mean diabatic heating and friction are the most important sources for changes of the Hadley cell, while the behaviour of the Ferrell cell is mostly controlled by friction.

  14. Transport of atmospheric NOx and HNO3 over Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Abiodun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cape Town, the most popular tourist city in Africa, usually experiences air pollution with unpleasant odour in winter. Previous studies have associated the pollution with local emission of pollutants within the city. The present study examines the transport of atmospheric pollutants (NOx and HNO3 over South Africa and shows how the transport of pollutants from the Mpumalanga Highveld may contribute to the pollution in Cape Town. The study analysed observation data (2001–2008 from Cape Town air quality network and simulation data (2001–2004 from regional climate model (RegCM4 over southern Africa. The simulation accounts for the influence of complex topography, atmospheric condition, and atmospheric chemistry on emission and transport of pollutants over southern Africa. Flux budget analysis was used to examine whether Cape Town is a source or sink for NOx and HNO3 during the extreme pollution events. The results show that extreme pollution events over Cape Town are associated with the low-level (surface–850 hPa transport of NOx from the Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town, and with a tongue of high concentration of HNO3 that extends from the Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town along the south coast of South Africa. The prevailing atmospheric conditions during the extreme pollution events feature an upper-level (700 hPa anticyclonic flow over South Africa and a low-level col over Cape Town. The anticyclonic flow induces a strong subsidence motion, which prevents vertical mixing of the pollutants and caps high concentration of pollutants close to the surface as they are transported from the Mpumalanga Highveld toward Cape Town, while the col accumulates the pollutants over the city. This study shows that Cape Town can be a sink for the NOx and HNO3 during extreme pollution events and suggests that the accumulation of pollutants transported from other areas (e.g. Mpumalanga Highveld may contribute substantially to the air pollution in Cape Town.

  15. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  16. Burning water: the water footprint of biofuel-based transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The trend towards substitution of conventional transport fuels by biofuels requires additional water. The EU aims to replace 10 percent of total transport fuels by biofuels by 2020. This study calculates the water footprint (WF) of different transport modes using bio-ethanol, biodiesel or bio-electr

  17. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  18. Atmospheric lifetime of levoglucosan during transport in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheesley, Rebecca; Usenko, Sascha; Barrett, Tate

    2015-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are a major driver of climate change, especially in the Arctic. Over the last century, the Arctic has undergone warming at a rate almost twice the global mean, triggering sea ice reduction which enables intensified Arctic oil exploration and commercial shipping. Thorough characterization of these changing aerosol sources, composition and processing will improve aerosol parameterization in Arctic climate models. Atmospheric processing, specifically reaction and oxidation of aerosol components during transport, is difficult to assess. In this study, calculated half-lives for levoglucosan measured at Barrow, AK, USA are used to characterize relative levels of atmospheric processing during wintertime in the Arctic. In the current study, the 14C-based apportioned BC was combined with reported ratios for levoglucosan/BC to calculate τ1/2 for levoglucosan. This enabled examination of relative atmospheric processing over the Arctic winter; processing will likely increase aerosol hygroscopicity. Ambient measurements during the field campaign reveal that the atmospheric half-lives of levoglucosan were inconsistent in mid to late winter, suggesting variability in atmospheric processing during transport.

  19. PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere: determining important driving forces using a global atmospheric transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Friedman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatially and temporally resolved global atmospheric PCB model, driven by meteorological data, that is skilled at simulating mean atmospheric PCB concentrations and seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and mean Arctic concentrations. However, the model does not capture the observed Arctic summer maximum in atmospheric PCBs. We use the model to estimate global budgets for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 7 PCBs, and demonstrate that congeners that deposit more readily show lower potential for long-range transport, consistent with a recently-described "differential removal hypothesis" regarding the hemispheric transport of PCBs. Using sensitivity simulations to assess processes within, outside, or transport to the Arctic, we examine the influence of climate- and emissions-driven processes on Arctic concentrations and their effect on improving the simulated Arctic seasonal cycle. We find evidence that processes occurring outside the Arctic have a greater influence on Arctic atmospheric PCB levels than processes that occur within the Arctic. Our simulations suggest that re-emissions from sea ice melting or from the Arctic Ocean during summer would have to be unrealistically high in order to capture observed temporal trends of PCBs in the Arctic atmosphere. We conclude that mid-latitude processes are likely to have a greater effect on the Arctic under global change scenarios than re-emissions within the Arctic.

  20. Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources to Atmosphere as Affected by Shallow Subsurface and Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Hosken, K.; Schulte, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movement and modeling of chemical vapor through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface when subjected to natural atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land surface is of importance to applications such as landmine detection and vapor intrusion into subsurface structures. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of these sensor signals to make assessment of source conditions remains a challenge. Chemical signatures are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the unsaturated soil environment, attenuating signal strength and masking contaminant source conditions. The dominant process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal or no quantification of other processes contributing to vapor migration, such as thermal diffusion, convective gas flow due to the displacement of air, expansion/contraction of air due to temperature changes, temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and fluctuations in atmospheric pressure. Soil water evaporation and interfacial mass transfer add to the complexity of the system. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmosphere interface and use the resulting dataset to test existing theories on subsurface gas flow and iterate between numerical modeling efforts and experimental data. Ultimately, we aim to update conceptual models of shallow subsurface vapor transport to include conditionally significant transport processes and inform placement of mobile sensors and/or networks. We have developed a two-dimensional tank apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and a flow-through head space for simulation of the atmospheric interface. A detailed matrix of realistic atmospheric boundary conditions was applied in a series of

  1. Impact of carbonation on water transport properties of cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonation is a very well-known cementitious materials pathology. It is the major cause of reinforced concrete structures degradation. It leads to rebar corrosion and consequent concrete cover cracking. In the framework of radioactive waste management, cement-based materials used as building materials for structures or containers would be simultaneously submitted to drying and atmospheric carbonation. Although scientific literature regarding carbonating is vast, it is clearly lacking information about the influence of carbonation on water transport properties. This work then aimed at studying and understanding the change in water transport properties induced by carbonation. Simultaneously, the representativeness of accelerated carbonation (in the laboratory) was also studied. (author)

  2. Comparison of curved trajectory atmospheric transport vs. assumed straight-line transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dose-To-Man program as currently being implemented at the Savannah River Laboratory provides estimates of the environmental effects of Savannah River Plant operations. These estimates utilize a polar grid structure and assume straight-line transport of materials released to the atmosphere to distances beyond grid boundaries. The assumption of straight-line transport is standard for such estimates and greatly simplifies the computations involved in providing estimates of effects. Generally, the atmospheric transport trajectory will be curved; and, for distances out to 100 km or so, the assumption may lead to significant error. Therefore, a computer code was constructed to provide an estimate of the curved trajectory transport relative to straight-line transport over an extended time period

  3. Effects of Atmospheric Conditions and the Land/Atmospheric Interface on Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Howington, S. E.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    with a network of soil and atmospheric sensors and a head space for air flow to simulate the atmospheric boundary layer. Experiments were performed under varying temperature values at the soil surface bounded by the atmospheric boundary layer. The model of Smits et al. [2011], accounting for non-equilibrium phase change and coupled heat, water vapor and liquid water flux through soil, was amended to include organic vapor in the gas phase and migration mechanisms often overlooked in models (thermal and Knudsen diffusion, density driven advection). Experimental results show increased vapor mass flux across the soil/atmospheric interface due to heat applied from the atmosphere and coupling of heat and mass transfer in the shallow subsurface for both steady and diurnal temperature patterns. Comparison of model results to experimental data shows dynamic interactions between transport in porous media and boundary conditions. Results demonstrate the value of considering interactions of the atmosphere and subsurface to better understand chemical gas transport through unsaturated soils and the land/atmospheric interface.

  4. Predicting water transport in multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baukh, V.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.; Erich, S.J.F.; Ven, L.G.J. van der

    2012-01-01

    Water transport in polymer coatings is a key process in their failure. Mostly, such systems are composed of multiple layers to meet the required specifications. Understanding water transport requires a model that relates the kinetics with the properties of the layers. In this article a theoretical m

  5. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-board the Polarstern research vessel and in the Siberian Lena delta Samoylov research station (N 72° 22', E 126° 29'). The Polarstern measurements cover the summer 2015 Arctic campaign from July to mid-October, including six weeks in the Fram Strait region in July- August, followed by a campaign reaching the North Pole and a transect from the Norwegian Sea to the North Sea. These vapour observations are completed by water isotopic measurements in samples from the surface ocean water for Polarstern and from precipitation in Samoylov and Tiksi (120 km south-east of the station). A custom-made designed automatic calibration system has been implemented in a comparable manner for both vapour instruments, based on the injection of different liquid water standards, which are completely vaporised in dry air at high temperature. Subsequent humidity level can be adjusted from 2000 to at least 30000 ppm. For a better resilience, an independent calibration system has been added on the Samoylov instrument, allowing measurements of one standard at humidity levels ranging from 2000 to 15000 ppm: dry air is introduced in a tank containing a large amount of liquid water standard, undergoing evaporation under a controlled environment. The measurement protocol includes an automatic calibration every 25 hours. First instrument characterisation experiments depict a significant isotope-humidity effect at low humidity, dependant on the isotopic composition of the standard. For ambient air, our first isotope

  6. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user's guide, and a programmer's guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user's guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user's guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer's guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer's guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements

  7. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    OpenAIRE

    H. Riede; Jöckel, P.; Sander, R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D) global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M), the photochemistry submodel...

  8. The Initial Atmospheric Transport (IAT) Code: Description and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Charles W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bartel, Timothy James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Initial Atmospheric Transport (IAT) computer code was developed at Sandia National Laboratories as part of their nuclear launch accident consequences analysis suite of computer codes. The purpose of IAT is to predict the initial puff/plume rise resulting from either a solid rocket propellant or liquid rocket fuel fire. The code generates initial conditions for subsequent atmospheric transport calculations. The Initial Atmospheric Transfer (IAT) code has been compared to two data sets which are appropriate to the design space of space launch accident analyses. The primary model uncertainties are the entrainment coefficients for the extended Taylor model. The Titan 34D accident (1986) was used to calibrate these entrainment settings for a prototypic liquid propellant accident while the recent Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL, or simply APL) large propellant block tests (2012) were used to calibrate the entrainment settings for prototypic solid propellant accidents. North American Meteorology (NAM )formatted weather data profiles are used by IAT to determine the local buoyancy force balance. The IAT comparisons for the APL solid propellant tests illustrate the sensitivity of the plume elevation to the weather profiles; that is, the weather profile is a dominant factor in determining the plume elevation. The IAT code performed remarkably well and is considered validated for neutral weather conditions.

  9. The conservative characteristic FD methods for atmospheric aerosol transport problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kai; Liang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, we develop the new conservative characteristic finite difference methods (C-CFD) for the atmospheric aerosol transport problems. We propose the time second-order and spatial high-order conservative characteristic finite difference methods for the aerosol vertical advection-diffusion process and the two-dimensional conservative characteristic finite difference methods for aerosol horizontal transport process in the second-order splitting algorithm. Based on the characteristic form of advection-diffusion equations tracking back along the characteristic curve, we treat the integrals over the tracking cells at the previous time level by the conservative interpolations and propose to treat the diffusion terms by the average along the characteristics, where the high-order discrete fluxes are obtained by approximating the cumulative mass function and are continuous at the tracking points. The important feature is that the proposed C-CFD schemes preserve mass and have second-order accuracy in time and high-order accuracy in space. Numerical tests are taken to show the accuracy in time and space and mass conservation of our C-CFD schemes, compared with the standard CFD method. A real case of air quality modelling during the 2008 Beijing Olympics and a severe haze in North China are further simulated and analyzed by using our C-CFD algorithm. Simulated results are in good agreement with observations. The developed C-CFD algorithm can be used for efficiently solving large scale atmospheric aerosol transport problems.

  10. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  11. Atmospheric pollution in the mediterranean area: geochemical studies of aerosols and rain waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now recognised that the atmosphere is a major pathway for the transport of material to the oceans. The material in the atmosphere is present as gaseous and particulate (aerosol) phases. Aerosols may be removed from the atmosphere by a combination of 'dry' (i.e. not involving an atmospheric aqueous phase) and 'wet' (precipitation scavenging) processes. Thus, aerosols are intimately related to rain waters, and interactions between the two are discusses below in relation to the input of material to the Mediterranean Sea

  12. Lagrangian coherent structures as mesoscale transport barriers in atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Shibabrat; Ross, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Coherent structures in two-dimensional flows have long been studied in the context of transport in fluid dynamics. However, for geophysical systems a small vertical velocity can lead to nontrivial three-dimensional motion of airborne biological populations affecting agriculture or hazardous outputs from natural disasters. The pathways and barriers in the lower atmosphere, from ground level to a kilometer altitude and over a horizontal scale of several kilometers-which bridge the scale of, for example, local farmlands to the larger regional scale-are still unclear. This requires exploring relevant spatiotemporal scales related to advection in the space of 3D + time. In this talk, we will present the application of finite-time Lyapunov exponent based three-dimensional Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) to address questions of transport using historical data sets from satellite observations, field measurements and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model.

  13. Regional atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen over the British isles assessed using a multi-layer atmospheric transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, N.; Tang, Y.S.; Dragosits, U.; Kluizenaar, Y.de; Sutton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen for the major political regions of the British Isles are investigated with a multi-layer atmospheric transport model. The model is validated against measurements of NH3 concentration and is developed to provide atmospheric budgets for defined subdomains of the

  14. Atmospheric nitrogen in the Mississippi River Basin - Amissions, deposition and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; Goolsby, D.A.; Battaglin, W.A.; Stensland, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen has been cited as a major factor in the nitrogen saturation of forests in the north-eastern United States and as a contributor to the eutrophication of coastal waters, including the Gulf of Mexico near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Sources of nitrogen emissions and the resulting spatial patterns of nitrogen deposition within the Mississippi River Basin, however, have not been fully documented. An assessment of atmospheric nitrogen in the Mississippi River Basin was therefore conducted in 1998-1999 to: (1) evaluate the forms in which nitrogen is deposited from the atmosphere; (2) quantify the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition throughout the basin; and (3) relate locations of emission sources to spatial deposition patterns to evaluate atmospheric transport. Deposition data collected through the NADP/NTN (National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network) and CASTNet (Clean Air Status and Trends Network) were used for this analysis. NO(x) Tier 1 emission data by county was obtained for 1992 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (Emissions Trends Viewer CD, 1985-1995, version 1.0, September 1996) and NH3 emissions data was derived from the 1992 Census of Agriculture (US Department of Commerce. Census of Agriculture, US Summary and County Level Data, US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Geographic Area series, 1995:1b) or the National Agricultural Statistics Service (US Department of Agriculture. National Agricultural Statistics Service Historical Data. Accessed 7/98 at URL, 1998. http://www.usda.gov/nass/pubs/hisdata.htm). The highest rates of wet deposition of NO3- were in the north-eastern part of the basin, downwind of electric utility plants and urban areas, whereas the highest rates of wet deposition of NH4+ were in Iowa, near the center of intensive agricultural activities in the Midwest. The lowest rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition were on the western (windward

  15. Water isotope characteristics of landfalling atmospheric rivers in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, H.; Reilly, S. P.; Martin, A.; Kawzenuk, B.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are a defining feature of mid-latitude water vapor transport, responsible for 30-50% of the precipitation delivered to the western US on an annual basis. Despite the growing number of intra-event stable isotope studies, water isotope time series has only been examined for a single AR event to date. Here, we present hourly oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in precipitation for two AR events: 1) A December 10-12 event, collected in Santa Clara, CA; and 2) Four precipitation time series collected during the February 6-8 AR event in Cazadero, CA. During the December event, δ18O values decrease steadily from ~ -2 to ~ -20 ‰, with the exception of the 6 hours leading to the passage of the cold front at the surface. During this period, d-excess values decreases by 10-15 ‰, consistent with a transition between multiple moisture sources. Three of four February precipitation events exhibit V-shapes of up to 6 ‰ in δ18O values. Such patterns have been observed in a prior AR event as well as other mid-latitude cyclones, and may reflect changes in post-condensation exchange related to cold front passage. Future work will incorporate additional meteorological in-situ and satellite-derived observations in order to gain insight into the atmospheric river dynamics.

  16. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    The atmospheric branch of the water cycle, although containing just a tiny fraction of the Earth's total water reserves, presents a crucial interface between the physical climate (such as large-scale rainfall patterns) and the ecosystems upon which human societies ultimately depend. Because of the central importance of water in the Earth system, the question of how the water cycle is changing, and how it may alter in future as a result of anthropogenic changes, present one of the greatest challenges of this century. The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Climate Change and Water (Bates et al 2008) highlighted the increasingly strong evidence of change in the global water cycle and associated environmental consequences. It is of critical importance to climate prediction and adaptation strategies that key processes in the atmospheric water cycle are precisely understood and determined, from evaporation at the surface of the ocean, transport by the atmosphere, condensation as cloud and eventual precipitation, and run-off through rivers following interaction with the land surface, sub-surface, ice, snow and vegetation. The purpose of this special focus issue of Environmental Research Letters on anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle is to consolidate the recent substantial advances in understanding past, present and future changes in the global water cycle through evidence built upon theoretical understanding, backed up by observations and borne out by climate model simulations. Thermodynamic rises in water vapour provide a central constraint, as discussed in a guest editorial by Bengtsson (2010). Theoretical implications of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation are presented by O'Gorman and Muller (2010) and with reference to a simple model (Sherwood 2010) while observed humidity changes confirm these anticipated responses at the land and ocean surface (Willett et al 2008). Rises in low-level moisture are thought to fuel an

  17. Operational simulation of continental water masses consistent with atmospheric and oceanic data.

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Dill; Walter, C.;  

    2008-01-01

    Operational global mass transport data of the atmosphere and the oceans are widely used for studies of earth rotation excitation and gravity field simulations and are essential for GRACE dealising purposes, too. Seasonal and short periodic variations are also caused by continental water mass redistributions. In order to account for the continental hydrology processes as well and to close the global water cycle, continental water mass storage fields and fluxes are needed in the same operationa...

  18. Passive water and ion transport by cotransporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, D D; Hirayama, B A; Meinild, A K;

    1999-01-01

    1. The rabbit Na+-glucose (SGLT1) and the human Na+-Cl--GABA (GAT1) cotransporters were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and passive Na+ and water transport were studied using electrical and optical techniques. Passive water permeabilities (Lp) of the cotransporters were determined from the c...

  19. Atmospheric transport, clouds and the Arctic longwave radiation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlar, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clouds interact with radiation, causing variations in the amount of electromagnetic energy reaching the Earth's surface, or escaping the climate system to space. While globally clouds lead to an overall cooling radiative effect at the surface, over the Arctic, where annual cloud fractions are high, the surface cloud radiative effect generally results in a warming. The additional energy input from absorption and re-emission of longwave radiation by the clouds to the surface can have a profound effect on the sea ice state. Anomalous atmospheric transport of heat and moisture into the Arctic, promoting cloud formation and enhancing surface longwave radiation anomalies, has been identified as an important mechanism in preconditioning Arctic sea ice for melt. Longwave radiation is emitted equally in all directions, and changes in the atmospheric infrared emission temperature and emissivity associated with advection of heat and moisture over the Arctic should correspondingly lead to an anomalous signal in longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). To examine the role of atmospheric heat and moisture transport into the Arctic on TOA longwave radiation, infrared satellite sounder observations from AIRS during 2003-2014 are analyzed for summer (JJAS). Thermodynamic metrics are developed to identify months characterized by a high frequency of warm and moist advection into the Arctic, and segregate the 2003-14 time period into climatological and anomalously warm, moist summer months. We find that anomalously warm, moist months result in a significant TOA longwave radiative cooling, which is opposite the forcing signal that the surface experiences during these months. At the timescale of the advective events, 3-10 days, the TOA cooling can be as large as the net surface energy budget during summer. When averaged on the monthly time scale, and over the full Arctic basin (poleward of 75°N), summer months experiencing frequent warm, moist advection events are

  20. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on a range of atmospheric and external parameters. We show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the mi...

  1. The role of moisture transport between ground and atmosphere in global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Projections of the effect of climate change on future water availability are examined by reviewing the formulations used to calculate moisture transport between the ground and the atmosphere. General circulation models and climate change impact models have substantially different formulations for evapotranspiration, so their projections of future water availability often disagree, even though they use the same temperature and precipitation forecasts. General circulation models forecast little change in tropical and subtropical water availability, while impact models show severe water and agricultural shortages. A comparison of observations and modeling techniques shows that the parameterizations in general circulation models likely lead to an underestimate of the impacts of global warming on soil moisture and vegetation. Such errors would crucially affect the temperature and precipitation forecasts used in impact models. Some impact model evaporation formulations are probably more appropriate than those in general circulation models, but important questions remain. More observations are needed, especially in the vicinity of forests, to determine appropriate parameterizations

  2. Proceedings of the 2{sup nd} international conference on transport, atmosphere and climate (TAC-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausen, Robert; Blum, Anja (eds.) [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Velthoven, Peter F.J. van [Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Institut, De Bilt (Netherlands); Bruening, Claus [European Commission, DG Research, Directorate Environment, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    This volume collects oral and poster contributions to the '2nd International Conference on Transport, Atmosphere and Climate (TAC-2)' held in Aachen and Maastricht, 2009. With the objective of updating our knowledge on the impacts of transport on the composition of the atmosphere and on climate, the TAC-2 conference covered all aspects of the impact of the different modes of transport (aviation, road transport, shipping etc.) on atmospheric chemistry, cloud physics, radiation and climate, in particular: Engine emissions (gaseous and particulate), emission scenarios and emission data bases for transport, near-field and plume processes, effective emissions, transport impact on the chemical composition of the atmosphere, transport impact on aerosols, contrails, contrail cirrus, ship tracks, indirect cloud effects (e.g., aerosol-cloud interaction), radiation forcing, impact on climate, metrics for measuring climate change and damage, mitigation of transport impacts by technological changes in vehicles and engines, mitigation of transport impacts by operational means. (orig.)

  3. Meridional transport and deposition of atmospheric 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Feichter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores exhibit larger temporal variability than expected based on theoretical production calculations. To investigate whether this is due to atmospheric transport a general circulation model study is performed with the 10Be production divided into stratospheric, tropospheric tropical, tropospheric subtropical and tropospheric polar sources. A control run with present day 10Be production rate is compared with a run during a geomagnetic minimum. The present 10Be production rate is 4–5 times higher at high latitudes than in the tropics whereas during a period of no geomagnetic dipole field it is constant at all latitudes. The 10Be deposition fluxes, however, show a very similar latitudinal distribution in both the present day and the geomagnetic minimum run indicating that 10Be is well mixed in the atmosphere before its deposition. This is also confirmed by the fact that the contribution of 10Be produced in the stratosphere is dominant (55%–70% and relatively constant at all latitudes. The contribution of stratospheric 10Be is approximately 70% in Greenland and 60% in Antarctica reflecting the weaker stratosphere-troposphere air exchange in the Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dam

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The main features and theoretical concepts of SWAP are described.A serious limitation of many model applications is the availability of accurate input parameters. With the rapid increase of processor cal...

  5. The Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) - Validation of a long-term atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrich, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Hans; Strobl, Christopher; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In the last couple of years, the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model (ARTM) has been developed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) and the Society for Plant and Reactor Security (GRS). ARTM is an atmospheric dispersion model for continuous long-term releases of radionuclides into the atmosphere, based on the Lagrangian particle model. This model, developed in the first place as a more realistic replacement for the out-dated Gaussian plume models, is currently being optimised for further scientific purposes to study atmospheric dispersion in short-range scenarios. It includes a diagnostic wind field model, allows for the application of building structures and multiple sources (including linear, 2-and 3-dimensional source geometries), and considers orography and surface roughness. As an output it calculates the activity concentration, dry and wet deposition and can model also the radioactive decay of Rn-222. As such, ARTM requires to undergo an intense validation process. While for short-term and short-range models, which were mainly developed for examining nuclear accidents or explosions, a few measurement data-sets are available for validation, data-sets for validating long-term models are very sparse and the existing ones mostly prove to be not applicable for validation. Here we present a strategy for the validation of long-term Lagrangian particle models based on the work with ARTM. In our validation study, the first part we present is a comprehensive analysis of the model sensitivities on different parameters like e.g. (simulation grid size resolution, starting random number, amount of simulation particles, etc.). This study provides a good estimation for the uncertainties of the simulation results and consequently can be used to generate model outputs comparable to the available measurements data at various distances from the emission source. This comparison between measurement data from selected scenarios and simulation results

  6. The Use of Strontium-87/Strontium-86 Ratios to Measure Atmospheric Transport into Forested Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graustein, William C.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios indicate the sources of strontium in samples of natural waters, vegetation, and soil material taken from watersheds in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. More than 75 percent of the strontium in the vegetation is ultimately derived from atmospheric transport and less than 25 percent from the weathering of the underlying rock. Much of the airborne strontium enters the watersheds by impacting on coniferous foliage, but deciduous foliage apparently traps little, if any, strontium-bearing aerosol. The strontium and presumably other nutrients are continuously recycled in a nearly closed system consisting of upper soil horizons, forest litter, and the standing crop of vegetation.

  7. An examination of atmospheric river moisture transport and hydrology using isotope-enabled CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaumer, Jesse

    Atmospheric rivers are a feature of the atmospheric circulation that play a major role in terms of precipitation, flooding, drought, and even the global climate system itself. Thus understanding what the main controls on these weather systems are is critical if one wants to be able to determine the impact they could eventually impose on society. Also too, almost all climate projections are performed by global climate or earth system models. Thus there is a need to ensure that these sorts of models can accurately simulate atmospheric rivers, and the global hydrologic cycle in general, if one is to have confidence in the projections generated by these programs. These concerns are examined in this thesis. In particular, the CAM5 model is used to generate a climatology of extreme moisture transport from transient eddies and atmospheric rivers, which is compared to a reanalysis. It is found that although the average climatological results are similar, the average moisture flux per event was too weak, indicating that the model may not adequately simulate the more extreme flux and/or precipitation events, which can have the largest impact on society. To further investigate what might be causing this bias, water tracer and isotope physics were added to CAM5, where the biases present in the isotope-enabled simulations show that CAM5 generates too much precipitation. A sensitivity analysis is performed to try and determine the specific cause of the bias, and it is found that CAM5 generates deep convection too frequently, particularly in the winter midlatitudes over the ocean. This could also help explain the weakened moisture fluxes in atmospheric rivers, as too much moisture is lost in the model due to overly active convection. Finally, water tracers are used to examine the moisture sources for the West Coast of the United States, including in atmospheric rivers. It is found that atmospheric rivers pull more moisture from the tropics than average. It is also found that in

  8. WATER FORMATION IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF THE EARLY EARTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Marcq, Emmanuel; Vettier, Ludovic; Määttänen, Anni, E-mail: benjamin.fleury@latmos.ipsl.fr [Université Versailles St-Quentin, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, 11 Boulevard d’Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2015-07-10

    The water concentration and distribution in the early Earth's atmosphere are important parameters that contribute to the chemistry and the radiative budget of the atmosphere. If the atmosphere above the troposphere is generally considered as dry, photochemistry is known to be responsible for the production of numerous minor species. Here we used an experimental setup to study the production of water in conditions simulating the chemistry above the troposphere of the early Earth with an atmospheric composition based on three major molecules: N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}. The formation of gaseous products was monitored using infrared spectroscopy. Water was found as the major product, with approximately 10% of the gas products detected. This important water formation is discussed in the context of the early Earth.

  9. Atmospheric drivers of storage water use in Scots pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Verbeeck

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we determined the microclimatic drivers of storage water use in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. growing in a temperate climate. The storage water use was modeled using the ANAFORE model, integrating a dynamic water flow and – storage model with a process-based transpiration model. The model was calibrated and validated with sap flow measurements for the growing season of 2000 (26 May–18 October.

    Because there was no severe soil drought during the study period, we were able to study atmospheric effects. Incoming radiation was the main driver of storage water use. The general trends of sap flow and storage water use are similar, and follow more or less the pattern of incoming radiation. Nevertheless, considerable differences in the day-to-day pattern of sap flow and storage water use were observed, mainly driven by vapour pressure deficit (VPD. During dry atmospheric conditions (high VPD storage water use was reduced. This reduction was disproportionally higher than the reduction in measured sap flow. Our results suggest that the trees did not rely more on storage water during periods of atmospheric drought, without severe soil drought.

    A third important factor was the tree water deficit. When storage compartments were depleted beyond a threshold, storage water use was limited due to the low water potential in the storage compartments. The maximum relative contribution of storage water to daily transpiration was also constrained by an increasing tree water deficit.

  10. Understanding the Atmospheric Response to Ocean Heat Transport: a Model Inter-Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B.

    2012-12-01

    The oceans' contribution to poleward heat transport (1 to 2 PW) is dwarfed by the atmosphere, and yet ocean heat transport (OHT) exerts a powerful climatic influence by exciting various atmospheric feedbacks. OHT drives polar-amplified greenhouse warming through a dynamical redistribution of tropospheric water vapor, and helps set the strength and position of the ITCZ. These complex responses explicitly couple tropical and extra-tropical processes, and depend on interactions between large-scale dynamics and moist physics. Considerable insights have been drawn from recent idealized experiments with aquaplanet GCMs coupled to slab oceans with prescribed OHT convergence (q-flux). However sensitivity to uncertain model parameterizations pose a barrier to deeper understanding. I will introduce a new multi-institution collaboration called the Q-flux / Aquaplanet Model Inter-comparison Project (QAquMIP), designed to test the robustness of the climatic impact of OHT and its relationship to traditional climate sensitivity. A standardized set of GCM experiments, repeated across a broad range of models, are forced by a few simple analytical q-fluxes. Experimental controls include the meridional scale of poleward OHT, strength of inter-hemispheric OHT, and zonally asymmetric equatorial heating. I will compare robust spatial patterns of temperature and precipitation changes associated with OHT forcing to those driven by CO2, and discuss the underlying spatial pattern of atmospheric feedbacks. A recurring theme is the key role of moist convection in communicating sea surface heating signals throughout the atmosphere, with consequences for clouds, water vapor, radiation, and hydrology. QAquMIP will better constrain the possible role of the oceans in past warm climates, provide a standard framework for testing new parameterizations, and advance our fundamental understanding of the moist processes contributing to present-day climate sensitivity.

  11. Transport of tritium contamination to the atmosphere in an arid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Johnson, M.J.; Michel, R.L.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Soil-plant-atmosphere interactions strongly infl uence water movement in desert unsaturated zones, but litile is known about how such interactions aff ect atmospheric release of subsurface water-borne contaminants. This 2-yr study, performed at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site in southern Nevada, quantifi ed the magnitude and spatiotemporal variability of tritium (3H) transport from the shallow unsaturated zone to the atmosphere adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) facility. Tritium fl uxes were calculated as the product of 3H concentrations in water vapor and respective evaporation and transpiration water-vapor fl uxes. Quarterly measured 3H concentrations in soil water vapor and in leaf water of the dominant creosote-bush [Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville] were spatially extrapolated and temporally interpolated to develop daily maps of contamination across the 0.76-km2 study area. Maximum plant and root-zone soil concentrations (4200 and 8700 Bq L-1, respectively) were measured 25 m from the LLRW facility boundary. Continuous evaporation was estimated using a Priestley-Taylor model and transpiration was computed as the diff erence between measured eddy-covariance evapotranspiration and estimated evaporation. The mean evaporation/transpiration ratio was 3:1. Tritium released from the study area ranged from 0.12 to 12 ??g d-1 and totaled 1.5 mg (8.2 ?? 1010 Bq) over 2 yr. Tritium fl ux variability was driven spatially by proximity to 3H source areas and temporally by changes in 3H concentrations and in the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. Evapotranspiration removed and limited penetration of precipitation beneath native vegetation and fostered upward movement and release of 3H from below the root zone. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  12. Modification of Atmospheric Circulations and Transports due to Amazon Deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, A.; Dirmeyer, P.

    2013-12-01

    Land-use change (LUC) has generally been considered a local environmental issue, but it is now becoming a force of global importance. LUC occurs on local scales, with real world social and economic benefits, that can potentially cause ecological degradation. Large-scale LUC, such as deforestation in the Amazon, can have a significant local affect on the climate and has the potential to impact the regional and global climate systems. Previous climate modeling studies have shown non-local responses due to Amazon deforestation, however, a common flaw in these studies is the use of prescribed ocean conditions, which can dampen the global response. Using fully coupled modeling simulations with the Community Earth System Model version 1.2.0, the Amazon rainforest has been replaced with a distribution of representative tropical crops. The degree of modification to the general circulation due to heating anomalies in the tropics as a response to the removal of the Amazon rainforest is quantified. Most notably, modifications to the Hadley and Walker circulations, the two fundamental circulations mediating the climate at low latitudes, occur. Coupling these circulation changes with sensible heat and latent heat fluxes, atmospheric transports of heat and moisture are affected both regionally and globally.

  13. Atmospheric transport and wet deposition of ammonium in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John T.; Aneja, Viney P.; Dickey, David A.

    Wet deposition and transport analysis has been performed for ammonium (NH 4+) in North Carolina, USA. Multiple regression analysis is employed to model the temporal trend and seasonality in monthly volume-weighted mean NH 4+ concentrations in precipitation from 1983 to 1996 at six National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) sites. A significant ( ppopulated network of swine and poultry operations. This trend is positively correlated with increasing ammonia (NH 3) emissions related to the vigorous growth of North Carolina's swine population since 1990, particularly in the state's Coastal Plain region. A source-receptor regression model, which utilizes weekly NH 4+ concentrations in precipitation in conjunction with boundary layer air mass back trajectories, is developed to statistically test for the influence of a particular NH 3 source region on NH 4+ concentrations at surrounding NADP/NTN sites for the years 1995-1996. NH 3 emissions from this source region, primarily evolving from swine and poultry operations, are found to increase NH 4+ concentration in precipitation at sites up to ≈80 km away. At the Scotland County (NC36) and Wake County (NC41) sites, mean NH 4+ concentrations show increases of at least 44% for weeks during which 25% or more back trajectories are influenced by this source region.

  14. Understanding transport in model water desalination membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edwin

    Polyamide based thin film composites represent the the state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used in water desalination. The performance of these membranes is enabled by the ultrathin (~100 nm) crosslinked polyamide film in facilitating the selective transport of water over salt ions. While these materials have been refined over the last several decades, understanding the relationships between polyamide structure and membrane performance remains a challenge because of the complex and heterogeneous nature of the polyamide film. In this contribution, we present our approach to addressing this challenge by studying the transport properties of model polyamide membranes synthesized via molecular layer-by-layer (mLbL) assembly. First, we demonstrate that mLbL can successfully construct polyamide membranes with well-defined nanoscale thickness and roughness using a variety of monomer formulations. Next, we present measurement tools for characterizing the network structure and transport of these model polyamide membranes. Specifically, we used X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to characterize their structure as well as a recently-developed indentation based poromechanics approach to extrapolate their water diffusion coefficient. Finally, we illustrate how these measurements can provide insight into the original problem by linking the key polyamide network properties, i.e. water-polyamide interaction parameter and characteristic network mesh size, to the membrane performance.

  15. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model To Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, Estelle; Huete, Alfredo; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; Zelicoff, A. P.; Bunderson, L.; Crimmins, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al., 2003 reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model, Nickovic et al. 2001) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  16. Factors governing water condensation in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, David S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    Modeling results are presented suggesting a diurnal condensation cycle at high altitudes at some seasons and latitudes. In a previous paper, the use of atmospheric optical depth measurements at the Viking lander site to show diurnal variability of water condensation at different seasons of the Mars year was described. Factors influencing the amount of condensation include latitude, season, atmospheric dust content and water vapor content at the observation site. A one-dimensional radiative-convective model is used herein based on the diabatic heating routines under development for the Mars General Circulation Model. The model predicts atmospheric temperature profiles at any latitude, season, time of day and dust load. From these profiles and an estimate of the water vapor, one can estimate the maximum occurring at an early morning hour (AM) and the minimum in the late afternoon (PM). Measured variations in the atmospheric optical density between AM and PM measurements were interpreted as differences in AM and PM condensation.

  17. Atmospheric effects on infrared measurements at ground level: Application to monitoring of transport infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Dumoulin, Jean

    2014-05-01

    Being able to perform easily non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of critical transport infrastructures is a major preoccupation of many technical offices. Among all the existing electromagnetic methods [1], long term thermal monitoring by uncooled infrared camera [2] is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its low cost on the market. Nevertheless, Knowledge of environmental parameters during measurement in outdoor applications is required to carry out accurate measurement corrections induced by atmospheric effects at ground level. Particularly considering atmospheric effects and measurements in foggy conditions close as possible to those that can be encountered around transport infrastructures, both in visible and infrared spectra. In the present study, atmospheric effects are first addressed by using data base available in literature and modelling. Atmospheric attenuation by particles depends greatly of aerosols density, but when relative humidity increases, water vapor condenses onto the particulates suspended in the atmosphere. This condensed water increases the size of the aerosols and changes their composition and their effective refractive index. The resulting effect of the aerosols on the absorption and scattering of radiation will correspondingly be modified. In a first approach, we used aerosols size distributions derived from Shettle and Fenn [3] for urban area which could match some of experimental conditions encountered during trials on transport infrastructures opened to traffic. In order to calculate the influence of relative humidity on refractive index, the Hänel's model [4] could be used. The change in the particulate size is first related to relative humidity through dry particle radius, particle density and water activity. Once the wet aerosol particle size is found, the effective complex refractive index is the volume weighted average of the refractive indexes of the dry aerosol substance

  18. A synthesis of atmospheric mercury depletion event chemistry linking atmosphere, snow and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Steffen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It was discovered in 1995 that, during the spring time, unexpectedly low concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM occurred in the Arctic air. This was surprising for a pollutant known to have a long residence time in the atmosphere; however conditions appeared to exist in the Arctic that promoted this depletion of mercury (Hg. This phenomenon is termed atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs and its discovery has revolutionized our understanding of the cycling of Hg in Polar Regions while stimulating a significant amount of research to understand its impact to this fragile ecosystem. Shortly after the discovery was made in Canada, AMDEs were confirmed to occur throughout the Arctic, sub-Artic and Antarctic coasts. It is now known that, through a series of photochemically initiated reactions involving halogens, GEM is converted to a more reactive species and is subsequently associated to particles in the air and/or deposited to the polar environment. AMDEs are a means by which Hg is transferred from the atmosphere to the environment that was previously unknown. In this article we review the history of Hg in Polar Regions, the methods used to collect Hg in different environmental media, research results of the current understanding of AMDEs from field, laboratory and modeling work, how Hg cycles around the environment after AMDEs, gaps in our current knowledge and the future impacts that AMDEs may have on polar environments. The research presented has shown that while considerable improvements in methodology to measure Hg have been made the main limitation remains knowing the speciation of Hg in the various media. The processes that drive AMDEs and how they occur are discussed. As well, the roles that the snow pack, oceans, fresh water and the sea ice play in the cycling of Hg are presented. It has been found that deposition of Hg from AMDEs occurs at marine coasts and not far inland and that a fraction of the deposited Hg does not

  19. IASOA circumpolar observations in service for research of atmospheric transports into and out of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihma, Timo; Uttal, Taneil; Walden, Von; Cox, Christopher; Starkweather, Sandy; Makshtas, Alexander; Key, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) is an International Polar Year legacy consortium that focuses on coordinating measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected at ten observatories in the U.S., Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. The IASOA data portal and collaboratory process support thematic expert groups that work towards common goals for utilizing interoperable data products across the observatories. In addition to detailed surface observations and upper-air radiosonde program, some of the IASOA observatories collect information on the vertical profiles of moisture, cloud boundaries, cloud water/ice contents, and aerosols using radars, lidars ceilometers and radiometers. Collectively the IASOA network provides a unique source of information that can be utilized in order to provide the best possible empirical estimates of the horizontal atmospheric transports of momentum, heat, moisture, cloud water, cloud ice, and aerosols into and out of the Arctic Ocean region. These can be used in turn to support the evaluation of atmospheric reanalyses, weather and climate models, and satellite remote sensing products, and subsequently studies on the interaction between the Arctic and lower latitudes including the role of mid- and low-latitude forcing on the Arctic amplification of climate warming and the effects of Arctic changes on mid-latitude weather and climate. In addition, the IASOA data are valuable for the evaluation of gridded products (reanalyses, models, and satellite data) with respect to Earth surface variables, such as snow depth, soil moisture, surface temperature, radiative fluxes, albedo, as well as turbulent fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, CO2, and CH4. Evaluation of surface fluxes is a vital to complement the evaluation of horizontal transports. These together will yield a comprehensive assessment of the quality of available gridded products in representing atmospheric budgets of heat, moisture

  20. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  1. Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Boucher, O.; Bopp, L.; Chappell, A.; Ciais, P.; Hauglustaine, D.; Peñuelas, J.; Tao, S.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe) plays an important role in controlling oceanic primary productivity. However, the sources of Fe in the atmosphere are not well understood. In particular, the combustion sources of Fe and the subsequent deposition to the oceans have been accounted for in only few ocean biogeochemical models of the carbon cycle. Here we used a mass-balance method to estimate the emissions of Fe from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass by accounting for the Fe contents in fuel and the partitioning of Fe during combustion. The emissions of Fe attached to aerosols from combustion sources were estimated by particle size, and their uncertainties were quantified by a Monte Carlo simulation. The emissions of Fe from mineral sources were estimated using the latest soil mineralogical database to date. As a result, the total Fe emissions from combustion averaged for 1960-2007 were estimated to be 5.3 Tg yr-1 (90% confidence of 2.3 to 12.1). Of these emissions, 1, 27 and 72% were emitted in particles 10 μm (PM> 10), respectively, compared to a total Fe emission from mineral dust of 41.0 Tg yr-1 in a log-normal distribution with a mass median diameter of 2.5 μm and a geometric standard deviation of 2. For combustion sources, different temporal trends were found in fine and medium-to-coarse particles, with a notable increase in Fe emissions in PM1 since 2000 due to an increase in Fe emission from motor vehicles (from 0.008 to 0.0103 Tg yr-1 in 2000 and 2007, respectively). These emissions have been introduced in a global 3-D transport model run at a spatial resolution of 0.94° latitude by 1.28° longitude to evaluate our estimation of Fe emissions. The modelled Fe concentrations as monthly means were compared with the monthly (57 sites) or daily (768 sites) measured concentrations at a total of 825 sampling stations. The deviation between modelled and observed Fe concentrations attached to aerosols at the surface was within a factor of 2 at most

  2. Sources, transport and deposition of iron in the global atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition of iron (Fe plays an important role in controlling oceanic primary productivity. However, the sources of Fe in the atmosphere are not well understood. In particular, the combustion sources of Fe and their deposition over oceans are not accounted for in current biogeochemical models of the carbon cycle. Here we used a mass-balance method to estimate the emissions of Fe from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass by accounting for the Fe contents in fuel and the partitioning of Fe during combustion. The emissions of Fe attached to aerosols from combustion sources were estimated by particle size, and their uncertainties were quantified by a Monte Carlo simulation. The emissions of Fe from mineral sources were estimated using the latest soil mineralogical database to date. As a result, the total Fe emissions from combustion averaged for 1960–2007 were estimated to be 5.1 Tg yr−1 (90% confidence of 2.2 to 11.5. Of these emissions, 2, 33 and 65% were emitted in particles 1, 1–10 μm (PM1−10, and >10 μm (PM>10, respectively, compared to total Fe emissions from mineral sources of 41.0 Tg yr−1. For combustion sources, different temporal trends were found in fine and medium-to-coarse particles, with a notable increase in Fe emissions in PM1 and PM1−10 since 2000 due to a rapid increase from motor vehicles. These emissions have been introduced in a global 3-D transport model run at a spatial resolution of of 0.94° latitude by 1.28° longitude to evaluate our estimation of Fe emissions. The modelled Fe concentrations were compared to measurements at 825 sampling stations. The deviation between modelled and observed Fe concentrations attached to aerosols at the surface was within a factor of two at most sampling stations, and the deviation was within a factor of 1.5 at sampling stations dominated by combustion sources. We analyzed the relative contribution of combustion sources to total Fe concentrations over

  3. A process-based evapotranspiration model incorporating coupled soil water-atmospheric controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration models (in the framework of the Penman-Monteith equation) with improved parametrizations of various resistance terms to water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, evidence suggests that estimates of evapotranspiration and its partitioning are prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from the exclusion of surface hydro-thermal properties and of physical interactions close to the surface where heat and water vapor fluxes originate. Recent progress has been made in mechanistic modeling of surface-turbulence interactions, accounting for localized heat and mass exchange rates from bare soil surfaces covered by protruding obstacles. We seek to extend these results partially vegetated surfaces, to improve predictive capabilities and accuracy of remote sensing techniques quantifying evapotranspiration fluxes. The governing equations of liquid water, water vapor, and energy transport dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system are coupled to resolve diffusive vapor fluxes from isolated pores (plant stomata and soil pores) across a near-surface viscous sublayer, explicitly accounting for pore-scale transport mechanisms and environmental forcing. Preliminary results suggest that this approach offers unique opportunities for directly linking transport properties in plants and adjacent bare soil with resulting plant transpiration and localized bare soil evaporation rates. It thus provides an essential building block for interpreting and upscaling results to field and landscape scales for a range of vegetation cover and atmospheric conditions.

  4. Diurnal to annual variations in the atmospheric water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Ruane, Alexander C

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation examines aspects of diurnal to annual variability in the atmospheric water cycle in observations and global numerical weather prediction models. Investigations begin with an in-depth evaluation of variance at a single time scale, followed by a comprehensive analysis of a particular water cycle component, and finally a complete description of the balances and exchanges of water cycle components across time scales. Comparisons of global and regional reanalyses reveal ...

  5. Retrieving Atmospheric Precipitable Water Vapor Using Artificial Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Discussing of water vapor and its variation is the important issue for synoptic meteorology and meteorology. In physical Atmospheric, the moisture content of the earth atmosphere is one of the most important parameters, it is hard to represent water vapor because of its space-time variation. High-spectral resolution Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS data can be used to retrieve the small scale vertical structure of air temperature, which provided a more accurate and good initial field for the numerical forecasting and the large-scale weather analysis. This paper proposes an artificial neural network to retrieve the clear sky atmospheric radiation data from AIRS and comparing with the AIRS Level-2 standard product, and gain a good inversion results.

