WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric trace gases

  1. Production, modification, and consumption of atmospheric trace gases by microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Prof. Dr. H. G.

    2011-01-01

    Some trace gases are contained in the atmosphere in appreciable amounts: methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, nitrous oxide. The bulk of these gases is of biological origin. Hydrogen is a primary product of microbial metabolism under anaerobic conditions. However, before reaching the atmosphere, it is converted by methane bacteria to methane, by nitrate reducing bacteria to nitrogen and to nitrous oxide and by sulfate reducing bacteria to hydrogen sulfide. Carbon monoxide is produced from cert...

  2. Atmospheric trace gases monitoring by UV-vis spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pinhua; Li, Ang; Wu, Fengcheng; Qin, Min; Hu, Rezhi; Xu, Jin; Si, Fuqi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Due to rapidly economic development, air pollution has become an important issue in China. Phenomena such as regional haze in winter and high O3 concentration in summer are strongly related to increasing trace species. For better understanding the air pollution formation, it is necessary to know spatial and temporal distribution of trace species in the atmosphere. UV-vis spectroscopic techniques are of great advantages for trace species monitoring to meet several requirements, e.g. versatility, high sensitivity, good temporal resolution and field applicability. We have studied and developed various trace gases monitoring techniques and instruments based on UV-vis spectroscopic technique for in-situ measurements and remote sensing, e.g. LP-DOAS, IBBCEAS, CRDS, MAX-DOAS and mobile DOAS for NO2, SO2, HCHO, HONO, NO3, and N2O5 etc. The principle, instrumentation and inversion algorithm are presented. As typical applications of these techniques, investigation of the evolution of HONO and NO3 radicals over Beijing area, measurements of regional pollution in NCP and YRD are discussed in the aspects of HONO and nocturnal NO3 radical characteristics, trace gases (NO2, SO2 etc.) temporal and spatial distribution, pollution transport pathway, emission sources.

  3. Isotopic analysis of atmospheric trace gases by FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) discriminates chemical species solely on the basis of their mass. Infrared spectroscopy of gases, however, distinguishes molecular species by their vibrational and rotational frequencies, which depend on both the mass and the molecular structure. This provides a potentially important advantage in determining isotope ratios for species of the sme mass. We have developed methods of precise analysis of atmospheric trace gases such as CO2, CH4, CO and N2O based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. More recently we have extend the measurements to encompass individual isotopic species. FTIR absorption spectra of gas samples are recorded and the individual isotopomers analysed as independent species in the spectra. We report on two pilot studies to assess the technique, using a low (1 cm-1) resolution, benchtop spectrometer for 13C analysis in CO2, and a high resolution spectrometer to quantify 13C, 17O and 18O isotopomers independently in CO2. (author)

  4. Remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases by diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Kan, Ruifeng; He, Yabai; He, Ying; Zhang, Yujun; Xie, Pinhua; liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    Gaseous ammonia is the most abundant alkaline trace gas in the atmosphere. In order to study its role in acid deposition and aerosol formation, as well as its influence on the regional air quality and atmospheric visibility, several instruments has been developed based on TDLAS (Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy) techniques. In this paper, a long open path TDLAS system and a continuous-wave CRDS (Cavity-Ring down Spectroscopy) system are presented. The long open path system has been developed for NH3 in-situ monitoring by combining wavelength modulation with harmonic detection techniques to obtain the necessary detection sensitivity. The prototype instrument has been used to monitor atmospheric NH3 concentration at an urban site near Beijing National Stadium during Beijing Olympics in 2008, and recently used to measure the fluxes of NH3 from farm fields by flux-gradient method. The detection limit for ammonia is proved approximately 3ppb for a total path length of 456m. The continuous-wave, rapidly swept CRDS system has been developed for localized atmospheric sensing of trace gases at remote sites. Passive open-path optical sensor units could be coupled by optical fiber over distances of >1 km to a single transmitter/receiver console incorporating a photodetector and a swept-frequency diode laser tuned to molecule-specific near-infrared wavelengths. A noise-limited minimum detectable mixing ratio of ~11 ppbv is attained for ammonia at atmospheric pressure. The developed instruments are deployable in agricultural, industrial, and natural atmospheric environments.

  5. Measurement of Trace Gases in the Atmosphere of Venus Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes to develop small, lightweight, low power instrumentation for the in situ balloon-borne measurement of several trace gases of importance...

  6. Optical parametric oscillators in lidar sounding of trace atmospheric gases in the mid infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Shumskii, V. K.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    Applicability of a KTA crystal-based laser system with optical parametric generation to lidar sounding of the atmosphere in the spectral range 3-4 μm is studied in this work. A technique developed for lidar sounding of trace atmospheric gases is based on differential absorption (DIAL) technique and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested to estimate its efficiency for lidar sounding of atmospheric trace gases.

  7. Wet precipitation scavenging of soluble atmospheric trace gases due to chemical absorption in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the effects of irreversible chemical reactions of the first and higher orders and aqueous-phase dissociation reactions on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform concentration and temperature. We employ an one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of chemically active soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the partial hyperbolic differential equation of the first order. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of chlorine, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide for the exponential and linear initial altitudinal distributions of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear and uniform altitudinal temperature distributions. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for sulfur dioxide are in a good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  8. Measuring OH Reaction Rate Constants and Estimating the Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Vladimir; Kurylo, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Reactions with hydroxyl radicals and photolysis are the main processes dictating a compound's residence time in the atmosphere for a majority of trace gases. In case of very short-lived halocarbons their reaction with OH dictates both the atmospheric lifetime and active halogen release. Therefore, the accuracy of OH kinetic data is of primary importance for the comprehensive modeling of a compound's impact on the atmosphere, such as in ozone depletion (i.e., the Ozone Depletion Potential, ODP) and climate change (i.e., the Global Warming Potential, GWP), each of which are dependent on the atmospheric lifetime of the compound. We have demonstrated the ability to conduct very high accuracy determinations of OH reaction rate constants over the temperature range of atmospheric interest, thereby decreasing the uncertainty of kinetic data to 2-3%. The atmospheric lifetime of a well-mixed compound due to its reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl radicals can be estimated by using a simple scaling procedure that is based on the results of field observations of methyl chloroform concentrations and detailed modeling of the OH distribution in the atmosphere. The currently available modeling results of the atmospheric fate of various trace gases allow for an improved understanding of the ability and accuracy of simplified semi-empirical estimations of atmospheric lifetimes. These aspects will be illustrated in this presentation for a variety of atmospheric trace gases.

  9. Spectroscopic Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases on Long-Distance Flights

    OpenAIRE

    Dix, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis results of spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric trace gases on long-distance flights are presented. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), bromine oxide (BrO), ozone (O3), formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrous acid (HONO) are detected in scattered light spectra by means of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). The underlying scientific scope is to gain information on global trace gas distributions, e.g. of BrO, which plays an important role in ozone chemistry or of HONO, which a...

  10. Inter-hemispheric gradient of atmospheric trace gases in the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of atmospheric trace gases show that the concentrations and isotopic compositions of these species can change dramatically across the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) separating the two hemispheres. Because the anthropogenic sources of virtually all trace gases are greater in the northern than in the southern hemisphere, concentrations of the species are lower in the southern hemisphere. Typically the concentration gradient is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the trace gas in the atmosphere. Hence understanding the transport across the ITCZ is crucial to determining the variation of important trace gases in the New Zealand region. Container ships are being used to collect large clean air samples on voyages across the Pacific on great circle routes between Auckland (New Zealand), Honolulu (Hawaii) and Los Angeles and Seattle on the US West coast. Measurements on these samples are being used to supplement extensive carbon isotope measurements of atmospheric methane made at fixed sites in the southern hemisphere: Baring Head (New Zealand), Suva (Fiji) and Scott Base (Antarctica) to provide information on the global methane cycle. The authors present the first results of high precision measurements of the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon monoxide and methane in transects across the equator. These have been obtained using a Finnigan MAT 252 high precision isotope ratio mass spectrometer with a modified miniature inlet system and a stringent calibration protocol. Overall precision for δ13C in ambient methane and carbon monoxide in clean air approaches 0.02 per thousand which helps provide information on several subtle processes controlling the abundance of the trace gases in the atmosphere. The 13C in methane and carbon dioxide data show remarkable seasonal variations across the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and may be used to infer aspects of transport of gases to extra tropical regions in the southern hemisphere

  11. Taking the atmosphere's pulse: The application of GC-IRMS to stable isotopes in atmospheric trace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the industrial revolution, the abundance of many atmospheric trace gases has changed significantly. This is of concern because many of these trace species play a fundamental role in determining physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere important for maintaining life on earth. The impacts of the changes have been studied by a combination of analytical and theoretical modelling techniques. Stable isotope measurements made by conventional dual inlet IRMS for example, have provided valuable constraints on the budgets and removal mechanisms of key atmospheric trace gases. Unfortunately, in most cases, the application of these methods has been limited, because large air samples and cumbersome off line processing techniques are required to pre-concentrate enough gas for analysis. GC-IRMS offers a very attractive alternative because it combines on line processing with air sample size requirements typically 1000 times less than used in conventional techniques. In this article we focus on the requirements imposed on GC-IRMS by some of the current applications in atmospheric trace gas research. In addition, we examine some of the analytical and calibration aspects of the method applied to this kind of work. We finish with a summary of some of the comparative advantages and disadvantages of the GC-IRMS technique and some suggestions for future research using the method applied to specific atmospheric trace gases. (author)

  12. MAX-DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases in Ny-Ålesund

    OpenAIRE

    Wittrock, F.; Oetjen, H.; Richter, A; Fietkau, S.; T. Medeke; Rozanov, A.(CPPM, Aix-Marseille Université and CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille, France); J. P. Burrows

    2003-01-01

    International audience A new approach to derive tropospheric concentrations of some atmospheric trace gases from ground-based UV/vis measurements is described. The instrument, referred to as the MAX-DOAS, is based on the well-known UV/vis instruments, which use the sunlight scattered in the zenith sky as the light source and the method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to derive column amounts of absorbers like ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Substantial enhancements have ...

  13. An overview of current issues in the uptake of atmospheric trace gases by aerosols and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Kolb

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A workshop was held in the framework of the ACCENT (Atmospheric Composition Change – a European Network Joint Research Programme on "Aerosols" and the Programme on "Access to Laboratory Data". The aim of the workshop was to hold "Gordon Conference" type discussion covering accommodation and reactive uptake of water vapour and trace pollutant gases on condensed phase atmospheric materials. The scope was to review and define the current state of knowledge of accommodation coefficients for water vapour on water droplet and ice surfaces, and uptake of trace gas species on a variety of different surfaces characteristic of the atmospheric condensed phase particulate matter and cloud droplets. Twenty-six scientists participated in this meeting through presentations, discussions and the development of a consensus review.

    In this review we present an analysis of the state of knowledge on the thermal and mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on aqueous droplets and ice and a survey of current state-of the-art of reactive uptake of trace gases on a range of liquid and solid atmospheric droplets and particles. The review recommends consistent definitions of the various parameters that are needed for quantitative representation of the range of gas/condensed surface kinetic processes important for the atmosphere and identifies topics that require additional research.

  14. Long-lived atmospheric trace gases measurements in flask samples from three stations in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.; Indira, N. K.; Ramonet, M.; Delmotte, M.; Ciais, P.; Bhatt, B. C.; Reddy, M. V.; Angchuk, D.; Balakrishnan, S.; Jorphail, S.; Dorjai, T.; Mahey, T. T.; Patnaik, S.; Begum, M.; Brenninkmeijer, C.; Durairaj, S.; Kirubagaran, R.; Schmidt, M.; Swathi, P. S.; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Yver Kwok, C.; Gaur, V. K.

    2015-09-01

    With the rapid growth in population and economic development, emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from the Indian subcontinent have sharply increased during recent decades. However, evaluation of regional fluxes of GHGs and characterization of their spatial and temporal variations by atmospheric inversions remain uncertain due to a sparse regional atmospheric observation network. As a result of an Indo-French collaboration, three new atmospheric stations were established in India at Hanle (HLE), Pondicherry (PON) and Port Blair (PBL), with the objective of monitoring the atmospheric concentrations of GHGs and other trace gases. Here we present the results of the measurements of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, and H2 from regular flask sampling at these three stations over the period 2007-2011. For each species, annual means, seasonal cycles and gradients between stations were calculated and related to variations in natural GHG fluxes, anthropogenic emissions, and monsoon circulations. Covariances between species at the synoptic scale were analyzed to investigate the likely source(s) of emissions. The flask measurements of various trace gases at the three stations have the potential to constrain the inversions of fluxes over southern and northeastern India. However, this network of ground stations needs further extension to other parts of India to better constrain the GHG budgets at regional and continental scales.

  15. MAX-DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases in Ny-Ålesund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittrock, F.; Oetjen, H.; Richter, A.; Fietkau, S.; Medeke, T.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    A new approach to derive tropospheric concentrations of some atmospheric trace gases from ground-based UV/vis measurements is described. The instrument, referred to as the MAX-DOAS, is based on the well-known UV/vis instruments, which use the sunlight scattered in the zenith sky as the light source and the method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to derive column amounts of absorbers like ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Substantial enhancements have been applied to this standard setup to use different lines of sight near to the horizon as additional light sources (MAX - multi axis). Results from measurements at Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E) are presented and interpreted with the full-spherical radiation transport model SCIATRAN. In particular, measurements of the oxygen dimer O4 which has a known column and vertical distribution in the atmosphere are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to parameters such as multiple scattering, solar azimuth, surface albedo and refraction in the atmosphere and also to validate the radiative transport model. As a first application, measurements of NO2 emissions from a ship lying in Ny-Ålesund harbour are presented. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of long term UV/vis multi axis measurement that can be used to derive not only column amounts of different trace gases but also some information on the vertical location of these absorbers.

  16. Potential for the use of reconstructed IASI radiances in the detection of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Atkinson

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Principal component (PC analysis has received considerable attention as a technique for the extraction of meteorological signals from hyperspectral infra-red sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. In addition to achieving substantial bit-volume reductions for dissemination purposes, the technique can also be used to generate reconstructed radiances in which random instrument noise has been reduced. Studies on PC analysis of hyperspectral infrared sounder data have been undertaken in the context of numerical weather prediction, instrument monitoring and geophysical variable retrieval, as well as data compression. This study examines the potential of PC analysis for chemistry applications.

    A major concern in the use of PC analysis for chemistry is that the spectral features associated with trace gases may not be well represented in the reconstructed spectra, either due to deficiencies in the training set or due to the limited number of PC scores used in the radiance reconstruction. In this paper we show examples of reconstructed IASI radiances for several trace gases: ammonia, sulphur dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide. It is shown that care must be taken in the selection of spectra for the initial training set: an iterative technique, in which outlier spectra are added to a base training set, gives the best results. For the four trace gases examined, key features of the chemical signatures are retained in the reconstructed radiances, whilst achieving a substantial reduction in instrument noise.

    A new regional re-transmission service for IASI is scheduled to start in 2010, as part of the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS. For this EARS-IASI service it is intended to include PC scores as part of the data stream. The paper describes the generation of the reference eigenvectors for this new service.

  17. Potential for the use of reconstructed IASI radiances in the detection of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Atkinson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Principal component (PC analysis has received considerable attention as a technique for the extraction of meteorological signals from hyperspectral infra-red sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS. In addition to achieving substantial bit-volume reductions for dissemination purposes, the technique can also be used to generate reconstructed radiances in which random instrument noise has been suppressed. To date, most studies have been in the context of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP. This study examines the potential of PC analysis for chemistry applications.

    A major concern in the use of PC analysis for chemistry has been that the spectral features associated with trace gases may not be well represented in the reconstructed spectra, either due to deficiencies in the training set or due to the limited number of PC scores used in the radiance reconstruction. In this paper we show examples of reconstructed IASI radiances for several trace gases: ammonia, sulphur dioxide, methane and carbon monoxide. It is shown that care must be taken in the selection of spectra for the initial training set: an iterative technique, in which outlier spectra are added to a base training set, gives the best results. For the four trace gases examined, the chemical signatures are retained in the reconstructed radiances, whilst achieving a substantial reduction in instrument noise.

    A new regional re-transmission service for IASI is scheduled to start in 2010, as part of the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS. For this EARS-IASI service it is intended to include PC scores as part of the data stream. The paper describes the generation of the reference eigenvectors for this new service.

  18. Detectability of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Wilson, E.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of radiative transfer simulations of a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) in the detection of trace species in the Martian atmosphere. We investigated two scenarios: 1) nadir and/or limb sounding from a Mars orbiter in the thermal infrared, 2) solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared from the Martian surface. In both scenarios, a GCFR would allow detection of trace gases at a lower concentration than that detectable by a conventional filter radiometer. In nadir/limb sounding, we find that CH4, SO2, N2O, C2H2 and CH3OH are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits. From solar occultation measurements, we find that CH4, SO2, C2H2, C2H6 are detectable at concentrations lower than previously-derived upper limits but only in low dust conditions.

  19. Observations of atmospheric trace gases by MAX-DOAS in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianxin; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Zhou, Haijin; Du, Libin; Qu, Junle; Chen, Chao; An, Quan; Wu, Chengxuan; Wang, Xiufen

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric trace gases exist in the atmosphere of the earth rarely. But the atmospheric trace gases play an important role in the global atmospheric environment and ecological balance by participating in the global atmospheric cycle. And many environmental problems are caused by the atmospheric trace gases such as photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, etc. So observations of atmospheric trace gases become very important. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) developed recently is a kind of promising passive remote sensing technology which can utilize scattered sunlight received from multiple viewing directions to derive vertical column density of lower tropospheric trace gases like ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It has advantages of simple structure, stable running, passive remote sensing and real-time online monitoring automatically. A MAX-DOAS has been developed at Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) for remote measurements of lower tropospheric trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3). In this paper, we mainly introduce the stucture of the instrument, calibration and results. Detailed performance analysis and calibration of the instrument were made at Qingdao. We present the results of NO2, SO2 and O3 vertical column density measured in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay. The diurnal variation and the daily average value comparison of vertical column density during a long-trem observation are presented. The vertical column density of NO2 and SO2 measured during Qingdao oil pipeline explosion on November 22, 2013 by MAX-DOAS is also presented. The vertical column density of NO2 reached to a high value after the explosion. Finally, the following job and the outlook for future possible improvements are given. Experimental calibration and results show that the developed MAX-DOAS system is reliable and credible.

  20. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  1. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, Hilary R.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent path length reduces the mass from approximately 150 kg to approximately 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of greater than 99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to approximately 30 ppb for formaldehyde, and approximately 500 ppb for methane. We expect custom

  2. Airborne multi-axis DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases on CARIBIC long-distance flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dix

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument was implemented and operated onboard a long-distance passenger aircraft within the framework of the CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container. The instrument was designed to keep weight, size and power consumption low and to comply with civil aviation regulations. It records spectra of scattered light from three viewing directions (nadir, 10° above and below horizon using a miniaturized telescope system. The telescopes are integrated in the main pylon of the inlet system which is mounted at the belly of the aircraft. Fibre bundles transmit light from the telescopes to spectrograph-detector units inside the DOAS container instrument. The latter is part of the removable CARIBIC instrument container, which is installed monthly on the aircraft for a series of measurement flights.

    During 30 flight operations within three years, measurements of HCHO, HONO, NO2, BrO, O3 and the oxygen dimer O4 were conducted. All of these trace gases except BrO could be analysed with a 30 s time resolution. HONO was detected for the first time in a deep convective cloud over central Asia, while BrO, NO2 and O3 could be observed in tropopause fold regions. Biomass burning signatures over South America could be seen and measurements during ascent and descent provided information on boundary layer trace gas profiles (e.g. NO2 or HCHO.

  3. Airborne multi-axis DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases on CARIBIC long-distance flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dix

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument was implemented and operated onboard a long-distance passenger aircraft within the framework of the CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container. The instrument was designed to keep weight, size and power consumption low and to comply with civil aviation regulations. It records spectra of scattered light from three viewing directions (nadir, 10° above and below horizon using a miniaturized telescope system. The telescopes are integrated in the main pylon of the inlet system which is mounted at the belly of the aircraft. Fibre bundles transmit light from the telescopes to spectrograph-detector units inside the DOAS container instrument. The latter is part of the removable CARIBIC instrument container, which is installed monthly on the aircraft for a series of measurement flights.

    During 30 flight operations within three years, measurements of HCHO, HONO, NO2, BrO, O3 and the oxygen dimer O4 were conducted. All of these trace gases except BrO could be analysed with a 30 s time resolution. HONO was detected for the first time in a deep convective cloud over central Asia. BrO, NO2 and O3 could be observed in tropopause fold regions, biomass burning signatures over South America could be seen and measurements during ascent and descent provided information on boundary layer trace gas profiles (e.g. NO2 or HCHO.

  4. MAX-DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases in Ny-Ålesund - Radiative transfer studies and their application

    OpenAIRE

    Wittrock, F.; Oetjen, H.; Richter, A.; Fietkau, S.; Medeke, T.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    International audience A new approach to derive tropospheric concentrations of some atmospheric trace gases from ground-based UV/vis measurements is described. The instrument, referred to as the MAX-DOAS, is based on the well-known UV/vis instruments, which use the sunlight scattered in the zenith sky as the light source and the method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to derive column amounts of absorbers like ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Substantial enhancements have ...

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO(sub 2)) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO(sub 2) and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO(sub 2) on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels

  6. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  7. Synthesis of corrected multi-wavelength spectrometers for atmospheric trace gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hikmat H.Asadov; Islam M.Mirzabalayev; Davud Z.Aliyev; Javid A.Agayev; Sima R.Azimova; Nabi A.Nabiyev; Sevinj N.Abdullayeva

    2009-01-01

    The method for synthesis of corrected three-wavelengths spectrometers for trace gas components of atmo sphere on the basis of development of mathematical model has been suggested.The classification table for possible structures of corrected spectrometers is considered.The synthesis allows to reveal some new variants for development of three-wavelength spectrometers for trace gas components of atmosphere.For experimental checkup of achieved theoretical results,a laboratory pattern of three-wavelength spectrometer is developed and tested.

  8. On the attribution of contributions of atmospheric trace gases to emissions in atmospheric model applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grewe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised tagging method, which describes the combined effect of emissions of various species from individual emission categories, e.g. the impact of both, nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbon emissions on ozone. This method is applied to two simplified chemistry schemes, which represent the main characteristics of atmospheric ozone chemistry. Analytical solutions are presented for this tagging approach. In the past, besides tagging approaches, sensitivity methods were used, which estimate the contributions from individual sources based on differences in two simulations, a base case and a simulation with a perturbation in the respective emission category. We apply both methods to our simplified chemical systems and demonstrate that potentially large errors (factor of 2 occur with the sensitivity method, which depend on the degree of linearity of the chemical system. For some chemical regimes this error can be minimised by employing only small perturbations of the respective emission, e.g. 5%. Since a complete tagging algorithm for global chemistry models is difficult to achieve, we present two error metrics, which can be applied for sensitivity methods in order to estimate the potential error of this approach for a specific application.

  9. On the attribution of contributions of atmospheric trace gases to emissions in atmospheric model applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grewe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an improved tagging method, which describes the combined effect of emissions of various species from individual emission categories, e.g. the impact of both, nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbon emissions on ozone. This method is applied to two simplified chemistry schemes, which represent the main characteristics of atmospheric ozone chemistry. Analytical solutions are presented for this tagging approach. In the past, besides tagging approaches, sensitivity methods were used, which estimate the contributions from individual sources based on differences in two simulations, a base case and a simulation with a perturbation in the respective emission category. We apply both methods to our simplified chemical systems and demonstrate that potentially large errors (factor of 2 occur with the sensitivity method, which depend on the degree of linearity of the chemical system. This error depends on two factors, the ability to linearise the chemical system around a base case, and second the completeness of the contributions, which means that all contributions should principally add up to 100%. For some chemical regimes the first error can be minimised by employing only small perturbations of the respective emission, e.g. 5%. The second factor depends on the chemical regime and cannot be minimized by a specific experimental set-up. It is inherent to the sensitivity method. Since a complete tagging algorithm for global chemistry models is difficult to achieve, we present two error metrics, which can be applied for sensitivity methods in order to estimate the potential error of this approach for a specific application.

  10. MAX-DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases in Ny-Ålesund - Radiative transfer studies and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittrock, F.; Oetjen, H.; Richter, A.; Fietkau, S.; Medeke, T.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-06-01

    A new approach to derive tropospheric concentrations of some atmospheric trace gases from ground-based UV/vis measurements is described. The instrument, referred to as the MAX-DOAS, is based on the well-known UV/vis instruments, which use the sunlight scattered in the zenith sky as the light source and the method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to derive column amounts of absorbers like ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Substantial enhancements have been applied to this standard setup to use different lines of sight near to the horizon as additional light sources (MAX - multi axis). Results from measurements at Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E) are presented and interpreted with the full-spherical radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. In particular, measurements of the oxygen dimer O4 which has a known column and vertical distribution in the atmosphere are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the retrieval to parameters such as multiple scattering, solar azimuth, surface albedo and refraction in the atmosphere and also to validate the radiative transfer model. As a first application, measurements of NO2 emissions from a ship lying in Ny-Ålesund harbour are presented. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of long term UV/vis multi axis measurement that can be used to derive not only column amounts of different trace gases but also some information on the vertical location of these absorbers.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO2), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented

  14. A portable infrared laser spectrometer for flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere-atmosphere interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimbaud, C.; Catoire, V.; Gogo, S.; Robert, C.; Chartier, M.; Laggoun-Défarge, F.; Grossel, A.; Albéric, P.; Pomathiod, L.; Nicoullaud, B.; Richard, G.

    2011-07-01

    A portable infrared laser absorption spectrometer named SPIRIT (SPectromètre Infra-Rouge In situ Troposphérique) has been set up for the simultaneous flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere-atmosphere interface. It uses a continuous wave distributed feedback room temperature quantum cascade laser and a patented new optical multi-pass cell. The aim of SPIRIT field studies is to get a better understanding of land and water bodies to atmosphere exchange mechanisms of greenhouse gases (GHG). The analytical procedures to derive concentrations and fluxes are described, as well as the performances of the instrument under field conditions. The ability of SPIRIT to assess space and time dependence emissions of two GHG—nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4)—for different types of ecosystems is demonstrated through in situ measurements on peatland, on fertilized soil, and on water body systems. The objectives of these investigations and preliminary significant results are reported.

  15. A portable infrared laser spectrometer for flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere–atmosphere interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A portable infrared laser absorption spectrometer named SPIRIT (SPectromètre Infra-Rouge In situ Troposphérique) has been set up for the simultaneous flux measurements of trace gases at the geosphere–atmosphere interface. It uses a continuous wave distributed feedback room temperature quantum cascade laser and a patented new optical multi-pass cell. The aim of SPIRIT field studies is to get a better understanding of land and water bodies to atmosphere exchange mechanisms of greenhouse gases (GHG). The analytical procedures to derive concentrations and fluxes are described, as well as the performances of the instrument under field conditions. The ability of SPIRIT to assess space and time dependence emissions of two GHG—nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4)—for different types of ecosystems is demonstrated through in situ measurements on peatland, on fertilized soil, and on water body systems. The objectives of these investigations and preliminary significant results are reported

  16. Atmospheric transport and chemistry of trace gases in LMDz5B: evaluation and implications for inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Representation of atmospheric transport is a major source of error in the estimation of greenhouse gas sources and sinks by inverse modelling. Here we assess the impact on trace gas mole fractions of the new physical parameterisations recently implemented in the Atmospheric Global Climate Model LMDz to improve vertical diffusion, mesoscale mixing by thermal plumes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL, and deep convection in the troposphere. At the same time, the horizontal and vertical resolution of the model used in the inverse system has been increased. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the impact of these developments on the representation of trace gas transport and chemistry, and to anticipate the implications for inversions of greenhouse gas emissions using such an updated model. Comparison of a one-dimensional version of LMDz with large eddy simulations shows that the thermal scheme simulates shallow convective tracer transport in the PBL over land very efficiently, and much better than previous versions of the model. This result is confirmed in three dimensional simulations, by a much improved reproduction of the Radon-222 diurnal cycle. However, the enhanced dynamics of tracer concentrations induces a stronger sensitivity of the new LMDz configuration to external meteorological forcings. At larger scales, the inter-hemispheric exchange is slightly slower when using the new version of the model, bringing them closer to observations. The increase in the vertical resolution (from 19 to 39 layers significantly improves the representation of stratosphere/troposphere exchange. Furthermore, changes in atmospheric thermodynamic variables, such as temperature, due to changes in the PBL mixing, significantly modify chemical reaction rates and the equilibrium value of reactive trace gases. One implication of LMDz model developments for future inversions of greenhouse gas emissions is the ability of the updated system to assimilate a larger

  17. Investigating atmospheric transport processes of trace gases with ICON-ART on different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Jennifer; Ruhnke, Roland; Rieger, Daniel; Vogel, Heike; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    We have extended the global ICON [1] (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic) modelling framework by introducing ICON-ART [2]. ICON is jointly developed by the German Weather Service (DWD) and Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), and is used for numerical weather prediction as well as for future climate predictions. ICON-ART is developed at the KIT with the goal to simulate interactions between trace substances and the state of the atmosphere. For the dynamics (transport and diffusion) of gaseous tracers, the original ICON tracer framework is used. A process splitting approach separates the physical processes. In this study, we present results of the ICON-ART extension, including the full gas-phase chemistry module. This module uses the kpp formalism [3] to generate chemistry modules and the photolysis module is based on Cloud-J7.3 [4]. Photolysis rates are calculated online based on the meteorological state of the atmosphere, as well as on the actual ozone profile and cloud optical parameters. Two simulations are performed with ICON-ART. The first one with physics parameterisations for the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and the second one with that for climate simulation in order to investigate the dynamical influence on the distribution of long-lived as well as of short-lived species by comparing both simulations. The results are evaluated with other model results and with observation. In addition to that, we use aircraft campaign data to validate the results on the regional scale for short term simulations by using the NWP physics. [1] Zängl, G., Reinert, D., Ripodas, P., and Baldauf, M.: The ICON (ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic) modelling framework of DWD and MPI-M: Description of the non-hydrostatic dynamicalcore, Q. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc,141, 563-579, doi:10.1002/qj.2378, 2015 [2] Rieger, D., Bangert, M., Bischoff-Gauss, I., Förstner, J., Lundgren, K., Reinert, D., Schröter, J., Vogel, H., Zängl, G., Ruhnke, R., and Vogel, B.: ICON-ART 1.0 - a new online

  18. Application of the angular position of the visible horizon for atmospheric trace gases retrieval by MAX-DOAS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchkouski, Ilya; Krasovsky, Alexander; Demin, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Significant impact on the retrieval process of atmospheric trace gases by MAX-DOAS has accuracy of the elevation angle adjustment of the telescope unit. Additional information about the magnitude of the true elevation angles in MAX-DOAS system is very important because a slight change in elevation at angles 0 ° - 5 ° leads to a change in the geometry of the observation that has a strong influence on the measured value (slant column density). For monitoring the state of the atmosphere automated device based on the spectrograph ORIEL MS257 with a cooled CCD Andor Technology, spectral range 411-493 nm, FWHM = 0.5 nm has been constructed. This instrument records the spectrum of scattered sunlight in the range of elevation angles 0 ° - 90 ° within an aperture of 1.3 °. The number of registered spectra per day amounts to 4000. This device passed MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaign in the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry (Mainz) for the period 20.06.2013 - 10.09.2013. Procedures of the retrieval of nitrogen dioxide parallel measurements has been performed, the results of comparisons will be presented. Series of data about the angular position of the visible horizon line for two months of observation has been obtained. Using this pattern, corrections can be made in determining the elevation angle of the telescope unit, during the processing of the experimental data by MAX-DOAS.

  19. Ratios among atmospheric trace gases together with winds imply exploitable information for bird navigation: a model elucidating experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, H. G.

    2013-11-01

    A model of avian goal-oriented navigation is described that is based on two empirical findings building a bridge from ornithology to atmospheric chemistry. (1) To orient their courses homeward from distant unfamiliar areas, homing pigeons require long-term exposure to undisturbed winds at the home site and olfactory access to the environmental air at home and abroad. (2) Above Germany, ratios among some atmospheric trace gases vary along differently oriented spatial gradients as well as depending on wind direction. The model emulates finding (1) by utilising the analysed air samples on which finding (2) is based. Starting with an available set of 46 omnipresent compounds, virtual pigeons determine the profile of relative weights among them at each of 96 sites regularly distributed around a central home site within a radius of 200 km and compare this profile with corresponding profiles determined at home under varying wind conditions. Referring to particular similarities and dissimilarities depending on home-wind direction, they try to estimate, at each site, the compass direction they should fly in order to approach home. To make the model work, an iterative algorithm imitates evolution by modifying sensitivity to the individual compounds stepwise at random. In the course of thousands of trial-and-error steps it gradually improves homeward orientation by selecting smaller sets of most useful and optimally weighted substances from whose proportional configurations at home and abroad it finally derives navigational performances similar to those accomplished by real pigeons. It is concluded that the dynamic chemical atmosphere most likely contains sufficient spatial information for home-finding over hundreds of kilometres of unfamiliar terrain. The underlying chemo-atmospheric processes remain to be clarified.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made

  1. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and

  2. The impact of vibrational Raman scattering of air on DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    J. Lampel; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-01-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered. After inelastic scattering on N2 and O2 molecules, the scattered photons occur as additional intensity at a different wavelength, effectively leading to "filling-in" of both solar Fraunhofer lines and absorptions of atmospheric constituents, if the inelastic scattering happens after the absorption. Measured spectra in p...

  3. The impact of vibrational Raman scattering of air on DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    Lampel, J; Frieß, U.; U. Platt

    2015-01-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered. After inelastic scattering on N2 and O2 molecules, the scattered photons occur as additional intensity at a different wavelength, effectively leading to filling-in of both solar Fraunhofer lines and absorptions of atmospheric constituents. Measured spectra in passive DOAS applications are typically corrected for rotationa...

  4. A broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer for in-situ measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bitter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer and its deployment during the 2002 North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX to measure ambient concentrations of NO3, N2O5, I2 and OIO at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland. The effective absorption path lengths accessible with the spectrometer generally exceeded 10 km, enabling sensitive localised ``point' measurements of atmospheric absorbers to be made adjacent to the other instruments monitoring chemically related species at the same site. For the majority of observations, the spectrometer was used in an open path configuration thereby avoiding surface losses of reactive species. A subset of observations targeted the N2O5 molecule by detecting the additional NO3 formed by the thermal dissociation of N2O5. In all cases the concentrations of the atmospheric absorbers were retrieved by fitting the differential structure in the broadband cavity ringdown spectra using a methodology adapted from long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy. The uncertainty of the retrieval depends crucially on the correct treatment and fitting of the absorption bands due to water vapour, a topic that is discussed in the context of analysing broadband cavity ringdown spectra. The quality of the measurements and the retrieval method are illustrated with representative spectra acquired during NAMBLEX in spectral regions around 660 nm (NO3 and N2O5 and 570 nm (I2 and OIO. Typical detection limits were 1 pptv for NO3 in an integration time of 100 s, 4 pptv for OIO and 20 pptv for I2 in an integration time of 10 min. Additionally, the concentrations of atmospheric water vapour and the aerosol optical extinction were retrieved in both spectral regions. A companion paper in this issue presents the time series of the measurements and discusses their significance for understanding the variability of short lived nitrogen and iodine compounds in the marine

  5. Influence of modelled soil biogenic NO emissions on related trace gases and the atmospheric oxidizing capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkamp, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Wilcke, W.; Lawrence, M G

    2009-01-01

    The emission of nitric oxide (NO) by soils (SNOx) is an important source of oxides of nitrogen (NOx=NO+NO2) in the troposphere, with estimates ranging from 4 to 21 Tg of nitrogen per year. Previous studies have examined the influence of SNOx on ozone (O-3) chemistry. We employ the ECHAM5/MESSy atmospheric chemistry model (EMAC) to go further in the reaction chain and investigate the influence of SNOx on lower tropospheric NOx, O-3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), nitric acid (HNO3), the hydroxyl ...

  6. A broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer for in-situ measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bitter

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer and its deployment during the 2002 North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX to measure ambient concentrations of NO3, N2O5, I2 and OIO at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland. The effective absorption path lengths accessible with the spectrometer generally exceeded 10 km, enabling sensitive localised ''point'' measurements of atmospheric absorbers to be made adjacent to the other instruments monitoring chemically related species at the same site. For the majority of observations, the spectrometer was used in an open path configuration thereby avoiding surface losses of reactive species. A subset of observations targeted the N2O5 molecule by detecting the additional NO3 formed by the thermal dissociation of N2O5. In all cases the concentrations of the atmospheric absorbers were retrieved by fitting the differential structure in the broadband cavity ringdown spectra using a methodology adapted from long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy. The uncertainty of the retrieval depends crucially on the correct treatment and fitting of the absorption bands due to water vapour, a topic that is discussed in the context of analysing broadband cavity ringdown spectra. The quality of the measurements and the retrieval method are illustrated with representative spectra acquired during NAMBLEX in spectral regions around 660 nm (NO3 and N2O5 and 570 nm (I2 and OIO. Typical detection limits were 1 pptv for NO3 in an integration time of 100 s, 4 pptv for OIO and 20 pptv for I2 in an integration time of 10 min. Additionally, the concentrations of atmospheric water vapour and the aerosol optical extinction were retrieved in both spectral regions. A companion paper in

  7. Differential Radiometers Using Fabry-Perot Interferometric Technique for Remote Sensing Determination of Various Atmospheric Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Wilson, E. L.

    2007-01-01

    New type of remote sensing instrument based upon the Fabry-Perot inte rferometric technique has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) is a well known, powerful spectroscopic technique and one of its many applications is to be use d to measure greenhouse gases and also some harmful species in the at mosphere. With this technique, absorption of particular species is me asured and related to its concentration. A solid Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a frequency filter to restrict the measurement to particular absorption bands of the gas of interest. With adjusting the thicknes s of the etalon that separation (in frequency) of the transmitted fri nges can be made equal to the almost constant separation of the gas a bsorption lines. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refi-action of its material, the transmission fring es can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption li nes of the particular species. With this alignment between absorption lines and fringes, changes in the amount of a species in the atmosph ere strongly affect the amount of light transmitted by the etalon and can be related to gas concentration. The instrument that we have dev eloped detects the absorption of various atmospheric trace gases in d irect or reflected sunlight. Our instrument employing Fabry-Perot interferometer makes use of two features to achieve high sensitivity. The first is high spectral resolution enabling one to match the width of an atmospheric absorption feature by the instrumental band pass. The second is high optical throughput enabled by using multiple spectral lines simultaneously. For any species that one wishes to measure, thi s first feature is available while the use of multiple spectral features can be employed only for species with suitable spectra and freedom from interfering species in the same wavelength region. We have deve loped an instrument for use as ground based

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Trace Gases HCl, NO and SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridass, C.; Aw-Musse, A.; Dowdye, E.; Bandyopadhyay, C.; Misra, P.; Okabe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data have been recorded in the spectral region 400-4000/cm of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide with I/cm resolution and of nitric oxide with 0.25 cm-i resolution, under quasi-static conditions, when the sample gas was passed through tubings of aluminum, copper, stainless steel and teflon. The absorbance was measured for the rotational lines of the fundamental bands of (1)H(35)Cl and (1)H(37)Cl for pressures in the range 100-1000 Torr and for the (14)N(16)O molecule in the range 100-300 Torr. The absorbance was also measured for individual rotational lines corresponding to the three modes of vibrations (upsilon(sub 1) - symmetric stretch, upsilon(sub 2) - symmetric bend, upsilon(sub 3) - anti-symmetric stretch) of the SO2 molecule in the pressure range 25-150 Torr. A graph of absorbance versus pressure was plotted for the observed rotational transitions of the three atmospherically significant molecules, and it was found that the absorbance was linearly proportional to the pressure range chosen, thereby validating Beer's law. The absorption cross-sections were determined from the graphical slopes for each rotational transition recorded for the HCl, NO and SO2 species. Qualitative and quantitative spectral changes in the FT-IR data will be discussed to identify and characterize various tubing materials with respect to their absorption features.