  6. Mechanism of isotonic water transport in glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussing, H H; Eskesen, K

    1989-07-01

    Since water and electrolytes pass cell membranes via separate channels, there can be no interactions in the membranes, and osmotic interactions between water and solutes can be expressed as the product of solute flux, frictional coefficient of solute, and length of pathway. It becomes clear that isotonic transport via a cell is impossible. In glands, where cation-selective junctions impede anion flux between the cells, isotonic water transport is only possible if sodium, after having passed the junction, is reabsorbed in the acinus and returned to the serosal side. Thus it can be recycled via the cation-selective junction and exert its drag on water more than once. This hypothesis was tested on frog skin glands. Skins were mounted in flux chambers with identical Ringer solutions on both sides. Na channels of the principal cells were closed with amiloride in the outside solution, and secretion stimulated with noradrenaline in the inside solution. Influx and efflux of Na, K and Br (used as tracer for Cl) were measured on paired half-skins during the constant-secretion phase. Flux ratios for both Na and K were higher than expected for electrodiffusion, indicating outgoing solvent drag. Flux ratios for K were much higher than those for Na. This is an agreement with the concept that Na is reabsorbed in the acinus and K is not. Two independent expressions for the degree of sodium recycling are developed. Under all experimental conditions these expressions give values for the recycling which are in good agreement. PMID:2473601

  7. The water footprint of biofuel-based transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P.W.; Hoekstra, A.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The EU target to replace 10 percent of transport fuels by renewables by 2020 requires additional water. This study calculates water footprints (WFs) of transport modes using first generation bio-ethanol, biodiesel or bio-electricity and of European transport if 10 percent of transport fuels is bio-e

  8. Metal Contamination of the Natural Environment in Norway from Long Range Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinnes, E. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry (Norway)], E-mail: eiliv.steinnes@chembio.ntnu.no

    2001-05-15

    Long range atmospheric transport is the most important source of contamination to the natural environment in Norway with many heavy metals. Investigations based on aerosol studies, bulk deposition measurements and moss analysis show that airborne transport from other parts of Europe is the major mode for supply of vanadium, zinc, arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, cadmium, tin,antimony, tellurium, thallium, lead, and bismuth, whereas metals such as chromium, nickel, and copper are mainly derived from point sources within Norway and in northwestern Russia close to the Norwegian border. Elements associated with long range transport show substantial enrichment in the humus horizon of natural soils in southern Norway, sometimes to levels suspected to cause effects on soil microbial processes. E.g. lead concentration values of 150-200 ppm are observed in the most contaminated areas in the south as compared to about 5 ppm in the far north. Elements such as lead and cadmium also show enrichment in some terrestrial food chains. These elements also show considerably elevated levels over background concentrations in the water and sediment of small lakes in the southern part of the country. Retrospective studies based on ombrogenous peatcores indicate that long range transport has been a significant source of heavy metal contamination in southern Norway for the last couple of centuries. The deposition of most heavy metals in Norway has been considerably reduced over the last 20 yr, with the exception of contributions in the north from Russian smelters.

  9. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking, Version 2(RATCHET2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, James V.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

    2006-07-01

    This manual describes the atmospheric model and computer code for the Atmospheric Transport Module within SAC. The Atmospheric Transport Module, called RATCHET2, calculates the time-integrated air concentration and surface deposition of airborne contaminants to the soil. The RATCHET2 code is an adaptation of the Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emissions Tracking (RATCHET). The original RATCHET code was developed to perform the atmospheric transport for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Fundamentally, the two sets of codes are identical; no capabilities have been deleted from the original version of RATCHET. Most modifications are generally limited to revision of the run-specification file to streamline the simulation process for SAC.

  10. High-resolution terahertz atmospheric water vapor continuum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the large number of rotational and vibrational transitions of many molecules of interest. This region of the spectrum has particular utility for applications such as pollution monitoring and the detection of energetic chemicals using remote sensing over long path lengths through the atmosphere. Although there has been much attention to atmospheric effects over narrow frequency windows, accurate measurements across a wide spectrum are lacking. The water vapor continuum absorption is an excess absorption that is unaccounted for in resonant line spectrum simulations. Currently a semiempirical model is employed to account for this absorption, however more measurements are necessary to properly describe the continuum absorption in this region. Fourier Transform Spectroscopy measurements from previous work are enhanced with high-resolution broadband measurements in the atmospheric transmission window at 1.5THz. The transmission of broadband terahertz radiation through pure water vapor as well as air with varying relative humidity levels was recorded for multiple path lengths. The pure water vapor measurements provide accurate determination of the line broadening parameters and experimental measurements of the transition strengths of the lines in the frequency region. Also these measurements coupled with the atmospheric air measurements allow the water vapor continuum absorption to be independently identified at 1.5THz. Simulations from an atmospheric absorption model using parameters from the HITRAN database are compared with the current and previous experimental results.

  11. Electron transport analysis in water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    A reliable set of electron collision cross sections for water vapor, including elastic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation, electron attachment, and ionization cross sections, is estimated by the electron swarm method. In addition, anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collisions is considered in the cross section set. Electron transport coefficients such as electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization coefficient are calculated from the cross section set by Monte Carlo simulation in a wide range of E/N values, where E and N are the applied electric field and the number density of H2O molecules, respectively. The calculated transport coefficients are in good agreement with those measured. The obtained results confirm that the anisotropic electron scattering is important for the calculation at low E/N values. Furthermore, the cross section set assuming the isotropic electron scattering is proposed for practical use.

  12. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrell, Cecilia

    1999-04-01

    The load of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is considered high in the Baltic ecosystem. The Baltic Sea spans over 12 latitudes and the regional differences in climate affect the behavior of POPs. Therefore spatial and temporal variability of the concentrations of POPs in air and precipitation within this area has been investigated at 16 (mostly rural) stations around the Baltic Sea between 1990-1993. In addition, the deposition of gaseous and particulate associated POPs to the Baltic Sea is estimated from empirical data. This atmospheric input of POPs is compared with the input from rivers. Additionally, data from Ross Island, Antarctica and Lake Kariba, Zimbabve, Africa is presented, and all results are discussed and explained using the `global fractionation hypothesis` as a framework. In the Baltic Sea, concentration of individual POPs in air were found to be influenced by their physical-chemical properties, ambient air temperature and location. A latitudinal gradient, with higher levels in the south was found for PCBs and the gradient was more pronounced for the low volatility congeners. As a result, the high volatility congeners in air increased in relative importance with latitude. Generally, PCB concentration increased with temperature, but slopes of the partial pressure in air versus reciprocal temperature were different between congeners and between stations. In general, the low volatility congeners were more temperature dependent than the high volatility PCB congeners. Steep slopes at a sampling location indicate that the concentration in air is largely determined by diffusive exchange with soils. Lack of a temperature dependence may be due to the influence of long-range transported air masses at remote sites and due to the episodic, or random nature of PCB sources at urban sites. The concentrations of individual congeners in precipitation were found to be influenced by atmospheric concentrations of PCBs, ambient temperature, precipitation volume and

  13. Water activated doping and transport in multilayered germanane crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of germanane (GeH) has opened the door for covalently functionalizable 2D materials in electronics. Herein, we demonstrate that GeH can be electronically doped by incorporating stoichiometric equivalents of phosphorus dopant atoms into the CaGe2 precursor. The electronic properties of these doped materials show significant atmospheric sensitivity, and we observe a reduction in resistance by up to three orders of magnitude when doped samples are measured in water-containing atmospheres. This variation in resistance is a result of water activation of the phosphorus dopants. Transport measurements in different contact geometries show a significant anisotropy between in-plane and out-of-plane resistances, with a much larger out-of-plane resistance. These measurements along with finite element modeling results predict that the current distribution in top-contacted crystals is restricted to only the topmost, water activated crystal layers. Taken together, these results pave the way for future electronic and optoelectronic applications utilizing group IV graphane analogues. (paper)

  14. Spectroscopy underlying microwave remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, M. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a spectroscopist's view on the problem of recovery of the atmosphere humidity profile using modern microwave radiometers. Fundamental equations, including the description of their limitations, related to modeling of atmospheric water vapor absorption are given. A review of all reported to date experimental studies aimed at obtaining corresponding numerical parameters is presented. Best estimates of these parameters related to the Voigt (Lorentz, Gross, Van Vleck - Weisskopf and other equivalent) profile based modeling of the 22- and 183-GHz water vapor diagnostic lines and to non-resonance absorption as well as corresponding uncertainties are made on the basis of their comparative analysis.

  15. The atmosphere can be a source of certain water soluble volatile organic compounds in urban streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Scott J.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.; ,; James F. Pankow,

    2014-01-01

    Surface water and air volatile organic compound (VOC) data from 10 U.S. Geological Survey monitoring sites were used to evaluate the potential for direct transport of VOCs from the atmosphere to urban streams. Analytical results of 87 VOC compounds were screened by evaluating the occurrence and detection levels in both water and air, and equilibrium concentrations in water (Cws) based on the measured air concentrations. Four compounds (acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether, toluene, and m- & p-xylene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples, in more than 10% of air samples, and more than 10% of detections in air were greater than long-term method detection levels (LTMDL) in water. Benzene was detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Two percent of benzene detections in air were greater than one-half the LTMDL in water. Six compounds (chloroform, p-isopropyltoluene, methylene chloride, perchloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethene) were detected in more than 20% of water samples and in more than 10% of air samples. Five VOCs, toluene, m- & p-xylene, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), acetone, and benzene were identified as having sufficiently high concentrations in the atmosphere to be a source to urban streams. MTBE, acetone, and benzene exhibited behavior that was consistent with equilibrium concentrations in the atmosphere.

  16. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  17. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stemmler

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use since decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8–23 t a−1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere lead to episodic transport events (timescale of days into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≈1 t a−1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondarily formed.

  18. Global modelling of the early Martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Water cycle and ice evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, R.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Head, J.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Charnay, B.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss 3D global simulations of the early Martian climate that we have performed assuming a faint young Sun and denser CO2 atmosphere. We include a self-consistent representation of the water cycle, with atmosphere-surface interactions, atmospheric transport, and the radiative effects of CO2 and H2O gas and clouds taken into account. We find that for atmospheric pressures greater than a fraction of a bar, the adiabatic cooling effect causes temperatures in the southern highland valley net...

  19. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.

    1993-09-13

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate.

  20. INVESTIGATION OF ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY TRANSPORT ON THE BASIS OF AEROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NYITRAI L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global upper-air data base over the last 40 years is available by courtesy of College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University of Wyoming. Considering the fact, that in the atmospheric moisture transport between the oceans and the continents the humidity flow is much stronger towards the mainland than in the reverse direction, therefore it is reasonable to look for some correlation between the moisture transport and precipitation climate of the continents. For Europe, this is not easy because of the highly indented coastlines. According to laws of physics moisture transport influx to a (part of a continent i.e. through the border of a closed curve occurs as rain falling out in the water balance of the geographical area investigated. We are interested in quasi-stationary temporal changes showed by the stationary approach mentioned above that can be related to climate change. In Europe the precipitation regime of the rainy coast in Western Balkans can be described as a stationary approach, while the relationship between the moisture coming from the seas and the precipitation climate of Central and Eastern Europe in the past 40 years can be examined as a quasi-stationary process. This change in our region moves towards more frequent droughts having great economic influences, mainly in agriculture and hydrology. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between moisture convergence calculated by the radiosonde measurements and the precipitation climate of a selected area of land.

  1. Atmospheric emissions and long-range transport of persistent organic chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheringer M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Persistent organic chemicals include several groups of halogenated compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs, and polyfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs. These chemicals remain for long times (years to decades in the environment and cycle between different media (air, water, sediment, soil, vegetation, etc.. The environmental distribution of this type of chemicals can conveniently be analyzed by multimedia models. Multimedia models consist of a set of coupled mass balance equations for the environmental media considered; they can be set up at various scales from local to global. Two applications of multimedia models to airborne chemicals are discussed in detail: the day-night cycle of PCBs measured in air near the surface, and the atmospheric long-range transport of volatile precursors of PFCAs, formation of PFCAs by oxidation of these precursors, and subsequent deposition of PFCAs to the surface in remote regions such as the Arctic.

  2. Short Communication: Atmospheric moisture transport, the bridge between ocean evaporation and Arctic ice melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gimeno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available If we could choose a region where the effects of global warming are likely to be pronounced and considerable, and at the same time one where the changes could affect the global climate in similarly asymmetric way with respect to other regions, this would unequivocally be the Arctic. The atmospheric branch of the hydrological cycle lies behind the linkages between the Arctic system and the global climate. Changes in the atmospheric moisture transport have been proposed as a vehicle for interpreting the most significant changes in the Arctic region. This is because the transport of moisture from the extratropical regions to the Arctic has increased in recent decades, and is expected to increase within a warming climate. This increase could be due either to changes in circulation patterns which have altered the moisture sources, or to changes in the intensity of the moisture sources because of enhanced evaporation, or a combination of these two mechanisms. In this short communication we focus on the assessing more objectively the strong link between ocean evaporation trends and Arctic Sea ice melting. We will critically analyze several recent results suggesting links between moisture transport and the extent of sea-ice in the Arctic, this being one of the most distinct indicators of continuous climate change both in the Arctic and on a global scale. To do this we will use a sophisticated Lagrangian approach to develop a more robust framework on some of these previous disconnect ng results, using new information and insights. Among the many mechanisms that could be involved are hydrological (increased Arctic river discharges, radiative (increase of cloud cover and water vapour and meteorological (increase in summer storms crossing the Arctic, or increments in precipitation.

  3. Short Communication: Atmospheric moisture transport, the bridge between ocean evaporation and Arctic ice melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, L.; Vázquez, M.; Nieto, R.; Trigo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    If we could choose a region where the effects of global warming are likely to be pronounced and considerable, and at the same time one where the changes could affect the global climate in similarly asymmetric way with respect to other regions, this would unequivocally be the Arctic. The atmospheric branch of the hydrological cycle lies behind the linkages between the Arctic system and the global climate. Changes in the atmospheric moisture transport have been proposed as a vehicle for interpreting the most significant changes in the Arctic region. This is because the transport of moisture from the extratropical regions to the Arctic has increased in recent decades, and is expected to increase within a warming climate. This increase could be due either to changes in circulation patterns which have altered the moisture sources, or to changes in the intensity of the moisture sources because of enhanced evaporation, or a combination of these two mechanisms. In this short communication we focus on the assessing more objectively the strong link between ocean evaporation trends and Arctic Sea ice melting. We will critically analyze several recent results suggesting links between moisture transport and the extent of sea-ice in the Arctic, this being one of the most distinct indicators of continuous climate change both in the Arctic and on a global scale. To do this we will use a sophisticated Lagrangian approach to develop a more robust framework on some of these previous disconnect ng results, using new information and insights. Among the many mechanisms that could be involved are hydrological (increased Arctic river discharges), radiative (increase of cloud cover and water vapour) and meteorological (increase in summer storms crossing the Arctic, or increments in precipitation).

  4. High-Accuracy Spectral Lines for Radiation Transport in Stellar Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Amit R. Sharma; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Robert Warmbier; Ralf Schneider; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of radiative transfer is an important element for the understanding of the spectral signature and physical structure of stellar atmosphere. PHOENIX1 is a such, very general non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium(NLTE) stellar atmosphere computer code which can handle very large model atoms/molecules as well as line blanketing by hundreds of millions of atomic and molecular lines. The code is used to compute model atmospheres and synthetic spectra (solution of the radiative transport e...

  5. Modeling UTLS water vapor: Transport/Chemistry interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis was initially meant to be a study on the impact on chemistry and climate from UTLS water vapor. However, the complexity of the UTLS water vapor and its recent changes turned out to be a challenge by it self. In the light of this, the overall motivation for the thesis became to study the processes controlling UTLS water vapor and its changes. Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, involved in important climate feedback loops. Thus, a good understanding of the chemical and dynamical behavior of water vapor in the atmosphere is crucial for understanding the climate changes in the last century. Additionally, parts of the work was motivated by the development of a coupled climate chemistry model based on the CAM3 model coupled with the Chemical Transport Model Oslo CTM2. The future work will be concentrated on the UTLS water vapor impact on chemistry and climate. We are currently studying long term trends in UTLS water vapor, focusing on identification of the different processes involved in the determination of such trends. The study is based on natural as well as anthropogenic climate forcings. The ongoing work on the development of a coupled climate chemistry model will continue within our group, in collaboration with Prof. Wei-Chyung Wang at the State University of New York, Albany. Valuable contacts with observational groups are established during the work on this thesis. These collaborations will be continued focusing on continuous model validation, as well as identification of trends and new features in UTLS water vapor, and other tracers in this region. (Author)

  6. Isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor before and after the monsoon's end in the Nagqu River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wusheng; YAO Tandong; TIAN Lide; WANG Yu; YIN Changliang

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapor samples were collected in the Nagqu River Basin in the middle of Tibetan Plateau between August and October in 2004. Results show that there exist some fluctuations of the δ18O of atmospheric water vapor, especially before and after the monsoon's end. Moreover, the variety trend of the δ 18O of atmospheric water vapor inverse correlates with that of dew point. Precipitation events make an important effect upon the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. During the whole sampling period, the δ18O values of atmospheric water vapor are low while precipitation events occurred. The moisture origins also contribute to the variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The oceanic moisture transported by the southwest monsoon results in lower δ18O of atmospheric water vapor in the Nagqu River Basin. Compared with the influence of the oceanic moisture, the δ18O values, however, appear high resulting from the effect of the continental air mass in this region.

  7. Mercury from combustion sources: a review of the chemical species emitted and their transport in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different species of mercury have different physical/chemical properties and thus behave quite differentially in air pollution control equipment and in the atmosphere. In general, emission of mercury from coal combustion sources are approximately 20-50% elemental mercury (Hg0) and 50-80% divalent mercury (Hg(II)), which may be predominantly HgCl2. Emissions of mercury from waste incinerators are approximately 10-20% Hg0 and 75-85% Hg(II). The partitioning of mercury in flue gas between the elemental and divalent forms may be dependent on the concentration of particulate carbon, HCl and other pollutants in the stack emissions. The emission of mercury from combustion facilities depends on the species in the exhaust stream and the type of air pollution control equipment used at the source. Air pollution control equipment for mercury removal at combustion facilities includes activated carbon injection, sodium sulfide injection and wet lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization. White Hg(II) is water-soluble and may be removed form the atmosphere by wet and dry deposition close to the combustion sources, the combination of a high vapor pressure and low water-solubility facilitate the long-range transport of Hg0 in the atmosphere. Background mercury in the atmosphere is predominantly Hg0. Elemental mercury is eventually removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition onto surfaces and by wet deposition after oxidation to water-soluble, divalent mercury. 62 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on atmospheric composition (CO2 and N2 levels), planetary mass, and external parameters (stellar spectrum, orbital distance and impacts). From coupled 1D climate and escape modeling, we show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the middle and upper atmosphere acting as a bottleneck on escape in other circumstances. Around G-stars, efficient loss only occurs on planets with intermediate CO2 atmospheric partial pressures (0.1 to 1 bar) that receive a net flux close to the critical runaway greenhouse limit. Because G-star total luminosity increases with time but XUV/UV luminosity decreases, this places strong limits on moist...

  9. Water transport by the renal Na(+)-dicarboxylate cotransporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinild, A K; Loo, D D; Pajor, A M;

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of the renal Na(+)-dicarboxylate cotransporter, NaDC-1, to transport water. Rabbit NaDC-1 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, cotransporter activity was measured as the inward current generated by substrate (citrate or succinate), and water transport....... This solute-coupled influx of water took place in the absence of, and even against, osmotic gradients. There was a strict stoichiometric relationship between Na(+), substrate, and water transport of 3 Na(+), 1 dicarboxylate, and 176 water molecules/transport cycle. These results indicate that the renal Na...

  10. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Atmospheric Dynamics via the Shallow Water System

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag and magnetic drag) and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single, key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag varies significantly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulatio...

  11. ATMOSPHERIC MOISTURE CONDENSATION TO WATER RECOVERY BY HOME AIR CONDITIONERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth’s atmosphere contains billion cubic meters of fresh water, which is considerable as a reliable water resource, especially in sultry areas. What is important in this context, how to extract the water, in an economic manner. In order to extract water from air conditioner, no need to spend any cost, because water produced as a by-product and trouble production. This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the quantity and chemical quality of water obtained from Bandar Abbas air conditioners; at intervals beginning of March to early December of 2010. Sixty six samples were taken in cluster random plan. Bandar Abbas divided into four clusters; based on distance to shore and population density. Chemical tests which included: Turbidity, alkalinity, total hardness, Dissolved Solids (TDS and Electrical Conductivity (EC and quantity measurement were performed on them. Obtained water had slightly acidic pH, near to neutral range. Total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, total hardness and alkalinity of extracted water were in low rate. Each air conditioner produced 36 liter per day averagely. Split types obtained more water to window air conditioners. With regard to some assumptions, approximately 4680 to 9360 cubic meter per day water is obtainable which is suitable for many municipal and industrial water applications.

  12. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 – Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Righi, M; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Using the EMAC global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE, we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and ...

  13. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Righi, Mattia; Hendricks, Johannes; Sausen, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Using the EMAC global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE, we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and shipping-induced aerosol concent...

  14. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riede

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M, the photochemistry submodel JVAL (J, and the new trajectory submodel TRAJECT (T, to simulate chemistry along atmospheric trajectories, which are provided offline. With the same chemistry submodels coupled to the 3-D EMAC model and consistent initial conditions and physical parameters, a unique consistency between the two models is achieved. Since only mixing processes within the 3-D model are excluded from the model consistency, comparisons of results from the two models allow to separate and quantify contributions of transport, chemistry, and mixing along the trajectory pathways. Consistency of transport between the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the 3-D EMAC model is achieved via calculation of kinematic trajectories based on 3-D wind fields from EMAC using the trajectory model LAGRANTO. The combination of the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the trajectory model LAGRANTO can be considered as a Lagrangian chemistry-transport model (CTM moving isolated air parcels. The procedure for obtaining the necessary statistical basis for the quantification method is described as well as the comprehensive diagnostics with respect to chemistry.

    The quantification method presented here allows to investigate the characteristics of transport, chemistry, and mixing in a grid-based 3-D model. The analysis of chemical processes within the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT is easily extendable to include, for example, the impact of different transport pathways or of mixing processes onto

  15. Surface transport of microorganisms by water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J A

    1991-01-01

    Several studies have reported on the quality of runoff from land that has received either an application of livestock waste or been utilized as a pasture for livestock. Unfortunately, these studies have not directed their efforts to understanding and developing the relationships among several of the important parameters that influence runoff quality. One of the reasons for this deficiency is that the list of influencing parameters is quite long. Nevertheless, it is important to identify the parameters and their probable impact on movement of organisms in water. The microbiological aspects are influenced by the fate of organisms in the environment. Radiant energy (sunlight), temperature, available nutrients, presence of toxic materials, available moisture (precipitation and humidity), and soil pH all influence the death/growth rate of the organisms in question. Site characteristics, such as slope, vegetative cover, antecedent moisture content, soil type, organic matter content, infiltration rate, and surface condition of the soil, all influence microorganism movement. Hydrologic factors, such as frequency, duration, and intensity of rainfall, are very critical in determining the characteristics of runoff events that provide the transportation to move introduced organisms from their application site. There are very few models today that can be used to calculate the microorganism population in runoff. While many of the influencing parameters have been identified, there has been little research on the surface transport of microorganisms. PMID:2009386

  16. Ecological aspects of water coal fuel transportation and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna SHVORNIKOVA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the aspects of influence of transportation process and burning of water coal fuel on an ecological condition of environment. Also mathematical dependences between coal ash level and power consumption for transportation are presented.

  17. The Impact of Oceanic Heat Transport on the Atmospheric Circulation: a Thermodynamic Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Alexander; Lunkeit, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates how global thermodynamic properties of the climate system are affected by the changes in the intensity of the imposed oceanic heat transport in an atmospheric general circulation model in aqua-planet configuration. Increasing the poleward oceanic heat transport results in an overall increase in the surface temperature and a decrease in the equator-to-pole surface temperature difference as a result of the ice-albedo feedback. Following the classical ansatz by Stone, the atmospheric heat transport changes in such a way that the total poleward heat transport remains almost unchanged. We also find that the efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport which suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production, as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fl...

  18. Atmospheric correction for China's coastal water color remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The space satellite programs, such as CZCS/Nimbus- 7, VHRSR/FY - 1, OCTS/ADEOS and SeaWiFS/SeaStar, have demonstrated and proven that remote sensing is a powerful tool for understanding the spatial and temporal ocean color distribution. In general, there are two main techni cal keys in the processing ocean color satellite data. They are the atmospheric correction and the inver sion of water-leaving radiance into water constituents (such as chlorophyll, suspended material and yel low substance) quantitatively. The SeaWiFS (sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor) atmospheric correc tion algorithm for China's coastal waters is discussed.First, the major advantages of SeaWiFS are introduced. Second, in view of the problems of the SeaDAS algorithm applying in China' s coastal waters, the local atmospheric correction algorithms are discussed and developed. Finally, the advantages of the loc al algorithms are presented by the compari son of the results from two different algorithms.

  19. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    Floating fens are valuable wetlands, found in North-Western Europe, that are formed by floating root mats when old turf ponds are colonized by plants. These terrestrialization ecosystems are known for their biodiversity and the presence of rare plant species, and the root mats reveal different vegetation zones at a small scale. The vegetation zones are a result of strong gradients in abiotic conditions, including groundwater dynamics, nutrients and pH. To prevent irreversible drought effects such as land subsidence and mineralization of peat, water management involves import of water from elsewhere to maintain constant surface water levels. Imported water may have elevated levels of salinity during dry summers, and salt exposure may threaten the vegetation. To assess the risk of exposure of the rare plant species to salinity, the hydrology of such root mats must be understood. Physical properties of root mats have scarcely been investigated. We have measured soil characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, vertical root mat movement and groundwater dynamics in a floating root mat in the nature reserve Nieuwkoopse Plassen, in the Netherlands. The root mat mostly consists of roots and organic material, in which the soil has a high saturated water content, and strongly varies in its stage of decomposition. We have found a distinct negative correlation between degree of decomposition and hydraulic conductivity, similar to observations for bogs in the literature. Our results show that the relatively young, thin edge of the root mat that colonizes the surface water has a high hydraulic conductivity and floats in the surface water, resulting in very small groundwater fluctuations within the root mat. The older part of the root mat, that is connected to the deeper peat layers is hydrologically more isolated and the material has a lower conductivity. Here, the groundwater fluctuates strongly with atmospheric forcing. The zones of hydraulic properties and vegetation, appear to

  20. Collisions, magnetization, and transport coefficients in the lower solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2013-01-01

    The lower solar atmosphere is an intrinsically multi-component and collisional environment with electron and proton collision frequencies in the range $10^{8}-10^{10}$ Hz, which may be considerably higher than the gyro-frequencies for both species. We aim to provide a reliable quantitative set of data for collision frequencies, magnetization, viscosity, and thermal conductivity for the most important species in the lower solar atmosphere. Having such data at hand is essential for any modeling that is aimed at describing realistic properties of the considered environment. We describe the altitude dependence of the parameters and the different physics of collisions between charged species, and between charged and neutrals species. Regions of dominance of each type of collisions are clearly identified. We determine the layers within which either electrons or ions or both are unmagnetized. Protons are shown to be un-magnetized in the lower atmosphere in a layer that is at least 1000 km thick even for a kilo-Gauss...

  1. The Application of Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian Transport Scheme in a Spectral Atmosphere Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaocong; LIU Yimin; WU Guoxiong; Shian-Jiann LIN; BAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    A flux-form semi-Lagrangian transport scheme (FFSL) was implemented in a spectral atmospheric GCM developed and used at IAP/LASG.Idealized numerical experiments show that the scheme is good at shape preserving with less dissipation and dispersion,in comparison with other conventional schemes.Importantly,FFSL can automatically maintain the positive definition of the transported tracers,which was an underlying problem in the previous spectral composite method (SCM).To comprehensively investigate the impact of FFSL on GCM results,we conducted sensitive experiments.Three main improvements resulted:first,rainfall simulation in both distribution and intensity was notably improved,which led to an improvement in precipitation frequency.Second,the dry bias in the lower troposphere was significantly reduced compared with SCM simulations.Third,according to the Taylor diagram,the FFSL scheme yields simulations that are superior to those using the SCM:a higher correlation between model output and observation data was achieved with the FFSL scheme,especially for humidity in lower troposphere.However,the moist bias in the middle and upper troposphere was more pronounced with the FFSL scheme.This bias led to an over-simulation of precipitable water in comparison with reanalysis data.Possible explanations,as well as solutions,are discussed herein.

  2. Recent Improvements to an Advanced Atmospheric Transport Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. L.; Hunter, C. H.

    2005-10-24

    The Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) has developed an advanced atmospheric modeling capability using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and a stochastic Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) for operational use at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For local simulations concerning releases from the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA), RAMS is run in a nested grid configuration with horizontal grid spacing of 8 and 2 km for each grid, with 6-hr forecasts updated every 3 hours. An interface to allow for easy user access to LPDM had been generated, complete with post-processing results depicting surface concentration, deposition, and a variety of dose quantities. A prior weakness in this approach was that observations from the SRS tower network were only incorporated into the three-dimensional modeling effort during the initialization process. Thus, if the forecasted wind fields were in error, the resulting plume predictions would also be erroneous. To overcome this shortcoming, the procedure for generating RAMS wind fields and reading them into LPDM has been modified such that SRS wind measurements are blended with the predicted three-dimensional wind fields from RAMS using the Barnes technique. In particular, the horizontal components in RAMS are replaced with the observed values at a series of 8 towers that exist within the SRS boundary (covering {approx}300 km{sup 2}). Even though LPDM is currently configured to account only for radioactive releases, it was used in a recent chlorine gas release to generate plume concentrations based on unit releases from the site of a train accident in Graniteville, South Carolina. This information was useful to local responders as an indication of potential protective actions downwind of the release.

  3. Modelling intercontinental transport of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere

    OpenAIRE

    Tarrasón, L; Iversen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Intercontinental exchange of sulphur in major parts of the northern hemisphere has been studied with a 3-dimensional Eulerian transport model that resolves regional scale variability. Model results for 1988 have been evaluated against daily observations of sulphur dioxide and particulate sulphate in Europe and North America and show that the model reproduces the episodic character of oxidised sulphur in air. Yearly averages agree with the observations within a factor of 2, at over 75% of the ...

  4. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  6. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warneford, Emma S., E-mail: emma.warneford@maths.ox.ac.uk; Dellar, Paul J., E-mail: dellar@maths.ox.ac.uk [OCIAM, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune

  7. Natural chlorine and fluorine in the atmosphere, water and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The geochemical cycles of chlorine and fluorine are surveyed and summarized as framework for the understanding of the global natural abundances of these species in the atmosphere, water, and precipitation. In the cycles the fluxes into and out of the atmosphere can be balanced within the limits of our knowledge of the natural sources and sinks. Sea salt from the ocean surfaces represent the predominant portion of the source of chlorine. It is also an important source of atmospheric fluorine, but volcanoes are likely to be more important fluorine sources. Dry deposition of sea salt returns about 85 percent of the salt released there. Precipitation removes the remainder. Most of the sea salt materials are considered to be cyclic, moving through sea spray over the oceans and either directly back to the oceans or deposited dry and in precipitation on land, whence it runs off into rivers and streams and returns to the oceans. Most of the natural chlorine in the atmosphere is in the form of particulate chloride ion with lesser amounts as gaseous inorganic chloride and methyl chloride vapor. Fluorine is emitted from volcanoes primarily as HF. It is possible that HF may be released directly form the ocean surface but this has not been confirmed by observation. HCl and most likely HF gases are released into the atmosphere by sea salt aerosols. The mechanism for the release is likely to be the provision of protons from the so-called excess sulfate and HNO3. Sea salt aerosol contains fluorine as F(-), MgF(+), CaF(+), and NaF. The concentrations of the various species of chlorine and fluorine that characterize primarily natural, unpolluted atmospheres are summarized in tables and are discussed in relation to their fluxes through the geochemical cycle.

  8. The Economics of Bulk Water Transport in Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Hodges; Kristiana Hansen; Donald McLeod

    2014-01-01

    Municipalities often face increasing demand for limited water supplies with few available alternative sources. Under some circumstances, bulk water transport may offer a viable alternative. This case study documents a hypothetical transfer between a water utility district in northern California and urban communities located on the coast of central and southern California. We compare bulk water transport costs to those of constructing a new desalination facility, which is the current plan of ...

  9. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam.

    OpenAIRE

    Vos

    1997-01-01

    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute transport are evaluated. Pressure heads simulated with the one-dimensional water balance model SWATRE are too large. The two-dimensional SWMS_2D model simulates water flow well for the winter leaching periods. Th...

  10. Turbulent Transport Mechanics at the Forest-Atmosphere Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel

    1999-11-01

    A new method is developed to estimate momentum and scalar sources and sinks from measured mean concentration profiles within forested canopies (termed as the "Inverse" problem). The method combines many of the practical advantages of a previously proposed Lagrangian Localized Near Field theory and higher order Eulerian closure principles. Particularly, this "hybrid" method successfully combines the essential physics of closure modeling and the robustness of the regression source inversion developed for the Localized Near Field theory. The method is tested using measured mean CO2 concentration and eddy-covariance fluxes collected in a 15 year-old pine forest for a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions and using temperature and sensible heat flux measurements collected in a wind tunnel for a planar heat source. It is demonstrated that the newly proposed method is well suited for routine source and flux distribution inferences within the canopy.

  11. RETADDII: modeling long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A versatile model is described which estimates atmospheric dispersion based on plume trajectories calculated for the mixed layer. This model allows the treatment of the dispersal from a source at an arbitrary height while taking account of plume depletion by dry and wet deposition together with the decay of material to successor species. The plume depletion, decay and growth equations are solved in an efficient manner which can accommodate up to eight pollutants (i.e. a parent and seven serial decay products). The code is particularly suitable for applications involving radioactive chain decay or for cases involving chemical species with successor decay products. Arbitrary emission rates can be specified for the members of the chain or, as is commonly the case, a sole emission rate can be specified for the first member. The code, in its current configuration, uses readily available upper-air wind data for the North American continent

  12. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of < 100 microseconds. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  13. Atmospheric Fate and Transport of Agricultural Dust and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Fitz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust and odor are significant sources of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. Daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots associated with increased cattle activity in the early evenings are routinely observed, while consistently high ammonia is observed throughout the day. Here we present measurements of aerosol size distributions and concentrations of gas and particulate phase ammonia species collected at a feedlot in Texas during summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. A GRIMM sequential mobility particle sizer and GRIMM 1.108 aerosol spectrometer were used to determine aerosol size distributions in the range of 10 nm to 20 µm aerodynamic diameter at the downwind and upwind edges of the facility. Using aqueous scrubbers, simultaneous measurements of both gas phase and total ammonia species present in the gas and particle phases were also collected. In addition to the continuous measurements at the edges of the facility, coincident aerosol and ammonia measurements were obtain at an additional site further downwind (~3.5 km). Taken together our measurements will be used to quantify aerosol and ammonia dispersion and transport. Relationships between the fate and transport of the aerosols and ammonia will be discussed.

  14. Meridional energy transport in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system: Compensation and partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, R.; Vallis, G. K.

    2012-04-01

    The variability and compensation of the energy transport in the atmosphere and ocean are discussed with a hierarchy of coupled models. A state-of-the-art Coupled Model (GFDL CM2.1), an Intermediate Complexity Climate Model (GFDL ICCM) and a simple Energy Balance Model (EBM) are used in this study. For decadal time scales, a high degree of compensation is found for the transport in the Northern Hemisphere in the Atlantic sector. The variability of the total, or planetary, heat transport (PHT) is much smaller than the variability in either the atmosphere (AHT) or ocean (OHT) alone, a feature sometimes referred to as `Bjerknes compensation'. In the coupled models used, natural decadal variability stems from the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and variations in the strength of the AMOC tend to lead the variability in the OHT. Furthermore, the PHT is positively correlated with the OHT, implying that the atmosphere is compensating, but imperfectly, for variations in the ocean transport. In the Southern Hemisphere no significant anticorrelation is found between OHT and AHT, consistent with the absence of decadal scale variability in the ocean. For both coupled models, the strongest anticorrelation between transports is found at the period of AMOC variability and decreases as the time scale decreases. Unlike the AHT and AMOC, the AHT and the transport in the oceanic gyres are positively correlated, suggesting that coupling between the wind-driven ocean circulation and the atmosphere militates against long-term variability involving the wind-driven flow. Moisture and sensible heat transports in the atmosphere are also positively correlated at decadal time scales. In the Northern Hemisphere compensation is weaker at low latitudes than at high. This is consistent with the notion that at low latitudes a larger fraction of the oceanic transport is due to the wind-driven warm cell, and the atmospheric and wind-driven oceanic energy transports vary in unison

  15. Molecular mechanisms of water transport in the eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Hamann, Steffen Ellitsgaard

    2002-01-01

    general model for water transport in ocular epithelia. Some water-transporting membranes contain aquaporins, others do not. The ultrastructure is also variable among the cell layers and cannot be fitted into a general model. On the other hand, the direction of cotransport in symporters complies with the......The four major sites for ocular water transport, the corneal epithelium and endothelium, the ciliary epithelium, and the retinal pigment epithelium, are reviewed. The cornea has an inherent tendency to swell, which is counteracted by its two surface cell layers, the corneal epithelium and...... endothelium. The bilayered ciliary epithelium secretes the aqueous humor into the posterior chamber, and the retinal pigment epithelium transports water from the retinal to the choroidal site. For each epithelium, ion transport mechanisms are associated with fluid transport, but the exact molecular coupling...

  16. Water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Theory, numerical models, and field and laboratory measurements are used to describe and predict water flow and nutrient transport in a layered silt loam soil. One- and two-dimensional models based on the Darcy equation for water flow and the convection-dispersion equation for solute transport are e

  17. He^2+ transport in the Martian upper atmosphere with an induced magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Shematovich, Valery; Bisikalo, Dimitri; Stenberg, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Dieval, Catherine; Gerard, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind helium may be a significant source of neutral helium in the Martian atmosphere. The precipitating particles also transfer mass, energy, and momentum. To investigate the transport of He^2+ in the upper atmosphere of Mars, we have applied the direct simulation Monte Carlo method to solve the kinetic equation. We calculate the upward He, He^+, and He^2+ fluxes, resulting from energy spectra of the downgoing He^2+ observed below 500 km altitude by the Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Ener...

  18. Trans boundary transport of pollutants by atmospheric mineral dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Yigal; Dayan, Uri; Rabi, Reut; Rudich, Yinon; Stein, Mordechai

    2006-05-01

    The transport of anthropogenic pollution by desert dust in the Eastern Mediterranean region was studied by analyzing major and trace element composition, organic species, and Pb isotope ratios in suspended dust samples collected in Jerusalem, Israel. Dust storms in this region are associated with four distinct synoptic conditions (Red Sea Trough (RS), Eastern High (EH), Sharav Cyclone (SC), and Cold Depression (Cyprus low, CD)) that carry dust mostly from North African (SC, CD, EH) and Arabian and Syrian (RS, EH) deserts. Substantial contamination of dust particles by Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni is observed, while other elements (Na, Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Rb, REE, U, and Th) display natural concentrations. Sequential extraction of the abovementioned elements from the dust samples shows that the carbonate and sorbed fractions contain most of the pollution, yet the Al-silicate fraction is also contaminated, implying that soils and sediments in the source terrains of the dust are already polluted. We identified the pollutant sources by using Pb isotopes. It appears that before the beginning of the dust storm, the pollutants in the collected samples are dominated by local sources but with the arrival of dust from North Africa, the proportion of foreign pollutants increases. Organic pollutants exhibit behavior similar and complementary to that of the inorganic tracers, attesting to the importance of anthropogenic-pollutant addition en route of the dust from its remote sources. Pollution of suspended dust is observed under all synoptic conditions, yet it appears that easterly winds carry higher proportions of local pollution and westerly winds carry pollution emitted in the Cairo basin. Therefore, pollution transport by mineral dust should be accounted for in environmental models and in assessing the health-related effects of mineral dust.

  19. Atmospheric Transport of Radioactive Nuclides from Russia to Neighboring Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova, V.; Takano, M

    2002-01-01

    On August 10, 1985, during the completion of reactor fueling network on a nuclear submarine at Chazhma Cove near Vladivostok, an uncontrolled chain reaction occurred. The air, ground and water were radioactively contaminated. The Vladivostok region (southern Primoriye Kray) still contains several nuclear fleet facilities where periodic refueling of submarines is carried out. In addition, there are about 60 decommissioned submarines that have been waiting for many years for final defueling. Th...

  20. Atmospheric moisture transports to the Arctic from different reanalyses: comparative assessment and analysis of source terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Ambroise; Zolina, Olga; Gulev, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of the Arctic heat and moisture balances is critically important for understanding mechanisms of polar climate change and the observed amplification of the Arctic warming. Basic characteristics of the atmosphere in the Arctic region have quite a large spread in the modern era and first generation reanalyses, thus preventing effective use of reanalyses for the assessment of atmospheric moisture and heat transports and analysis of variability in the source terms. We used Eulerian approach to derive and intercompare to each other estimates of the moisture transports in the atmosphere from 5 reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25, NCEP-1). Computational procedure involved decomposition of the velocity and moisture fields into mean conditions and variations around the mean. This concept allowed for the further association of the mean and eddy transports with large scale circulation modes (mean component) and synoptic transients (eddy component). The latter was associated with the characteristics of cyclone activity derived from the same reanalyses using state of the art numerical algorithm for cyclone identification and tracking. Atmospheric moisture transport is most intense over the GIN Sea and the North European basin, however over this area of the most intense transports, the contributions from the eddy and mean transport components are not correlated hinting on different pattern of variability in moisture fluxes due to cyclone activity and mean circulation. Decadal scale variability in the atmospheric moisture transports has been further associated with the Arctic-scale and regional differences between local precipitation and evaporation as well as with the magnitude of the storage terms. Potential mechanisms of variability in these terms are discussed.

  1. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  2. Moist convection and the vertical structure and water abundance of Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Mcgrattan, Kevin B.

    1990-01-01

    The cumulative effects of an ensemble of moist convective plumes on a conditionally unstable atmosphere are predicted by a model of moist convection on Jupiter in which the heating/cooling and drying/moistening of the environment occur through (1) compensating subsidence, (2) detrainment of updraft air at cloud tops, and (3) the evaporation and melting of falling condensate. Parahydrogen is transported as a passive tracer. Pure moist convective, mixed moist-dry convective, and primarily dry convective regimes are possible, depending on the assumed deep-water abundance, efficiency of condensate evaporation, and initial temperature profile.

  3. Transport of Water in Semicrystalline Block Copolymer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Daniel; Oparaji, Onyekachi

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b-PEO) is a semicrystalline block copolymer (BCP) with interesting properties. It is mechanically tough, amphiphilic, and has a polar phase. The mechanical toughness is due to the crystallinity of PEO and the high glass transition temperature of PS, as well as the morphological structure of the BCP. The polymer has high CO2, water, and salt solubility that derive from the polar PEO component. Potential applications include CO2 separation, water purification, and lithium air batteries. In all of the aforementioned applications, water transport is an important parameter. The presence of water can also affect thermal and mechanical properties. Water transport and thermal and mechanical properties of a lamellar PS- b-PEO copolymer have been measured as a function of water activity. Water transport can be affected by the heterogeneous nature of a semicrystalline BCP. Therefore, Fourier transform infrared - attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy has been employed, because water transport and polymer swelling can be measured simultaneously. The effect of BCP structure on transport has been investigated by comparing water transport in PS- b-PEO to a PEO homopolymer. The crystalline content of the PEO and the presence of glassy PS lamellae will be used to explain the transport results.

  4. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-01-01

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds". I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars size to 10 Earth-mass. The states are: globally ice covered (Ts< 245K), cold and damp (270 < Ts< 290K), hot and moist (350< Ts< 550K) and very hot and dry (Ts< 900K). No stable climate exists for 290< Ts < 350K or 550 < Ts < 900K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describe the liquid ...

  5. The long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols from South Asia to Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Zhiyuan; Kang, Shichang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-04-01

    High levels of carbonaceous aerosol exist over South Asia, the area adjacent to the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. Little is known about if they can be transported across the Himalayas, and as far inland as the Tibetan Plateau. To resolve such scientific questions, aerosol samples were collected weekly from August 2009 to July 2010 at Qomolangma (Mt. Everest) Station for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research(QOMS, 4276 m a.s.l.). In the laboratory, major ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon, levoglucosan, water-soluble organic carbon, and organic acids were analyzed. The concentration levels of OC and EC at QOMS are comparable to those at high-elevation sites on the southern slopes of the Himalayas (Langtang and NCO-P), but 3 to 6 times lower than those at Manora Peak, India, and Godavari, Nepal. Sulfate was the most abundant anion species followed by nitrate. The dust loading, represented by Ca2+ concentration, was relatively constant throughout the year. OC, EC and other ionic species (NH+4 , K+, NO‑ and SO2‑) exhibited a pronounced peak in the pre-monsoon period and a minimum in the monsoon season, being similar to the seasonal trends of aerosol compo-sition reported previously from the southern slope of the Himalayas. The strong correlation of OC and EC in QOMS aerosols with K+ and levoglucosan indicates that they mainly originated from biomass burning. Molecular distributions of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds (malonic acid/ succinic acid, maleic acid/fumaric acid) further support this finding. The fire spots observed by MODIS and backward air-mass trajectories further demonstrate that in pre-monsoon season, agricultural and forest fires in northern India and Nepal were most likely sources of carbonaceous aerosol at QOMS. In addition to large-scale atmospheric circulation, the unique mountain/valley breeze system can also have an important effect on air-pollutant transport.With the consideration of the darkening force of

  6. Proton and hydrogen atoms transport in the Martian upper atmosphere with an induced magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Shematovich, Valery; Bisikalo, Dimitri; Dieval, Catherine; Barabash, Stas; Stenberg, Gabriella; Nilsson, Hans; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Holmstrom, Mats; Gerard, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    We have applied the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method to solve the kinetic equation for the H/H^+ transport in the upper Martian atmosphere. We calculate the upward H and H^+ fluxes, values that can be measured, and the altitude profile of the energy deposition to be used to understand the energy balance in the Martian atmosphere. The calculations of the upward flux have been made for the Martian atmosphere during solar minimum. We use an energy spectrum of the down moving protons in the a...

  7. Temperature influence on water transport in hardened cement pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drouet, Emeline [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Poyet, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.poyet@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Torrenti, Jean-Michel [Université Paris-Est, IFSTTAR, Département Matériaux & Structures, 14-52 boulevard Newton, F-77447 Marne la Vallée cedex 2 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Describing water transport in concrete is an important issue for the durability assessment of radioactive waste management reinforced concrete structures. Due to the waste thermal output such structures would be submitted to moderate temperatures (up to 80 °C). We have then studied the influence of temperature on water transport within hardened cement pastes of four different formulations. Using a simplified approach (describing only the permeation of liquid water) we characterized the properties needed to describe water transport (up to 80 °C) using dedicated experiments. For each hardened cement paste the results are presented and discussed.

  8. Temperature influence on water transport in hardened cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Describing water transport in concrete is an important issue for the durability assessment of radioactive waste management reinforced concrete structures. Due to the waste thermal output such structures would be submitted to moderate temperatures (up to 80 °C). We have then studied the influence of temperature on water transport within hardened cement pastes of four different formulations. Using a simplified approach (describing only the permeation of liquid water) we characterized the properties needed to describe water transport (up to 80 °C) using dedicated experiments. For each hardened cement paste the results are presented and discussed

  9. Atmospheric forcing of the upper ocean transport in the Gulf of Mexico: From seasonal to diurnal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judt, Falko; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) was an environmental disaster, which highlighted the urgent need to predict the transport and dispersion of hydrocarbon. Although the variability of the atmospheric forcing plays a major role in the upper ocean circulation and transport of the pollutants, the air-sea interaction on various time scales is not well understood. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the atmospheric forcing and upper ocean response in the GoM from seasonal to diurnal time scales, using climatologies derived from long-term observations, in situ observations from two field campaigns, and a coupled model. The atmospheric forcing in the GoM is characterized by striking seasonality. In the summer, the time-average large-scale forcing is weak, despite occasional extreme winds associated with hurricanes. In the winter, the atmospheric forcing is much stronger, and dominated by synoptic variability on time scales of 3-7 days associated with winter storms and cold air outbreaks. The diurnal cycle is more pronounced during the summer, when sea breeze circulations affect the coastal regions and nighttime wind maxima occur over the offshore waters. Realtime predictions from a high-resolution atmosphere-wave-ocean coupled model were evaluated for both summer and winter conditions during the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) in July-August 2012 and the Surfzone Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE) in November-December 2013. The model generally captured the variability of atmospheric forcing on all scales, but suffered from some systematic errors.

  10. Water Vapor Tacers as Diagnostics of the Regional Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle, especially in North America where moisture transport and local evaporation are important sources of water for precipitation. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. All evaporative sources of water are accounted for by tracers, and the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites General Circulation Model (GEOS GCM) is used to simulate several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. Using this methodology, a detailed analysis of the recycling of water, interannual variability of the sources of water and links to the Great Plains low-level jet and North American monsoon will be presented. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation especially regarding the North American monsoon and GEWEX America Prediction Project (GAPP) will be discussed.

  11. Springtime trans-pacific atmospheric transport from east Asia: a transit-time-pdf approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M.; McKendry, I.; Jaffe, D.

    2003-04-01

    The atmosphere is known to episodically transport aerosols, dust, and gaseous pollutants from industrialized south-east Asia, the Gobi desert, and Siberian wild fires to western North America. We give a novel characterization of the ever-present background transport from these regions and of the probability of transport ``events", that is, long-range transport of high concentrations with minimal dispersion. Our primary transport diagnostic is the transit-time probability density function (pdf), {\\cal G}, which is a tracer-independent measure of the flow that allows us to isolate the role of transport from other factors such as source variability and chemistry. The pdf approach, unlike typical back-trajectory analyses, captures transport due to all possible paths and accounts for both resolved advection and subgrid processes. We use a numerical model of the global atmosphere (MATCH), driven by NCEP reananlysis data, to establish the springtime statistics of daily averages of {\\cal G}. A suitably defined average of {\\cal G} quantifies the mass fraction of background air of a given transit time, or age, from the source regions. An analysis of the variability of {\\cal G} at fixed transit time allows us to identify transport events and to estimate their probability of occurrence. This is illustrated for transport events to the ``Pacific-North-West" (PNW) region of North America, defined as (43.8o-53.3o{N}) × (115.3o-124.7o{W}). Correlations between {\\cal G} averaged over the PNW and the winds at any point in the atmosphere identify large-scale anomaly structures of the flow that correspond to favorable transport to the PNW.

  12. The high life: Transport of microbes in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Griffin, Dale W.; Jaffe, Daniel A.

    2011-07-01

    Microbes (bacteria, fungi, algae, and viruses) are the most successful types of life on Earth because of their ability to adapt to new environments, reproduce quickly, and disperse globally. Dispersal occurs through a number of vectors, such as migrating animals or the hydrological cycle, but transport by wind may be the most common way microbes spread. General awareness of airborne microbes predates the science of microbiology. People took advantage of wild airborne yeasts to cultivate lighter, more desirable bread as far back as ancient Egypt by simply leaving a mixture of grain and liquids near an open window. In 1862, Louis Pasteur's quest to disprove spontaneous generation resulted in the discovery that microbes were actually single-celled, living creatures, prevalent in the environment and easily killed with heat (pasteurization). His rudimentary experiments determined that any nutrient medium left open to the air would eventually teem with microbial life because of free-floating, colonizing cells. The same can happen in a kitchen: Opportunistic fungal and bacterial cells cause food items exposed to the air to eventually spoil.

  13. Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release

  14. The high life: Transport of microbes in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.J.; Griffin, Dale W.; Jaffe, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes (bacteria, fungi, algae, and viruses) are the most successful types of life on Earth because of their ability to adapt to new environments, reproduce quickly, and disperse globally. Dispersal occurs through a number of vectors, such as migrating animals or the hydrological cycle, but transport by wind may be the most common way microbes spread. General awareness of airborne microbes predates the science of microbiology. People took advantage of wild airborne yeasts to cultivate lighter, more desirable bread as far back as ancient Egypt by simply leaving a mixture of grain and liquids near an open window. In 1862, Louis Pasteur's quest to disprove spontaneous generation resulted in the discovery that microbes were actually single-celled, living creatures, prevalent in the environment and easily killed with heat (pasteurization). His rudimentary experiments determined that any nutrient medium left open to the air would eventually teem with microbial life because of free-floating, colonizing cells. The same can happen in a kitchen: Opportunistic fungal and bacterial cells cause food items exposed to the air to eventually spoil.

  15. The Economics of Bulk Water Transport in Southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hodges

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipalities often face increasing demand for limited water supplies with few available alternative sources. Under some circumstances, bulk water transport may offer a viable alternative. This case study documents a hypothetical transfer between a water utility district in northern California and urban communities located on the coast of central and southern California. We compare bulk water transport costs to those of constructing a new desalination facility, which is the current plan of many communities for increasing supplies. We find that using water bags to transport fresh water between northern and southern California is in some instances a low-cost alternative to desalination. The choice is constrained, however, by concerns about reliability and, thus, risk. Case-study results demonstrate the challenges of water supply augmentation in water-constrained regions.

  16. Screening models for releases of radionuclides to atmosphere, surface water, and ground -- Work sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three levels of screening for the atmospheric transport pathways and two levels for surface water are presented. The ground has only one screening level. Level 1 is the simplest approach and incorporates a high degree of conservatism. The estimate of the effective dose for this level assumes a concentration based upon the radionuclide concentration at the point of emission to the environment, i.e., at the stack for atmospheric emissions, at the end of the effluent pipe for liquid effluent releases, and at a well because of the buried radioactive material. Levels 2 and 3 are presented for atmospheric releases, and Level 2 for surface water releases only and are more detailed and correspondingly less conservative. Level 2 screening accounts for dispersion in the atmosphere and in surface waters and combines all recognized pathways into the screening factor. For the atmospheric pathway, Level 3 screening includes more definitive pathways analysis. Should the user be found in compliance on the basis of Level 1 screening, no further calculations are required. If the user fails Level 1, the user proceeds to the next level and checks for compliance. This process is repeated until the user passes screening (is in compliance) or no further screening levels exist. If the user fails the final level, professional assistance should be obtained in environmental radiological assessment. Work sheets are designed to lead the user through screening in a step-by-step manner until compliance is demonstrated or it is determined that more sophisticated methods or expertise are needed. Flow diagrams are provided as a guide to identify key steps in the screening process

  17. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-01-01

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds". I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars size to 10 Earth-mass. The states are: globally ice covered (Ts< 245K), cold and damp (270 < Ts< 290K), hot and moist (350< Ts< 550K) and very hot and dry (Ts< 900K). No stable climate exists for 290< Ts < 350K or 550 < Ts < 900K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describe the liquid water habitable zone, the width and location of which depends on planet mass. At each solar constant, two or three different climate states are stable. This is a consequence of strong non-linearities in both thermal emission and the net absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surfa...

  18. The atmospheric transport of iodine-129 from Fukushima to British Columbia, Canada and its deposition and transport into groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herod, Matt N.; Suchy, Martin; Cornett, R. Jack; Kieser, W. E.; Clark, Ian D.; Graham, Gwyn

    2015-12-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident (FDNA) released iodine-129 (15.7 million year half-life) and other fission product radionuclides into the environment in the spring and summer of 2011. 129I is recognized as a useful tracer for the short-lived radiohazard 131I, which has a mobile geochemical behavior with potential to contaminate water resources. To trace 129I released by the FDNA reaching Canada, pre-accident and post-accident rain samples collected in Vancouver, on Saturna Island and from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program in Washington State were measured. Groundwater from the Abbotsford-Sumas Aquifer was sampled to determine the fate of 129I that infiltrates below the root zone. Modeling of vadose zone transport was performed to constrain the travel time and retardation of 129I. The mean pre-accident 129I concentration in rain was 31 × 106 atoms/L (n = 4). Immediately following the FDNA, 129I values increased to 211 × 106 atoms/L and quickly returned to near-background levels. However, pulses of elevated 129I continued for several months. The increases in 129I concentrations from both Vancouver and Saturna Island were synchronized, and occurred directly after the initial release from the FDNA. The 129I in shallow (3H/3He age March 2013 with an average of 3.2 × 106 atoms/L (n = 32) that was coincident with modeled travel times for Fukushima 129I. The groundwater response and the modeling results suggest that 129I was partially attenuated in soil, which is consistent with its geochemical behavior; however, we conclude that the measured variability may be due to Fukushima 129I entering groundwater.

  19. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution

  20. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution. (KRM)

  1. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the use of these observations to infer source/sink distributions in inversion studies continues to be complicated by difficulty in quantifying atmospheric transport model errors. We will present results from several different experiments designed to quantify different aspects of transport error using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). In the first set of experiments, an ensemble of simulations is constructed using perturbations to parameters in the model s moist physics and turbulence parameterizations that control sub-grid scale transport of trace gases. Analysis of the ensemble spread and scales of temporal and spatial variability among the simulations allows insight into how parameterized, small-scale transport processes influence simulated CO2 distributions. In the second set of experiments, atmospheric tracers representing model error are constructed using observation minus analysis statistics from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The goal of these simulations is to understand how errors in large scale dynamics are distributed, and how they propagate in space and time, affecting trace gas distributions. These simulations will also be compared to results from NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project that quantified the impact of uncertainty in satellite constrained CO2 flux estimates on atmospheric mixing ratios to assess the major factors governing uncertainty in global and regional trace gas distributions.

  2. Development of an advanced atmospheric/transport model for emergency response purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during an accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are based Gaussian distributions and have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven program called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. The WIND system atmospheric models employ certain assumptions that allow the computations of the ground-level concentration of toxic or radioactive materials to be made quickly. Gaussian models, such as PF/PL and 2DPUF, suffer from serious limitations including the inability to represent recirculation of pollutants in complex terrain, the use of one stability class at a given time to represent turbulent mixing over heterogeneous terrain, and the use of a wind field computed at only one height in the atmosphere. These limitations arise because the fundamental conservation relations of the atmosphere have been grossly simplified. Three-dimensional coupled atmospheric-dispersion models are not limited by the over-simplifications of the Gaussian assumption and have been used in the past to predict the transport of pollutants in a variety of atmospheric circulations. The disadvantage of these models is that they require large amounts of computational time; however, technology has progressed enough so that real-time simulations of dispersion may be made. These complex models can be run in an operational mode so that routine forecasts of the wind field and particulate concentration can be made

  3. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-11-14

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  4. Evidence for short-range transport of atmospheric mercury to a rural, inland site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Sarah E.; McKee, Lester; Gilbreath, Alicia; Yee, Donald; Connor, Mike; Fu, Xuewu

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) species, including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particulate-bound mercury (Hg p), were monitored near three sites, including a cement plant (monitored in 2007 and 2008), an urban site and a rural site (both monitored in 2005 and 2008). Although the cement plant was a significant source of Hg emissions (for 2008, GEM: 2.20 ± 1.39 ng m -3, RGM: 25.2 ± 52.8 pg m -3, Hg p 80.8 ± 283 pg m -3), average GEM levels and daytime average dry depositional RGM flux were highest at the rural site, when all three sites were monitored sequentially in 2008 (rural site, GEM: 2.37 ± 1.26 ng m -3, daytime RGM flux: 29 ± 40 ng m -2 day -1). Photochemical conversion of GEM was not the primary RGM source, as highest net RGM gains (75.9 pg m -3, 99.0 pg m -3, 149 m -3) occurred within 3.0-5.3 h, while the theoretical time required was 14-23 h. Instead, simultaneous peaks in RGM, Hg p, ozone (O 3), nitrogen oxides, and sulfur dioxide in the late afternoon suggested short-range transport of RGM from the urban center to the rural site. The rural site was located more inland, where the average water vapor mixing ratio was lower compared to the other two sites (in 2008, rural: 5.6 ± 1.4 g kg -1, urban: 9.0 ± 1.1 g kg -1, cement plant: 8.3 ± 2.2 g kg -1). Together, these findings suggested short-range transport of O 3 from an urban area contributed to higher RGM deposition at the rural site, while drier conditions helped sustain elevated RGM levels. Results suggested less urbanized environments may be equally or perhaps more impacted by industrial atmospheric Hg emissions, compared to the urban areas from where Hg emissions originated.

  5. Global modelling of the early Martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Water cycle and ice evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, R; Millour, E; Head, J; Madeleine, J -B; Charnay, B

    2012-01-01

    We discuss 3D global simulations of the early Martian climate that we have performed assuming a faint young Sun and denser CO2 atmosphere. We include a self-consistent representation of the water cycle, with atmosphere-surface interactions, atmospheric transport, and the radiative effects of CO2 and H2O gas and clouds taken into account. We find that for atmospheric pressures greater than a fraction of a bar, the adiabatic cooling effect causes temperatures in the southern highland valley network regions to fall significantly below the global average. Long-term climate evolution simulations indicate that in these circumstances, water ice is transported to the highlands from low-lying regions for a wide range of orbital obliquities, regardless of the extent of the Tharsis bulge. In addition, an extended water ice cap forms on the southern pole, approximately corresponding to the location of the Noachian/Hesperian era Dorsa Argentea Formation. Even for a multiple-bar CO2 atmosphere, conditions are too cold to a...

  6. On the characteristics of water vapor transport from atmosphere boundary layer to stratosphere over Tibetan Plateau regions in summer%夏季青藏高原地区近地层水汽进入平流层的特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斌; 徐祥德; 杨帅; 卞建春

    2012-01-01

    Identification of the main mechanism of water vapor transportation from atmosphere surface layer into stratosphere over Asian monsoon region, especially for the region of Tibetan Plateau (TP), plays a significant role in understanding the global climate change and globalenvironment. In order to investigate the possible mechanism of water vapor transportation from the surface layer to upper troposphere and stratosphere, we used the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART driven by the hourly output generated by the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model for the period from 20 to 26 August, 2006. Based on the three-dimensional trajectories backward tracing analysis and their changes in temperature, humidity and other physical variables, our results show that small-scale convection lift and the large-scale transportation are the two main factors responsible for the water vapor entry from surface layer to stratosphere. Air parcels from the surface layer could be lifted up to 9~12 km height via active convention within 24 hours, and then passed through the tropopause in the Tibetan Plateau southeast, which was driven by the large scale advection associated with the south Asian anticyclone circulation. Most air parcels could further transport to lower latitudes and impact the global troposphere-stratosphere water vapor budget. Air parcels on the cloud top height were largely located over the northwest of TP, whereas their locations of Laglangrian minimum temperature, I. E. , where the air parcels dehydration happened, were mostly located in the south of TP. The potential temperature difference between these two regions is about 15 ~ 35 K, implying a significant dehydration processes for all air parcels. This result indicates that that the mechanism of water vapor transportation from atmosphere surface layer to stratosphere over Tibetan Plateau regions in summer is potentially controlled by large scale circulation associated with southern Asian monsoon, while

  7. Modeling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury to the Great Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Cohen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mercury contamination in the Great Lakes continues to have important public health and wildlife ecotoxicology impacts, and atmospheric deposition is a significant ongoing loading pathway. The objective of this study was to estimate the amount and source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition to each lake, information needed to prioritize amelioration efforts. A new global, Eulerian version of the HYSPLIT-Hg model was used to simulate the 2005 global atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury to the Great Lakes. In addition to the base case, 10 alternative model configurations were used to examine sensitivity to uncertainties in atmospheric mercury chemistry and surface exchange. A novel atmospheric lifetime analysis was used to characterize fate and transport processes within the model. Model-estimated wet deposition and atmospheric concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0 were generally within ∼10% of measurements in the Great Lakes region. The model overestimated non-Hg(0 concentrations by a factor of 2–3, similar to other modeling studies. Potential reasons for this disagreement include model inaccuracies, differences in atmospheric Hg fractions being compared, and the measurements being biased low. Lake Erie, downwind of significant local/regional emissions sources, was estimated by the model to be the most impacted by direct anthropogenic emissions (58% of the base case total deposition, while Lake Superior, with the fewest upwind local/regional sources, was the least impacted (27%. The U.S. was the largest national contributor, followed by China, contributing 25% and 6%, respectively, on average, for the Great Lakes. The contribution of U.S. direct anthropogenic emissions to total mercury deposition varied between 46% for the base case (with a range of 24–51% over all model configurations for Lake Erie and 11% (range 6–13% for Lake Superior. These results illustrate the importance of atmospheric

  8. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to Bjørnøya (Bear island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenborn, Roland; Christensen, Guttorm; Evenset, Anita; Schlabach, Martin; Stohl, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    A first medium term monitoring of atmospheric transport and distribution for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Bjørnøya (Bear island) air samples has been performed in the period between week 51/1999 and week 28/2003. A total of 50 single compounds consisting of polychlorinated biphenyls (33 congeners), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (alpha-, beta-, gamma-HCH), alpha-endosulfan, cyclodiene pesticides (chlordanes, nonachlor-isomers, oxy-chlordane, heptachlor and chlordane) as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) derivatives were analysed and quantified. Atmospheric transport of POPs was identified as an important contamination source for the island. PCBs, HCB and HCH isomers were the predominant POP groups, contributing with 70-90% to the overall POP burden quantified in the Bjørnøya air samples. The highest concentration levels for a single compound were found for HCB (25-35 pg m(-3)). However, the sum of 33 PCB congeners was found to be in the same concentration range (annual means between 15 and 30 pg m(-3)). Cyclodiene pesticides, DDT derivatives and alpha-endosulfan were identified as minor contaminants. Several atmospheric long-range transport episodes were identified and characterised. Indications for industrial emissions as well as agricultural sources were found for the respective atmospheric transport episodes. A first simple statistical correlation assessment showed that for long-range transport of pollution, the local meteorological situation is not as important as the air mass properties integrated over the time period of the transport event. The local weather situation, on the other hand, is important when investigating deposition rates and up-take/accumulation properties in the local ecosystem. Based upon chemical data interpretation, valuable information about the influence of primary and secondary sources on the air mass contamination with chlorinated insecticides (e.g., HCHs) was found and discussed. The

  9. Atmospheric electrical field measurements near a fresh water reservoir and the formation of the lake breeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lopes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to access the effect of the lakes in the atmospheric electrical field, measurements have been carried out near a large man-made lake in southern Portugal, the Alqueva reservoir, during the ALqueva hydro-meteorological EXperiment 2014. The purpose of these conjoint experiments was to study the impact of the Alqueva reservoir on the atmosphere, in particular on the local atmospheric electric environment by comparing measurements taken in the proximity of the lake. Two stations 10 km apart were used, as they were located up- and down-wind of the lake (Amieira and Parque Solar, respectively, in reference to the dominant northwestern wind direction. The up-wind station shows lower atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG values than the ones observed in the down-wind station between 12 and 20 UTC. The difference in the atmospheric electric PG between the up-wind and the down-wind station is ~30 V/m during the day. This differential occurs mainly during the development of a lake breeze, between 10 and 18 UTC, as a consequence of the surface temperature gradient between the surrounding land and the lake water. In the analysis presented, a correlation is found between the atmospheric electric PG differences and both wind speed and temperature gradients over the lake, thus supporting the influence of the lake breeze over the observed PG variation in the two stations. Two hypotheses are provided to explain this observation: (1 The air that flows from the lake into the land station is likely to increase the local electric conductivity through the removal of ground dust and the transport of cleaner air from higher altitudes with significant light ion concentrations. With such an increase in conductivity, it is expected to see a reduction of the atmospheric electric PG; (2 the resulting air flow over the land station carries negative ions formed by wave splashing in the lake's water surface, as a result of the so-called balloelectric effect

  10. Barriers to Superfast Water Transport in Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Ritos, Konstantinos; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes hold the promise of extraordinary fast water transport for applications such as energy efficient filtration and molecular level drug delivery. However, experiments and computations have reported flow rate enhancements over continuum hydrodynamics that contradict each...

  11. Numerical study of the auroral particle transport in the polar upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation and with some reasonable assumptions, a one-dimensional transport equation of charged energetic particles is derived by taking account of major interactions with neutral species in the upper atmosphere, including the processes of elastic scattering, the excitation, the ionization and the secondary electron production. The transport equation is numerically solved, for a simplified atmosphere consisting only of nitrogen molecules (N2), to obtain the variations of incident electron fluxes as a function of altitude, energy and pitch angle. The model results can describe fairly the transport characteristics of pre-cipitating auroral electron spectra in the polar upper atmosphere; meanwhile the N2 ionization rates calculated from the modeled differential flux spectra also exhibit good agreements with existing empirical models in terms of several key parameters. Taking the energy flux spectra of precipitating electrons observed by FAST satellite flying over EISCAT site on May 15, 1997 as model inputs, the model-calculated ionization rate profile of neutral atmosphere consists reasonably with that recon-structed from electron density measurements by the radar.

  12. The climatological mean atmospheric transport under weakened Atlantic thermohaline circulation climate scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erukhimova, T. [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics, College Station, TX (United States); Zhang, R. [GFDL/NOAA, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bowman, K.P. [Texas A and M University, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College Station, TX (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Global atmospheric transport in a climate subject to a substantial weakening of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC) is studied by using climatological Green's functions of the mass conservation equation for a conserved, passive tracer. Two sets of Green's functions for the perturbed climate and for the present climate are evaluated from 11-year atmospheric trajectory calculations, based on 3-D winds simulated by GFDL's newly developed global coupled ocean-atmosphere model (CM2.1). The Green's function analysis reveals pronounced effects of the climate change on the atmospheric transport, including seasonally modified Hadley circulation with a stronger Northern Hemisphere cell in DJF and a weaker Southern Hemisphere cell in JJA. A weakened THC is also found to enhance mass exchange rates through mixing barriers between the tropics and the two extratropical zones. The response in the tropics is not zonally symmetric. The 3-D Green's function analysis of the effect of THC weakening on transport in the tropical Pacific shows a modified Hadley cell in the eastern Pacific, confirming the results of our previous studies, and a weakening (strengthening) of the upward and eastward motion to the south (north) of the Equator in the western Pacific in the perturbed climate as compared to the present climate. (orig.)

  13. The slant path atmospheric refraction calibrator - An instrument to measure the microwave propagation delays induced by atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.; Bender, Peter L.

    1992-01-01

    The water vapor-induced propagation delay experienced by a radio signal traversing the atmosphere is characterized by the Slant Path Atmospheric Refraction Calibrator (SPARC), which measures the difference in the travel times between an optical and a microwave signal propagating along the same atmospheric path with an accuracy of 15 picosec or better. Attention is given to the theoretical and experimental issues involved in measuring the delay induced by water vapor; SPARC measurements conducted along a 13.35-km ground-based path are presented, illustrating the instrument's stability, precision, and accuracy.

  14. Water transport in parchment and endosperm of coffee bean

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez-Martinez, Alejandra; Salgado-Cervantes, M.A.; Rodriguez-Jimenes, G.C.; Garcia-Alvarado, M.A.; Cherblanc, Fabien; Benet, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    International audience This paper aims at contributing to identify the eventual regions where fungus Aspergillus ochraceus could grow and produce ochratoxin A (OTA) during drying of coffee beans. Internal structure of coffee bean was analyzed by optical microscopy for endosperm and parchment. From the expression of the dissipation in the grain due to the water transport, we show that a relationship formally analogous to an equation of diffusion governs the water transport. Three structures...

  15. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 – Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Righi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and shipping-induced aerosol concentrations to the ones obtained for the year 2000 in a previous study with the same model configuration. The simulations suggest that black carbon and aerosol nitrate are the most relevant pollutants from land transport in 2000 and 2030 and their impacts are characterized by very strong regional variations during this time period. Europe and North America experience a decrease in the land-transport-induced particle pollution, although in these regions this sector remains a major source of surface-level pollution in 2030 under all RCPs. In Southeast Asia, however, a significant increase is simulated, but in this region the surface-level pollution is still controlled by other sources than land transport. Shipping-induced air pollution is mostly due to aerosol sulfate and nitrate, which show opposite trends towards 2030. Sulfate is strongly reduced as a consequence of sulfur reduction policies in ship fuels in force since 2010, while nitrate tends to increase due to the excess of ammonia following the reduction in ammonium sulfate. The aerosol-induced climate impact of both sectors is dominated by aerosol-cloud effects and is projected to decrease between 2000 and 2030, nevertheless still contributing a significant radiative forcing to Earth's radiation budget.

  16. Highways in the sky: scales of atmospheric transport of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David G; Ross, Shane D

    2015-01-01

    Many high-risk plant pathogens are transported over long distances (hundreds of meters to thousands of kilometers) in the atmosphere. The ability to track the movement of these pathogens in the atmosphere is essential for forecasting disease spread and establishing effective quarantine measures. Here, we discuss the scales of atmospheric dispersal of plant pathogens along a transport continuum (pathogen scale, farm scale, regional scale, and continental scale). Growers can use risk information at each of these dispersal scales to assist in making plant disease management decisions, such as the timely application of appropriate pesticides. Regional- and continental-scale atmospheric features known as Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) may shuffle plant pathogens along highways in the sky. A promising new method relying on overlapping turbulent back-trajectories of pathogen-laden parcels of air may assist in localizing potential inoculum sources, informing local and/or regional management efforts such as conservation tillage. The emergence of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs, or drones) to sample plant pathogens in the lower atmosphere, coupled with source localization efforts, could aid in mitigating the spread of high-risk plant pathogens. PMID:26047561

  17. Cluster Analysis of Atmospheric Dynamics and Pollution Transport in a Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Maksimovich, Elena; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmentin, Marc; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Summertime atmospheric dynamics in the coastal zone of the industrialized Dunkerque agglomeration in northern France was characterized by a cluster analysis of back trajectories in the context of pollution transport. The MESO-NH atmospheric model was used to simulate the local dynamics at multiple scales with horizontal resolution down to 500 m, and for the online calculation of the Lagrangian backward trajectories with 30-min temporal resolution. Airmass transport was performed along six principal pathways obtained by the weighted k-means clustering technique. Four of these centroids corresponded to a range of wind speeds over the English Channel: two for wind directions from the north-east and two from the south-west. Another pathway corresponded to a south-westerly continental transport. The backward trajectories of the largest and most dispersed sixth cluster contained low wind speeds, including sea-breeze circulations. Based on analyses of meteorological data and pollution measurements, the principal atmospheric pathways were related to local air-contamination events. Continuous air quality and meteorological data were collected during the Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene 2006 campaign. The sites of the pollution measurements served as the endpoints for the backward trajectories. Pollutant transport pathways corresponding to the highest air contamination were defined.

  18. Impact of inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Deokjung

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis is investigated, and it is verified that the inflow transport approximation significantly improves the accuracy of the transport and transport/diffusion solutions. A methodology for an inflow transport approximation is implemented in order to generate an accurate transport cross section. The inflow transport approximation is compared to the conventional methods, which are the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations. The three transport approximations are implemented in the lattice physics code STREAM, and verification is performed for various verification problems in order to investigate their effects and accuracy. From the verification, it is noted that the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations cause significant error in calculating the eigenvalue and the power distribution. The inflow transport approximation shows very accurate and precise results for the verification problems. The inflow transport approximation shows significant improvements not only for the high leakage problem but also for practical large core problem analyses.

  19. Atmospheric transport of persistent semi-volatile organic chemicals to the Arctic and cold condensation in the mid-troposphere – Part 1: 2-D modeling in mean atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this study for revisiting the cold condensation effect on global distribution of semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs, the atmospheric transport of SVOCs to the Arctic in the mid-troposphere in a mean meridional atmospheric circulation over the Northern Hemisphere was simulated by a two-dimensional (2-D atmospheric transport model. Results show that under the mean meridional atmospheric circulation the long-range atmospheric transport of SVOCs from warm latitudes to the Arctic occurs primarily in the mid-troposphere. Although major sources are in low and mid-latitude soils, the modeled air concentration of SVOCs in the mid-troposphere is of the same order as or higher than that near the surface, demonstrating that the mid-troposphere is an important pathway and reservoir of SVOCs. The cold condensation of the chemicals is also likely to take place in the mid-troposphere over a source region of SVOCs in warm low latitudes through interacting with clouds. We demonstrate that the temperature dependent vapour pressure and atmospheric degradation rate of SVOCs exhibit similarities between lower atmosphere over the Arctic and the mid-troposphere over a tropical region. Frequent occurrence of atmospheric ascending motion and convection over warm latitudes carry the chemicals to a higher altitude where some of these chemicals may partition onto solid or aqueous phase through interaction with atmospheric aerosols, cloud water droplets and ice particles, and become more persistent at lower temperatures. Stronger winds in the mid-troposphere then convey solid and aqueous phase chemicals to the Arctic where they sink by large-scale descending motion and wet deposition. Using calculated water droplet-air partitioning coefficient of several persistent organic semi-volatile chemicals under a mean air temperature profile from the equator to the North Pole we propose that clouds are likely important sorbing media for SVOCs and pathway of

  20. Water transportation across narrow channel of nanometer dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2010-06-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube and aquaporin, the study of the transportation of water across nanochannels has become one of the hot subjects. When the radius of a nanochannel is only about one nanometer or a little larger, water confined in those nanoscale channels usually exhibits dynamics different from those in bulk system, such as the wet-dry transition due to the confinement, concerted hydrogen-bond orientations and flipping, concerted motion of water molecules, and strong interactions with external charges. Those dynamics correlate with the unique behavior of the water transportation across the channels, such as the extra-high permeability, excellent on-off gating behavior with response to the external mechanical and electrical signals and noises, enhancement by structure outside the channel, directional transportation driven by charges close to a channel or electric field. In this article, we review some of the recent progress on the study of the water molecules inside those narrow nanochannels.

  1. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal sabkhat (salt flats) of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, documents an annual bromide loss of approximately 255 metric tons (0.0032 Gmoles), or 85 kg/km2. This value is an order of magnitude greater than previously published direct measurements from the atmosphere over an evaporative environment of a salar in Bolivia. Laboratory evidence, consistent with published reports, suggests that this loss is by vapor transport to the atmosphere. If this bromine flux to the atmosphere is representative of the total earth area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global atmospheric bromide flux.

  2. The coordinated development of China' s inland water transport%The coordinated development of China' s inland water transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Aimin; Tian Feng; Haasis H.D; Mao Lang; Cai Jia

    2012-01-01

    The coordinated development is the core of sustainable development and the hot issue of international research. Inland water transport (IWT) is an important part of the water resources exploiting system and comprehensive transport system under socio-economic context of river basin, and also the country' s sustainable development priorities to achieve resource-conserving and environment-friendly strategy. Based on the coordinated development content, the paper combined Germany' s successful development experience, explored the elements and problem of the coordinated development of IWT system of China' s national economic strategy and basin economy, water resourse system, comprehensive transport system, and system itself, and their countermeasures and suggestions, in order to facilitate rapid and coordinated development of China' s inland water transport.

  3. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 1. Water column chemistry and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, M.E.; Wentz, D.A.; Aiken, G.R.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    We studied total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in eight streams, located in Oregon, Wisconsin, and Florida, that span large ranges in climate, landscape characteristics, atmospheric Hg deposition, and water chemistry. While atmospheric deposition was the source of Hg at each site, basin characteristics appeared to mediate this source by providing controls on methylation and fluvial THg and MeHg transport. Instantaneous concentrations of filtered total mercury (FTHg) and filtered methylmercury (FMeHg) exhibited strong positive correlations with both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and streamflow for most streams, whereas mean FTHg and FMeHg concentrations were correlated with wetland density of the basins. For all streams combined, whole water concentrations (sum of filtered and particulate forms) of THg and MeHg correlated strongly with DOC and suspended sediment concentrations in the water column. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  4. Coherent water transport across the South Atlantic

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Beron-Vera, F J

    2015-01-01

    The role of mesoscale eddies in transporting Agulhas leakage is investigated using a recent technique from nonlinear dynamical systems theory applied on geostrophic currents inferred from the over two-decade-long satellite altimetry record. Eddies are found to acquire material coherence away from the Agulhas retroflection, near the Walvis Ridge in the South Atlantic. Yearly, 1 to 4 coherent material eddies are detected with diameters ranging from 40 to 280 km. A total of 23 eddy cores of about 50 km in diameter and with at least 30% of their contents traceable into the Indian Ocean were found to travel across the subtropical gyre with minor filamentation. No more than 5\\% of such cores pour their contents on the North Brazil Current. While ability of eddies to carry Agulhas leakage northwestward across the South Atlantic is supported by our analysis, this is more restricted than suggested by earlier ring transport assessments.

  5. Germany’s water footprint of transport fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Water footprint of Germany meeting EU biofuel targets was investigated. • Trade analysis ascertained the source and magnitude of the external water footprint. • Policy implementation increased the water footprint of the transport fuel sector 64%. • This study improves upon a previous one undertaken at the EU level. - Abstract: Germany is required by European Union legislation to achieve a 10% mixture of renewable energy in all road transport fuels by the year 2020. This paper intends to quantify the water use impacts of Germany’s compliance with the transport fuel goal of the EU Renewables Directive. Although the stated purpose of this Directive is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector and address energy security concerns, a more encompassing analysis considering sustainable development paths must include other environmental impacts, including water resource use. The water footprint indicator can contribute to a more intelligent environmental analysis of biofuel targets, although it alone cannot attest to the sustainability of human water use. This research builds upon the results of a similar study that aimed to quantify the freshwater impacts of meeting this EU transport fuel goal across Member States. By looking more closely at the case of Germany, country-specific data can be used in the analysis that lead to different results than those reached in the previous study. Results indicate that achieving a 10% mixture of biofuels in the road transport sector could lead to a 64% increase in the water footprint of the transport fuel sector when compared to a baseline scenario of no policy implementation

  6. Influence of model resolution on the atmospheric transport of 10Be

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, A M; Heikkilä, U.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the transport path of the solar activity proxy 10Be from source to archive is crucial for the interpretation of its observed variability. The extent of mixing of the strong production signal has been quantified in a previous study (Heikkilä et al., 2009). In this study we perform sensitivity studies to investigate the influence of model resolution on the level of mixing and transport path of 10Be in the atmosphere using the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model. This study per...

  7. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  8. Water vapor and gas transport through polymeric membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water vapor transport through polymeric materials plays an important role in a large number of applications such as: food packaging, breathable clothing, roofing membranes, diapers, and the removal of water vapor from gas streams (e.g. dehydration of natural gas or the drying of compressed air). Dep

  9. Deep update with new water transport cost model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEEP 3.11 is a new version of DEEP which is capable to calculate the water transport cost in any place, with acceptable accuracy. The user needs only to specify water flow or the capacity, pipeline length and elevation of sites against sea level or difference in elevation of the beginning and end of the pipeline routs

  10. The efficiency and sensitivity analysis of observations for atmospheric transport model with emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueran; Elbern, Hendrik; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Air quality and climate change are influenced by the fluxes of green house gases, reactive emissions and aerosols in the atmosphere. But observations of the chemical states in the atmosphere typically have low temporal and spatial density. Therefore, many works are introduced to spatio-temporal data assimilation methods in atmospheric chemistry in recent years. There is no doubt that the optimization of the initial state is always of great importance for the improvement of predictive skill. However, specified to the chemistry transport model with high dependence on the emissions in the troposphere, the optimization of the initial state is no longer the only issue. The lack of the ability to observe and estimate surface emission fluxes and important inner atmospheric fluxes with necessary accuracy is a major roadblock of hampering the progress in predictive skills of the atmospheric transport model. However, in many cases, the better estimations for both the initial state and emission rates are not always obtained with certain observational network configurations via various popular data assimilation methods, such as the ensemble Kalman filter and smoother and 4D-variation. It leads to the waste of resource by optimizing the improper parameters or brings the inaccuracy of the optimization by unsuitable weight between the initial state and emission rates. Hence, in order to make a scientific and quantitative decision about which parameters to be optimized and how to balance them before any data assimilation procedure, we establish the dynamic model for emission rates with the constraint of diurnal profile shape and extend the state vector of atmospheric transport model so that the emission rates are included. Then, a theoretical approach, based on Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble cases, to evaluate the potential improvement is introduced. By singular value decomposition, the efficiency of observations to optimize initial state and emission rates of the

  11. Quantifying the relationship between atmospheric transport and the chemical composition of precipitation on Bermuda

    OpenAIRE

    Moody, Jennie L.; Galloway, James N.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to investigate the influence of different atmospheric flow patterns on thecomposition of precipitation on the island of Bermuda, a cluster analysis of atmospherictrajectories was performed to identify periods of similar transport. The cluster analysistechnique represents a relatively objective alternative to the more subjective method ofclassifying trajectories according to compass sector. Data were stratified into two broadseasons, defined as a warm (April-September) and a cool ...

  12. Model analyses of atmospheric mercury: present air quality and effects of transpacific transport on the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mercury is a toxic air and water pollutant that is of significant concern because of its effects on human health and ecosystems. A mechanistic representation of the atmospheric mercury cycle is developed for the state-of-the-art global climate-chemistry model, CAM-Chem (Community Atmospheric Model with Chemistry. The model simulates the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg in three forms: elemental mercury (Hg(0, reactive mercury (Hg(II, and particulate mercury (PHg. Emissions of mercury include those from human, land, ocean, biomass burning and volcano related sources. Land emissions are calculated based on surface solar radiation flux and skin temperature. A simplified air–sea mercury exchange scheme is used to calculate emissions from the oceans. The chemistry mechanism includes the oxidation of Hg(0 in gaseous phase by ozone with temperature dependence, OH, H2O2 and chlorine. Aqueous chemistry includes both oxidation and reduction of Hg(0. Transport and deposition of mercury species are calculated through adapting the original formulations in CAM-Chem. The CAM-Chem model with mercury is driven by present meteorology to simulate the present mercury air quality during the 1999–2001 periods. The resulting surface concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM are then compared with the observations from worldwide sites. Simulated wet depositions of mercury over the continental United States are compared to the observations from 26 Mercury Deposition Network stations to test the wet deposition simulations. The evaluations of gaseous concentrations and wet deposition confirm a strong capability for the CAM-Chem mercury mechanism to simulate the atmospheric mercury cycle. The results also indicate that mercury pollution in East Asia and Southern Africa is very significant with TGM concentrations above 3.0 ng m−3. The comparison to wet deposition indicates that wet deposition patterns of

  13. International Space Station Atmosphere Control and Supply, Atmosphere Revitalization, and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem - Verification for Node 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 ACS, AR, and WRM design and detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for Node 1.

  14. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water in Hot, Hydrogen-dominated Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Kevin; Lyons, James R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres in hot, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. We construct novel analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the m...

  15. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  16. Influence of model resolution on the atmospheric transport of 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Smith

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the transport path of the solar activity proxy 10Be from source to archive is crucial for the interpretation of its observed variability. The extent of mixing of the strong production signal has been quantified in a previous study (Heikkilä et al., 2009. In this study we perform sensitivity studies to investigate the influence of model resolution on the level of mixing and transport path of 10Be in the atmosphere using the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model. This study permits us to choose an acceptable resolution, and so minimum CPU time, to produce physically accurate reconstructions. Four model resolutions are applied: T21L19: a coarse horizontal and vertical resolution with model top at ca. 30 km, T42L31: an average horizontal and fine vertical one, T42L39: similar vertical resolution than L19 but including the middle atmosphere up to ca. 80 km and T63L47: a fine resolution horizontally and vertically with middle atmosphere. Comparison with observations suggests that a finer vertical resolution might be beneficial, although the spread between observations was much larger than between the four model runs. A full validation of the resolutions is not possible with the limited number of observations available. In terms of atmospheric mixing the differences became more distinguishable. All resolutions agreed that the main driver of deposition variability is the stratospheric 10Be (total contribution 68% which is transported into the troposphere at latitudes 30–50°. In the troposphere the model resolutions deviated largely in the dispersion of the stratospheric component over latitude. The finest resolution (T63L47 predicted the least dispersion towards low latitudes but the most towards the poles, whereas the coarsest resolution (T21L19 suggested the opposite. The tropospheric components of 10Be differed less between the four model runs. The largest differences were found in the polar tropospheric components, which contribute the

  17. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 – Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Righi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the EMAC global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE, we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and shipping-induced aerosol concentrations to the ones obtained for the year 2000 in a previous study with the same model configuration. The simulations suggest that black carbon and aerosol nitrate are the most relevant pollutants from land transport in 2000 and 2030, but their impacts are characterized by very strong regional variations during this time period. Europe and North America experience a decrease in the land-transport-induced particle pollution, although in these regions this sector remains the dominant source of surface-level pollution in 2030 under all RCPs. In Southeast Asia, on the other hand, a significant increase is simulated, but in this region the surface-level pollution is still controlled by other sources than land transport. Shipping-induced air pollution is mostly due to aerosol sulfate and nitrate, which show opposite trends towards 2030. Sulfate is strongly reduced as a consequence of sulfur reduction policies in ship-fuels in force since 2010, while nitrate tends to increase due to the excess of ammonia following the reduction in ammonium-sulfate. The aerosol-induced climate impact of both sectors is dominated by aerosol-cloud effects and is projected to decrease between 2000 and 2030, nevertheless still contributing a significant radiative forcing to the Earth's radiation budget.

  18. The model study of water mass and energy exchange between the inland water body and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN ShuFen; YAN JinFeng; XIA Nan; LI Qian

    2008-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional eddy diffusion model, a model to study the water mass and energy exchange between the water body (such as lake and wetland) and the atmosphere is developed, which takes the phase change process due to the seasonal melting and freezing of water and the convection mixing process of en-ergy caused by temperature stratification into consideration. The model uses en-thalpy instead of temperature as predictive variable, which will help to deal with the phase change process and to design an efficient numerical scheme for obtaining the solution more easily. The performance of the model and the rationality of taking convection mixing into the consideration are validated by using observed data of Kinneret Lake in Israel and Lower Two Medicine Lake in Montana State in America. The comparison of model results with observed data indicates that the model pre-sented here is capable of describing the physical process of water mass and en-ergy between the water body (lake and wetland) and atmosphere. Comparison of the result from wetland with shallow and deep lakes under the same forcing condi-tions shows that the evaporation from wetland is much greater than that from lakes,which accords with the real observation fact and physical mechanism.

  19. The model study of water mass and energy exchange between the inland water body and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on a one-dimensional eddy diffusion model,a model to study the water mass and energy exchange between the water body(such as lake and wetland) and the atmosphere is developed,which takes the phase change process due to the seasonal melting and freezing of water and the convection mixing process of energy caused by temperature stratification into consideration. The model uses enthalpy instead of temperature as predictive variable,which will help to deal with the phase change process and to design an efficient numerical scheme for obtaining the solution more easily. The performance of the model and the rationality of taking convection mixing into the consideration are validated by using observed data of Kinneret Lake in Israel and Lower Two Medicine Lake in Montana State in America. The comparison of model results with observed data indicates that the model presented here is capable of describing the physical process of water mass and energy between the water body(lake and wetland) and atmosphere. Comparison of the result from wetland with shallow and deep lakes under the same forcing conditions shows that the evaporation from wetland is much greater than that from lakes,which accords with the real observation fact and physical mechanism.

  20. Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses that individuals may have received from operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. This report deals specifically with the atmospheric transport model, Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET). RATCHET is a major rework of the MESOILT2 model used in the first phase of the HEDR Project; only the bookkeeping framework escaped major changes. Changes to the code include (1) significant changes in the representation of atmospheric processes and (2) incorporation of Monte Carlo methods for representing uncertainty in input data, model parameters, and coefficients. To a large extent, the revisions to the model are based on recommendations of a peer working group that met in March 1991. Technical bases for other portions of the atmospheric transport model are addressed in two other documents. This report has three major sections: a description of the model, a user`s guide, and a programmer`s guide. These sections discuss RATCHET from three different perspectives. The first provides a technical description of the code with emphasis on details such as the representation of the model domain, the data required by the model, and the equations used to make the model calculations. The technical description is followed by a user`s guide to the model with emphasis on running the code. The user`s guide contains information about the model input and output. The third section is a programmer`s guide to the code. It discusses the hardware and software required to run the code. The programmer`s guide also discusses program structure and each of the program elements.