  9. The impact of vibrational Raman scattering of air on DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, J.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-09-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered. After inelastic scattering on N2 and O2 molecules, the scattered photons occur as additional intensity at a different wavelength, effectively leading to "filling-in" of both solar Fraunhofer lines and absorptions of atmospheric constituents, if the inelastic scattering happens after the absorption. Measured spectra in passive DOAS applications are typically corrected for rotational Raman scattering (RRS), also called Ring effect, which represents the main contribution to inelastic scattering. Inelastic scattering can also occur in liquid water, and its influence on DOAS measurements has been observed over clear ocean water. In contrast to that, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) of N2 and O2 has often been thought to be negligible, but it also contributes. Consequences of VRS are red-shifted Fraunhofer structures in scattered light spectra and filling-in of Fraunhofer lines, additional to RRS. At 393 nm, the spectral shift is 25 and 40 nm for VRS of O2 and N2, respectively. We describe how to calculate VRS correction spectra according to the Ring spectrum. We use the VRS correction spectra in the spectral range of 420-440 nm to determine the relative magnitude of the cross-sections of VRS of O2 and N2 and RRS of air. The effect of VRS is shown for the first time in spectral evaluations of Multi-Axis DOAS data from the SOPRAN M91 campaign and the MAD-CAT MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaign. The measurements yield in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections that the observed VRS(N2) cross-section at 393 nm amounts to 2.3 ± 0.4 % of the cross-section of RRS at 433 nm under tropospheric conditions. The contribution of VRS(O2) is also found to be in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections. It is concluded, that this phenomenon has to be included in the spectral evaluation of weak absorbers as it

  10. Year-round retrievals of trace gases in the Arctic using the Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mariani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (E-AERI was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada in October 2008. Spectra from the E-AERI provide information about the radiative balance and budgets of trace gases in the Canadian high Arctic. Measurements are taken every 7 min year-round, including polar night when the solar-viewing spectrometers at PEARL are not operated. This allows E-AERI measurements to fill the gap in the PEARL dataset during the four months of polar night. Measurements were taken year-round in 2008–2009 at the PEARL Ridge Lab, which is 610 m a.s.l. (above sea-level, and from 2011 onwards at the Zero-Altitude PEARL Auxiliary Lab (0PAL, which is at sea level 15 km from the Ridge Lab. Total columns of O3, CO, CH4, and N2O have been retrieved using a modified version of the SFIT2 retrieval algorithm adapted for emission spectra. This provides the first ground-based nighttime measurements of these species at Eureka. Changes in the total columns driven by photochemistry and dynamics are observed. Analyses of E-AERI retrievals indicate accurate spectral fits (root-mean-square residuals consistent with noise and a 10–15% uncertainty in the total column, depending on the trace gas. O3 comparisons between the E-AERI and a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometer, three Brewer spectrophotometers, two UV-visible ground-based spectrometers, and a System D'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ at PEARL are made from 2008–2009 and for 2011. 125HR CO, CH4, and N2O columns are also compared with the E-AERI measurements. Mean relative differences between the E-AERI and the other spectrometers are 1–10% (14% is for the un-smoothed profiles, which are less than the E-AERI's total column uncertainties. The E-AERI O3 and CO measurements are well correlated with the other spectrometers (r > 0.92 with the 125HR. The 24 h diurnal cycle

  11. Year-round retrievals of trace gases in the Arctic using the Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Z.; Strong, K.; Palm, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Adams, C.; Zhao, X.; Savastiouk, V.; McElroy, C. T.; Goutail, F.; Drummond, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (E-AERI) was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada in October 2008. Spectra from the E-AERI provide information about the radiative balance and budgets of trace gases in the Canadian high Arctic. Measurements are taken every 7 min year-round, including polar night when the solar-viewing spectrometers at PEARL are not operated. This allows E-AERI measurements to fill the gap in the PEARL dataset during the four months of polar night. Measurements were taken year-round in 2008-2009 at the PEARL Ridge Lab, which is 610 m a.s.l. (above sea-level), and from 2011 onwards at the Zero-Altitude PEARL Auxiliary Lab (0PAL), which is at sea level 15 km from the Ridge Lab. Total columns of O3, CO, CH4, and N2O have been retrieved using a modified version of the SFIT2 retrieval algorithm adapted for emission spectra. This provides the first ground-based nighttime measurements of these species at Eureka. Changes in the total columns driven by photochemistry and dynamics are observed. Analyses of E-AERI retrievals indicate accurate spectral fits (root-mean-square residuals consistent with noise) and a 10-15% uncertainty in the total column, depending on the trace gas. O3 comparisons between the E-AERI and a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, three Brewer spectrophotometers, two UV-visible ground-based spectrometers, and a System D'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) at PEARL are made from 2008-2009 and for 2011. 125HR CO, CH4, and N2O columns are also compared with the E-AERI measurements. Mean relative differences between the E-AERI and the other spectrometers are 1-10% (14% is for the un-smoothed profiles), which are less than the E-AERI's total column uncertainties. The E-AERI O3 and CO measurements are well correlated with the other spectrometers (r > 0.92 with the 125HR). The 24 h diurnal cycle and 365-day seasonal

  12. A pre-processor of trace gases and aerosols emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; M. Pirre; Marecal, V.; Grell, G; R. Stockler; R. F. Mello; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2010-01-01

    The pre-processor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emissions fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in regional or global transport models. The emissions considered are urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources from most recent databases or from satellite fire detections for biomass burning. A plumerise model is used to derive the height of smoke emissions from satel...

  13. Polar night retrievals of trace gases in the Arctic using the Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Z.; Strong, K.; Palm, M.; Lindenmaier, R.; Adams, C.; Zhao, X.; Savastiouk, V.; McElroy, C. T.; Goutail, F.; Drummond, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (E-AERI) was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada in October 2008. Spectra from the E-AERI provide information about the radiative balance and budgets of trace gases in the Canadian high Arctic. Measurements are taken every seven minutes year-round, including polar night when the solar-viewing spectrometers at PEARL are not operated. This allows E-AERI measurements to fill the gap in the PEARL dataset during the four months of polar night. Measurements were taken year-round in 2008-2009 at the PEARL Ridge Lab, which is 610 m above sea-level, and from 2011-onwards at the Zero-Altitude PEARL Auxiliary Lab (0PAL), which is 15 km from the Ridge Lab at sea level. Total columns of O3, CO, CH4, and N2O have been retrieved using a modified version of the SFIT2 retrieval algorithm adapted for emission spectra. This provides the first nighttime measurements of these species at Eureka. Changes in the total columns driven by photochemistry and dynamics are observed. Analyses of E-AERI retrievals indicate accurate spectral fits (root-mean-square residuals based spectrometers, and a System D'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ) at PEARL are made from 2008-2009 and for 2011. 125HR CO, CH4, and N2O columns are also compared with the E-AERI measurements. Mean relative differences between the E-AERI and the other spectrometers are 1-14% (depending on the gas), which are less than the E-AERI's total column uncertainties. The E-AERI O3 and CO measurements are well correlated with the other spectrometers; the best correlation is with the 125HR (r > 0.92). The 24-h diurnal cycle and 365-day seasonal cycle of CO are observed and their amplitudes are quantified by the E-AERI (6-12% and 46%, respectively). The seasonal variability of H2O has an impact on the retrievals, leading to larger uncertainties in the summer months. Despite increased water vapour at

  14. Atmospheric transport and chemistry of trace gases in LMDz5B: evaluation and implications for inverse modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Hourdin, F.; Saunois, M.; COZIC A.; Couvreux, F; Grandpeix, J.-Y.; Lefebvre, M.-P.; C. Rio; Bergamaschi, P.; Chambers, S. D.; U. Karstens; Kazan, V.; S. Van der Laan; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Representation of atmospheric transport is a major source of error in the estimation of greenhouse gas sources and sinks by inverse modelling. Here we assess the impact on trace gas mole fractions of the new physical parameterizations recently implemented in the atmospheric global climate model LMDz to improve vertical diffusion, mesoscale mixing by thermal plumes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), and deep convection in the troposphere. At the same time, the horizontal ...

  15. Polar night retrievals of trace gases in the Arctic using the Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mariani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (E-AERI was installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada in October 2008. Spectra from the E-AERI provide information about the radiative balance and budgets of trace gases in the Canadian high Arctic. Measurements are taken every seven minutes year-round, including polar night when the solar-viewing spectrometers at PEARL are not operated. This allows E-AERI measurements to fill the gap in the PEARL dataset during the four months of polar night. Measurements were taken year-round in 2008–2009 at the PEARL Ridge Lab, which is 610 m above sea-level, and from 2011-onwards at the Zero-Altitude PEARL Auxiliary Lab (0PAL, which is 15 km from the Ridge Lab at sea level. Total columns of O3, CO, CH4, and N2O have been retrieved using a modified version of the SFIT2 retrieval algorithm adapted for emission spectra. This provides the first nighttime measurements of these species at Eureka. Changes in the total columns driven by photochemistry and dynamics are observed. Analyses of E-AERI retrievals indicate accurate spectral fits (root-mean-square residuals < 1.5% and a 10–15% uncertainty in the total column, depending on the trace gas. O3 comparisons between the E-AERI and a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometer, three Brewer spectrophotometers, two UV-visible ground-based spectrometers, and a System D'Analyse par Observations Zenithales (SAOZ at PEARL are made from 2008–2009 and for 2011. 125HR CO, CH4, and N2O columns are also compared with the E-AERI measurements. Mean relative differences between the E-AERI and the other spectrometers are 1–14% (depending on the gas, which are less than the E-AERI's total column uncertainties. The E-AERI O3 and CO measurements are well correlated with the other spectrometers; the best

  16. Retrieval of trace gases vertical profile in the lower atmosphere combining. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy with radiative transfer models

    OpenAIRE

    Palazzi, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    The motivation for the work presented in this thesis is to retrieve profile information for the atmospheric trace constituents nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) in the lower troposphere from remote sensing measurements. The remote sensing technique used, referred to as Multiple AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS), is a recent technique that represents a significant advance on the well-established DOAS, especially for what it concerns the study of...

  17. Off-axis measurements of atmospheric trace gases by use of an airborne ultraviolet-visible spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Bortoli, Daniele; Bonafè, Ubaldo; Kostadinov, Ivan; Oulanovsky, Alexey

    2002-09-01

    An airborne UV-visible spectrometer, the Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences, airborne version (GASCOD/A4π) was successfully operated during the Airborne Polar Experiment, Geophysica Aircraft in Antarctica airborne campaign from Ushuaia (54°49'S, 68°18'W), Argentina in southern spring 1999. The instrument measured scattered solar radiation through three optical windows with a narrow field of view (FOV), one from the zenith, two from the horizontal, as well as actinic fluxes through 2π FOV radiometric heads. Only a few airborne measurements of scattered solar radiation at different angles from the zenith are available in the literature. With our configuration we attempted to obtain the average line-of-sight concentrations of detectable trace gases. The retrieval method, based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy, is described and results for ozone are shown and compared with measurements from an in situ instrument as the first method of validation.

  18. A pre-processor of trace gases and aerosols emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The pre-processor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emissions fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in regional or global transport models. The emissions considered are urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources from most recent databases or from satellite fire detections for biomass burning. A plumerise model is used to derive the height of smoke emissions from satellite fire products. The pre-processor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The way to include these emissions in transport models is also detailed. The pre-processor is coded using Fortran 90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the database.

  19. A pre-processor of trace gases and aerosols emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; Pirre, M.; Marecal, V.; Grell, G.; Stockler, R.; Mello, R. F.; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2010-06-01

    The pre-processor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emissions fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in regional or global transport models. The emissions considered are urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources from most recent databases or from satellite fire detections for biomass burning. A plumerise model is used to derive the height of smoke emissions from satellite fire products. The pre-processor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The way to include these emissions in transport models is also detailed. The pre-processor is coded using Fortran 90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the database.

  20. Organic Halogen and Related Trace Gases in the Tropical Atmosphere: Results from Recent Airborne Campaigns Over the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, E. L.; Navarro, M. A.; Donets, V.; Schauffler, S.; Lueb, R.; Hendershot, R.; Gabbard, S.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Riemer, D. D.; Pan, L.; Salawitch, R. J.; Nicely, J. M.; Montzka, S. A.; Miller, B.; Moore, F. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Hintsa, E. J.; Campos, T. L.; Quack, B.; Zhu, X.; Pope, L.

    2014-12-01

    Organic halogen gases, especially containing bromine and iodine, play a significant role as precursors to active halogen chemistry and ozone catalytic loss. Much of the reactive organic halogen originates from biological processes in the surface ocean, which can be quite variable by season and location. The tropics and coastal margins are potentially important sources that are being examined. The recent coordinated CONTRAST/ATTREX/CAST missions were conducted in the Western Tropical Pacific, a region that is a major transport pathway for tropospheric air entering the stratosphere. One of the goals of the missions was to identify sources, distributions, and transport of organic halogens from the ocean surface into the tropical lower stratosphere. The missions were conducted during the NH winter season, Jan-Feb, 2014. In this presentation, we will discuss the distributions and variability of organic halogen gases in the study region and will examine the input of organic halogen species into the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Comparison with other tracers, such as methyl nitrate and NMHC, will help identify source regions for these gases. We will focus on the measurements obtained in the CONTRAST and ATTREX missions with data from in-situ GC/MS measurements and whole air samples collected on the NSF GV and NASA Global Hawk aircraft. Comparisons with other recent airborne campaigns, such as HIPPO and TC4, and with several ship-based studies will provide an additional context for evaluating the variability of organic halogen species in the tropical atmosphere and their role in transporting reactive halogen compounds into the UT/LS.

  1. Human activities affecting trace gases and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Earth's climate has been in a constant state of change throughout geologic time due to natural perturbations in the global geobiosphere. However, various human activities have the potential to cause future global warming over a relatively short amount of time. These activities, which affect the Earth's climate by altering the concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere, include energy consumption, particularly fossil-fuel consumption; industrial processes (production and use of chlorofluorocarbons, halons, and chlorocarbons, landfilling of wastes, and cement manufacture); changes in land use patterns, particularly deforestation and biomass burning; and agricultural practices (waste burning, fertilizer usage, rice production, and animal husbandry). Population growth is an important underlying factor affecting the level of growth in each activity. This paper describes how the human activities listed above contribute to atmospheric change, the current pattern of each activity, and how levels of each activity have changed since the early part of this century

  2. Trace elements removal from hot flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahab, M. (Valtion teknillinen tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Polttoainejalostustekniikan laboratorio); Mroueh, U.M. (Valtion Teknillinen Tutkimuskeskus, Espoo (Finland). Kemian Lab.)

    1989-11-01

    Granular-bed filtration was investigated theoretically and experimentally with the view to its applicability to gaseous trace element removal at high temperatures. Granular-bed filters have received a great deal of attention recently as an alternative to the more conventional gas cleanup devices such as cyclones, electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and bag-filters. None of these conventional devices is capable of operating efficiently at high temperatures, (800-900 deg C), typical combined-cycle power generation plants. Moreover, a sizeable proportion of the volatilised trace metals will exit from the reactor in the vapour phase and these purification devices are not generally designed to remove the gaseous species. In an atmospheric test rig, trace elements of concern were removed in a fixed granular-bed filter at 800-900 deg C temperature range using sorbent particles (such as limestone) as the unbonded filter medium. Two configurations of the experimental apparatus were employed to enable an accurate determination of the removal efficiency of various sorbent particles. The results show that volatilised trace elements can be effectively removed from hot flue gases by passing them through a fixed bed of suitably selected solid sorbents. Removal efficiencies of higher than 99% were achieved with solid sorbent particles in the 0.3-3.0 mm size range, operating at 800-900 deg C.

  3. Soil and litter exchange of reactive trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil and litter play an important role in the exchange of trace gases between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. - The exchange of ammonia between vegetation and the atmosphere is highly influenced by soil and litter emissions especially in managed ecosystems (grassla...

  4. Absorption of Soluble Gases by Atmospheric Nanoaerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, Tov; Krasovitov, Boris; Lushnikov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We investigate mass transfer during absorption of atmospheric trace soluble gases by a single droplet whose size is comparable to the molecular mean free path in air at normal conditions. It is assumed that the trace reactant diffuses to the droplet surface and then reacts with the substances inside the droplet according to the first order rate law. Our analysis applies a flux-matching theory of transport processes in gases and assumes constant thermophysical properties of the gases and liquids. We derive an integral equation of Volterra type for the transient molecular flux density to a liquid droplet and solve it numerically. Numerical calculations are performed for absorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2), dinitrogen trioxide (N2O3) and chlorine (Cl2) by liquid nanoaerosols accompanied by chemical dissociation reaction. It is shown that during gas absorption by nanoaerosols the kinetic effects play significant role, and neglecting kinetic effects leads to significant overestimation of the soluble gas flux into a...

  5. Greenhouse effect of trace gases, 1970-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, A.; Hansen, J.; Lee, P.; Lebedeff, S.; Mitchell, T.

    1981-01-01

    Increased abundances were measured for several trace atmospheric gases in the decade 1970-1980. The equilibrium greenhouse warming for the measured increments of CH4, chlorofluorocarbons and N2O is between 50% and 100% of the equilibrium warming for the measured increase of atmospheric CO2 during the same 10 years. The combined warming of CO2 and trace gases should exceed natural global temperature variability in the 1980's and cause the global mean temperature to rise above the maximum of the late 1930's.

  6. Study of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere: Groundbased observation using SUBARU/IRCS and development of radiative transfer model for MEX/PFS limb observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Nakagawa, H.; Kasaba, Y.; Giuranna, M.; Geminale, A.; Sindoni, G.; Sagawa, H.; Mendrok, J.; Kasai, Y.; Formisano, V.

    2012-09-01

    We observed Martian atmosphere to investigate CH4, H2O, and HDO on 30 November 2011, 4-5 January 2012, and 12 April 2012 using SUBARU/ IRCS. This observation aims to verify CH4 on Mars, constrain its source, and investigate the distribution of H2O/HDO ratio. Our observation covered possible source areas of CH4, i.e. the areas where the extend plumes of CH4 were detected by previous groundbased and MEX/PFS observations [1,2] and the potential mud volcanism areas [3,4]. This paper will show some preliminary results. Vertical profiles of these trace gases are crucial for understanding their chemistry and transportation. Limb observations by MEX/PFS are a powerful tool to retrieve vertical profiles of H2O, CO, and CH4. For this purpose, we adapted the SARTre model, a radiative transfer code which includes multiple scattering for limb geometry observations developed for the terrestrial atmosphere [5], to the Martian atmosphere. In order to validate our model, SARTre model for Martian limb, we first compared of our synthetic spectra in nadir geometry with the result from ARS [6] which has been widely used for previous studies of MEX/PFS nadir-observation. We concluded that the difference between them is small offset (below 3%) in the spectral range between 3000 and 3030 cm-1.

  7. Miniature Tunable Laser Spectrometers for Quantifying Atmospheric Trace Gases, Water Resources, Earth Back-Contamination, and In Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Chris; Blacksberg, Jordana; Flesch, Greg; Keymeulen, Didier; Christensen, Lance; Forouhar, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    The Tunable Laser Spectrometers (TLS) technique has seen wide applicability in gas measurement and analysis for atmospheric analysis, industrial, commercial and health monitoring and space applications. In Earth science using balloons and aircraft over 2 decades, several groups (JPL, NASA Langley & Ames, NOAA, Harvard U., etc) have demonstrated the technique for ozone hole studies, lab kinetics measurements, cloud physics and transport, climate change in the ice record. The recent availability of high-power (mW) room temperature lasers (TDL, IC, QC) has enabled miniaturized, high-sensitivity spectrometers for industry and space (1) Mars, Titan, Venus, Saturn, Moon (2) Commercial isotope ratio spectrometers are replacing bulkier, complex isotope ratio mass spectrometers.

  8. Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, Ronald G.; Kurylo, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We seek funding from NASA for the third year (2005) of the four-year period January 1, 2003 - December 31, 2006 for continued support of the MIT contributions to the multi-national global atmospheric trace species measurement program entitled Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE). The case for real-time high-frequency measurement networks like AGAGE is very strong and the observations and their interpretation are widely recognized for their importance to ozone depletion and climate change studies and to verification issues arising from the Montreal Protocol (ozone) and Kyoto Protocol (climate). The proposed AGAGE program is distinguished by its capability to measure over the globe at high frequency almost all of the important species in the Montreal Protocol and almost all of the significant non-CO2 gases in the Kyoto Protocol.

  9. Impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of atmospheric trace gases: a case study of peroxides and HO2 radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Field measurements of atmospheric peroxides were obtained during the summer on two consecutive years over urban Beijing, and focused on the impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of peroxide compounds and hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2. The major peroxides were determined to be hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, methyl hydroperoxide (MHP, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA. A negative correlation was found between H2O2 and PAA in rainwater, providing evidence for a conversion between H2O2 and PAA in the aqueous phase. A standard gas phase chemistry model based on the NCAR Master Mechanism provided a good reproduction of the observed H2O2 profile on non-haze days but greatly overpredicted the H2O2 level on haze days. We attribute this overprediction to the reactive uptake of HO2 by the aerosols, since there was greatly enhanced aerosol loading and aerosol liquid water content on haze days. The discrepancy between the observed and modeled H2O2 can be diminished by adding to the model a newly proposed transition metal ion catalytic mechanism of HO2 in aqueous aerosols. This confirms the importance of the aerosol uptake of HO2 and the subsequent aqueous phase reactions in the reduction of H2O2. The closure of HO2 and H2O2 between the gas and aerosol phases suggests that the aerosols do not have a net reactive uptake of H2O2, because the conversion of HO2 to H2O2 on aerosols compensates for the H2O2 loss. Laboratory studies for the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the presence of HO2 are urgently required to better understand the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the real atmosphere.

  10. Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1999-03-01

    Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

  11. Demonstration of superconducting sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder (SMILES) for observing trace gases in the middle atmosphere using the exposed facility of the Japanese experimental module (JEM) of the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Seta, Masumichi; Kasai, Yasuko; Ochiai, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Inatani, Junji; Ikeda, Naomi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Iida, Yukiei; Fujii, Yasunori

    1999-01-01

    The sub-millimeter wavelength region is advantageous for high-precision observations of trace species in the stratosphere. A Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is scheduled to demonstrate the measurements of extremely faint sub-millimeter-wave emissions of the atmospheric trace gases on the Exposed Facility (EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station in 2003. The applications of superconductivity and mechanical 4K-refrigerator in space will be demonstrated in the experiment. JEM/SMILES obtains the diurnal and seasonal variability in the global three-dimensional distributions of the stratospheric trace gases for quantitative understanding of the stratospheric ozone depletion and its effect on the climate change with respect to the relationships among chemical reaction processes and their relationships with atmospheric dynamics. JEM/SMILES utilizes the 640GHz band to measure the vertical profiles of trace gases involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion such as chlorine monoxide (CLO), bromine monoxide (BrO), etc., along with atmospheric temperature. JEM/SMILES employs Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixers to improve measurement precision and spatial resolution, thereby enabling us to quantitatively understand the interactive processes between chemistry and dynamics.

  12. LIDAR technology for measuring trace gases on Mars and Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riris

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Trace gases and their isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of a planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. Calculations show that an orbiting laser remote sensing instrument is capable of measuring trace gases on a global scale with unprecedented accuracy, and higher spatial resolution that can be obtained by passive instruments. Our proposed lidar uses Integrated Path Differential Absorption technique, Optical Parametric Amplifiers, and a receiver with high sensitivity detector at 1.65 μm to map methane concentrations, a strong greenhouse gas. For Mars we can use the same technique in the 3–4 μm spectral range to map various biogenic gas concentrations and search for the existence of life. Preliminary results demonstrating methane and water vapour detection using a laboratory prototype illustrate the viability of the technique.

  13. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    We compare the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. We find that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quarter of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that du...

  14. Greenhouse effect of chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Lacis, Andrew; Prather, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A comparison is made of the radiative (greenhouse) forcing of the climate system due to changes of atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons and other trace gases. It is found that CFCs, defined to include chlorofluorocarbons, chlorocarbons, and fluorocarbons, now provide about one-quater of current annual increases in anthropogenic greenhouse climate forcing. If the growth rates of CFC production in the early 1970s had continued to the present, current annual growth of climate forcing due to CFCs would exceed that due to CO2.

  15. Light emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS): a novel technique for monitoring atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, Ryan M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.

    2009-08-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light- Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e., does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), iodine monoxide (IO), water (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). Aerosol extinction is retrieved at two wavelengths by means of observing water and O4 and measuring pressure, temperature and relative humidity independently. The instrument components are presented, and the approach to measure aerosol extinction is demonstrated by means of a set of experiments where laboratory generated monodisperse aerosols are added to the cavity. The aerosol extinction cross section agrees well with Mie calculations, demonstrating that our setup enables measurements of the above gases in open cavity mode.

  16. Influence of orographically induced transport process on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the distribution of trace gases; Einfluss orographisch induzierter Transportprozesse auf die Struktur der atmosphaerischen Grenzschicht und die Verteilung von Spurengasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossmann, M.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of terrain on the structure of the atmospheric boundary-layer and the distribution of trace gases during periods of high atmospheric pressure was studied by means of meteorological and air-chemical data collected in September 1992 during the TRACT experiment in the transition area between the upper Rhine valley and the northern Black Forest. The emphasis was on the investigation of the development of the convective boundary layer, the formation of thermally induced circulation systems, and the orographic exchange between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere. Thanks to the extensive measurements, phenomena not yet described in literature could be verified by case studies, and processes that had only been established qualitatively could be quantified. (orig.)

  17. Community Radiative Transfer Model Applications - A Study of the Retrieval of Trace Gases in the Atmosphere from Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Data of a Full-spectral Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Nalli, N. R.; Tan, C.; Zhang, K.; Iturbide, F.; Wilson, M.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) [3] operationally supports satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting, sensor data verification, and the retrievals of satellite products. The CRTM has been applied to UV and visible sensors, infrared and microwave sensors. The paper will demonstrate the applications of the CRTM, in particular radiative transfer in the retrieva algorithm. The NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally generates vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature (AVTP) and moisture (AVMP) from Suomi NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) measurements. Current operational CrIS data have reduced spectral resolution: 1.25 cm-1 for a middle wave band and 2.5 cm-1 for a short-wave wave band [1]. The reduced spectral data largely degraded the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. CrIS full spectral data are also available now which have single spectral resolution of 0.625 cm-1 for all of the three bands: long-wave band, middle wave band, and short-wave band. The CrIS full-spectral resolution data is critical to the retrieval of trace gases such as O3, CO [2], CO2, and CH4. In this paper, we use the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to study the impact of the CrIS spectral resolution on the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. The newly released CRTM version 2.2.1 can simulates Hamming-apodized CrIS radiance of a full-spectral resolution. We developed a small utility that can convert the CRTM simulated radiance to un-apodized radiance. The latter has better spectral information which can be helpful to the retrievals of the trace gases. The retrievals will be validated using both NWP model data as well as the data collected during AEROSE expeditions [4]. We will also discuss the sensitivity on trace gases between apodized and un-apodized radiances. References[1] Gambacorta, A., et al.(2013), IEEE Lett., 11(9), doi:10.1109/LGRS.2014.230364, 1639-1643. [2] Han, Y., et

  18. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  19. Compilation and evaluation of gas-phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere: volume 2. Organic compounds and Knudsen numbers for gas uptake calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion of organic vapours to the surface of aerosol or cloud particles is an important step for the formation and transformation of atmospheric particles. So far, however, a database of gas phase diffusion coefficients for organic compounds of atmospheric interest has not been available. In this work we have compiled and evaluated gas phase diffusivities (pressure-independent diffusion coefficients of organic compounds reported by previous experimental studies, and we compare the measurement data to estimates obtained with Fuller's semi-empirical method. The difference between measured and estimated diffusivities are mostly Kn although their gas phase diffusivities may vary over a wide range. Knudsen numbers of gases with unknown diffusivity can be approximated by a simple function of particle diameter and pressure and can be used to characterize the influence of diffusion on gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles. We use a kinetic multi-layer model of gas-particle interaction to illustrate the effects of gas phase diffusion on the condensation of organic compounds with different volatilities. The results show that gas-phase diffusion can play a major role in determining the growth of secondary organic aerosol particles by condensation of low-volatility organic vapours.

  20. Stable isotope measurement techniques for atmospheric greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical requirements to perform useful measurements of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and of their isotope ratios are of direct relevance for all laboratories engaged in this field. A meaningful interpretation of isotopes in global models on sources and sinks of CO2 and other greenhouse gases depends on strict laboratory protocols and data quality control measures ensuring comparable data in time and space. Only with this precondition met, the isotope techniques can serve as a potentially powerful method for reducing uncertainties in the global CO2 budgets and for tracing pathways and interaction of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric pools of carbon. This publication provides four contributions describing methods for the determination of the isotopic composition of trace gases in atmospheric air and in ice cores. These contributions have been indexed separately

  1. Greenhouse effects due to man-made perturbations of trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. C.; Yung, Y. L.; Lacis, A. A.; Mo, T.; Hansen, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, methane, ammonia, and a number of other trace constituents of the earth's atmosphere have infrared absorption bands in the spectral range from 7 to 14 microns. Despite their small amounts, these gases can have a significant effect on the thermal structure of the atmosphere by transmitting most of the thermal radiation from the earth's surface to the lower atmosphere. In the present paper, this greenhouse effect is computed for a number of trace gases. The nature and climatic implications of possible changes in the concentrations of N2O, CH4, NH3, and HNO3 are discussed.

  2. Trace Gases, CO2, Climate, and the Greenhouse Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II

    1988-01-01

    Reports carbon dioxide and other trace gases can be the cause of the Greenhouse Effect. Discusses some effects of the temperature change and suggests some solutions. Included are several diagrams, graphs, and a table. (YP)

  3. Measurements of trace gases above the tropical forests....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Monks, P. S.

    2009-04-01

    Measurements of trace gases above the tropical forests; A comparison between ozone levels in the forest and the oil palm plantation areas using the BAe -146 aircraft. The atmospheric composition of Sabah region (Borneo) was sampled using the FAAM BAE-146 instrumented aircraft during July 2008 as part of the OP3 (Oxidant particle photochemical processes above a South East Asia tropical rain forest) project. Tropical forests play an important role in the carbon and energy balance of the Earth (which determine global climate) and are themselves vulnerable to climate change. The tropical biosphere is one of the main sources of reactive trace gas emissions into the global atmosphere, and understanding the role of ozone in these areas is of major importance given the rapid changes in land-use in the tropics. This poster presents preliminary ozone concentrations results collected using the FAAM BAE 146 instrumented aircraft over some of Malaysia most extended oil palm plantations; comparing these with the results recorded when flying over forest areas. Oil palm is becoming one of the most widespread tropical crops; in Malaysia 13% of the land area (4.3Mha) is now oil palm plantations (MPOCP, 2008) compared with 1% in 1974 (FAO, 2005). This poster is expected to show very significant ozone concentrations over the two different landscapes. The set-up of the instruments, the specific sampling sites, as well as the land cover areas will be described.

  4. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  5. Microwave remote sensing of stratospheric trace gases using digital Fast Fourier Transform spectrometers

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefan C.; Murk, Axel; Monstein, Christian; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Meyer, HAnsueli

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Applied Physics observes middle atmospheric trace gases, such as ozone and water vapour, by microwave radiometry. We report on the comparison of measurements using a novel digital Fast Fourier Transform and accousto optical spectrometers. First tests made on ground are presented as well as first experience about the use of such spectrometers under aircraft conditions.

  6. Effects of land use on surface–atmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko; Misztal, Pawel; Di Marco, Chiara; Skiba, Ute; Ryder, James; Helfter, Carole; Cape, J. Neil; Owen, Sue; Dorsey, James; Gallagher, Martin W.; Coyle, Mhairi; Phillips, Gavin; Davison, Brian; Langford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of land–atmosphere fluxes of sensible and latent heat, momentum, CO2, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NO, NO2, N2O and O3 over a 30 m high rainforest canopy and a 12 m high oil palm plantation in the same region of Sabah in Borneo between April and July 2008. The daytime maximum CO2 flux to the two canopies differs by approximately a factor of 2, 1200 mg C m−2 h−1 for the oil palm and 700 mg C m−2 h−1 for the rainforest, with the oil palm plantation showing ...

  7. On the impact of Vibrational Raman Scattering of N2/O2 on MAX-DOAS Measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Johannes; Zielcke, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as the applications of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered since they can modify the observed spectra. Inelastic scattering of photons by N2 and O2 molecules can be observed as additional intensity, effectively leading to filling-in of both, solar Fraunhofer lines and absorption bands of atmospheric constituents. The main contribution is due to rotational Raman scattering, which can lead to changes in observed optical densities of absorption lines up to several percent. Measured optical densities are typically corrected for this effect (also known as Ring Effect). In contrast to that Vibrational Raman scattering of N2 and O2 was often thought to be negligible, but also contributes to this effect. We present calculations of Vibrational Raman cross-sections for O2 and N2 for the application in passive DOAS measurements. Consequences of vibrational Raman scattering are red-shifted Fraunhofer structures, so called 'Fraunhofer Ghost' lines (FGL), in scattered light spectra and filling-in of Fraunhofer lines, additional to rotational Raman scattering. We also present first unequivocal observations of FGL at optical densities of up to several 104. From our measurements and calculations of the optical density of these FGL, we conclude, that this phenomenon has to be included in the spectral evaluation of weak absorbers. Its relevance is demonstrated in spectral evaluations of Multi-Axis (MAX)-DOAS data and an agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections is found. To exclude cross-sensitivities with other absorbers, such as water vapour, MAX-DOAS data from different latitudes and different instruments were analysed. We evaluate the influence of the additional intensities due to vibrational Raman scattering on the spectral retrieval of IO, Glyoxal, H2O and NO2 in the blue wavelength range. In the case of NO2 the column densities derived from certain wavelength

  8. Using eddy covariance and Earth observation products to investigate the Indian Ocean as a source/sink of trace gases to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarsky, Alex; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2015-04-01

    According to well known climatologies for CO2 and DMS, the southwest Indian Ocean shows strong seasonality in surface water concentrations. Available CO2 observations show values around equilibrium from November to April, followed by a strong decrease that results in an undersaturation of around 80 µatm in July/August. Consequently, this area is an important sink for atmospheric CO2. In contrast this region is predicted to be a hotspot for DMS emissions. Maximum surface concentrations are expected in northern hemisphere winter (NH). However, the air-sea gas exchange is largely influenced by the monsoon circulation, hence it is computed to peak in June/July. Furthermore these climatologies are based on low spatial and temporal resolution observations, which is especially important when dealing with a seasonally reversing ocean-atmosphere system. Given the evidence that the Indian Ocean is changing faster than other ocean basins, it is important to understand the mechanisms that drive air-sea exchange in this significant sink/source region. Here we present preliminary data obtained during a cruise starting in Durban, South Africa and ending in Male, Maledives, from July to August 2014. For the first time, eddy covariance air-sea fluxes and concentration gradient measurements for CO2 and DMS were obtained simultaneously in the southwestern Indian Ocean. We will derive gas transfer coefficients (k) from these direct measurements and correlate with wind speed (u) and other parameters measured on board in order to investigate the mechanisms behind gas transfer. Furthermore, we will examine the intercomparison of DMS and CO2 so as to focus on the effect of solubility on gas exchange. In addition, we will use a range of outputs from remote sensing platforms to assist the interpretation of the in situ data (e.g. significant wave heights, existence of diurnal warming, impact of SST skin on the CO2 fluxes, rain frequency and intensity, existence of SST fronts). The

  9. ENSO effects on stratospheric trace gases: How do we capture reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braesicke, Peter; Kirner, Oliver; Versick, Stefan; Joeckel, Patrick; Stiler, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is an important pacemaker for interannual variability in the Earth's atmosphere. ENSO impacts on trace gases have been observed and modelled for the stratosphere and the troposphere. However, unambiguous attribution is often difficult due to the limited length of homogenous observational records and thus long-term (decadal) trends are sometimes difficult to detect. Generally ENSO impacts in low latitudes are easier to detect, because the response emerges close (temporally and spatially) to the forcing. Moving from low to high latitudes it becomes increasingly difficult to isolate ENSO driven variability, due to time-lags involved and many other modes of variability playing a role as well. Here, we use a nudged version of the EMAC chemistry-climate model to evaluate ENSO impacts on trace gases over the last 35 years (a so-called Ref-C1SD integration) and contrast the nudged model with its free running counterpart. We use water vapour and ozone observations from the MIPAS instrument on ENVISAT from 2002 to 2012 to test the model performance. Using lagged correlations for the longer model time-series we trace the ENSO signal from the tropical lower troposphere to the polar lower and middle stratosphere and provide a framework for simple attribution of the ENSO signal in trace gases. This concise characterisation of the ENSO impact on trace gases aids improved trend detection in temporally limited time series.

  10. Titan's temporal evolution in stratospheric trace gases near the poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena; Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Bampasidis, Georgios; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Nixon, Conor A.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Anderson, Carrie M.; Cottini, Valeria; Flasar, F. Michael

    2016-05-01

    We analyze spectra acquired by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at high resolution from October 2010 until September 2014 in nadir mode. Up until mid 2012, Titan's Northern atmosphere exhibited the enriched chemical content found since the Voyager days (November 1980), with a peak around the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE) in 2009. Since then, we have observed the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox) until 2014. For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H6 and C3H8) and CO2, the evolution in the past 4 years at a given latitude is not very significant within error bars especially until mid-2013. In more recent dates, these molecules show a trend for increase in the south. This trend is dramatically more pronounced for the other trace species, especially in 2013-2014, and at 70°S relative to 50°S. These two regions then demonstrate that they are subject to different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. For most species, we find higher abundances at 50°N compared to 50°S, with the exception of C3H8, CO2, C6H6 and HC3N, which arrive at similar mixing ratios after mid-2013. While the 70°N data show generally no change with a trend rather to a small decrease for most species within 2014, the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. The 663 cm-1 HC3N and the C6H6 674 cm-1 emission bands appeared in late 2011/early 2012 in the south polar regions and have since then exhibited a dramatic increase in their abundances. At 70°S HC3N, HCN and C6H6 have increased by 3 orders of magnitude over the past 3-4 years while other molecules, including C2H4, C3H4 and C4H2, have increased less sharply (by 1-2 orders of magnitude). This is a strong

  11. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    S. Baidar; Oetjen, H.; S. Coburn; Dix, B.; I. Ortega; R. Sinreich; R. Volkamer

    2013-01-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is uniq...

  12. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, T; Ibrahim, O.; R. Shaiganfar; U. Platt

    2010-01-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal ...

  13. Five-year flask measurements of long-lived trace gases in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, X.; Indira, N. K.; Ramonet, M.; Delmotte, M.; Ciais, P.; Bhatt, B. C.; Reddy, M. V.; Angchuk, D.; Balakrishnan, S.; Jorphail, S.; Dorjai, T.; Mahey, T. T.; Patnaik, S.; Begum, M.; Brenninkmeijer, C.; Durairaj, S.; Kirubagaran, R.; Schmidt, M.; Swathi, P. S.; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Yver Kwok, C.; Gaur, V. K.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth in population and economic development, emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from the Indian subcontinent have sharply increased during recent decades. However, evaluation of regional fluxes of GHGs and characterization of their spatial and temporal variations by atmospheric inversions remain uncertain due to a sparse regional atmospheric observation network. As a result of Indo-French collaboration, three new atmospheric stations were established in India at Hanle (HLE), Pondicherry (PON) and Port Blair (PBL), with the objective of monitoring the atmospheric concentrations of GHGs and other trace gases. Here we present the results of five-year measurements (2007-2011) of CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, and H2 from regular flask sampling at these three stations. For each species, annual means, seasonal cycles and gradients between stations were calculated and related to variations in the natural GHG fluxes, anthropogenic emissions, and the monsoon circulations. Covariances between species at the synoptic scale were analyzed to investigate the dominant source(s) of emissions. The flask measurements of various trace gases at the three stations show potential to constrain the inversions of fluxes over Southern and Northeastern India. However, this network of ground stations needs further extension to other parts of India to allow a better understanding of, and constraints on the GHG budgets at regional and continental scales.

  14. Volume 1 Chapter 2: Emissions and concentrations of radiatively active atmospheric trace constituents

    OpenAIRE

    W. Winiwarter

    2014-01-01

    Radiatively active atmospheric trace constituents consist of the following groups of compounds: long-lived greenhouse gases with residence times of years, subject to international conventions; short-lived gases formed in the atmosphere from precursor compounds, remaining in the atmosphere for hours or days: notably ozone; and aerosols, that is, airborne particles interacting with short-wave radiation with both direct and indirect effects. The "direct effect" covers scattering or absorption of...