  1. Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The isotopic activity ratios of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe are of interest for distinguishing nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of light water reactor (LWR) fuel burn-up through three operational reactor power cycles are conducted to explore the possible xenon isotopic signature of nuclear reactor releases under different operational conditions. It is studied how ratio changes are related to various parameters including the neutron flux, uranium enrichment and fuel burn-up. Further, the impact of diffusion and mixing on the isotopic activity ratio variability are explored. The simulations are validated with reported reactor emissions. In addition, activity ratios are calculated for xenon isotopes released from nuclear explosions and these are compared to the reactor ratios in order to determine whether the discrimination of explosion releases from reactor effluents is possible based on isotopic activity ratios

  2. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  3. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Gabriel J Bowen

    2015-01-01

    Human activities affect the water cycle in many ways, some of which remain difficult to measure. One such process is emission of water vapor through combustion of fossil fuels, which may be a significant part of the atmospheric water budget in urban centers. It has not previously been possible to uniquely identify combustion-derived water vapor with atmospheric measurements. We introduce a method for the measurement of combustion-derived vapor, and show that this source contributes as much as...

  4. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry. PMID:20058916

  5. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry.

  6. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index

  7. Water Transport Models of Moisture Absorption and Sweat Discharge Yarns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fa-ming; ZHOU Xiao-hong; WANG Shan-yuan

    2008-01-01

    An important property of moisture absorption and sweat discharge yams is their water transport property. In the paper, two water transport models of moisture absorption and sweat discharge yams were developed to investigate the influence factors on their wicking rate. In parallel Column Pores Model, wicking rate is determined by the equivalent capillary radius R and length of the capillary tube L. In Pellets Accumulation Model, wicking rate is decided by the capillary radius r and length of the fiber unit assemble L0.

  8. Atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to the Arctic, today and in a future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octaviani, Mega; Stemmler, Irene; Lammel, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants are of great concern because of their long residence time and long-range transport potential in the environment and because they are readily bioaccumulated along food chains and toxic for wildlife and humans. A multicompartment model is used to study global-scale and long term chemodynamics of anthropogenic organic substances in the Earth system. Model components are the atmosphere (ECHAM5) and ocean general circulation models (MPIOM), which include dynamic sub-models for atmospheric aerosols and the marine biogeochemistry, two-dimensional surface compartments (topsoil, vegetation surfaces, ice, and temporal snow cover) and intercompartmental mass exchange process parameterisations [1-3]. The transports into and out of the Arctic (66° N) are characterized for 1950-2000 under one realisation of present-day climate [4-5] and for 2001-2100 under one realisation of future climate (greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B of IPCC-AR4). Despite decaying primary emissions (since decades) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and dichlorodimephenyltrichloromethane (DDT) are continuing to accumulate in the Arctic, which is fed by atmospheric transports. The main regions of import (and export) are identified and the vertical distribution and seasonalities are characterized. Changes by the end of the 21st century are discussed in the context of a major teleconnection, i.e. the Arctic Oscillation. References [1] Guglielmo F, Lammel G, Maier-Reimer E: Global environmental cycling of DDT and ?-HCH in the 1980s - a study using a coupled atmosphere and ocean general circulation model. Chemosphere 76 (2009) 1509-1517 [2] Stemmler I, Lammel G: Cycling of DDT in the global oceans 1950-2002: World ocean returns the pollutant. Geophys. Res. Lett. 36 (2009) L24602 [3] Hofmann L, Stemmler I, Lammel G: The impact of organochlorines cycling in the cryosphere on their global distributions and fate - 2. Land ice and temporary snow cover. Environ. Pollut. 162 (2012) 482

  9. Influence of atmospheric transport patterns on xenon detections at the CTBTO radionuclide network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysta, Monika; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2016-04-01

    In order to fulfil its task of monitoring for signals emanating from nuclear explosions, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) operates global International Monitoring System (IMS) comprising seismic, infrasound, hydroacoustic and radionuclide measurement networks. At present, 24 among 80 radionuclide stations foreseen by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) are equipped with certified noble gas measurement systems. Over a past couple of years these systems collected a rich set of measurements of radioactive isotopes of xenon. Atmospheric transport modelling simulations are crucial to an assessment of the origin of xenon detected at the IMS stations. Numerous studies undertaken in the past enabled linking these detections to non Treaty-relevant activities and identifying main contributors. Presence and quantity of xenon isotopes at the stations is hence a result of an interplay of emission patterns and atmospheric circulation. In this presentation we analyse the presence or absence of radioactive xenon at selected stations from an angle of such an interplay. We attempt to classify the stations according to similarity of detection patterns, examine seasonality in those patterns and link them to large scale or local meteorological phenomena. The studies are undertaken using crude hypotheses on emission patterns from known sources and atmospheric transport modelling simulations prepared with the FLEXPART model.

  10. Computational study of effect of water finger on ion transport through water-oil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Nobuaki; Wang, Lingjian; Morita, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    When an ion transports from water to oil through water-oil interface, it accompanies hydrated water molecules and transiently forms a chain of water, called "water finger." We thoroughly investigated the role of the water finger in chloride ion transport through water-dichloromethane interface by using molecular dynamics technique. We developed a proper coordinate w to describe the water finger structure and calculated the free energy landscape and the friction for the ion transport as a function of ion position z and the water finger coordinate w. It is clearly shown that the formation and break of water finger accompanies an activation barrier for the ion transport, which has been overlooked in the conventional free energy curve along the ion position z. The present analysis of the friction does not support the hypothesis of augmented local friction (reduced local diffusion coefficient) at the interface. These results mean that the experimentally observed rate constants of interfacial ion transfer are reduced from the diffusion-limited one because of the activation barrier associated to the water finger, not the anomalous local diffusion. We also found that the nascent ion just after the break of water finger has excessive hydration water than that in the oil phase.

  11. The Potential Importance of Non-Local, Deep Transport on the Energetics, Momentum, Chemistry, and Aerosol Distributions in the Atmospheres of Earth, Mars and Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Rafkin, Scot

    2010-01-01

    A review of non-local, deep transport mechanisms in the atmosphere of Earth provides a good foundation for examining whether similar mechanisms are operating in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan. On Earth, deep convective clouds in the tropics constitute the upward branch of the Hadley Cell and provide a conduit through which energy, moisture, momentum, aerosols and chemical species are moved from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. This transport produces mid-tropospheric minima in quantities such as water vapor and moist static energy and maxima where the clouds detrain. Analogs to this terrestrial transport are found in the strong and deep thermal circulations associated with topography on Mars and with Mars dust storms. Observations of elevated dust layers on Mars further support the notion that non-local deep transport is an important mechanism in the atmosphere of Mars. On Titan, the presence of deep convective clouds almost assures that non-local, deep transport is occur...

  12. ATMOSPHERE PROTECTION IN CASE OF EMERGENCY DURING TRANSPORTATION OF DANGEROUS CARGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Berlov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper highlights the development of numerical models for prediction of atmospheric pollution in case of burning of the solid rocket propellant in a railway car, situated near the building on railway territory. These models can be used in predicting the effectiveness of neutralization upon the atmosphere protection for this type of accidents. Methodology.To solve this problem the numerical models based on the use of Navier-Stokes equations, to determine the velocity field of the wind flow near cars and buildings, and contaminants-transfer equations in the atmosphere were developed. For the numerical integration of pollutant transport equation was used implicit «change – triangle» difference scheme. When constructing a difference scheme physical and geometric cleavage of the transfer equation is carried out in four steps. Unknown value of pollutant concentration at each step of cleavage is determined by the explicit scheme – the method of «point-to-point computation». For the numerical integration of the Navier-Stokes equations are used implicit difference schemes. When carrying out computing experiment also takes into account: the velocity profile of wind flow; interaction between the building and the wind flow and flame jet of solid rocket propellant; the presence of a railroad car; inside which there is a source of pollution; instability of pollutant emissions. On the basis of constructed numerical models was performed the computer experiment for assessing the level of air pollution at dangerous cargo rail transportation in case of emergency at railway territory.The application calculations for the timely combustion products neutralization of solid rocket propellant were carried out. Findings. The numerical models that let promptly calculate air contamination in case of emergency during solid rocket propellant transportation, as well as calculate the rational parameters of pollutant neutralization process were developed by

  13. Impact of biomass burning on ocean water quality in Southeast Asia through atmospheric deposition: eutrophication modeling

    OpenAIRE

    P. Sundarambal; P. Tkalich; Balasubramanian, R

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nutrients (N and P species) can intensify anthropogenic eutrophication of coastal waters. It was found that the atmospheric wet and dry depositions of nutrients was remarkable in the Southeast Asian region during the course of smoke haze events, as discussed in a companion paper on field observations (Sundarambal et al., 2010b). The importance of atmospheric deposition of nutrients in terms of their biological responses in the coastal waters of the ...

  14. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in Ile-de-France: Local contribution and Long range transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric aerosols interact directly in a great number of processes related to climate change and public health, modifying the energy budget and partly determining the quality of the air we breathe. In my PhD, I chose to study the perturbation, if not the aggravation, of the living conditions in Ile-de-France associated to aerosol transport episodes in the free troposphere. This situation is rather frequent and still badly known. To achieve my study, I developed the observation platform 'TReSS' Transportable Remote Sensing Station, whose instruments were developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorology Dynamique by the LiMAG team. 'TReSS' consists of a new high-performance 'Mini-Lidar' and of two standard radiometers: a sun photometer and a thermal infrared radiometer. The principle of my experimental approach is the synergy of the vertical Lidar profiles and the particle size distributions over the column, obtained by the 'Almucantar' inversion of sun photometer data. The new 'Lidar and Almucantar' method characterizes the vertical distribution by layer and the optical micro-physical properties of the local and transported aerosols. Firstly, I undertook the characterization of the Paris aerosol, mainly of anthropogenic origin. Their radiative properties were analyzed in the daily and yearly scales. Then, I conducted a statistical multi-year study of transport episodes and a two-week study case, representative of a succession of desert dust intrusion in Ile-de-France. My PhD work concludes by a study on the impact of biomass burning aerosols during the heat wave on August 2003. I study the impact of the transported aerosols into the local radiative budget and the possible consequences on the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. (author)

  15. Global transport and localized layering of metallic ions in the upper atmospherer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Carter

    Full Text Available A numerical model has been developed which is capable of simulating all phases of the life cycle of metallic ions, and results are described and interpreted herein for the typical case of Fe+ ions. This cycle begins with the initial deposition of metallics through meteor ablation and sputtering, followed by conversion of neutral Fe atoms to ions through photoionization and charge exchange with ambient ions. Global transport arising from daytime electric fields and poleward/ downward di.usion along geomagnetic field lines, localized transport and layer formation through de- scending convergent nulls in the thermospheric wind field, and finally annihilation by chemical neutralization and compound formation are treated. The model thus sheds new light on the interdependencies of the physical and chemical processes a.ecting atmospheric metallics. Model output analysis confirms the dominant role of both global and local transport to the ion's life cycle, showing that upward forcing from the equatorial electric field is critical to global movement, and that diurnal and semidiurnal tidal winds are responsible for the forma- tion of dense ion layers in the 90±250 km height region. It is demonstrated that the assumed combination of sources, chemical sinks, and transport mechanisms actually produces F-region densities and E-region layer densities similar to those observed. The model also shows that zonal and meridional winds and electric fields each play distinct roles in local transport, whereas the ion distribution is relatively insensitive to reasonable variations in meteoric deposition and chemical reaction rates.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ion chemistry and composition; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions.

  16. Error characterization of CO2 vertical mixing in the atmospheric transport model WRF-VPRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Karstens

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the dominant uncertainties in inverse estimates of regional CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes is related to model errors in vertical transport within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. In this study we present the results from a synthetic experiment using the atmospheric model WRF-VPRM to realistically simulate transport of CO2 for large parts of the European continent at 10 km spatial resolution. To elucidate the impact of vertical mixing error on modeled CO2 mixing ratios we simulated a month during the growing season (August 2006 with different commonly used parameterizations of the PBL (Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ and Yonsei-University (YSU scheme. To isolate the effect of transport errors we prescribed the same CO2 surface fluxes for both simulations. Differences in simulated CO2 mixing ratios (model bias were on the order of 3 ppm during daytime with larger values during night. We present a simple method to reduce this bias by 70–80% when the true height of the mixed layer is known.

  17. Error characterization of CO2 vertical mixing in the atmospheric transport model WRF-VPRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Karstens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the dominant uncertainties in inverse estimates of regional CO2 surface-atmosphere fluxes is related to model errors in vertical transport within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. In this study we present the results from a synthetic experiment using the atmospheric model WRF-VPRM to realistically simulate transport of CO2 for large parts of the European continent at 10 km spatial resolution. To elucidate the impact of vertical mixing error on modeled CO2 mixing ratios we simulated a month during the growing season (August 2006 with different commonly used parameterizations of the PBL (Mellor-Yamada-Janjić (MYJ and Yonsei-University (YSU scheme. To isolate the effect of transport errors we prescribed the same CO2 surface fluxes for both simulations. Differences in simulated CO2 mixing ratios (model bias were on the order of 3 ppm during daytime with larger values at night. We present a simple method to reduce this bias by 70–80% when the true height of the mixed layer is known.

  18. Bacteria in the global atmosphere – Part 2: Modelling of emissions and transport between different ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are constantly being transported through the atmosphere, which may have implications for human health, agriculture, cloud formation, and the dispersal of bacterial species. We simulated the global transport of bacterial cells, represented as 1μm diameter spherical solid particle tracers, in a chemistry-climate model. We investigated the factors influencing residence time and distribution of the particles, including emission region, CCN activity and removal by ice-phase precipitation. The global distribution depends strongly on the assumptions made about uptake into cloud droplets and ice. The transport is also affected, to a lesser extent, by the emission region and by season. We examine the potential for exchange of bacteria between ecosystems and obtain rough estimates of the flux from each ecosystem by using an optimal estimation technique, together with a new compilation of available observations described in a companion paper. Globally, we estimate the total emissions of bacteria to the atmosphere to be 1400 Gg per year with an upper bound of 4600 Gg per year, originating mainly from grasslands, shrubs and crops. In order to improve understanding of this topic, more measurements of the bacterial content of the air will be necessary. Future measurements in wetlands, sandy deserts, tundra, remote glacial and coastal regions and over oceans will be of particular interest.

  19. Regulation of radionuclides discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water from Ukraine NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible order of radionuclides discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water from Ukraine NPPs regulation is given allowance for laws and norms of Ukraine and ICRP and IAEA guidelines. For definition of a dose relevant to marginal discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water of separate radionuclides are counted dose coefficients (Sv/Bg). Considered three critical age groups: the babies (up to 1 year), children (till 10 years) and adult. The age group being critical for discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water are determined. The radionuclides producing the greatest contribution to a dose are determined. Guidelines on calculation of marginal radionuclides discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water of Ukraine NPPs are given. Matching of doses from actual radionuclides discharges to the atmosphere and emissions to the water of Ukraine NPPs with quotas, assigned in RSNU-97 is carried out

  20. Well-to-Wheels Water Consumption: Tracking the Virtual Flow of Water into Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, D. J.; Elgowainy, A.; Hao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Water and energy resources are fundamental to life on Earth and essential for the production of consumer goods and services in the economy. Energy and water resources are heavily interdependent—energy production consumes water, while water treatment and distribution consume energy. One example of this so-called energy-water nexus is the consumption of water associated with the production of transportation fuels. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can be used to compare the environmental impacts of different transportation fuels on a consistent basis. In this presentation, the expansion of GREET to perform life cycle water accounting or the "virtual flow" of water into transportation and other energy sectors and the associated implications will be discussed. The results indicate that increased usage of alternative fuels may increase freshwater resource consumption. The increased water consumption must be weighed against the benefits of decreased greenhouse gas and fossil energy consumption. Our analysis highlights the importance of regionality, co-product allocation, and consistent system boundaries when comparing the water intensity of alternative transportation fuel production pathways such as ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity with conventional petroleum-based fuels such as diesel and gasoline.

  1. Lumping, testing, tuning: The invention of an artificial chemistry in atmospheric transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Matthias

    Since the late 1950s computer simulation has been used to investigate the transport of pollutants in the atmosphere. About 20 years later also the chemical transformation of atmospheric pollutants was included in computer models of photochemical smog formation. Due to limited knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and due to limited computer capacity, chemical processes in the atmosphere were modeled with the help of simplified chemical models. In these models chemical substances are lumped together forming artificial virtual compounds with virtual characteristics. The paper aims at studying the practices developed in chemical model building and the creation of confidence in these models. Core of the paper will be the analysis of the Urban Airshed Model (UAM) for the Los Angeles region, a pioneering development in the early 1970s. The construction of the UAM involved the "lumping" of chemical processes and extensive testing and tuning. These practices led to a consistent model representation, in which diverse pieces of information fitted and were mutually stabilized. The pragmatic achievement of consistency created confidence, even though empirical tests of the models remained ambiguous and problematic.

  2. Application of numerical environment system to regional atmospheric radioactivity transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazawa, H.; Ohkura, T.; Iida, T. [Nagoya University, Department of Nuclear Engineering (Japan); Chino, M.; Nagai, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Main functions of the Numerical Environment System (NES), as a part of the Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) project implemented by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, became available for test use purposes although the development of the system is still underway. This system consists of numerical models of meteorology and atmospheric dispersion, database necessary for model simulations, post- and pre-processors such as data conversion and visualization, and a suite of system software which provide the users with system functions through a web page access. The system utilizes calculation servers such as vector- and scalar-parallel processors for numerical model execution, a EWS which serves as a hub of the system. This system provides users in the field of nuclear emergency preparedness and atmospheric environment with easy-to-use functions of atmospheric dispersion simulations including input meteorological data preparation and visualization of simulation results. The performance of numerical models in the system was examined with observation data of long-range transported radon-222. The models in the system reproduced quite well temporal variations in the observed radon-222 concentrations in air which were caused by changes in the meteorological field in the synoptic scale. By applying the NES models in combination with the idea of backward-in-time atmospheric dispersion simulation, seasonal shift of source areas of radon-222 in the eastern Asian regions affecting the concentrations in Japan was quantitatively illustrated. (authors)

  3. Effective pollutant emission heights for atmospheric transport modelling based on real-world information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission data needed as input for the operation of atmospheric models should not only be spatially and temporally resolved. Another important feature is the effective emission height which significantly influences modelled concentration values. Unfortunately this information, which is especially relevant for large point sources, is usually not available and simple assumptions are often used in atmospheric models. As a contribution to improve knowledge on emission heights this paper provides typical default values for the driving parameters stack height and flue gas temperature, velocity and flow rate for different industrial sources. The results were derived from an analysis of the probably most comprehensive database of real-world stack information existing in Europe based on German industrial data. A bottom-up calculation of effective emission heights applying equations used for Gaussian dispersion models shows significant differences depending on source and air pollutant and compared to approaches currently used for atmospheric transport modelling. - The comprehensive analysis of real-world stack data provides detailed default parameter values for improving vertical emission distribution in atmospheric modelling

  4. 10-year record of atmospheric composition in the high Himalayas: source, transport and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasoni, Paolo; Laj, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Maione, Michela; Putero, Davide; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro; Gobbi, Gianpaolo; Sellegri, Karine; Verza, Gianpietro; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Arduini, Jgor

    2016-04-01

    South Asia represents a global "hot-spot" for air-quality and climate impacts. Since the end of the 20th Century, field experiments and satellite observations identified a thick layer of atmospheric pollutants extending from the Indian Ocean up to the atmosphere of the Himalayas. Since large amount of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) - like atmospheric aerosol (in particular, the light-absorbing aerosol) and ozone - characterize this region, severe implications were recognized for population health, ecosystem integrity as well as regional climate impacts, especially for what concerns hydrological cycle, monsoon regimes and cryosphere. Since 2006, the Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (NCO-P, 27.95N, 86.82 E, 5079 m a.s.l.), a global station of the WMO/GAW programme has been active in the eastern Nepal Himalaya, not far from the Mt. Everest. NCO-P is located away from large direct anthropogenic pollution sources. The closest major urban area is Kathmandu (200 km south-west from the measurement site). As being located along the Khumbu valley, the observations are representative of synoptic-scale and mountain thermal circulation, providing direct information about the vertical transport of pollutants/climate-altering compounds to the Himalayas and to the free troposphere. In the framework of international programmes (GAW/WMO, UNEP-ABC, AERONET) the following continuous measurement programmes have been carried out at NCO-P: surface ozone, aerosol size distribution (from 10 nm to 25 micron), total particle number, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, equivalent BC, PM1-PM10, AOD by sun-photometry, global solar radiation (SW and LW), meteorology. Long-term sampling programmes for the off-line determination of halogenated gases and aerosol chemistry have been also activated. The atmospheric observation records at NCO-P, now representing the longest time series available for the high Himalayas, provided the first direct evidences about the systematic

  5. Tube transport of water vapor with condensation and desorption

    OpenAIRE

    Nordbo, Annika; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Siivola, Erkki.; Lehto, Roope; Vesala , Timo; Timonen, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Attenuation and delay of active tracers in tube transport is an important current problem, but its full explanation is still lacking. To this end a model is introduced, where part of a tracer undergoes condensation and evaporation, treated as a diffusion-type process, in addition to Taylor dispersion. Condensation of water was verified by high-speed imaging, and the model solution fitted the breakthrough curves of laboratory measurements with pulses of water vapor of varying relat...

  6. Atmospheric transport of mineral dust from the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Temporal variability, acid processing, and iron solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.; Rengarajan, R.

    2014-08-01

    transport of chemical constituents from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the Bay of Bengal is a conspicuous seasonal feature that occurs during the late NE-monsoon (December-March). With this perspective, aerosol composition and abundance of mineral dust have been studied during November 2009 to March 2010 from a sampling site (Kharagpur: 22.3°N, 87.3°E) in the IGP, representing the atmospheric outflow to the Bay of Bengal. The chemical composition of PM2.5 suggests the dominance of nss-SO42- (6.9-24.3 µg m-3); whereas the abundance of mineral dust varied from 3 to 18 µg m-3. The concentration of aerosol iron (FeTot) and its fractional solubility (Fews % = Fews/FeTot *100, where Fews is the water-soluble fraction of FeTot) varied from 60 to 1144 ng m-3 and from 6.7 to 26.5%, respectively. A striking similarity in the temporal variability of total inorganic acidity (TIA = NO3- + nss-SO42-) and Fews (%) provides evidence for acid processing of mineral dust (alluvium) during atmospheric transport from the IGP. The contribution of TIA to water-soluble inorganic species [(nss-SO42- + NO3-)/ΣWSIS], mass ratios of Ca/Al and Fe/Al, and abundance of dust (%) and Fews (%) in the IGP-outflow are similar to the aerosol composition over the Bay of Bengal. With the rapid increase in anthropogenic activities over south and south-east Asia, the enhanced fractional solubility of aerosol iron (attributed to acid processing of mineral dust) has implications to further increase in the air-sea deposition of Fe to the Ocean surface.

  7. Particle acceleration and transport in reconnecting twisted loops in a stratified atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Kontar, Eduard; Bian, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Twisted coronal loops should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. Twisted magnetic fields contain excess magnetic energy, which can be released during magnetic reconnection, causing solar flares. The aim of this work is to investigate magnetic reconnection, and particle acceleration and transport in kink-unstable twisted coronal loops, with a focus on the effects of resistivity, loop geometry and atmospheric stratification. Another aim is to perform forward-modelling of bremsstrahlung emission and determine the structure of hard X-ray sources. We use a combination of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle methods. First, the evolution of the kinking coronal loop is considered using resistive MHD model, incorporating atmospheric stratification and loop curvature. Then, the obtained electric and magnetic fields and density distributions are used to calculate electron and proton trajectories using a guiding-centre approximation, taking into account Coulomb collisions. It is shown that electric fields in twist...

  8. Effects of atmospheric water on the optical properties of soot aerosols with different mixing states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soot aerosols have become the second most important contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide in terms of direct forcing, which is the dominant absorber of visible solar radiation. The optical properties of soot aerosols depend strongly on the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components and its hygroscopic properties. In this study, the effects of atmospheric water on the optical properties of soot aerosols have been investigated using a superposition T-matrix method that accounts for the mixing mechanism of soot aerosols with atmospheric water. The dramatic changes in the optical properties of soot aerosols were attributed to its different mixing states with atmospheric water (externally mixed, semi-embedded mixed, and internally mixed). Increased absorption is accompanied by a larger increase in scattering, which is reflected by the increased single scattering albedo. The asymmetry parameter also increased when increasing the atmospheric water content. Moreover, atmospheric water intensified the radiative absorption enhancement attributed to the mixing states of the soot aerosols, with values ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 on average at 0.870 μm. The increased absorption and scattering ability of soot aerosols, which is attributed to atmospheric water, exerted an opposing effect on climate change. These findings should improve our understanding of the effects of atmospheric water on the optical properties of soot aerosols and their effects on climate. The mixing mechanism for soot aerosols and atmospheric water is important when evaluating the climate effects of soot aerosols, which should be explicitly considered in radiative forcing models. - Highlights: • Effects of atmospheric water on optical properties of soot aerosols are investigated. • Increased absorption is accompanied by a larger increase in scattering. • Atmospheric water intensified the absorption enhancement due the mixing states

  9. Eolian transport of geogenic hexavalent chromium to ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Clark, D.; Imes, J.L.; Councell, T.B.

    2010-01-01

    A conceptual model of eolian transport is proposed to address the widely distributed, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) observed in ground water in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Concentrations (30 to more than 1000 μg/L Cr+6) extend over thousands of square kilometers of ground water systems. It is hypothesized that the Cr is derived from weathering of chromium-rich pyroxenes and olivines present in ophiolite sequence of the adjacent Oman (Hajar) Mountains. Cr+3 in the minerals is oxidized to Cr+6 by reduction of manganese and is subsequently sorbed on iron and manganese oxide coatings of particles. When the surfaces of these particles are abraded in this arid environment, they release fine, micrometer-sized, coated particles that are easily transported over large distances by wind and subsequently deposited on the surface. During ground water recharge events, the readily soluble Cr+6 is mobilized by rain water and transported by advective flow into the underlying aquifer. Chromium analyses of ground water, rain, dust, and surface (soil) deposits are consistent with this model, as are electron probe analyses of clasts derived from the eroding Oman ophiolite sequence. Ground water recharge flux is proposed to exercise some control over Cr+6 concentration in the aquifer.

  10. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  11. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  12. Soil physics with Python transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system

    CERN Document Server

    Bittelli, Marco; Tomei, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents numerical methods to solve soil physics problems using computers. It starts with the theory and then shows how to use Python code to solve the problems. Most soil physics books focus on deriving rather than solving the differential equations for mass and energy transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The focus of this book is on solutions. Agricultural and biological scientists usually have a good working knowledge of algebra and calculus, but not of differential equations. Here numerical procedures are used to solve differential equations.

  13. Worldwide status of long range atmospheric transportation models for use in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of the work of a working group put together in order to summarize the status of long range atmospheric transportation models for use in an emergency situation in real-time mode. The most important characteristics of the various models are summarized. The models in use in the Nordic countries as well as a couple of non-Nordic models are presented in more detail. A discussion of the desired characteristics of real-time models (also referred to as Emergency Response Assisting Systems) is included

  14. Atmospheric fate and transport of fine volcanic ash: Does particle shape matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. M.; Allard, M. P.; Klewicki, J.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Mulukutla, G.; Genareau, K.; Sahagian, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash presents hazards to infrastructure, agriculture, and human and animal health. In particular, given the economic importance of intercontinental aviation, understanding how long ash is suspended in the atmosphere, and how far it is transported has taken on greater importance. Airborne ash abrades the exteriors of aircraft, enters modern jet engines and melts while coating interior engine parts causing damage and potential failure. The time fine ash stays in the atmosphere depends on its terminal velocity. Existing models of ash terminal velocities are based on smooth, quasi-spherical particles characterized by Stokes velocity. Ash particles, however, violate the various assumptions upon which Stokes flow and associated models are based. Ash particles are non-spherical and can have complex surface and internal structure. This suggests that particle shape may be one reason that models fail to accurately predict removal rates of fine particles from volcanic ash clouds. The present research seeks to better parameterize predictive models for ash particle terminal velocities, diffusivity, and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer. The fundamental hypothesis being tested is that particle shape irreducibly impacts the fate and transport properties of fine volcanic ash. Pilot studies, incorporating modeling and experiments, are being conducted to test this hypothesis. Specifically, a statistical model has been developed that can account for actual volcanic ash size distributions, complex ash particle geometry, and geometry variability. Experimental results are used to systematically validate and improve the model. The experiments are being conducted at the Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH. Terminal velocities and dispersion properties of fine ash are characterized using still air drop experiments in an unconstrained open space using a homogenized mix of source particles. Dispersion and sedimentation dynamics are quantified using particle image

  15. Water Transport in Trees--An Artificial Laboratory Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, K.; Razpet, N.; Cepic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water transport in tall trees is an everyday phenomenon, seldom noticed and not completely understood even by scientists. As a topic of current research in plant physiology it has several advantages for presentation within school physics lectures: it is interdisciplinary and clearly shows the connection between physics and biology; the…

  16. Classroom Techniques to Illustrate Water Transport in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakrim, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The transport of water in plants is among the most difficult and challenging concepts to explain to students. It is even more difficult for students enrolled in an introductory general biology course. An easy approach is needed to demonstrate this complex concept. I describe visual and pedagogical examples that can be performed quickly and easily…

  17. Pollution transport in the Boden garrison storm water

    OpenAIRE

    Udén, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A study concerning the pollution transport in storm water pipes. Yearly volume and maximum flow is calculated for a number of outlets, from an industrial area in northern Sweden. The pipes are elso evaluated concerning their ability to handle bigger oil spills.

  18. Water transport between CNS compartments: contributions of aquaporins and cotransporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, N; Zeuthen, T

    2010-01-01

    or hydrocephalus. The molecular pathways by which water molecules cross the cell membranes of the brain are not well-understood, although the discovery of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in the brain improved our understanding of some of these transport processes, particularly under pathological conditions. In the present...

  19. Superconductivity and Fast Proton Transport in Nanoconfined Water

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K H

    2016-01-01

    A real-space molecular-orbital description of Cooper pairing in conjunction with the dynamic Jahn-Teller mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity predicts that electron-doped water confined to the nanoscale environment of a carbon nanotube or biological macromolecule should superconduct below and exhibit fast proton transport above the transition temperature, Tc = 230 degK (-43 degC).

  20. Some effects of ablation on transport properties in the Jovian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolsi, L.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the transport properties at the inner and outer boundary for mixing between ablation products and a Jovian-like atmosphere are calculated. The dominant species at these boundaries are C, H, O, He, H+, and e. Accurate potential energy curves are obtained for the fifteen possible two-body interactions among these species by fitting good semiempirical potentials for which transport collision cross sections have been tabulated to accurate experimental and theoretical information. Results are obtained for the viscosity and translational thermal conductivity of the pure species and the binary diffusion coefficients from 1000 K to 25,000 K. In addition, the mixture translational thermal conductivity and viscosity are calculated at the inner and outer mixing boundaries. This information is required for calculating flowfield properties and surface heating. The most important conclusion is that the translational thermal conductivity is substantially lower at the inner mixing boundary than it is at the outer mixing boundary.

  1. Physical Hydrography and Algal Bloom Transport in Hong Kong Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Cui-ping; LEE Joseph H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: I) In the wet season (May~August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November~April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.

  2. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    OpenAIRE

    Kasting, James F.; Chen, Howard; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a '...

  3. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-03-29

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration is being considered as a way to offset fossil-fuel-related CO{sub 2} emissions to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The accumulation of vast quantities of injected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic sequestration sites may entail health and environmental risks from potential leakage and seepage of CO{sub 2} into the near-surface environment. We are developing and applying a coupled subsurface and atmospheric surface-layer modeling capability built within the framework of the integral finite difference reservoir simulator TOUGH2. The overall purpose of modeling studies is to predict CO{sub 2} concentration distributions under a variety of seepage scenarios and geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric conditions. These concentration distributions will provide the basis for determining above-ground and near-surface instrumentation needs for carbon sequestration monitoring and verification, as well as for assessing health, safety, and environmental risks. A key feature of CO{sub 2} is its large density ({rho} = 1.8 kg m{sup -3}) relative to air ({rho} = 1.2 kg m{sup -3}), a property that may allow small leaks to cause concentrations in air above the occupational exposure limit of 4 percent in low-lying and enclosed areas such as valleys and basements where dilution rates are low. The approach we take to coupled modeling involves development of T2CA, a TOUGH2 module for modeling the multicomponent transport of water, brine, CO{sub 2}, gas tracer, and air in the subsurface. For the atmospheric surface-layer advection and dispersion, we use a logarithmic vertical velocity profile to specify constant time-averaged ambient winds, and atmospheric dispersion approaches to model mixing due to eddies and turbulence. Initial simulations with the coupled model suggest that atmospheric dispersion quickly dilutes diffuse CO{sub 2} seepage fluxes to negligible concentrations, and that rainfall

  4. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  5. Models of coupled salt and water transport across leaky epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, A M; Stephenson, J L

    1981-05-15

    A general formulation is presented for the verification of isotonic transport and for the assignment of a degree of osmotic coupling in any epithelial model. In particular, it is shown that the concentration of the transported fluid in the presence of exactly equal bathing media is, in general, not a sufficient calculation by which to decide the issue of isotonicity of transport. Within this framework, two epithelial models are considered: (1) A nonelectrolyte compartment model of the lateral intercellular space is presented along with its linearization about the condition of zero flux. This latter approximate model is shown to be useful in the estimation of deviation from isotonicity, intraepithelial solute polarization effects, and the capacity to transport water against a gradient. In the case of uphill water transport, some limitations of a model of fixed geometry are indicated and the advantage of modeling a compliant interspace is suggested. (2) A comprehensive model of cell and channel is described which includes the major electrolytes and the possible presence of intraepithelial gradients. The general approach to verification of isotonicity is illustrated for this numerical model. In addition, the insights about parameter dependence gained from the linear compartment model are shown to be applicable to understanding this large simulation. PMID:6264088

  6. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  7. Pollutants transport and atmospheric variability of CO2 over Siberia: contribution of airborne measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here intends to characterize the variations of atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, O3 and ultrafine particles, over a large scale aircraft transect above Siberia, during three intensive YAK-AEROSIB campaigns in April 2006, September 2006 and August 2007, respectively. Pollutant and greenhouse gases distribution in this poorly studied region is needed to model atmospheric long range transport. I show here that CO concentrations at the time of the campaigns is broadly affected by (1) advection of Chinese pollutants through baro-clinic perturbations, (2) advection (diffuse or not) of European pollutants at various altitudes, (3) and of biomass burning from Central Asia. This set of factors is analyzed through a novel statistical technique based on clustering of backward transport simulated by the FLEXPART Lagrangian model. Large observed CO2 gradients in summer are matched against vertical mixing in GCM simulated CO2. At last I present ultrafine particle measurements, and a possible nucleation summer maximum in the clean, continental mid-troposphere. (author)

  8. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘英华; 李堃; 陈伟宇; 司伟; 谭启檐; 陈云飞

    2015-01-01

    Porous graphene has a high mechanical strength and an atomic-layer thickness that makes it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solutions are a type of strong long-range interaction that may greatly infl uence fl uid transport through nanopores. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through 1.05-nm diameter monolayer graphene nanopores, with their edges charge-modified. Our results indicated that these nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase–decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonically decrease. The co-ion rejection can reach 76.5%and 90.2%when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. The Cl−ion current increases and reaches a plateau, and the Na+current decreases as the charge amount increases in systems in which Na+ions act as counterions. In addition, charge modification can enhance water transport through nanopores. This is mainly due to the ion selectivity of the nanopores. Notably, positive charges on the pore edges facilitate water transport much more strongly than negative charges.

  9. Semi-volatile organic compounds as molecular markers for atmospheric and ecosystem transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genualdi, Susan

    The use of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) as molecular markers to identify the contributions of regional and long-range atmospheric transport, as well as current and historic sources, and contaminant deposition in remote ecosystems of the Western U.S. was investigated. Trans-Pacific air masses influenced by Siberian biomass burning events had elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the historic use pesticides dieldrin and alpha-HCH, while air masses influenced by regional fires in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had enhanced concentrations of PAHs and the current-use pesticides dacthal and endosulfan. This suggests that previously deposited SOCs, such as pesticides, revolatilize to the atmosphere during forest fires. In addition, forest soils collected from a burned area in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. had significantly lower SOC concentrations (34 to 100 %) than soils collected from an unburned area separated only by a two lane road. This confirms that SOCs re-volatilize and/or degrade from soils and vegetation during the burning process. The chiral signatures of alpha-HCH in air masses at three sites in the Pacific Northwestern U.S. indicated that the boundary layer has a non-racemic alpha-HCH signature likely due to re-volatilization of alpha-HCH from the Pacific Ocean and that the free troposphere is a source of racemic alpha-HCH. Racemic alpha-HCH was also associated with Asian and trans-Pacific air masses. Racemic cis and trans-chlordane in Pacific Northwestern U.S. air masses indicated that U.S. urban areas continue to be a source of chlordane to the atmosphere. The deposition of non-racemic alpha-HCH in seasonal snowpack in continental Western U.S. national park high elevation ecosystems reflected regional transport, while the high latitude, Alaskan national parks were influenced by long-range atmospheric transport of racemic alpha-HCH. The chiral signature of alpha-HCH in fish collected from high elevation and high

  10. Atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust to the ocean: implications for research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Prospero, Joseph M; Baker, Alex R; Dentener, Frank; Ickes, Luisa; Liss, Peter S; Mahowald, Natalie M; Nickovic, Slobodan; García-Pando, Carlos Pérez; Rodríguez, Sergio; Sarin, Manmohan; Tegen, Ina; Duce, Robert A

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews our knowledge of the measurement and modeling of mineral dust emissions to the atmosphere, its transport and deposition to the ocean, the release of iron from the dust into seawater, and the possible impact of that nutrient on marine biogeochemistry and climate. Of particular concern is our poor understanding of the mechanisms and quantities of dust deposition as well as the extent of iron solubilization from the dust once it enters the ocean. Model estimates of dust deposition in remote oceanic regions vary by more than a factor of 10. The fraction of the iron in dust that is available for use by marine phytoplankton is still highly uncertain. There is an urgent need for a long-term marine atmospheric surface measurement network, spread across all oceans. Because the southern ocean is characterized by large areas with high nitrate but low chlorophyll surface concentrations, that region is particularly sensitive to the input of dust and iron. Data from this region would be valuable, particularly at sites downwind from known dust source areas in South America, Australia, and South Africa. Coordinated field experiments involving both atmospheric and marine measurements are recommended to address the complex and interlinked processes and role of dust/Fe fertilization on marine biogeochemistry and climate.

  11. A regional study of atmospheric gravity waves using the USArray Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, M. A. H.; Stephan, C. C.; de Groot-Hedlin, C. D.; Alexander, M. J.; Hoffmann, L.

    2015-12-01

    The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is a network of approximately 400 seismo-acoustic stations deployed on a 70 km Cartesian grid covering an area of 2,000,000 km2 in the continental United States. The network moves eastward through station redeployments and is now located on the Atlantic coast. This dense network has provided unprecedented opportunities for research in seismology, infrasound and atmospheric science. We have developed a novel technique to investigate gravity wave occurrence and propagation across the network and have applied it to atmospheric pressure data recorded from Jan 1, 2010 through 2014. We divided the stations in this time range into 3,600 non-overlapping triangular arrays (triads). Each triad is most sensitive to propagating gravity waves in the 1-6 hour period range. We report two lines of research with this new dataset. First, we study individual large events in which atmospheric gravity waves are observed to cross the TA. We also study the long-term occurrence statistics of gravity waves and compare them to satellite observations of convective clouds and gravity waves in the stratosphere. We discuss plans for future work when the network is redeployed in Alaska.

  12. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  13. Influence of model resolution on the atmospheric transport of 10Be

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Smith

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the transport path of the solar activity proxy 10Be from source to archive is crucial for the interpretation of its observed variability. The extent of mixing of the strong production signal has been quantified in a previous study (Heikkilä et al., 2009. In this study we perform sensitivity studies to investigate the influence of model resolution on the degree of mixing and transport path of 10Be in the atmosphere using the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model. This study permits us to choose an acceptable resolution, and so minimum CPU time, to produce reconstructions as physically accurate as possible. Five model resolutions are applied: T21L19: a coarse horizontal and vertical resolution with model top at ca. 30 km, T42L31: an average horizontal and fine vertical one, T42L39: similar vertical resolution than L19 but including the middle atmosphere up to ca. 80 km, T63L31: a fine horizontal and vertical resolution and T63L47: a fine resolution horizontally and vertically with middle atmosphere. Comparison with observations suggests that a finer horizontal and vertical resolution might be beneficial, producing a reduced meridional gradient, although the spread between observations was much larger than between the five model runs. In terms of atmospheric mixing the differences became more distinguishable. All resolutions agreed that the main driver of deposition variability, observed in natural archives, is the input of stratospheric 10Be (total contribution 68% which is transported into the troposphere at latitudes 30–50°. In the troposphere the model resolutions deviated largely in the dispersion of the stratospheric component over latitude. The finest resolution (T63L47 predicted the least dispersion towards low latitudes but the most towards the poles, whereas the coarsest resolution (T21L19 suggested the opposite. The tropospheric components of 10Be differed less between the five model runs. The largest differences were found

  14. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  15. Influence of Uncertainty in Atmospheric Transport Modeling on Regional and Continental Scale Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliasz, M.; Schuh, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric transport modeling and its uncertainty play a crucial role in inversion studies with a goal to estimate fluxes of trace gases like carbon dioxide from available concentration measurements. Lagrangian particle models (e.g., CSU LPDM, STILT, FLEXPART) driven by regional meteorological models (e.g., WRF, RAMS) are state of the art tools in regional CO2 research including not only inversion studies, but also designing of tower network, or testing and supporting flight scenarios. They are typically used backward in time as an adjoint transport model providing, for each data point, influence functions (footprints) for surface fluxes and inflow fluxes across a domain perimeter. Modeling system used at CSU is based on SiB-RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System with Simple Biosphere model) providing meteorological fields for the LPDM (Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model). Our LPDM can be run both in a forward and backward in time mode. Therefore, we recommend to use the comparison of forward and backward in time simulations as a method to evaluate internal model uncertainty. In addition the LPDM concentration fields can be compared to tracer concentrations simulated directly by RAMS, i.e. Eulerian grid model. We will discuss how simulated concentration fields, and in turn, the results of atmospheric inversions are affected by (1) model simplifications and optimizations, (2) time and space resolution of meteorological fields, and (3) selection of a domain for inversion study. The simulations are performed for the North America and smaller regional domains for a passive tracer and a tracers resulting from different CO2 fluxes (assimilation and respiration). Finally, we would like to propose a framework for inter comparison of different LPDMs coupled to regional meteorological models. This framework includes a sparse matrix format for influence functions to facilitate exchange and further applications of this product by different research groups.

  16. Nanoscale transport of electrons and ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, Paul Christopher

    The following dissertation discusses the theoretical study of water on the nanoscale, often involved with essential biological molecules such as DNA and proteins. First I introduce the study of water on the nanoscale and how experimentalists approach confinement with nanopores and nanogaps. Then I discuss the theoretical method we choose for understanding this important biological medium on the molecular level, namely classical molecular dynamics. This leads into transport mechanisms that utilize water on the nanoscale, in our case electronic and ionic transport. On the scale of mere nanometers or less electronic transport in water enters the tunneling regime, requiring the use of a quantum treatment. In addition, I discuss the importance of water in ionic transport and its known effects on biological phenomena such as ion selectivity. Water also has great influence over DNA and proteins, which are both introduced in the context of nanopore sequencing. Several techniques for nanopore sequencing are examined and the importance of protein sequencing is explained. In Chapter 2, we study the effect of volumetric constraints on the structure and electronic transport properties of distilled water in a nanopore with embedded electrodes. Combining classical molecular dynamics simulations with quantum scattering theory, we show that the structural motifs water assumes inside the pore can be probed directly by tunneling. In Chapter 3, we propose an improvement to the original sequencing by tunneling method, in which N pairs of electrodes are built in series along a synthetic nanochannel. Each current time series for each nucleobase is cross-correlated together, reducing noise in the signals. We show using random sampling of data from classical molecular dynamics, that indeed the sequencing error is significantly reduced as the number of pairs of electrodes, N, increases. In Chapter 4, we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a

  17. Changes of Atmospheric Water Balance over China under the IPCC SRES A1B Scenario Based on RegCM3 Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Bo; JIANG Da-Bang

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of the Regional Climate Model Version 3 (RegCM3) under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A1B scenario were employed to investigate possible decadal changes and long-term trends of annual mean atmospheric water balance components over China in the 21st century with reference to the period of 1981-2000. An evaluation showed that RegCM3 can reasonably reproduce annual evapotranspiration, precipitation, and water vapor transport over China, with a better performance for March–June. It was found that the water vapor exchange between the land surface and atmosphere would be significantly intensified in Northwest China by the mid-to late-21st century and that the region would possibly shift to a wetter or drought-mitigated state under global warming. Conversely, the water vapor exchange evidently weakened over the Tibetan Plateau and South-west China by the mid-to late-21st century. In addition, there appears to be a drier state for Northeast China and the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River valley by the mid-to late-21st century, with slight mitigation by the end compared with the mid-21st century. The westerly and southwesterly water vapor transport over China generally presents an increasing trend, with increasing diver-gence over the Tibetan Plateau and Northeast China, corresponding to a loss of atmospheric water vapor by water vapor transport.

  18. A study of atmospheric diffusion from the LANDSAT imagery. [pollution transport over the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Viswanadham, Y.; Torsani, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT multispectral scanner data of the smoke plumes which originated in eastern Cabo Frio, Brazil and crossed over into the Atlantic Ocean, are analyzed to illustrate how high resolution LANDSAT imagery can aid meteorologists in evaluating specific air pollution events. The eleven LANDSAT images selected are for different months and years. The results show that diffusion is governed primarily by water and air temperature differences. With colder water, low level air is very stable and the vertical diffusion is minimal; but water warmer than the air induces vigorous diffusion. The applicability of three empirical methods for determining the horizontal eddy diffusivity coefficient in the Gaussian plume formula was evaluated with the estimated standard deviation of the crosswind distribution of material in the plume from the LANDSAT imagery. The vertical diffusion coefficient in stable conditions is estimated using Weinstock's formulation. These results form a data base for use in the development and validation of meso scale atmospheric diffusion models.