  15. Infrared spectroscopic measurements on planetary atmospheric gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared spectroscopic measurements were performed on trace gas molecules known to be infrared-active in the atmospheres of Earth and the Outer Planets. The measurements were performed at low temperatures relevant to the planetary atmospheres employing the high spectral resolution attainable with a tunable diode laser spectrometer. Accurate data on the intensities, N(2-), O(2-), and air-broadened half-widths of lines in the nu(sub 1)-fundamental band (7.78 microns) of 14-N2O-16 were obtained at several temperatures between 185 and 296 K. These data are needed in remote sensing, ozone depletion, and climate modeling studies of the terrestrial atmosphere. The pressure-induced shifts of some 14-N2O-16 lines were also measured. Intensity data in the 10(sup 0)0-01(sup 1)0 band (13.87 microns) of 12-C16-O2 at 295 K which are useful in studies of the thermal structure of the Earth's atmosphere were measured. They differ significantly from previously published and cataloged data. Measurements of the absolute intensities and the H2-broadened half-widths of several spectral lines in the nu(sub 3) band of GeH4, which was detected in the atmospheres of the Outer Planets, were performed at low temperatures between 94 and 300 K. The combined intensity of the nu(sub 3) bands of all of the five isotopic species of GeH4 as well as that of the Q-branches alone were measured independently at 294 using the Wilson-Wells-Penner-Weber Technique. Absolute intensities, collision-broadened half-widths, and pressure-induced shifts of several lines in the nu(sub 4)-fundamental bands of 12-CH4 and 13-CH4 around 7.70 microns, the nu(sub 2)-fundamantal band of 12-CH3D at 4.55 microns, the nu(sub 3)-fundamental band of 12-CH3D at 7.76 microns, the nu(sub 6)-fundamental band of 12-CH3D at 8.61 microns, and the CO fundamental at 4.67 microns, all of which appear in the spectra of the Outer Planets, were measured at low temperatures

  16. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available From Multi-Axis- (MAX- DOAS observations information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  17. Mobile MAX-DOAS observations of tropospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Ibrahim, O.; Shaiganfar, R.; Platt, U.

    2010-02-01

    From Multi-Axis- (MAX-) DOAS observations, information on tropospheric trace gases close to the surface and up to the free troposphere can be obtained. Usually MAX-DOAS observations are performed at fixed locations, which allows to retrieve the diurnal variation of tropospheric species at that location. Alternatively, MAX-DOAS observations can also be made on mobile platforms like cars, ships or aircrafts. Then, in addition to the vertical (and temporal) distribution, also the horizontal variation of tropospheric trace gases can be measured. Such information is important for the quantitative comparison with model simulations, study of transport processes, and for the validation of tropospheric trace gas products from satellite observations. However, for MAX-DOAS observations from mobile platforms, the standard analysis techniques for MAX-DOAS observations can usually not be applied, because the probed airmasses can change rapidly between successive measurements. In this study we introduce a new technique which overcomes these problems and allows the exploitation of the full information content of mobile MAX-DOAS observations. Our method can also be applied to MAX-DOAS observations made at fixed locations in order to improve the accuracy especially in cases of strong winds. We apply the new technique to MAX-DOAS observations made during an automobile trip from Brussels to Heidelberg.

  18. Techniques for the measurement of trace moisture in high-purity electronic specialty gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of water vapor (moisture) contamination in process gases is critical to the successful manufacture of semiconductor devices. As specified moisture levels have become more stringent, there is a growing demand for more sensitive analytical methods. Instrumental methods currently being used or in development for measuring trace moisture at ppbv levels include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, intracavity laser spectroscopy, electron impact ionization mass spectrometry, and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry. In addition, sensor-based technologies such as oscillating quartz crystal microbalances, and chilled mirror-, capacitor-, and electrolytic-based hygrometers operate in this regime. These approaches are presented and reviewed. As the success of each trace moisture method is dependent on the degree to which the different process gases interfere with the measurement process, important process gas applications of the techniques are highlighted. Advantages and disadvantages as well as future developments and trends are also presented

  19. Fuel characteristics and trace gases produced through biomass burning

    OpenAIRE

    BAMBANG HERO SAHARJO; SHIGETO SUDO; SEIICHIRO YONEMURA; HARUO TSURUTA

    2010-01-01

    Saharjo BH, Sudo S, Yonemura S, Tsuruta H (2010) Fuel characteristics and trace gases produced through biomass burning. Biodiversitas 11: 40-45. Indonesian 1997/1998 forest fires resulted in forest destruction totally 10 million ha with cost damaged about US$ 10 billion, where more than 1 Gt CO2 has been released during the fire episode and elevating Indonesia to one of the largest polluters of carbon in the world where 22% of world’s carbon dioxide produced. It has been found that 80-90% of ...

  20. BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H2-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, using a model atmosphere with photochemistry and a biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibility of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H2 atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO2 levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In Sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV-quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to accumulate detectable biosignature gases in an H2 atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmospheres, where photochemically produced OH is the major destructive species. Most potential biosignature gases, such as dimethylsulfide and CH3Cl, are therefore more favorable in low-UV, as compared with solar-like UV, environments. A few promising biosignature gas candidates, including NH3 and N2O, are favorable even in solar-like UV environments, as these gases are destroyed directly by photolysis and not by H (or O). A more subtle finding is that most gases produced by life that are fully hydrogenated forms of an element, such as CH4 and H2S, are not effective signs of life in an H2-rich atmosphere because the dominant atmospheric chemistry will generate such gases abiologically, through photochemistry or geochemistry. Suitable biosignature gases in H2-rich atmospheres for super-Earth exoplanets transiting M stars could potentially be detected in transmission spectra with the James Webb Space Telescope

  1. Long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2), O2, and δ13CH4 isotopes at Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory, UK: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew C.; Forster, Grant L.; Oram, David E.; Reeves, Claire E.; Pickers, Penelope A.; Barningham, S. Thomas; Sturges, William T.; Bandy, Brian; Nisbet, Euan G.; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca; Fleming, Zoe

    2016-04-01

    The Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO) is situated on the north Norfolk Coast (52.95°N, 1.13°E) in the United Kingdom and is run by the University of East Anglia (UEA), with support from the UK National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS). In 2016, the WAO became a UK-ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observing System) monitoring station. Since 2008, we have been collecting high-precision long-term in situ measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), carbon monoxide (CO) and molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as regular bag sampling for δ13CH4. In early 2013, the measurement of atmospheric methane (CH4) commenced, and nitrous oxide (N2O) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) began in 2014. We summarise the CO2, O2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO, H2 and δ13CH4 measurements made to date and highlight some key features observed (e.g. seasonal cycles, long-term trends, pollution events and deposition events). We summarise how the long-term measurements fit into other broader projects which have helped to support the long term time-series at WAO over the years, and highlight how we contribute to broader global atmospheric observation networks.

  2. Long-Term Changes of Tropospheric Trace Gases over Pakistan Derived From Multiple Satellite Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Naila; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Murtaza, Rabbia; Noreen, Asma; Khalid, Tameem

    2016-07-01

    in June (Summer/Monsoon). For NO2, the highest concentrations are observed during Winter and the lowest concentrations are found in Summer/Monsoon. Like TOC, the HCHO showed seasonal maxima during summer and minima during winter. The expected sources are the crop residue burning, biomass/fossil fuel burning for heating purposes, urbanization, industrialization and meterological variations. Further focus is made on exploring the association of trace gases in atmosphere and their source identification.

  3. Contribution to the chromatography of atmospheric gases (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part, the author studies the gas-phase chromatographic separation of the atmospheric rare gases, of hydrogen, and of some gaseous compounds of carbon (CO, CO2, CH4) using inactive gases to obtain the most favourable operational conditions far this separation. In the second part, the optimum conditions for detecting non-active gases using an ionisation chamber and a 239Pu radioactive source emitting 5.15 MeV α particles are determined. (author)

  4. Fuel characteristics and trace gases produced through biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAMBANG HERO SAHARJO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Saharjo BH, Sudo S, Yonemura S, Tsuruta H (2010 Fuel characteristics and trace gases produced through biomass burning. Biodiversitas 11: 40-45. Indonesian 1997/1998 forest fires resulted in forest destruction totally 10 million ha with cost damaged about US$ 10 billion, where more than 1 Gt CO2 has been released during the fire episode and elevating Indonesia to one of the largest polluters of carbon in the world where 22% of world’s carbon dioxide produced. It has been found that 80-90% of the fire comes from estate crops and industrial forest plantation area belongs to the companies which using fire illegally for the land preparation. Because using fire is cheap, easy and quick and also support the companies purpose in achieving yearly planted area target. Forest management and land use practices in Sumatra and Kalimantan have evolved very rapidly over the past three decades. Poor logging practices resulted in large amounts of waste will left in the forest, greatly elevating fire hazard. Failure by the government and concessionaires to protect logged forests and close old logging roads led to and invasion of the forest by agricultural settlers whose land clearances practices increased the risk of fire. Several field experiments had been done in order to know the quality and the quantity of trace produced during biomass burning in peat grass, peat soil and alang-alang grassland located in South Sumatra, Indonesia. Result of research show that different characteristics of fuel burned will have the different level also in trace gasses produced. Peat grass with higher fuel load burned produce more trace gasses compared to alang-alang grassland and peat soil.

  5. Isotope variations of carbon dioxide, methane and other trace gases in Cracow and Kasprowy, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonal variations of concentration and isotopic composition of the atmospheric trace gases CO2, CH4 and SF6 are presented for a three years period in two stations in Poland. The station in Cracow represents a polluted urban area with strong contributions of anthropogenic local sources, while the other one is located 80 km away in the High Tatra mountains at Kasprowy Wierch representing a nearly undisturbed clean station. Trends of the concentration and isotopic signatures are discussed and a separation of the CO2 concentration in three components of anthropogenic, biogenic and background origin is presented. (author)

  6. Scavenging of radioactive soluble gases from inhomogeneous atmosphere by evaporating rain droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze effects of inhomogeneous concentration and temperature distributions in the atmosphere, rain droplet evaporation and radioactive decay of soluble gases on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain. We employ a one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of radioactive soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients and non-uniform initial altitudinal distributions of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. We assume that conditions of equilibrium evaporation of rain droplets are fulfilled. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the linear wave equation that describes propagation of a scavenging wave front. The obtained equation is solved by the method of characteristics. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of gaseous iodine-131 and tritiated water vapor (HTO) for the exponential initial distribution of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear temperature distribution. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for tritiated water vapor are in good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements. - Highlights: • Original model of soluble radioactive gas scavenging by precipitation is proposed. • Effect of radioactive decay on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain is analyzed. • Atmospheric temperature inhomogeneity changes dynamics of soluble gas scavenging. • Gas scavenging by evaporative rain droplets is determined by linear wave equation. • Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with atmospheric measurements

  7. MAX-DOAS observations of trace gases over Mainz: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Carlos; Gu, Myojeong; Remmers, Julia; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report on levels of trace gases in ambient atmosphere in Mainz, Germany. We measured the differential Slant Column Density (dSCD) of NO2, HCHO and O4 in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum using a Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument. The MAX-DOAS observations were taken at Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, from January to March 2014, at different elevation angles. The main aim of the study is to compare the results of the Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument with those from a 'scientific' MAX-DOAS instrument operated simultaneously at the same location. We quantify systematic differences and random and errors of both data sets for different measurement conditions. The preliminary results of this MAX DOAS observations and the diurnal variation of the retrieved trace gas DSCDs will be discussed in this work.

  8. Trace Contaminant Testing with the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Broerman, Craig D.; Campbell, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Every spacecraft atmosphere contains trace contaminants resulting from offgassing by cabin materials and human passengers. An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). Part of the risk mitigation effort for this new technology is the study of how atmospheric trace contaminants will affect and be affected by the technology. One particular area of concern is ammonia, which, in addition to the normal spacecraft sources, can also be offgassed by the amine-based sorbent. In the spring of 2009, tests were performed at Johnson Space Center (JSC) with typical cabin atmosphere levels of five of the most common trace gases, most of which had not yet been tested with this technology. A subscale sample of the sorbent was exposed to each of the chemicals mixed into a stream of moist, CO2-laden air, and the CO2 adsorption capacity of the sorbent was compared before and after the exposure. After these typical-concentration chemicals were proven to have negligible effect on the subscale sample, tests proceeded on a full-scale test article in a sealed chamber with a suite of eleven contaminants. To isolate the effects of various test rig components, several extended-duration tests were run: without injection or scrubbing, with injection and without scrubbing, with injection of both contaminants and metabolic CO2 and water vapor loads and scrubbing by both the test article and dedicated trace contaminant filters, and with the same injections and scrubbing by only the test article. The high-level results of both the subscale and full-scale tests are examined in this paper.

  9. Measurements of Trace Gases in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Ray, E. A.; Richard, E. C.; Thompson, T. L.; Atlas, E. L.; Lowenstein, M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Park, S.; Weinstock, E. M.; Swartz, W. H.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A unique dataset of airborne in situ observations of HCl, O3, HNO3, H2O, CO, CO2 and CH3Cl has been made in and near the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A total of 16 profiles across the tropopause were obtained at latitudes between 10degN and 3degs from the NASA WB-57F high-altitude aircraft flying from Costa Rica. Few in situ measurements of these gases, particularly HCl and HNO3, have been reported for the TTL. The general features of the trace gas vertical profiles are consistent with the concept of the TTL as distinct from the lower troposphere and lower stratosphere. A combination of the tracer profiles and correlations with O3 is used to show that a measurable amount of stratospheric air is mixed into this region. The HCl measurements offer an important constraint on stratospheric mixing into the TTL because once the contribution from halocarbon decomposition is quantified, the remaining HCl (>60% in this study) must have a stratospheric source. Stratospheric HCl in the TTL brings with it a proportional amount of stratospheric O3. Quantifying the sources of O3 in the TTL is important because O3 is particularly effective as a greenhouse gas in the tropopause region.

  10. Monitoring shipping emissions with MAX-DOAS measurements of reactive trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittrock, Folkard; Peters, Enno; Seyler, André; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Burrows, John P.; Chirkov, Maksym; Meier, Andreas C.; Richter, Andreas; Schönhardt, Anja; Schmolke, Stefan; Theobald, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution from ships contributes to overall air quality problems and it has direct health effects on the population in particular in coastal regions, and in harbor cities. In order to reduce the emissions the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) have tightened the regulations for air pollution. E.g. Sulfur Emission Control Areas (SECA) have been introduced where the sulfur content of marine fuel is limited. However, up to now there is no regular monitoring system available to verify that ships are complying with the new regulations. Furthermore measurements of reactive trace gases in marine environments are in general sparse. The project MeSMarT (Measurements of shipping emissions in the marine troposphere, www.mesmart.de) has been established as a cooperation between the University of Bremen and the German Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency) with support of the Helmholtz Research Centre Geesthacht to estimate the influence of ship emissions on the chemistry of the atmospheric boundary layer and to establish a monitoring system for main shipping routes. Here we present MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 and SO2 carried out during ship campaigns in the North and Baltic Sea and from two permanent sites close to the Elbe river (Wedel, Germany) and on the island Neuwerk close to the mouths of Elbe and Weser river. Mixing ratios of both trace gases have been retrieved using different approaches (pure geometric and taking into account the radiative transfer) and compared to in situ and air borne observations (see Kattner et al., Monitoring shipping emissions with in-situ measurements of trace gases, and Meier et al., Airborne measurements of NO2 shipping emissions using imaging DOAS) observations. Furthermore simple approaches have been used to calculate emission factors of NOx and SO2 for single ships.

  11. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    OpenAIRE

    G. C. Hulley; Duren, R. M.; F. M. Hopkins; Hook, S. J.; Vance, N.; Guillevic, P.; Johnson, W. R.; Eng, B. T.; Mihaly, J. M.; V. M. JOVANOVIC; Chazanoff, S. L.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and div...

  12. Biosignature Gases in H2-Dominated Atmospheres on Rocky Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S; Hu, R

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) Super Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, by using a model atmosphere with photochemistry, and biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibilty of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H2 atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO2 levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to in an H2 atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmosp...

  13. Observations of halogenated trace gases in Taiwan and Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Lauren J.; Laube, Johannes C.; Sturges, William T.; Oram, David E.; Wang, Jia-Lin; Ou-Yang, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Neng-Huei; Mead, Iq; Rigby, Matt; White, Emily

    2015-04-01

    There are a large variety of halocarbons present in the atmosphere that significantly impact on stratospheric ozone depletion and/or global warming. Though the use of some of these compounds has been phased out and replaced under global control measures, relatively long atmospheric lifetimes, imperfect substitutes and incomplete reductions in usage mean that global concentrations of halocarbons still require regular monitoring. This is especially true for the rapidly developing East Asian region, where high emissions have been repeatedly reported in recent years. We here present results from an air sampling activity in Taiwan and Malaysia during the spring months of 2013 and 2014. A large range of halocarbons, including a number of novel gases, were investigated via high sensitivity gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). We find periods of relatively clean air as well as episodes that appear to be impacted by urban and/or industrial emissions and examine correlations between individual species. Observed mixing ratios are compared in context with both global background data and other regional studies. Enhancements in the abundances of many halocarbons are detected with examples including the Halons 1211 and 1202 as well as the very long-lived perfluorocarbons c-C4F8, C5F12 and C7F16. We also show and evaluate unusually high mixing ratios of other globally growing halocarbons such as sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl), and CFC-113a (CF3CCl3). Finally, we use NAME analysis to produce back-trajectories in order to assess possible regional emission sources.

  14. Isotope aided studies of atmospheric carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The substantial increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and their role in global warming have become major concerns of world governments. Application of isotope techniques to label sources and sinks of CO2 and other greenhouse gases has emerged as a potentially powerful method for reducing uncertainties in the global CO2 budgets and for tracing pathways and interaction of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric pools of carbon. As with CO2 concentration measurements, meaningful integration of isotopes in global models requires careful attention to quality assurance, quality control and inter-comparability of measurements made by a number of networks and laboratories. To support improvements in isotope measurement capabilities, the IAEA began implementing Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs) in 1992. The first project, entitled Isotope Variations of Carbon Dioxide and other Trace Gases in the Atmosphere, was implemented from 1992 to 1994. A significant contribution was made towards a better understanding of the global carbon cycle and especially of the sources and sinks of carbon with data on the 14C and 13C content of atmospheric CO2, pointing to a better understanding of the problem of the 'missing sink' in the global carbon cycle. Important methodological developments in the field of high precision stable isotope mass spectrometry and improved data acquisition procedures emerged from work carried out within the framework of this programme. The development of pressurized gas standards and planning for an associated interlaboratory calibration were initiated. Due to the good progress and long standing nature of the required work a second CRP was initiated and implemented from 1996 to 1999. It was entitled Isotope aided Studies of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Other Trace Gases - Phase II, to document the close relationship of both programmes. This publication provides an overview of the scientific outcomes of the studies conducted within Phase II of

  15. MAX-DOAS aerosol and trace gases measurements in megacities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); College of Environmental Science and Engineering Peking University, Beijing (China); Brauers, Theo [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Shao, Min [College of Environmental Science and Engineering Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAXDOAS) is a new remote sensing technique to measure atmospheric trace gases. Compared to other areas in the world, the atmospheric observations in megacities in China are rather limited. We present MAX-DOAS measurements at four sites in Beijing and Guangzhou in 2006 and 2008. At each site, the scattered sunlight was recorded at 7 elevation angles for about 1 months. Using the zenith spectrum as reference, the Differential Slant Column Densities (DSCDs) of HCHO, CHOCHO, O{sub 4} and NO{sub 2} at offaxis viewing geometries were derived from the DOAS fit. These DSCDs were simulated using a backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The aerosol and trace gas profiles were defined by 3 parameters: the integrated quantities (T), the height of the surface layer (H), and the fraction of T below H. We fitted the modeled values to the measured values at the corresponding viewing geometries by varying the 3 parameters. The aerosol extinction and the boundary layer height were successfully retrieved from the measured O{sub 4} DSCDs as well as ground level concentrations of CHOCHO, HCHO, and NO{sub 2}, the latter being compared to simultaneous in-situ measurements.

  16. Sources and sinks of trace gases in Amazonia and the Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M. M. C.; Keller, M.; Silva, D. A.

    Data for trace gas fluxes (NOx, N2O, and CH4) from the Amazon and cerrado region are presented with focus on the processes of production and consumption of these trace gases in soils and how they may be changed because of land use changes in both regions. Fluxes are controlled by seasonality, soil moisture, soil texture, topography, and fine-root dynamics. Compared to Amazonian forests where the rapid cycling of nitrogen supports large emissions of N2O, nitrification rates and soil emissions of N oxide gases in the cerrado region are very low. Several studies report CH4 consumption during both wet and dry seasons in forest soils, but there is occasionally net production of CH4 during the wet season. A few studies suggest an unknown source of CH4 from upland forests. As with N oxide emissions, there are few data on CH4 emissions from cerrado soils, but CH4 consumption occurs during both wet and dry seasons. Clearing natural vegetation, burning, fertilization of agricultural lands, intensive cattle ranching, and increasing dominance by legume species in areas under secondary succession after land conversion have all been identified as causes of increasing N2O and NO emissions from tropical regions. Large uncertainties remain for regional estimates of trace gas fluxes. Improvement of models for the N oxides and CH4 fluxes for Amazonia and the cerrado still depends upon gathering more data from sites more widely distributed across two vast biomes and more importantly on basic theory about the controls of emissions from the ecosystem to the atmosphere.

  17. Satellite-derived Signatures of Trace Gases from US. Oil and Gas Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2005, there has been an increase in shale gas production, which is expected to continue through 2035, leading to heightened environmental concerns regarding increased emissions of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) and degradation of local air quality. Emissions of CH4 and VOCs may occur at any stage of exploration and production via venting, flashing, flaring, or fugitive/non-permitted emissions. The industrial equipment used to install and maintain a well is a potential emission source of CH4, VOCs, nitrogen oxides, and other gases. Emissions from these individual point sources can accumulate and represent a substantial area source of trace gases to the atmosphere. We have begun to characterize the trace gas signatures associated with oil and natural gas (O&NG) operations in the U.S. using satellite observations over two key regions: the Marcellus and Bakkan Shale Deposits. Current satellite products, including CH4 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, are compared to aircraft and ground measurements. Preliminary analysis during June 2012 shows the potential for TES in the mid-troposphere to detect and track increases in CH4 due to a gas well leak in the Marcellus Shale Region. Trace gas trends from satellite observations are analyzed in the vicinity of O&NG sites. The TES CH4 representative tropospheric volume mixing ratio (RTVMR) product, particularly used for emission detection, displays evidence of increasing methane over PA from 2006 through 2012. This analysis begins to provide improved constraints on O&NG emissions and supply a template for future geo-missions, such as TEMPO, for continued observations of air quality.

  18. Physics of Atmospheric Electric Discharges in Gases: An Informal Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Parrot, M

    2007-01-01

    A short account of the physics of electrical discharges in gases is given in view of its historical evolution and application to planetary atmospheres. As such it serves as an introduction to the articles on particular aspects of electric discharges contained in this book, in particular in the chapters on lightning and the violent discharges which in the recent two decades have been observed to take place in Earth's upper atmosphere. In addition of briefly reviewing the early history of gas discharge physics we discuss the main parameters affecting violent atmospheric discharges like collision frequency, mean free path and critical electric field strength. Any discharge current in the atmosphere is clearly carried only by electrons. Above the lower bound of the mesosphere the electrons must be considered magnetized with the conductivity becoming a tensor. Moreover, the collisional mean free path in the upper atmosphere becomes relatively large which lowers the critical electric field there and more easily ena...

  19. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere—Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhao; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Xiang, Hao; Fang, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm) attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm–661 nm), meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm–30 nm), Aitken mode (30 nm–100 nm), and accumulation mode (100 nm–661 nm) reached 4923 cm−3, 12193 cm−3 and 4801 cm−3, respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of “repeated, short-lived” nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in industrial cities of

  20. Transport of terrestrial atmospheric gases to the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, H. K.; Freeman, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment instruments on the lunar surface have identified fluxes of ions which may be different from the solar wind both in elemental and in isotopic abundances. At present, only O/+/ is (tentatively) identified, but the mechanism operates to produce ions at the moon which have their origin in the earth's atmosphere. Consequently, the 'solar wind' component of the surface-correlated gases is effectively a combination of terrestrial atmospheric ions and the actual solar wind. The results differ from solar wind results if the terrestrial ion abundances strongly differ from those of the solar wind.

  1. Development of 2-D-MAX-DOAS and retrievals of trace gases and aerosols optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ivan

    Air pollution is a major problem worldwide that adversely a_ects human health, impacts ecosystems and climate. In the atmosphere, there are hundreds of important compounds participating in complex atmospheric reactions linked to air quality and climate. Aerosols are relevant because they modify the radiation balance, a_ect clouds, and thus Earth albedo. The amount of aerosol is often characterized by the vertical integral through the entire height of the atmosphere of the logarithm fraction of incident light that is extinguished called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). The AOD at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is 0.19 (multi annual global mean), and that over oceans is 0.13. About 43 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions, sample spatial scales that resemble satellite ground-pixels and atmospheric models, and help integrate remote sensing and in-situ observations to obtain optical closure on the effects of aerosols and trace gases in our changing environment. In this work, I present the recent development of the University of Colorado two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument to measure the azimuth and altitude distribution of trace gases and aerosol optical properties simultaneously with a single instrument. The instrument measures solar scattered light from any direction in the sky, including direct sun light in the hyperspectral domain. In Chapter 2, I describe the capabilities of 2-D measurements in the context of retrievals of azimuth distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), and glyoxal (CHOCHO), which are precursors for tropospheric O3 and aerosols. The measurements were carried out during the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) campaign in Mainz, Germany and show the ability to bridge spatial scales to

  2. MASERATI: a new rocket-borne diode laser absorption spectrometer for in-situ measurement of trace gases in the middle and upper atmosphere; MASERATI: Ein neues raketengetragenes Diodenlaser-Absorptionsspektrometer zur in situ-Messung von Spurengasen in der mittleren und oberen Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucke, H. von

    1999-09-01

    MASERATI (middle atmosphere spectrometric experiment on Rockets for the analysis of trace gas influences) is the first rocket-borne tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS). It was developed to measure water vapor and carbon dioxide in the altitude range from 50 to 90 km and 120 km, respectively. Infrared absorption spectroscopy using two laser diodes is applied to measure both trace gases simultaneously. The laser beams are sent into an open multiple-pass absorption setup mounted on top of the sounding rocket. High sensitivity is achieved by means of frequency modulation and lock-in techniques. The results of several tests performed in the laboratory demonstrate that the instrument is capable of detecting relative absorbances down to 10{sup -4} - 10{sup -5} when integrating spectra for 1 s. Two almost identical MASERATI instruments have been built and launched on sounding rockets from the Andoeya rocket range (69 N, 16 E) in northern Norway during winter 1997/98. The results of these flights demonstrate that MASERATI is a new suitable tool for in situ studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. (orig.)

  3. Greenhouse gases regional fluxes estimated from atmospheric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    build up a new system to measure continuously CO2 (or CO), CH4, N2O and SF6 mixing ratios. It is based on a commercial gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N) which have been modified to reach better precision. Reproducibility computed with a target gas on a 24 hours time step gives: 0.06 ppm for CO2, 1.4 ppb for CO, 0.7 ppb for CH4, 0.2 ppb for N2O and 0.05 ppt for SF6. The instrument's run is fully automated, an air sample analysis takes about 5 minutes. In July 2006, I install instrumentation on a telecommunication tall tower (200 m) situated near Orleans forest in Trainou, to monitor continuously greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6), atmospheric tracers (CO, Radon-222) and meteorological parameters. Intake lines were installed at 3 levels (50, 100 and 180 m) and allow us to sample air masses along the vertical. Continuous measurement started in January 2007. I used Mace Head (Ireland) and Gif-sur-Yvette continuous measurements to estimate major greenhouse gases emission fluxes at regional scale. To make the link between atmospheric measurements and surface fluxes, we need to quantify dilution due to atmospheric transport. I used Radon-222 as tracer (radon tracer method) and planetary boundary layer heights estimates from ECMWF model (boundary layer budget method) to parameterize atmospheric transport. In both cases I compared results to available emission inventories. (author)

  4. Retrieval of Atmospheric Aerosol and Trace Gas Vertical Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Selami

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the vertical distribution of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols were retrieved using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). Various inversion methods were used to retrieve the profiles from the MAX-DOAS measurements. A new MAX-DOAS instrument optimized for the measurement of aerosol and trace gas profiles was developed. The retrieval methods were tested and advanced in the scope of the EUSAAR (European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research)...

  5. Ground-based imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohberger, Falko; Hönninger, Gerd; Platt, Ulrich

    2004-08-20

    We describe a compact remote-sensing instrument that permits spatially resolved mapping of atmospheric trace gases by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and present our first applications of imaging of the nitrogen dioxide contents of the exhaust plumes of two industrial emitters. DOAS permits the identification and quantification of various gases, e.g., NO2, SO2, and CH2O, from their specific narrowband (differential) absorption structures with high selectivity and sensitivity. With scattered sunlight as the light source, DOAS is used with an imaging spectrometer that is simultaneously acquiring spectral information on the incident light in one spatial dimension (column). The second spatial dimension is scanned by a moving mirror. PMID:15352396

  6. Stratospheric trace gases from SCIAMACHY limb measurements using 3D full spherical Monte Carlo radiative transfer model Tracy-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukite, Janis [Max- Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia (Latvia); Kuehl, Sven; Wagner, Thomas [Max- Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Deutschmann, Tim; Platt, Ulrich [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A two step method for the retrieval of stratospheric trace gases (NO{sub 2}, BrO, OClO) from SCIAMACHY limb observations in the UV/VIS spectral region is presented: First, DOAS is applied on the spectra, yielding slant column densities (SCDs) of the respective trace gases. Second, the SCDs are converted into vertical concentration profiles applying radiative transfer modeling. The Monte Carlo method benefits from conceptual simplicity and allows realizing the concept of full spherical geometry of the atmosphere and also its 3D properties, which are important for a realistic description of the limb geometry. The implementation of a 3D box air mass factor concept allows accounting for horizontal gradients of trace gases. An important point is the effect of horizontal gradients on the profile inversion. This is of special interest in Polar Regions, where the Sun elevation is typically low and photochemistry can highly vary along the long absorption paths. We investigate the influence of horizontal gradients by applying 3-dimensional radiative transfer modelling.

  7. Climate aspects of radioactive trace gases, especially krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of krypton 85 currently present in the atmosphere is 3.300 Peta Bq. This atmospheric krypton contamination stems from atom bomb tests of the past and from nuclear power plants as well as spent fuel reprocessing plants. The paper investigates the air-electric and air-chemical impact of Kr-85 on the atmosphere and makes a forecast of the future Kr-85 contamination. (DG)

  8. Continuous field measurements of delta(13)C-CO(2) and trace gases by FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Joachim; Zeeman, Matthias J; Werner, Roland A; Eugster, Werner; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2008-09-01

    Continuous analysis of the (13)C/(12)C ratio of atmospheric CO(2) (delta(13)C-CO(2)) is a powerful tool to quantify CO(2) flux strengths of the two major ecosystem processes assimilation and respiration. Traditional laboratory techniques such as isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with flask sampling are subject to technical limitations that do not allow to fully characterising variations of atmospheric delta(13)C-CO(2) at all relevant timescales. In our study, we demonstrate the strength of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in combination with a PLS-based calibration strategy for online analysis of delta(13)C-CO(2) in ambient air. The ability of the instrument to measure delta(13)C-CO(2) was tested on a grassland field-site and compared with standard laboratory-based IRMS measurements made on field-collected flask samples. Both methods were in excellent agreement, with an average difference of 0.4 per thousand (n=81). Simultaneously, other important trace gases such as CO, N(2)O and CH(4) were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:18763182

  9. Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) data processing and atmospheric temperature and trace gas retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riese, M.; Spang, R.; Preusse, P.; Ern, M.; Jarisch, M.; Offermann, D.; Grossmann, K. U.

    1999-07-01

    The Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) experiment aboard the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) was successfully flown in early November 1994 (STS 66) and in August 1997 (STS 85). This paper focuses on the first flight of the instrument, which was part of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science 3 (ATLAS 3) mission of NASA. During a free flying period of 7 days, limb scan measurements of atmospheric infrared emissions were performed in the 4 to 71 μm wavelength region. For improved horizontal resolution, three telescopes (viewing directions) were used that sensed the atmosphere simultaneously. Atmospheric pressures, temperatures, and volume mixing ratios of various trace gases were retrieved from the radiance data by using a fast onion-peeling retrieval technique. This paper gives an overview of the data system including the raw data processing and the temperature and trace gas profile retrieval. Examples of version 1 limb radiance data (level 1 product) and version 1 mixing ratios (level 2 product) of ozone, ClONO2, and CFC-11 are given. A number of important atmospheric transport processes can already be identified in the level 1 limb radiance data. Radiance data of the lower stratosphere (18 km) indicate strong upwelling in some equatorial regions, centered around the Amazon, Congo, and Indonesia. Respective data at the date line are consistent with convection patterns associated with El Niño. Very low CFC-11 mixing ratios occur inside the South Polar vortex and cause low radiance values in a spectral region sensitive to CFC-11 emissions. These low values are a result of considerable downward transport of CFC-11 poor air that occurred during the winter months. Limb radiance profiles and retrieved mixing ratio profiles of CFC-11 indicate downward transport over ˜5 km. The accuracy of the retrieved version 1 mixing ratios is rather different for the various trace gases. In the middle atmosphere the estimated

  10. Comparing new techniques for the determination of minor and trace elements in volcanic gases by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor and trace elements could be useful indicators of volcanic activity and the knowledge of their distribution contributes to a better understanding of degassing processes from various sources. The samples of volcanic gases were collected by means of alkaline absorption solutions at the fumarole fields of La Fossa volcano on the island Vulcano, Southern Italy. The outlet temperatures ranged from 300 degC to 600 degC. Ammonia solution and organic absorption media like tetraethylammoniumhydroxide and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane were tested in addition to the conventionally applied 4M NaOH solution. A large number of minor and trace elements was determined by application of NAA, HPLC and AAS. For NAA, a new preparation technique including freeze drying was applied. In agreement with models proposed for the formation of the fumarolic gases we interpret the different concentrations of trace elements found as a consequence of mixing processes between magmatic fluids and hydrothermal gases. The positive correlations of metals and halogens and the lower concentrations of these metals in gases with higher CO2 indicate their origin from a hydrothermal system. Furthermore, the strict distribution along a general trend as displayed by our samples suggests that a single hydrothermal source is involved in the mixing process. Nevertheless, we cannot exclude that other processes (i.e., gas-rock interaction, remobilization, changes in gas velocity, etc) could contribute considerably to the presence of trace elements in fumarolic gases. (author)

  11. Knudsen cell: Investigations about the uptake of important traces gases on ambient airborne mineral dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Sabrina; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust constitutes one of the largest mass fractions of natural aerosol. Its emission is estimated between 800 - 2000 Tg/a]. The dust is emitted through sand and dust storms in the arid regions of our planet, in particular by the great desserts such as the Sahara. The complex chemical composition of mineral dust is similar to crust material, because the dust is produced by soil erosion. The main components of mineral dust are SiO2 and Al2O3, whereas the active oxides (Fe2O3, TiO2) show some variety in content due to the dust source region. Mineral dust particles can be transported over several 1000 km and during its transport the surface can be changed by the uptake of water vapor and trace gases. On such modified surfaces homo- and heterogeneous reactions can occur. Trace gas uptakes play an important role in atmospheric chemistry as sinks or sources for several gaseous species. Hence, it is necessary to study these reactions. Among several experimental setups, the Knudsen cell is one of the promising tools to study reactive uptakes from the gas phase and the release of products formed by dust surface-mediated reactions. The Knudsen cell, implemented by Golden et al. in 1975, is a high vacuum flow reactor operating under molecular flow conditions, i.e., gas-wall collisions are highly preferred over gas-gas collisions. Despite several Knudsen cell studies examining the reaction between different traces gases and model dust surfaces constituted of not more than a few components, no measurements utilizing collected ambient mineral dust are done so far. For a better understanding of the chemistry on mineral dust surfaces gas uptake measurements will be done with a Knudsen cell. The first measurements are done with isopropanol on TiO2. Afterwards there are studies with different substrates like, Al2O3 (α- and γ-phase), FeO2, Arizona test dust, air collected mineral dust from the Cap Verde islands. In the beginning SO2, NO2 and HNO3 will be used.

  12. Buoyancy driven flow of light gases in atmosphere compared to that of hot gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardisi, S. [Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, University of Calgary, Calgary, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Karim, G.A., E-mail: karim@ucalgary.ca [Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, University of Calgary, Calgary, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    The transient formation and subsequent dispersion of the plumes of a fixed mass of lighter than air gases emerging out of open cylindrical enclosures with negligible pressure difference was investigated using 3-D and 2-D CFD models. Subsequently, the dispersion into atmosphere of a similar amount of equally buoyant hot air was also considered. The structure and dynamics of the resulting thermally driven hot air plumes were compared to the corresponding characteristics of the mass-transfer driven isothermal plumes. Some cases were investigated in which the dispersing gases were both lighter than air and at a different temperature from that of the atmosphere. The similarities and differences of these double heat-mass-transfer driven problems with the other cases were discussed. It was shown that a criterion developed previously for judging the validity of the 2-D model relative to the more complex 3-D approach for mass-transfer driven problems could be equally applied for the thermally driven or double heat and mass-transfer driven plume flow characteristics.

  13. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time ( The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ε, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB are presented. These profiles contain ~12 degrees of freedom (DOF over a 3.5 km altitude range, an independent information approximately every 250 m. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD agrees well with nearby ground-based in situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, H2O442, ϵ360, ϵ477 for 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 42 ppm, 0.004 km−1, 0.002 km−1 in the free troposphere (FT, and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 252 ppm, 0.012 km−1, 0.006 km−1

  14. Evolution of Titan's major atmospheric gases and cooling since accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.; Lerman, Abraham

    2014-04-01

    This paper discusses two possible pathways of loss of the two main gases from Titan's post-accretional atmosphere, methane (CH4) and ammonia (NH3), by the mechanisms of thermal escape and emission from the interior coupled with thermal escape. The results give the decline of initial atmospheric gas masses to their present-day levels of 0.1 bar CH4 and 1.4 bar N2 (or equivalent 1.7 bar NH3, as a precursor of N2). From the published data on planetary and Titan's accretion rates, the accretion temperature was estimated as Tac=355 to 300 K. In the first 0.5-0.6 Myr after accretion, Titan's surface cools to 150 K and it takes about 5 Myr to cool to near its present temperature of 94 K. The present-day internal composition corresponds to the accreted Titan made of two solids, antigorite and brucite, that account for 59.5 wt%, and an outer shell of an aqueous solution of NH3+(NH4)2SO4 accounting for 40.0 wt%, and methane for a much smaller fraction of 0.6 wt%. In thermal escape of CH4 and NH3, based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of gas-molecule velocities, the initial gas mass N0 in the atmosphere is lost by a first-order flux, Nt=N0 exp(-kt), where t is time (yr) and k (yr-1) is a rate parameter that depends on temperature, gas molecular mass, atmosphere thickness, and Titan's escape velocity. The computed initial Tac=355 K is too high and the two gases would be lost from the primordial atmosphere in several hundred years. However, emissions of CH4 and NH3 from the interior, at reasonable rates that do not deplete the Titan gas inventory and function for periods of different length of time in combination with thermal escape, may result in stable CH4 and NH3 atmospheric masses, as they are at the present. The periods of emissions of different magnitudes of CH4 range from 6×104 to 6×105 yr, and those of NH3 are 55,000-75,000 yr. At the lower Tac=300 K, thermal escape of gases alone allows their atmospheric masses to decrease from the primordial to the present

  15. The airborne mass spectrometer AIMS - Part 2: Measurements of trace gases with stratospheric or tropospheric origin in the UTLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Voigt, Christiane; Schäuble, Dominik; Jeßberger, Philipp; Ziereis, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of climate-sensitive trace gas variabilities in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region (UTLS) and their impact on its radiative budget requires accurate measurements. The composition of the UTLS is governed by transport and chemistry of stratospheric and tropospheric constituents, such as chlorine, nitrogen oxide and sulfur compounds. The Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer AIMS has been developed to accurately measure a set of these constituents on aircraft by means of chemical ionization. Here we present a setup using SF5- reagent ions for the simultaneous measurement of trace gas concentrations of HCl, HNO3 and SO2 in the pptv to ppmv (10-12 to 10-6 mol mol-1) range with in-flight and online calibration called AIMS-TG (Atmospheric chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for measurements of trace gases). Part 1 of this paper (Kaufmann et al., 2016) reports on the UTLS water vapor measurements with the AIMS-H2O configuration. The instrument can be flexibly switched between two configurations depending on the scientific objective of the mission. For AIMS-TG, a custom-made gas discharge ion source has been developed for generation of reagent ions that selectively react with HCl, HNO3, SO2 and HONO. HNO3 and HCl are routinely calibrated in-flight using permeation devices; SO2 is continuously calibrated during flight adding an isotopically labeled 34SO2 standard. In addition, we report on trace gas measurements of HONO, which is sensitive to the reaction with SF5-. The detection limit for the various trace gases is in the low 10 pptv range at a 1 s time resolution with an overall uncertainty of the measurement of the order of 20 %. AIMS has been integrated and successfully operated on the DLR research aircraft Falcon and HALO (High Altitude LOng range research aircraft). As an example, measurements conducted during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition of the LMS/UT and Earth System Model Validation) mission with

  16. Quantifying wind and pressure effects on trace gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, K. R.; Baird, A. J.; Teh, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    Large uncertainties persist in estimates of soil-atmosphere exchange of important trace gases. One significant source of uncertainty is the combined effect of wind and pressure on these fluxes. Wind and pressure effects are mediated by surface topography: few surfaces are uniform and over scales of tenths of a metre to tens of metres, air pressure and wind speed at the ground surface may be very variable. In this paper we consider how such spatial variability in air pressure and wind speed affects fluxes of trace gases. We used a novel nested wind tunnel design comprising a toroidial wind tunnel, in which wind speed and pressure may be controlled, set within a larger, linear wind tunnel. The effects of both wind speed and pressure differentials on fluxes of CO2 and CH4 within three different ecosystems (forest, grassland, peat bog) were quantified. We find that trace gas fluxes are positively correlated with both wind speed and pressure differential near the surface boundary. We argue that wind speed is the better proxy for trace gas fluxes because of its stronger correlation and because wind speed is more easily measured and wind speed measurement methodology more easily standardized. Trace gas fluxes, whether into or out of the soil, increase with wind speed within the toroidal tunnel (+55 % flux per m s-1), while faster, localized surface winds that are external to the toroidal wind tunnel reduce trace gas fluxes (-13 % flux per m s-1). These results are consistent for both trace gases over all ecosystem soil types studied. Our findings support the need for a revised conceptualization of soil-atmosphere gas exchange. We propose a conceptual model of the soil profile that has a "mixed layer", with fluxes controlled by wind speed, wind duration, porosity, water table, and gas production and consumption.