  19. History of water loss and atmospheric O2 buildup on rocky exoplanets near M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng

    2015-12-01

    It is recently proposed that early stellar luminosity evolution of M dwarfs leads to severe water loss and the buildup of massive O2 atmospheres on rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of these stars if interactions of such O2 atmospheres with planetary surfaces are inefficient. Here we show that even without considering atmosphere-surface interactions, the existence of a massive O2 atmosphere on such exoplanets is not an unavoidable consequence around M0-M3 stars and depends on stellar XUV properties, the mass of the exoplanets, and most importantly the initial planetary water inventories. In the case of inefficient atmosphere-surface interactions, the distribution of atmospheric O2 contents on these exoplanets should be bi-modal and such a distribution could be verified by future surveys of rocky exoplanets.

  20. Influence of atmospheric convection on the long and short-range transport of Xe133 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Krysta, Monika; Gheddou, Abdelhakim; Nikkinen, Mika

    2014-05-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 79 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases supported by the atmospheric transport modelling (ATM). The ATM system is based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART, designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollution from point sources. In the operational configuration only the transport of the passive tracer is simulated. The question arises whether including other atmospheric processes, like convection, will improve results. To answer this question a series of forward simulations was conducted, assuming the maximum transport of 14 days. Each time 2 runs were performed: one with convection and one without convection. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. Due to the fact that CTBTO has recently received a noble gas emission inventory from the ANSTO facility we had a chance to do more accurate simulations. Studies have been performed to link Xe133 emissions with detections at the IMS stations supported by the ATM. The geographical localization to some extend justifies the assumption that the only source of Xe133 observed at the neighbouring stations, e.g. AUX04, AUX09 and NZX46, comes from the ANSTO facility. In simulations the analysed wind data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5 degree. The results of quantitative and qualitative comparison will be presented.

  1. Development of a Model for Water and Heat Exchange Between the Atmosphere and a Water Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shufen; YAN Jinfeng; XIA Nan; SUN Changhai

    2007-01-01

    A model for studying the heat and mass exchange between the atmosphere and a water body is developed,in which the phase change process of water freezing in winter and melting in summer and the function of the convective mixing process are taken into consideration. The model uses enthalpy rather than temperature as the predictive variable. It helps to set up governing equations more concisely, to deal with the phase change process more easily, and make the numerical scheme simpler. The model is verified by observed data from Lake Kinneret for a non-frozen lake in summer time, and Lake Lower Two Medicine for a frozen lake in winter time. Reasonably good agreements between the model simulations and observed data indicate that the model can serve as a component for a water body in a land surface model. In order to more efficiently apply the scheme in a climate system model, a sensitivity study of various division schemes with less layers in the vertical direction in the water body is conducted. The results of the study show that the division with around 10 vertical layers could produce a prediction accuracy that is comparable to the fine division with around 40 layers.

  2. Melt onset over Arctic sea ice controlled by atmospheric moisture transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortin, Jonas; Svensson, Gunilla; Graversen, Rune G.; Kapsch, Marie-Luise; Stroeve, Julienne C.; Boisvert, Linette N.

    2016-06-01

    The timing of melt onset affects the surface energy uptake throughout the melt season. Yet the processes triggering melt and causing its large interannual variability are not well understood. Here we show that melt onset over Arctic sea ice is initiated by positive anomalies of water vapor, clouds, and air temperatures that increase the downwelling longwave radiation (LWD) to the surface. The earlier melt onset occurs; the stronger are these anomalies. Downwelling shortwave radiation (SWD) is smaller than usual at melt onset, indicating that melt is not triggered by SWD. When melt occurs early, an anomalously opaque atmosphere with positive LWD anomalies preconditions the surface for weeks preceding melt. In contrast, when melt begins late, clearer than usual conditions are evident prior to melt. Hence, atmospheric processes are imperative for melt onset. It is also found that spring LWD increased during recent decades, consistent with trends toward an earlier melt onset.

  3. Maintaining Atmospheric Mass and Water Balance Within Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max; Todling, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the modifications implemented into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version-5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (ADAS) to maintain global conservation of dry atmospheric mass as well as to preserve the model balance of globally integrated precipitation and surface evaporation during reanalysis. Section 1 begins with a review of these global quantities from four current reanalysis efforts. Section 2 introduces the modifications necessary to preserve these constraints within the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis procedure, and the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) algorithm. Section 3 presents experiments quantifying the impact of the new procedure. Section 4 shows preliminary results from its use within the GMAO MERRA-2 Reanalysis project. Section 5 concludes with a summary.

  4. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  5. Inferring global and regional methane sources and sinks using isotopic observations and atmospheric chemical transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, M. L.; Wenger, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Lunt, M. F.; Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the major isotopologues of atmospheric methane have the potential to improve our understanding of the methane budget at the global and regional scale. Using global and regional chemical transport models, we can predict the atmospheric variations in 13C-CH4 and D-CH4, for given assumptions about source isotope ratios and fractionation due to methane sinks. This information can then be used to test the impact that various measurement techniques, technologies and sampling strategies have on our knowledge of the methane budget. We show that, at the global scale, an extensive and accurate network of isotopic measurements can lead to a reduction in the uncertainties in the major global sources. Furthermore, measurements of the D/H ratio in methane may provide some level of uncertainty reduction in the magnitude of the OH sink. Uncertainties can be reduced with improved precision and accuracy of the atmospheric observations. However, to make the most of an atmospheric methane isotope network, we show that the characterisation of source isotope ratios must also be improved. Finally, we put the theory into practice by deriving sector-specific methane sources at the national scale using 13C-CH4 samples collected as part of the Greenhouse gAs Uk and Global Emissions (GAUGE) project. GAUGE measurements are made from a tall tower site to the east of the UK, a background station on the west coast of Ireland and during intensive aircraft sampling campaigns. We will discuss the challenges and benefits associated with adding isotopic information to a national greenhouse gas sampling network and outline a strategy for improvements in the future.

  6. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  7. Comparison between Satellite Water Vapour Observations and Atmospheric Models’ Predictions of the Upper Tropospheric Thermal Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dim, J. R.; T. Y. Nakajima; T. Takamura; Kikuchi, N

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric profiles (temperature, pressure, and humidity) are commonly used parameters for aerosols and cloud properties retrievals. In preparation of the launch of the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate/Second-Generation GLobal Imager (GCOM-C/SGLI) satellite, an evaluation study on the sensitivity of atmospheric models to variations of atmospheric conditions is conducted. In this evaluation, clear sky and above low clouds water vapour radiances of the upper troposphere obtained from ...

  8. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R

    2002-05-01

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has

  9. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has been higher

  10. The relation between atmospheric humidity and temperature trends for stratospheric water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueglistaler, S.; Liu, Y. S.; Flannaghan, T. J.; Haynes, P. H.; Dee, D. P.; Read, W. J.; Remsberg, E. E.; Thomason, L. W.; Hurst, D. F.; Lanzante, J. R.; Bernath, P. F.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relation between atmospheric temperature and water vapor—a fundamental component of the global climate system—for stratospheric water vapor (SWV). We compare measurements of SWV (and methane where available) over the period 1980-2011 from NOAA balloon-borne frostpoint hygrometer (NOAA-FPH), SAGE II, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)/Aura, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) to model predictions based on troposphere-to-stratosphere transport from ERA-Interim, and temperatures from ERA-Interim, Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis (MERRA), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), Radiosonde Atmospheric Temperature Products for Assessing Climate (RATPAC), HadAT2, and RICHv1.5. All model predictions are dry biased. The interannual anomalies of the model predictions show periods of fairly regular oscillations, alternating with more quiescent periods and a few large-amplitude oscillations. They all agree well (correlation coefficients 0.9 and larger) with observations for higher-frequency variations (periods up to 2-3 years). Differences between SWV observations, and temperature data, respectively, render analysis of the model minus observation residual difficult. However, we find fairly well-defined periods of drifts in the residuals. For the 1980s, model predictions differ most, and only the calculation with ERA-Interim temperatures is roughly within observational uncertainties. All model predictions show a drying relative to HALOE in the 1990s, followed by a moistening in the early 2000s. Drifts to NOAA-FPH are similar (but stronger), whereas no drift is present against SAGE II. As a result, the model calculations have a less pronounced drop in SWV in 2000 than HALOE. From the mid-2000s onward, models and observations agree reasonably, and some differences can be traced to problems in the temperature data. These results indicate that both SWV and temperature data may still

  11. The Relation Between Atmospheric Humidity and Temperature Trends for Stratospheric Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueglistaler, S.; Liu, Y. S.; Flannaghan, T. J.; Haynes, P. H.; Dee, D. P.; Read, W. J.; Remsberg, E. E.; Thomason, L. W.; Hurst, D. F.; Lanzante, J. R.; Bernath, P. F.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relation between atmospheric temperature and water vapor-a fundamental component of the global climate system-for stratospheric water vapor (SWV). We compare measurements of SWV (and methane where available) over the period 1980-2011 from NOAA balloon-borne frostpoint hygrometer (NOAA-FPH), SAGE II, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)/Aura, and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) to model predictions based on troposphere-to-stratosphere transport from ERA-Interim, and temperatures from ERA-Interim, Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis (MERRA), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), Radiosonde Atmospheric Temperature Products for Assessing Climate (RATPAC), HadAT2, and RICHv1.5. All model predictions are dry biased. The interannual anomalies of the model predictions show periods of fairly regular oscillations, alternating with more quiescent periods and a few large-amplitude oscillations. They all agree well (correlation coefficients 0.9 and larger) with observations for higherfrequency variations (periods up to 2-3 years). Differences between SWV observations, and temperature data, respectively, render analysis of the model minus observation residual difficult. However, we find fairly well-defined periods of drifts in the residuals. For the 1980s, model predictions differ most, and only the calculation with ERA-Interim temperatures is roughly within observational uncertainties. All model predictions show a drying relative to HALOE in the 1990s, followed by a moistening in the early 2000s. Drifts to NOAA-FPH are similar (but stronger), whereas no drift is present against SAGE II. As a result, the model calculations have a less pronounced drop in SWV in 2000 than HALOE. From the mid-2000s onward, models and observations agree reasonably, and some differences can be traced to problems in the temperature data. These results indicate that both SWV and temperature data may still suffer

  12. Assessment and Requirements of Nuclear Reaction Databases for GCR Transport in the Atmosphere and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    The transport properties of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the atmosphere, material structures, and human body (self-shielding) am of interest in risk assessment for supersonic and subsonic aircraft and for space travel in low-Earth orbit and on interplanetary missions. Nuclear reactions, such as knockout and fragmentation, present large modifications of particle type and energies of the galactic cosmic rays in penetrating materials. We make an assessment of the current nuclear reaction models and improvements in these model for developing required transport code data bases. A new fragmentation data base (QMSFRG) based on microscopic models is compared to the NUCFRG2 model and implications for shield assessment made using the HZETRN radiation transport code. For deep penetration problems, the build-up of light particles, such as nucleons, light clusters and mesons from nuclear reactions in conjunction with the absorption of the heavy ions, leads to the dominance of the charge Z = 0, 1, and 2 hadrons in the exposures at large penetration depths. Light particles are produced through nuclear or cluster knockout and in evaporation events with characteristically distinct spectra which play unique roles in the build-up of secondary radiation's in shielding. We describe models of light particle production in nucleon and heavy ion induced reactions and make an assessment of the importance of light particle multiplicity and spectral parameters in these exposures.

  13. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  14. Temporal variations of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor at Delingha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen stable isotope of atmospheric water vapor is widely used to study the modern process of cli- mate. Atmospheric water vapor samples were collected at Dlingha, northeast of Tibetan Plateau during the period from July 2005 to February 2006. The variation of δ18O and the relationships between δ18O and both the temperature and specific humidity are analyzed in this paper. Results show that the sea- sonal variation of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor at Delingha is remarkable with higher δ18O in summer and lower δ18O in winter. The temporal variation of vapor δ18O shows obvious fluctuations, with magnitude of over 37‰. The daily variation of the δ18O is highly correlated with air temperature. The relationship between δ18O and atmospheric water vapor content is complex. Study shows that δ18O of atmospheric water vapor is positively correlated with specific humidity in winter in seasonal scale and inversely correlated with specific humidity in summer rainy period. The δ18O values of at- mospheric water vapor are lower than those of precipitation at Delingha, and the average difference is 10.7‰. Variations of δ18O of atmospheric water vapor is also found to be affected by precipitation events, The model results show that the precipitation effect could have caused the vapor δ18O in the raining season to lower by 7% in average in July and August.

  15. Structural basis of water-specific transport through the AQP1 water channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Haixin; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Lee, John K.; Walian, Peter; Jap, Bing K.

    2001-12-01

    Water channels facilitate the rapid transport of water across cell membranes in response to osmotic gradients. These channels are believed to be involved in many physiological processes that include renal water conservation, neuro-homeostasis, digestion, regulation of body temperature and reproduction. Members of the water channel superfamily have been found in a range of cell types from bacteria to human. In mammals, there are currently 10 families of water channels, referred to as aquaporins (AQP): AQP0-AQP9. Here we report the structure of the aquaporin 1 (AQP1) water channel to 2.2Å resolution. The channel consists of three topological elements, an extracellular and a cytoplasmic vestibule connected by an extended narrow pore or selectivity filter. Within the selectivity filter, four bound waters are localized along three hydrophilic nodes, which punctuate an otherwise extremely hydrophobic pore segment. This unusual combination of a long hydrophobic pore and a minimal number of solute binding sites facilitates rapid water transport. Residues of the constriction region, in particular histidine 182, which is conserved among all known water-specific channels, are critical in establishing water specificity. Our analysis of the AQP1 pore also indicates that the transport of protons through this channel is highly energetically unfavourable.

  16. How do atmospheric rivers form?

    OpenAIRE

    Helen F. Dacre; Clark, Peter A.; Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Stringer, Marc A.; Lavers, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the source of atmospheric rivers: Are they rivers of moisture exported from the subtropics or footprints left behind by poleward travelling storms? The term atmospheric river is used to describe corridors of strong water vapor transport in the troposphere. Filaments of enhanced water vapor, commonly observed in satellite imagery extending from the subtropics to the extratropics, are routinely used as a proxy for identifying these regions of strong water vapor transport. The pre...

  17. Hybrid advection scheme for 3-dimensional atmospheric models. Testing and application for a study of NO{sub x} transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubov, V.A.; Rozanov, E.V. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schlesinger, M.E.; Andronova, N.G. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The problems of ozone depletion, climate change and atmospheric pollution strongly depend on the processes of production, destruction and transport of chemical species. A hybrid transport scheme was developed, consisting of the semi-Lagrangian scheme for horizontal advection and the Prather scheme for vertical transport, which have been used for the Atmospheric Chemical Transport model to calculate the distributions of different chemical species. The performance of the new hybrid scheme has been evaluated in comparison with other transport schemes on the basis of specially designed tests. The seasonal cycle of the distribution of N{sub 2}O simulated by the model, as well as the dispersion of NO{sub x} exhausted from subsonic aircraft, are in a good agreement with published data. (author) 8 refs.

  18. Formation of Organic Molecules and Water in Warm Disk Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Najita, Joan R; Glassgold, Alfred E

    2011-01-01

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molec...

  19. Effects of Irrigation in India on the Atmospheric Water Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, O.A.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Stacke, T.; Wiltshire, A.; Lucas-Picher, P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of large-scale irrigation in India on the moisture budget of the atmosphere was investigated using three regional climate models and one global climate model, all of which performed an irrigated run and a natural run without irrigation. Using a common irrigation map, year-round irrigation

  20. The potential for regional-scale bias in top-down CO2 flux estimates due to atmospheric transport errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of CO2 fluxes that are based on atmospheric data rely upon a meteorological model to simulate atmospheric CO2 transport. These models provide a quantitative link between surface fluxes of CO2 and atmospheric measurements taken downwind. Therefore, any errors in the meteorological model can propagate into atmospheric CO2 transport and ultimately bias the estimated CO2 fluxes. These errors, however, have traditionally been difficult to characterize. To examine the effects of CO2 transport errors on estimated CO2 fluxes, we use a global meteorological model-data assimilation system known as "CAM–LETKF" to quantify two aspects of the transport errors: error variances (standard deviations and temporal error correlations. Furthermore, we develop two case studies. In the first case study, we examine the extent to which CO2 transport uncertainties can bias CO2 flux estimates. In particular, we use a common flux estimate known as CarbonTracker to discover the minimum hypothetical bias that can be detected above the CO2 transport uncertainties. In the second case study, we then investigate which meteorological conditions may contribute to month-long biases in modeled atmospheric transport. We estimate 6 hourly CO2 transport uncertainties in the model surface layer that range from 0.15 to 9.6 ppm (standard deviation, depending on location, and we estimate an average error decorrelation time of ∼2.3 days at existing CO2 observation sites. As a consequence of these uncertainties, we find that CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes would need to be biased by at least 29%, on average, before that bias were detectable at existing non-marine atmospheric CO2 observation sites. Furthermore, we find that persistent, bias-type errors in atmospheric transport are associated with consistent low net radiation, low energy boundary layer conditions. The meteorological model is not necessarily more uncertain in these conditions. Rather, the extent to which meteorological

  1. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  2. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Chen, Howard; Kopparapu, Ravi K.

    2015-11-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a moist greenhouse explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing inverse climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1D models.

  3. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a 'moist greenhouse' explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing 'inverse' climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1-D models.

  4. STRATOSPHERIC TEMPERATURES AND WATER LOSS FROM MOIST GREENHOUSE ATMOSPHERES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasting, James F.; Kopparapu, Ravi K. [Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16801 (United States); Chen, Howard, E-mail: jfk4@psu.edu, E-mail: hwchen@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a moist greenhouse explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing inverse climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1D models.

  5. A simplified method to estimate atmospheric water vapor using MODIS near-infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinming; Gu, Xiaoping; Wu, Zhanping

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric water vapor plays a significant role in the study of climate change and hydrological cycle processes. In order to acquire the accurate distribution of atmospheric water vapor which is varying with time, location, and altitude, it is necessary to monitor it at high spatial and temporal resolution. Unfortunately, it is difficult to map the spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor due to the lack of meteorological instrumentation at adequate spatial and temporal observation scales. This paper introduces a simplified method to retrieve Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using the ratio of the apparent reflectance values of the 18th and 19th band of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Compared to the EOS PWV products of the same time and area, the PWV estimated using this simplified method is closer to the radiosonde results which is considered as the true PWV value. Results reveal that this simplified method is applicable over cloud-free atmospheric conditions of the mid-latitude regions.

  6. Atmospheric Modelling of Aerosols Long-Range Transport over the Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapipith, V.; Adhikary, B.; Bhave, P.; Panday, A. K.; Mukherji, A.

    2014-12-01

    An Atmospheric Modelling System has been set up at International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) Headquarters in Kathmandu, Nepal, for the assessment of air quality in the Hindukush Himalaya region. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model version 3.6 is being implemented over a regional domain stretching across 4995 x 4455 km centred at Kathmandu, where an intensive field campaign, Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley (SusKat) took place from December 2012 to February 2013. Seven stations around the valley collected data on meteorology and chemical parameters. WRF-Chem simulation are carried out for the winter time period at high horizontal resolution (1 km × 1 km), which is achieved by nesting the domain of interest, e.g. Kathmandu Valley, inside three coarser domains. Model validation is performed against the field data as well as satellite data, focusing on aerosols. The challenge of capturing the necessary atmospheric processes is discussed. The effort aims for a better understanding of atmospheric processes and aerosol impacts, as well as the impact of long-range transport, particularly of black carbon aerosol upon the radiative budget over the Himalayan glaciers. The rapid melting of Himalayan glaciers and snowfields, and the shrinkage of permafrost as noticed by glaciologists is a concern. Based on physically adjusted schemes, the WRF meteorological model performs well with Pearson correlation coefficients higher than 0.8 for temperature and solar radiation, although it has a tendency to overestimate wind speed. The WRF with chemistry is then used with local and regional emission databases, in combination and after comparison with the global inventory, as input for describing the long-range transport of aerosols. Improved aerosol prediction will allow us to provide crucial information needed for mitigation and adaptation strategies that save people's lives across the Himalaya. The regional

  7. Atmospheric water balance over oceanic regions as estimated from satellite, merged, and reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Dong-Bin; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    2013-05-01

    The column integrated atmospheric water balance over the ocean was examined using satellite-based and merged data sets for the period from 2000 to 2005. The data sets for the components of the atmospheric water balance include evaporation from the HOAPS, GSSTF, and OAFlux and precipitation from the HOAPS, CMAP, and GPCP. The water vapor tendency was derived from water vapor data of HOAPS. The product for water vapor flux convergence estimated using satellite observation data was used. The atmospheric balance components from the MERRA reanalysis data were also examined. Residuals of the atmospheric water balance equation were estimated using nine possible combinations of the data sets over the ocean between 60°N and 60°S. The results showed that there was considerable disagreement in the residual intensities and distributions from the different combinations of the data sets. In particular, the residuals in the estimations of the satellite-based atmospheric budget appear to be large over the oceanic areas with heavy precipitation such as the intertropical convergence zone, South Pacific convergence zone, and monsoon regions. The lack of closure of the atmospheric water cycle may be attributed to the uncertainties in the data sets and approximations in the atmospheric water balance equation. Meanwhile, the anomalies of the residuals from the nine combinations of the data sets are in good agreement with their variability patterns. These results suggest that significant consideration is needed when applying the data sets of water budget components to quantitative water budget studies, while climate variability analysis based on the residuals may produce similar results.

  8. Heat and water transfer in bare topsoil and the lower atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    ten Berge, H.F.M.

    1996-01-01

    This book describes an analysis of processes and factors that affect the energy balance of bare soil, and the associated exchange of heat and moisture at the surface. After a brief treatment of basic transport theory, the processes of soil-atmosphere interaction are expressed in a simulation algorithm. This algorithm provides an instrument to study the 'conditioning' effect of soil on the lower atmosphere, and vice versa. Examples of sensitivity analysis are presented, with emphasis on the be...

  9. Co-regulation of water and K(+) transport in sunflower plants during water stress recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch, Manuel; Benlloch-González, María

    2016-06-01

    16-day-old sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to deficit irrigation for 12 days. Following this period, plants were rehydrated for 2 days to study plant responses to post-stress recovery. The moderate water stress treatment applied reduced growth in all plant organs and the accumulation of K(+) in the shoot. After the rehydration period, the stem recovered its growth and reached a similar length to the control, an effect which was not observed in either root or leaves. Moreover, plant rehydration after water stress favored the accumulation of K(+) in the apical zone of the stem and expanding leaves. In the roots of plants under water stress, watering to field capacity, once the plants were de- topped, rapidly favored K(+) and water transport in the excised roots. This quick and short-lived response was not observed in roots of plants recovered from water stress for 2 days. These results suggest that the recovery of plant growth after water stress is related to coordinated water and K(+) transport from the root to the apical zone of the ​​stem and expanding leaves. This stimulation of K(+) transport in the root and its accumulation in the cells of the growing zones of the ​​stem must be one of the first responses induced in the plant during water stress recovery. PMID:27016874

  10. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  11. Importance and Use of Plants in Evaluating Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Arid Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraski, B. J.; Sandstrom, M. W.; Michel, R. L.; Radyk, J. C.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Johnson, M. J.; Mayers, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    Improved understanding of soil-plant-atmosphere interactions is critical to water-resource and waste management decisions. Multiple-year field studies of soil-water movement at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS; http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/) near Beatty, Nevada identified plants as the primary control on the near-surface water balance and showed that the boundary conditions imposed by plant activity in the uppermost soil layer results in episodic, deep drying well below the root zone during periods of below-average precipitation. The results help to explain the evidence for negligible recharge and upward flow that has been inferred from environmental-tracer and soil-physics based studies of undisturbed, arid sites. The findings have contributed to the development of new conceptual models that incorporate the influence of desert vegetation in analyses of paleo- to present-day water fluxes in deep unsaturated zones. Studies at the ADRS are also using plants to investigate the transport of contaminants away from a closed low-level radioactive waste disposal area. Soil-gas sampling results indicated that tritium has moved as much as 300 m from the disposal area, and that transport primarily occurs in the gas phase with preferential transport through coarse-textured sediment layers. The need for an efficient means of gathering plume-scale data led to the development of a method that uses plant water to identify the presence and distribution of tritium. The method entails field sampling and solar distillation of foliage to collect plant water, followed by laboratory filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphite-based, solid-phase-extraction (SPE) column. The method was evaluated using an evergreen shrub (creosote bush; Larrea tridentata (DC.) Cov.). Tritium concentrations in plant water determined with the distillation-SPE method did not differ significantly from those determined with the standard (and more laborious) toluene

  12. Role of volcanic dust in the atmospheric transport and deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracquadanio, Milena; Dinelli, Enrico; Trombini, Claudio

    2003-12-01

    The role of volcanic ash as scavenger of atmospheric pollutants, in their transport and final deposition to the ground is examined. Attention is focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and on particulate mercury (Hgp). The ash-fall deposits studied belong to the 2001 and 2002 eruptive activity of Mount Etna, Southern Italy, and were investigated at three (2001) and four (2002) sites downwind of the major tephra dispersal pattern. The dry deposition of mercury and PAHs was determined, and, in particular, a downward flux to the ground of PAHs (approximately 7.29 microg m(-2) per day) and mercury (750 ng m(-2) per day) was estimated in Catania from October 26 to October 28, 2002. Finally, evidence on the anthropogenic origin of PAHs scavenged from the troposphere by volcanic ash is supported by the analysis of PAH compositions in granulometrically homogeneous fractions.

  13. Simulation of transport of atmospheric tracers for decision support system SWD-WJ/RODOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented is report on work aimed at implementation computer codes serving for modelling of transport of nuclides and other tracers in the atmosphere. Codes are to be implemented to the decision support system SWD-WJ/RODOS. A comprehensive analysis has been made of different dispersion models from the point of view of their applicability for Polish circumstances, taking into account computer power at Swierk site and goals SWD-WJ/RODOS system is to meet. NPS(LINCOM)/RIMPUFF and HYPACT codes have been presented in more details as those codes have been selected for SWD-WJ/RODOS. Results of computer tests with those codes are presented in the report, in particular results of an international experiment INEX2 performed in November 1998. (author)

  14. Direct variational data assimilation algorithm for atmospheric chemistry data with transport and transformation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Nuterman, Roman; Baklanov, Alexander; Mahura, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric chemistry dynamics is studied with convection-diffusion-reaction model. The numerical Data Assimilation algorithm presented is based on the additive-averaged splitting schemes. It carries out ''fine-grained'' variational data assimilation on the separate splitting stages with respect to spatial dimensions and processes i.e. the same measurement data is assimilated to different parts of the split model. This design has efficient implementation due to the direct data assimilation algorithms of the transport process along coordinate lines. Results of numerical experiments with chemical data assimilation algorithm of in situ concentration measurements on real data scenario have been presented. In order to construct the scenario, meteorological data has been taken from EnviroHIRLAM model output, initial conditions from MOZART model output and measurements from Airbase database.

  15. The effects of plants on the transport of methane to the atmosphere from the everglades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of clipped and unclipped plots showed that the emergent macrophytes, Cladium jamaicense and Eleocharis interstincta, enhanced methane flux to the atmosphere by factors of 1.4 to 3.6. A comparison of night/day methane flux indicated that molecular diffusion, rather that pressurized ventilation, was the dominant gas transport mode in Cladium. Carbon isotopic measurements of sedimentary and emmitted methane indicated that little or no methane oxidation occurred in the rhizosphere of marl soils, as corroborated by incubation data (King et al., Ap. Env. Microb. 56, 2902, 1990). However, isotope data was consistent with the presence of methane oxidation in the rhizosphere of plants living in peat soils as was indicated by the incubation experiment results (Ibid)

  16. A Godunov-Type Scheme for Atmospheric Flows on Unstructured Grids: Scalar Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Boybeyi, Zafer; Löhner, Rainald; Sarma, Ananthakrishna

    2006-08-01

    This is the first paper in a two-part series on the implementation of Godunov-type schemes on unstructured grids for atmospheric flow simulations. Construction of a high-resolution flow solver for the scalar transport equation is described in detail. Higher-order accuracy in space is achieved via a MUSCL-type gradient reconstruction after van Leer and the monotonicity of solution is enforced by slope limiters. Accuracy in time is maintained by implementing a multi-stage explicit Runge-Kutta time-marching algorithm. The scheme is conservative and exhibits minimal numerical dispersion and diffusion. Five different benchmark test cases are simulated for the validation of the numerical scheme.

  17. Speciation and transport of radionuclides in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the chemical speciation of a number of radionuclides migrating in a slightly contaminated ground water plume are identifying the most mobile species and providing an opportunity to test and/or validate geochemical models of radionuclide transport in ground waters. Results to date have shown that most of the migrating radionuclides are present in anionic or nonionic forms. These include anionic forms of 55Fe, 60Co, /sup 99m/Tc, 106Ru, 131I, and nonionic forms of 63Ni and 125Sb. Strontium-70 and a small fraction of the mobile 60Co are the only cationic radionuclides which have been detected moving in the ground water plume beyond 30 meters from the source. A comparison of the observed chemical forms with the predicted species calculated from modeling thermodynamic data and ground water chemical parameters has indicated a good agreement for most of the radioelements in the system, including Tc, Np, Cs, Sr, Ce, Ru, Sb, Zn, and Mn. The discrepancies between observed and calculated solutions species were noted for Fe, Co, Ni and I. Traces of Fe, Co, and Ni were observed to migrate in anionic or nonionic forms which the calculations failed to predict. These anionic/nonionic species may be organic complexes having enhanced mobility in ground waters. The radioiodine, for example, was shown to behave totally as an anion but further investigation revealed that 49-57% of this anionic iodine was organically bound. The ground water and aqueous extracts of trench sediments contain a wide variety of organic compounds, some of which could serve as complexing agents for the radionuclides. These results indicate the need for further research at a variety of field sites in defining precisely the chemical forms of the mobile radionuclide species, and in better understanding the role of dissolved organic materials in ground water transport of radionuclides

  18. An interpretation of some whole plant water transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscus, E L; Klute, A; Kaufmann, M R

    1983-04-01

    A treatment of water flow into and through plants to the evaporating surface of the leaves is presented. The model is driven by evaporation from the cell wall matrix of the leaves. The adsorptive and pressure components of the cell wall matric potential are analyzed and the continuity between the pressure component and the liquid tension in the xylem established. Continuity of these potential components allows linking of a root transport function, driven by the tension in the xylem, to the leaf water potential. The root component of the overall model allows for the solvent-solute interactions characteristic of a membrane-bound system and discussion of the interactions of environmental variables such as root temperature and soil water potentials. A partition function is developed from data in the literature which describes how water absorbed by the plant might be divided between transpiration and leaf growth over a range of leaf water potentials.Relationships between the overall system conductance and the conductance coefficients of the various plant parts (roots, xylem, leaf matrix) are established and the influence of each of these discussed.The whole plant flow model coupled to the partition function is used to simulate several possible relationships between leaf water potential and transpiration rate. The effects of changing some of the partition function coefficients, as well as the root medium water potential on these simulations is illustrated.In addition to the general usefulness of the model and its ability to describe a wide range of situations, we conclude that the relationships used, dealing with bulk fluid flow, diffusion, and solute transport, are adequate to describe the system and that analogically based theoretical systems, such as the Ohm's law analogy, probably ought to be abandoned for this purpose. PMID:16662912

  19. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  20. Water, heat and salt transport through the Strait of Otranto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Sadegh; Gačić, Miroslav; Kovačević, Vedrana; Cardin, Vanessa

    2010-05-01

    The water, heat and salt transports through the Strait of Otranto are estimated applying direct method to historical current and hydrographical data (from December 94 through November 95). A variational inverse method based on a variational principle and a finite element solver is used to reconstruct the current, temperature and salinity fields across the Strait section from sparse measurements. The mean annual inflow and outflow water transport rates are estimated as 0.901±0.039 Sv and -0.939±0.315 Sv, respectively, and the net transport for the period of study is equal to -0.032±0.208 Sv. Thus, on a yearly time interval, the inflow and the outflow are practically compensated. The heat and salt transports due to advection process are estimated for five monthly periods, namely December 1994, February, May, August and November 1995. Considering these five periods representative of the seasonal cycle during the year, their average values show that there is a net heat advection into the Adriatic Sea on a yearly basis. The estimated value of advected heat and the corresponding error are 2.408±0.490 TW, which is equivalent to a heat gain of 17.37±3.53 W m-2 for the whole basin. This value is compared to the heat loss of -36±152 (std) W m-2 through the air-sea interface calculated by means of bulk formulas over the Adriatic Sea. The two values are expected to be balance each other in order to close the heat budget of the basin. The possible reasons for this difference to occur are discussed. On a yearly basis, the salt transport is estimated as an input of salt equal to 0.05×106 Kg s-1. The average annual fresh water budget is estimated as -0.002 Sv, equivalent to the mass of fresh water of 2.00×106Kg s-1 or to the level of 0.45 m yr-1 for the entire Adriatic Sea. The import of salt that is less than the gain of fresh water is in agreement with the fact that the Adriatic Sea is a dilution basin.

  1. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Associated Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Column transport experiments were conducted in which water from the Chancellor nuclear test cavity was transported through crushed volcanic tuff from Pahute Mesa. In one experiment, the cavity water was spiked with solute 137Cs, and in another it was spiked with 239/240Pu(IV) nanocolloids. A third column experiment was conducted with no radionuclide spike at all, although the 137Cs concentrations in the water were still high enough to quantify in the column effluent. The radionuclides strongly partitioned to natural colloids present in the water, which were characterized for size distribution, mass concentration, zeta potential/surface charge, critical coagulation concentration, and qualitative mineralogy. In the spiked water experiments, the unanalyzed portion of the high-concentration column effluent samples were combined and re-injected into the respective columns as a second pulse. This procedure was repeated again for a third injection. Measurable filtration of the colloids was observed after each initial injection of the Chancellor water into the columns, but the subsequent injections (spiked water experiments only) exhibited no apparent filtration, suggesting that the colloids that remained mobile after relatively short transport distances were more resistant to filtration than the initial population of colloids. It was also observed that while significant desorption of 137Cs from the colloids occurred after the first injection in both the spiked and unspiked waters, subsequent injections of the spiked water exhibited much less 137Cs desorption (much greater 137Cs colloid-associated transport). This result suggests that the 137Cs that remained associated with colloids during the first injection represented a fraction that was more strongly adsorbed to the mobile colloids than the initial 137Cs associated with the colloids. A greater amount of the 239/240

  2. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 – Part 2: Aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Righi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3, about one order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3, mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7–12 km. This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which results also in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: The aviation-induced RF in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of −15 mW m-2, with a maximum value of −63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  3. Observations of Fire-Atmosphere Interactions and Near-Surface Heat Transport on a Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Craig B.; Seto, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    A simple field experiment was conducted to measure and quantify fire-atmosphere interactions during a grass fire spreading up a hill under a moderate cross-slope wind. The observed fire intensity measured by passive radiometers and calculated sensible heat fluxes ranged between 90 and 120 kW m. Observations from this experiment showed that convective heat generated from the fire front was transported downwind in the lowest 2 m and the highest plume temperatures remained in this shallow layer, suggesting the fire spread was driven primarily by the advection of near-ignition temperature gases, rather than by radiation of the tilted flame. Fire-induced circulations were present with upslope flows occurring during the fire-front passage helping to transport heat up the slope and perpendicular to the fire front. A decrease in atmospheric pressure of 0.4 hPa occurred at the fire front and coincided with a strong updraft core of nearly 8 m s. These observations provide evidence that, even under moderately windy conditions, the pressure minimum in the fire remains rather close to the combustion zone and plume. The turbulence associated with the fire front was characterized by isotropic behaviour at 12.0 m above the ground, while less isotropic conditions were found closer to the ground due to higher horizontal variances associated with fire-induced flow at the fire front. From analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget terms, it was found that buoyancy production, rather than shear generation, had a larger contribution to the generation of turbulence kinetic energy, even during a highly sheared and moderate ambient wind.

  4. Atmospheric Transport of Arid Aerosol from Desert Regions of Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Boris; Solomon, Paul; Sitnov, Sergei; Grechko, Evgeny; Maximenkov, Leonid; Artamonova, Maria; Pogarski, Fedor

    2010-05-01

    Investigation of atmospheric transport of arid aerosol from Central Asia was held within the ISTC project 3715. Particular attention was paid to the removal of aerosol from the Aral Sea region and its further transport, because aerosol and pollutants emission from Central Asia affect the airspace of the entire Asian continent. At the same time measurements of aerosols in the atmosphere of Central Asia are holding in a small number of stations, and currently available data are insufficient to define the initial conditions and/or verification of models of long-range transport. To identify sources of pollution transported from Central Asia, in Kyrgyzstan measurement and sampling of air were organized: at the station on the northern slope of the Kirgiz Range, 30 km south of Bishkek, at an altitude of 1700 m above sea level (Bishkek Site, 42,683N; 74,694E ), and on permanent alpine Teploklyuchenka lidar station in the Central Tien Shan at an altitude of 2000 m above sea level (Lidar Site, 42,467N; 78,533E). The chemical analysis of collected aerosol and soils samples was carried out. Measurements of aerosol at these stations have been merged with the simulation of the trajectories of air masses in the study region and with the satellite (the Terra and Aqua satellites) observations of aerosol optical thickness in this region. Satellite data for the region 43-47 N, and 58-62 E (Aral Sea) from April 2008 to September 2009 were analyzed. The moments were selected, when the value of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was greatest (more than 0.5), and the transport from the Aral Sea region to the observation sites took place. For each of these days, the forward trajectories, which started at 6 points within the region, were calculated using the HYSPLIT model. The days, on which the trajectories reached the BISHKEK and LIDAR sites, were determined from the data obtained. Calculations on the basis of the RAMS model were performed for these days. These calculations were performed

  5. Vertical distribution of water in the atmosphere of Venus - A simple thermochemical explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John S.; Grinspoon, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Several lines of evidence concerning the vertical abundance profile of water in the atmosphere of Venus lead to strikingly unusual distributions (the water vapor abundance decreases sharply in the immediate vicinity of the surface) or to serious conflicts in the profiles (different IR bands suggest water abundances that are discrepant by a factor of 2.5 to 10). These data sets can be reconciled if (1) water molecules associate with carbon dioxide and sulfur trioxide to make gaseous carbonic acid and sulfuric acid in the lower atmosphere, and (2) the discrepant 0.94-micrometer water measurements are due to gaseous sulfuric acid, requiring it to be a somewhat stronger absorber than water vapor in this wavelength region. A mean total water abundance of 50 + or - 20 parts/million and a near-surface free water vapor abundance of 10 + or - 4 parts/million are derived.

  6. Understanding dynamics of large-scale atmospheric vortices with moist-convective shallow water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, M.; Zeitlin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric jets and vortices which, together with inertia-gravity waves, constitute the principal dynamical entities of large-scale atmospheric motions, are well described in the framework of one- or multi-layer rotating shallow water models, which are obtained by vertically averaging of full “primitive” equations. There is a simple and physically consistent way to include moist convection in these models by adding a relaxational parameterization of precipitation and coupling precipitation with convective fluxes with the help of moist enthalpy conservation. We recall the construction of moist-convective rotating shallow water model (mcRSW) model and give an example of application to upper-layer atmospheric vortices.

  7. Global emission inventory and atmospheric transport of black carbon. Evaluation of the associated exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rong

    2015-06-01

    This thesis presents research focusing on the improvement of high-resolution global black carbon (BC) emission inventory and application in assessing the population exposure to ambient BC. A particular focus of the thesis is on the construction of a high-resolution (both spatial and sectorial) fuel consumption database, which is used to develop the emission inventory of black carbon. Above all, the author updates the global emission inventory of black carbon, a resource subsequently used to study the atmospheric transport of black carbon over Asia with the help of a high-resolution nested model. The thesis demonstrates that spatial bias in fuel consumption and BC emissions can be reduced by means of the sub-national disaggregation approach. Using the inventory and nested model, ambient BC concentrations can be better validated against observations. Lastly, it provides a complete uncertainty analysis of global black carbon emissions, and this uncertainty is taken into account in the atmospheric modeling, helping to better understand the role of black carbon in regional and global air pollution.

  8. Long-range transport of radioisotopes in the atmosphere and the calculation of collective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In estimating the long range (up to 1000 km) transport and dispersal of atmospheric pollutants, the meteorological conditions at the source become less relevant as the distance from the source increases, making it difficult to extrapolate to larger distances using short range modelling techniques. The MESOS model has therefore been developed to take into account the temporal and spatial changes in the atmospheric boundary layer along the trajectory of a pollutant release, including the effects of diurnal cycle and lateral dispersion in the synoptic scale windfield. The model is described together with the associated data base incorporating a year's meteorological data from synoptic stations and ships across Western Europe. A simulation of dispersal following the Windscale release of 1957 is compared with measurements. The use of the model is further illustrated by application to a hypothetical site both for routine continuous releases and short term accidental releases. This work has been carried out within the framework of a research contract between the EURATOM-CEA Association and Imperial College. (H.K.)

  9. Variability of Atlantic Ocean heat transport and its effects on the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Sutton

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The variability of the Atlantic meridional Ocean Heat Transport (OHT has been diagnosed from a simulation of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, and the mechanisms responsible for this variability have been elucidated. It has been demonstrated that the interannual variability in Atlantic OHT is dominated by windstress-driven Ekman fluctuations. In contrast, the decadal and multidecadal variability is associated with the fluctuations of the Thermohaline Circulation (THC, driven by the fluctuations in deep convection over the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian (GIN Sea. The fluctuations of OHT induce Ocean Heat Content (OHC, and Sea Surface Temperature (SST anomalies over the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic. The SST anomalies, in turn, have an impact on the atmosphere. The lead-lag relationships between the fluctuations of THC-related OHT and those of OHC and SST raise the possibility that a knowledge of OHT fluctuations could be used to predict variations in Atlantic Sea surface temperatures, and perhaps aspects of climate, several years in advance. A comparison of results from a second, independent, coupled model simulation is also presented, and similar conclusions reached.

  10. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  11. Long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants to the Eastern Mediterranean basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A permanent stations has been established in the Eastern Mediterranean coast of Turkey for continuous monitoring of aerosols and precipitation. The station is part of the MED-POL programme which includes all countries that have coasts in the Mediterranean Sea and attempts to determine the role of the atmospheric fluxes of pollutants on the pollution of the Mediterranea Sea. Aerosol and deposition samples have been collected since early 1992. Concentrations of SO4, NO3, Cl, Li, Pb, K, Ca, Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Se, Zn and Na were determined by ion chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry. Daily samples will be screened to select the ones which correspond to transport from Europe and will be analyzed for a larger number of parameters using INAA. Method development took most of the time in 1992, and analysis are still in progress. Available data have shown that concentrations of anthropogenic elements are smaller in the Eastern Mediterranean atmosphere compared to other rural sites in the Europe. (author). 21 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs

  12. Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Maggiore catchment is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years series of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition, four small rivers draining forested catchments and four high mountain lakes. An improvement in the quality of atmospheric deposition was detected, due to decreasing sulphate concentration and increasing pH. Similar trends were also found in high mountain lakes and in small rivers. Atmospheric deposition, however, is still providing a large and steady flux of nitrogen compounds (nitrate and ammonium which is causing increasing nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems and increasing nitrate levels in rivers. Besides atmospheric deposition, an important factor controlling water acidification and recovery is the weathering of rocks and soils which may be influenced by climate warming. A further factor is the episodic deposition of Saharan calcareous dust which contributes significantly to base cation deposition. Keywords: trend, atmospheric deposition, nitrogen, stream water chemistry.

  13. Water Vapour Absorption in the Clear Atmosphere of an exo-Neptune

    CERN Document Server

    Fraine, Jonathan; Benneke, Björn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-01-01

    Transmission spectroscopy to date has detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain high mean molecular weights, opaque clouds, or scattering hazes in their atmospheres, obscuring our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of HAT-P-11b (~4 Earth radii) from the optical to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at 1.4 micrometre wavelength. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts-per- million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to ~1 mbar, and sufficiently hydrogen-rich to exhibit a large scale height. The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere with an upper limit of ~700 times the abundance of...

  14. Atmospheric Transport Modelling confining potential source location of East-Asian radionuclide detections in May 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The radionuclide component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is in place to detect tiny traces of fission products from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. The challenge for the interpretation of IMS radionuclide data is to discriminate radionuclide sources of CTBT relevance against emissions from nuclear facilities. Remarkable activity concentrations of Ba/La-140 occurred at the IMS radionuclide stations RN 37 (Okinawa) and RN 58 (Ussurysk) mid of May 2010. In those days also an elevated Xe-133 level was measured at RN 38 (Takasaki). Additional regional measurements of radioxenon were reported in the press and further analyzed in various publications. The radionuclide analysis gives evidence for the presence of a nuclear fission source between 10 and 12 May 2010. Backward Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) with HYSPLIT driven by 0.2° ECMWF meteorological data for the IMS samples indicates that, assuming a single source, a wide range of source regions is possible including the Korean Peninsula, the Sea of Japan (East Sea), and parts of China and Russia. Further confinement of the possible source location can be provided by atmospheric backtracking for the assumed sampling periods of the reported regional xenon measurements. New studies indicate a very weak seismic event at the DPRK test site on early 12 May 2010. Forward ATM for a pulse release caused by this event shows fairly good agreement with the observed radionuclide signature. Nevertheless, the underlying nuclear fission scenario remains quite unclear and speculative even if assuming a connection between the waveform and the radionuclide event.

  15. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  16. Water transport across biological membranes: Overton, water channels, and peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devuyst, O

    2010-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) corresponds to the ultrasmall pore predicted by the modelization of peritoneal transport. Proof-of-principle studies have shown that upregulation of the expression of AQP1 in peritoneal capillaries is reflected by increased water permeability and ultrafiltration, without affecting the osmotic gradient and the permeability for small solutes. Inversely, studies in Aqp1 mice have shown that haplo-insufficiency in AQP1 is reflected by significant attenuation of water transport. Recent studies have identified lead compounds that could act as agonists of aquaporins, as well as putative binding sites and potential mechanisms of gating the water channel. By modulating water transport, these pharmacological agents could have clinically relevant effects in targeting specific tissues or disease states. These studies on the peritoneal membrane also provide an experimental framework to investigate the role of water channels in the endothelium and various cell types.

  17. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.