  17. Trace metal removal from combustion gases. Raskasmetallipaeaestoejen vaehentaemismenetelmaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U.-M.

    1987-01-15

    This literature survey deals with alternative methods applicable for reducing heavy metal emissions released in fluidized bed combustion or gasification of fossil fuels, such as coal, heavy oil, and municipal and industrial wastes. The elements mercury, cadmium, lead, nickel, vanadium and zinc are the main concern of this study. Increasingly greater attention is being paid to heavy metal emissions from energy production because of the observation in the last few years of the enrichment of some metals into the fine particles. The detectabily range of the existing particulate control devices is usually at this particle size. Most of the investigations aiming at the development of new methods for the reduction of heavy metal emissions are still in the initial stage. Because of the limited information available concerning the problem of heavy metals, this study deals also with some alkali metal removal methods, which possibly can give useful information. The emissions of heavy metals can be reduced, e.g. by binding them to compounds which can be removed from the flue gases. The predominant binding mechanisms are chemical and physical adsorption. Several natural aluminium, calcium and magnesium silicate materials can be used as chemical sorbents. They are also the least expensive of the sorbents. High surface alumina powders are possible physical adsorbents. The reactions between heavy metals and adsorbent can take place in the combustion zone of the fluidized bed reactor or the hot flue gases can be passed through a gas clean-up device, such as granular-bed filter, dry plate scrubber, or adsorbent-smoke reactor.

  18. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M.; Anderson, B.; Beyersdorf, A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G.; Eichler, P.; Fried, A.; Keutsch, F. N.; Mikoviny, T.; Thornhill, K. L.; Walega, J. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Yang, M.; Yokelson, R.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-11-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin for deriving emission factors and followed ~ 13.6 km downwind for observing chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution (10 m/0.1 s). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3 and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butandione and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 ppbV ppmV-1 CO emitted. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a near-explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into PAN and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the plume. Formaldehyde, acetone

  19. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Eichler, Philipp; Fried, Alan; Keutsch, Frank N.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Walega, James G.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert J.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-03-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed ˜ 13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV-1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the

  20. Aircraft measurements of trace gases between Japan and Singapore in October of 1993, 1996, and 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Hidekazu; Inoue, Hisayuki Y.

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios were measured in discrete air samples from aircraft between Japan and Singapore in October. The mixing ratios of all trace gases at 9-12 km were enhanced over the South China Sea in 1997 compared with those in 1993 and 1996. Vertical distributions of all trace gases over Singapore in 1997 also showed largely elevated mixing ratios at all altitudes. These distributions indicate a wide outflow of trace gases from intense biomass burning in the southeast Asia regions in the very strong El Niño year. The enhanced trace gases showed a strong linear correlation between CH4 and CO, and between CO and CO2, with the regression slopes of 0.051 (ΔCH4 ppb/ΔCOppb) and 0.089 (ΔCOppb/ΔCO2ppb). The emission ratios are characteristic of fires with relatively lower combustion efficiency from the tropical rain forest and peat lands in Kalimantan and Sumatra of Indonesia.

  1. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antartica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, P.R.; Meeker, K. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro (USA)); Finnegan, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-11-01

    SO{sub 2} emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO{sub 2} emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing partcle and {sup 7}LiOH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. The authors infer HCl and HF emissions in 1983 to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Anarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in Central Antarctica snow.

  2. Remote sensing of atmospheric greenhouse gases: bridging spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpage, N.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.; Hewson, W.; Sembhi, H.; Somkuti, P.; Webb, A.; Palmer, P. I.; Feng, L.

    2015-12-01

    Observed atmospheric variations of greenhouse gases (GHG) are determined by surface-atmosphere exchange, and atmospheric chemistry and transport. These processes occur over a wide spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. Confronting atmospheric transport models and ultimately improving the fidelity of surface flux estimates demands an integrated observing system that captures these scales. We will discuss using data the role of GHG remote sensing instruments and argue that our ability to deploy them from the ground and to fly them on satellite, aircraft, and unmanned airborne vehicles (UAV) mean that they represent the ideal technology to bridge the observed scales of variability. We will discuss a five-year record of global-scale column observations of CO2 and CH4 from the Japanese GOSAT satellite instrument that is available from University of Leicester as part of the ESA Climate Change Initiative. We will showcase new CO2 and CH4 column data that was collected by our shortwave infrared spectrometer GHOST oboard the NASA Global Hak during a regional survey over the eastern Pacific during early spring 2015, which included coincident overpasses from GOSAT and the NASA OCO-2. These data are being used to test atmospheric transport models over remote regions and to help validate satellite observations over the oceans. We will also discuss GHOST data collected on the UK Dornier 226 research aircraft to measure local-scale measurements over Leicester city centre, a major power plant, and downwind of a controlled Cumbrian heathland fire. Finally, we will report preliminary results from a new ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer station at Harwell (80 km west of London). We anticipate that this site will eventually join the TCCON network, which has been used to validation of satellite observations.

  3. Effects of traces of molecular gases (hydrogen, nitrogen) in glow discharges in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, E. B. M.; Smid, P.; Hoffmann, V.

    2008-07-01

    The "Grimm" type of low pressure glow discharge source, introduced some forty years ago, has proved to be a versatile analytical source. A flat sample is used as the cathode and placed about 0.2mm away from the end of a hollow tubular anode leading to an obstructed discharge. When the source was first developed, it was used for the direct analysis of solid metallic samples by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), normally with argon as the plasma gas; it was soon found that, using suitable electrical parameters, the cathode material was sputtered uniformly from a circular crater of diameter equal to that of the tubular anode, so that the technique could be used for compositional depth profile analysis (CDPA). Over the years the capability and applications of the technique have steadily increased. The use of rf powered discharges now permits the analysis of non-conducting layers and samples; improved instrumental design now allows CDPA of ever thinner layers (e.g. resolution of layers 5 nm thick in multilayer stacks is possible). For the original bulk material application, pre-sputtering could be used to remove any surface contamination but for CDPA, analysis must start immediately the discharge is ignited, so that any surface contamination can introduce molecular gases into the plasma gas and have significant analytical consequences, especially for very thin layers; in addition, many types of samples now analysed contain molecular gases as components (either as occluded gas, or e.g. as a nitride or oxide), and this gas enters the discharge when the sample is sputtered. It is therefore important to investigate the effect of such foreign gases on the discharge, in particular on the spectral intensities and hence the analytical results. The presentation will concentrate mainly on the effect of hydrogen in argon discharges, in the concentration range 0-2 % v/v but other gas mixtures (e.g. Ar/N_2, Ne/H_2) will be considered for comparison. In general, the introduction of

  4. Relationship between epiphytic lichens, trace elements and gaseous atmospheric pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobben, van H.F.; Wamelink, G.W.W.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the joint effect of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and trace elements on epiphytic lichens. We used our data to test the hypothesis that lichens are generally insensitive to toxic effects of trace elements, and can therefore be used as accumulator organisms to esti

  5. Analysis of the horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols in summer 2013 during the MADCAT campaign in Mainz, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Julia; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    With the MAX-DOAS technique it is possible to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases and aerosols in the lower troposphere. Often these instruments monitor the atmosphere in one azimuthal direction only. Therefore horizontal variability is not resolved. Especially the comparison to satellite data close to strong emission sources (one main application of MAX-DOAS) is possibly biased. Many new developed MAX-DOAS instruments are capable to measure automatically in more than one azimuthal direction. During the MADCAT campaign in summer 2013 in Mainz, Germany, several instruments of this kind were operated simultaneously, which provides the opportunity to monitor the horizontal distribution of trace gases and aerosols with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The observed variation for different azimuth angles does not only reflect gradients in the trace gas concentrations, but also differences in the light path length, which is affected by sun and viewing geometry as well as aerosol distribution. Information about the aerosol profile, the total AOD and the phase function is gathered from a Ceilometer and an Aeronet sun photometer on the same site. To distinguish between the different effects comparisons with radiative transfer models are performed. Here especially the influence of the simplified model of Henyey-Greenstein phase functions against measured phase functions from Aeronet is investigated. Also the influence on the observed azimuthal gradients of different wind patterns and cloud conditions is studied.

  6. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities for greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision and accuracy. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch Programme for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows application of the analyser in isotopic tracer experiments, for example 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  7. A Nanoparticulate Photocatalytic Filter for Removal of Trace Contaminant Gases Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maintaining a healthy atmosphere in closed life support systems is necessary for the well being of the crew and success of a space mission. Current trace...

  8. A Nanoparticulate Photocatalytic Filter for Removal of Trace Contaminant Gases Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maintaining a healthy atmosphere in closed life support systems is essential for crew well being and success of space missions. Current trace contaminant control...

  9. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  10. Measurements of organic gases during aerosol formation events in the boreal forest atmosphere during QUEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sellegri

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic VOCs are important in the growth and possibly also in the formation of atmospheric aerosol particles. In this work, we present 10 min-time resolution measurements of organic trace gases at Hyytiälä, Finland during March 2002. The measurements were part of the project QUEST (Quantification of Aerosol Nucleation in the European Boundary Layer and took place during a two-week period when nucleation events occurred with various intensities nearly every day. Using a ground-based Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS instrument, the following trace gases were detected: acetone, TMA, DMA, mass 68 amu (candidate=isoprene, monoterpenes, Methyl Vinyl Ketone (MVK and Methacrolein (MaCR, cis-3-hexenyl acetate and MonoTerpene Oxidation Products (MTOP. For all of them except for the amines, we present daily variations during different classes of event days, and non-event days. Isoprene, monoterpenes, MVK+MaCR, cis-3-hexenyl acetate and MTOP are found to show significant correlations with the condensational sink (CS, which indicates that a fraction of these compounds are participating to the growth of the nucleated particles and generally secondary organic aerosol formation. Moreover, the terpene oxidation products (TOP (MVK, MaCR and MTOP show a higher ratio to the CS on event days compared to non-event days, indicating that their abundance relative to the surface of aerosol available is higher on nucleation days.

  11. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-03-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time (detector system. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study) air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, an independent information approximately every 250 m

  12. 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, J.A.; Moore, B. III

    1998-07-01

    This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system.

  13. Remote Sensing of Stratospheric Trace Gases by TELIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian; Birk, Manfred; Wagner, Georg; Trautmann, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    TELIS (TErahertz and submillimeter LImb Sounder) is a balloon-borne cryogenic heterodyne spectrometer with two far infrared and submillimeter channels (1.8 THz and 480-650 GHz developed by DLR and SRON, respectively). The instrument was designed to investigate atmospheric chemistry and dynamics with a focus on the stratosphere. Between 2009 and 2011, TELIS participated in three winter campaigns in Kiruna, Sweden. The recent campaign took place in 2014 over Timmins, Canada. During previous campaigns, TELIS shared a stratospheric balloon gondola with the balloon version of MIPAS (MIPAS-B) and mini-DOAS. The primary scientific goal of these campaigns has been to monitor the time-dependent chemistry of chlorine and bromine, and to achieve the closure of chemical families inside the polar vortex. In this work, we present retrieved profiles of ozone (O3), hydrogen chlorine (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydroxyl radical (OH) obtained by the 1.8 THz channel from the polar winter flights during 2009-2011. Furthermore, the corresponding retrieval algorithm is briefly described. The quality of the retrieval products is analyzed in a quantitative manner including: error characterization, internal comparisons of the two different channels, and external comparisons with coincident spaceborne observations. The errors due to the instrument parameters and pressure dominate in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, while the errors at higher altitudes are mainly due to the spectroscopic parameters and the radiometric calibration. The comparisons with other limb sounders help us to assess the measurement capabilities and instrument characteristics of TELIS, thereby establishing the instrument as a valuable tool to study the chemical interactions in the stratosphere.

  14. Continuous measurements of greenhouse gases and atmospheric oxygen at the Namib Desert Atmospheric Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    E. J. Morgan; J. V. Lavrič; Seifert, T.; T. Chicoine; Day, A; J. Gomez; Logan, R. (Robert); Sack, J.; Shuuya, T.; E. G. Uushona; K. Vincent; Schultz, U.; E.-G. Brunke; C. Labuschagne; Thompson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A new coastal background site has been established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the central Namib Desert at Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations for a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated, continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g....

  15. Continuous measurements of greenhouse gases and atmospheric oxygen at the Namib Desert Atmospheric Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, E.J.; J. V. Lavrič; Seifert, T; Chicoine, T.; Day, A; J. Gomez; Logan, R; Sack, J.; T. Shuuya; Uushona, E.G.; K. Vincent; U. Schultz; Brunke, E.-G.; C. Labuschagne; R. L. Thompson

    2015-01-01

    A new coastal background site has been established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the central Namib Desert at Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations for a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g.l., 50 km from the coast at the north...

  16. Atmospheric trace gas measurements in the tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Anna Katinka

    2009-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry has been used for ground-based solar absorption, laboratory and flux measurements, to study the atmospheric composition, as well as physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere.The solar absorption FTIR measurements have been performed in Paramaribo, Suriname (5.8 N, 55.2 W) between September 2004 and November 2007 and represent the first remote sensing measurements in the inner tropics over severalyears. These measurements are of great impo...

  17. Azimuthal variability of trace gases and aerosols measured during the MADCAT campaign in summer 2013 in Mainz, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Julia; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    With the MAX-DOAS technique it is possible to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases and aerosols in the lower troposphere. Often these instruments monitor the atmosphere in one azimuthal direction only. Therefore horizontal variability is not resolved. Especially the comparison to satellite data close to strong emission sources (one main application of MAX-DOAS) is possibly biased. MADCAT (Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases) took place in summer 2013 in Mainz, a city in the Rhine-Main region close to Frankfurt, with high population density and many industrial complexes. The main focus of this campaign was on the comparison of the results from the different instruments. Therefore 16 MAX-DOAS instruments from 10 different institutes were operated on the roof of the MPI for Chemistry. In standard operation mode, vertical scans at one or several selected azimuth viewing direction were performed. In addition, 6 instruments scanned the sky also in azimuth direction every two hours. These scans were performed under a low elevation angle (2°) to capture the pollution close to the ground. A comparison of the trace gas columns derived from these instruments will be shown for NO2 and O4, the latter is used to retrieve information about aerosols. The observed variation for different azimuth angles does not only reflect a gradient in the trace gas, but also differences in the light path length, which is affected by sun and viewing geometry as well as aerosols. To distinguish between the different effects comparisons with radiative transfer models are performed. The results of the azimuth scans are also compared to car-DOAS measurements around Mainz, which were conducted at least twice a day.

  18. Tracing organic gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymen, T.A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of tracing various air pollutants, including low molecular weight hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and aromatics, are discussed. Gas chromatography and flame ionization, or electron capture detection were used to detect the pollutants in ambient air, depending on which method was more sensitive for the pollutant in question. Analysis, calibration procedures, and sampling techniques (both automatic field operation and discontinuous laboratory control), were studied for samples collected near a vinyl chloride plant, and in an area with intensive paint industry. The combination of gas-solid or gas-liquid chromatography with a highly sensitive detector offers a versatile analytic method of measuring organic air pollutants. (6 diagrams, 6 graphs, 16 references, 9 tables)

  19. Quantum cascade laser-based spectrometer for high sensitive measurements of trace gases in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Tang; Wenqing Liu; Ruifeng Kan; Yujun Zhang; Dong Chen; Shuai Zhang; Jun Ruan

    2012-01-01

    A quantum cascade (QC) laser-based spectrometer is developed to measure trace gases in air.The proposed spectrometer is tested for N2O,and the results presented in this letter.This system takes advantage of recent technology in QC lasers by utilizing intra-pulse scan spectroscopy,which allows high sensitive measurement.Without calibration gases,the gas concentration can be calculated with scan integration and the corresponding values from the HITRAN04 database.By analyzing the Allan variance,a detection limit of 2 ppb is obtained.Continuous measurement of N2O sampled from ambient air shows the applicability of the proposed system for the field measurements of gases of environmental concern.

  20. Different wavelength evaluation ranges in the retrieval of trace gases with DOAS at the example of BrO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Leif; Lampel, Johannes; Platt, Ulrich [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Sihler, Holger [Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Optical remote sensing via scattered sunlight differential optical absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) is routinely used to determine various trace gases in the atmosphere. Different applications and platforms (e.g. DOAS of volcanic plumes, Satellite measurements, Zenith DOAS or Max-DOAS) differ in measurement conditions, cross correlations of absorptions of different trace gases and their respective concentrations. Here, we present a method to determine the optimal evaluation range at the example of bromine oxide (BrO). With strongest absorption features of BrO between 315nm - 360nm, its retrieval results can depend on cross correlations with strong absorber like Ozone (O{sub 3}) or sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Whereas O{sub 3} influences especially Satellite and stratospheric measurements, SO{sub 2} cannot be neglected in the case of high volcanic gas emissions. Absorption features of both species are most pronounced at low wavelengths, but their diminished influence at higher wavelength ranges competes with a higher detection limit of BrO. The study is performed with artificial spectra and the results are compared with retrievals from real spectra of volcanic plumes, satellite and marine Max-DOAS measurements.

  1. The influence of Arctic haze and radiatively active trace gases on the arctic climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing fossil fuel consumption and industrial activities have raised concerns of possible man-induced climate changes. The changes result mostly from increased radiatively active trace gases (RAG) and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere. Among the by-products of combustion, carbon dioxide is the leading RAG. Fossil fuel combustion also generates sulfates and soot, the principal constituents of the Arctic haze. Both CO2 and Arctic haze interact with radiative processes to produce external climate forcing. Due to their strong tendency to absorb visible solar radiation, soot particles result in strong diabatic heating in the Arctic. With a mixing ratio of 10-10, a concentration 1 million times less than H2O, the solar radiative heating produced by particulate soot is still comparable to that of H2O. The Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) has recently completed a climate simulation with a double carbon dioxide scenario. Version 2 of the CCC-GCM includes a mixed-layer ocean and thermodynamic ice model. It allows for the evaluation of climate changes due to an external forcing. The aim of this paper is to compare the climate changes induced by increasing CO2 and Arctic haze. Since both signals are occurring simultaneously, the authors must investigate the individual contributions with a climate model. A preliminary sensitivity study of the Arctic haze (February to May) with interactive sea ice was done. The analysis suggests that the excess of solar radiative heating leads to increasing rates of snow and ice melt during spring and summer. The most sensitive regions are the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and the Greenland Sea. In both regions, the ice is substantially reduced. The anomaly of sea ice amount continues its propagation northward in June and July even though the Arctic haze is absent during that period

  2. Interannual variability of tropospheric trace gases and aerosols: The role of biomass burning emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Marlier, Miriam E.; Faluvegi, Greg; Shindell, Drew T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Mangeon, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Fires are responsible for a range of gaseous and aerosol emissions. However, their influence on the interannual variability of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols has not been systematically investigated from a global perspective. We examine biomass burning emissions as a driver of interannual variability of large-scale abundances of short-lived constituents such as carbon monoxide (CO), hydroxyl radicals (OH), ozone, and aerosols using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE composition-climate model and a range of observations, with an emphasis on satellite information. Our model captures the observed variability of the constituents examined in most cases, but with substantial underestimates in boreal regions. The strongest interannual variability on a global scale is found for carbon monoxide (~10% for its global annual burden), while the lowest is found for tropospheric ozone (~1% for its global annual burden). Regionally, aerosol optical depth shows the largest variability which exceeds 50%. Areas of strong variability of both aerosols and CO include the tropical land regions (especially Equatorial Asia and South America) and northern high latitudes, while even regions in the northern midlatitudes experience substantial interannual variability of aerosols. Ozone variability peaks over equatorial Asia in boreal autumn, partly due to varying biomass burning emissions, and over the western and central Pacific in the rest of the year, mainly due to meteorological fluctuations. We find that biomass burning emissions are almost entirely responsible for global CO interannual variability, and similarly important for OH variability. The same is true for global and regional aerosol variability, especially when not taking into account dust and sea-salt particles. We show that important implications can arise from such interannual influences for regional climate and air quality.

  3. Airborne measurements of different trace gases during the AROMAT-2 campaign with an Avantes spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Tim; Meier, Andreas; Schönhardt, Anja; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) is a well-known, versatile, and frequently used technique for the analysis of trace gases within the atmosphere. Although DOAS has been used for several decades, airborne DOAS has become more popular during the last years because of the possibility of measuring in high lateral resolutions with the help of imaging instruments. Here, we present results of the AROMAT-2 campaign in Romania in summer 2015. The introduced measurements were taken using a nadir viewing Avantes spectrometer on board of a Cessna aircraft which flew over Bucharest and the Turceni power plant in Romania. The instrument covers the wavelength region of 287 - 551nm at a spectral resolution of 0.13nm and has a temporal resolution of 0.5s, translating to about 450m in flight direction at 3000m flight attitude. The field of view of the instrument was set to 8.1 degrees, resulting in a pixel size across track of about 420m. Compared to the imaging DOAS instrument AirMAP which was also operated from the aircraft, the signal to noise ratio of the simple nadir viewing spectrometer is slightly better, which allows an analysis of less abundant species and interesting spectral features. The results show a day-to-day variation of NO2 over the city of Bucharest as well as spectral features over lakes in the city, which can be attributed to algae. Furthermore, we were able to measure large emission plumes of NO2 and SO2 over the Turceni power plant, which could be observed over long spatial distances. In addition, the results from the Avantes instrument were used for comparison with measurements of the imaging spectrometer AirMAP and good agreement was found, providing independent verification of the imager data.

  4. A new UK Greenhouse Gas measurement network providing ultra high-frequency measurements of key radiatively active trace gases taken from a network of tall towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Manning, A. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Derwent, R. G.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Sturges, W. T.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric concentrations of gases is important in assessing the impact of international policies related to the atmospheric environment. The effects of control measures on greenhouse gases introduced under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols are now being observed. Continued monitoring is required to assess the overall success of the Protocols. For over 15 years the UK Government have funded high-frequency measurements of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting gases at Mace Head, a global background measurement station on the west coast of Ireland. These continuous, high-frequency, high-precision measurements are used to estimate regional (country-scale) emissions of greenhouse gases across the UK using an inversion methodology (NAME-Inversion) that links the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment - NAME) with the Mace Head observations. This unique inversion method acts to independently verify bottom up emission estimates of radiatively active and ozone-depleting trace gases. In 2011 the UK government (DECC) funded the establishment and integration of three new tall tower measurements stations in the UK, to provide enhanced resolution emission maps and decrease uncertainty of regional emission estimates produced using the NAME-Inversion. One station included in this new UK network was already established in Scotland and was used in collaboration with Edinburgh University. The two other new stations are in England and were set-up early in 2012, they contain brand new instrumentation for measurements of greenhouse gases. All three additional stations provide ultra high-frequency (1 sec) data of CO2 and CH4 using the Picarro© Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer and high frequency (20 min) measurements of N2O and SF6 from custom built sample modules with GC-ECD. We will present the new tall tower UK measurement network in detail. Using high-frequency measurements at new operational sites, including Mace

  5. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high

  6. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Engel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT and lowermost stratosphere (LMS. A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campaigns (consisting of a total of 36 flights, distributed over all seasons and typically covering latitudes between 35° N and 75° N in the European longitude sector (10° W–20° E, were performed. Here we present an overview of the project, describing the instrumentation, the encountered meteorological situations during the campaigns and the data set available from SPURT. Measurements were obtained for N2O, CH4, CO, CO2, CFC12, H2, SF6, NO, NOy, O3 and H2O. We illustrate the strength of this new data set by showing mean distributions of the mixing ratios of selected trace gases, using a potential temperature-equivalent latitude coordinate system. The observations reveal that the LMS is most stratospheric in character during spring, with the highest mixing ratios of O3 and NOy and the lowest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6. The lowest mixing ratios of NOy and O3 are observed during autumn, together with the highest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6 indicating a strong tropospheric influence. For H2O, however, the maximum concentrations in the LMS are found during summer, suggesting unique (temperature- and convection-controlled conditions for this molecule during transport across the tropopause. The SPURT data set is presently the most accurate and complete data set for many trace species in the LMS, and its main value is the simultaneous measurement of a suite of trace gases having different lifetimes and physical-chemical histories. It is thus very well suited for

  7. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Bönisch, H.; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; Gurk, C.; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; Königstedt, R.; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R.; Parchatka, U.; Peter, T.; Schell, D.; Schiller, C.; Schmidt, U.; Spelten, N.; Szabo, T.; Weers, U.; Wernli, H.; Wetter, T.; Wirth, V.

    2006-02-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campaigns (consisting of a total of 36 flights), distributed over all seasons and typically covering latitudes between 35° N and 75° N in the European longitude sector (10° W-20° E), were performed. Here we present an overview of the project, describing the instrumentation, the encountered meteorological situations during the campaigns and the data set available from SPURT. Measurements were obtained for N2O, CH4, CO, CO2, CFC12, H2, SF6, NO, NOy, O3 and H2O. We illustrate the strength of this new data set by showing mean distributions of the mixing ratios of selected trace gases, using a potential temperature-equivalent latitude coordinate system. The observations reveal that the LMS is most stratospheric in character during spring, with the highest mixing ratios of O3 and NOy and the lowest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6. The lowest mixing ratios of NOy and O3 are observed during autumn, together with the highest mixing ratios of N2O and SF6 indicating a strong tropospheric influence. For H2O, however, the maximum concentrations in the LMS are found during summer, suggesting unique (temperature- and convection-controlled) conditions for this molecule during transport across the tropopause. The SPURT data set is presently the most accurate and complete data set for many trace species in the LMS, and its main value is the simultaneous measurement of a suite of trace gases having different lifetimes and physical-chemical histories. It is thus very well suited for studies of

  8. L'effet de serre par le CO2 et les gaz traces Greenhouse Effect from CO2 and Trace Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand A.

    2006-11-01

    , mainly from combustion and deforestation, and have been progressively accumulating in the Earth's atmosphere, could result in a greenhouse effect that could cause the heating up of the Earth by several degrees in the 21st century. The climatic consequences (melting of ice, etc. would be disastrous. Therefore, we examined the leading parameters involved in this phenomenon: nature of the greenhouse effect, carbon cycle, CO2 transfer on a worldwide scale, trace gases, climatic consequences of the greenhouse effect due to CO2 and trace gases. We reached the following conclusions:(a The CO2 and trace-gas concentration in the atmosphere increases exponentially in the absence of any regulations, and this occurs at the same time as human production of the same substances also at an exponential rate. (b No increase has as yet been detected in the Earth's average temperature due to the greenhouse effect. Moreover, since 1940 we have been going through a period of cooling. (c Human activity also produces antagonistic cooling effects (effect of dust in the atmosphere, etc. that are rather poorly understood. (d The study of ancient climates indicates a regular succession of cool and warm periods, which should reassure us about any sudden and irreversible change in the climate. (e However, it is absolutely necessary to improve our fundamental understanding of the main factors governing the Earth's climate (chemistry of the atmosphere, ocean/ atmosphere transfers, etc. and eventually to limit the production of some trace gases (Freon, in particular.

  9. ARTEAM - Advanced ray tracing with earth atmospheric models

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, G.J.; Moerman, M. M.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Ray Tracing with Earth Atmospheric Models (ARTEAM) aims at a description of the electro-optical propagation environment in the marine atmospheric surface layer. For given meteorological conditions, the model evaluates height- and range-resolved transmission losses, refraction and turbulence effects. These results are subsequently applied to an electro-optical sensor with given specifications to evaluate the effective range and performance of the sensor under the prevailing meteor...

  10. Rapid, accurate and precise measurement of the isotopic composition of atmospheric gases: A generalized GC-IRMS solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the isotopic composition of individual gas species in air is an analytical challenge faced by researchers in many disciplines. The existence of many different types of air (atmospheric air, dissolved air, air bubbles in ice, soil air, growth chamber atmospheres) and the enormous dynamic range of concentrations makes the problem difficult. The recent combination of gas chromatography with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) has allowed the solution of many previously difficult or intractable problems of this sort. Interest is divided between analysis of trace gases (CO2, CH4, N2O and CH3Cl) and the major species (N2, O2 and Ar). Recent instrumental developments have allowed us to assemble a generalized GC-IRMS approach capable of high precision isotopic analysis of both trace and major species at natural and enriched abundances, while permitting high throughput automated analysis using sample containers compatible with field collection

  11. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazor, E. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot, Israel); Truesdell, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He, /sup 40/Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar, and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic helium and argon-40 formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 to 3%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 to 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 to 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as Cl or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range.

  12. Atmospheric trace chemistry in the American humid tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge Jr., James P.; Machado, P. A.; Pate, J. B.; Sheesley, D. C.; Wartburg, A. F.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to define global mean concentrations of trace substances and to incorporate these into global models of net source and sink strengths of the various natural and anthropogenic atmospheric contaminants.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1974.tb01973.x

  13. The star reference system of MIPAS-B2. Line of sight determination of a balloonborne spectrometer for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gases; Das Sternreferenzsystem von MIPAS-B2. Sichtlinien-Bestimmung fuer ein ballongetragenes Spektrometer zur Fernerkundung atmosphaerischer Spurengase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maucher, G.

    1999-07-01

    The spectrometer MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - Balloonborne Version) is a limb emission sounder in the mid infrared spectral range, adapted to a stratospheric balloon gondola. Its task is remote sensing of vertical profiles of several trace gases in the context of environmental research. The thesis discusses the effects of errors in the stabilisation and knowledge of the line of sight on the measurements. A variation in the line of sight affects the instrumental line shape of recorded spectra and broadens - through the coaddition of spectra - the resulting field of view. An insufficient knowledge reduces the accuracy of the retrieved vertical profiles. The new pointing system is described. The hard- and software components needed for the star reference system are shown in detail. The central component is a CCD-camera taking pictures of a part of the night sky for every interferogram. The light of the stars is superimposed onto the light of marks representing the optical axies without masking the infrared beam. Through this, the thermal warping of the optics due to the changes in temperature during flight can be determined. After data reduction star images are sent to ground by telemetry. Algorithms for subpixel resolution, calculation of star positions and star pattern recognition have been developed. The results derived with the star reference system and the performance of the pointing system are analysed. The error sources are discussed. (orig./SR) [German] Das Fourierspektrometer MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer fuer passive atmosphaerische Sondierung - Ballonversion) erfasst von einem Stratosphaerenballon aus Emissionsspektren im infraroten Spektralbereich mit der Methode der Horizontsondierung. Daraus werden Hoehenprofile einer groesseren Anzahl umweltrelevanter Spurengase im selben Luftvolumen gewonnen. Im ersten Teil der Arbeit werden die Auswirkungen von Stabilisierungsfehlern diskutiert, die sowohl das Apparateprofil

  14. One year observations of atmospheric reactive gases (O3, CO, NOx, SO2) at Jang Bogo base in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek Rhee, Tae; Seo, Sora

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a remote area surrounded by the Southern Ocean and far from the influence of human activities, giving us unique opportunity to investigate the background variation of trace gases which are sensitive to the human activities. Korean Antarctic base, Jang Bogo, was established as a unique permanent overwintering base in Terra Nova Bay in February, 2014. One year later, we installed a package of instruments to monitor atmospheric trace gases at the base, which includes long-lived greenhouse gases, CO2, CH4, and N2O, and reactive gases, O3, CO, NOx, and SO2. The atmospheric chemistry observatory, where these scientific instruments were installed, is located ca. 1 km far from the main building and power plant, minimizing the influence of pollution that may come from the operation of the base. Here we focus on the reactive gases measured in-situ at the base; O3 displays a typical seasonal variation with high in winter and low in summer with seasonal amplitude of ~18 ppb, CO was high in September at ~56 ppb, probably implying the invasion of lower latitude air mass with biomass burning, and low in late summer due to photochemical oxidation. NO did not show clear seasonal variation, but SO2 reveals larger values in summer than in winter. We will discuss potential atmospheric processes behind these first observations of reactive gases in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica.

  15. The ray-tracing mapping operator in an asymmetric atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a spherically symmetric atmosphere, the refractive index profile is retrieved from bending angle measurements through Abel integral transform. As horizontal refractivity inhomogeneity becomes significant in the moist low atmosphere, the error in refractivity profile obtained from Abel inversion reaches about 10%. One way to avoid this error is to directly assimilate bending angle profile into numerical weather models. This paper discusses the 2D ray-tracing mapping operator for bending angle in an asymmetric atmosphere. Through simulating computations, the retrieval error of the refractivity in horizontal inhomogeneity is assessed. The step length of 4 rank Runge-Kutta method is also tested.

  16. Trapping, chemistry, and export of trace gases in the South Asian summer monsoon observed during CARIBIC flights in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Baker, Angela K.; Schuck, Tanja J.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Zahn, Andreas; Hermann, Markus; Stratmann, Greta; Ziereis, Helmut; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-03-01

    The CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) passenger aircraft observatory performed in situ measurements at 10-12 km altitude in the South Asian summer monsoon anticyclone between June and September 2008. These measurements enable us to investigate this atmospheric region (which so far has mostly been observed from satellites) using the broad suite of trace gases and aerosol particles measured by CARIBIC. Elevated levels of a variety of atmospheric pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide, total reactive nitrogen oxides, aerosol particles, and several volatile organic compounds) were recorded. The measurements provide detailed information about the chemical composition of air in different parts of the monsoon anticyclone, particularly of ozone precursors. While covering a range of 3500 km inside the monsoon anticyclone, CARIBIC observations show remarkable consistency, i.e. with distinct latitudinal patterns of trace gases during the entire monsoon period. Using the CARIBIC trace gas and aerosol particle measurements in combination with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, we investigated the characteristics of monsoon outflow and the chemical evolution of air masses during transport. The trajectory calculations indicate that these air masses originated mainly from South Asia and mainland Southeast Asia. Estimated photochemical ages of the air were found to agree well with transport times from a source region east of 90-95° E. The photochemical ages of the air in the southern part of the monsoon anticyclone were systematically younger (less than 7 days) and the air masses were mostly in an ozone-forming chemical mode. In its northern part the air masses were older (up to 13 days) and had unclear ozone formation or destruction potential. Based on analysis of forward trajectories, several receptor regions were identified. In addition to predominantly westward transport, we found evidence for

  17. Analysis of Process Gases and Trace Contaminants in Membrane-Aerated Gaseous Effluent Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin Michael; Meyer, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    In membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs), hollow fibers are used to supply oxygen to the biofilms and bulk fluid. A pressure and concentration gradient between the inner volume of the fibers and the reactor reservoir drives oxygen mass transport across the fibers toward the bulk solution, providing the fiber-adhered biofilm with oxygen. Conversely, bacterial metabolic gases from the bulk liquid, as well as from the biofilm, move opposite to the flow of oxygen, entering the hollow fiber and out of the reactor. Metabolic gases are excellent indicators of biofilm vitality, and can aid in microbial identification. Certain gases can be indicative of system perturbations and control anomalies, or potentially unwanted biological processes occurring within the reactor. In confined environments, such as those found during spaceflight, it is important to understand what compounds are being stripped from the reactor and potentially released into the crew cabin to determine the appropriateness or the requirement for additional mitigation factors. Reactor effluent gas analysis focused on samples provided from Kennedy Space Center's sub-scale MABRs, as well as Johnson Space Center's full-scale MABRs, using infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography techniques. Process gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrous oxide, were quantified to monitor reactor operations. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) GC-MS analysis was used to identify trace volatile compounds. Compounds of interest were subsequently quantified. Reactor supply air was examined to establish target compound baseline concentrations. Concentration levels were compared to average ISS concentration values and/or Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) levels where appropriate. Based on a review of to-date results, current trace contaminant control systems (TCCS) currently on board the ISS should be able to handle the added load from bioreactor systems without the need

  18. Measurements of reactive trace gases in the marine boundary layer using novel DOAS methods

    OpenAIRE

    Lampel, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS) can have a large impact on tropospheric chemistry. Already small concentrations in the marine boundary layer (MBL) can have a significant impact on the global budget of ozone and other trace-gases. Shipborne measurements of BrO and IO were conducted in the MBL from 70°S to 90°N to obtain a global picture of their distribution over several years. A focus were upwelling regions, which can provide large amounts of precursor substances for RHS in the MBL, of which s...

  19. Observations of trace gases and aerosols over the Indian Ocean during the monsoon transition period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, T.K.; Khan, A.; Ahammed, Y.N.; Tanwar, R.S.; Parmar, R.S.; Zalpuri, K.S.; Gupta, P.K.; Jain, S.L.; Singh, R.; Mitra, A.P.; Garg, S.C; Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, V.S.N.; DileepKumar, M.; Shepherd, A.J.

    of the system is done regularly with the help of a built-in ozone generator. The analyzers incorporate corrections due to changes in temper- ature, pressure in the absorption cell and drift in the intensity of UV lamp. The data presented here are according... cruise. The zero check is done every two hours using in-built zero air scrubber. The instrumental (TECO-48CTL) peri- odic zero drift is corrected before processing the data. Collection of other trace gases (CH4,N2O, CO2) was done by grab sampling, i...

  20. Potential contribution of nuclear energy to limit the emissions of greenhouse-effect-related trace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy conservation and partial adoption of low-emission energy carriers can be expected to mitigate the effects of anthropogenically produced trace gases on the global climate. This is where nuclear energy also makes its contribution. The author discusses its share in emission reduction and climate improvement in the past and at present, and its future perspectives both on a global and a regional base in the short medium, and long term. This involves environmental aspects as well as safety-related and economic aspects. The author presents the problems and unsolved issues relative to nuclear energy technology development till today and in the future. (orig.)

  1. Source identification of trace elements emitted into Athens atmosphere. Relation between trace elements and tropospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source identification of trace elements emitted into Athens (Greece) atmospheric environment has been studied by the Enrichment Factor (EF) and by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The prevailing wind direction is related to EF data in order to identify the possible pathways of trace elements, in the Athens basin. As gas pollutants and trace elements could be emitted from the same source, the possible relation between these two groups is studied by PCA and correlation relations. According to EF data, the trace elements Fe, Sm, Th, Co, Sc, Cr and K have a crustal origin while the elements Zn, As, Sb, Ag, Br result of anthropogenic pollution. The study of the prevailing wind direction showed that the existing geophysical channel in the northern area of Athens basin could be a pathway for the entrance of Fe, La, Sm, Th, Co, Cr, Na and Ag into Athens atmosphere. On the contrary, the sea breeze could be a potential cleaner of the atmosphere from the same elements. Six source factors were resolved by PCA for all the Athens area explaining the 90% of the total variance. They could nominated as soil dust, central heating, movement of cars, car tires, car break abrasion and sea breeze. After the application of PCA and the linear regression model, the concentration of atmospheric ozone shows to have a positive significant correlation with Na and Zn and a negative significant correlation with As, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Fe, La, Sb, Sc, Sm. A possible explanation of the mechanism for the decrease of atmospheric ozone concentration in relation to trace metals is given according to the existing literature data. (author)

  2. Evolution of trace gases and particles emitted by a chaparral fire in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Wold

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB is a major global source of trace gases and particles. Accurately representing the production and evolution of these emissions is an important goal for atmospheric chemical transport models. We measured a suite of gases and aerosols emitted from an 81 hectare prescribed fire in chaparral fuels on the central coast of California, US on 17 November 2009. We also measured physical and chemical changes that occurred in the isolated downwind plume in the first ~4 h after emission. The measurements were carried out onboard a Twin Otter aircraft outfitted with an airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (AFTIR, aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, single particle soot photometer (SP2, nephelometer, LiCor CO2 analyzer, a chemiluminescence ozone instrument, and a wing-mounted meteorological probe. Our measurements included: CO2; CO; NOx; NH3; non-methane organic compounds; organic aerosol (OA; inorganic aerosol (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and chloride; aerosol light scattering; refractory black carbon (rBC; and ambient temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and three-dimensional wind velocity. The molar ratio of excess O3 to excess CO in the plume (ΔO3/ΔCO increased from −5.13 (±1.13 × 10−3 to 10.2 (±2.16 × 10−2 in ~4.5 h following smoke emission. Excess acetic and formic acid (normalized to excess CO increased by factors of 1.73 ± 0.43 and 7.34 ± 3.03 (respectively over the same time since emission. Based on the rapid decay of C2H4 we infer an in-plume average OH concentration of 5.27 (±0.97 × 106 molec cm−3, consistent with previous studies showing elevated OH concentrations in biomass burning plumes. Ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate all increased over the course of 4 h. The observed ammonium increase was a factor of 3.90 ± 2.93 in about 4 h, but accounted for just ~36

  3. Evolution of trace gases and particles emitted by a chaparral fire in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Akagi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB is a major global source of trace gases and particles. Accurately representing the production and evolution of these emissions is an important goal for atmospheric chemical transport models. We measured a suite of gases and aerosols emitted from an 81 ha prescribed fire in chaparral fuels on the central coast of California, US on 17 November 2009. We also measured post-emission chemical changes in the isolated downwind plume for ~4 h of smoke aging. The measurements were carried out on board a Twin Otter aircraft outfitted with an airborne Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (AFTIR, aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, single particle soot photometer (SP2, nephelometer, LiCor CO2 analyzer, a chemiluminescence ozone instrument, and a wing-mounted meteorological probe. Our measurements included: CO2; CO; NOx; NH3; non-methane organic compounds; organic aerosol (OA; inorganic aerosol (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and chloride; aerosol light scattering; refractory black carbon (rBC; and ambient temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, and three-dimensional wind velocity. The molar ratio of excess O3 to excess CO in the plume (ΔO3/ΔCO increased from −0.005 to 0.102 in 4.5 h. Excess acetic and formic acid (normalized to excess CO increased by factors of 1.7 ± 0.4 and 7.3 ± 3.0 (respectively over the same aging period. Based on the rapid decay of C2H4 we infer an in-plume average OH concentration of 5.3 (±1.0 × 106 molecules cm−3, consistent with previous studies showing elevated OH concentrations in biomass burning plumes. Ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate all increased with plume aging. The observed ammonium increase was a factor of 3.9 ± 2.6 in about 4 h, but accounted for just ~36 % of the gaseous ammonia lost on a molar basis. Some of the gas phase NH3 loss may have been due to condensation

  4. MLS and ACE-FTS measurements of UTLS Trace Gases in the Presence of Multiple Tropopauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Walker, K. A.; Hegglin, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    The extra-tropical tropopause region is dynamically complex, with frequent occurrence of multiple tropopauses and of a "tropopause inversion layer" of enhanced static stability just above the tropopause. The tropopause structure is zonally-asymmetric and time-varying and, along with the UT jets and the stratospheric polar night jet, it defines the barriers and pathways that control UTLS transport. Averages of trace gases that do not account for the tropopause structure (such as zonal or equivalent latitude means) can obscure features of trace gas distributions that are important for understanding the role of the extra-tropical tropopause region in determining UTLS composition and hence its significance to climate processes. In this work we examine MLS and ACE-FTS UTLS trace gas profiles (using the recently reprocessed version 3 data from both instruments), including H2O, O3, CO and HNO3, in the context of extra-tropical tropopause structure seen in the GEOS-5 temperature fields, to help define differences in trace gas distributions related to differing UTLS thermal structures.

  5. The role of atmospheric gases in global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Tuckett, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this opening chapter of this book is to explain in simple terms what the greenhouse effect is, what its origins are, and what the properties of greenhouse gases are. I will restrict this chapter to an explanation of the physical chemistry of greenhouse gases and the greenhouse effect, and not delve too much into the politics of ‘what should or should not be done’. However, one simple message to convey at the onset is that the greenhouse effect is not just about concentration le...

  6. BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H{sub 2}-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, S.; Bains, W.; Hu, R. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H{sub 2} atmospheres and habitable surface temperatures, using a model atmosphere with photochemistry and a biomass estimate framework for evaluating the plausibility of a range of biosignature gas candidates. We find that photochemically produced H atoms are the most abundant reactive species in H{sub 2} atmospheres. In atmospheres with high CO{sub 2} levels, atomic O is the major destructive species for some molecules. In Sun-Earth-like UV radiation environments, H (and in some cases O) will rapidly destroy nearly all biosignature gases of interest. The lower UV fluxes from UV-quiet M stars would produce a lower concentration of H (or O) for the same scenario, enabling some biosignature gases to accumulate. The favorability of low-UV radiation environments to accumulate detectable biosignature gases in an H{sub 2} atmosphere is closely analogous to the case of oxidized atmospheres, where photochemically produced OH is the major destructive species. Most potential biosignature gases, such as dimethylsulfide and CH{sub 3}Cl, are therefore more favorable in low-UV, as compared with solar-like UV, environments. A few promising biosignature gas candidates, including NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O, are favorable even in solar-like UV environments, as these gases are destroyed directly by photolysis and not by H (or O). A more subtle finding is that most gases produced by life that are fully hydrogenated forms of an element, such as CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S, are not effective signs of life in an H{sub 2}-rich atmosphere because the dominant atmospheric chemistry will generate such gases abiologically, through photochemistry or geochemistry. Suitable biosignature gases in H{sub 2}-rich atmospheres for super-Earth exoplanets transiting M stars could potentially be detected in transmission

  7. DC normal glow discharges in atmospheric pressure atomic and molecular gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC glow discharges were experimentally investigated in atmospheric pressure helium, argon, hydrogen, nitrogen and air. The discharges were characterized by visualization of the discharges and voltage and current measurements for current of up to several milliamperes. Significant differences are seen in the gas temperature; however all the discharges appear to operate as temperature and pressure scaled versions of low pressure discharges. In the normal glow discharges, features such as negative glow, Faraday dark space and positive column regions are clearly observable. In hydrogen and to a lesser degree in helium and argon standing striations of the positive column were visible in the normal glow regime. Normal glow characteristics such as normal current density at the cathode and constant electric field in the positive column are observed although there are some unexplained effects. The emission spectra for each of the discharges were studied. Also the rotational and vibrational temperature of the discharges were measured by adding trace amounts of N2 to the discharge gas and comparing modeled optical emission spectra of the N2 2nd positive system with spectroscopic measurements from the discharge. The gas temperatures for a 3.5 mA normal glow discharge were around 420 K, 680 K, 750 K, 890 K and 1320 K in helium, argon, hydrogen, nitrogen and air, respectively. Measured vibrational and excitation temperatures indicate non-thermal discharge operation. Mixtures of gases achieved intermediate temperatures.

  8. Measurement of fission product gases in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, W. R.; Tobin, M. J.; Marsan, D. J.; Schell, C. W.; Vives-Batlle, J.; Yoon, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to quickly detect and assess the magnitude of releases of fission-produced radioactive material is of significant importance for ongoing operations of any conventional nuclear power plant or other activities with a potential for fission product release. In most instances, the control limits for the release of airborne radioactivity are low enough to preclude direct air sampling as a means of detection, especially for fission gases that decay by beta or electron emission. It is, therefore, customary to concentrate the major gaseous fission products (krypton, xenon and iodine) by cryogenic adsorption for subsequent separation and measurement. This study summarizes our initial efforts to develop an automated portable system for on-line separation and concentration with the potential for measuring environmental levels of radioactive gases, including 85Kr, 131,133,135Xe, 14C, 3H, 35S, 125,131I, etc., without using cryogenic fluids. Bench top and prototype models were constructed using the principle of heatless fractionation of the gases in a pressure swing system. This method removes the requirement for cryogenic fluids to concentrate gases and, with suitable electron and gamma ray detectors, provides for remote use under automatic computer control. Early results using 133Xe tracer show that kinetic chromatography, i.e., high pressure adsorption of xenon and low pressure desorption of air, using specific types of molecular sieves, permits the separation and quantification of xenon isotopes from large volume air samples. We are now developing the ability to measure the presence and amounts of fission-produced xenon isotopes that decay by internal conversion electrons and beta radiation with short half-lives, namely 131mXe, 11.8 d, 133mXe, 2.2 d, 133Xe, 5.2 d and 135Xe, 9.1 h. The ratio of the isotopic concentrations measured can be used to determine unequivocally the amount of fission gas and time of release of an air parcel many kilometers downwind from a

  9. Trace elements in the atmosphere over South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural sources of trace elements in the atmosphere are suspended soil particles, the evaporation of sea spray and smoke from veld fires. In urban and industrialised areas the main sources are fossil-fuel power plants, metallurgical smelters, blast furnaces, incinerators, automobiles, fossil-fueled locomotives and open fires in the Black townships. Often a source can be recognised by the relative concentrations of particular trace elements. A monitoring programme was established in 1974 by the Air Pollution Research Group of the CSIR and the Isotope and Radiation Division of the Atomic Energy Board in order to study the levels of trace elements in urban areas such as Johannesburg, Cape Town, and Durban, to measure the effects of industrialisation on trace elements levels in developing areas such as Richards Bay and Saldanha Bay and also to determine baseline values in rural areas. Extremely sensitive analytical techniques, e.g. neutron activation and atomic absorption were used for the analyses of filter samples. Methods of sampling and analysis are discussed and the preliminary results of this programme are presented

  10. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  11. Field Observations of the Processing of Organic Aerosol Particles and Trace Gases by Fogs and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, J. L.; Herckes, P.

    2003-12-01

    In many environments, organic compounds account for a significant fraction of fine particle mass. Because the lifetimes of accumulation mode aerosol particles are governed largely by interactions with clouds, it is important to understand how organic aerosol particles are processed by clouds and fogs. Recently we have examined the organic composition of clouds and fogs in a variety of environments as well as how these fogs and clouds process organic aerosol particles and soluble organic trace gases. The investigations, conducted in Europe, North America, Central America, and the Pacific region, have included studies of polluted radiation fogs, orographic clouds in clean and polluted environments, and marine stratocumulus. Our results show that organic matter is a significant component of fog and cloud droplets. In polluted California radiation fogs, we observed concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) ranging from 2 to 40 ppmC, with significantly lower concentrations measured in marine and continental clouds. An average of approximately 80 percent of organic matter was found in solution, while the remainder appears to be suspended material inside cloud and fog drops. Ultrafiltration measurements indicate that as much as half of the dissolved organic carbon is present in very large molecules with molecular weights in excess of 500 Daltons. Field measurements made using a two-stage cloud water collector reveal that organic matter tends to be enriched in smaller cloud or fog droplets. Consequently, removal of organic compounds by precipitating clouds or by direct cloud/fog drop deposition will be slowed due to the fact that small drops are incorporated less efficiently into precipitation and removed less efficiently by sedimentation or inertial impaction. Despite this trend, we have observed that sedimentation of droplets from long-lived radiation fogs provides a very effective mechanism for cleansing the atmosphere of carbonaceous aerosol particles, with organic

  12. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds - mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  13. Redistribution of trace gases by convective clouds – mixed-phase processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of gas transport to the free and upper troposphere in convective clouds is investigated in an axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of gas transport to the treatment of gas uptake by different ice hydrometeors. Two parameters are used to describe this uptake. The gas retention coefficient defines the fraction of dissolved gas that is retained in an ice particle upon freezing, which includes also the riming process. We also define a gas burial efficiency defining the amount of gas entrapped in ice crystals growing by vapour diffusion. Model calculations are performed for continental and maritime clouds using a complete range of gas solubilities, retention coefficients and burial efficiencies. The results show that the magnitude of the gas retention coefficient is much more important for gas transport in maritime clouds than in continental clouds. The cause of this difference lies in the different microphysical processes dominating the formation and evolution of hydrometeors in the two cloud types. For highly soluble gases, the amount of gas transported to the free troposphere in maritime clouds falls approximately linearly by a factor of 12 as the retention coefficient is varied between 0 and 1. Gas transport is relatively insensitive to the magnitude of the gas burial efficiency. However, the burial efficiency strongly controls the concentration of trace gases inside anvil ice crystals, which subsequently form cirrus clouds.

  14. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, A.; H. Bönisch; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; C. Gurk; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; R. Königstedt; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R; Parchatka, U.; Peter, T.; Schell, D.

    2006-01-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campa...

  15. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, A.; H. Bönisch; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; C. Gurk; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; R. Königstedt; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R; Parchatka, U.; Peter, T.; Schell, D.

    2006-01-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight...

  16. Highly resolved observations of trace gases in the lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere from the Spurt project: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, A.; H. Bönisch; Brunner, D.; Fischer, H.; Franke, H.; Günther, G.; C. Gurk; Hegglin, M.; Hoor, P.; R. Königstedt; Krebsbach, M.; Maser, R; Parchatka, U.; Peter, Th.; Schell, D.

    2005-01-01

    During SPURT (Spurenstofftransport in der Tropopausenregion, trace gas transport in the tropopause region) we performed measurements of a wide range of trace gases with different lifetimes and sink/source characteristics in the northern hemispheric upper troposphere (UT) and lowermost stratosphere (LMS). A large number of in-situ instruments were deployed on board a Learjet 35A, flying at altitudes up to 13.7 km, at times reaching to nearly 380 K potential temperature. Eight measurement campa...

  17. Effect of noble gases on an atmospheric greenhouse /Titan/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, R.; Owen, T.

    1973-01-01

    Several models for the atmosphere of Titan have been investigated, taking into account various combinations of neon and argon. The investigation shows that the addition of large amounts of Ne and/or Ar will substantially reduce the hydrogen abundance required for a given greenhouse effect. The fact that a large amount of neon should be present if the atmosphere is a relic of the solar nebula is an especially attractive feature of the models, because it is hard to justify appropriate abundances of other enhancing agents.

  18. Sorption of atmospheric gases by bulk lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, C. A.; Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioning of plasma facing components has enhanced the performance of several fusion devices. Elemental lithium will react with air during maintenance activities and with residual gases (H2O, CO, CO2) in the vacuum vessel during operations. We have used a mass balance (microgram sensitivity) to measure the mass gain of lithium samples during exposure of a ˜1 cm2 surface to ambient and dry synthetic air. For ambient air, we found an initial mass gain of several mg/h declining to less than 1 mg/h after an hour and decreasing by an order of magnitude after 24 h. A 9 mg sample achieved a final mass gain corresponding to complete conversion to Li2CO3 after 5 days. Exposure to dry air resulted in a 30 times lower initial rate of mass gain. The results have implications for the chemical state of lithium plasma facing surfaces and for safe handling of lithium coated components.

  19. Continuous measurements of greenhouse gases and atmospheric oxygen at the Namib Desert Atmospheric Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Morgan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new coastal background site has been established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs in the central Namib Desert at Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations for a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated, continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g.l., 50 km from the coast at the northern border of the Namib Sand Sea. Atmospheric oxygen is measured with a differential fuel cell analyzer (DFCA. Carbon dioxide and methane are measured with an early-model cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS; nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide are measured with an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS. Instrument-specific water corrections are employed for both the CRDS and OA-ICOS instruments in lieu of drying. The performance and measurement uncertainties are discussed in detail. As the station is located in a remote desert environment, there are some particular challenges, namely fine dust, high diurnal temperature variability, and minimal infrastructure. The gas handling system and calibration scheme were tailored to best fit the conditions of the site. The CRDS and DFCA provide data of acceptable quality when base requirements for operation are met, specifically adequate temperature control in the laboratory and regular supply of electricity. In the case of the OA-ICOS instrument, performance is significantly improved through the implementation of a drift correction through frequent measurements of a working tank.

  20. Continuous measurements of greenhouse gases and atmospheric oxygen at the Namib Desert Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, E. J.; Lavrič, J. V.; Seifert, T.; Chicoine, T.; Day, A.; Gomez, J.; Logan, R.; Sack, J.; Shuuya, T.; Uushona, E. G.; Vincent, K.; Schultz, U.; Brunke, E.-G.; Labuschagne, C.; Thompson, R. L.; Schmidt, S.; Manning, A. C.; Heimann, M.

    2015-02-01

    A new coastal background site has been established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the central Namib Desert at Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations for a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated, continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g.l., 50 km from the coast at the northern border of the Namib Sand Sea. Atmospheric oxygen is measured with a differential fuel cell analyzer (DFCA). Carbon dioxide and methane are measured with an early-model cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS); nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide are measured with an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS). Instrument-specific water corrections are employed for both the CRDS and OA-ICOS instruments in lieu of drying. The performance and measurement uncertainties are discussed in detail. As the station is located in a remote desert environment, there are some particular challenges, namely fine dust, high diurnal temperature variability, and minimal infrastructure. The gas handling system and calibration scheme were tailored to best fit the conditions of the site. The CRDS and DFCA provide data of acceptable quality when base requirements for operation are met, specifically adequate temperature control in the laboratory and regular supply of electricity. In the case of the OA-ICOS instrument, performance is significantly improved through the implementation of a drift correction through frequent measurements of a working tank.

  1. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  2. Possible cometary origin of heavy noble gases in the atmospheres of Venus, earth, and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Tobias; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Kleinfeld, Idit

    1992-01-01

    Due consideration of the probable history of the Martian atmosphere, as well as noble-gas data from the Mars-derived SNC meteorites and from laboratory tests on the trapping of noble gases in ice, are the bases of the presently hypothesized domination of noble gases in the atmospheres of all terrestrial planets by a mixture of internal components and a contribution from comets. If verified, this hypothesis would underscore the significance of impacts for these planets' volatile inventories. The sizes of the hypothesized comets are of the order of 120 km for Venus and only 80 km for that which struck the earth.

  3. A New Laser Based Approach for Measuring Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, we developed a proof-of-concept system for a new open-path laser absorption spectrometer concept for measuring atmospheric CO2. The measurement approach utilizes high-reliability all-fiber-based, continuous-wave laser technology, along with a unique all-digital lock-in amplifier method that, together, enables simultaneous transmission and reception of multiple fixed wavelengths of light. This new technique, which utilizes very little transmitted energy relative to conventional lidar ...

  4. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  5. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-09-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm) simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV) from aircraft movements in real-time (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~ 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, independent of signal-to-noise at which the trace gas is detected. The boundary layer NO2

  6. Sorption of atmospheric gases by bulk lithium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, C. A. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics; Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Capece, A. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Koel, B. E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2016-01-01

    Lithium conditioning of plasma facing components has enhanced the performance of several fusion devices. Elemental lithium will react with air during maintenance activities and with residual gases (H2O, CO, CO2) in the vacuum vessel during operations. We have used a mass balance (microgram sensitivity) to measure the mass gain of lithium samples during exposure of a similar to 1 cm(2) surface to ambient and dry synthetic air. For ambient air, we found an initial mass gain of several mg/h declining to less than 1 mg/h after an hour and decreasing by an order of magnitude after 24 h. A 9 mg sample achieved a final mass gain corresponding to complete conversion to Li2CO3 after 5 days. Exposure to dry air resulted in a 30 times lower initial rate of mass gain. The results have implications for the chemical state of lithium plasma facing surfaces and for safe handling of lithium coated components. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Membrane Separation of Gases from the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    A test bed has been constructed to test membrane modules for separation of gases under temperature and pressure conditions normally encountered on the surface of Mars. The test bed allows independent control of: (1) feed flow rates, (2) feed composition, (3) feed pressure, (4) permeate pressure, and (5) operating temperature. Preliminary data obtained at a nominal feed pressure of 760 torr and permeate pressure of 10 torr has demonstrated the ability of one membrane module to operate at temperatures as low as -70 C. At temperatures below -40 C, however, significant loss of carbon dioxide and argon was observed, probably indicating condensation at the relatively high pressure used. As expected, permeation flow rates decreased with decreasing temperature, the flow at -30 C approximately 37% of the value at +23 C. Values of permeability for individual gas components showed similar decreases with decreasing temperature, but permeability ratios changed significantly. For example, the ratio of the permeabilities of carbon dioxide and nitrogen increased from 2.6 at 23 C to 5.6 at -30 C. Additional data at lower operating pressures and temperatures must be obtained in order to optimize design of a usable separation system.

  8. A Fourier transform infrared trace gas and isotope analyser for atmospheric applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Concern in recent decades about human impacts on Earth's climate has led to the need for improved and expanded measurement capabilities of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this paper we describe in detail an in situ trace gas analyser based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy that is capable of simultaneous and continuous measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrous oxide (N2O and 13C in CO2 in air with high precision. High accuracy is established by reference to measurements of standard reference gases. Stable water isotopes can also be measured in undried airstreams. The analyser is automated and allows unattended operation with minimal operator intervention. Precision and accuracy meet and exceed the compatibility targets set by the World Meteorological Organisation – Global Atmosphere Watch for baseline measurements in the unpolluted troposphere for all species except 13C in CO2.

    The analyser is mobile and well suited to fixed sites, tower measurements, mobile platforms and campaign-based measurements. The isotopic specificity of the optically-based technique and analysis allows its application in isotopic tracer experiments, for example in tracing variations of 13C in CO2 and 15N in N2O. We review a number of applications illustrating use of the analyser in clean air monitoring, micrometeorological flux and tower measurements, mobile measurements on a train, and soil flux chamber measurements.

  9. Soil greenhouse gases emissions reduce the benefit of mangrove plant to mitigating atmospheric warming effect

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guangcheng; Chen, Bin; Yu, Dan; Ye, Yong; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Chen, Shunyang

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove soils have been recognized as sources of atmospheric greenhouse gases but the atmospheric fluxes are poorly characterized, and their adverse warming effect has scarcely been considered with respect to the role of mangrove wetlands in mitigating global warming. The present study balanced the warming effect of soil greenhouse gas emissions with plant carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration rate in a highly productive mangrove wetland in South China to assess the role of mangrove wetland in ...

  10. Continuous Measurements of Greenhouse Gases and Atmospheric Oxygen in the Namib Desert

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Eric James

    2015-01-01

    A new, near-coastal background site was established for observations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and atmospheric oxygen in the central Namib Desert near Gobabeb, Namibia. The location of the site was chosen to provide observations in a data-poor region in the global sampling network for GHGs. Semi-automated, continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, atmospheric oxygen, and basic meteorology are made at a height of 21 m a.g.l., 50 km from...

  11. THE INTEGRITY OF THE ICE RECORD OF GREENHOUSE GASES WITH A SPECIAL FOCUS ON ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Raynaud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 25 years, the ice core record has provided a unique and precious archive of past changes in three important greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide CO2, methane CH4 and nitrous oxide N2O. Recovering the Vostok ice core has played a major role, being the first ice record showing the variations of CO2 and CH4 during a full glacial-interglacial cycle, and a few years later being extended to three more cycles. This information, by revealing the tight coupling between climate and carbon cycle during the last glacial-interglacial cycles, has become a benchmark against which climate and carbon cycle models can be tested. The purpose of the present work is to discuss the degree of integrity of the ice core record of greenhouse gases and to assess to which degree it provides an accurate reconstruction of the past atmospheric changes. The various processes potentially affecting the integrity of the record are discussed. They include the interactions of trace gases with precipitation or firn grains, the effect of summer-melting at the surface of the ice sheet, the diffusion and the gravitational setting of gases in the open spaces of the firn, the physical, chemical and biological interactions between the air trapped and the ice matrix, the role of the transformation of air bubbles into air hydrates with depth in the ice column. Providing to select an appropriate sampling site, to take specific precautions during storage and transportation of the ice cores, and to select ice of good quality, the ice core record of initial atmospheric gases is hardly affected by the processes listed above. Such conclusion is strongly supported by the remarkable agreement of global signals like CO2 or CH4 measured in different cores taken at different locations. Finally, I bring back here the history of how the ice core record of atmospheric CO2 has been obtained, from the pioneering times to today, and summarize the main conclusions reached in terms of climate

  12. Measurement of fossil fuel derived carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gases above Sacramento, California in Spring 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Turnbull

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct quantification of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several carbon cycle and air quality questions. We collected in-situ CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements and flask samples in the boundary layer and free troposphere over Sacramento, California, USA, during two aircraft flights over and downwind of this urban area during spring of 2009. The flask samples were analyzed for Δ14CO2 and CO2 to determine the recently added CO2ff mole fraction. A suite of additional greenhouse gases including hydrocarbons and halocarbons were measured in the same samples. Strong correlations were observed between CO2ff and numerous trace gases associated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff and these species, and compare these with bottom-up inventory-derived estimates. Recent county level inventory estimates for carbon monoxide (CO and benzene from the California Air Resources Board CEPAM database are in good agreement with our measured emission ratios, whereas older emissions inventories appear to overestimate emissions of these gases. For most other trace species, there are substantial differences between our measured emission ratios and those derived from available emission inventories. For the first flight, we combine in situ CO measurements with the measured CO:CO2ff emission ratio of 14±2 ppbCO/ppmCO2 to derive an estimate of CO2ff mole fraction throughout this flight, and also estimate the biospheric CO2 mixing ratio (CO2bio from the difference of total and fossil CO2. The resulting CO2bio varies substantially between air in the urban plume and the surrounding boundary layer air. Finally, we use the in situ estimates of CO2ff mole fraction to infer total fossil fuel CO2

  13. Incorporation of Solar Noble Gases from a Nebula-Derived Atmosphere During Magma Ocean Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolum, D. S.; Cassen, P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Porcelli, D.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of solar noble gases in the deep interior of the Earth is inferred from the Ne isotopic compositions of MORB (Mid-ocean Ridge Basalts) and OIB (Oceanic Island Basalt); Ar data may also consistent with a solar component in the deep mantle. Models of the transport and distribution of noble gases in the earth's mantle allow for the presence of solar Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne ratios and permit the calculation of lower mantle noble gas concentrations. These mantle data and models also indicate that the Earth suffered early (0.7 to 2 x 10(exp 8) yr) and large (greater than 99 percent) losses of noble gases from the interior, a result previously concluded for atmospheric Xe. We have pursued the suggestion that solar noble gases were incorporated in the forming Earth from a massive, nebula-derived atmosphere which promoted large-scale melting, so that gases from this atmosphere dissolved in the magma ocean and were mixed downward. Models of a primitive atmosphere captured from the solar nebula and supported by accretion luminosity indicate that pressures at the Earth's surface were adequate (and largely more than the required 100 Atm) to dissolve sufficient gases. We have calculated the coupled evolution of the magma ocean and the overlying atmosphere under conditions corresponding to the cessation (or severe attenuation) of the sustaining accretion luminosity, prior to the complete removal of the solar nebula. Such a condition was likely to obtain, for instance, when most of the unaccumulated mass resided in large bodies which were only sporadically accreted. The luminosity supporting the atmosphere is then that provided by the cooling Earth, consideration of which sets a lower limit to the time required to solidify the mantle and terminate the incorporation of atmospheric gases within it. In our initial calculations, we have fixed the nebula temperature at To = 300K, a value likely to be appropriate for nebular temperatures at lAU in the early planet-building epoch

  14. On the detectability of trace chemical species in the martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Wilson, E. L.

    2015-11-01

    The martian atmosphere is host to many trace gases including water (H2O) and its isotopologues, methane (CH4) and potentially sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and further organic compounds, which would serve as indirect tracers of geological, chemical and biological processes on Mars. With exception of the recent detection of CH4 by Curiosity, previous detections of these species have been unsuccessful or considered tentative due to the low concentrations of these species in the atmosphere (∼10-9 partial pressures), limited spectral resolving power and/or signal-to-noise and the challenge of discriminating between telluric and martian features when observing from the Earth. In this study, we present radiative transfer simulations of an alternative method for detection of trace gas species - the gas correlation radiometry method. Two potential observing scenarios were explored where a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) instrument: (1) performs nadir and/or limb sounding of the martian atmosphere in the thermal infrared (200-2000 cm-1 from an orbiting spacecraft or (2) performs solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared (2000-5000 cm-1) from a lander on the martian surface. In both scenarios, simulations of a narrowband filter radiometer (without gas correlation) were also generated to serve as a comparison. From a spacecraft, we find that a gas correlation filter radiometer, in comparison to a filter radiometer (FR), offers a greater discrimination between temperature and dust, a greater discrimination between H2O and HDO, and would allow detection of N2O and CH3OH at concentrations of ∼10 ppbv and ∼2 ppbv, respectively, which are lower than previously-derived upper limits. However, the lowest retrievable concentration of SO2 (approximately 2 ppbv) is comparable with previous upper limits and CH4 is only detectable at concentrations of approximately 10 ppbv, which is an order of magnitude higher than the concentration recently measured

  15. A New Laser Based Approach for Measuring Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Dobler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, we developed a proof-of-concept system for a new open-path laser absorption spectrometer concept for measuring atmospheric CO2. The measurement approach utilizes high-reliability all-fiber-based, continuous-wave laser technology, along with a unique all-digital lock-in amplifier method that, together, enables simultaneous transmission and reception of multiple fixed wavelengths of light. This new technique, which utilizes very little transmitted energy relative to conventional lidar systems, provides high signal-to-noise (SNR measurements, even in the presence of a large background signal. This proof-of-concept system, tested in both a laboratory environment and a limited number of field experiments over path lengths of 680 m and 1,600 m, demonstrated SNR values >1,000 for received signals of ~18 picoWatts averaged over 60 s. A SNR of 1,000 is equivalent to a measurement precision of ±0.001 or ~0.4 ppmv. The measurement method is expected to provide new capability for automated monitoring of greenhouse gas at fixed sites, such as carbon sequestration facilities, volcanoes, the short- and long-term assessment of urban plumes, and other similar applications. In addition, this concept enables active measurements of column amounts from a geosynchronous orbit for a network of ground-based receivers/stations that would complement other current and planned space-based measurement capabilities.

  16. Composition and Trends of Short-Lived Trace Gases in the UT/LS over Europe Observed by the CARIBIC Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Oram, D. E.; O'Sullivan, D. A.; Slemr, F.; Schuck, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) involves the monthly deployment of an instrument container equipped to make atmospheric measurements from aboard a commercial airliner, and has operated since 2005 from aboard a Lufthansa Airbus 340-600 . Measurements from the container include in-situ trace gas and aerosol analyses and the collection of aerosol and whole air samples for post-flight laboratory analysis. Measurements made from the sampling flasks include greenhouse gas (GHG), halocarbon and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis. CARIBIC flights originate in Frankfurt, Germany with routes to India, East Asia, South America, North America and Africa, and typical aircraft cruising altitudes of 10-12km allow for the monitoring of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) along these routes. Data collected during the aircraft’s departure from and return to Frankfurt provide a 4 year time series of near-monthly measurements of the composition of the UT/LS above Europe. Here we present a discussion of the composition of short-lived trace gases in the whole air samples collected above Europe during CARIBIC flights. Over 150 air samples were collected between May 2005 and July 2009, or about 4 samples per month. Of the whole air samples collected, about 45% showed influence by stratospheric air (i.e. very low values of GHG, NMHC and halocarbons, elevated O3, high potential vorticity). The remaining samples were representative of the upper troposphere; back trajectories for these samples indicate that a little over half were collected in air masses that had been in the boundary layer within the previous 8 days. The predominant source regions for these samples were the Gulf of Mexico and continental North America. Owing to their wide range of chemical lifetimes and the varying composition of emissions, short-lived trace gases transported to the UT/LS can be useful indicators of source

  17. Limitations of wind extraction from 4-D-Var assimilation of trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Allen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent variational data assimilation allows the possibility of extracting wind information from observations of long-lived trace gases. Since trace gas observations are not available at sufficient resolution for deriving feature-track winds, they must be combined with model background information to produce an analysis. If done with time-dependent variational assimilation, wind information may be extracted via the adjoint of the linearized tracer continuity equation. This paper presents idealized experiments that illustrate the mechanics of tracer-wind extraction and demonstrate some of the limitations of this procedure. We first examine tracer-wind extraction using a simple one-dimensional advection equation. The analytic solution for a single trace gas observation is discussed along with numerical solutions for multiple observations. The limitations of tracer-wind extraction are then explored using highly idealized ozone experiments performed with a development version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM in which stratospheric globally-distributed hourly stratospheric ozone profiles are assimilated in a single 6-h update cycle in January 2009. Starting with perfect background ozone conditions, but imperfect dynamical conditions, ozone errors develop over the 6-h background window. Wind increments are introduced in the analysis in order to reduce the differences between background ozone and ozone observations. For "perfect" observations (unbiased and no random error, this results in root mean square (RMS vector wind error reductions of up to ∼ 3 m s−1 in the winter hemisphere and tropics. Wind extraction is more difficult in the summer hemisphere due to weak ozone gradients and smaller background wind errors. The limitations of wind extraction are also explored for observations with imposed random errors and for limited sampling patterns. As expected, the amount of wind information extracted degrades as

  18. A kinetics study for reaction process of Rn daughter and atmospheric trace gas using alpha track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of investigators have reported formation of radiolytic ultrafine particles produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with atmospheric trace gases. Previous studies have suggested that a very high localized concentration of the hydroxyl radical produced by the radiolysis of water can react with atmospheric trace gases such as SO2 and produce lower vapor pressure compounds that can subsequently nucleate. To determine the trace gas and water vapor concentration dependence of the active, positively charged, first decay product of radon (Po-218), a well-controlled radon chamber was used in this research. The mobility spectrum of the decay products in the range of 0.07-5.0 cm2/V.sec from the radon chamber was measured using alpha track detector installed inside a specially-designed electrostatic spectrometer. Measurements were taken for different concentrations (0.5 ppm to 5 ppm) of SO2 in purified, compressed air. A kinetics study following the clustering of SO2 around the PoOx + ion in an excess of SO2 for interpretation of the reaction processes was performed

  19. Integrated method for the measurement of trace atmospheric bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Key

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous atmospheric bases are thought to play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their sources, transport, and sinks remain poorly understood. Of the many methods available to measure such compounds in ambient air, few meet the current need of being applicable to the complete range of potential analytes and fewer still are convenient to implement using instrumentation that is standard to most laboratories. In this work, an integrated approach to measuring trace atmospheric nitrogenous bases has been developed and validated. The method uses a simple acid scrubbing step to capture and concentrate the bases as their phosphite salts, which then are derivatized and analyzed using GC/MS and/or LC/MS. The advantages of both techniques in the context of the present measurements are discussed. The approach is sensitive, selective, reproducible, as well as convenient to implement and has been validated for different sampling strategies. The limits of detection for the families of tested compounds are suitable for ambient measurement applications, as supported by field measurements in an urban park and in the exhaust of on-road vehicles.

  20. Integrated method for the measurement of trace nitrogenous atmospheric bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, D.; Stihle, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Bonnet, C.; Depernon, L.; Liu, O.; Kennedy, S.; Latimer, R.; Burgoyne, M.; Wanger, D.; Webster, A.; Casunuran, S.; Hidalgo, S.; Thomas, M.; Moss, J. A.; Baum, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogenous atmospheric bases are thought to play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their sources, transport, and sinks remain poorly understood. Of the many methods available to measure such compounds in ambient air, few meet the current need of being applicable to the complete range of potential analytes and fewer still are convenient to implement using instrumentation that is standard to most laboratories. In this work, an integrated approach to measuring trace, atmospheric, gaseous nitrogenous bases has been developed and validated. The method uses a simple acid scrubbing step to capture and concentrate the bases as their phosphite salts, which then are derivatized and analyzed using GC/MS and/or LC/MS. The advantages of both techniques in the context of the present measurements are discussed. The approach is sensitive, selective, reproducible, as well as convenient to implement and has been validated for different sampling strategies. The limits of detection for the families of tested compounds are suitable for ambient measurement applications (e.g., methylamine, 1 pptv; ethylamine, 2 pptv; morpholine, 1 pptv; aniline, 1 pptv; hydrazine, 0.1 pptv; methylhydrazine, 2 pptv), as supported by field measurements in an urban park and in the exhaust of on-road vehicles.

  1. Integrated method for the measurement of trace atmospheric bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, D.; Stihle, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Bonnet, C.; Depernon, L.; Liu, O.; Kennedy, S.; Latimer, R.; Burgoyne, M.; Wanger, D.; Webster, A.; Casunuran, S.; Hidalgo, S.; Thomas, M.; Moss, J. A.; Baum, M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Nitrogenous atmospheric bases are thought to play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their sources, transport, and sinks remain poorly understood. Of the many methods available to measure such compounds in ambient air, few meet the current need of being applicable to the complete range of potential analytes and fewer still are convenient to implement using instrumentation that is standard to most laboratories. In this work, an integrated approach to measuring trace atmospheric nitrogenous bases has been developed and validated. The method uses a simple acid scrubbing step to capture and concentrate the bases as their phosphite salts, which then are derivatized and analyzed using GC/MS and/or LC/MS. The advantages of both techniques in the context of the present measurements are discussed. The approach is sensitive, selective, reproducible, as well as convenient to implement and has been validated for different sampling strategies. The limits of detection for the families of tested compounds are suitable for ambient measurement applications, as supported by field measurements in an urban park and in the exhaust of on-road vehicles.

  2. Computerized atmospheric trace contaminant control simulation for manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Buildup of atmospheric trace contaminants in enclosed volumes such as a spacecraft may lead to potentially serious health problems for the crew members. For this reason, active control methods must be implemented to minimize the concentration of atmospheric contaminants to levels that are considered safe for prolonged, continuous exposure. Designing hardware to accomplish this has traditionally required extensive testing to characterize and select appropriate control technologies. Data collected since the Apollo project can now be used in a computerized performance simulation to predict the performance and life of contamination control hardware to allow for initial technology screening, performance prediction, and operations and contingency studies to determine the most suitable hardware approach before specific design and testing activities begin. The program, written in FORTRAN 77, provides contaminant removal rate, total mass removed, and per pass efficiency for each control device for discrete time intervals. In addition, projected cabin concentration is provided. Input and output data are manipulated using commercial spreadsheet and data graphing software. These results can then be used in analyzing hardware design parameters such as sizing and flow rate, overall process performance and program economics. Test performance may also be predicted to aid test design.

  3. Coherent structures and trace gases fluxes and concentrations in and above a heterogeneous spruce forest (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foken, T.

    2013-12-01

    Near the FLUXNET site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) three intensive measuring periods took place in 2007, 2008, and 2011 within the EGER project (ExchanGE processes in mountainous Regions). The main focus of all three experiments was the investigation of turbulent structures and their influence on the energy exchange and trace gas fluxes as well as trace gas reactions. Due to a tornado-like storm event an approximately 300 m long forest edge between a 25 m high spruce forest and a clearing was generated about 150 m south of the DE-Bay site. The investigation of processes at these forest edge was the main issue of the 2011 experiment. A main topic of all experiments was the investigation of the coupling between the atmosphere, the crowns and the trunk space as well as the horizontal coupling. This coupling algorithm is based on the analysis of coherent structures at three levels. While a complete coupling was only observed during daytime, at night well-coupled events were found in connection with low-level jets. The change of inert (CO2) or reactive (O3, NO, NO2, HONO) trace gas concentration could be explained with the coupling situation. It was also found that at the forest edge, coherent structures contribute less to total turbulent flux than within the forest. Accordingly, these coherent motions do not ensure that there is better vertical coupling between the forest stand and the overlying atmosphere at the forest edge. The relative contributions of sweeps and ejections to coherent flux reveal that there might be even larger circulations that cause better ventilation at the forest edge. Ejections dominate during the daytime, whereas sweeps contribute more during nighttime. Thus, there is systematic outflow during the daytime and inflow of fresh air directly at the forest edge during the nighttime. To underline these findings perpendicular to the edge, a mobile measuring system investigated the horizontal gradients of temperature, moisture, radiation, carbon

  4. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry. PMID:20058916

  5. Use of sodar data for analysis of relations between concentrations of minor atmospheric gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical relations between surface concentrations of minor atmospheric gases have been studied. As it was found a relation between concentrations of gases having the same sources (e.g., fuel burning for NO and CO) is close to linear trend. On the other hand, two species which are both a source and a sink to each other (e.g., O3 and NO) demonstrate hyperbolical regression line. Finally, concentrations of two species one of which is partially a source for another (e.g., NO and NO2) demonstrate exponential (logarithmic) type of trend. However, real relations between concentrations of two minor gases for any day represent non-homogeneous and complicated closed graphs like Carno cycle. As it was found a structure of these graphs during a day may be successfully explained by dynamics of the thermal stratification with the use of sodar data. Two examples of this analysis have been demonstrated

  6. Airborne measurements and emission estimates of greenhouse gases and other trace constituents from the 2013 California Yosemite Rim wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, E. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Singh, H. B.; Tanaka, T.; Roby, M. C.; Hamill, P.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Contezac, J.; Blake, D. R.; Simpson, I. J.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Diskin, G. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Choi, Y.; Ryerson, T. B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Loewenstein, M.; Gore, W.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents airborne measurements of multiple atmospheric trace constituents including greenhouse gases (such as CO2, CH4, O3) and biomass burning tracers (such as CO, CH3CN) downwind of an exceptionally large wildfire. In summer 2013, the Rim wildfire, ignited just west of the Yosemite National Park, California, and burned over 250,000 acres of the forest during the 2-month period (17 August to 24 October) before it was extinguished. The Rim wildfire plume was intercepted by flights carried out by the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) on 29 August and the NASA DC-8, as part of SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys), on 26 and 27 August during its intense, primary burning period. AJAX revisited the wildfire on 10 September when the conditions were increasingly smoldering, with slower growth. The more extensive payload of the DC-8 helped to bridge key measurements that were not available as part of AJAX (e. g. CO). Data analyses are presented in terms of emission ratios (ER), emission factors (EF) and combustion efficiency and are compared with previous wildfire studies. ERs were 8.0 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 26 August, 6.5 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 29 August and 18.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 on 10 September 2013. The increase in CH4 ER from 6.5 to 8.0 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 during the primary burning period to 18.3 ppb CH4 (ppm CO2)-1 during the fire's slower growth period likely indicates enhanced CH4 emissions from increased smoldering combustion relative to flaming combustion. Given the magnitude of the Rim wildfire, the impacts it had on regional air quality and the limited sampling of wildfire emissions in the western United States to date, this study provides a valuable dataset to support forestry and regional air quality management, including observations of ERs of a wide number of species from the Rim wildfire.