  18. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  19. Transport and scavenging of Pu in surface waters of the Southern Hemisphere Oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastaud, J.; Povinec, P.P.; Aoyama, M.;

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of 239Pu in Atlantic and Indian Ocean waters about four decades after their main injection from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests is discussed. Recent data obtained in the framework of the SHOTS (Southern Hemisphere Ocean Tracer Studies) projects are evaluated and compared...... with previous investigations. Seawater samples were collected during the round the globe BEAGLE2003 (Blue Ocean Global Expedition) along the 30°S transect in the Atlantic and the 20°S transect in the Indian Ocean. The results indicate transport of surface waters labelled with 239Pu from the western North...... Pacific via the Indonesian Seas to the South Indian Ocean and then to the South Atlantic Ocean. Along the whole BEAGLE2003 sampling route, the Atlantic Ocean has the lowest 239Pu content due to its particle scavenging on the long way from the western North Pacific. On the other hand, concentrations...

  20. Global atmospheric emissions and transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Evaluation of modeling and transboundary pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huizhong; Tao, Shu

    2014-05-01

    Global atmospheric emissions of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from 69 major sources were estimated for a period from 1960 to 2030. Regression models and a technology split method were used to estimated country and time specific emission factors, resulting in a new estimate of PAH emission factor variation among different countries and over time. PAH emissions in 2007 were spatially resolved to 0.1° × 0.1° grids based on a newly developed global high-resolution fuel combustion inventory (PKU-FUEL-2007). MOZART-4 (The Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) was applied to simulate the global tropospheric transport of Benzo(a)pyrene, one of the high molecular weight carcinogenic PAHs, at a horizontal resolution of 1.875° (longitude) × 1.8947° (latitude). The reaction with OH radical, gas/particle partitioning, wet deposition, dry deposition, and dynamic soil/ocean-air exchange of PAHs were considered. The simulation was validated by observations at both background and non-background sites, including Alert site in Canadian High Arctic, EMEP sites in Europe, and other 254 urban/rural sites reported from literatures. Key factors effecting long-range transport of BaP were addressed, and transboundary pollution was discussed.

  1. Airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain: Identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential source areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya-Manzano, José María; Fernández-Rodríguez, Santiago; Smith, Matt; Tormo-Molina, Rafael; Reynolds, Andrew M; Silva-Palacios, Inmaculada; Gonzalo-Garijo, Ángela; Sadyś, Magdalena

    2016-11-15

    The pollen grains of Quercus spp. (oak trees) are allergenic. This study investigates airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain with the aim identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential sources areas. Two types of Quercus distribution maps were produced. Airborne Quercus pollen concentrations were measured at three sites located in the Extremadura region (SW Spain) for 3 consecutive years. The seasonal occurrence of Quercus pollen in the air was investigated, as well as days with pollen concentrations ≥80Pm(-3). The distance that Quercus pollen can be transported in appreciable numbers was calculated using clusters of back trajectories representing the air mass movement above the source areas (oak woodlands), and by using a state-of-the-art dispersion model. The two main potential sources of Quercus airborne pollen captured in SW Spain are Q. ilex subsp. ballota and Q. suber. The minimum distances between aerobiological stations and Quercus woodlands have been estimated as: 40km (Plasencia), 66km (Don Benito), 62km (Zafra) from the context of this study. Daily mean Quercus pollen concentration can exceed 1,700Pm(-3), levels reached not less than 24 days in a single year. High Quercus pollen concentration were mostly associated with moderate wind speed events (6-10ms(-1)), whereas that a high wind speed (16-20ms(-1)) seems to be associated with low concentrations. PMID:27443456

  2. Impact of meteorological inflow uncertainty on tracer transport and source estimation in urban atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Donald D.; Gowardhan, Akshay; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Baskett, Ronald L.

    2016-10-01

    A computational Bayesian inverse technique is used to quantify the effects of meteorological inflow uncertainty on tracer transport and source estimation in a complex urban environment. We estimate a probability distribution of meteorological inflow by comparing wind observations to Monte Carlo simulations from the Aeolus model. Aeolus is a computational fluid dynamics model that simulates atmospheric and tracer flow around buildings and structures at meter-scale resolution. Uncertainty in the inflow is propagated through forward and backward Lagrangian dispersion calculations to determine the impact on tracer transport and the ability to estimate the release location of an unknown source. Our uncertainty methods are compared against measurements from an intensive observation period during the Joint Urban 2003 tracer release experiment conducted in Oklahoma City. The best estimate of the inflow at 50 m above ground for the selected period has a wind speed and direction of 4.6-2.5+2.0 m s-1 and 158.0-23+16 , where the uncertainty is a 95% confidence range. The wind speed values prescribed in previous studies differ from our best estimate by two or more standard deviations. Inflow probabilities are also used to weight backward dispersion plumes and produce a spatial map of likely tracer release locations. For the Oklahoma City case, this map pinpoints the location of the known release to within 20 m. By evaluating the dispersion patterns associated with other likely release locations, we further show that inflow uncertainty can explain the differences between simulated and measured tracer concentrations.

  3. A new multi-tracer transport scheme for the dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, C.

    2012-04-01

    The integration of a conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme (CSLAM) in NCAR's High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) is considered here. HOMME is a highly scalable atmospheric modeling framework, and its current horizontal discretization relies on spectral element (SE) and/or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods on the cubed-sphere. It is one dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The main advantage of CSLAM is that the upstream cell (trajectories) information and computation of weights of integrals can be reused for each additional tracer. This makes CSLAM particularly interesting for global atmospheric modeling with growing number of tracers, e.g. more than 100 tracers for the chemistry version of CAM. An algorithm specifically designed for multiple processors and on the cubed-sphere grid for CSLAM in HOMME is a challenging task. HOMME is running on an element ansatz on the six cube faces. Inside these elements we create an Eulerian finite volume grid of equiangular gnomonic type, which represents the arrival grid in the scheme. But CSLAM relies on backward trajectories, which entails a departure grid. That means departure and arrival grid don't necessary have to be on the same element and certainly not on the same cube face. Also the reconstruction for higher order modeling needs a patch of tracer values which extend the element. Here we consider a third order reconstruction method. Therefore, we introduce a halo for the tracer values in the cell centers of a cube-element. The size of this halo depends on the Courant number (CFL condition) and the reconstruction type. Note that for a third order scheme and CFL number communication can be limited to one per time step. This data structure allows us to consider an element with its halo as one task where we have to be extra carful for elements which share a cube edge due to projection and orientation reasons. We stress that the reconstruction coefficients for elements

  4. Load of soil and water by atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After comprehensive retrofitting of power plants with flue gas desulfurization systems has been completed in Germany, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ammonia became the most important air pollutants. Pollution control measures to reduce the release of these substances which predominantly originate from traffic and agriculture had only marginal success. Some way or other, emissions into the atmosphere return to the ground and entail here generally harmful side effects. After introductory remarks on nitrogen as an air contaminant, the present potential in the derivation of emittor/receptor-relationships for nitrogen compounds are described. Subsequently, the nitrogen deposition rates are quantified and evaluated. (orig.)

  5. Aircraft Measurements of Saharan dust properties and impact of atmospheric transport during Fennec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Claire; Highwood, Ellie; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Brooke, Jennifer; Bart, Mark; Dean, Angela; Dorsey, James; Crosier, Jonny; McQuaid, Jim; Brindley, Helen; Banks, James; Marsham, John; Sodemann, Harald; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of Saharan dust from recent airborne campaigns have found variations in size distributions and optical properties across Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. These variations have an impact on radiation and thus weather and climate, and are important to characterise and understand, in particular, to understand how they vary with time after dust uplift, transport, and height in the atmosphere. New in-situ aircraft measurements from the Fennec 2011 aircraft campaign over a remote part of the Sahara Desert and the Atlantic Ocean will be presented and compared to previous airborne measurements. Size distributions extending to 300 μm will be shown, representing measurements extending further into the coarse mode than previously published for Saharan dust. The dust sampled by the aircraft covered a wide variety of loadings, dust source regions (Mali, Mauritania and Algeria) and dust ages (from fresh uplift to several days old). A significant coarse mode was present in the size distribution measurements with effective diameter up to 23 μm, and the mean size distribution showed greater concentrations of coarse mode than previous aircraft measurements. Single scattering albedo (SSA) values at 550nm calculated from these size distributions revealed high absorption from 0.77 to 0.95, with a mean of 0.85. Directly measured SSA values were higher (0.91 to 0.99) but new instrumentation revealed that these direct measurements, behind Rosemount inlets, overestimate the SSA by 0.02 to 0.20 depending on the concentration of coarse particles present. This is caused by inlet inefficiencies and pipe losses. Previous measurements of SSA from aircraft measurements may also have been overestimates for this reason. This has a significant impact on atmospheric heating rates. The largest dust particles were encountered closest to the ground, and were most abundant in cases where dust was freshly uplifted. Number concentration, mass loading and extinction coefficient showed inverse

  6. Atmospheric moisture transport: the bridge between ocean evaporation and Arctic ice melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, L.; Vázquez, M.; Nieto, R.; Trigo, R. M.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in the atmospheric moisture transport have been proposed as a vehicle for interpreting some of the most significant changes in the Arctic region. The increasing moisture over the Arctic during the last decades is not strongly associated with the evaporation that takes place within the Arctic area itself, despite the fact that the sea ice cover is decreasing. Such an increment is consistent and is more dependent on the transport of moisture from the extratropical regions to the Arctic that has increased in recent decades and is expected to increase within a warming climate. This increase could be due either to changes in circulation patterns which have altered the moisture sources, or to changes in the intensity of the moisture sources because of enhanced evaporation, or a combination of these two mechanisms. In this short communication we focus on the more objective assessment of the strong link between ocean evaporation trends and Arctic Sea ice melting. We will critically analyse several recent results suggesting links between moisture transport and the extent of sea ice in the Arctic, this being one of the most distinct indicators of continuous climate change both in the Arctic and on a global scale. To do this we will use a sophisticated Lagrangian approach to develop a more robust framework on some of these previous disconnecting results, using new information and insights. Results reached in this study stress the connection between two climate change indicators, namely an increase in evaporation over source regions (mainly the Mediterranean Sea, the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Pacific Ocean in the paths of the global western boundary currents and their extensions) and Arctic ice melting precursors.

  7. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of Kzz and Kyy through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of Kyy than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970

  8. Categorisation of nuclear explosions from legitimate radioxenon sources with atmospheric transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppner, M.; Postelt, F.; Kalinowski, M.; Plastino, W.

    2012-04-01

    Radioxenon is produced during nuclear explosions and due to its high fission ratio during the reaction and its noble gas character the isotopes can be detected remote from the location of the explosion. Therefore it is used by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Organization (CTBTO) as an indicator for the nuclear character of an explosion and is monitored with the International Monitoring System (IMS). The concentration of radioxenon in the air is continuously measured by multiple stations worldwide and is in need of an automatic categorization scheme in order to highlight signals of interest and to sort out signals that can be explained by legitimate sources. The dispersion and transport of radioxenon emissions through the atmosphere can be simulated with atmospheric transport modelling. Many legitimate sources of radioxenon exist: Nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities are mainly responsible for the worldwide background. The characterisation of this background is an important prerequisite to discriminate nuclear explosion signals against the background. It has been discovered that the few existing isotope production facilities are the major contributors to the background, each with emission strengths in the order of magnitude or more than all nuclear power plants together. Therefore, especially the characterization of these few, but strong, emitters can improve the quality of the signal prediction. Since the location of such an emitter is usually known the source-receptor sensitivity matrices can be utilized together with measured radioxenon concentrations from IMS stations in order to deduct information about the time dependent emissions from the strong emitter. An automatic method to determine an approximated, time dependent source term of an emitter with known location has been developed and is presented. This is a potentially valid tool for the categorization of radioxenon samples, because it can be used to assess whether the measured

  9. Simulation of atmospheric krypton-85 transport to assess the detectability of clandestine nuclear reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jens Ole

    2010-02-02

    The radioactive noble gas krypton-85 is released into the atmosphere during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel or irradiated breeding targets. This is a necessary step for plutonium separation. Therefore the {sup 85}Kr signature of reprocessing could possibly be used for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities producing nuclear weaponusable material. The {sup 85}Kr content of the atmosphere has grown over the last decades as the emissions from military and civilian nuclear industry could not be compensated by the decay with a half-life of 10.76 years. In this study, the global {sup 85}Kr background distribution due to emissions of known reprocessing facilities for the period from 1971 until 2006 was simulated using the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 applying the newest available annual emission data. The convective tracer transport scheme and the operator splitting for the physical calculations in the model were modified in order to guarantee physically correct results for tracer point sources, in particular non negative concentrations. An on-line routine controlling the {sup 85}Kr -budget in the model enforced exact mass conservation. The results of the simulation were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection with very good agreement at most observation sites except those in the direct vicinity of {sup 85}Kr sources. Of particular interest for the {sup 85}Kr detection potential was the variability of {sup 85}Kr background concentrations which was evaluated for the first time in a global model. In addition, the interhemispheric transport as simulated by ECHAM5 was analyzed using a two-box model providing a mean exchange time of τ {sub ex} = 10.5 months. The analysis of τ{sub ex} over simulated 35 years indicates that in years with strong South Asian or African Monsoon the interhemispheric transport is faster during the monsoon season. A correlation analysis of

  10. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Yinghua; Chen, Weiyu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qiyan; Chen, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    Porous graphene has high mechanical strength and atomic layer thickness, which make it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solution are a kind of strong long-range interaction which may have great influence on the fluid transport through nanopores. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through a 1.05-nm-in-diameter monolayer graphene nanopore with its edge charge-modified. From the results, it is found that the nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonously decrease. The co-ions rejection can reach 75% and 90% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. Cl ions current increases and reaches a plateau, and Na+ current decreases with the charge amount in the systems where they act as counterions. Beside...

  11. Water Transport and the Evolution of CM Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, R.; Cohen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Extraterrestrial water-bearing minerals are of great importance both for understanding the formation and evolution of the solar system and for supporting future human activities in space. Asteroids are the primary source of meteorites, many of which show evidence of an early heating episode and varying degrees of aqueous alteration. The origin and characterization of hydrated minerals (minerals containing H2O or OH) among both the main-belt and near-earth asteroids is important for understanding a wide range of solar system formation and evolutionary processes, as well as for planning for human exploration. Current hypotheses postulate asteroids began as mixtures of water ice and anhydrous silicates. A heating event early in solar system history was then responsible for melting the ice and driving aqueous alteration. The link between asteroids and meteorites is forged by reflectance spectra, which show 3-µm bands indicative of bound OH or H2O on the C-class asteroids, which are believed to be the parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites in our collections. The conditions at which aqueous alteration occurred in the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites are thought to be well-constrained: at 0-25 C for less than 15 Myr after asteroid formation. In previous models, many scenarios exhibit peak temperatures of the rock and co-existing liquid water in more than 75 percent of the asteroid's volume rising to 150 C and higher, due to the exothermic hydration reactions triggering a thermal runaway effect. However, even in a high porosity, water-saturated asteroid very limited liquid water flow is predicted (distances of 100's nm at most). This contradiction has yet to be resolved. Still, it may be possible for water to become liquid even in the near-surface environment, for a long enough time to drive aqueous alteration before vaporizing or freezing then subliming. Thus, we are using physics- and chemistry-based models that include thermal and fluid transport as well

  12. A new look at the atmospheric water cycle: measurements of water vapor and its main isotopologue using SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepmaker, Remco; Frankenberg, Christian; Aben, Ilse; Schrijver, Hans; Gloudemans, Annemieke; Roeckmann, Thomas; Yoshimura, Kei

    2010-05-01

    Water vapor is by far the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. As a warmer atmosphere can contain more water vapor, a positive feedback effect with respect to climate change is expected. The distribution of water vapor is very inhomogeneous and variable, unlike that of other greenhouse gases. In the light of climate reconstructions and predictions, it is therefore crucial to better understand the water cycle and its response to past and present climate change. The relative abundance of the heavy water isotopologue HDO provides a deeper insight in the water cycle, as evaporation and condensation processes deplete heavy water in the gas phase. In the application of isotopologues, however, the space-borne retrieval of atmospheric water vapor isotopologues near the surface has so far been overlooked. We provide, for the first time (Frankenberg et al., Science 2009), global HDO/H2O abundances using the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartography (SCIAMACHY) instrument onboard ENVISAT. This allows for an entirely new perspective on the near-surface distribution of water vapor isotopologues. We are using the 2.3 micron (SWIR) window of SCIAMACHY, which is also used for the first time (Schrijver et al., AMT 2009) to derive total water vapor columns. Because of this wavelength range, and because SCIAMACHY is an absorption spectrometer, we are sensitive down to the lowest parts of the atmosphere where most of the water vapor resides. We further exploit a novel method to correct for the scattering effects of an ice layer on the SWIR detector and in order to further improve the accuracy of our HDO/H2O dataset, we derived an improved spectral linelist for H2O in the 2.3 micron window. The total water vapor columns have been validated with collocated ECMWF data and show good agreement. First results of atmospheric HDO/H2O show an expected latitudinal gradient, but also strong evaporation signals over the Red Sea and highly depleted values

  13. Heat and water transfer in bare topsoil and the lower atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berge, H.F.M.

    1996-01-01

    This book describes an analysis of processes and factors that affect the energy balance of bare soil, and the associated exchange of heat and moisture at the surface. After a brief treatment of basic transport theory, the processes of soil-atmosphere interaction are expressed in a simulation algorit

  14. Surface waters as a sink and source of atmospheric gas phase ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G Brooks; Foley, Laura; Carroll, Angela L; Roebuck, Jesse Alan; Guy, Amanda; Mead, Ralph N; Kieber, Robert J; Willey, Joan D; Skrabal, Stephen A; Felix, J David; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Helms, John R

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the first ethanol concentrations in fresh and estuarine waters and greatly expands the current data set for coastal ocean waters. Concentrations for 153 individual measurements of 11 freshwater sites ranged from 5 to 598 nM. Concentrations obtained for one estuarine transect ranged from 56 to 77 nM and levels in five coastal ocean depth profiles ranged from 81 to 334 nM. Variability in ethanol concentrations was high and appears to be driven primarily by photochemical and biological processes. 47 gas phase concentrations of ethanol were also obtained during this study to determine the surface water degree of saturation with respect to the atmosphere. Generally fresh and estuarine waters were undersaturated indicating they are not a source and may be a net sink for atmospheric ethanol in this region. Aqueous phase ethanol is likely converted rapidly to acetaldehyde in these aquatic ecosystems creating the undersaturated conditions resulting in this previously unrecognized sink for atmospheric ethanol. Coastal ocean waters may act as either a sink or source of atmospheric ethanol depending on the partial pressure of ethanol in the overlying air mass. Results from this study are significant because they suggest that surface waters may act as an important vector for the uptake of ethanol emitted into the atmosphere including ethanol from biofuel production and usage.

  15. HIFI observations of water in the atmosphere of comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogh, P.; Crovisier, J.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Lis, D. C.; Moreno, R.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Emprechtinger, M.; Szutowicz, S.; Banaszkiewicz, M.; Bensch, F.; Blecka, M. I.; Cavalié, T.; Encrenaz, T.; Jehin, E.; Küppers, M.; Lara, L. -M; Lellouch, E.; Swinyard, B. M.; Vandenbussche, B.; Bergin, E. A.; Blake, G.A.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; de Graauw, Th.; Hutsemekers, D.; Kidger, M.; Manfroid, J.; Medvedev, A. S.; Naylor, D. A.; Schieder, R.; Thomas, N.; Waelkens, C.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Dieleman, P.; Güsten, R.; Klein, T.; Kasemann, C.; Caris, M.; Olberg, M.; Benz, A. O.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution far-infrared and sub-millimetre spectroscopy of water lines is an important tool to understand the physical and chemical properties of cometary atmospheres. We present observations of several rotational ortho- and para-water transitions in comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd) performed with HIF

  16. New progress of research on water cycle in atmosphere in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    New progresses are introduced briefly about the water cycle study on atmosphere of China made in recent years. The introduction includes eight aspects as follows: 1) precipitation characteristics, 2) stability of climatic system, 3) precipitation sensitive region, 4) regional evaporation and evapotranspiration, 5) water surface evaporation, 6) vegetation transpiration, 7) cloud physics, and 8) vapor source.

  17. Water Vapour Content of the Atmosphere in Relation to Surface Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Majumdar

    1977-10-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical relationship between precipitate water vapour in the atmosphere & surface humidity has been investigated. By introducing the concept of a lapse parameter alpha, a method has been devised for estimation of precipitable water vapour. Results have been compared for six Indian Stations for which upper air data were available.

  18. Reactivity of water vapor in an atmospheric pressure DBD -Application to LDPE surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, S; Viville, Pascal; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    The reactivity of water vapor introduced in an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge supplied in argon is investigated through optical emission spectroscopy measurements. This discharge is also used for the treatment of LDPE surfaces. Water contact angles measurements, XPS and AFM techniques are used to study the grafting of oxygen functions on the LDPE surface and increase its hydrophilicity.

  19. Middle atmospheric water vapour and dynamics in the vicinity of the polar vortex during the Hygrosonde-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lossow

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Hygrosonde-2 campaign took place on 16 December 2001 at Esrange/Sweden, with the aim to investigate the small scale distribution of water vapour in the middle atmosphere in the vicinity of the Arctic polar vortex. In-situ balloon and rocket-borne measurements of water vapour were performed by means of OH fluorescence hygrometry. The combined measurements yielded a high resolution water vapour profile up to an altitude of 75 km. Using water vapour as a dynamical tracer it was possible to directly relate the water data to the position of the polar vortex. The measurement probed extra-vortex air below 19 km and in the altitude range between 45 km and 60 km and vortex air elsewhere. Transitions between vortex and extra-vortex usually coincided with wind shears caused by gravity waves which advect air masses with different water vapour characteristics. From the combination of the results from the Hygrosonde-2 campaign and the first flight of the optical hygrometer in 1994 (Hygrosonde-1 a clear picture of the characteristic water vapour distribution inside and outside the polar vortex can be drawn. Systematic differences in the water vapour concentration between the inside and outside of the polar vortex can be observed all the way up into the mesosphere and are consistent with efficient downward transport of air inside the vortex. It is evident that in-situ measurements with high spatial resolution are needed to fully account for the small-scale exchange processes in the polar winter middle atmosphere.

  20. Atmospheric transport, deposition, and fate of triazine herbicides and their metabolites in pristine areas at Isle Royale National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Cromwell, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    layer of the lakes increased during deposition periods and decreased later in the year. The fate of triazines in shallow lakes suggests faster degradation and shorter half-lives, while deeper lakes have residence times for atrazine that may exceed 10 years.Rainfall samples were collected at Isle Royale National Park, located in Lake Superior, and triazine herbicides were identified and quantified. Water samples were also collected from pristine lakes and analyzed for the presence of herbicides, and long-range atmospheric transport was determined using air-parcel, back-trajectory analysis. Results indicated that deposition was seasonal, with maximum concentrations occurring during the first week of June. Atrazine had the largest mass deposited on Isle Royal. Atrazine and deethylatrazine were the only herbicides detected in the surface-water samples. The annual mass of herbicides deposited by rainfall was calculated at 13.4, 3.7, and 54.0 ??g/m2, for 1992, 1993, and 1994, respectively. The source of the herbicides was attributed to Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, which are high-use areas for herbicides such as alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor.

  1. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  2. Forests, Water, and the Atmosphere in Northern California: Insights from Sap-Flow Data Analysis and Numerical Atmospheric Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Percy Anne

    Evapotranspiration cools the land surface by consuming a large fraction of the net radiative energy at the surface. In forested regions, trees actively control the rate of transpiration by modulating stomatal conductance in response to environmental conditions, and species with different stomatal dynamics can affect the atmosphere in distinct ways. Using principal component analysis (PCA) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation with direct, tree-level measurements of water use, we show that Douglas-firs ( Pseudotsuga menziesii), a common evergreen needleleaf tree species in the Northern California Coast Range, decrease their transpiration sharply in the summer dry season in response to a dry root zone; and in contrast, broadleaf evergreen tree species, especially Pacific madrones (Arbutus menziesii), transpire maximally in the summer dry season because their transpiration is much less sensitive to a dry root zone and increases continually in response to increasing atmospheric evaporative demand. We scale up these tree-level observations to construct a bottom-up estimate of regional transpiration, and we use these regional estimates along with atmospheric models, one simple and one comprehensive, to quantify the potential impact of species transpiration differences on regional summertime climate. The atmospheric models suggest that these species differences in transpiration could affect the well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer temperature and humidity by 1-1.5 degrees C and 1 g/kg, respectively, and near-surface temperature and humidity by 1.5-2.5 degrees C and 2-3 g/kg, respectively. We further investigate the sensitivity of California climate to evapotranspiration by estimating the sensitivity of wind energy forecasts at a California wind farm to regional-scale perturbations in soil moisture using a regional atmospheric model. These tests show that forecasts at this particular farm are most sensitive to soil moisture in the Central Valley, and

  3. Micrometeorological Measurement of Fetch- and Atmospheric Stability-Dependent Air- Water Exchange of Legacy Semivolatile Organic Contaminants in Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlinger, J. A.; Tobias, D. E.; Rowe, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Coastal waters including the Laurentian Great Lakes are particularly susceptible to local, regional, and long- range transport and deposition of semivolatile organic contaminants (SOCs) as gases and/or associated with particles. Recently-marketed SOCs can be expected to undergo net deposition in surface waters, whereas legacy SOCs such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are likely to be at equilibrium with respect to air-water exchange, or, if atmospheric concentrations decrease through, e.g., policy implementation, to undergo net gas emission. SOC air-water exchange flux is usually estimated using the two-film model. This model describes molecular diffusion through the air and water films adjacent to the air-water interface. Air-water exchange flux is estimated as the product of SOC fugacity, typically based on on-shore gaseous concentration measurements, and a transfer coefficient, the latter which is estimated from SOC properties and environmental conditions. The transfer coefficient formulation commonly applied neglects resistance to exchange in the internal boundary layer under atmospherically stable conditions, and the use of on-shore gaseous concentration neglects fetch-dependent equilibration, both of which will tend to cause overestimation of flux magnitude. Thus, for legacy chemicals or in any highly contaminated surface water, the rate at which the water is cleansed through gas emission tends to be over-predicted using this approach. Micrometeorological measurement of air-water exchange rates of legacy SOCs was carried out on ships during four transect experiments during off-shore flow in Lake Superior using novel multicapillary collection devices and thermal extraction technology to measure parts-per-quadrillion SOC levels. Employing sensible heat in the modified Bowen ratio, fluxes at three over-water stations along the transects were measured, along with up-wind, onshore gaseous concentration and aqueous concentration. The atmosphere was unstable for

  4. TIPEX (Tropical Indo-Pacific water transport and ecosystem monitoring EXperiment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchull Jeon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors influencing the climate around Korea is the oceanic-atmospheric variability in the tropical region between the eastern Indian and the western Pacific Oceans. Lack of knowledge about the air-sea interaction in the tropical Indo-Pacific region continues to make it problematic forecasting the ocean climate in the East Asia. The ‘Tropical Indo-Pacific water transport and ecosystem monitoring EXperiment (TIPEX’ is a program for monitoring the ocean circulation variability between Pacific and Indian Oceans and for improving the accuracy of future climate forecasting. The main goal of the TIPEX program is to quantify the climate and ocean circulation change between the Indian and the Pacific Oceans. The contents of the program are 1 to observe the mixing process of different water masses and water transport in the eastern Indian and the western Pacific, 2 to understand the large-scale oceanic-climatic variation including El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO/Warm Pool/Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO/Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD, and 3 to monitor the biogeochemical processes, material flux, and biological changes due to the climate change. In order to effectively carry out the monitoring program, close international cooperation and the proper co-work sharing of tasks between China, Japan, Indonesia, and India as well as USA is required.

  5. Development and Validation of Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics for the Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. The formulation of the sources and sinks of tracer water is generally proportional to the prognostic water vapor variable. Because all water has been accounted for in tracers, the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The tracers have been implemented in a GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation consisting of several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. The recycling of water and interannual variability of the sources of water will be examined. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation will be discussed.

  6. Precipitation efficiency derived from isotope ratios in water vapor distinguishes dynamical and microphysical influences on subtropical atmospheric constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J.; Noone, D.

    2015-09-01

    With water vapor and clouds expected to effect significant feedbacks on climate, moisture transport through convective processes has important implications for future temperature change. The precipitation efficiency—the ratio of the rates at which precipitation and condensation form (e = P/C)—is useful for characterizing how much boundary layer moisture recycles through precipitation versus mixes into the free troposphere through cloud detrainment. Yet it is a difficult metric to constrain with traditional observational techniques. This analysis characterizes the precipitation efficiency of convection near the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, using a novel tracer: isotope ratios in water vapor. The synoptic circulation patterns associated with high and low precipitation efficiency are identified, and the importance of large-scale dynamics and local convective processes in regulating vertical distributions of atmospheric constituents important for climate is evaluated. The results suggest that high e days are correlated with plume-like transport originating from the relatively clean tropics, while low e days are associated with westerly transport, generated by a branching of the jet stream. Differences in transport pathway clearly modify background concentrations of water vapor and other trace gases measured at Mauna Loa Observatory; however, local convective processes appear to regulate aerosols there. Indeed, differences between observed and simulated diurnal cycles of particle number concentration indicate that precipitation scavenges aerosols and possibly facilitates new particle formation when e is high. As measurements of isotope ratios in water vapor expand across the subtropics, the techniques presented here can further our understanding of how synoptic weather, precipitation processes, and climate feedbacks interrelate.

  7. Relative Influence of Initial Surface and Atmospheric Conditions on Seasonal Water and Energy Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and analyzed wet and dry soil moisture composites for the mid-latitude GCIP region of the central US using long climate model simulations made with the NCAR CCM3 and reanalysis products from NCEP. Using the diagnostic composites as a guide, we have completed a series of predictability experiments in which we imposed soil water initial conditions in CCM3 for the GCIP region for June 1 from anomalously wet and dry years, with atmospheric initial conditions taken from June 1 of a year with 'near-normal' soil water, and initial soil water from the near-normal year and atmospheric initial conditions from the wet and dry years. Preliminary results indicate that the initial state of the atmosphere is more important than the initial state of soil water determining the subsequent late spring and summer evolution of sod water over the GCIP region. Surprisingly, neither the composites or the predictability experiments yielded a strong influence of soil moisture on the atmosphere. To explore this further, we have made runs with extreme dry soil moisture initial anomalies imposed over the GCIP region (the soil close to being completely dry). These runs did yield a very strong effect on the atmosphere that persisted for at least three months. We conclude that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly is crucial, at least in CCM3, and are currently investigating whether a threshold exists, below which little impact is seen. In a complementary study, we compared the impact of the initial condition of snow cover versus the initial atmospheric state over the western US (corresponding to the westward extension of the GAPP program follow-on to GCIP). In this case, the initial prescription of snow cover is far more important than the initial atmospheric state in determining the subsequent evolution of snow cover. We are currently working to understand the very different soil water and snow cover results.

  8. Strong Water Isotopic Anomalies in the Martian Atmosphere: Probing Current and Ancient Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Novak, R. E.; Käufl, H. U.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Tokunaga, A.; Khayat, A.; Smith, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    We measured maps of atmospheric water (H2O) and its deuterated form (HDO) across the martian globe, showing strong isotopic anomalies and a significant high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) enrichment indicative of great water loss. The maps sample the evolution of sublimation from the north polar cap, revealing that the released water has a representative D/H value enriched by a factor of about 7 relative to Earth's ocean [Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)]. Certain basins and orographic depressions show even higher enrichment, whereas high-altitude regions show much lower values (1 to 3 VSMOW). Our atmospheric maps indicate that water ice in the polar reservoirs is enriched in deuterium to at least 8 VSMOW, which would mean that early Mars (4.5 billion years ago) had a global equivalent water layer at least 137 meters deep.

  9. Variational fine-grained data assimilation schemes for atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The paper concerns data assimilation problem for an atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models. Data assimilation is carried out within variation approach on a single time step of the approximated model. A control function is introduced into the model source term (emission rate) to provide flexibility to adjust to data. This function is evaluated as the minimum of the target functional combining control function norm to a misfit between measured and model-simulated analog of data. This provides a flow-dependent and physically-plausible structure of the resulting analysis and reduces the need to calculate model error covariance matrices that are sought within conventional approach to data assimilation. Extension of the atmospheric transport model with a chemical transformations module influences data assimilation algorithms performance. This influence is investigated with numerical experiments for different meteorological conditions altering convection-diffusion processes characteristics, namely strong, medium and low wind conditions. To study the impact of transformation and data assimilation, we compare results for a convection-diffusion model (without data assimilation), convection-diffusion with assimilation, convection-diffusion-reaction (without data assimilation) and convection-diffusion-reaction-assimilation models. Both high dimensionalities of the atmospheric chemistry models and a real-time mode of operation demand for computational efficiency of the algorithms. Computational issues with complicated models can be solved by using a splitting technique. As the result a model is presented as a set of relatively independent simple models equipped with a kind of coupling procedure. With regard to data assimilation two approaches can be identified. In a fine-grained approach data assimilation is carried out on the separate splitting stages [1,2] independently on shared measurement data. The same situation arises when constructing a hybrid model

  10. The role of atmospheric precipitation in introducing contaminants to the surface waters of the Fuglebekken catchment, Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kozak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the Svalbard Archipelago is located at a high latitude, far from potential contaminant sources, it is not free from anthropogenic impact. Towards the Fuglebekken catchment, in the southern part of Spitsbergen, north of Hornsund fjord, contaminants can be transported from mainland pollution sources. In the precipitation and surface water collected in the catchment, the following elements were detected and quantified: Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Cs, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn. Additionally, pH, electrical conductivity and total organic carbon (TOC were determined in those samples. The acidic reaction of precipitation waters was identified as an important factor intensifying the metal migration in this Arctic tundra environment. The air mass trajectory, surprisingly, explained the variability of only a small fraction of trace elements in precipitation water. The air mass origin area was correlated only with the concentrations of As, V and Cr. Wind directions were helpful in explaining the variability of Mn, U and Ba concentrations (east–north-easterly wind and the contents of B, As, Rb, Se, Sr and Li in precipitation (south-westerly wind, which may indicate the local geological source of those. Atmospheric deposition was found to play a key role in the transport of contaminants into the Fuglebekken catchment; however, the surface water composition was modified by its pH and TOC content.

  11. Validation of the atmospheric transport model: comparison of observed krypton-85 concentrations with those computed using a Gaussian plume model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty monthly average 85Kr concentrations measured at 13 sampling locations between 25 and 150 km from a quasi-continuous point source were used in a validation study of the Atmospheric Transport Model for Toxic Substances (ATM-TOX). Although the computed values tended to overestimate, more than 60% of them fell within a factor of 2 of the observed concentrations

  12. Preliminary results from the Los Alamos TA54 complex terrain Atmospheric Transport Study (ATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E.; Chan, M.; Sanders, L.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal site at TA54, Area G la located on a mesa top amidst a complex terrain of finger like mesas typically 30 motors or more In height above canyons of widths varying from 100 to 300 motors. Atmospheric dispersion from this site is of concern for routine operations and for potential Incidents during waste retrieval operations. Indian lands are located In the dominant downwind direction within 500 m from the site and provide further incentive to understand the potential and actual impacts of waste disposal operations. The permanent network of meteorological towers at LANL have been located primarily at mesa-top locations to coincide with most laboratory facilities and as such do not resolve the effects of channeling in the canyons and the influence this has on potential surface releases. An Atmospheric Transport Study (ATS) was initiated to better understand the wind flow fields and dispersion from the LANL Waste Storage and Disposal facilities at TA-54, Area G. As part of this effort, a series of six portable meteorological towers were sited in the vicinity of Area G, two at mesa top locations, one just east of the site where the mesas have dissipated to mild ridges, and three in the canyons adjacent to the disposal site mesa as indicated on the topographic representation of the local terrain. Since 1994, the towers have collected horizontal wind velocities, pressure, temperature, relative humidity and a radiation gamma reading every fifteen minutes. The data bass is being analyzed for trends and to provide a basis for comparison to computational modeling efforts to predict the flow fields.

  13. Parallelization and load balancing of a comprehensive atmospheric chemistry transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbern, Hendrik

    Chemistry transport models are generally claimed to be well suited for massively parallel processing on distributed memory architectures since the arithmetic-to-communication ratio is usually high. However, this observation proves insufficient to account for an efficient parallel performance with increasing complexity of the model. The modeling of the local state of the atmosphere ensues very different branches of the modules' code and greater differences in the computational work load and, consequently, runtime of individual processors occur to a much larger extent during a time step than reported for meteorological models. Variable emissions, changes in actinic fluxes, and all processes associated with cloud modeling are highly variable in time and space and are identified to induce large load imbalances which severely affect the parallel efficiency. This is more so, when the model domain encompasses more heterogeneous meteorological or regional regimes, which impinge dissimilarly on simulations of atmospheric chemistry processes. These conditions hold for the EURAD model applied in this study, which covers the European continental scale as integration domain. Based on a master-worker configuration with a horizontal grid partitioning approach, a method is proposed where the integration domain of the individual processors is locally adjusted to accommodate for load imbalances. This ensures a minimal communication volume and data exchange only with the next neighbors. The interior boundary adjustments of the processors are combined with routine boundary exchange which is required each time step anyway. Two dynamic load balancing schemes were implemented and compared against a conventional equal area partition and a static load balancing scheme. The methods are devised for massively parallel distributed memory computers of both, Single and Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (SIMD, MIMD) types. A midsummer episode of highly elevated ozone concentrations

  14. Reference dataset of volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties for atmospheric measurement retrievals and transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andreas; Durant, Adam; Sytchkova, Anna; Diplas, Spyros; Bonadonna, Costanza; Scarnato, Barbara; Krüger, Kirstin; Kylling, Arve; Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions emit up to 50 wt.% (total erupted mass) of fine ash particles (threat for aviation operations. Recent volcanic eruptions, such as the 2010 Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull event, illustrated how volcanic ash can severely impact commercial air traffic. In order to manage the threat, it is important to have accurate forecast information on the spatial extent and absolute quantity of airborne volcanic ash. Such forecasts are constrained by empirically-derived estimates of the volcanic source term and the nature of the constituent volcanic ash properties. Consequently, it is important to include a quantitative assessment of measurement uncertainties of ash properties to provide realistic ash forecast uncertainty. Currently, information on volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties is derived from a small number of somewhat dated publications. In this study, we provide a reference dataset for physical (size distribution and shape), chemical (bulk vs. surface chemistry) and optical properties (complex refractive index in the UV-vis-NIR range) of a representative selection of volcanic ash samples from 10 different volcanic eruptions covering the full variability in silica content (40-75 wt.% SiO2). Through the combination of empirical analytical methods (e.g., image analysis, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and UV/Vis/NIR/FTIR Spectroscopy) and theoretical models (e.g., Bruggeman effective medium approach), it was possible to fully capture the natural variability of ash physicochemical and optical characteristics. The dataset will be applied in atmospheric measurement retrievals and atmospheric transport modelling to determine the sensitivity to uncertainty in ash particle characteristics.

  15. Water security, global change and land-atmosphere feedbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadson, Simon; Acreman, Michael; Harding, Richard

    2013-11-13

    Understanding the competing pressures on water resources requires a detailed knowledge of the future water balance under uncertain environmental change. The need for a robust, scientifically rigorous evidence base for effective policy planning and practice has never been greater. Environmental change includes, but is not limited to, climate change; it also includes land-use and land-cover change, including deforestation for agriculture, and occurs alongside changes in anthropogenic interventions that are used in natural resource management such as the regulation of river flows using dams, which can have impacts that frequently exceed those arising in the natural system. In this paper, we examine the role that land surface models can play in providing a robust scientific basis for making resource management decisions against a background of environmental change. We provide some perspectives on recent developments in modelling in land surface hydrology. Among the range of current land surface and hydrology models, there is a large range of variability, which indicates that the specification and parametrization of several basic processes in the models can be improved. Key areas that require improvement in order to address hydrological applications include (i) the representation of groundwater in models, particularly at the scales relevant to land surface modelling, (ii) the representation of human interventions such as dams and irrigation in the hydrological system, (iii) the quantification and communication of uncertainty, and (iv) improved understanding of the impact on water resources availability of multiple use through treatment, recycling and return flows (and the balance of consumptive and conservative uses). Through a series of examples, we demonstrate that changes in water use could have important reciprocal impacts on climate over a wide area. The effects of water management decisions on climate feedbacks are only beginning to be investigated-they are

  16. Assessing the tangent linear behaviour of common tracer transport schemes and their use in a linearised atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holdaway

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The linearity of a selection of common advection schemes is tested and examined with a view to their use in the tangent linear and adjoint versions of an atmospheric general circulation model. The schemes are tested within a simple offline one-dimensional periodic domain as well as using a simplified and complete configuration of the linearised version of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5. All schemes which prevent the development of negative values and preserve the shape of the solution are confirmed to have non-linear behaviour. The piecewise parabolic method (PPM with certain flux limiters, including that used by default in GEOS-5, is found to support linear growth near the shocks. This property can cause the rapid development of unrealistically large perturbations within the tangent linear and adjoint models. It is shown that these schemes with flux limiters should not be used within the linearised version of a transport scheme. The results from tests using GEOS-5 show that the current default scheme (a version of PPM is not suitable for the tangent linear and adjoint model, and that using a linear third-order scheme for the linearised model produces better behaviour. Using the third-order scheme for the linearised model improves the correlations between the linear and non-linear perturbation trajectories for cloud liquid water and cloud liquid ice in GEOS-5.

  17. Assessing the Tangent Linear Behaviour of Common Tracer Transport Schemes and Their Use in a Linearised Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kent, James

    2015-01-01

    The linearity of a selection of common advection schemes is tested and examined with a view to their use in the tangent linear and adjoint versions of an atmospheric general circulation model. The schemes are tested within a simple offline one-dimensional periodic domain as well as using a simplified and complete configuration of the linearised version of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5). All schemes which prevent the development of negative values and preserve the shape of the solution are confirmed to have nonlinear behaviour. The piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with certain flux limiters, including that used by default in GEOS-5, is found to support linear growth near the shocks. This property can cause the rapid development of unrealistically large perturbations within the tangent linear and adjoint models. It is shown that these schemes with flux limiters should not be used within the linearised version of a transport scheme. The results from tests using GEOS-5 show that the current default scheme (a version of PPM) is not suitable for the tangent linear and adjoint model, and that using a linear third-order scheme for the linearised model produces better behaviour. Using the third-order scheme for the linearised model improves the correlations between the linear and non-linear perturbation trajectories for cloud liquid water and cloud liquid ice in GEOS-5.

  18. Atmospheric mercury deposition and its contribution of the regional atmospheric transport to mercury pollution at a national forest nature reserve, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Wang, Dingyong; Du, Hongxia; Sun, Tao; Zhao, Zheng; Wei, Shiqing

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition by wet and dry processes contributes to the transformation of mercury from atmosphere to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Factors influencing the amount of mercury deposited to subtropical forests were identified in this study. Throughfall and open field precipitation samples were collected in 2012 and 2013 using precipitation collectors from forest sites located across Mt. Jinyun in southwest China. Samples were collected approximately every 2 weeks and analyzed for total (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg). Forest canopy was the primary factor on THg and MeHg deposition. Simultaneously, continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) were carried out from March 2012 to February 2013 at the summit of Mt. Jinyun. Atmospheric GEM concentrations averaged 3.8 ± 1.5 ng m(-3), which was elevated compared with global background values. Sources identification indicated that both regional industrial emissions and long-range transport of Hg from central, northeast, and southwest China were corresponded to the elevated GEM levels. Precipitation deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in Mt. Jinyun were slightly higher than those reported in Europe and North America, whereas total fluxes of MeHg and THg under forest canopy on Mt. Jiuyun were 3 and 2.9 times of the fluxes of THg in wet deposition in the open. Highly elevated litterfall deposition fluxes suggest that even in remote forest areas of China, deposition of atmospheric Hg(0) via uptake by vegetation leaf may be a major pathway for the deposition of atmospheric Hg. The result illustrates that areas with greater atmospheric pollution can be expected to have greater fluxes of Hg to soils via throughfall and litterfall.

  19. Observational constraints on atmospheric and oceanic cross-equatorial heat transports: revisiting the precipitation asymmetry problem in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Wang, Hailan; Cheng, Anning; Kato, Seiji; Fasullo, John T.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Allan, Richard P.

    2016-05-01

    Satellite based top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiation budget observations are combined with mass corrected vertically integrated atmospheric energy divergence and tendency from reanalysis to infer the regional distribution of the TOA, atmospheric and surface energy budget terms over the globe. Hemispheric contrasts in the energy budget terms are used to determine the radiative and combined sensible and latent heat contributions to the cross-equatorial heat transports in the atmosphere (AHTEQ) and ocean (OHTEQ). The contrast in net atmospheric radiation implies an AHTEQ from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) (0.75 PW), while the hemispheric difference in sensible and latent heat implies an AHTEQ in the opposite direction (0.51 PW), resulting in a net NH to SH AHTEQ (0.24 PW). At the surface, the hemispheric contrast in the radiative component (0.95 PW) dominates, implying a 0.44 PW SH to NH OHTEQ. Coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) models with excessive net downward surface radiation and surface-to-atmosphere sensible and latent heat transport in the SH relative to the NH exhibit anomalous northward AHTEQ and overestimate SH tropical precipitation. The hemispheric bias in net surface radiative flux is due to too much longwave surface radiative cooling in the NH tropics in both clear and all-sky conditions and excessive shortwave surface radiation in the SH subtropics and extratropics due to an underestimation in reflection by clouds.

  20. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, BoHung

    2016-01-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices.

  1. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, Bohung

    2016-09-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices.

  2. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordsworth, R. D.; Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: rwordsworth@uchicago.edu [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 60637 IL (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on a range of atmospheric and external parameters. We show that CO{sub 2} can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the middle and upper atmosphere acting as a bottleneck on escape in other circumstances. Around G-stars, efficient loss only occurs on planets with intermediate CO{sub 2} atmospheric partial pressures (0.1-1 bar) that receive a net flux close to the critical runaway greenhouse limit. Because G-star total luminosity increases with time but X-ray and ultraviolet/ultravoilet luminosity decreases, this places strong limits on water loss for planets like Earth. In contrast, for a CO{sub 2}-rich early Venus, diffusion limits on water loss are only important if clouds caused strong cooling, implying that scenarios where the planet never had surface liquid water are indeed plausible. Around M-stars, water loss is primarily a function of orbital distance, with planets that absorb less flux than ∼270 W m{sup –2} (global mean) unlikely to lose more than one Earth ocean of H{sub 2}O over their lifetimes unless they lose all their atmospheric N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} early on. Because of the variability of H{sub 2}O delivery during accretion, our results suggest that many 'Earth-like' exoplanets in the habitable zone may have ocean-covered surfaces, stable CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O-rich atmospheres, and high mean surface temperatures.