  7. Iterative maximum a posteriori (IMAP)-DOAS for retrieval of strongly absorbing trace gases: Model studies for CH_4 and CO_2 retrieval from near infrared spectra of SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenberg, C.; U. Platt; Wagner, T

    2005-01-01

    In the past, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has mostly been employed for atmospheric trace gas retrieval in the UV/Vis spectral region. New spectrometers such as SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT also provide near infrared channels and thus allow for the detection of greenhouse gases like CH4, CO2, or N2O. However, modifications of the classical DOAS algorithm are necessary to account for the idiosyncrasies of this spectral region, i.e. the temperature and...

  8. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    S. Baidar; Oetjen, H.; S. Coburn; Dix, B.; I. Ortega; R. Sinreich; R. Volkamer

    2012-01-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 5...

  9. Quantifying the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols based on WRF-Chem simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Qian; W. I. Gustafson Jr.; J. D. Fast

    2010-01-01

    One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MIL...

  10. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Qian; W. I. Gustafson; J. D. Fast

    2010-01-01

    One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MIL...

  11. Emission of Climate-Relevant Trace Gases and Succession of Microbial Communities during Open-Windrow Composting

    OpenAIRE

    Hellmann, B.; Zelles, L.; Palojarvi, A.; Bai, Q.

    1997-01-01

    Determination of different indicators of microbial biomass, community structure, and bioactivity by the fumigation extraction method, as well as determination of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and their subfractions and the measurement of trace gases, respectively, provides valuable information about microbial succession in composting processes. The emission rates of carbon dioxide (CO(inf2)), methane (CH(inf4)), and nitrous oxide (N(inf2)O) increased successively during compost maturation:...

  12. Shallow borehole array for measuring fluxes of reduced trace gases in Greenland as an analogue for volatile emission on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Planetary exploration of Mars is rapidly advancing with high-resolution data from orbiting and landed instruments upending the image of a monotonously arid red planet and raising interest in the search for evidence of past or present Martian life. The plausibility of biotic influences on release and sequestration of water and other volatile molecules on Mars remains a highly contentious topic. Despite this uncertainty, treating volatile emissions as potential atmospheric biomarkers is prudent for planetary protection and is critical for refinement of exploration strategies aimed at life detection on Mars. Using deeply eroded Paleoproterozoic bedrock in southwestern Greenland as an analogue for Mars, a team of scientists from Indiana University, Princeton University, Goddard Space Flight Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Honey Bee Robotics is participating in a three-year field campaign to analyze seasonal and diurnal variation in concentration and isotopic composition of methane, ethane, and hydrogen sulfide in bedrock boreholes (0.5 to 2 m depth) and soil pipe wells (1 to 1.5 m depth) intersecting permafrost environments across a study site of about 1 km2. Open-path laser spectroscopy (OPLS) will be used from a fixed platform coupled to a roving reflector in order to map out gas emissions from a variety of bedrock and vegetated terrains in periglacial settings. OPLS mapping will be used to target sites for seasonal and diurnal monitoring surface fluxes of reduced gases. Bedrock boreholes will be drilled percussively and soil pipe-wells will be inserted by hand. Each borehole or well will have one fiber optic line and two capillary lines installed by hand through an inert screw-compression seal. The capillary lines will be used to transfer gas into detection instruments at the surface and the fiber optic line will allow transfer of data from temperature and pressure sensors to data loggers. The field campaign will culminate with an integrated drill

  13. Airborne observations of trace gases over boreal Canada during BORTAS: campaign climatology, airmass analysis and enhancement ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. O'Shea

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In situ airborne measurements were made over Eastern Canada in summer 2011 as part of the BORTAS experiment (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and~Satellites. In this paper we present observations of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4 and other biomass burning tracers and related trace gases, both climatologically and through case studies, as recorded on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Vertical profiles of CO2 were generally characterised by depleted boundary layer concentrations relative to the free troposphere, consistent with terrestrial biospheric uptake. In contrast, CH4 concentrations were found to rise with decreasing altitude due to strong local and regional surface sources. We use coincident tracer-tracer correlations and a Lagrangian trajectory model to characterise and differentiate air mass history of intercepted plumes. In particular, CO, HCN and CH3CN were used to identify air masses that have been recently influenced by biomass burning. Concentrations of CO2 were found to have a mean tropospheric, campaign-average concentration of 384.8 ppm (ranging between 371.5 and 397.1 ppm, whilst CH4 concentrations had a mean value of 1859 ppb (ranging between 1797 and 1968 ppb, representing the episodic sampling of local fire plumes. CH4 and CO2 concentrations during BORTAS were found to be broadly comparable to previous measurements in the region during the regional burning season and with reanalysed composition fields from the EU Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Change (MACC project. By examining individual case studies we were able to quantify emissions from biomass burning. Using both near-field (1 day sampling, boreal forest fire plumes were identified throughout the troposphere. Fresh plumes from fires in Northwest Ontario yield emission factors for CH4 and CO2 of 8.5 ± 0.9 g (kg dry matter−1 and 1512 g ± 185 g (kg dry matter−1, respectively. We have

  14. Long term measurements of submicrometer urban aerosols: statistical analysis for correlations with meteorological conditions and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wehner

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term measurements (over 4 years of particle number size distributions (submicrometer particles, 3--800 nm in diameter, trace gases (NO, NO2, and O3, and meteorological parameters (global radiation, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, etc. were taken in a moderately polluted site in the city of Leipzig (Germany. The resulting complex data set was analyzed with respect to seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation of the submicrometer aerosol. Car traffic produced a peak in the number size distribution at around 30 nm particle diameter during morning rush hour on weekdays. A second peak at 10--15 nm particle diameter occurred around noon during summer, confirmed by high correlation between concentration of particles less than 20 nm and the global radiation. This new-particle formation at noon was correlated with the amount of global radiation. A high concentration of accumulation mode particles (between 100 and 800 nm, which are associated with large particle-surface area, might prevent this formation. Such high particle concentration in the ultrafine region (particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter was not detected in the particle mass, and thus, particle mass concentration is not suitable for determining the diurnal patterns of particles. In summer, statistical time series analysis showed a cyclic pattern of ultrafine particles with a period of one day and confirmed the correlation with global radiation. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed a strong correlation between the particle concentration for 20 -- 800 nm particles and the NO- and NO2-concentrations, indicating the influence of combustion processes on this broad size range, in particular during winter. In addition, PCA also revealed that particle concentration depended on meteorological conditions such as wind speed and wind direction, although the dependence differed with particle size class.

  15. Long term measurements of submicrometer urban aerosols: statistical analysis for correlations with meteorological conditions and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wehner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term measurements (over 4 years of particle number size distributions (submicrometer particles, 3-800 nm in diameter, trace gases (NO, NO2, and O3, and meteorological parameters (global radiation, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, etc. were taken in a moderately polluted site in the city of Leipzig (Germany. The resulting complex data set was analyzed with respect to seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation of the submicrometer aerosol. Car traffic produced a peak in the number size distribution at around 20 nm particle diameter during morning rush hour on weekdays. A second peak at 10-15 nm particle diameter occurred around noon during summer, confirmed by high correlation between concentration of particles less than 20 nm and the global radiation. This new-particle formation at noon was correlated with the amount of global radiation. A high concentration of accumulation mode particles (between 100 and 800 nm, which are associated with large particle-surface area, might prevent this formation. Such high particle concentration in the ultrafine region (particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter was not detected in the particle mass, and thus, particle mass concentration is not suitable for determining the diurnal patterns of particles. In summer, statistical time series analysis showed a cyclic pattern of ultrafine particles with a period of one day and confirmed the correlation with global radiation. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed a strong correlation between the particle concentration for 20-800 nm particles and the NO- and NO2-concentrations, indicating the influence of combustion processes on this broad size range, in particular during winter. In addition, PCA also revealed that particle concentration depended on meteorological conditions such as wind speed and wind direction, although the dependence differed with particle size class.

  16. A simple method to estimate entropy of atmospheric gases from their action

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Ivan R; Rose, Michael T; Crossan, Angus N

    2015-01-01

    A convenient model for estimating the total entropy ({\\Sigma}Si) of atmospheric gases based on physical action is proposed. This realistic approach is fully consistent with statistical mechanics, but uses the properties of translational, rotational and vibrational action to partition the entropy. When all sources of action are computed as appropriate non-linear functions, the total input of thermal energy ({\\Sigma}SiT) required to sustain a chemical system at specific temperatures (T) and pressures (p) can be estimated, yielding results in close agreement with published experimental third law values. Thermodynamic properties of gases including enthalpy, Gibbs energy and Helmholtz energy can be easily calculated from simple molecular and physical properties. We propose that these values for entropy are employed both chemically for reactions and physically for computing atmospheric profiles, the latter based on steady state heat flow equilibrating thermodynamics with gravity. We also predict that this applicati...

  17. A simple method to estimate entropy of atmospheric gases from their action

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Ivan R.; Geering, Harold; Rose, Michael T.; Crossan, Angus N.

    2015-01-01

    A convenient model for estimating the total entropy ({\\Sigma}Si) of atmospheric gases based on physical action is proposed. This realistic approach is fully consistent with statistical mechanics, but uses the properties of translational, rotational and vibrational action to partition the entropy. When all sources of action are computed as appropriate non-linear functions, the total input of thermal energy ({\\Sigma}SiT) required to sustain a chemical system at specific temperatures (T) and pre...

  18. Optical propagation in linear media atmospheric gases and particles, solid-state components, and water

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    PART I: Background Theory and Measurement. 1. Optical Electromagnetics I. 2. Optical Electromagnetics II. 3. Spectroscopy of Matter. 4. Electrodynamics I: Macroscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 5. Electrodynamics II: Microscopic Interaction of Light and Matter. 6. Experimental Techniques. PART II: Practical Models for Various Media. 7. Optical Propagation in Gases and the Atmosphere of the Earth. 8. Optical Propagation in Solids. 9. Optical Propagation in Liquids. 10. Particle Absorption and Scatter. 11. Propagation Background and Noise

  19. Quantifying sources and sinks of reactive gases in the lower atmosphere using airborne flux observations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, G. M.; Crounse, J. D.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concent...

  20. Neural-estimator for the surface emission rate of atmospheric gases

    OpenAIRE

    Paes, F. F.; Velho, H. F. Campos

    2009-01-01

    The emission rate of minority atmospheric gases is inferred by a new approach based on neural networks. The neural network applied is the multi-layer perceptron with backpropagation algorithm for learning. The identification of these surface fluxes is an inverse problem. A comparison between the new neural-inversion and regularized inverse solution id performed. The results obtained from the neural networks are significantly better. In addition, the inversion with the neural netwroks is fster...

  1. Autonomous Long-Path DOAS Measurements of Tropospheric Trace Gases at Neumayer Station III, Antarctica: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Frieß, Udo; Pöhler, Denis; Weller, Rolf; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Reactive Halogen Species (RHS, like IO, BrO, ClO, etc.) have an important impact on atmospheric chemistry. In Polar Regions, the role of halogen radical chemistry has been subject of intensive research for more than two decades. Among the most prominent effects of RHS on the Polar atmosphere are the change of the oxidative capacity of the troposphere including wide-spread and frequently virtually complete destruction of tropospheric ozone, in particular during springtime, as well as the oxidation and subsequent deposition of gaseous elemental mercury. The number of field observations and the understanding of the underlying processes varies greatly between bromine, iodine and chlorine compounds. While elevated BrO concentrations resulting from autocatalytic processes (the so-called bromine explosion mechanism) are frequently observed, the abundance and influence of iodine is still subject to discussions and available observations give no consistent picture. With only a few direct observations of chlorine compounds, such as ClO and OClO, the role of tropospheric chlorine chemistry remains poorly understood to date, despite strong evidence for its relevance. The lack of observations of chlorine radicals is mainly due to the challenging detection, particularly in the case of ClO. Scattered sunlight DOAS measurements, which are available from a number of Polar locations, are not sensitive for ClO, due to insufficient radiation intensity in the UV spectral region (DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument with an active light source suitable for the detection of ClO. It has been set up at the German Research Station Neumayer III in coastal Antarctica during the summer season 2015/16 and is planned to operate autonomously for at least one year. The instrument is able to detect - in addition to ClO - many trace gases absorbing in the UV/Vis including BrO, OClO, IO, I2, OIO, ozone, NO2, H2O, O4, and SO2 simultaneously at a temporal resolution of 1

  2. An approach to noble-gas isotopic compositions in natural gases and gas-source tracing in the Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of noble gases, i.e. He Ar Kr and Xe, are measured in natural gases from the Zhongbu gasfield in the Ordos Basin. And heavy noble-gas isotopes (Kr, Xe) are here first used in geochemically studying natural gases and gas-source correlation. Isotopic compositions of heavy noble gases in natural gases, especially Xe, show two-source mixing in the Zhongbu gasfield. Gas sources are somewhat different in the northeast and the southwest of the gasfield. Generally, the gas source of the Lower Paleozoic makes a greater contribution in the southwest than in the northeast in the field. Two kinds of gases can be differentiated from isotopic compositions of heavy noble gases and from their relation with the Ar isotopic composition, Therefore, the comprehensive study on isotopic compositions of light and heavy noble gases can supply more useful information on gas-source correlation and tracing.

  3. Applications of a versatile technique for trace analysis: atmospheric pressure negative chemical ionization.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, B A; Davidson, W R; Lovett, A M

    1980-01-01

    The ability to use ambient air as a carrier and reagent gas in an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source allows instantaneous air analysis to be combined with hypersensitivity toward a wide variety of compounds. The TAGA (Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser) is an instrument which is designed to use both positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for trace gas analysis; this paper describes several applications of negative APCI which demonstrates that the techni...

  4. Black carbon and trace gases over South Asia: Measurements and Regional Climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Pathak, Binita; Parottil, Ajay

    2016-07-01

    Trace gases and aerosols are simulated with 50 km spatial resolution over South Asian CORDEX domain enclosing the Indian sub-continent and North-East India for the year 2012 using two regional climate models RegCM4 coupled with CLM4.5 and WRF-Chem 3.5. Both models are found to capture the seasonality in the simulated O3 and its precursors, NOx and CO and black carbon concentrations together with the meteorological variables over the Indian Subcontinent as well as over the sub-Himalayan North-Eastern region of India including Bangladesh. The model simulations are compared with the measurements made at Dibrugarh (27.3°N, 94.6°E, 111 m amsl). Both the models are found to capture the observed diurnal and seasonal variations in O3 concentrations with maximum in spring and minimum in monsoon, the correlation being better for WRF-Chem (R~0.77) than RegCM (R~0.54). Simulated NOx and CO is underestimated in all the seasons by both the models, the performance being better in the case of WRF-Chem. The observed difference may be contributed by the bias in the estimation of the O3 precursors NOx and CO in the emission inventories or the error in the simulation of the meteorological variables which influences O3 concentration in both the models. For example, in the pre-monsoon and winter season, the WRF-Chem model simulated shortwave flux overestimates the observation by ~500 Wm-2 while in the monsoon and post monsoon season, simulated shortwave flux is equivalent to the observation. The model predicts higher wind speed in all the seasons especially during night-time. In the post-monsoon and winter season, the simulated wind pattern is reverse to observation with daytime low and night-time high values. Rainfall is overestimated in all the seasons. RegCM-CLM4.5 is found to underestimate rainfall and other meteorological parameters. The WRF-Chem model closely captured the observed values of black carbon mass concentrations during pre-monsoon and summer monsoon seasons, but

  5. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems–Atmosphere interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, Kim; Sutton, M.A.;

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O3, CH4, N2O and particles...

  6. PREP-CHEM-SRC – 1.0: a preprocessor of trace gas and aerosol emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; M. Pirre; Marecal, V.; Grell, G; R. Stockler; R. F. Mello; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2011-01-01

    The preprocessor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emission fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in atmospheric-chemistry transport models. The considered emissions are from the most recent databases of urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources. For biomass burning, emissions can be also estimated directly from satellite fire detections using a fire emission model included...

  7. Freeze dried samples of volcanic gases - a new method for the determination of trace elements by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new routine technique for the determination of trace elements in volcanic gases by NAA is presented. For time and money saving reasons this method is applicable to samples, collected by the conventional method. This technique uses evacuated glass bottles, partly filled with NaOH solution to absorb acidic gas components and CO2, which is the main constituent of the incondensable gas fraction at ambient conditions. The application of NAA to samples collected by this method shows two main sources of difficulties: drying of NaOH without loosing volatile elements of interest (in particular Hg and Se) and the high activities of 24Na after neutron irradiation. The first can be avoided by liquid irradiation, thereby limiting the irradiation time, the second excludes the determination of short and medium lived nuclides because of the high γ-background due to 24Na. A new freeze drying technique enables the application of long irradiation times and therefore the use of long-lived activation products for analysis. The samples of volcanic gases were collected at the fumarole fields of La Fossa volcano on the island Vulcano. Southern Italy. This technique allows very sensitive determinations of trace elements in volcanic gases and adds highly valuable information to the understanding and modeling of volcanic gas sources. (orig.)

  8. Massive impact-induced release of carbon and sulfur gases in the early Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Bottke, W. F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent revisions to our understanding of the collisional history of the Hadean and early-Archean Earth indicate that large collisions may have been an important geophysical process. In this work we show that the early bombardment flux of large impactors (>100 km) facilitated the atmospheric release of greenhouse gases (particularly CO2) from Earth's mantle. Depending on the timescale for the drawdown of atmospheric CO2, the Earth's surface could have been subject to prolonged clement surface conditions or multiple freeze-thaw cycles. The bombardment also delivered and redistributed to the surface large quantities of sulfur, one of the most important elements for life. The stochastic occurrence of large collisions could provide insights on why the Earth and Venus, considered Earth's twin planet, exhibit radically different atmospheres.

  9. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India); Joshi, N. K. [Faculty of Engineering and technology, MITS, lakshmangarh, (Sikar), Rajasthan 332311 (India); Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K. [Electrical Engineering Department, V. J.T.I, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kothari, D. C. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz(E) 400098 (India)

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  10. Acceleration of radiative transfer model calculations for the retrieval of trace gases under cloudy conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the independent pixel approximation (IPA), radiative transfer computations involving cloudy scenes require two separate calls to the radiative transfer model (RTM), one call for a clear sky scenario, the other for an atmosphere containing clouds. In this paper, clouds are considered as an optically homogeneous layer. We present two novel methods for RTM performance enhancement with particular application to trace gas retrievals under cloudy conditions. Both methods are based on reusing results from clear-sky RTM calculations to speed up corresponding calculations for the cloud-filled scenario. The first approach is numerically exact, and has been applied to the discrete-ordinate with matrix exponential (DOME) RTM. Results from the original clear sky computation can be saved in the memory and reused for the non-cloudy layers in the second computation. In addition, for the whole-atmosphere boundary-value approach to the determination of the intensity field, we can exploit a ’telescoping technique’ to reduce the dimensionality (and hence the computational effort for the solution) of the boundary value problem in the absence of Rayleigh scattering contributions for higher azimuthal components of the radiation field. The second approach is (for the cloudy scenario) to generate a spectral correction applied to the radiation field from a fast two-stream RTM. This correction is based on the use of principal-component analysis (PCA) applied to a given window of spectral optical property data, in order to exploit redundancy in the data and confine the number of full-stream multiple scatter computations to the first few EOFs (Empirical Orthogonal Functions) arising from the PCA. This method has been applied to the LIDORT RTM; although the method involves some approximation, it provides accuracy better than 0.2%, and a speed-up factor of approximately 2 compared with two calls of RTM. -- Highlights: • Reusing results from clear-sky computations for a model with a

  11. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Ed

    2016-04-01

    We present results from the eleventh annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ghg/GHGbulletin.html) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The results are based on research and observations performed by laboratories contributing to the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme (www.wmo.int/gaw). The Bulletin presents results of global analyses of observational data collected according to GAW recommended practices and submitted to the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). Bulletins are prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ScientificAdvisoryGroups.html) in collaboration with WDCGG. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and N2O derived from this network reached new highs in 2014, at 397.7±0.1 ppm, 1833±1 ppb and 327.1±0.1 ppb respectively. These values constitute 143%, 254% and 121% of pre-industrial (before 1750) levels. The atmospheric increase of CO2 from 2013 to 2014 was 1.9 ppm, which is smaller than the increase from 2012 to 2013 and the average growth rate for the past decade (˜2.06 ppm per year), but larger than the average growth rate for the 1990s (˜1.5 ppm per year). Smaller growth in 2014 compared with other recent years is most likely related to a relatively small net change in large fluxes between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere. The rise of atmospheric CO2 has been only about a half of what is expected if all excess CO2 from burning fossil-fuels stayed in the air. The other half has been absorbed by the land biosphere and the oceans, leading to ocean acidification. For both CH4 and N2O the increases from 2013 to 2014 were larger than those observed from 2012 to 2013 and the mean rates over the past 10 years. The National

  12. Technical Note: A new global database of trace gases and aerosols from multiple sources of high vertical resolution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bodeker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new database of trace gases and aerosols with global coverage, derived from high vertical resolution profile measurements, has been assembled as a collection of binary data files; hereafter referred to as the "Binary DataBase of Profiles" (BDBP. Version 1.0 of the BDBP, described here, includes measurements from different satellite- (HALOE, POAM II and III, SAGE I and II and ground-based measurement systems (ozonesondes. In addition to the primary product of ozone, secondary measurements of other trace gases, aerosol extinction, and temperature are included. All data are subjected to very strict quality control and for every measurement a percentage error on the measurement is included. To facilitate analyses, each measurement is added to 3 different instances (3 different grids of the database where measurements are indexed by: (1 geographic latitude, longitude, altitude (in 1 km steps and time, (2 geographic latitude, longitude, pressure (at levels ~1 km apart and time, (3 equivalent latitude, potential temperature (8 levels from 300 K to 650 K and time.

    In contrast to existing zonal mean databases, by including a wider range of measurement sources (both satellite and ozonesondes, the BDBP is sufficiently dense to permit calculation of changes in ozone by latitude, longitude and altitude. In addition, by including other trace gases such as water vapour, this database can be used for comprehensive radiative transfer calculations. By providing the original measurements rather than derived monthly means, the BDBP is applicable to a wider range of applications than databases containing only monthly mean data. Monthly mean zonal mean ozone concentrations calculated from the BDBP are compared with the database of Randel and Wu, which has been used in many earlier analyses. As opposed to that database which is generated from regression model fits, the BDBP uses the original (quality controlled measurements with no smoothing applied in any

  13. Technical Note: A new global database of trace gases and aerosols from multiple sources of high vertical resolution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dameris

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A new database of trace gases and aerosols with global coverage, derived from high vertical resolution profile measurements, has been assembled as a collection of binary data files; hereafter referred to as the "Binary DataBase of Profiles" (BDBP. Version 1.0 of the BDBP, described here, includes measurements from different satellite- (HALOE, POAM II and III, SAGE I and II and ground-based measurement systems (ozonesondes. In addition to the primary product of ozone, secondary measurements of other trace gases, aerosol extinction, and temperature are included. All data are subjected to very strict quality control and for every measurement a percentage error on the measurement is included. To facilitate analyses, each measurement is added to 3 different instances (3 different grids of the database where measurements are indexed by: (1 geographic latitude, longitude, altitude (in 1 km steps and time, (2 geographic latitude, longitude, pressure (at levels ~1 km apart and time, (3 equivalent latitude, potential temperature (8 levels from 300 K to 650 K and time. In contrast to existing zonal mean databases, by including a wider range of measurement sources (both satellite and ozonesondes, the BDBP is sufficiently dense to permit calculation of changes in ozone by latitude, longitude and altitude. In addition, by including other trace gases such as water vapour, this database can be used for comprehensive radiative transfer calculations. By providing the original measurements rather than derived monthly means, the BDBP is applicable to a wider range of applications than databases containing only monthly mean data. Monthly mean zonal mean ozone concentrations calculated from the BDBP are compared with the database of Randel and Wu, which has been used in many earlier analyses. As opposed to that database which is generated from regression model fits, the BDBP uses the original (quality controlled measurements with no smoothing applied in any way and

  14. Note: A dual temperature closed loop batch reactor for determining the partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Oliver; Rochelle, Christopher A.; Masters, Andrew J.; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented which can be used to determine partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems. The key advantages of this system are (1) The system can be isolated with no external exchange, making it ideal for experiments with conservative tracers. (2) Both phases can be sampled concurrently to give an accurate composition at each phase at any given time. (3) Use of a lower temperature flow loop outside of the reactor removes contamination and facilitates sampling. (4) Rapid equilibration at given pressure/temperature conditions is significantly aided by stirring and circulating the water phase using a magnetic stirrer and high-pressure liquid chromatography pump, respectively.

  15. Note: A dual temperature closed loop batch reactor for determining the partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental approach is presented which can be used to determine partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems. The key advantages of this system are (1) The system can be isolated with no external exchange, making it ideal for experiments with conservative tracers. (2) Both phases can be sampled concurrently to give an accurate composition at each phase at any given time. (3) Use of a lower temperature flow loop outside of the reactor removes contamination and facilitates sampling. (4) Rapid equilibration at given pressure/temperature conditions is significantly aided by stirring and circulating the water phase using a magnetic stirrer and high-pressure liquid chromatography pump, respectively

  16. Biomass burning emissions of trace gases and particles in marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, S. J.; Keywood, M. D.; Galbally, I. E.; Gras, J. L.; Cainey, J. M.; Cope, M. E.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Bentley, S. T.; Meyer, C. P.; Ristovski, Z.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    (ΔO3 / ΔCO 0.001-0.074). A short-lived increase in NMOCs by a factor of 10 corresponded with a large CO enhancement, an increase of the NMOC / CO emission ratio (ER) by a factor of 2-4 and a halving of the BC / CO ratio. Rainfall on Robbins Island was observed by radar during this period which likely resulted in a lower fire combustion efficiency, and higher emission of compounds associated with smouldering. This highlights the importance of relatively minor meteorological events on BB emission ratios. Emission factors (EFs) were derived for a range of trace gases, some never before reported for Australian fires, (including hydrogen, phenol and toluene) using the carbon mass balance method. This provides a unique set of EFs for Australian coastal heathland fires. Methyl halide EFs were higher than EFs reported from other studies in Australia and the Northern Hemisphere which is likely due to high halogen content in vegetation on Robbins Island. This work demonstrates the substantial impact that BB plumes can have on the composition of marine air, and the significant changes that can occur as the plume interacts with terrestrial, aged urban and marine emission sources.

  17. Chemically fractionated uranium tission xenon in mantle rocks, gases and terrestrial atmosphere?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new conception on the origin if isotopic composition of terrestrial atmospheric xenon has been suggested. According this conception the excess of Xe-129 originates from I-129 that is a product of neutron induced fusion of U-235, but not from primordial I-129 trapped by the Earth during its accretion. Having analyzed all published data on xenon isotopic composition in mantle rocks and gases, the obvious correlation between excess Xe-129 and excesses in other xenon isotopes, particularly in Xe-132 and Xe-131, has been found. Refs. 42, figs. 18

  18. Condition of Retrieving Vertical Column Density of Atmospheric Pollution Gases by Using Scattered Solar Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method to monitor the vertical column density (VCD) of atmospheric pollution gases by using the scattered solar radiation. The necessary condition of capturing the useful scattered solar radiation is achieved. The condition is only dependent on the solar elevation angle, while independent of the solar azimuth angle, which could greatly simply the capturing equipment and procedure. Under the condition, the VCD of tropospheric NO2 in Chengdu, China is retrieved from the scattered solar radiation, which is close to that from the direct solar radiation

  19. DIAL monitoring of atmospheric climate-determining gases employing high-power pulsed laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchev, Stoyan P.; Naboko, Sergei V.; Naboko, Vassily N.; Pencheva, Vasilka H.; Donchev, T.; Pavlov, Lyubomir Y.; Simeonov, P.

    2003-11-01

    High-power pulsed laser diodes are employed for determining atmospheric humidity and methane. The proposed DIAL method optimizes the spectral properties of laser radiation within the molecular absorption bands of 0.86 - 0.9 μm of these major greenhouse gases. The explicit absorption spectrum is explored by computational convolution method based on reference data on spectral linestrengths modulated by the characteristic broad laser line of the selected laser diodes. The lidar scheme is ultimately compact, of low-energy consumption and suggests a large potential for ecological monitoring.

  20. Condition of Retrieving Vertical Column Density of Atmospheric Pollution Gases by Using Scattered Solar Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Sao-Yi

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to monitor the vertical column density (VCD) of atmospheric pollution gases by using the scattered solar radiation. The necessary condition of capturing the useful scattered solar radiation is achieved. The condition is only dependent on the solar elevation angle, while independent of the solar azimuth angle, which could greatly simply the capturing equipment and procedure. Under the condition, the VCD of tropospheric NO2 in Chengdu, China is retrieved from the scattered solar radiation, which is dose to that from the direct solar radiation.

  1. Combining stable isotope (δ13C) of trace gases and aerobiological data to monitor the entry and dispersion of microorganisms in caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Anton, E; Cuezva, S; Jurado, V; Porca, E; Miller, A Z; Fernandez-Cortes, A; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Sanchez-Moral, S

    2014-01-01

    Altamira Cave (north of Spain) contains one of the world's most prominent Paleolithic rock art paintings, which are threatened by a massive microbial colonization of ceiling and walls. Previous studies revealed that exchange rates between the cave and the external atmosphere through the entrance door play a decisive role in the entry and transport of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) and nutrients to the interior of the cave. A spatial-distributed sampling and measurement of carrier (CO2) and trace (CH4) gases and isotopic signal of CO2 (δ(13)C) inside the cave supports the existence of a second connection (active gas exchange processes) with the external atmosphere at or near the Well Hall, the innermost and deepest area of the cave. A parallel aerobiological study also showed that, in addition to the entrance door, there is another connection with the external atmosphere, which favors the transport and increases microorganism concentrations in the Well Hall. This double approach provides a more complete knowledge on cave ventilation and revealed the existence of unknown passageways in the cave, a fact that should be taken into account in future cave management. PMID:23807558

  2. Carbon dioxide, trace gases, and greenhouse effect: their part in the future of our climate. Kohlendioxyd, Spurengase und Glashauseffekt: ihre Rolle fuer die Zukunft unseres Klimas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flohn, H.

    1981-01-01

    Man's activity increasingly affects the evolution of climate in a foreseeable future. This began as early as with the neolithic revolution (by conversion of vegetation and soil), intensified by the industrial revolution (changing atmospheric constituents, aerosol particles) and by the exponential growth of world's population. Based on recent model calculations, the role of carbon dioxide and other trace gases and the so-called greenhouse effect of the atmosphere will be discussed, as well as possible sources of error of forecasting the future fate of CO/sub 2/. Since no sufficiently realistic interactive models of the climatic system (i.e. atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere and biosphere) will be available quite soon, analogues from the historic and geologic past are offered and critically discussed. Of peculiar interest is the Pliocene (about 3-5 million years ago), during which the Antarctic continent was highly glaciated, while the Arctic Ocean was ice-free: this asymmetry verifes a model hypothesis proposed 1962 by BUDYKO. Critical thresholds of the CO/sub 2/ content are estimated; in the latter case large-scale displacements of the earth's climatic belts have to be expected.

  3. Organic Nitrates: A Complex Family of Atmospheric Trace Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballschmiter, K.; Fischer, R. G.; Grünert, A.; Kastler, J.; Schneider, M.; Woidich, S.

    2003-04-01

    Biogenic and geogenic hydrocarbons are the precursors of organic nitrates that are formed as tropospheric photo-oxidation products in the presence of NOx. Air chemistry leads to a very complex pattern of nitric acid esters: alkyl nitrates, aryl-alkyl nitrates, and bifunctional nitrates like alkyl dinitrates, hydroxy alkyl nitrates and carbonyl alkyl nitrates. We have analyzed the pattern of organic nitrates in air samples after adsorption/thermal desorption (low volume sampling-LVS) or adsorption/solvent desorption (high volume sampling-HVS) by capillary gas chromatography with electron capture (ECD) and mass spectrometric detection (MSD) using air aliquotes of 100 up to 3000 liters on column. The complexity of the organic nitrates found in air requires a group pre-separation by normal phase liquid chromatography. A detection limit per compound of 0.005 ppt(v) is achieved by our approach. We have synthesized a broad spectrum of organic nitrates as reference compounds. Air samples were taken from central Europe, the US West (Utah, Nevada, California), and the North- and South Atlantic including Antarctica. Levels and patterns of the regional and global occurrence of the various groups of C1-C12 organic nitrates including dinitrates and hydroxy nitrates and nitrates of isoprene (2-methylbutadiene) are presented. Werner G., J. Kastler, R. Looser, K. Ballschmiter: "Organic nitrates of isoprene as atmospheric trace compounds" Angewandte Chemie - International Edition (1999) 38: 1634-1637. Woidich S., O. Froescheis, O. Luxenhofer, K. Ballschmiter: "EI- and NCI-mass spectrometry of arylalkyl nitrates and their occurrence in urban air" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (1999) 364 : 91-99. Kastler, J; Jarman, W; Ballschmiter, K.: "Multifunctional organic nitrates as constituents in European and US urban photo-smog" Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. (2000) 368:244-249. Schneider M., K. Ballschmiter: "C3-C14 alkyl nitrates in remote South Atlantic air" Chemosphere (1999) 38: 233-244. Fischer

  4. Development of a new methodology for the retrieval of in-situ stratospheric trace gases concentration from airborne limb-absorption measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petritoli, Andrea; Giovanelli, Giorgio; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan K.; Castelli, Elisa; Bonafe, U.; Oulanovsky, A.; Yushkov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The UV-Vis DOAS spectrometer GASCOD/A4p (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences, Airborne version) was installed on board the stratospheric Geophysica aircraft during the APE-THESEO and APE-GAIA campaign in February-March and September-October 1999 respectively. The instrument is provided by five input windows, three of which measure scattered solar radiation from the zenith and from two horizontal windows, 90 degree(s) away from the zenith to perform limb-absorption measurements. Spectra from 290 to 700 nm were processed through DOAS technique to obtain trace gases column amounts. Data from horizontal windows, which are performed for the first time from an airborne spectrometer, are used to retrieve an average concentration of the gases along a characteristic length of the line of sight. An atmospheric Air Mass Factor model (AMEFCO) is used to calculate the probability density function and the characteristic length used to reduce the slant column amounts to in-situ concentration values. The validation of the method is performed through a comparison of the values obtained, with a in-situ chemiluminescent ozone analyzer (FOZAN) which performed synchronous measurements on board Geophysica aircraft. Data from the APE-GAIA campaign was presented and discussed.

  5. MLS and ACE-FTS measurements of UTLS Trace Gases in Relation to Multiple Tropopauses and Upper-Tropospheric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Hegglin, M. I.; Walker, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    The extra-tropical tropopause region is dynamically complex, with frequent occurrence of multiple tropopauses and of a "tropopause inversion layer" of enhanced static stability just above the tropopause. The tropopause structure is zonally-asymmetric and time-varying and, along with the UT jets and the stratospheric polar night jet, it defines the barriers and pathways that control UTLS transport. Averages of trace gases that do not account for the tropopause structure (such as zonal or equivalent latitude means) can obscure features of trace gas distributions that are important for understanding the role of the extra-tropical tropopause region in determining UTLS composition and hence its significance to climate processes. In this work we examine MLS and ACE-FTS UTLS trace gas profiles, including H2O, O3, CO and HNO3, in the context of extra-tropical tropopause and UT jet structure seen in the GEOS-5 temperature fields, to gain understanding of UTLS trace gas distributions and transport barriers.

  6. Biogenic feedbacks on the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases: overview of the GREENCYCLES network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: GREENCYCLES is a Marie Curie research training network focussed on the roles of global biogeochemistry for climate change. The project aims to reduce uncertainties associated with biogenic feedbacks on global environmental change and foster the education of the next generation of Earth system scientists. GREENCYCLES young scientists are offered a unique environment bringing together key European research modelling teams with complementary expertise in coupled earth system, oceans, field-based understanding of the terrestrial and oceanic processes, and space based observations. To improve the understanding of the important biogeochemical processes that control the concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, the network is spread across six key science objectives, each involving different individual research projects undertaken by Early-Stage Researchers (ESRs) and Experienced Researchers (ERs): quantify feedbacks in the global carbon cycle; determine the effects of changing land use on climate; improve understanding of natural sources of CH4 and their responses to human activities; quantify impacts of climate change and climate variability on fire-induced emissions of greenhouse gases; quantify impacts of climate change on terrestrial and oceanic biogenic emissions of aerosols and chemically active gases, and their effects on tropospheric chemistry; quantify impacts of vegetation and climate changes on atmospheric dust, and its feedbacks on CO2 and climate. An overview of the research and training progress to date will be presented. (author)

  7. Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical information obtained by means of breath analysis, of environmental trace analysis, and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method. (Authors)

  8. Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Trace Contaminant Control Through FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.; Pruitt, M. W.; Wheeler, R. M.; Monje, O.

    2013-01-01

    Trace contaminant control has been a concern of spacecraft designers and operators from early in the progression of manned spaceflight. Significant technological advancement has occurred since the first designs were implemented in the 1960s, culminating in the trace contaminant control system currently in use aboard the International Space Station as part of the atmosphere revitalization system.

  9. New SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases at atmospheric concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillevic, Myriam; Wyss, Simon A.; Pascale, Céline; Vollmer, Martin K.; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Reimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In order to better support the monitoring of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, we develop a method to produce reference gas mixtures for fluorinated gases (F-gases, i.e. gases containing fluorine atoms) in a SI-traceable way, meaning that the amount of substance fraction in mole per mole is traceable to SI-units. These research activities are conducted in the framework of the HIGHGAS and AtmoChem-ECV projects. First, single-component mixtures in synthetic air at ~85 nmol/mol (ppb) are generated for HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane, a widely used HFC) and HFC-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene, a car air conditioner fluid of growing importance). These mixtures are first dynamically produced by permeation: a permeator containing the pure substance loses mass linearly over time under a constant gas flow, in the permeation chamber of a magnetic suspension balance, which is regularly calibrated. This primary mixture is then pressurised into Silconert2000-coated stainless steel cylinders by cryo-filling. In a second step these mixtures are dynamically diluted using 2 subsequent dilution steps piloted by mass flow controllers (MFC) and pressure controllers. The assigned mixture concentration is calculated mostly based on the permeator mass loss, on the carrier gas purity and on the MFCs flows. An uncertainty budget is presented, resulting in an expanded uncertainty of 2% for the HFC-125 reference mixture and of 2.5% for the HFC-1234yf mixture (95% confidence interval). The final gas, with near-atmospheric concentration (17.11 pmol/mol for HFC-125, 2.14 pmol/mol for HFC-1234yf) is then measured with Medusa-GC/MS technology against standards calibrated on existing reference scales. The assigned values of the dynamic standards are in excellent agreement with measurements vs the existing reference scales, SIO-14 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography for HFC-125 and Empa-2013 for HFC-1234yf. Moreover, the Medusa-GC/MS measurements show the excellent purity of the SI

  10. Noble gases, nitrogen, and methane from the deep interior to the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    Titan's thick N2-CH4 atmosphere is unlike any in the Solar System, and its origin has been shrouded in mystery for over half a century. Here, I perform a detailed analysis of chemical and isotopic data from the Cassini-Huygens mission to develop the hypothesis that Titan's (non-photochemical) atmospheric gases came from deep within. It is suggested that Titan's CH4, N2, and noble gases originated in a rocky core buried inside the giant satellite, and hydrothermal and cryovolcanic processes were critical to the creation of Titan's atmosphere. Mass balance and chemical equilibrium calculations demonstrate that all aspects of this hypothesis can be considered geochemically plausible with respect to contemporary observational, experimental, and theoretical knowledge. Specifically, I show that a rocky core with a bulk noble gas content similar to that in CI carbonaceous meteorites would contain sufficient 36Ar and 22Ne to explain their reported abundances. I also show that Henry's law constants for noble gases in relevant condensed phases can be correlated with the size of their atoms, which leads to expected mixing ratios for 84Kr (∼0.2 ppbv) and 132Xe (∼0.01 ppbv) that can explain why these species have yet to be detected (Huygens upper limit plume. Given its important implications to the origin and evolution of volatiles in the outer Solar System, we must go back to Titan to acquire additional isotopic data that will allow more rigorous tests of models of the origin of its atmosphere. I predict the following isotopic ratios: 20Ne/22Ne ≈ 8.9, 36Ar/38Ar ≈ 5.3, (14N/15N)NH3 ≈ 130-170 , (12C/13C)CO2 ≈ 84 , (D/H)H2O ≈ 1.7 ×10-4 ; and recommend that future in situ instrumentation have the capability to measure the rare isotopologues of N2 and CH4, which represent previously unconsidered but potentially valuable sources of geochemical information on the origin and evolution of Titan's atmosphere.