  3. Modeling of Water Flow Processes in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: The Soil-Tree-Atmosphere Continuum Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Trees and forests play a key role in controlling the water and energy balance at the land-air surface. This study reports on the calibration of an integrated soil-tree-atmosphere continuum (STAC) model using Bayesian inference with the DREAM algorithm and temporal observations of soil moisture content, matric head, sap flux, and leaf water potential from the King's River Experimental Watershed (KREW) in the southern Sierra Nevada mountain range in California. Water flow through the coupled system is described using the Richards' equation with both the soil and tree modeled as a porous medium with nonlinear soil and tree water relationships. Most of the model parameters appear to be reasonably well defined by calibration against the observed data. The posterior mean simulation reproduces the observed soil and tree data quite accurately, but a systematic mismatch is observed between early afternoon measured and simulated sap fluxes. We will show how this points to a structural error in the STAC-model and suggest and test an alternative hypothesis for root water uptake that alleviates this problem.

  4. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  5. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  6. Characteristics of water-vapour inversions observed over the Arctic by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and radiosondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An accurate characterization of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere is useful in climate change and attribution studies as well as for the climate modelling community to improve projections of future climate over this highly sensitive region. Here, we investigate one of the dominant features of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere, i.e. water-vapour inversions, using eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data (2002–2010 and radiosounding profiles released from the two Arctic locations (North Slope of Alaska at Barrow and during SHEBA. We quantify the characteristics of clear-sky water vapour inversions in terms of their frequency of occurrence, strength and height covering the entire Arctic for the first time.

    We found that the frequency of occurrence of water-vapour inversions is highest during winter and lowest during summer. The inversion strength is, however, higher during summer. The observed peaks in the median inversion-layer heights are higher during the winter half of the year, at around 850 hPa over most of the Arctic Ocean, Siberia and the Canadian Archipelago, while being around 925 hPa during most of the summer half of the year over the Arctic Ocean. The radiosounding profiles agree with the frequency, location and strength of water-vapour inversions in the Pacific sector of the Arctic. In addition, the radiosoundings indicate that multiple inversions are the norm with relatively few cases without inversions. The amount of precipitable water within the water-vapour inversion structures is estimated and we find a distinct, two-mode contribution to the total column precipitable water. These results suggest that water-vapour inversions are a significant source to the column thermodynamics, especially during the colder winter and spring seasons. We argue that these inversions are a robust metric to test the reproducibility of thermodynamics within climate models. An accurate statistical

  7. Long-range atmospheric transport and the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Changbai Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangai; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Zhu, Weihong; Kannan, Narayanan; Li, Donghao

    2015-01-01

    The Changbai (also known as "Baekdu") Mountain, on the border between China and North Korea, is the highest mountain (2750 m) in northeastern China. Recently, this mountain region has experienced a dramatic increase in air pollution, not only because of increasing volumes of tourism-derived traffic but also because of the long-range transport of polluted westerly winds passing through major industrial and urban cities in the eastern region of China. To assess the relative importance of the two sources of pollution, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model substances were determined in the mountain soil. A total of 32 soil samples were collected from different sides of the mountain at different latitudes between July and August of 2009. The ∑PAH concentrations were within the range 38.5-190.1 ng g(-1) on the northern side, 117.7-443.6 ng g(-1) on the southern side, and 75.3-437.3 ng g(-1) on the western side. A progressive increase in the level of ∑PAHs with latitude was observed on the southern and western sides that face the westerly wind with abundant precipitation. However, a similar concentration gradient was not observed on the northern side that receives less rain and is on the leeward direction of the wind. The high-molecular-weight PAH compounds were predominant in the soils on the southern and western sides, while low-molecular-weight PAHs dominated the northern side soils. These findings show that the distribution of PAHs in the mountain soil is strongly influenced by the atmospheric long-range transport and cold trapping. PMID:25036943

  8. How Does Leaf Anatomy Influence Water Transport outside the Xylem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Thomas N; John, Grace P; Scoffoni, Christine; Sack, Lawren

    2015-08-01

    Leaves are arguably the most complex and important physicobiological systems in the ecosphere. Yet, water transport outside the leaf xylem remains poorly understood, despite its impacts on stomatal function and photosynthesis. We applied anatomical measurements from 14 diverse species to a novel model of water flow in an areole (the smallest region bounded by minor veins) to predict the impact of anatomical variation across species on outside-xylem hydraulic conductance (Kox). Several predictions verified previous correlational studies: (1) vein length per unit area is the strongest anatomical determinant of Kox, due to effects on hydraulic pathlength and bundle sheath (BS) surface area; (2) palisade mesophyll remains well hydrated in hypostomatous species, which may benefit photosynthesis, (3) BS extensions enhance Kox; and (4) the upper and lower epidermis are hydraulically sequestered from one another despite their proximity. Our findings also provided novel insights: (5) the BS contributes a minority of outside-xylem resistance; (6) vapor transport contributes up to two-thirds of Kox; (7) Kox is strongly enhanced by the proximity of veins to lower epidermis; and (8) Kox is strongly influenced by spongy mesophyll anatomy, decreasing with protoplast size and increasing with airspace fraction and cell wall thickness. Correlations between anatomy and Kox across species sometimes diverged from predicted causal effects, demonstrating the need for integrative models to resolve causation. For example, (9) Kox was enhanced far more in heterobaric species than predicted by their having BS extensions. Our approach provides detailed insights into the role of anatomical variation in leaf function.

  9. Structure and Water Transport in Nafion Nanocomposite Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric; Page, Kirt

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorinated ionomers, specifically Nafion, are the most widely used ion exchange membranes for vanadium redox flow battery applications, where an understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and transport of water/ions is critical to battery performance. In this study, the structure of Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes, synthesized using sol-gel chemistry, as well as cast directly from Nafion/SiO2 nanoparticle dispersions, was measured using both small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). Through contrast match studies of the SiO2 nanoparticles, direct information on the change in the structure of the Nafion membranes and the ion-transport channels within was obtained, where differences in membrane structure was observed between the solution-cast membranes and the membranes synthesized using sol-gel chemistry. Additionally, water sorption and diffusion in these Nafion/SiO2 nanocomposite membranes were measured using in situ time-resolved Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS).

  10. Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraine, Jonathan; Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjorn; Knutson, Heather; Jordán, Andrés; Espinoza, Néstor; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Wilkins, Ashlee; Todorov, Kamen

    2014-09-25

    Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core.

  11. Structure-dependent water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes: toward selective gating upon temperature regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2015-04-28

    Determining water structure in nanopores and its influence on water transport behaviour is of great importance for understanding and regulating the transport across nanopores. Here we report an ultrafast-slow flow transition phenomenon for water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes owing to the change in water structure in nanopores induced by temperature. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show the dependence of water transport behaviours on water structures. Our results indicate that owing to the change in water structure in nanopores, water flux across nanopores with certain pore sizes decreases sharply (nearly 3 orders of magnitude) with the decreasing temperature. This phenomenon is very sensitive to the pore size. The threshold temperatures for the occurrence of the ultrafast-slow flow transition for water transport are also determined for various pore sizes. These findings suggest a novel protocol for selective gating of water and proton conduction across nanopores and temperature-controlled drug release.

  12. Sensitivity study of land biosphere CO2 exchange through an atmospheric tracer transport model using satellite-derived vegetation index data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a simple, globally uniform model of CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere by coupling the model with a three-dimensional atmospheric tracer transport model using observed winds, and checking results against observed concentrations of CO2 at various monitoring sites. CO2 fluxes are derived from observed greenness using satellite-derived Global Vegetation Index data, combined with observations of temperature, radiation, and precipitation. We explore a range of CO2 flux formulations together with some modifications of the modelled atmospheric transport. We find that while some formulations can be excluded, it cannot be decided whether or not to make CO2 uptake and release dependent on water stress. It appears that the seasonality of net CO2 fluxes in the tropics, which would be expected to be driven by water availability, is small and is therefore not visible in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2. The latter is dominated largely by northern temperate and boreal vegetation, where seasonality is mostly temperature determined. We find some evidence that there is still considerable CO2 release from soils during northern-hemisphere winter. An exponential air temperature dependence of soil release with a Q10 of 1.5 is found to be most appropriate, with no cutoff at low freezing temperatures. This result is independent of the year from which observed winds were taken. This is remarkable insofar as year-to-year changes in modelled CO2 concentrations caused by changes in the wind data clearly outweigh those caused by year-to-year variability in the climate and vegetation index data. (orig.)

  13. Impacts of lindane usage in the Canadian prairies on the Great Lakes ecosystem. 1. Coupled atmospheric transport model and modeled concentrations in air and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianmin; Daggupaty, Sreerama; Harner, Tom; Li, Yifan

    2003-09-01

    A coupled atmospheric transport, soil-air, water-air exchange model was developed to investigate the impacts of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH or lindane) usage in the Canadian prairies over the Great Lakes region. The fate of gamma-HCH in air and soil is governed by atmospheric dynamics and physical and chemical processes that are described by the coupled model. These processes include transport and turbulent diffusion in the atmosphere, dry and wet deposition, exchange at the interfacial boundaries of air-water and soil-air, and removal processes from the soil such as diffusion, leaching, and degradation. Numerical experiments were conducted for the period of May 1, 1998-April 30, 1999, starting with application of lindane in the spring. The coupled model was executed with two lindane emission (usage) inventories in the model domain. The first scenario contained all known fresh emission sources in Canada-98% was usage in the prairies; the second excluded emission sources from Ontario and Quebec. The model showed that, in the absence of the reemission from past application of lindane, usage of lindane in Ontario and Quebec has a negligible impact on air concentrations in these regions and that the lindane budget in the Great Lakes ecosystem is mostly attributed to applications of lindane in the canola fields in Canadian prairie provinces. Model-predicted air concentrations and seasonal trends agreed well with measured data over the same time period for several background sites operated under the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Air temperature was shown to play a key role on surface-air exchange dynamics of gamma-HCH. A future paper will assess loadings to the Great Lakes based on these validated model results. PMID:12967095

  14. The water cycle in the general circulation model of the martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, D. S.; Rodin, A. V.; Medvedev, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Within the numerical general-circulation model of the Martian atmosphere MAOAM (Martian Atmosphere: Observation and Modeling), we have developed the water cycle block, which is an essential component of modern general circulation models of the Martian atmosphere. The MAOAM model has a spectral dynamic core and successfully predicts the temperature regime on Mars through the use of physical parameterizations typical of both terrestrial and Martian models. We have achieved stable computation for three Martian years, while maintaining a conservative advection scheme taking into account the water-ice phase transitions, water exchange between the atmosphere and surface, and corrections for the vertical velocities of ice particles due to sedimentation. The studies show a strong dependence of the amount of water that is actively involved in the water cycle on the initial data, model temperatures, and the mechanism of water exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. The general pattern and seasonal asymmetry of the water cycle depends on the size of ice particles, the albedo, and the thermal inertia of the planet's surface. One of the modeling tasks, which results from a comparison of the model data with those of the TES experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor, is the increase in the total mass of water vapor in the model in the aphelion season and decrease in the mass of water ice clouds at the poles. The surface evaporation scheme, which takes into account the turbulent rise of water vapor, on the one hand, leads to the most complete evaporation of ice from the surface in the summer season in the northern hemisphere and, on the other hand, supersaturates the atmosphere with ice due to the vigorous evaporation, which leads to worse consistency between the amount of the precipitated atmospheric ice and the experimental data. The full evaporation of ice from the surface increases the model sensitivity to the size of the polar cap; therefore, the increase in the

  15. Sodium and chloride transport in soft water and hard water acclimated zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, A M Z; Amstrup, J; Novak, I;

    2003-01-01

    While the zebrafish is commonly used for studies of developmental biology and toxicology, very little is known about their osmoregulatory physiology. The present investigation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport revealed that the zebrafish is able to tolerate extremely low ambient ion concentrations...... and that this is achieved at least in part by a greatly enhanced apparent uptake capacity and affinity for both ions. Zebrafish maintain plasma and whole body electrolyte concentrations similar to most other freshwater teleosts even in deionized water containing only 35 microM NaCl, i.e soft water. We recorded an extremely...... inhibitor was more variable. Differential response of Na(+) uptake to amiloride depending on acclimation medium suggests that different Na(+) transport mechanisms are employed by zebrafish acclimated to soft and hard water....

  16. Multiple sources of soluble atmospheric iron to Antarctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, V. H. L.; Edwards, R.; Delmonte, B.; Ellis, A.; Andersson, P. S.; Bowie, A.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Neff, P.; Tuohy, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Ross Sea, Antarctica, is a highly productive region of the Southern Ocean. Significant new sources of iron (Fe) are required to sustain phytoplankton blooms in the austral summer. Atmospheric deposition is one potential source. The fractional solubility of Fe is an important variable determining Fe availability for biological uptake. To constrain aerosol Fe inputs to the Ross Sea region, fractional solubility of Fe was analyzed in a snow pit from Roosevelt Island, eastern Ross Sea. In addition, aluminum, dust, and refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations were analyzed, to determine the contribution of mineral dust and combustion sources to the supply of aerosol Fe. We estimate exceptionally high dissolved Fe (dFe) flux of 1.2 × 10-6 g m-2 y-1 and total dissolvable Fe flux of 140 × 10-6 g m-2 y-1 for 2011/2012. Deposition of dust, Fe, Al, and rBC occurs primarily during spring-summer. The observed background fractional Fe solubility of ~0.7% is consistent with a mineral dust source. Radiogenic isotopic ratios and particle size distribution of dust indicates that the site is influenced by local and remote sources. In 2011/2012 summer, relatively high dFe concentrations paralleled both mineral dust and rBC deposition. Around half of the annual aerosol Fe deposition occurred in the austral summer phytoplankton growth season; however, the fractional Fe solubility was low. Our results suggest that the seasonality of dFe deposition can vary and should be considered on longer glacial-interglacial timescales.

  17. Modeling of highly brines transport in large water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimova, T. P.; Lepikhin, A. P.; Parshakova, Y. N.; Tiunov, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the numerical modeling of a dilution and transport of highly brines in large water bodies taking into account the density stratification effects. This problem has an exceptional importance for the guarantee of ecological security of the Kama Reservoir in the conditions of extending exploitation of Verhnekamsk deposit of potassium and magnesium salts - one of the largest in the world. The output of million of tones of the potassium fertilizer is accompanied by the producing of the same quantity of highly brines demanding utilization. With the existing technologies the desalination of such quantity of brines is extremely energy-capacious and almost inapplicable. That is why main way for the brine utilization is the release into the surface water bodies or underground water-bearing horizons. Since the uncertainty level in the parameter setting for underground water-bearing horizons is higher than that for the surface water bodies, under the same or close conditions the release into the surface water bodies is considerably less dangerous. The main water body able to assimilate such huge amount of the removed brines is the upper part of the Kama Reservoir located within the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre. The wastewater arriving from this centre make a decisive contribution to the formation of hydrochemical regime of Kama river. We suggested two-dimensional imitational hydrodynamical model allowing to determine the possible pollution zones depending on the flow rate and concentration of pollutant, flow rate and water level in the Kama river and wind characteristics in the zone of pollutant discharge. This model allows not only to calculate the distribution of pollution zones for various pollutant sources but also to estimate the consequences of emergencies. The Kama river near the Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial centre has complex morphometry. For the complete and efficient accounting for the morphometry peculiarities the non-linear orthogonal

  18. Atmospheric transport modelling of time resolved 133Xe emissions from the isotope production facility ANSTO, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöppner, M; Plastino, W; Hermanspahn, N; Hoffmann, E; Kalinowski, M; Orr, B; Tinker, R

    2013-12-01

    The verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) relies amongst other things on the continuous and worldwide monitoring of radioxenon. The characterization of the existing and legitimate background, which is produced mainly by nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities, is of high interest to improve the capabilities of the monitoring network. However, the emissions from legitimate sources can usually only be estimated. For this paper historic source terms of (133)Xe emissions from the isotope production facility at ANSTO, Sydney, Australia, have been made available in a daily resolution. Based on these high resolution data, different source term sets with weekly, monthly and yearly time resolution have been compiled. These different sets are then applied together with atmospheric transport modelling (ATM) to predict the concentration time series at two radioxenon monitoring stations. The results are compared with each other in order to examine the improvement of the prediction capability depending on the used time resolution of the most dominant source term in the region.

  19. Dechloranes in lichens from the southeast Tibetan Plateau: Evidence of long-range atmospheric transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Shujuan; Li, Xinghong; Luo, Dongxia; Jing, Chuanyong

    2016-02-01

    Dechloranes (Decs) have been recently found to occur widely in the environment even in the remote polar regions. However, the understanding of their environmental fate is rather limited. The Tibetan Plateau (TP) may be an important indicator region to study the long-range atmospheric transport and their fates of these emerging contaminants since it has very limited local sources. In the present study, Dechlorane plus (DP), Dechlorane 602 (Dec 602), Dechlorane 603 (Dec 603) and Dechlorane 604 (Dec 604) were analyzed in lichen samples from the southeast TP. The results showed that only DP and Dec 602 were detected, with a detection frequency of 89% and 100%, respectively. The average concentrations (dry weight) of ΣDP and Dec 602 were 318 pg g(-1) (20-1132 pg g(-1)) and 167 pg g(-1) (27-843 pg g(-1)), respectively. The DP concentration in this study was much higher than those in moss from the remote Ny-Ålesund, Arctic. The concentrations of Dec 602 were found to generally increase with increasing altitude, while DP concentrations seemingly showed an opposite altitudinal trend along the mountain slopes. No stereoselective accumulation or transformation of anti-DP and syn-DP was observed in lichens and the altitudinal behavior of the two isomers was similar. This research documented that Decs are prone to undergo LRAT and cold-trapping by the mountains in the southeast TP. PMID:26386769

  20. Accuracy of the Water Vapour Content Measurements in the Atmosphere Using Optical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the accuracy and the errors of water vapour content measurements in the atmosphere using optical methods, especially starphotometer. After the general explanations of the used expressions for the star-magnitude observations of the water vapour absorption in section 3 the absorption model for the water vapour band will be discussed. Sections 4 and 5 give an overview on the technique to determine the model parameters both from spectroscopic laboratory and radiosonde observation data. Finally, the sections 6 and 7 are dealing with the details of the errors; that means errors of observable magnitude, of instrumental extraterrestrial magnitude, of atmospheric extinction determination and of water vapour content determination by radiosonde humidity measurements. The main conclusion is: Because of the high precision of the results the optical methods for water vapour observation are suited to validate and calibrate alternative methods (GPS, LIDAR, MICROWAVE) which are making constant progress wo...

  1. Remote sensing of atmospheric water content from Bhaskara SAMIR data. [using statistical linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, B. S.; Hariharan, T. A.; Sharma, A. K.; Pandey, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    The 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz passive microwave radiometers (SAMIR) on board the Indian satellite Bhaskara have provided very useful data. From these data has been demonstrated the feasibility of deriving atmospheric and ocean surface parameters such as water vapor content, liquid water content, rainfall rate and ocean surface winds. Different approaches have been tried for deriving the atmospheric water content. The statistical and empirical methods have been used by others for the analysis of the Nimbus data. A simulation technique has been attempted for the first time for 19.35 GHz and 22.235 GHz radiometer data. The results obtained from three different methods are compared with radiosonde data. A case study of a tropical depression has been undertaken to demonstrate the capability of Bhaskara SAMIR data to show the variation of total water vapor and liquid water contents.

  2. Plant water-stress parameterization determines the strength of land-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Marie; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Ouwersloot, Huug G.; Peters, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Land-surface models that are currently used in numerical weather predictions models and earth system models all assume various plant water-stress parameterizations. We investigate the impact of this variety of parametrizations on the performance of atmospheric models. For this, we use a conceptual framework where a convective atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model is coupled to a daytime model for the land surface fluxes of carbon, water, and energy. We first validate our coupled model for a set of surface and upper-atmospheric diurnal observations over a grown maize field in the Netherlands. We then perform a sensitivity analysis of this coupled land-atmosphere system by varying the modeled plant water-stress response from a very insensitive to a sensitive response during dry soil conditions. We first propose and verify a feedback diagram that ties plant water-stress response and large-scale atmospheric conditions to the diurnal cycles of ABL CO2, humidity and temperature. Based on our undertanstanding of the diurnal coupled system, we then explore the impact of the assumed water-stress reponse for the development of a dry spell on a synoptic time scale. We find that during a progressive 3-week soil drying caused by evapotranspiration, an insensitive plant will dampen atmospheric heating because the vegetation continues to transpire while soil moisture is available. In contrast, the sensitive plant reduces its transpiration to prevent soil moisture depletion. But when absolute soil moisture comes close to wilting point, the insensitive plant will suddenly close its stomata causing a switch to a land-atmosphere coupling regime dominated by sensible heat exchange. We find that in both cases, our modeled progressive soil moisture depletion contributes to further atmospheric warming up to 6 K, reduced photosynthesis up to 89 %, and CO2 enrichment up to 30 ppm, but the full impact is strongly delayed for the insensitive plant. Finally, we demonstrate that the assumed

  3. Foliar Water Uptake of Tamarix ramosissima from an Atmosphere of High Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many species have been found to be capable of foliar water uptake, but little research has focused on this in desert plants. Tamarix ramosissima was investigated to determine whether its leaves can directly absorb water from high humidity atmosphere and, if they can, to understand the magnitude and importance of foliar water uptake. Various techniques were adopted to demonstrate foliar water uptake under submergence or high atmospheric humidity. The mean increase in leaf water content after submergence was 29.38% and 20.93% for mature and tender leaves, respectively. In the chamber experiment, obvious reverse sap flow occurred when relative humidity (RH was persistently above 90%. Reverse flow was recorded first in twigs, then in branches and stems. For the stem, the percentage of negative sap flow rate accounting for the maximum value of sap flow reached 10.71%, and its amount accounted for 7.54% of diurnal sap flow. Small rainfall can not only compensate water loss of plant by foliar uptake, but also suppress transpiration. Foliar uptake can appear in the daytime under certain rainfall events. High atmospheric humidity is beneficial for enhancing the water status of plants. Foliar uptake should be an important strategy of water acquisition for desert plants.

  4. Numerical analysis of coupled water transport in wood with a focus on the coupling parameter sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, T.; Turk, G.; Rodman, U.;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study of sorption rate function in a so-called multi-Fickian or multi-phase model. This model describes the complex moisture transport system in wood, which consists of separate water-vapour and bound-water diffusion interacting through sorption. In the numerical example inf...... influence of the sorption rate function on water transport is presented. It can be seen that the sorption rate function has a noticeable influence on coupled water transport in wood....

  5. The Asian monsoon's role in atmospheric heat transport responses to orbital and millennial-scale climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, D.; Green, B.; Donohoe, A.; Marshall, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have provided a framework for understanding the zonal-mean position of the tropical rain belt by documenting relationships between rain belt latitude and atmospheric heat transport across the equator (Donohoe et al., 2013). Modern seasonal and interannual variability in globally-averaged rain belt position (often referred to as 'ITCZ position') reflects the interhemispheric heat balance, with the rain belt's displacement toward the warmer hemisphere directly proportional to atmospheric heat transport into the cooler hemisphere. Model simulations suggest that rain belt shifts are likely to have obeyed the same relationship with interhemispheric heat transport in response to past changes in orbital parameters, ice sheets, and ocean circulation. This relationship implies that even small (±1 degree) shifts in the mean rain belt require large changes in hemispheric heat budgets, placing tight bounds on mean rain belt shifts in past climates. This work has primarily viewed tropical circulation in two dimensions, as a pair of zonal-mean Hadley cells on either side of the rain belt that are displaced north and south by perturbations in hemispheric energy budgets, causing the atmosphere to transport heat into the cooler hemisphere. Here we attempt to move beyond this zonal-mean perspective, motivated by arguments that the Asian monsoon system, rather than the zonal-mean circulation, plays the dominant role in annual-mean heat transport into the southern hemisphere in the modern climate (Heaviside and Czaja, 2012; Marshall et al., 2014). We explore a range of climate change experiments, including simulations of North Atlantic cooling and mid-Holocene climate, to test whether changes in interhemispheric atmospheric heat transport are primarily driven by the mean Hadley circulation, the Asian monsoon system, or other regional-scale atmospheric circulation changes. The scalings that this work identifies between Asian monsoon changes and atmospheric heat

  6. Assessment of Atmospheric Water Vapor Abundance Above RSL Locations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdis, Jodi R.; Murphy, Jim; Wilson, Robert John

    2016-10-01

    The possible signatures of atmospheric water vapor arising from Martian Recurring Slope Lineae (RSLs)1 are investigated. These RSLs appear during local spring and summer on downward slopes, and have been linked to liquid water which leaves behind streaks of briny material. Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detector (MAWD)2 and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES)3-5 derived water vapor abundance values are interrogated to determine whether four RSL locations at southern mid-latitudes (Palikir Crater, Hale Crater, Horowitz Crater, and Coprates Chasma) exhibit episodic enhanced local water vapor abundance during southern summer solstice (Ls = 270°) and autumnal equinox (Ls = 360°) when RSLs are observed to develop6,7. Any detected atmospheric water vapor signal would expand upon current knowledge of RSLs, while non-detection would provide upper limits on RSL water content. Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) and MGS TES derived temperature values are also investigated due to the appearance of active RSLs after the surface temperature of the slopes exceeds 250 K1.A high spatial resolution Martian atmospheric numerical model will be employed to assess the magnitude and temporal duration of water vapor content that might be anticipated in response to inferred RSL surface water release. The ability of past and future orbiter-based instruments to detect such water vapor quantities will be assessed.References1. McEwen, A. et al. 2011, Sci., 333, 7402. Jakosky, B. & Farmer, C. 1982, JGR, 87, 29993. Christensen, P. et al. 1992, JGR, 97, 77194. Christensen, P. et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 238235. Smith, M. 2002, JGR, 107, 51156. Ojha, L. et al. 2015, Nature Geosci., 8, 8297. Stillman, D. et al. 2014, Icarus, 233, 328

  7. Application of Vacuum Swing Adsorption for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Removal from Manned Spacecraft Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J.; Fulda, P.; Howard, D.; Ritter, J.; Levan, M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and testing of a vacuum-swing adsorption process to remove metabolic 'water and carbon dioxide gases from NASA's Orion crew exploration vehicle atmosphere is presented. For the Orion spacecraft, the sorbent-based atmosphere revitalization (SBAR) system must remove all metabolic water, a technology approach 1Lhathas not been used in previous spacecraft life support systems. Design and testing of a prototype SBAR in sub-scale and full-scale configurations is discussed. Experimental and analytical investigations of dual-ended and single-ended vacuum desorption are presented. An experimental investigation of thermal linking between adsorbing and desorbing columns is also presented.

  8. The Role of Plant Water Storage on Water Fluxes within the Coupled Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. W.; Duman, T.; Parolari, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Plant water storage (PWS) contributes to whole-plant transpiration (up to 50%), especially in large trees and during severe drought conditions. PWS also can impact water-carbon economy as well as the degree of resistance to drought. A 1-D porous media model is employed to accommodate transient water flow through the plant hydraulic system. This model provides a mechanistic representation of biophysical processes constraining water transport, accounting for plant hydraulic architecture and the nonlinear relation between stomatal aperture and leaf water potential when limited by soil water availability. Water transport within the vascular system from the stem base to the leaf-lamina is modeled using Richards's equation, parameterized with the hydraulic properties of the plant tissues. For simplicity, the conducting flow in the radial direction is not considered here and the capacitance at the leaf-lamina is assumed to be independent of leaf water potential. The water mass balance in the leaf lamina sets the upper boundary condition for the flow system, which links the leaf-level transpiration to the leaf water potential. Thus, the leaf-level gas exchange can be impacted by soil water availability through the water potential gradient from the leaf lamina to the soil, and vice versa. The root water uptake is modeled by a multi-layered macroscopic scheme to account for possible hydraulic redistribution (HR) in certain conditions. The main findings from the model calculations are that (1) HR can be diminished by the residual water potential gradient from roots to leaves at night due to aboveground capacitance, tree height, nocturnal transpiration or the combination of the three. The degree of reduction depends on the magnitude of residual water potential gradient; (2) nocturnal refilling to PWS elevates the leaf water potential that subsequently delays the onset of drought stress at the leaf; (3) Lifting water into the PWS instead of HR can be an advantageous strategy

  9. Rotationally resolved water dimer spectra in atmospheric air and pure water vapour in the 188-258 GHz range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, E A; Koshelev, M A; Odintsova, T A; Parshin, V V; Tretyakov, M Yu

    2014-12-21

    New experimental results regarding "warm" water dimer spectra under equilibrium conditions are presented. An almost equidistant series of six peaks corresponding to the merged individual lines of the bound dimer with consecutive rotational quantum numbers is studied in the 188-258 GHz frequency range in water vapour over a broad range of pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's atmosphere. The series is a continuation of the sequence detected earlier at lower frequencies at room temperature. The signal-to-noise ratio of the observed spectra allowed investigating their evolution, when water vapour was diluted by atmospheric air with partial pressure from 0 up to 540 Torr. Analysis of the obtained spectra permitted determining the dimerization constant as well as the hydrogen bond dissociation energy and the dimer spectral parameters, including the average coefficient of collisional broadening of individual lines by water vapour and air. The manifestation of metastable states of the dimer in the observed spectra is assessed. The contribution of three possible pair states of water molecules to the second virial coefficient is evaluated over the broad range of temperatures. The work supports the significant role of the water dimer in atmospheric absorption and related processes.

  10. Deposition of heavy water on soil and reemission to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field experiments using heavy water as a tracer instead of tritiated water (HTO) were carried out in November 1995 and August 1996 in Japan. The objective of these experiments was to estimate the behavior of HTO in the environment when HTO was released to the atmosphere. We measured the evolution of depth profiles of heavy water concentrations in soil water and compared the reemission rates with the evaporation velocities to study the deposition and reemission of heavy water to/from soil. The depth profiles of heavy water concentrations in soil were expressed by exponential functions of which the gradient depended on the deposition period. The initial reemission rates of heavy water from the soil were the highest, regardless of the meteorological conditions. The reemission occurred not only during the day but also at night, suggesting that the exchange of heavy water in the soil surface layer with H2O in air played a dominant role during nighttime. (orig.)

  11. Atmospheric correction of SeaWiFS imagery for turbid coastal and inland waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xianqiang; PAN Delu; MAO Zhihua

    2004-01-01

    A practical algorithm of atmospheric correction for turbid coastal and inland waters is provided. The present algorithm uses the property that the water-leaving radiance at 412 nm increases very little with the increasing of water turbidity. Thus, in very turbid coastal and inland waters, the radiance at 412 nm can be used to estimate the aerosol scattering radiance at 865 nm. The performance of the new algorithm is validated with simulation for several cases. It is found that the retrieved remotely sensed reflectance is usually with error less than 10% for the first six bands of SeaWiFS. This new algorithm is also tested under various atmospheric conditions in the Changjiang River Estuary and the Hangzhou Bay where the sediment concentration is very high and the standard SeaWiFS atmospheric correction algorithm creates a mask due to atmospheric correction failure. The result proves the efficiency of this simple algorithm in reducing the errors of the water-leaving radiance retrieving using SeaWiFS satellite data.

  12. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  13. Integrated Assessment of Ecosystem Effects of Atmospheric Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecosystems obtain a portion of their nutrients from the atmosphere. Following the Industrial Revolution, however, human activities have accelerated biogeochemical cycles, greatly enhancing the transport of substances among the atmosphere, water, soil, and living things. The atmos...

  14. Complexes and clusters of water relevant to atmospheric chemistry: H2O complexes with oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Petr G; Ignatov, Stanislav K; Schrems, Otto

    2005-03-01

    Experimental observations and data from quantum chemical calculations on complexes between water molecules and small, oxygen-containing inorganic species that play an important role as oxidants in the atmosphere (O(1D), O(3P), O2(X3sigmag), O2(b1sigmag+), O3, HO, HOO, HOOO, and H2O2) are reviewed, with emphasis on their structure, hydrogen bonding, interaction energies, thermodynamic parameters, and infrared spectra. In recent years, weakly bound complexes containing water have increasingly attracted scientific attention. Water in all its phases is a major player in the absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation. Thus, complexes between water and other atmospheric species may have a perceivable influence on the radiative balance and contribute to the greenhouse effect, even though their concentrations are low. In addition, they can play an important role in the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere, particularly in the oxidation of trace gases. Apart from gas-phase complexes, the interactions of oxidants with ice surfaces have also received considerable advertency lately due to their importance in the chemistry of snow, ice clouds, and ice surfaces (e.g., ice shields in polar regions). In paleoclimate--respectively paleoenvironmental--studies, it is essential to understand the transfer processes from the atmosphere to the ice surface. Consequently, special attention is being paid here to the intercomparison of the properties of binary complexes and the complexes and clusters of more complicated compositions, including oxidants adsorbed on ice surfaces, where ice is considered a kind of large water cluster. Various facts concerning the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere (concentration profiles and possible influence on radical reactions in the atmosphere) are discussed. PMID:15799459

  15. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota

  16. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota.

  17. Impact of the aerosol type on HICO™ atmospheric correction in coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bassani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol type on the results of the atmospheric correction of HICO™ (Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean hyperspectral data. The reflectance was obtained by using the HICO@CRI (HICO ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery algorithm, a physically-based atmospheric correction algorithm developed specifically for HICO™ data by adapting the vector version of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV radiative transfer code. The HICO@CRI algorithm was applied on six HICO™ images acquired in the Northern part of the Mediterranean Basin, using the micro-physical properties measured with a CIMEL sun sky-radiometer at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT AERONET site and the optical properties of the maritime, continental, and urban aerosol types provided by default by the 6SV. The results highlight that the aerosol type can improve the accuracy of the atmospheric correction. Indeed, the accuracy of the water reflectance retrieved from the available HICO™ data decreases in the sensor spectral domain, considering the AERONET micro-physical properties, of 30% using the urban aerosol type, of 20% using the continental type, and finally of less than 10% assuming a maritime type. Thus, the aerosol type has to be taken into consideration in the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data over coastal environment, if water quality analysis has to be performed, because of the influence of aerosol type on the water reflectance.

  18. Experimental Study of Water Transport through Hydrophilic Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate one of the fundamental aspects of Nanofluidics, which is the experimental study of water transport through nanoscale hydrophilic conduits. A new method based on spontaneous filling and a novel hybrid nanochannel design is developed to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single nanofluidic channels/tubes. This method does not require any pressure and flow sensors and also does not rely on any theoretical estimations, holding the potential to be standards for nanofluidic flow characterization. We have used this method to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our experimental results quantify the increased mass flow resistance as a function of nanochannel height, showing a 45% increase for a 7nm channel compared with classical hydrodynamics, and suggest that the increased resistance is possibly due to formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. It has been further shown that this method can reliably measure a wide range of pure mass flow resistances of nanoscale conduits, and thus is promising for advancing studies of liquid transport in hydrophobic graphene nanochannels, CNTs, as well as nanoporous media. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  19. FEMWATER BLT, Water or Waste Transport in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: FEMWATER,BLT is used to model release and transport of contaminants from wastes stored in metallic containers in saturated or unsaturated soil systems including low- level waste disposal sites. Both programs provide two-dimensional, time-dependent, finite-element analyses. FEMWATER calculates water velocity, moisture content, and pressure head in unsaturated/ saturated porous media. BLT, a modification of the FEMWATER code, predicts container degradation, waste form leaching, and radionuclide migration in unsaturated porous media. 2 - Method of solution: FEMWATER and BLT perform two-dimensional time- dependent analyses using the finite element method. Nonlinearities in the unsaturated flow equations are handled through Picard iteration. The transport equations in BLT are linear, and Gaussian elimination is used to solve the matrix equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 528 finite elements (FEMWATER), 595 nodal points (FEMWATER), 225 finite elements (BLT), 252 nodal points (BLT), 100 waste-containing elements, 20 different waste types. These limits may be changed by re-dimensioning the appropriate arrays

  20. A Review of Water Isotopes in Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Xi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable water isotopologues, mainly 1H2O, 1H2HO (HDO, and H12O18, are useful tracers for processes in the global hydrological cycle. The incorporation of water isotopes into Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs since 1984 has helped scientists gain substantial new insights into our present and past climate. In recent years, there have been several significant advances in water isotopes modeling in AGCMs. This paper reviews and synthesizes key advances accomplished in modeling (1 surface evaporation, (2 condensation, (3 supersaturation, (4 postcondensation processes, (5 vertical distribution of water isotopes, and (6 spatial δ18O-temperature slope and utilizing (1 spectral nudging technique, (2 higher model resolutions, and (3 coupled atmosphere-ocean models. It also reviews model validation through comparisons of model outputs and ground-based and spaceborne measurements. In the end, it identifies knowledge gaps and discusses future prospects of modeling and model validation.

  1. The effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien Ming eEaslon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial higher plants are composed of roots and shoots, distinct organs that conduct complementary functions in dissimilar environments. For example, roots are responsible for acquiring water and nutrients such as inorganic nitrogen from the soil, yet shoots consume the majority of these resources. The success of such a relationship depends on excellent root-shoot communications. Increased net photosynthesis and decreased shoot nitrogen and water use at elevated CO2 fundamentally alter these source-sink relations. Lower than predicted productivity gains at elevated CO2 under nitrogen or water stress may indicate shoot-root signaling lacks plasticity to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The following presents recent research results on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling, emphasizing the influence that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are having on these source-sink interactions.

  2. Mesoscale Modeling of Water Vapor and Dust in Valles Marineris: Atmospheric Influences on Recurring Slope Lineae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, C. W. S.; Rafkin, S. C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive recurring slope lineae (RSL) activity has been detected in Valles Marineris on Mars and coincides with regions where water ice fogs appear [1]. The origin of the water driving RSL flow is not well understood, but observational evidence suggests atmospheric processes play a crucial role [2]. Provided the atmospheric vapor concentration is high enough, water ice fogs can form overnight if the surface temperature cools below the condensation temperature. Correlations between dust storms and flow rates suggest that atmospheric dust opacity, and its influence on air temperature, also has a significant effect on RSL activity. We investigate planetary boundary layer processes that govern the hydrological cycle and dust cycle on Mars using a mesoscale atmospheric model to simulate the distribution of water and dust with respect to regional atmospheric circulations. Our simulations in Valles Marineris show a curious temperature structure, where the inside of the canyon appears warmer relative to the plateaus immediately outside. For a well-mixed atmosphere, this temperature structure indicates that when the atmosphere inside the canyon is saturated and fog is present within Valles Marineris, fog and low-lying clouds should also be present on the cooler surrounding plateaus as well. However, images taken with the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) show instances where water ice fog appeared exclusively inside the canyon. These results have important implications for the origin and concentration of water vapor in Valles Marineris, with possible connections to RSL. The potential temperatures from our simulations show a high level of stability inside the canyon produced dynamically by sinking air. However, afternoon updrafts along the canyon walls indicate that over time, water vapor within the chasm would escape along the sides of the canyon. Again, this suggests a local source or mechanism to concentrate water vapor is needed to explain the fog

  3. Detection of carbon monoxide and water absorption lines in an exoplanet atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacky, Quinn M; Barman, Travis S; Macintosh, Bruce A; Marois, Christian

    2013-03-22

    Determining the atmospheric structure and chemical composition of an exoplanet remains a formidable goal. Fortunately, advancements in the study of exoplanets and their atmospheres have come in the form of direct imaging--spatially resolving the planet from its parent star--which enables high-resolution spectroscopy of self-luminous planets in jovian-like orbits. Here, we present a spectrum with numerous, well-resolved molecular lines from both water and carbon monoxide from a massive planet orbiting less than 40 astronomical units from the star HR 8799. These data reveal the planet's chemical composition, atmospheric structure, and surface gravity, confirming that it is indeed a young planet. The spectral lines suggest an atmospheric carbon-to-oxygen ratio that is greater than that of the host star, providing hints about the planet's formation.

  4. Variability of winter-time middle atmospheric water vapour over the Arctic as observed with a ground-based microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschanz, Brigitte; Kivi, Rigel; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2014-05-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapour has a long chemical lifetime and can therefore be used as a tracer for dynamics. The ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C is designed for the use on campaigns and measures profiles of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and thus provides valuable data for the investigation of atmospheric processes. It has been operational for five years and has successfully participated in measurement campaigns under various climatic conditions in Germany, Switzerland, California, Finland and on la Réunion. The temporal resolution of the obtained water vapour profiles approximately 2 hours depending on tropospheric conditions. During two campaigns from January to June 2010 and from July 2011 to April 2013 in Sodankylä, Finland, MIAWARA-C monitored time series of polar middle atmospheric water vapour for three winters with three Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) occurring in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. The obtained time series are used to study the effects of the three SSWs on middle-atmospheric water vapour. During an SSW, humid mid- to low-latitude air is transported towards the polar region resulting in a fast increase in water vapour. The descent of water vapour after the SSW allows the estimation of the descent rate over the polar region as the normal wintertime circulation reforms. Results from the three SSWs are compared. The ground-based water vapour data is combined with sonde data of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and ground-based microwave wind measurements for one winter in order to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamics in the polar winter atmosphere.

  5. Anthropogenic Influence on Secondary Aerosol Formation and Total Water-Soluble Carbon on Atmospheric Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioda, Adriana; Mateus, Vinicius; Monteiro, Isabela; Taira, Fabio; Esteves, Veronica; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, the atmosphere is an important source of nutrients, as well as pollutants, because of its interfaces with soil and water. Important compounds in the gaseous phase are in both organic and inorganic forms, such as organic acids, nitrogen, sulfur and chloride. In spite of the species in gas form, a huge number of process, anthropogenic and natural, are able to form aerosols, which may be transported over long distances. Sulfates e nitrates are responsible for rain acidity; they may also increase the solubility of organic compounds and metals making them more bioavailable, and also can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol samples (PM2.5) were collected in a rural and industrial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to quantify chemical species and evaluate anthropogenic influences in secondary aerosol formation and organic compounds. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from August 2010 to July 2011. The aerosol mass was determined by Gravimetry. The water-soluble ionic composition (WSIC) was obtained by Ion Chromatography in order to determine the major anions (NO3-, SO4= and Cl-); total water-soluble carbon (TWSC) was determined by a TOC analyzer. The average aerosol (PM2.5) concentrations ranged from 1 to 43 ug/m3 in the industrial site and from 4 to 35 ug/m3 in the rural area. Regarding anions, the highest concentrations were measured for SO42- (10.6 μg/m3-12.6 μg/m3); where the lowest value was found in the rural site and the highest in the industrial. The concentrations for NO3- and Cl- ranged from 4.2 μg/m3 to 9.3 μg/m3 and 3.1 μg/m3 to 6.4 μg /m3, respectively. Sulfate was the major species and, like nitrate, it is related to photooxidation in the atmosphere. Interestingly sulfate concentrations were higher during the dry period and could be related to photochemistry activity. The correlations between nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were weak, suggesting different sources for these

  6. Putting FLEXPART to REST: The Provision of Atmospheric Transport Modeling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Don; Arnold, Dèlia

    2015-04-01

    We are developing a RESTful set of modeling services for the FLEXPART modeling system. FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) is a Lagrangian transport and dispersion model used by a growing international community. It has been used to simulate and forecast the atmospheric transport of wildfire smoke, volcanic ash and radionuclides and may be run in backwards mode to provide information for the determination of emission sources such as nuclear emissions and greenhouse gases. This open source software is distributed in source code form, and has several compiler and library dependencies that users need to address. Although well-documented, getting it compiled, set up, running, and post-processed is often tedious, making it difficult for the inexperienced or casual user. Well-designed modeling services lower the entry barrier for scientists to perform simulations, allowing them to create and execute their models from a variety of devices and programming environments. This world of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) has progressed to a REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm, in which the pervasive and mature HTTP environment is used as a foundation for providing access to model services. With such an approach, sound software engineering practises are adhered to in order to deploy service modules exhibiting very loose coupling with the clients. In short, services are accessed and controlled through the formation of properly-constructed Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI's), processed in an HTTP environment. In this way, any client or combination of clients - whether a bash script, Python program, web GUI, or even Unix command line - that can interact with an HTTP server, can run the modeling environment. This loose coupling allows for the deployment of a variety of front ends, all accessing a common modeling backend system. Furthermore, it is generally accepted in the cloud computing community that RESTful approaches constitute a sound approach towards

  7. Trajectory mapping of middle atmospheric water vapor by a mini network of NDACC instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lainer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The important task to observe the global coverage of middle atmospheric trace gases like water vapor or ozone usually is accomplished by satellites. Climate and atmospheric studies rely upon the knowledge of trace gas distributions throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere. Many of these gases are currently measured from satellites, but it is not clear whether this capability will be maintained in the future. This could lead to a significant knowledge gap of the state of the atmosphere. We explore the possibilities of mapping middle atmospheric water vapor in the Northern Hemisphere by using Lagrangian trajectory calculations and water vapor profile data from a small network of five ground-based microwave radiometers. Four of them are operated within the frame of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Keeping in mind that the instruments are based on different hardware and calibration setups, a height-dependent bias of the retrieved water vapor profiles has to be expected among the microwave radiometers. In order to correct and harmonize the different data sets, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite is used to serve as a kind of traveling standard. A domain-averaging TM (trajectory mapping method is applied which simplifies the subsequent validation of the quality of the trajectory-mapped water vapor distribution towards direct satellite observations. Trajectories are calculated forwards and backwards in time for up to 10 days using 6 hourly meteorological wind analysis fields. Overall, a total of four case studies of trajectory mapping in different meteorological regimes are discussed. One of the case studies takes place during a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW accompanied by the polar vortex breakdown; a second takes place after the reformation of stable circulation system. TM cases close to the fall equinox and June solstice event from the year 2012 complete the study, showing the high

  8. Trajectory mapping of middle atmospheric water vapor by a mini network of NDACC instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lainer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The important task to observe the global coverage of middle atmospheric trace gases like water vapor or ozone usually is accomplished by satellites. Climate and atmospheric studies rely upon the knowledge of trace gas distributions throughout the stratosphere and mesosphere. Many of these gases are currently measured from satellites, but it is not clear whether this capability will be maintained in the future. This could lead to a significant knowledge gap of the state of the atmosphere. We explore the possibilities of mapping middle atmospheric water vapor in the Northern Hemisphere by using Lagrangian trajectory calculations and water vapor profile data from a small network of five ground-based microwave radiometers. Four of them are operated within the frame of NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. Keeping in mind that the instruments are based on different hardware and calibration setups, a height dependent bias of the retrieved water vapor profiles has to be expected among the microwave radiometers. In order to correct and harmonize the different datasets, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on the Aura satellite is used to serve as a kind of travelling standard. A domain-averaging TM (trajectory mapping method is applied which simplifies the subsequent validation of the quality of the trajectory mapped water vapor distribution towards direct satellite observations. Trajectories are calculated forwards and backwards in time for up to 10 days using 6 hourly meteorological wind analysis fields. Overall, a total of four case studies of trajectory mapping in different meteorological regimes are discussed. One of the case studies takes place during a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW accompanied by the polar vortex breakdown, a second takes place after the reformation of stable circulation system. TM cases close to the fall equinox and June solstice event from the year 2012 complete the study, showing the high

  9. Movement of iodine and rain water from the atmosphere to the plant - soil - water system by the activable tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine is one of the important elements in the environmental and agricultural sciences. It is requested to elucidate the long-term behavior of iodine in the atmosphere - soil·plant - soil water system. We developed the new tracer method, in which iodine released into the atmosphere from the stack of iodine manufacturing plant in Chiba prefecture was used as the activable tracer. Using this method, we traced the direct deposition of iodine in atmosphere onto the plant tops and the penetration of fallout iodine into soil in an open air over a long period. A quantitative evaluation of recharge function of water resources in agricultural and forest lands of Japan was eagerly requested from the nation. For it, we developed the new Br-tracer method combined with the soil water sampling system with the alumina porous ceramic cup. This tracer method was successfully applied to the agricultural and forest land in the catchment area of Sakawa river in Kanagawa prefecture. And the infiltration rate of the rain water and irrigation water, from the soil surface to the dept of 3m of the soil horizon in the forest land, tea garden and paddy field was quantitatively measured during two years. (J.P.N.)