  11. Biomass Burning: The Cycling of Gases and Particulates from the Biosphere to the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Biomass burning is both a process of geochemical cycling of gases and particulates from the biosphere to the atmosphere and a process of global change. In the preface to the book, One Earth, One Future: Our Changing Global Environment (National Academy of Sciences, 1990), Dr. Frank Press, the President of the National Academy of Sciences, writes: "Human activities are transforming the global environment, and these global changes have many faces: ozone depletion, tropical deforestation, acid deposition, and increased atmospheric concentrations of gases that trap heat and may warm the global climate."It is interesting to note that all four global change "faces" identified by Dr. Press have a common thread - they are all caused by biomass burning.Biomass burning or vegetation burning is the burning of living and dead vegetation and includes human-initiated burning and natural lightning-induced burning. The bulk of the world's biomass burning occurs in the tropics - in the tropical forests of South America and Southeast Asia and in the savannasof Africa and South America. The majority of the biomass burning, primarily in the tropics (perhaps as much as 90%), is believed to be human initiated for land clearing and land-use change. Natural fires triggered by atmospheric lightning only accounts for ˜10% of all fires (Andreae, 1991). As will be discussed, a significant amount of biomass burning occurs in the boreal forests of Russia, Canada, and Alaska.Biomass burning is a significant source of gases and particulates to the regional and global atmosphere (Crutzen et al., 1979; Seiler and Crutzen, 1980; Crutzen and Andreae, 1990; Levine et al., 1995). Its burning is truly a multidiscipline subject, encompassing the following areas: fire ecology, fire measurements, fire modeling, fire combustion, remote sensing, fire combustion gaseous and particulate emissions, the atmospheric transport of these emissions, and the chemical and climatic impacts of these emissions. Recently

  12. The airborne mass spectrometer AIMS - Part 2: Measurements of trace gases with stratospheric or tropospheric origin in the UTLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, T.; Kaufmann, S.; Voigt, C.; Schäuble, D.; Jeßberger, P.; Ziereis, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the role of climate-sensitive trace gas variabilities in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region (UTLS) and their impact on its radiative budget requires accurate measurements. The composition of the UTLS is governed by transport and chemistry of stratospheric and tropospheric constituents, such as chlorine, nitrogen oxide and sulphur components. The Airborne chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer AIMS has been developed to accurately measure a set of these constituents on aircraft by means of chemical ionization. Here we present a setup using chemical ionization with SF5- reagent ions for the simultaneous measurement of trace gas concentrations in the pptv to ppmv (10-12 to 10-6 mol mol-1) range of HCl, HNO3 and SO2 with in-flight and online calibration called AIMS-TG. Part 1 of this paper (Kaufmann et al., 2015) reports on the UTLS water vapour measurements with the AIMS-H2O configuration. The instrument can be flexibly switched between two configurations depending on the scientific objective of the mission. For AIMS-TG, a custom-made gas discharge ion source has been developed generating a characteristic ionization scheme. HNO3 and HCl are routinely calibrated in-flight using permeation devices, SO2 is permanently calibrated during flight adding an isotopically labelled 34SO2 standard. In addition, we report on trace gas measurements of HONO which is sensitive to the reaction with SF5-. The detection limit for the various trace gases is in the low ten pptv range at a 1 s time resolution with an overall uncertainty of the measurement in the order of 20 %. AIMS has been integrated and successfully operated on the DLR research aircraft Falcon and HALO. Exemplarily, measurements conducted during the TACTS/ESMVal mission with HALO in 2012 are presented, focusing on a classification of tropospheric and stratospheric influences in the UTLS region. Comparison of AIMS measurements with other measurement techniques allow to draw a comprehensive

  13. WAVELENGTH-RESOLVED REMPI MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE MONITORING OF TOXIC INCINERATION TRACE GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Structure-selective measurement techniques are needed for the assessment of the toxic loading of incinerator gases. This review article shows that wavelength-resolved, resonance-enhanced, multiphoton- ionization (REMPY) mass spectrometry can be used to this end. In this case, how...

  14. The terrestrial biosphere as a net source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Ciais, Philippe; Michalak, Anna M.; Canadell, Josep G.; Saikawa, Eri; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Sitch, Stephen; Zhang, Bowen; Yang, Jia; Bousquet, Philippe; Bruhwiler, Lori; Chen, Guangsheng; Dlugokencky, Edward; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Melillo, Jerry; Pan, Shufen; Poulter, Benjamin; Prinn, Ronald; Saunois, Marielle; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    The terrestrial biosphere can release or absorb the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and therefore has an important role in regulating atmospheric composition and climate. Anthropogenic activities such as land-use change, agriculture and waste management have altered terrestrial biogenic greenhouse gas fluxes, and the resulting increases in methane and nitrous oxide emissions in particular can contribute to climate change. The terrestrial biogenic fluxes of individual greenhouse gases have been studied extensively, but the net biogenic greenhouse gas balance resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system remains uncertain. Here we use bottom-up (inventory, statistical extrapolation of local flux measurements, and process-based modelling) and top-down (atmospheric inversions) approaches to quantify the global net biogenic greenhouse gas balance between 1981 and 2010 resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system. We find that the cumulative warming capacity of concurrent biogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions is a factor of about two larger than the cooling effect resulting from the global land carbon dioxide uptake from 2001 to 2010. This results in a net positive cumulative impact of the three greenhouse gases on the planetary energy budget, with a best estimate (in petagrams of CO2 equivalent per year) of 3.9 ± 3.8 (top down) and 5.4 ± 4.8 (bottom up) based on the GWP100 metric (global warming potential on a 100-year time horizon). Our findings suggest that a reduction in agricultural methane and nitrous oxide emissions, particularly in Southern Asia, may help mitigate climate change.

  15. The terrestrial biosphere as a net source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Ciais, Philippe; Michalak, Anna M; Canadell, Josep G; Saikawa, Eri; Huntzinger, Deborah N; Gurney, Kevin R; Sitch, Stephen; Zhang, Bowen; Yang, Jia; Bousquet, Philippe; Bruhwiler, Lori; Chen, Guangsheng; Dlugokencky, Edward; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Melillo, Jerry; Pan, Shufen; Poulter, Benjamin; Prinn, Ronald; Saunois, Marielle; Schwalm, Christopher R; Wofsy, Steven C

    2016-03-10

    The terrestrial biosphere can release or absorb the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and therefore has an important role in regulating atmospheric composition and climate. Anthropogenic activities such as land-use change, agriculture and waste management have altered terrestrial biogenic greenhouse gas fluxes, and the resulting increases in methane and nitrous oxide emissions in particular can contribute to climate change. The terrestrial biogenic fluxes of individual greenhouse gases have been studied extensively, but the net biogenic greenhouse gas balance resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system remains uncertain. Here we use bottom-up (inventory, statistical extrapolation of local flux measurements, and process-based modelling) and top-down (atmospheric inversions) approaches to quantify the global net biogenic greenhouse gas balance between 1981 and 2010 resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system. We find that the cumulative warming capacity of concurrent biogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions is a factor of about two larger than the cooling effect resulting from the global land carbon dioxide uptake from 2001 to 2010. This results in a net positive cumulative impact of the three greenhouse gases on the planetary energy budget, with a best estimate (in petagrams of CO2 equivalent per year) of 3.9 ± 3.8 (top down) and 5.4 ± 4.8 (bottom up) based on the GWP100 metric (global warming potential on a 100-year time horizon). Our findings suggest that a reduction in agricultural methane and nitrous oxide emissions, particularly in Southern Asia, may help mitigate climate change. PMID:26961656

  16. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013. The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS. It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al. 2013: First, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically 4. Thus, the average value of the trace gas VMR in the atmospheric layer between the surface and the altitude, for which this observation was sensitive, can be calculated. Compared to the originally proposed method, we introduce several important modifications and improvements: We apply the method only to measurements at 1° elevation angles, for which the uncertainties are especially small. Using only 1 elevation angle also allows an increased temporal resolution. We apply correction factors (and their uncertainties as function of the simultaneously modelled O4 absorption. In this way the correction factors can be directly determined according to the measured O4 dAMF. Finally, the method is extended to trace gases analysed at other wavelengths and also to the retrieval of the aerosol extinction. Depending on the atmospheric visibility, the typical uncertainty of the results ranges from about 15 to 30%. We apply the rapid method to observations of a newly developed ground-based multifunctional passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (GM-DOAS instrument in the north-west outskirt near Hefei City in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations. Good agreement is found (squares of the correlation coefficients for NO2, SO2, and HCHO were 0.92, 0.84, and 0.59, respectively

  17. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  18. Effect of ''outer'' sources and dissipative processes on abundance of inert gases in atmospheres of the Earth group planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of abundance of inert gases in atmospheres of the Earth group planets is discussed. It is shown that introduction of He, Ne and 36Ar into the Mars and Mercury atmospheres with interplanetary dust and from other external sources require the presence of special mechanisms of losses for these gases. For the Mars atmosphere dissipation on atmosphere interaction with solar wind during the periods of anomalously low temperatures is a probable mechanisms of Ne and 36Ar losses. For the Mercury thermal dissipation for He and polar wind for other inert gases are possible. For all the planets of the Earth group dissipation on interaction with solar wind and introduction with interplanetary dust could play an important role at the early stages of evolution of planets

  19. Atmospheric observations for quantifying emissions of point-source synthetic greenhouse gases (CF4, NF3 and HFC-23)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Tim; Manning, Alistair J.; Li, Shanlan; Kim, Jooil; Park, Sunyoung; Fraser, Paul J.; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Steele, L. Paul; Krummel, Paul B.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2016-04-01

    The fluorinated species carbon tetrafluoride (CF4; PFC-14), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) and trifluoromethane (CHF3; HFC-23) are potent greenhouse gases with 100-year global warming potentials of 6,630, 16,100 and 12,400, respectively. Unlike the majority of CFC-replacement compounds that are emitted from fugitive and mobile emission sources, these gases are largely emitted from large single point sources - semiconductor manufacturing facilities (all three), aluminium smelting plants (CF4) and chlorodifluoromethane factories (HFC-23). In this work we show the potential for atmospheric measurements to understand regional sources of these gases and to highlight emission 'hotspots'. We target our analysis on measurements from two Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) long term monitoring sites that are particularly sensitive to regional emissions of these gases: Gosan on Jeju Island in the Republic of Korea and Cape Grim on Tasmania in Australia. These sites measure CF4, NF3 and HFC-23 alongside a suite of greenhouse and stratospheric ozone depleting gases every two hours using automated in situ gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry instrumentation. We couple each measurement to an analysis of air history using the regional atmospheric transport model NAME (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment) driven by 3D meteorology from the Met Office's Unified Model, and use a Bayesian inverse method (InTEM - Inversion Technique for Emission Modelling) to calculate yearly emission changes over a decade (2005-2015) at high spatial resolution. At present these gases make a small contribution to global radiative forcing, however, given that their impact could rise significantly and that point sources of such gases can be mitigated, atmospheric monitoring could be an important tool for aiding emissions reduction policy.

  20. Potential Trace Metal–Organic Complexation in the Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Okochi; Peter Brimblecombe

    2002-01-01

    It is possible that metal–organic complexation enhances the uptake of gaseous organic compounds and the solubility of metals in aerosols and atmospheric water. We investigated potential atmospheric organic ligands and the enhanced uptake of hydroxy-, oxo-, and dicarboxylic acids as well as dicarbonyls into atmospheric aqueous aerosol. We examined complexation with transition metals (iron, manganese, nickel, copper, zinc) and lead on the basis of available references and our experimental data....

  1. Long-term MAX-DOAS measurement of trace gases and aerosol in the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoru; Hao, Nan; Hendrick, François; Van Roozendael, Michel; Holla, Robert; Valks, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (Umwelt Forschungsstation Schneefernerhaus, UFS) is located immediately under the summit of Zugspitze (2962 m), the highest mountain of Germany, at a height of 2650 m. The UFS is a rare observation site in Germany with mostly clean and unpolluted air. It is ideal for both stratospheric composition measurements and trace gas measurements in the free-troposphere. It is optimal for detecting pollution events in the free-troposphere, which are indications of short- or long-range transport of air pollutants. A MAX-DOAS instrument has been working in the UFS since February 2011. With the zenith spectrum of each cycle used as the reference, the differential slant column densities (DSCDs) of trace gases are calculated from the spectra with Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The DSCDs of both O4 and NO2 are calculated in two different wavelength intervals, 338-370 nm in the UV region and 440-490 nm in the VIS region. For HCHO and HONO, optimal fitting windows have been determined in the UV region. A retrieval algorithm, based on the radiative transfer model LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, is used to provide information on the vertical profiles and vertical column densities (VCDs) of aerosol and trace gases. Meanwhile, zenith-sky radiance spectra during twilight hours are analyzed using DOAS method to derive the total vertical column densities (VCDs) of O3 and NO2. A zenith spectrum measured in the noon of a summer day was chosen as the reference spectrum. The slant column densities (SCDs) of O3 and NO2, which are the direct product of the DOAS analysis, are then converted into VCDs using the air mass factors (AMFs) derived by radiative transfer calculations. This work presents the results of the MAX-DOAS measurement in the UFS from 2012 to 2015, including aerosol (derived from O4 measurement), NO2, HCHO, and HONO, etc. The vertical profiles as well as the seasonal and diurnal variation

  2. Possible reduction in trace element emission into the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency is assessed of trace element separation in solid particles separator facilities in a heat plant (electric separator) and in a steel making factory (textile filter). Fly ash samples were taken before and behind the separator and were analyzed using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The trace element contents in different samples are tabulated. For the heat plant the levels of Sb, As, Se, Cs and Hg were the highest while for the steel plant the highest figures were found for Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu and Ni. In assessing the operation of separators, the cumulation of trace elements in the finest fraction of solid emission should be taken into consideration. (M.D.). 1 fig., 4 tabs., 19 refs

  3. Climatology and variability of trace gases in extratropical double-tropopause regions from MLS, HIRDLS, and ACE-FTS measurements

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. Schwartz; Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; N. J. Livesey; M. L. Santee; W. H. Daffer

    2015-01-01

    Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Aura High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) are used to present the first global climatological comparison of extratropical, nonpolar trace gas distributions in double-tropopause (DT) and single-tropopause (ST) regions. Stratospheric tracers, O3, HNO3, and HCl, have lower mixing ratios ∼2–8 km above t...

  4. Possible future scenarios for atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases. A simplified thermodynamic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo-Brown, F.; Sanchez-Salas, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, del IPN Edif. 9, U.P. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barranco-Jimenez, M.A. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Escuela Superior de Computo, del IPN Av., Miguel Bernard s/n., Esq. Juan de Dios Batiz, U.P. Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosales, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de las Americas Puebla, Exhacienda Sta., Catarina Martir, Cholula 72820, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-11-15

    Most of the increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere is mainly due to anthropogenic activities. This is particularly significant in the case of CO{sub 2}. The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} has systematically increased since the Industrial Revolution (260 ppm), with a remarkable raise after the 1970s until the present day (380 ppm). If this increasing tendency is maintained, the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that, for the year 2100, the CO{sub 2} concentration can augment up to approximately 675 ppm. In this work it is assumed that the quantity of anthropogenic greenhouse gases emitted to the Earth's atmosphere is proportional to the quantity of heat rejected to the environment by internal combustion heat engines. It is also assumed that this increasing tendency of CO{sub 2} due to men's activity stems from a mode of energy production mainly based on a maximum-power output paradigm. With these hypotheses, a thermoeconomic optimization of a thermal engine model under two regimes of performance: the maximum-power regime and the so-called ecological function criterion is presented. This last regime consists in maximizing a function that represents a good compromise between high power output and low entropy production. It is showed that, under maximum ecological conditions, the emissions of thermal energy to the environment are reduced approximately up to 50%. Thus working under this mode of performance the slope of the curves of CO{sub 2} concentration, for instance, drastically diminishes. A simple qualitative criterion to design ecological taxes is also suggested. (author)

  5. Possible future scenarios for atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases. A simplified thermodynamic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere is mainly due to anthropogenic activities. This is particularly significant in the case of CO2. The atmospheric concentration of CO2 has systematically increased since the Industrial Revolution (260 ppm), with a remarkable raise after the 1970s until the present day (380 ppm). If this increasing tendency is maintained, the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that, for the year 2100, the CO2 concentration can augment up to approximately 675 ppm. In this work it is assumed that the quantity of anthropogenic greenhouse gases emitted to the Earth's atmosphere is proportional to the quantity of heat rejected to the environment by internal combustion heat engines. It is also assumed that this increasing tendency of CO2 due to men's activity stems from a mode of energy production mainly based on a maximum-power output paradigm. With these hypotheses, a thermoeconomic optimization of a thermal engine model under two regimes of performance: the maximum-power regime and the so-called ecological function criterion is presented. This last regime consists in maximizing a function that represents a good compromise between high power output and low entropy production. It is showed that, under maximum ecological conditions, the emissions of thermal energy to the environment are reduced approximately up to 50%. Thus working under this mode of performance the slope of the curves of CO2 concentration, for instance, drastically diminishes. A simple qualitative criterion to design ecological taxes is also suggested. (author)

  6. An investigation of Martian atmospheric trace species using laboratory and computer-based simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Maria; Lewis, Stephen; Mason, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    The study of trace gas species in the Martian atmosphere has the potential to shed new light on wide-ranging topics such as the search for life and the history of liquid water on the planet. Investigating the way that molecules such as ozone, water and HCl are cycled in the atmosphere will give insights into the interactions taking place between the atmosphere, lithosphere and any potential biosphere. Numerous missions are currently being planned; for example the NASA/ESA Trace Gas Orbiter wh...

  7. Satellite Observations of Trace Gases and Their Application for Studying Air Quality Near Oil and Gas Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Nichols, M.; Fasnacht, Z.; Martins, D. K.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    The increase in the natural gas component of the energy sector has led many state and local municipalities to begin regulation of emissions from the oil and natural gas operators with air quality (AQ) as a concern. "Top-down" measurements of trace gases in the air above wells complement "bottom-up" inventories, used by EPA and AQ stakeholders, through a more accurate depiction of regional variability of methane and other species near and downwind of oil and gas operations. Satellite observations of methane, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, ozone, and other carbon gases enhance the spatial and temporal coverage of the data needed to demonstrate any long-term impacts from shale gas development. As part of a NASA AQAST (Air Quality Applied Sciences Team) project, we are evaluating satellite measurements of trace gases in regions with oil and gas operations for their application as a "top-down" constraint. For validation of the satellite instruments' sensitivities to emitted gases, we focus on regions where the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign deployed with ground and aircraft measurements, including, Maryland (2011), California and Texas (2013), and Colorado (2014). We compare vertical distributions of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nearby and downwind of oil and gas wells to locate any regional differences during the campaign time periods. This allows for better characterization of the satellite observations and their limitations for application in air quality studies in similar environments. Taking advantage of current EOS-era satellites' data records, we also analyze methane anomalies and gas correlations in the free troposphere from 2005 to present to identify trends for basins with oil and gas extraction sites and their influence on background concentrations downwind of wells. In most regions with oil and gas activity, we see continually

  8. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at 10 sites in Northern China

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Y. P.; Y. S. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil or water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosy...

  9. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Trebs

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3, nitric acid (HNO3, nitrous acid (HONO, hydrochloric acid (HCl, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+, nitrate (NO3, nitrite (NO2, chloride (Cl and sulfate (SO42−, and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil. This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate. Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity, through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions. Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition were ≤0.015 ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118 ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning

  10. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Trebs

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3, nitric acid (HNO3, nitrous acid (HONO, hydrochloric acid (HCl, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+, nitrate (NO3-, nitrite (NO2-, chloride (Cl- and sulfate (SO42-, and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil. This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate. Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity, through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions. Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder (WAD in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition were ≤0.015ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong

  11. Potential Trace Metal–Organic Complexation in the Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okochi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It is possible that metal–organic complexation enhances the uptake of gaseous organic compounds and the solubility of metals in aerosols and atmospheric water. We investigated potential atmospheric organic ligands and the enhanced uptake of hydroxy-, oxo-, and dicarboxylic acids as well as dicarbonyls into atmospheric aqueous aerosol. We examined complexation with transition metals (iron, manganese, nickel, copper, zinc and lead on the basis of available references and our experimental data. Humic-like substances are most likely ligands in the atmosphere, although this is a poorly characterized material. A number of polycarboxylic acids and hydroxy forms (e.g., citric and tartronic acids effectively complex metals such as copper in atmospheric aerosols. The simple equilibrium model calculations show that the effect of the complexation on the gas–aqueous phase partition of gaseous atmospheric ligands is quite small for the ligands with the high physical Henry’s law constants, e.g., dicarboxylic acids represented by oxalic acid, even if they have high affinity with metal ions. The lower Henry’s law constants of the α-dicarbonyls, such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, mean that the complexation could lead to profound increases in their partition into the aqueous phase. Despite quantum mechanical arguments for copper–glyoxal complexes, experiments showed no evidence of complexation between either hydrated or unhydrated α-dicarbonyls and the cupric ion. By contrast the β-dicarbonyl, malondialdehyde, has properties that would allow it to partition into atmospheric water via the complexation with metal ions under some conditions.

  12. Responses in tropospheric O3, OH and CH4 to changed emissions of important trace gases

    OpenAIRE

    Fuglestvedt, Jan S.; Berntsen, Terje; Isaksen, Ivar S.A.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional (altitude vs. latitude) photochemical/transport model of the global troposphere is applied to study the effects of changed emissions of NOx, CH4, CO2 and NMHC on the levels of O3, OH and CH4. On a mass basis, the efficiencies in increasing O3 concentrations differs markedly between the source gases, with NOx having the largest effects. The sensitivity to increased emissions of NOx from airplanes is found to be significantly higher than for ground emissions of NOx (> a factor...

  13. Quantifying sources and sinks of reactive gases in the lower atmosphere using airborne flux observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Glenn; Hanisco, T. F.; Atkinson, H. L.; Bui, Thaopaul; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Jacob, D.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Misztal, Pawel K.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Travis, Katherine; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-10-16

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  14. Quantifying Sources and Sinks of Reactive Gases in the Lower Atmosphere Using Airborne Flux Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Arkinson, H. L.; Bui, T. P.; Crounse, J. D.; Dean-Day, J.; Goldstein, A.; Guenther, A.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, G.; Jacob, D. J.; Karl, T.; Kim, P. S.; Liu, X.; Marvin, M. R.; Mikoviny, T.; Misztal, P. K.; Nguyen, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I.; Ryerson, T.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A.; Travis, K. R.; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P.O.; Wisthaler, A.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric composition is governed by the interplay of emissions, chemistry, deposition, and transport. Substantial questions surround each of these processes, especially in forested environments with strong biogenic emissions. Utilizing aircraft observations acquired over a forest in the southeast U.S., we calculate eddy covariance fluxes for a suite of reactive gases and apply the synergistic information derived from this analysis to quantify emission and deposition fluxes, oxidant concentrations, aerosol uptake coefficients, and other key parameters. Evaluation of results against state-of-the-science models and parameterizations provides insight into our current understanding of this system and frames future observational priorities. As a near-direct measurement of fundamental process rates, airborne fluxes offer a new tool to improve biogenic and anthropogenic emissions inventories, photochemical mechanisms, and deposition parameterizations.

  15. Note: A dual temperature closed loop batch reactor for determining the partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Oliver; Rochelle, Christopher A; Masters, Andrew J; Ballentine, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    An experimental approach is presented which can be used to determine partitioning of trace gases within CO2-water systems. The key advantages of this system are (1) The system can be isolated with no external exchange, making it ideal for experiments with conservative tracers. (2) Both phases can be sampled concurrently to give an accurate composition at each phase at any given time. (3) Use of a lower temperature flow loop outside of the reactor removes contamination and facilitates sampling. (4) Rapid equilibration at given pressure/temperature conditions is significantly aided by stirring and circulating the water phase using a magnetic stirrer and high-pressure liquid chromatography pump, respectively. PMID:26827363

  16. Global warming: Experimental study about the effect of accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molto, Carlos; Mas, Miquel

    2010-05-01

    The project presented here was developed by fifteen year old students of the Institut Sabadell (Sabadell Secondary School. Spain). The objective of this project was to raise the students awareness' about the problem of climate change, mainly caused by the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is also intended that students use the scientific method as an effective system of troubleshooting and that they use the ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) to elicit data and process information. To develop this project, four lessons of sixty minutes each were needed. The first lesson sets out the role of the atmosphere as an Earth's temperature regulator, highlighting the importance of keeping the levels of carbon dioxide, methane and water steam in balance. The second lesson is focused on the experimental activity that students will develop in the following lesson. In lesson two, students will present and justify their hypothesis about the experiment. Some theoretical concepts, necessary to carry out the experiment, will also be explained. The third lesson involves the core of the project, that is the experiment in the laboratory. The experiment consists on performing the atmosphere heating on a little scale. Four different atmospheres are created inside four plastic boxes heated by an infrared lamp. Students work in groups (one group for each atmosphere) and have to monitor the evolution of temperature by means of a temperature sensor (Multilog software). The first group has to observe the relationship between temperature and carbon dioxide levels increase, mainly caused by the widespread practice of burning fossil fuels by growing human populations. The task of this group is to measure simultaneously the temperature of an empty box (without CO2) and the temperature of a box with high carbon dioxide concentration. The carbon dioxide concentration is the result of the chemical reaction when sodium carbonate mixes with hydrochloric acid. The

  17. The state of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere using global observations through 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Oksana; Koide, Hiroshi; Dlugokencky, Ed; Montzka, Stephen A.; Keeling, Ralph; Tanhua, Toste; Lorenzoni, Laura

    2015-04-01

    We present results from the tenth annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ ghg/GHGbulletin.html) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The results are based on research and observations performed by laboratories contributing to the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme (www.wmo.int/gaw). The Bulletin presents results of global analyses of observational data collected according to GAW recommended practices and submitted to the World Data Center for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG), and for the first time, it includes a summary of ocean acidification. Bulletins are prepared by the WMO/GAW Scientific Advisory Group for Greenhouse Gases (http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/arep/gaw/ScientificAdvisoryGroups.html) in collaboration with WDCGG. The summary of ocean acidification and trends in ocean pCO2 was jointly produced by the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (IOC-UNESCO), the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), and the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre (OA-ICC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The tenth Bulletin included a special edition published prior to the United Nations Climate Summit in September 2014. The scope of this edition was to demonstrate the level of emission reduction necessary to stabilize radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases. It shows in particular that a reduction in radiative forcing from its current level (2.92 W m-2 in 2013) requires significant reductions in anthropogenic emissions of all major greenhouse gases. Observations used for global analysis are collected at more than 100 marine and terrestrial sites worldwide for CO2 and CH4 and at a smaller number of sites for other greenhouse gases. Globally averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide derived from this network reached new highs in 2013, with CO2 at 396.0 ± 0.1 ppm, CH4 at

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF LIGHTWEIGHT INSTRUMENTATION FOR MEASUREMENT OF LONG-LIVED TRACE GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ozone budget of the upper troposphere is highly uncertain with respect to both chemistry and dynamical effects. Extensive data in the 6 to 12 km region of the atmosphere is needed to constrain the relative roles of various dynamical processes, such as convection and int...

  19. Bioindication of atmospheric trace metals - With special references to megacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markert, Bernd, E-mail: markert@schlundmail.de [Fliederweg 17, D-49733 Haren/Erika (Germany); Wuenschmann, Simone [Fliederweg 17, D-49733 Haren/Erika (Germany); Fraenzle, Stefan [International Graduate School Zittau, D-02763 Zittau (Germany); Graciana Figueiredo, Ana Maria; Ribeiro, Andreza P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Linea Prestes 2242, CEP 05508-090, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wang Meie [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Centre for Eco-environmental Sciences, Beijing 110016 (China)

    2011-08-15

    After considering the particular problems of atmospheric pollution in megacities, i.e. agglomerations larger than 5 mio. inhabitants, with urbanization of World's population going on steadily, possibilities of active biomonitoring by means of green plants are discussed. Based on specific definitions of active and passive bioindication the chances of monitoring heavy metals in Sao Paulo megacity were demonstrated (first results published before). This is to show that there is need for increased use of bioindication to tackle the particular problems of megacities concerning environmental 'health', the data to be processed according to the Multi-Markered-Bioindication-Concept (MMBC). Comparison to other work shows this approach to be reasonable. - Highlights: > Chemical Pollution. > Bioindication. > Multi-Markered-Bioindication-Concept (MMBC). > Mega cities. - Bioindication is a relevant technique for observing the atmospheric deposition of chemical elements of the environment in megacities.

  20. Measurements of aerosol and trace gases at Agra in Indo-Gangetic plain during special aerosol land campaign II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjit; Maharaj Kumari, K.

    2010-05-01

    This paper deals with measurements of aerosol, their chemical properties and precursor trace gases at Agra in the Indo-Gangetic plain during ISRO-GBP special aerosol land campaign II. Aerosol and trace gas sampling as well a meteorological parameters monitoring were carried out at Dayalbagh, a suburban site of Agra during campaign in December 2004 along with seven other stations in India. The average TSPM level was 441.2 µg m-3 and ranges between 60.8 µg m-3 and 1004.6 µg m-3 and was higher than National Ambient Air Quality Standard values of India. The high load SPM in this region may be probably due to industrial-vehicular emissions of sulphur and nitrogen oxides, transport of soil-sand dust from local agricultural field and Thar Desert of Rajasthan and long range transported pollutants. Meteorological study revealed that high wind speed and wind from North West direction influences the aerosol load as it may be long range transported. TSP load was higher during initial foggy and foggy days and lower during post foggy days. NH4+ concentration is highest followed by NO3-, SO42-, Cl-, K+, Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+ and F-. The high concentration of NH4+ may be probably due to nearby cattle yard, use of fertilizers and biogenic emissions. The concentration of trace gases SO2, NO2, HNO3 and NH3 are 20.8 µg m-3, 26.3 µg m-3, 1.6 µg m-3, 18.6 µg m-3, respectively. The transportation of urban plumes may be responsible for high concentration of SO2 and NO2. HNO3/NO3- ratio is less than unity. NO3- and NO2 (r=0.4) suggests formation of particulate NO3- from NO2. Ratio of NH3/NH4+ is less than unity. SO42-/SO2 ratio is 0.84. The lack of correlation between SO42- and SO2 (r = 0.14) indicates only a small fraction of SO42- is contributed by SO2 while the major fraction is contributed by soil and other sources probably long range transported sulphate.

  1. Retrieval and monitoring of atmospheric trace gas concentrations in nadir and limb geometry using the space-borne SCIAMACHY instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, B; Richter, A; Rozanov, A; Von Savigny, Ch; Schmoltner, A M; Buchwitz, M; Bovensmann, H; Burrows, J P

    2006-09-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) onboard the European Envisat spacecraft performs continuous spectral observations of reflected, scattered and transmitted sunlight in various observation geometries. A unique feature of SCIAMACHY is the capability of probing the atmosphere in three different observation geometries:The nadir, limb, and occultation measurement modes. In nadir mode, column densities of trace gases are retrieved with a spatial resolution of typically 30 x 60 km using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Platt and Perner, 1983). Alternating with the nadir measurement, vertical profiles of absorber concentration in the stratosphere are derived in limb and occultation. In this paper we present an overview over some applications of SCIAMACHY data in space-based monitoring of atmospheric pollution. The DOAS algorithms for the retrieval of total column amounts from nadir spectra are briefly described and case studies of pollution events are presented. We also illustrate the technique used to derive stratospheric concentration profiles from limb observations and show comparisons with other remote sensing systems. Special emphasis will be given to techniques, which take advantage of SCIAMACHY's different viewing geometries. In particular, we will discuss the potential and limits of strategies to infer tropospheric abundances of O3 and NO2. PMID:16715354

  2. Retrieval of the vertical column density of the atmospheric pollution gases by using the scattered solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of monitoring the vertical column density (VCD) of atmospheric pollution gases by using the scattered solar radiation is proposed and the scheme to ensure the necessary condition is put forward. Under the condition, the VCD of tropospheric NO2 is retrieved from the scattered solar radiation, which is close to that from the direct solar radiation

  3. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  4. Osmium isotopic tracing of atmospheric emissions from an aluminum smelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogot, Julien; Poirier, André; Boullemant, Amiel

    2015-09-01

    We present for the first time the use of osmium isotopic composition as a tracer of atmospheric emissions from an aluminum smelter, where alumina (extracted from bauxite) is reduced through electrolysis into metallic aluminum using carbonaceous anodes. These anodes are consumed in the process; they are made of petroleum coke and pitch and have high Re/Os elementary ratio. Due to the relatively large geological age of their source material, their osmium shows a high content of radiogenic 187Os produced from in situ187Re radioactive decay. The radiogenic isotopic composition (187Os/188Os ∼ 2.5) of atmospheric particulate emissions from this smelter is different from that of other typical anthropogenic osmium sources (that come from ultramafic geological contexts with unradiogenic Os isotopes, e.g., 187Os/188Os < 0.2) and also different from average eroding continental crust 187Os/188Os ratios (ca. 1.2). This study demonstrates the capacity of osmium measurements to monitor particulate matter emissions from the Al-producing industry.

  5. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at ten sites in Northern China

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Y. P.; Y. S. Wang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil and water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the a...

  6. Global satellite analysis of the relation between aerosols and short-lived trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Veefkind

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal correlations between concurrent satellite observations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and tropospheric columns of nitrogen dioxide (NO2, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and formaldehyde (HCHO from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI are used to infer information on the global composition of aerosol particles. When averaging the satellite data over large regions and longer time periods, we find significant correlation between MODIS AOT and OMI trace gas columns for various regions in the world. This shows that these enhanced aerosol and trace gas concentrations originate from common sources, such as fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and organic compounds released from the biosphere. This leads us to propose that satellite-inferred AOT to NO2 ratios for regions with comparable photochemical regimes can be used as indicators for the relative regional pollution control of combustion processes. Indeed, satellites observe low AOT to NO2 ratios over the eastern United States and western Europe, and high AOT to NO2 ratios over comparably industrialized regions in eastern Europe and China. Emission databases and OMI SO2 observations over these regions suggest a much stronger sulfur contribution to aerosol formation than over the well-regulated areas of the eastern United States and western Europe. Furthermore, satellite observations show AOT to NO2 ratios are a factor 100 higher over biomass burning regions than over industrialized areas, reflecting the unregulated burning practices with strong primary particle emissions in the tropics compared to the heavily controlled combustion processes in the industrialized Northern Hemisphere. Simulations with a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem capture most of these variations, although on regional scales significant differences are found

  7. Global analysis of the relation between aerosols and short-lived trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Veefkind

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal correlations between concurrent satellite observations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and tropospheric columns of nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and formaldehyde from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI are used to infer information on the global composition of aerosol particles. When averaging the satellite data over large regions and longer time periods, we find significant correlation between MODIS AOT and OMI trace gas columns for various regions in the world. This suggests that enhanced aerosol and trace gas concentrations originate from common sources, such as fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and organic compounds released from the biosphere. This leads us to propose that satellite-inferred AOT to NO2 ratios for regions with comparable photochemical regimes can be used as indicators for the relative (local efficiency of combustion processes. Indeed, satellites observe low AOT to NO2 ratios over the eastern United States and western Europe, and high AOT to NO2 ratios over comparably industrialized regions in eastern Europe and China. Emission databases and OMI SO2 observations over these regions suggest a much stronger sulfur contribution to aerosol formation than over the well-regulated areas of the eastern United States and western Europe. Furthermore, satellite observations show AOT to NO2 ratios are a factor 100 higher over biomass burning regions than over industrialized areas, reflecting the unregulated burning practices with strong primary particle emissions in the tropics compared to the heavily controlled combustion processes in the industrialized Northern Hemisphere. Simulations with a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem capture most of these differences, providing some confidence in our understanding of aerosol sources, formation mechanisms, and sinks. Wintertime

  8. Flux measurements of energy and trace gases in urban Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, I.; Schade, G. W.; Adams, S.; Park, C.

    2008-12-01

    We describe the setup and some first year results of a new flux measurements tower in an urban area. An existing radio communications tower 4 km north of downtown Houston was equipped with micrometeorological instrumentation and trace gas sampling lines in spring 2007. Wind speed, temperature and relative humidity are recorded at five levels between 12 and 60 m above ground; 3-D wind speed measurements, solar and net radiances, and trace gas sampling are established from the 60 m level. A closed path IRGA is used for CO2 and water vapor fluxes, and independent instrumentation for criteria pollutant and VOC fluxes. Two CSI data loggers and software control the measurements, and EdiRe software is used to analyze turbulence data and compute fluxes. A project description is provided at http://atmo.tamu.edu/yellowcabtower. Surface properties as calculated from the gradient measurements show the site to be surprisingly uniform, with displacement heights between 5 and 9 m and roughness lengths between 0.4 and 0.7 m, despite urban heterogeneity. The latter is investigated through visible/near IR orthoimagery and LIDAR data, which are incorporated into a local GIS. Net radiation was also only marginally affected by surface heterogeneity. At this urban location it is balanced by roughly equal amounts of sensible heat, latent heat, and storage fluxes. Latent heat flux, however, is smaller outside the growing season, with an equivalent increase in winter storage fluxes, as expected. Significant differences are also observed with direction during summer, showing decreased Bowen ratios and lower CO2 emissions from sectors with a larger urban tree canopy cover in the footprint. The largely mature, dominantly oak urban canopy cover alleviates approximately 100 W m- 2 during typical summer days. On the other hand, anthropogenic CO2 emissions dominate over photosynthetic uptake all year round. Measured carbon fluxes peak during morning rush-hour traffic, especially when increasing

  9. Biomonitoring trace element atmospheric deposition using lichens in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of 34 elements, Ag, As, Au, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Ni, Rb, Ru, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Tm, U, W, Yb, and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in the early preserved epiphytic lichens (Parmotrema recticulata) from the remote Southwestern China area in 1960s, 1980s, and 1990s. The concentrations of Ag, As, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Nd, Ni, Sc, Se, Sm, Tb, U, Yb, and Zn were dropped down by the temporal prolonation. The elemental concentration levels obtained from the organisms indicate that the extent of heavy metal atmospheric deposition among the sampling sites was declining during the past decades. (author)

  10. Model sensitivity studies regarding the role of the retention coefficient for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases by deep convective cloud systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salzmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the retention coefficient (i.e. the fraction of a dissolved trace gas which is retained in hydrometeors during freezing for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases by deep convective cloud systems is investigated using a modified version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. Results from cloud system resolving model runs (in which deep convection is initiated by small random perturbations in association with so-called "large scale forcings (LSF" for a tropical oceanic (TOGA COARE and a mid-latitude continental case (ARM are compared to two runs in which bubbles are used to initiate deep convection (STERAO, ARM. In the LSF runs, scavenging is found to almost entirely prevent a highly soluble tracer initially located in the lowest 1.5 km of the troposphere from reaching the upper troposphere, independent of the retention coefficient. The release of gases from freezing hydrometeors leads to mixing ratio increases in the upper troposphere comparable to those calculated for insoluble trace gases only in the two runs in which bubbles are used to initiate deep convection. A comparison of the two ARM runs indicates that using bubbles to initiate deep convection may result in an overestimate of the influence of the retention coefficient on the vertical transport of highly soluble tracers. It is, however, found that the retention coefficient plays an important role for the scavenging and redistribution of highly soluble trace gases with a (chemical source in the free troposphere and also for trace gases for which even relatively inefficient transport may be important. The large difference between LSF and bubble runs is attributed to differences in dynamics and microphysics in the inflow regions of the storms. The dependence of the results on the model setup indicates the need for additional model studies with a more realistic initiation of deep convection, e.g., considering effects of orography in a nested

  11. The use of stable isotopes to trace the impact of landfill gases on environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of anaerobic fermentation leading to methanogenisis in landfills produces isotopically depleted methane and isotopically enriched carbon dioxide. While the inflammability of methane is a recognised environmental hazard, the impact of the carbon dioxide produced has not been recognised. Unlike methane, the carbon dioxide is very soluble in waters it comes in contact with and unlike leachates it is not contained by the engineered structure of modern landfills. The carbon dioxide gas has the potential of dissolving in ground waters, lowering their pH and degrading their water quality. We have used up to +13 per thousand delta/sup 13/C values of the CO/sub 2/ gas to trace and quantify the effect of the enhanced P/sub CO2/ on groundwater. The downstream consequences of enhanced P/sub CO2/ on groundwater quality also depend on matrix lithology, being more significant for basaltic environments such as those typical of Auckland landfills than for the rhyolitic sands and gravels common in Waikato landfills. (author)

  12. Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of trace gases of the stratosphere of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Rengel, Miriam; Hartogh, Paul; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Moreno, Raphael; Jarchow, Christopher; Courtin, Regis; Cernicharo, Jose; Lara, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the composition of Titan's stratosphere from new medium-resolution far-infrared observations performed with the full range of Herschel's Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) (51-220 $\\mu$m at a resolution $\\lambda$/$\\Delta \\lambda$ ranging from 950 to 5500 depending on wavelength and grating order). Methods: Using PACS, we obtained the spectral emission of several features of the Titan's stratosphere. We used a line-by-line radiative transfer code and the least-squares fitting technique to infer the abundances of the trace constituents. Results: Numerous spectral features attributable to CH$_4$, CO, HCN, and H$_2$O are present. From the flux density spectrum measured and by a detailed comparison with synthetic spectra, we constrain the stratospheric abundance of CH4, which is assumed to be constant with altitude, to be 1.29 $\\pm$ 0.03%. Similarly, we constrain the abundance of CO to be 50 $\\pm$ 2 ppm, and the HCN vertical distribution consistent with an increase from 40 ppb ...