  10. Advanced InSAR atmospheric correction: MERIS/MODIS combination and stacked water vapour models

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Li; Fielding, E.; Cross, P; R. Preusker

    2009-01-01

    A major source of error for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere (especially the part due to tropospheric water vapour). Based on experience with the Global Positioning System (GPS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) integrated model and the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) correction model, two new advanced InSAR water vapour correction models are demonstrated using ...

  11. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  12. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Emma J; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S; Lavrentieva, Nina N

    2016-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H$_2{}^{16}$O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H$_2$- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number $J$ up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300 - 2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for $J$\\p $J$\\pp-dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  13. Effects of water wave motion on pollutant transport in shallow coastal water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO; Jianhua(陶建华); HAN; Guang(韩光)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the study of the wave propagation, breaking, longshore current and the effect of wave on current structure in the near shore area with a mild bottom slope, the wave is considered to be an important dynamic factor for pollutant transportation in the coastal water. Numerical simulation shows that the pollutant will transfer along shore when the incident wave is at an angle to the shoreline. This phenomenon is very significant if the outfall is located in the surfzone. Therefore, in the design of sea outfall, to improve near shore environment, the water wave should be considered as an important hydrodynamic factor.

  14. Carrier transport in undoped CdO films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements were performed for the undoped CdO films with carrier concentrations (n) ranging from 2.4 × 1019 to 2.0 × 1020 cm−3 grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by the atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition using Cd powder and H2O as source materials. The n dependence of the optical gap energy (Eopt) could be explained by the combination of the band gap widening due to Burstein–Moss shift and the band gap shrinkages due to the electron–electron and electron–impurity interactions. For all the films, the carrier concentrations (n) were independent of measurement temperature (T), indicating that these films were n-type degenerate semiconductors. The barrier heights at grain boundaries determined from the 1000/T-ln(μT) curves were smaller than the thermal energy at 300 K, suggesting that the grain boundary scattering plays a minor role on the carrier transport in comparison with the intra-grain scattering. The n dependence of the gradient of the μ–T curve revealed the continuous transformation of the dominant intra-grain scattering mechanism from the phonon scattering to the ionized impurity scattering with increasing n. - Highlights: • Undoped CdO films were grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by CVD. • Hall effect measurements were performed for the CdO films at 83–343 K. • For many CdO films, the carrier concentration n was independent of temperature. • The grain boundary scattering plays a minor role in the CdO films. • The dominant intra-grain scattering exhibited the continuous change with n

  15. Atmospheric tracer investigation of transport and diffusion around a large isolated hill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, W.; Lamb, B.; Robinson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one single and dual tracer tests were conducted during May and June 1981, at Steptoe Butte (335 m), an isolated hill located in eastern Washington state. SF/sub 6/ and CBrF/sub 3/ tracer released from upwind of the hill at heights ranging from near the surface to approximately 190 m were used to study plume transport over and around the hill during unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions. Plumes releases upwind during daytime near-neutral conditions traveled up and over the hill with maximum concentrations on the windward side at receptor elevations between 0.5 and 1.5 times the source height. Maximum concentrations were in the same range as calculated from models for neutral flow over a hemisphere. Plumes released upwind during transitional day-to-night conditions exhibited maximum concentrations similar to the daytime releases, buth the tracer isopleths indicated some plume bifurcation. The concept of a critical streamline height to predict whether plumes impinge upon the hill and pass round it or travel up and over the hill was found to be valid at Steptoe Butte. The position of the maximum concentrations tended to shift toward the side of the hill as the horizontal displacement of the source from the flow centerline increased. The largest maximum concentration was in a range calculated previously with an impingement model of a turbulent plume embedded in a potential flow around a cyclinder, while the remainder of the maxima were in a range predicted with a similar model of potential flow over a hemisphere. 17 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  16. A Project on Atmospheric Water Generator with the Concept of Peltier Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Nandy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In many countries like India it is difficult to obtain water resources for irrigation or other purposes, especially in the arid regions. The problem of water scarcity is also observed in other places of the world due to lack of rainfall. However, in highly humid areas such as places close to the sea, water can be obtained by condensing the water vapour present in air. Here, the paper presents the method to develop a water condensation system based on thermoelectric cooler. The system consists of cooling elements, heat exchange unit and air circulation unit. A solar cell panel unit with a relevant high current output drives the cooling elements through a controlling circuit. Atmospheric Water Generator is a device that can convert atmospheric moisture directly into usable and even drinkable water. It is such a device which uses the principle of latent heat to convert molecules of water vapour into water droplets. It has been introduced a bit before, though it is not very common in India and some other countries. It has a great application standing on such age of technology where we all are running behind renewable sources. This paper also describes the experimental results and the system’s performance.

  17. Canopy-scale kinetic fractionation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapour isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The isotopic fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapour (H2O) between the atmosphere and terrestrial plants provide powerful constraints on carbon sequestration on land 1-2, changes in vegetation cover 3 and the Earth’s Dole effect 4. Past studies, relying mainly on leaf-scale observations, hav...

  18. 78 FR 70076 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510). The NRC staff has developed... SRP- LR. On April 12, 2013, (78 FR 21980) the NRC requested public comments on draft LR-ISG-2012-02... COMMISSION Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Fire Water Systems, Atmospheric Storage Tanks,...

  19. Water in planetary and cometary atmospheres: H2O/HDO transmittance and fluorescence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a modern methodology to retrieve water (H2O) and deuterated water (HDO) in planetary and cometary atmospheres, and constructed an accurate spectral database that combines theoretical and empirical results. On the basis of a greatly expanded set of spectroscopic parameters, we built a full non-resonance cascade fluorescence model and computed fluorescence efficiencies for H2O (500 million lines) and HDO (700 million lines). The new line list was also integrated into an advanced terrestrial radiative transfer code (LBLRTM) and adapted to the CO2 rich atmosphere of Mars, for which we adopted the complex Robert-Bonamy formalism for line shapes. We retrieved water and D/H in the atmospheres of Mars, comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini), and Earth by applying the new formalism to spectra obtained with the high-resolution spectrograph NIRSPEC/Keck II atop Mauna Kea (Hawaii). The new model accurately describes the complex morphology of the water bands and greatly increases the accuracy of the retrieved abundances (and the D/H ratio in water) with respect to previously available models. The new model provides improved agreement of predicted and measured intensities for many H2O lines already identified in comets, and it identifies several unassigned cometary emission lines as new emission lines of H2O. The improved spectral accuracy permits retrieval of more accurate rotational temperatures and production rates for cometary water.

  20. Quantifying the loss of information in source attribution problems using the adjoint method in global models of atmospheric chemical transport

    CERN Document Server

    Santillana, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to be able to identify the location of atmospheric pollution sources in our planet. Global models of atmospheric transport in combination with diverse Earth observing systems are a natural choice to achieve this goal. It is shown that the ability to successfully reconstruct the location and magnitude of an instantaneous source in global chemical transport models (CTMs) decreases rapidly as a function of the time interval between the pollution release and the observation time. A simple way to quantitatively characterize this phenomenon is proposed based on the effective -undesired- numerical diffusion present in current Eulerian CTMs and verified using idealized numerical experiments. The approach presented consists of using the adjoint-based optimization method in a state-of-the-art CTM, GEOS-Chem, to reconstruct the location and magnitude of a realistic pollution plume for multiple time scales. The findings obtained from these numerical experiments suggest a time scale of 2 days a...

  1. Reconstruction of (131)I radioactive contamination in Ukraine caused by the Chernobyl accident using atmospheric transport modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talerko, Nikolai

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of (131)I air and ground contamination field formation in the territory of Ukraine was made using the model of atmospheric transport LEDI (Lagrangian-Eulerian DIffusion model). The (131)I atmospheric transport over the territory of Ukraine was simulated during the first 12 days after the accident (from 26 April to 7 May 1986) using real aerological information and rain measurement network data. The airborne (131)I concentration and ground deposition fields were calculated as the database for subsequent thyroid dose reconstruction for inhabitants of radioactive contaminated regions. The small-scale deposition field variability is assessed using data of (137)Cs detailed measurements in the territory of Ukraine. The obtained results are compared with available data of radioiodine daily deposition measurements made at the network of meteorological stations in Ukraine and data of the assessments of (131)I soil contamination obtained from the (129)I measurements. PMID:16024139

  2. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David; Ross, Shane; Lin, Binbin

    2014-05-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. Members of this genus are important pathogens and mycotoxin producers. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. Spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2,200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. Some of the species of Fusarium identified from our collections have not been previously reported in the state of Virginia. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season. This work extends previous studies showing an association between atmospheric transport barriers (Lagrangian coherent structures or LCSs) and the movement of Fusarium in the lower atmosphere. An increased understanding of the aerobiology of Fusarium may contribute to new and improved control strategies for diseases causes by fusaria in the future.

  3. Two-dimensional time-dependent model of the transport of minor species in the Venus night side upper atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Collet, Arnaud; Cox, Cédric; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical tool developed to quantify the role of processes controlling the spatio-temporal distribution of the NO ultraviolet and O2 infrared nightglows in the Venus night side upper atmosphere, observed with the VIRTIS and SPICAV instruments on board Venus Express. This numerical tool consists in a two-dimensional chemical-transport time-dependent model which computes in a hypothetical rectangular solving domain the spatio-temporal distributions of the number densities of the fo...

  4. EVALUATION OF URBAN ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION MODELS USING DATA FROM THE JOINT URBAN 2003 FIELD EXPERIMENT

    OpenAIRE

    T. Urban, Jeffry; Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; F. Heagy, James

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: We have evaluated the performance of several urban atmospheric transport and dispersion models by comparing model predictions to tracer gas concentrations measured during the Joint Urban 2003 field experiment in Oklahoma City, USA. These models include the Urban Canopy, Urban Dispersion Model (UDM), and Micro-SWIFT/SPRAY (MSS) modes within the HPAC modelling suite, QUIC-URB/QUIC-PLUME models, and the MESO/RUSTIC models. We discuss some of the results of these comparisons...

  5. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. PMID:25189533

  6. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems.

  7. Potential risk of microplastics transportation into ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Esperanza; Gertsen, Hennie; Gooren, Harm; Peters, Piet; Salánki, Tamás; van der Ploeg, Martine; Besseling, Ellen; Koelmans, Albert A.; Geissen, Violette

    2016-04-01

    Microplastics, are plastics particles with a size smaller than 5mm. They are formed by the fragmentation of plastic wastes. They are present in the air, soil and water. But only in aquatic systems (ocean and rivers) are studies over their distribution, and the effect of microplastics on organisms. There is a lack of information of what is the distribution of microplastics in the soil, and in the ground water. This study tries to estimate the potential risk of microplastics transportation into the ground water by the activity of earthworms. Earthworms can produce burrows and/or galleries inside the soil, with the presence of earthworms some ecosystem services are enhanced, as infiltration. In this study we observed after 14 days with 5 treatments (0, 7, 28 and 60% w/w microplastics mixed with Populus nigra litter) and the anecic earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, in microcosms (3 replicas per treatment) that macroplastics are indeed deposit inside earthworms burrows, with 7% microplastics on the surface is possible to find 1.8 g.kg-1 microplastics inside the burrows, with a bioaumentation factor of 0.65. Burrows made by earthworms under 60% microplastics, are significant bigger (p<0.05) than the burrows of those earthworms without microplastics in their soil surface. The amount of litter that is deposit inside the burrows is significant higher (p<0.05) with the presence of microplastics on the surface than without microplastics. The microplastics size distribution is smaller inside the burrows than on the surface, with an abundance of particles under 63 μm.

  8. The role of convection, overshoot, and gravity waves for the transport of dust in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Freytag, Bernd; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter; Homeier, Derek; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Observationally, spectra of brown dwarfs indicate the presence of dust in their atmospheres while theoretically it is not clear what prevents the dust from settling and disappearing from the regions of spectrum formation. Consequently, standard models have to rely on ad hoc assumptions about the mechanism that keeps dust grains aloft in the atmosphere. We apply hydrodynamical simulations to develop an improved physical understanding of the mixing properties of macroscopic flows in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres, in particular of the influence of the underlying convection zone. We performed 2D radiation hydrodynamics simulations including a description of dust grain formation and transport with the CO5BOLD code. The simulations cover the very top of the convection zone and the photosphere including the dust layers for effective temperatures between 900K and 2800K, all with logg=5 assuming solar chemical composition. Convective overshoot occurs in the form of exponentially declining velocities with small s...

  9. Atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module. Model description version 2.8.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on the atmospheric radionuclide transport model with radon postprocessor and SBG module (model description version 2.8.0) covers the following issues: determination of emissions, radioactive decay, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive gases, atmospheric dispersion calculation for radioactive dusts, determination of the gamma cloud radiation (gamma submersion), terrain roughness, effective source height, calculation area and model points, geographic reference systems and coordinate transformations, meteorological data, use of invalid meteorological data sets, consideration of statistical uncertainties, consideration of housings, consideration of bumpiness, consideration of terrain roughness, use of frequency distributions of the hourly dispersion situation, consideration of the vegetation period (summer), the radon post processor radon.exe, the SBG module, modeling of wind fields, shading settings.

  10. Anthropogenic contamination of a phreatic drinking water winning: 3-dimensional reactive transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, J.; van der Grift, B.; Maas, D.; van den Brink, C.; Zaadnoordijk, J. W.

    2003-04-01

    Groundwater is contaminated at the regional scale by agricultural activities and atmospheric deposition. A 3-D transport model was set-up for a phreatic drinking water winning, where the groundwater composition was monitored accurately. The winning is situated at an area with unconsolidated Pleistocene deposits. The land use is nature and agriculture. Annual mass-balances were determined using a wide range of historic data. The modelling approach for the unsaturated zone was either simple box models (Cl, NO_3 and SO_4) or 1-D transport modelling using HYDRUS (Cd). The modelling approach for the saturated zone used a multiple solute version of MT3D, where denitrification associated with pyrite oxidation and sorption of Cd were included. The solute transport calculations were performed for the period 1950--2030. The results obtained for the year 2000 were used as input concentration for the period 2000--2030. A comparison between the calculated and the measured concentrations of groundwater abstracted for Cl, NO_3 and SO_4 yields the following. First, the input at the surface is rather well estimated. Second, the redox reactivity of the first two aquifers is negligible around the winning, which is confirmed by respiration experiments using anaerobically sampled aquifer sediments. The reactivity of the third aquifer, which is a marine deposit and lies at least 30 meters below surface, is considerable. The discrepancies between modelled and measured output are explained by lack of knowledge about the subsurface reactivity and/or wrong estimates of surface loading and leaching from the unsaturated zone. The patterns for other hydrogeochemical variables such as Ca, HCO_3 may further constrain this lack of knowledge. The results for Cd indicate that Cd becomes strongly retarded, despite the low reactivity of the sandy sediments. The winning is rather insensitive to Cd contamination (but the surface water drainage network is not). Two major uncertainties for input of Cd

  11. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery over turbid coastal waters using active and passive remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaoling; ZHANG Tinglu; GONG Wei; CHEN Liqiong; LU Jianzhong; ZHAO Xi; ZHANG Wei; YU Zhifeng

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an atmospheric correction method to process MODIS/Aqua (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) ocean color imagery over turbid coastal waters with the aid of concurrent CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) aerosol data, assuming that there exists "nonturbid" water in the study area where MODIS aerosol optical properties can be retrieved accurately. Aerosol properties from CALIOP measurements were obtained and related to those from MODIS. This relationship, combined with CALIOP aerosol data, was extended to turbid water to derive MODIS aerosol properties, where atmospheric correction using MODIS data alone often fails. By combining MODIS and CALIOP data, aerosol signals were separated from the total signals at the satellite level, and water-leaving radiances in turbid waters were subsequently derived. This method was tested on several MODIS/Aqua ocean color images over South China turbid waters. Comparison with field data shows that this method was effective in reducing the errors in the retrieved water-leaving radiance values to some extent. In the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Estuary, this method did not overestimate the aerosol effects as severely, and provided far fewer negative water-leaving radiance values than the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) default methods that used MODIS data alone.

  12. A Comparison of Water Vapor Line Parameters for Modeling the Venus Deep Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the near infrared windows into the Venus deep atmosphere has enabled the use of remote sensing techniques to study the composition of the Venus atmosphere below the clouds. In particular, water vapor absorption lines can be observed in a number of the near-infrared windows allowing measurement of the H2O abundance at several different levels in the lower atmosphere. Accurate determination of the abundance requires a good database of spectral line parameters for the H2O absorption lines at the high temperatures (up to ~700 K) encountered in the Venus deep atmosphere. This paper presents a comparison of a number of H2O line lists that have been, or that could potentially be used, to analyze Venus deep atmosphere water abundances and shows that there are substantial discrepancies between them. For example, the early high-temperature list used by Meadows and Crisp (1996) had large systematic errors in line intensities. When these are corrected for using the more recent high-temperature BT2 list o...

  13. Outgassing History and Escape of the Martian Atmosphere and Water Inventory

    CERN Document Server

    Lammer, H; Karatekin, Ö; Morschhauser, A; Niles, P B; Mousis, O; Odert, P; Möstl, U V; Breuer, D; Dehant, V; Grott, M; Gröller, H; Hauber, E; Pham, L B S

    2015-01-01

    The evolution and escape of the martian atmosphere and the planet's water inventory can be separated into an early and late evolutionary epoch. The first epoch started from the planet's origin and lasted $\\sim$500 Myr. Because of the high EUV flux of the young Sun and Mars' low gravity it was accompanied by hydrodynamic blow-off of hydrogen and strong thermal escape rates of dragged heavier species such as O and C atoms. After the main part of the protoatmosphere was lost, impact-related volatiles and mantle outgassing may have resulted in accumulation of a secondary CO$_2$ atmosphere of a few tens to a few hundred mbar around $\\sim$4--4.3 Gyr ago. The evolution of the atmospheric surface pressure and water inventory of such a secondary atmosphere during the second epoch which lasted from the end of the Noachian until today was most likely determined by a complex interplay of various nonthermal atmospheric escape processes, impacts, carbonate precipitation, and serpentinization during the Hesperian and Amazon...

  14. [Water-soluble anions of atmosphere on Tianwan nuclear power station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng-Qiang; He, Ying; Zheng, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Fa-Rong; Pang, Shi-Ping; Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2010-11-01

    Three major water-soluble anions (Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3-) in the atmosphere of the Tianwan nuclear power station in Lianyungang were determined by ion chromatography from June 2005 to May 2006. The results showed that the annual average concentration of Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3- in the atmosphere of Tianwan nuclear power station was (33.12 +/- 53.63) microg x m(-3), (53.34 +/- 30.34) microg x m(-3) and (8.34 +/- 4.47) microg x m(-3), respectively. The concentrations of the three water-soluble anions showed evident trend of seasonal variation. The concentrations of Cl-, SO4(2-) reached the highest level in summer and the lowest level in winter, while the concentration of NO3- in autumn and winter was higher than those in summer and spring. Meteorological parameters such as wind direction, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity were studied and showed definite influence to the anions concentration of the atmosphere. This is the first simultaneous monitoring of corrosive anions in the atmosphere of Chinese coastal nuclear power plant, and it will provide basis for the prevention of marine atmospheric corrosion, which will ensure the safely operating of our nuclear power industry. PMID:21250433

  15. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  16. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma generated in DI water on Cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by means of indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma stimulated solution. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of plasma-stimulated media (PSM) on breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). In our experiments, cold atmospheric plasma is generated in water using helium as carrier gas. The plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast and gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment.

  17. Alexandrite lidar for the atmospheric water vapor detection and development of powerful tunable sources in IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiumi, M.; Maeda, M.; Muraoka, K.; Uchino, O.

    1992-01-01

    New tunable solid-state lasers, such as alexandrite and Ti-sapphire lasers, provide a powerful technique to detect various molecules in the atmosphere whose absorption bands are in the infrared region. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to measure the tropospheric water vapor has been investigated by many authors, in an early stage, by dye and ruby lasers. Using the alpha band of water vapor, the longest detection range can be obtained with high accuracy, and the alexandrite laser is the most suitable laser for this purpose. In this paper, we describe the detection of water vapor in the atmosphere by an alexandrite lidar, and the development of powerful tunable sources based on Raman lasers in the infrared region.

  18. Reactivity of water vapor in an atmospheric argon flowing post-discharge plasma torch

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, S; Reniers, F

    2016-01-01

    The reactivity of water vapor introduced in the flowing post-discharge of an RF atmospheric plasma torch is investigated through electrical characterization, optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry measurements. Due to the technical features of the plasma torch, the post-discharge can be considered as divided into two regions: an inner region (inside the plasma torch device) where the water vapor is injected and an outer region which directly interacts with the ambient air. The main reactions induced by the injection of water vapor are identified as well as those indicative of the influence of the ambient air. Plausible pathways allowing the production of H, OH, O radicals and H2O2 are discussed as well as reactions potentially responsible for inhomogeneities and for a low DC current measured in the flowing post-discharge. Keywords: atmospheric post-discharge, H2O plasma reactivity, RF plasma torch

  19. Water use impacts of future transport fuels: role of California's climate policy & National biofuel policies (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, J.; Yeh, S.; Mishra, G. S.; Tiedeman, K.; Yang, C.

    2013-12-01

    In the coming decades, growing demand for energy and water and the need to address climate change will create huge challenges for energy policy and natural resource management. Synergistic strategies must be developed to conserve and use both resources more efficiently. California (CA) is a prime example of a region where policymakers have began to incorporate water planning in energy infrastructure development. But more must be done as CA transforms its energy system to meet its climate target. We analyze lifecycle water use of current and future transport fuel consumption to evaluate impacts & formulate mitigation strategies for the state at the watershed scale. Four 'bounding cases' for CA's future transportation demand to year 2030 are projected for analysis: two scenarios that only meet the 2020 climate target (business-as-usual, BAU) with high / low water use intensity, and two that meet long-term climate target with high / low water use intensity (Fig 1). Our study focuses on the following energy supply chains: (a) liquid fuels from conventional/unconventional oil & gas, (b) thermoelectric and renewable generation technologies, and (c) biofuels (Fig 2-3). We develop plausible siting scenarios that bound the range of possible water sources, impacts, and dispositions to provide insights into how to best allocate water and limit water impacts of energy development. We further identify constraints & opportunities to improve water use efficiency and highlight salient policy relevant lessons. For biofuels we extend our scope to the entire US as most of the biofuels consumed in California are and will be produced from outside of the state. We analyze policy impacts that capture both direct & indirect land use effects across scenarios, thus addressing the major shortcomings of existing studies, which ignore spatial heterogeneity as well as economic effects of crop displacement and the effects of crop intensification and extensification. We use the agronomic

  20. Inter-annual variability of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations as simulated with global terrestrial biosphere models and an atmospheric transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of atmospheric CO2 for the period from 1961 to 1997 have been simulated using a global tracer transport model driven by a new version of the Biome BioGeochemical Cycle model (Biome-BGC). Biome-BGC was forced by daily temperature and precipitation from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, and the calculated monthly-averaged CO2 fluxes were used as input to the global transport model. Results from an inter-comparison with the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach model (CASA) and the Simulation model of Carbon CYCLE in Land Ecosystems (Sim-CYCLE) model are also reported. The phase of the seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere was reproduced generally well by Biome-BGC, although the amplitude was smaller compared to the observations and to the other biosphere models. The CO2 time series simulated by Biome-BGC were compared to the global CO2 concentration anomalies from the observations at Mauna Loa and the South Pole. The modeled concentration anomalies matched the phase of the inter-annual variations in the atmospheric CO2 observations; however, the modeled amplitude was lower than the observed value in several cases. The result suggests that a significant part of the inter-annual variability in the global carbon cycle can be accounted for by the terrestrial biosphere models. Simulations performed with another climate-based model, Sim-CYCLE, produced a larger amplitude of inter-annual variability in atmospheric CO2, making the amplitude closer to the observed range, but with a more visible phase mismatch in a number of time periods. This may indicate the need to increase the Biome-BGC model sensitivity to seasonal and inter-annual changes in temperature and precipitation

  1. Marine sediment tolerances for remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols over water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    In surveying the literature, it is pointed out that there is a need to quantify the turbidity below which reflectance from the water column is negligible in comparison with atmospheric effects to allow the monitoring of aerosol optical depth over water bodies. Data that partially satisfy this need are presented. Laboratory measurements of reflectance upwelled from the water column are given for mixtures with various types of sediment at wavelengths between 400 and 1600 nm. The results of the study described here are a quantitative endorsement of the recommendations of Morell and Gordon (1980).

  2. Solar XUV and ENA-driven water loss from early Venus' steam atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Odert, P.; Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Gröller, H.; Johnstone, C. P.; Elkins-Tanton, L.; Tu, L.; Güdel, M.; Holmström, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study on the influence of the upper atmosphere hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen, driven by the solar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV), on an expected outgassed steam atmosphere of early Venus. By assuming that the young Sun was either a weak or moderately active young G star, we estimated the water loss from a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the solar XUV flux and the precipitation of solar wind produced energetic hydrogen atoms (ENAs). The production of ENAs and their interaction with the hydrodynamic extended upper atmosphere, including collision-related feedback processes, have been calculated by means of Monte Carlo models. ENAs that collide in the upper atmosphere deposit their energy and heat the surrounding atmosphere mainly above the main XUV energy deposition layer. It is shown that precipitating ENAs modify the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere, but the enhancement of the thermal escape rates caused by these energetic hydrogen atoms is negligible. Our results also indicate that the majority of oxygen arising from dissociated H2O molecules is left behind during the first 100 Myr. It is thus suggested that the main part of the remaining oxygen has been absorbed by crustal oxidation.

  3. A computerized coal-water slurry transportation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljubicic, B.R.; Trostad, B. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)

    1995-12-01

    Coal-water fuel (CWF) technology has been developed to the point where full-scale commercialization is just a matter of gaining sufficient market confidence in the price stability of alternate fossil fuels. In order to generalize alternative fuel cost estimates for the desired combinations of processing and/or transportation, a great deal of flexibility is required owing to the understood lack of precision in many of the newly emerging coal technologies. Previously, decisions regarding the sequential and spatial arrangement of the various process steps were made strictly on the basis of experience, simplified analysis, and intuition. Over the last decade, computer modeling has progressed from empirically based correlation to that of intricate mechanistic analysis. Nomograms, charts, tables, and many simple rules of thumb have been made obsolete by the availability of complex computer models. Given the ability to view results graphically in real or near real time, the engineer can immediately verify, from a practical standpoint, whether the initial assumptions and inputs were indeed valid. If the feasibility of a project is being determined in the context of a lack of specific data, the ability to provide a dynamic software-based solution is crucial. Furthermore, the resulting model can be used to establish preliminary operating procedures, test control logic, and train plant/process operators. Presented in this paper is a computerized model capable of estimating the delivered cost of CWF. The model uses coal-specific values, process and transport requirements, terrain factors, and input costs to determine the final operating configuration, bill of materials, and, ultimately, the capital, operating, and unit costs.

  4. Bubble Shuttle: A newly discovered transport mechanism, which transfers microorganisms from the sediment into the water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, O.; Stolle, C.; Leifer, I.; Schneider von Deimling, J.; Kiesslich, K.; Krause, S.; Frahm, A.; Treude, T.

    2013-12-01

    The diversity and abundance of methanotrophic microorganisms is well studied in the aquatic environment, indicating their importance in biogeochemical cycling of methane in the sediment and the water column. However, whether methanotrophs are distinct populations in these habitats or are exchanged between benthic and pelagic environments, remains an open question. Therefore, field studies were conducted at the 'Rostocker Seep' site (Coal Oil Point seep area, California, USA) to test our hypothesis that methane-oxidizing microorganisms can be transported by gas bubbles from the sediment into the water column. The natural methane emanating location 'Rostocker Seep' showed a strong surface water oversaturation in methane with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium. Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) analyzes were performed to determine the abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic microorganisms. Aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria were detected in the sediment and the water column, whereas anaerobic methanotrophs were detected exclusively in the sediment. The key device of the project was the newly developed "Bubble Catcher" used to collect naturally emanating gas bubbles at the sea floor together with particles attached to the bubble surface rim. Bubble Catcher experiments were carried out directly above a natural bubble release spot and on a reference site at which artificially released gas bubbles were caught, which had no contact with the sediment. CARD-FISH analyzes showed that aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria were transported by gas bubbles from the sediment into the water column. In contrast anaerobic methanotrophs were not detected in the bubble catcher. Further results indicate that this newly discovered Bubble Shuttle transport mechanism might influence the distribution pattern of methanotrophic microorganisms in the water column and even at the air-sea interface. Methane seep areas are often characterized

  5. Transport of thermal water from well to thermal baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montegrossi, Giordano; Vaselli, Orlando; Tassi, Franco; Nocentini, Matteo; Liccioli, Caterina; Nisi, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    The main problem in building a thermal bath is having a hot spring or a thermal well located in an appropriate position for customer access; since Roman age, thermal baths were distributed in the whole empire and often road and cities were built all around afterwards. Nowadays, the perspectives are changed and occasionally the thermal resource is required to be transported with a pipeline system from the main source to the spa. Nevertheless, the geothermal fluid may show problems of corrosion and scaling during transport. In the Ambra valley, central Italy, a geothermal well has recently been drilled and it discharges a Ca(Mg)-SO4, CO2-rich water at the temperature of 41 °C, that could be used for supplying a new spa in the surrounding areas of the well itself. The main problem is that the producing well is located in a forest tree ca. 4 km far away from the nearest structure suitable to host the thermal bath. In this study, we illustrate the pipeline design from the producing well to the spa, constraining the physical and geochemical parameters to reduce scaling and corrosion phenomena. The starting point is the thermal well that has a flow rate ranging from 22 up to 25 L/sec. The thermal fluid is heavily precipitating calcite (50-100 ton/month) due to the calcite-CO2 equilibrium in the reservoir, where a partial pressure of 11 bar of CO2 is present. One of the most vexing problems in investigating scaling processed during the fluid transport in the pipeline is that there is not a proper software package for multiphase fluid flow in pipes characterized by such a complex chemistry. As a consequence, we used a modified TOUGHREACT with Pitzer database, arranged to use Darcy-Weisbach equation, and applying "fictitious" material properties in order to give the proper y- z- velocity profile in comparison to the analytical solution for laminar fluid flow in pipes. This investigation gave as a result the lowest CO2 partial pressure to be kept in the pipeline (nearly 2

  6. Modeling the global atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury to the Great Lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Mark D.; Draxler, Roland R.; Artz, Richard S.; Blanchard, Pierrette; Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Han, Young Ji; Holsen, Thomas M.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Kelley, Paul; Lei, Hang; Loughner, Christopher P.; Luke, Winston T.; Lyman, Seth N.; Niemi, David; Pacyna, Jozef M.; Pilote, Martin; Poissant, Laurier; Ratte, Dominique; Ren, Xinrong; Steenhuisen, Frits; Steffen, Alexandra; Tordon, Rob; Wilson, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury contamination in the Great Lakes continues to have important public health and wildlife ecotoxicology impacts, and atmospheric deposition is a significant ongoing loading pathway. The objective of this study was to estimate the amount and source-attribution for atmospheric mercury deposition

  7. Low cost transportable device for transference of atmosphere sensitive materials from glove box to SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Saxild, Finn B.

    the field of high energy battery research involving highly reactive metals, e.g. lithium, we needed a means of transferring atmosphere sensitive materials from the protective atmosphere of a glove box, avoiding air exposure, to a sample chamber of a scanning electron microscope. Thus, we constructed a low...

  8. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides emitted due to wildfires near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Zibtsev, Sergey; Myroniuk, Viktor; Zhurba, Marina; Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Paugam, Ronan; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Kireev, Sergey I.

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, two major fires in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) have caused concerns about the secondary radioactive contamination that might have spread over Europe. The total active burned area was estimated to be about 15,000 hectares, of which 9000 hectares burned in April and 6000 hectares in August. The present paper aims to assess, for the first time, the transport and impact of these fires over Europe. For this reason, direct observations of the prevailing deposition levels of 137Cs and 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am in the CEZ were processed together with burned area estimates. Based on literature reports, we made the conservative assumption that 20% of the deposited labile radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr, and 10% of the more refractory 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am, were resuspended by the fires. We estimate that about 10.9 TBq of 137Cs, 1.5 TBq of 90Sr, 7.8 GBq of 238Pu, 6.3 GBq of 239Pu, 9.4 GBq of 240Pu and 29.7 GBq of 241Am were released from both fire events. These releases could be classified as of "Level 3" on the relative INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) scale, which corresponds to a serious incident, in which non-lethal deterministic effects are expected from radiation. To simulate the dispersion of the resuspended radionuclides in the atmosphere and their deposition onto the terrestrial environment, we used a Lagrangian dispersion model. Spring fires redistributed radionuclides over the northern and eastern parts of Europe, while the summer fires also affected Central and Southern Europe. The more labile elements escaped more easily from the CEZ and then reached and deposited in areas far from the source, whereas the larger refractory particles were removed more efficiently from the atmosphere and thus did mainly affect the CEZ and its vicinity. For the spring 2015 fires, we estimate that about 80% of 137Cs and 90Sr and about 69% of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am were deposited over areas outside the CEZ. 93% of the labile and 97% of

  9. Investigating atmospheric transport processes of trace gases with ICON-ART on different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Jennifer; Ruhnke, Roland; Rieger, Daniel; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    We have extended the global ICON [1] (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic) modelling framework by introducing ICON-ART [2]. ICON is jointly developed by the German Weather Service (DWD) and Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), and is used for numerical weather prediction as well as for future climate predictions. ICON-ART is developed at the KIT with the goal to simulate interactions between trace substances and the state of the atmosphere. For the dynamics (transport and diffusion) of gaseous tracers, the original ICON tracer framework is used. A process splitting approach separates the physical processes. In this study, we present results of the ICON-ART extension, including the full gas-phase chemistry module. This module uses the kpp formalism [3] to generate chemistry modules and the photolysis module is based on Cloud-J7.3 [4]. Photolysis rates are calculated online based on the meteorological state of the atmosphere, as well as on the actual ozone profile and cloud optical parameters. Two simulations are performed with ICON-ART. The first one with physics parameterisations for the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and the second one with that for climate simulation in order to investigate the dynamical influence on the distribution of long-lived as well as of short-lived species by comparing both simulations. The results are evaluated with other model results and with observation. In addition to that, we use aircraft campaign data to validate the results on the regional scale for short term simulations by using the NWP physics. [1] Zängl, G., Reinert, D., Ripodas, P., and Baldauf, M.: The ICON (ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic) modelling framework of DWD and MPI-M: Description of the non-hydrostatic dynamicalcore, Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc,141, 563-579, doi:10.1002/qj.2378, 2015 [2] Rieger, D., Bangert, M., Bischoff-Gauss, I., Förstner, J., Lundgren, K., Reinert, D., Schröter, J., Vogel, H., Zängl, G., Ruhnke, R., and Vogel, B.: ICON-ART 1.0 - a new online

  10. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; V. G. Gorshkov; D. Sheil; A. D. Nobre; B.-L. Li

    2013-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in t...

  11. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; V. G. Gorshkov; D. Sheil; A. D. Nobre; B.-L. Li

    2010-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in t...

  12. Flared natural gas-based onsite atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) for oilfield operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikramanayake, Enakshi D.; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-03-01

    Natural gas worth tens of billions of dollars is flared annually, which leads to resource waste and environmental issues. This work introduces and analyzes a novel concept for flared gas utilization, wherein the gas that would have been flared is instead used to condense atmospheric moisture. Natural gas, which is currently being flared, can alternatively power refrigeration systems to generate the cooling capacity for large scale atmospheric water harvesting (AWH). This approach solves two pressing issues faced by the oil-gas industry, namely gas flaring, and sourcing water for oilfield operations like hydraulic fracturing, drilling and water flooding. Multiple technical pathways to harvest atmospheric moisture by using the energy of natural gas are analyzed. A modeling framework is developed to quantify the dependence of water harvest rates on flared gas volumes and ambient weather. Flaring patterns in the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas and the Bakken Shale in North Dakota are analyzed to quantify the benefits of AWH. Overall, the gas currently flared annually in Texas and North Dakota can harvest enough water to meet 11% and 65% of the water consumption in the Eagle Ford and the Bakken, respectively. Daily harvests of upto 30 000 and 18 000 gallons water can be achieved using the gas currently flared per well in Texas and North Dakota, respectively. In fifty Bakken sites, the water required for fracturing or drilling a new well can be met via onsite flared gas-based AWH in only 3 weeks, and 3 days, respectively. The benefits of this concept are quantified for the Eagle Ford and Bakken Shales. Assessments of the global potential of this concept are presented using data from countries with high flaring activity. It is seen that this waste-to-value conversion concept offers significant economic benefits while addressing critical environmental issues pertaining to oil-gas production.

  13. Estimation of Footprints of Observation Sites Using NIES and FLEXPART Atmospheric Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, D.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Ganshin, A.; Zhuravlev, R.; Aoki, S.; Wunch, D.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Notholt, J.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) that record near-infrared (NIR) spectra of the sun. From these spectra, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of atmospheric constituents including CO2, CH4, H2O, and others are retrieved. Use of TCCON FTS observations is an appropriate way to validate satellite observations (SCIAMACHY, GOSAT, OCO-2). However, our knowledge about TCCON observations is limited. The retrievals from the ground based FTSs report column-averaged abundances, so the concentration distribution along the vertical profile as well as value and location of sources affecting the concentration are mainly unknown. Studying the footprint is especially important for sites located near regions with different emissions or sinks of GHG's, e.g. for coastal stations, where marine air masses are mixed with continental ones. In this work, we use the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) Eulerian three-dimensional transport model (TM) and the FLEXPART Lagrangian plume diffusion model (LPDM) to determine footprints of operational and future TCCON FTS observational sites. The NIES model was previously used to study the seasonal and inter-annual variability of CO2 and CH4. In paper by Belikov at al. (ACP, 2013) we shows, that the NIES model is able to successfully reproduce the vertical profile of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, SF6) and the seasonal and inter-annual variability of XCO2 and XCH4. Using this fact, NIES TM CO2concentrations sampled at the level of 1 km above ground and at 13:00 of local time were used to initialize backward tracer simulation with FLEXPART model. The sampling time is selected to fit the overpass time of satellites measuring greenhouse gases and because the NIES TM is more successful at reproducing diurnal tracer variations. Based on the FLEXPART back-trajectory simulations, we estimate footprints of operational and future TCCON FTS sites. These

  14. Applying Differential Transforms and ADER to Multi-Dimensional Atmospheric Transport and Non-Linear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    derivatives to time and space-time derivatives, given a set of known spatial derivatives, one can use DTs analytically compute time and space-time derivatives cheaply. Then, integrating directly in time over these space-time expansions of the PDE terms creates a time discretization method of the same philosophy as ADER methods but with significantly less expense than the explicit Cauchy-Kowalewski procedure, which can be exponential in complexity with respect to temporal order of accuracy. Because DTs compute mixed-dimension spatial derivatives and mixed space-time derivatives, over a single time step, all terms of the PDE are fully coupled to arbitrarily high-order accuracy in all spatial dimensions and time over a time step. DT-based ADER time discretizations lead to fully coupled, non-linear, accurate time stepping without resorting to multiple stages such as Runge-Kutta methods. This is advantageous in massively parallel computing environments because communication frequency and volume are reduced, leading to greater parallel efficiency. Results in two and three dimensions for linear transport and non-linear compressible Euler equations will be presented as well as accuracy and timing measurements to assess the efficiency for atmospheric models of applying DTs at various levels within Finite-Volume and Finite-Element discretizations of the underlying PDEs.

  15. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-04-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle - an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from -40.2 to -15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from -278.7 to -113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol-1) indicate that regional evaporation can account

  16. Potential energy of atmospheric water vapor and the air motions induced by water vapor condensation on different spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, Anastassia M.; Gorshkov, Victor G.

    2010-01-01

    Basic physical principles are considered that are responsible for the origin of dynamic air flow upon condensation of water vapor, the partial pressure of which represents a store of potential energy in the atmosphere of Earth. Quantitative characteristics of such flow are presented for several spatial scales. It is shown that maximum condensation-induced velocities reach 160 m/s and are realized in compact circulation patterns like tornadoes.

  17. Chiral Pesticides in Soil and Water and Exchange with the Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Bidleman, Terry F.; Leone, Andi D.; Renee L. Falconer; Tom Harner; Jantunen, Liisa M.M.; Karin Wiberg; Helm, Paul A.; Diamond, Miriam L.; Binh Loo

    2002-01-01

    The enantiomers of chiral pesticides are often metabolised at different rates in soil and water, leading to nonracemic residues. This paper reviews enantioselective metabolism of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in soil and water, and the use of enantiomers to follow transport and fate processes. Residues of chiral OCPs and their metabolites are frequently nonracemic in soil, although exceptions occur in which the OCPs are racemic. In soils where enantioselective degradation and/or metabolite...

  18. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  19. RESOLUTION OF THE PROBLEM OF TREATMENT OF WASTE WATER GENERATED BY CAR WASHES AND TRANSPORT ENTERPRISES

    OpenAIRE

    Gogina Elena Sergeevna; Salomeev Valeriy Petrovich; Pobegaylo Yuriy Petrovich

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that development of car service companies has caused a new environmental problem: waste water produced by transport enterprises. Their number multiplies day to day in big cities of Russia. At the same time, the quality of the waste water treated by local water treatment stations fails to meet the present-day standard requirements. Moreover, potable water shall not be used for the purpose of washing transport vehicles. Within the recent 10 years, MGSU has developed a n...

  20. The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Fahey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The AquaVIT-1 Intercomparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor Measurement Techniques was conducted at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in October 2007. The overall objective was to intercompare state-of-the-art and prototype atmospheric hygrometers with each other and with independent humidity standards under controlled conditions. This activity was conducted as a blind intercomparison with coordination by selected referees. The effort was motivated by persistent discrepancies found in atmospheric measurements involving multiple instruments operating on research aircraft and balloon platforms, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor reaches its lowest atmospheric values (less than 10 ppm. With the AIDA chamber volume of 84 m3, multiple instruments analyzed air with a common water vapor mixing ratio, either by extracting air into instrument flow systems, locating instruments inside the chamber, or sampling the chamber volume optically. The intercomparison was successfully conducted over 10 days during which pressure, temperature, and mixing ratio were systematically varied (50 to 500 hPa, 185 to 243 K, and 0.3 to 152 ppm. In the absence of an accepted reference instrument, the reference value was taken to be the ensemble mean of a core subset of the measurements. For these core instruments, the agreement between 10 and 150 ppm of water vapor is considered good with variation about the reference value of about ±10% (±1σ. In the region of most interest between 1 and 10 ppm, the core subset agreement is fair with variation about the reference value of ±20% (±1σ. The upper limit of precision was also derived for each instrument from the reported data. These results indicate that the core instruments, in general, have intrinsic skill to determine unknown water vapor mixing ratios with an accuracy of at least ±20%. The implication for atmospheric

  1. GPS meteorology - Remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor using the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Michael; Businger, Steven; Herring, Thomas A.; Rocken, Christian; Anthes, Richard A.; Ware, Randolph H.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new approach to remote sensing of water vapor based on the Global Positioning System (GPS). Geodesists and geophysicists have devised methods for estimating the extent to which signals propagating from GPS satellites to ground-based GPS receivers are delayed by atmospheric water vapor. This delay is parameterized in terms of a time-varying zenith wet delay (ZWD) which is retrieved by stochastic filtering of the GPS data. Given surface temperature and pressure readings at the GPS receiver, the retrieved ZWD can be transformed with very little additional uncertainty into an estimate of the integrated water vapor (IWV) overlying that receiver. Networks of continuously operating GPS receivers are being constructed by geodesists, geophysicists, and government and military agencies, in order to implement a wide range of positioning capabilities. These emerging GPS networks offer the possibility of observing the horizontal distribution of IWV or, equivalently, precipitate water with unprecedented coverage and a temporal resolution of the order of 10 min. These measurements could be utilized in operational weather forecasting and in fundamental research into atmospheric storm systems, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate change.

  2. The Research on Atmospheric Pressure Water Vapour Plasma Generation and Application for the Destruction of Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija Grigaitiene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Lithuanian Energy Institute an experimental atmospheric pressure Ar/water vapour plasma torch has been designed and tested. The power of plasma torch was estimated 40 ÷ 69 kW, the mean temperature of plasma jet at the exhaust nozzle was 2300÷2900K. The ch