  13. Refraction in planetary atmospheres: improved analytical expressions and comparison with a new ray-tracing algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Betremieux, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric refraction affects to various degrees exoplanet transit, lunar eclipse, as well as stellar occultation observations. Exoplanet retrieval algorithms often use analytical expressions for the column abundance along a ray traversing the atmosphere as well as for the deflection of that ray, which are first order approximations valid for low densities in a spherically symmetric homogeneous isothermal atmosphere. We derive new analytical formulae for both of these quantities, which are valid for higher densities, and use them to refine and validate a new ray tracing algorithm which can be used for arbitrary atmospheric temperature-pressure profiles. We illustrate with simple isothermal atmospheric profiles the consequences of our model for different planets: temperate Earth-like and Jovian-like planets, as well as HD189733b, and GJ1214b. We find that, for both hot exoplanets, our treatment of refraction does not make much of a difference to pressures as high as 10 atmosphere, but that it is important to ...

  14. ATMOSPHERIC MEASUREMENTS OF TRACE POLLUTANTS; LONG PATH FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Described are the results of a four-year study to measure trace pollutant concentrations in polluted atmospheres by kilometer pathlength Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy. The study covers selected smog episodes during the years 1976 to 1979. During 1976 ...

  15. Observing Trace Gases Of The Arctic And Subarctic Stratosphere By TELIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian; Vogt, Peter; Birk, Manfred; Wagner, Georg; Trautmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder (TELIS) is a balloon-borne cryogenic heterodyne spectrometer developed by a consortium of European institutes, which was mounted together with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - Balloon (MIPAS- B) and the mini- Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (mini-DOAS) instruments on a stratospheric gondola. The TELIS instrument is designed to monitor the vertical distribution of stratospheric state parameters associated with ozone destruction and climate change in Arctic and subarctic areas. The broad spectral coverage of TELIS is achieved by utilizing three frequency channels: a tunable 1.8THz channel based on a solid state local oscillator and a hot electron bolometer as mixer, a 480-650GHz channel with the Superconducting Integrated Receiver (SIR) technology, and a highly compact 500 GHz channel developed by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON), and the Rutherford Apple- ton Laboratory (RAL), respectively. Furthermore, an ex- tended spectral range is observed by the combination of TELIS and MIPAS-B, which can be employed for cross validation of several gas concentrations. Between 2009 and 2011 three successful scientific flights have been launched in Kiruna, Sweden and all relevant atmospheric gas species were seen by TELIS over an altitude range of 10-32.5 km. For estimation of concentration profiles from TELIS measurements, a constrained nonlinear least squares fitting framework along with var- ious Tikhonov-type regularization methods has been developed. In this work we present recent retrieval results from latest calibrated spectra during the 2010 flight. Emphasis is placed on ozone (O3) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), and error issues pertaining to the main instrumental uncertainty terms including nonlinearity in the calibration procedure, sideband ratio and pointing offset are investigated. The retrieved profiles are validated against

  16. Distribution of trace gases and aerosols in the troposphere over West Siberia and Kara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belan, Boris D.; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Nédélec, Philippe; Ancellet, Gérard; Pelon, Jacques; Berchet, Antoine; Arzoumanian, Emmanuel; Belan, Sergey B.; Penner, Johannes E.; Balin, Yurii S.; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Davydov, Denis K.; Ivlev, Georgii A.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Kozlov, Alexander S.; Chernov, Dmitrii G.; Fofonov, Alexader V.; Simonenkov, Denis V.; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic is affected by climate change much stronger than other regions of the globe. Permafrost thawing can lead to additional methane release, which enhances the greenhouse effect and warming, as well as changes of Arctic tundra ecosystems. A great part of Siberian Arctic is still unexplored. Ground-based investigations are difficult to be carried out in this area due to it is an out-of-the-way place. So, in spite of the high cost, aircraft-based in-situ measurements can provide a good opportunity to fill up the gap in data on the atmospheric composition over this region. The ninth YAK-AEROSIB campaign was focused on the airborne survey of Arctic regions of West Siberia. It was performed in October 2014. During the campaign, the high-precision in-situ measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, O3, black carbon and aerososls, including aerosol lidar profiles, have been carried out in the Siberian troposphere from Novosibirsk to Kara Sea. Vertical distributions of the above atmospheric constituents will be presented. This work was supported by LIA YAK-AEROSIB, CNRS (France), the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, CEA (France), the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); State contracts of the Ministry of Education and Science of Russia No. 14.604.21.0100, (RFMTFIBBB210290) and No. 14.613.21.0013 (RFMEFI61314X0013); Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No. 14-05-00526 and 14-05-00590).

  17. Trans-Pacific transport and evolution of aerosols and trace gases from Asia during the INTEX-B field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Adhikary

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM developed at the University of Iowa is applied to the analysis of observations obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEX-B, conducted over the Pacific Ocean during the 2006 North American spring season. This paper reports on the model performance of meteorological parameters, trace gases, aerosols and photolysis rate (J-values predictions with the NASA DC-8 and NSF/NCAR C-130 airborne measurements along with observations from three surface sites Mt. Bachelor, Trinidad Head and Kathmandu, Nepal. In general the model shows appreciable skill in predicting many of the important aspects of the observed distributions. The major meteorological parameters driving long range transport are accurately predicted by the WRF simulations used in this study. Furthermore, the STEM model predicts aerosols and trace gases concentrations within a standard deviation of most of the observed mean values. The results also point towards areas where model improvements are needed; e.g., the STEM model underestimates CO (15% for the DC8 and 6% for the C-130, whereas it overpredicts PAN (by a factor of two for both aircraft. The errors in the model calculations are attributed to uncertainty in emissions estimates and uncertainty in the top and lateral boundary conditions. Results from a series of sensitivity simulations examining the impact of the growth of emissions in Asia from 2000 to 2006, the importance of biomass burning, the effect of using boundary conditions from different global models, and the role of heterogeneous chemistry on the predictions are also presented. The impacts of heterogeneous reactions at specific times during dust transport episodes can be significant, and in the presence of dust both sulfate and nitrate aerosol production is increased and gas phase nitric acid levels are reduced appreciably (~50%. The aging of the air masses during the long range

  18. Woody encroachment by nitrogen-fixing species: impacts on nitrogen biogeochemistry expressed through nitrogen trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, J. P.; West, J. B.; Boutton, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally important vegetation change that continues to transform former grasslands or savannas into woodlands. This dramatic and geographically widespread phenomenon appears to be driven primarily by human land use changes, including reduced fire frequency and heavy livestock grazing. Observed effects of increased woody plant abundance in grasslands generally include alterations of above- and belowground productivity, changes in the chemistry of litter inputs, modifications to rooting depths and distributions, altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes, and changes in microclimate and energy balance. These changes to fundamental ecosystem characteristics have strong, but relatively poorly understood, potential to modify biogeochemical processes that can themselves influence regional and global climate through biogeochemistry-climate feedbacks. In addition, in South Texas woody encroachment has occurred across a complex landscape differing in soil type and water retention. This work tests the hypothesis that woody encroachment, in addition to increasing total nitrogen stocks in the system, has increased nitrogen losses due to increased rates of nitrogen soil gas efflux. Under dry soil conditions and in contrast to this hypothesis, reactive nitrogen soil efflux (NO + NOy + NH3) was 21.53 ± 3.4 ng N m-2 s-1 in intact grasslands compared to 6.23 ± 1.6 ng N m-2 s-1 in woodlands on the same soil type. The non-reactive nitrogen gas, nitrous oxide, was similar in magnitude between the grassland and encroached sites (~ 7 ng N m-2 s-1). Under moist soil conditions, the magnitude of flux increased and order of magnitude, but did not change the relative ranking. Measurements of soil respiration rate and microbial biomass suggest higher microbial activity in the encroached environment and potentially higher rates of immobilization by plants and microbes. Landscape position had a large overall effect on soil nitrogen trace gas efflux with

  19. Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of trace gases of the stratosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengel, M.; Sagawa, H.; Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Moreno, R.; Jarchow, C.; Courtin, R.; Cernicharo, J.; Lara, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the composition of Titan's stratosphere from new medium-resolution far-infrared observations performed with the full range of Herschel's Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) (51-220 μm at a resolution λ/Δλ ranging from 950 to 5500 depending on wavelength and grating order). Methods: Using PACS, we obtained the spectral emission of several features of the Titan's stratosphere. We used a line-by-line radiative transfer code and the least-squares fitting technique to infer the abundances of the trace constituents. Results: Numerous spectral features attributable to CH4, CO, HCN, and H2O are present. From the flux density spectrum measured and by a detailed comparison with synthetic spectra, we constrain the stratospheric abundance of CH4, which is assumed to be constant with altitude, to be 1.29 ± 0.03%. Similarly, we constrain the abundance of CO to be 50 ± 2 ppm, and the HCN vertical distribution consistent with an increase from 40 ppb at ~100 km to ~4 ppm at ~200 km, which is an altitude region where the HCN signatures are sensitive. Measurements of three H2O rotational lines confirm the H2O distribution profile recently obtained with Herschel. Furthermore, we determine the isotopic ratios 12C/13C in CO and HCN to be 124 ± 58, and 66 ± 35, respectively. Comparisons between our results and the values derived with other instruments show that our results are consistent with the vertical distributions and isotopic ratios in previous studies, except for the HCN distribution obtained with Cassini/CIRS, which does not agree with the PACS lines at the 1-σ confidence interval. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  20. Internationally harmonised approach to biomonitoring trace element atmospheric deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been supporting work on airborne particulate matter since 1992 through various co-ordinated research and technical co-operation projects. In 1997, biomonitoring air pollution using plants, became officially a part of the IAEA project on environmental pollution monitoring and research. Based on: (1) positive experience in using biomonitors, especially lower plants such as mosses and lichens in several developed countries; (2) the continuous use of biomonitors in several Member States; and (3) the fact that nuclear and related analytical techniques have been shown to be particularly appropriate for the analysis of air pollution biomonitors, such studies are now being supported by the IAEA in 14 countries within a co-ordinated research project. The main emphasis of this project is on (1) identification of suitable biomonitors of atmospheric pollution for local and/or regional application, and (2) their validation for general environmental monitoring, whenever possible. Although the participants are using different plants as biomonitors in their research in geographically and climatically diverse parts of the world, they are harmonising sampling approaches and analytical procedures. In this paper, an overview of these activities is given, along with the details, where possible. In all of these activities, proficiency testing and analytical quality assurance are important issue, which merits special attention. To this end, a variety of analytical quality control materials have been used in intercomparison exercises and proficiency testing. Within the scope of the NAT-5 intercomparison exercise, two lichen materials were distributed among 15 participating laboratories and a proficiency test was organised. The results obtained proved satisfactory performance for most participating laboratories. (author)

  1. Russian contribution to ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter: Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Grigoriev, Alexey; Anufreychik, Konstantin; Fedorova, Anna; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Ivanov, Yuriy; Moshkin, Boris; Kalinnikov, Yuriy; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-04-01

    . The MIR channel is a novel, high-aperture cross-dispersion spectrometer working in 2.3-4.2 μm spectral range, with resolving power of 50000, and covering simultaneously up to 300 nm per measurement. Targeting very high spectral resolution the MIR channel will operate in solar occultation only with a narrow FOV. MCT detector array with cryo-cooler is applied. The main science goal of MIR channel is to do record-breaking measurements and detections of minor gaseous species (CH4, C2H2, H2S, HCl and others), some yet undetected, some possibly related to volcanic or biologic activity. For the methane we predicting ~20 ppt sensitivity. The spectral range of MIR includes several CO2 absorption bands allowing doing measurements of density and temperature. D/H and its vertical profile in the Martian atmosphere will be measured for the first time. The short-wavelength side of MIR's spectral range is extended to cover almost the whole carbon monoxide band. TIRVIM is a 2-inch double pendulum Fourier-transform spectrometer covering in one interferometric channel the spectral range of 2-17 μm. Instrument has maximal optical path difference of 6 cm so its apodized spectral resolution is 0.2 cm-1. Single element PV-MCT detector with Stirling cooler is applied. To calibrate TIRVIM data onboard, internal black body and one-coordinate scanner are implemented. Scanning mirror provides possibility of observation in both nadir and solar occultation modes. FOV of the TIRVIM is 2.5deg. Main science goals of TIRVIM are detection of trace gases (solar occultation) and measurement of thermal profiles using 15μm-CO2 band (nadir). Martian aerosol properties and profiles can be also retrieved. Trace gases NO and N2O can be detected.

  2. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark Patrick, E-mail: mark.taylor@mq.edu.au

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m{sup 2}/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m{sup 2}/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m{sup 2}, more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m{sup 2} used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m{sup 2}) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m{sup 2}/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear — even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. - Graphical abstract: Post-play hand wipe, Headland Park, Townsville, Australia. - Highlights: • Bulk mineral port

  3. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m2/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m2/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m2, more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m2 used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m2) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m2/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes (208Pb/207Pb and 206Pb/207Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear — even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. - Graphical abstract: Post-play hand wipe, Headland Park, Townsville, Australia. - Highlights: • Bulk mineral port operations associated with emissions of metal-rich dusts

  4. Online technique for isotope and mixing ratios of CH4, N2O, Xe and mixing ratios of organic trace gases on a single ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar ice cores enclosing trace gas species offer a unique archive to study changes in the past atmosphere and in terrestrial/marine source regions. Here we present a new online technique for ice core and air samples to measure a suite of isotope ratios and mixing ratios of trace gas species on a single small sample. Isotope ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide and xenon with reproducibilities for ice core samples of 0.15‰ for δ13C-CH4, 0.22‰ for δ15N-N2O, 0.34 ‰ for δ18O-N2O, and 0.05‰ for δ136Xe. Mixing ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide, xenon, ethane, propane, methyl chloride and dichloro-difluoromethane with reproducibilities of 7 ppb for CH4, 3 ppb for N2O, 50 ppt for 136Xe, 70 ppt for C2H6, 70 ppt for C3H8, 20 ppt for CH3Cl, and 2 ppt for CCl2F2. The system consists of a vacuum extraction device, a preconcentration unit and a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CH4 is combusted to CO2 prior to detection while we bypassed the oven for all other species. The highly automated system uses only ~160 g ice, equivalent to ~16 mL air, which is less than previous methods. This large suite of parameters on a single ice sample is new and helpful to study phase relationships of parameters which are usually not measured together. A multi-parameter dataset is also key to understand in situ production processes of organic species in the ice, a critical issue observable in many organic trace gases. Novel is the determination of xenon isotope ratios using doubly charged Xe ions. The attained precision for δ136Xe is suitable to correct the isotopic ratios and mixing ratios for gravitational firn effects, with the benefit that this information is derived from the same sample. Lastly, anomalies in the Xe mixing ratio, δXe/air, can be used to detect melt layers.

  5. Online technique for isotope and mixing ratios of CH4, N2O, Xe and mixing ratios of organic trace gases on a single ice core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Bock, M.; Fischer, H.

    2014-08-01

    Firn and polar ice cores enclosing trace gas species offer a unique archive to study changes in the past atmosphere and in terrestrial/marine source regions. Here we present a new online technique for ice core and air samples to measure a suite of isotope ratios and mixing ratios of trace gas species on a single sample. Isotope ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide and xenon with reproducibilities for ice core samples of 0.15‰ for δ13C-CH4, 0.22‰ for δ15N-N2O, 0.34‰ for δ18O-N2O, and 0.05‰ per mass difference for δ136Xe for typical concentrations of glacial ice. Mixing ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide, xenon, ethane, propane, methyl chloride and dichlorodifluoromethane with reproducibilities of 7 ppb for CH4, 3 ppb for N2O, 70 ppt for C2H6, 70 ppt for C3H8, 20 ppt for CH3Cl, and 2 ppt for CCl2F2. However, the blank contribution for C2H6 and C3H8 is large in view of the measured values for Antarctic ice samples. The system consists of a vacuum extraction device, a preconcentration unit and a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CH4 is combusted to CO2 prior to detection while we bypass the oven for all other species. The highly automated system uses only ~ 160 g of ice, equivalent to ~ 16 mL air, which is less than previous methods. The measurement of this large suite of parameters on a single ice sample is new and key to understanding phase relationships of parameters which are usually not measured together. A multi-parameter data set is also key to understand in situ production processes of organic species in the ice, a critical issue observed in many organic trace gases. Novel is the determination of xenon isotope ratios using doubly charged Xe ions. The attained precision for δ136Xe is suitable to correct the isotopic ratios and mixing ratios for gravitational firn diffusion effects, with the benefit that this information is derived from the same sample. Lastly, anomalies in the Xe mixing ratio,

  6. Trace gas retrieval for limb DOAS under changing atmospheric conditions: The X-gas scaling method vs optimal estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueneke, Tilman; Grossmann, Katja; Knecht, Matthias; Raecke, Rasmus; Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Changing atmospheric conditions during DOAS measurements from fast moving aircraft platforms pose a challenge for trace gas retrievals. Traditional inversion techniques to retrieve trace gas concentrations from limb scattered UV/vis spectroscopy, like optimal estimation, require a-priori information on Mie extinction (e.g., aerosol concentration and cloud cover) and albedo, which determine the atmospheric radiative transfer. In contrast to satellite applications, cloud filters can not be applied because they would strongly reduce the usable amount of expensively gathered measurement data. In contrast to ground-based MAX-DOAS applications, an aerosol retrieval based on O4 is not able to constrain the radiative transfer in air-borne applications due to the rapidly decreasing amount of O4 with altitude. Furthermore, the assumption of a constant cloud cover is not valid for fast moving aircrafts, thus requiring 2D or even 3D treatment of the radiative transfer. Therefore, traditional techniques are not applicable for most of the data gathered by fast moving aircraft platforms. In order to circumvent these limitations, we have been developing the so-called X-gas scaling method. By utilising a proxy gas X (e.g. O3, O4, …), whose concentration is either a priori known or simultaneously in-situ measured as well as remotely measured, an effective absorption length for the target gas is inferred. In this presentation, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the novel approach along with some sample cases. A particular strength of the X-gas scaling method is its insensitivity towards the aerosol abundance and cloud cover as well as wavelength dependent effects, whereas its sensitivity towards the profiles of both gases requires a priori information on their shapes.

  7. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  8. Miniaturized Sensors for Monitoring of Atmospheric Trace Gases using Multiple Deployment Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Daylight Solutions proposes a miniaturized sensor package based on ECqcLTM and QEPAS technology that were independently developed by Daylight Solutions (San Diego,...

  9. Use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric deposition of trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some basic facts about the use of mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric trace element deposition are reviewed, and advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed, largely on the basis of experience from regular use of this technique in Norway over the last 20 years. Topics discussed include different versions of the moss technique, mechanisms and efficiencies of trace element uptake, conversion of concentrations in moss to bulk deposition rates, and contribution from sources other than air pollution to the elemental composition of different elements. Suggestions are presented for further work in order to extend the use of mosses as biomonitors. (author)

  10. Trace elements in atmospheric aerosols from background regions and biomass burning from the Amazon Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerosol particles from the tropical rain forest and from savannah biomass burning were collected in several experiments in the Amazon Basin. The size distribution of atmospheric trace elements was measured under both background and biomass burning conditions. Sampling from aircraft was performed over a large area of the Amazon Basin in August/September 1991. The aerosol mass concentration, black carbon and trace element concentrations were determined for fine and coarse aerosol particles. Particle induced X ray emission (PIXE) was used to measure the concentrations of up to 22 elements: Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb. During the dry season, when most of the biomass burning occurs, the concentration of inhalable particles exceeds 300 μg/m3 in regions far from the direct influence of emissions from biomass burning. Large amounts of fine particles are injected into the atmosphere, where they can travel over long distances. These particles are rich in K, P, S, Ca, Mg, Cl, Si, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and other trace elements. The emissions of trace elements and heavy metals into the global atmosphere owing to biomass burning are very significant, but are currently not considered in global atmospheric heavy metal inventories. Several essential nutrients, such as P, K, S and others, are transported into the atmosphere as a result of biomass burning processes. Most of the particles are water soluble and can be active as cloud condensation nuclei, with the potential to change the cloud formation mechanisms in the Amazon Basin and other regions of the planet. 22 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  11. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sicardy, Bruno; Bézard, Bruno; Sotin, Christophe; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matt; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 μm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution (~10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 10 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 μm, and CO, at 4.7 μm. We can extract methane's abundance between 70 and 750 km and CO's between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 μm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 μm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  12. Atmospheric Station Kresin u Pacova, Czech Republic - a central European research infrastructure for studying greenhouse gases, aerosols and air quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorská, Alice; Fusek, M.; Hanuš, Vlastimil; Hošková, K.; Michálek, J.; Prošek, P.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Sedlák, Pavel; Váňa, Milan; Veselik, P.; Vodička, Petr; Ždímal, Vladimír; Zíková, Naděžda

    Berlín: European Meteorological Society, 2014. "192-1". [EMS Annual Meeting, 14th & European Conference on Applications of Meteorology (ECAM), 10th. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : atmospheric station Křešín * Czech Republic * greenhouse gases * Aerosol-climate model * air quality Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality; DI - Air Pollution ; Quality (UCHP-M)

  13. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC

  14. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. T. Griffith

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In October–November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC, US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR systems and whole air sampling (WAS into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4–27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3, aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13–195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The

  15. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured trace gas emission factors from seven prescribed fires in South Carolina (SC), US, using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analysis. A total of 97 trace gas species were quantified from both airborne and ground-based sampling platforms, making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements include the first emission factors for a suite of monoterpenes produced by heating vegetative fuels during field fires. The first quantitative FTIR observations of limonene in smoke are reported along with an expanded suite of monoterpenes measured by WAS including α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, camphene, 4-carene, and myrcene. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of 0.4-27.9% of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) and ~ 21% of organic aerosol (mass basis) suggests that they impacted secondary formation of ozone (O3), aerosols, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes in the first few hours after emission. The variability in the initial terpene emissions in the SC fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the initially emitted gas-phase NMOCs was 13-195% different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~ 20 months earlier. It is likely that differences in stand structure and environmental conditions contributed to the high variability observed within and between these studies. Similar factors may explain much of the variability in initial emissions in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, was found to be fairly consistent with previous airborne fire measurements in other coniferous-dominated ecosystems, with the mean for these studies being 0.90 ± 0.06%, further confirming the value of HCN as a biomass burning tracer. The SC results also

  16. The role of neutron activation analysis for trace elements characterization, analysis and certification in atmospheric particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) owns these requirements and is universally accepted as one of the most reliable analytical tools for trace and ultratrace elements determination. Its use in trace elements atmospheric pollution related studies has been and is still extensive as can be demonstrate by several specific works and detailed reviews. In this work, the application of this nuclear technique, in solving a series of different analytical problems related to trace elements in air pollution processes is reported. Examples and results are given on the following topics: characterization of urban and rural airborne particulate samples; particles size distribution in the different inhalable and respirable fractions (PM10 and PM 2.5); certification of related Standard Reference Materials for data quality assurance. (author)

  17. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) – a novel imaging DOAS device for 2-D and 3-D imaging of trace gases and aerosols

    OpenAIRE

    S. General; D. Pöhler; H. Sihler; N. Bobrowski; Frieß, U.; J. Zielcke; M. Horbanski; P. B. Shepson; Stirm, B. H.; Simpson, W. R.; Weber, K; C. Fischer; U. Platt

    2014-01-01

    Many relevant processes in tropospheric chemistry take place on rather small scales (e.g., tens to hundreds of meters) but often influence areas of several square kilometer. Thus, measurements of the involved trace gases with high spatial resolution are of great scientific interest. In order to identify individual sources and sinks and ultimately to improve chemical transport models, we developed a new airborne instrument, which is based on the well established Differential ...

  18. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment

  19. Agricultural fires in the southeastern U.S. during SEAC4RS: Emissions of trace gases and particles and evolution of ozone, reactive nitrogen, and organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Y.; Huey, L. G.; Yokelson, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Choi, Y.; St. Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J. D.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Hanisco, T. F.; King, L. E.; Meinardi, S.; Mikoviny, T.; Palm, B. B.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sachse, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Simpson, I. J.; Tanner, D. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Ullmann, K.; Weber, R. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wisthaler, A.; Wolfe, G. M.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2016-06-01

    Emissions from 15 agricultural fires in the southeastern U.S. were measured from the NASA DC-8 research aircraft during the summer 2013 Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign. This study reports a detailed set of emission factors (EFs) for 25 trace gases and 6 fine particle species. The chemical evolution of the primary emissions in seven plumes was examined in detail for ~1.2 h. A Lagrangian plume cross-section model was used to simulate the evolution of ozone (O3), reactive nitrogen species, and organic aerosol (OA). Observed EFs are generally consistent with previous measurements of crop residue burning, but the fires studied here emitted high amounts of SO2 and fine particles, especially primary OA and chloride. Filter-based measurements of aerosol light absorption implied that brown carbon (BrC) was ubiquitous in the plumes. In aged plumes, rapid production of O3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), and nitrate was observed with ΔO3/ΔCO, ΔPAN/ΔNOy, and Δnitrate/ΔNOy reaching ~0.1, ~0.3, and ~0.3. For five selected cases, the model reasonably simulated O3 formation but underestimated PAN formation. No significant evolution of OA mass or BrC absorption was observed. However, a consistent increase in oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios of OA indicated that OA oxidation in the agricultural fire plumes was much faster than in urban and forest fire plumes. Finally, total annual SO2, NOx, and CO emissions from agricultural fires in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Missouri were estimated (within a factor of ~2) to be equivalent to ~2% SO2 from coal combustion and ~1% NOx and ~9% CO from mobile sources.

  20. Elimination of carbon dioxide and other atmospheric gases by means of calcium rich industrial w aste

    OpenAIRE

    Esquivias, L.; Santos, Alberto; Morales, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the use of an aqueous suspension comprising calcium in a proportion exceeding 15% by weight, the solid phase of such aqueous suspension being preferably portlandite proceeding from chemical industry waste, for the elimination of CO2 and other greenhouse effect gases. The present invention moreover relates to a procedure of elimination of said gases under conditions of ambient pressure and temperatures, through both induced and environmental carbo...

  1. Climatology and variability of trace gases in extratropical double-tropopause regions from MLS, HIRDLS, and ACE-FTS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Manney, G. L.; Hegglin, M. I.; Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.; Daffer, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Aura High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) are used to present the first global climatological comparison of extratropical, nonpolar trace gas distributions in double-tropopause (DT) and single-tropopause (ST) regions. Stratospheric tracers, O3, HNO3, and HCl, have lower mixing ratios ˜2-8 km above the primary (lowermost) tropopause in DT than in ST regions in all seasons, with maximum Northern Hemisphere (NH) differences near 50% in winter and 30% in summer. Southern Hemisphere winter differences are somewhat smaller, but summer differences are similar in the two hemispheres. H2O in DT regions of both hemispheres shows strong negative anomalies in November through February and positive anomalies in July through October, reflecting the strong seasonal cycle in H2O near the tropical tropopause. CO and other tropospheric tracers examined have higher DT than ST values 2-7 km above the primary tropopause, with the largest differences in winter. Large DT-ST differences extend to high NH latitudes in fall and winter, with longitudinal maxima in regions associated with enhanced wave activity and subtropical jet variations. Results for O3 and HNO3 agree closely between MLS and HIRDLS, and differences from ACE-FTS are consistent with its sparse and irregular midlatitude sampling. Consistent signatures in climatological trace gas fields provide strong evidence that transport from the tropical upper troposphere into the layer between double tropopauses is an important pathway for stratosphere-troposphere exchange.

  2. Influence of processing gases on the properties of cold atmospheric plasma SiOxCy coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Air plasma gas influences the hydrophobicity and morphology of SiOxCy coating. • SiOxCy coating contains more than 80% SiO2 and the rest contains CSiO3. • Percentage of Si-O-C bonds (XPS analyses) increases linearly with the SiOxCy coating hydrophibicity. • The carbon in the SiOxCy coatings is proven, by Tof-sims analyses, to be due to incomplete dissociation of precursor. - Abstract: Thin layers of SiOxCy (y = 4−x and 3 ≤ x ≤ 4) were applied using a cold atmospheric plasma torch on glass substrates. The aim was to investigate using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (Tof-Sims) the influence of the gases used on the morphology and composition of the deposits. A hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) precursor was injected in post-discharge in an air or nitrogen plasma using a carrier gas (air or nitrogen) and was applied on the substrate previously pre-treated by an air or nitrogen plasma. The carrier gas and plasma gas flows and the distance between the substrate and the plasma torch, the scanning speed, and the precursor flows were kept constant during the study. The gas used during activation pre-treatment showed no particular influence on the characteristics of the deposit. When air is used both as plasma and carrier gas, the coating layer is thicker (96 nm) than when nitrogen is used (64 nm). It was also evidenced that the gas carrying the precursor has little influence on the hydrophobicity of the coating, contrary to the plasma gas. The latter significantly influences the surface characteristics of the coatings. When air is used as plasma gas, a compact coating layer is obtained and the surface has a water contact angle (WCA) of 82°. When nitrogen is used, the deposit is more hydrophobic (WCA of 100°) and the deposit morphology is different. This increase in hydrophobicity could be correlated to the increase of Si-O-C bonds in the upper surface layers

  3. Tracing the gas composition of Titan's atmosphere with Herschel : Advances and Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengel, Miriam; Moreno, Raphael; Courtin, Régis; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Sagawa, Hideo; Hartogh, Paul; Swinyard, Bruce; Lara, Luisa; Feuchtgruber, Helmut; Jarchow, Christopher; Fulton, Trevor; Cernicharo, José; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolás; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; González, Armando

    2014-11-01

    The nitrogen-dominated atmosphere of Titan exhibits a great diversity and complexity of molecules and high organic material abundances. The origin of Titan atmosphere is poorly understood and its chemistry is rather complicated. In the framework of the Herschel guaranteed time key programme "Water and Related Chemistry in the Solar System" (Hartogh et al 2009), we carried out observations of the atmosphere of Titan with HIFI, PACS and SPIRE onboard Herschel (Rengel et al. 2014; Courtin et al. 2011, Moreno et al. 2011, 2012). Here we will review key results and discoveries on the atmosphere of Titan obtained with Herschel:-an inventory of species detected including some isotopes from a new survey between 51 and 671 microns.-the determination of the abundance of trace constituents and comparisons with previous efforts.-the unexpected detection of hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), a specie not previously identified in Titan's atmosphere, and the measurement of 16O/18O ratio in CO in Titan for the first time published.-the determination of the vertical profile of water vapor over the 100-450 km altitude range, distribution which does not follow previous predictions and allows to strength an Enceladus' activity as the source for the current water on Titan.With the advent of Herschel, these advances and discoveries allow a further characterization of the complex atmosphere of Titan and help to advance the study of the abundance distribution and the investigation of a variety of processes in Titan atmosphere.

  4. Measurement of the Residual Gases O2 and CO2 in Meat Products Packed in Modified Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čapla

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, consumers have increased demand for quality and food safety and also rising demand for natural foods without chemical additives. There are many ways to presserve freshness of these products, one of them is modified atmosphere packaging, which can mean elimination and/or replacement surrounding the product before closing it in package with a mixture of gases other than the original ambient air atmosphere. for replacement of atmosphere are generally used three types of gases such as carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen. this type of packaging is often used for meat and meat products, which belongs to foods that are under normal conditions perishable and for increasing the shelf life of meat products are also used various other preservation methods or their combinations. Packaging of meat and meat products in modified atmosphere is usually made with a high content of carbon dioxide, which has good bacteriostatic and fungistatic effect and is also an effective mean for increasing the shelf life of packaged products during storage and sale.

  5. Atmospheric Transport During the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific TRACE-P Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, Henry E.; Kiley, C. M.; Hannan, J. R.; Westberg, D. J.; Avery, M. A.; Newell, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric transport over the Pacific Basin is described during NASA's Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Experiment (TRACE-P) that was conducted between February - April 2001. The mission included extensive chemical sampling from two aircraft based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Base, Japan. Meteorological conditions during TRACE-P changed rapidly due to the seasonal winter/spring transition and the decay of prolonged ENSO cold phase (La Nina) conditions. To document these changes, TRACE-P was divided into two halves, and mean flow patterns during each half are presented and discussed. Important circulation features are the semi-permanent Siberian anticyclone and transient middle latitude cyclones that form near eastern Asia and then move eastward over the northern Pacific. Five-day backward trajectories from the various flight tracks show that air sampled by the aircraft had been transported from a variety of locations. Some parcels remained over the tropical western North Pacific during the entire period, while other important origins were Southeast Asia, Africa, and central Asia. Patterns of satellite-derived precipitation and lightning are described. TRACE-P occurs during a neutral to weak La Nina period of relatively cold sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific. Compared to climatology, the TRACE-P period exhibits deep convection located west of its typical position; however, tropospheric flow patterns do not exhibit a strong La Nina signal. Circulation patterns during TRACE-P are found to be generally similar to those during NASA's PEM WEST-B mission that occurred in the same region during February - March 1994.

  6. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO): overview of pilot measurements on ecosystem ecology, meteorology, trace gases, and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Acevedo, O. C.; Araùjo, A.; Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, C. G. G.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Chi, X.; Cintra, B. B. L.; da Silva, N. F.; Dias, N. L.; Dias-Júnior, C. Q.; Ditas, F.; Ditz, R.; Godoi, A. F. L.; Godoi, R. H. M.; Heimann, M.; Hoffmann, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Könemann, T.; Krüger, M. L.; Lavric, J. V.; Manzi, A. O.; Lopes, A. P.; Martins, D. L.; Mikhailov, E. F.; Moran-Zuloaga, D.; Nelson, B. W.; Nölscher, A. C.; Santos Nogueira, D.; Piedade, M. T. F.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Quesada, C. A.; Rizzo, L. V.; Ro, C.-U.; Ruckteschler, N.; Sá, L. D. A.; de Oliveira Sá, M.; Sales, C. B.; dos Santos, R. M. N.; Saturno, J.; Schöngart, J.; Sörgel, M.; de Souza, C. M.; de Souza, R. A. F.; Su, H.; Targhetta, N.; Tóta, J.; Trebs, I.; Trumbore, S.; van Eijck, A.; Walter, D.; Wang, Z.; Weber, B.; Williams, J.; Winderlich, J.; Wittmann, F.; Wolff, S.; Yáñez-Serrano, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Amazon Basin plays key roles in the carbon and water cycles, climate change, atmospheric chemistry, and biodiversity. It has already been changed significantly by human activities, and more pervasive change is expected to occur in the coming decades. It is therefore essential to establish long-term measurement sites that provide a baseline record of present-day climatic, biogeochemical, and atmospheric conditions and that will be operated over coming decades to monitor change in the Amazon region, as human perturbations increase in the future. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) has been set up in a pristine rain forest region in the central Amazon Basin, about 150 km northeast of the city of Manaus. Two 80 m towers have been operated at the site since 2012, and a 325 m tower is nearing completion in mid-2015. An ecological survey including a biodiversity assessment has been conducted in the forest region surrounding the site. Measurements of micrometeorological and atmospheric chemical variables were initiated in 2012, and their range has continued to broaden over the last few years. The meteorological and micrometeorological measurements include temperature and wind profiles, precipitation, water and energy fluxes, turbulence components, soil temperature profiles and soil heat fluxes, radiation fluxes, and visibility. A tree has been instrumented to measure stem profiles of temperature, light intensity, and water content in cryptogamic covers. The trace gas measurements comprise continuous monitoring of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and ozone at five to eight different heights, complemented by a variety of additional species measured during intensive campaigns (e.g., VOC, NO, NO2, and OH reactivity). Aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical measurements are being made above the canopy as well as in the canopy space. They include aerosol light scattering and absorption, fluorescence, number and volume size distributions, chemical

  7. System and Method for Providing Vertical Profile Measurements of Atmospheric Gases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A system and method for using an air collection device to collect a continuous air sample as the device descends through the atmosphere are provided. The air...

  8. Biomass burning emissions of trace gases and particles in marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania, 41° S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, S. J.; Keywood, M. D.; Galbally, I. E.; Gras, J. L.; Cainey, J. M.; Cope, M. E.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Bentley, S. T.; Meyer, C. P.; Ristovski, Z.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    with a large CO enhancement, an increase of the NMOC / CO emission ratio (ER) by a factor of 2-4 and a halving of the BC / CO ratio. Rainfall on Robbins Island was observed by radar during this period which likely resulted in a lower fire combustion efficiency, and higher emission of compounds associated with smouldering. This highlights the importance of relatively minor meterological events on BB emissions. Emission factors (EF) were derived for a range of trace gases, some never before reported for Australian conditions, (including hydrogen, phenol and toluene) using a calculated ER to CO and a published CO EF. The EF derived for most species are comparable to other temperate Australian studies but lower than Northern Hemisphere temperate studies. This work demonstrates the substantial impact that BB plumes have on the composition of marine air, and the significant changes that can occur as the plume is diluted and interacts with other emission sources. We also provide new trace gas and particle EF for temperate southern Australia.

  9. Biomass burning emissions of trace gases and particles in marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania, 41° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Lawson

    2015-07-01

    corresponded with a large CO enhancement, an increase of the NMOC / CO emission ratio (ER by a factor of 2–4 and a halving of the BC / CO ratio. Rainfall on Robbins Island was observed by radar during this period which likely resulted in a lower fire combustion efficiency, and higher emission of compounds associated with smouldering. This highlights the importance of relatively minor meterological events on BB emissions. Emission factors (EF were derived for a range of trace gases, some never before reported for Australian conditions, (including hydrogen, phenol and toluene using a calculated ER to CO and a published CO EF. The EF derived for most species are comparable to other temperate Australian studies but lower than Northern Hemisphere temperate studies. This work demonstrates the substantial impact that BB plumes have on the composition of marine air, and the significant changes that can occur as the plume is diluted and interacts with other emission sources. We also provide new trace gas and particle EF for temperate southern Australia.

  10. Dating of young groundwater using four anthropogenic trace gases (SF6, SF5CF3, CFC-12 and Halon-1301): methodology and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartyzel, Jakub; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    A dedicated, GC-based analytical system is presented which allows detection of four anthropogenic trace gases (SF6, SF5CF3, CFC-12 and Halon-1301) in a single water sample, with detection limits and measurement uncertainties sufficiently low to employ them as quantitative indicators of groundwater age. The gases dissolved in water are extracted in the field using the method based on a dynamic head-space concept. In the laboratory, the investigated gases are cryogenically enriched, separated and measured using an electron capture detector. Reproducibility of the analyses is in the order of 2-5 %. The investigated tracers were measured in several production wells located in the recharge area of an intensively exploited aquifer in southern Poland. While the piston-flow ages of groundwater in the investigated wells revealed internal consistency, they appeared to be generally smaller than the ages derived from time series of tritium content in those wells, interpreted by lumped-parameter models. This difference stems mainly from significantly longer travel times of tritium through the unsaturated zone, when compared to the gaseous tracers being used. The results of this study highlight the benefits of using multiple tracing in quantifying timescales of groundwater flow in shallow aquifer systems. PMID:26863003

  11. Atmospheric CO{sub 2}, trace gas and CN concentrations in Vaerrioe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, T.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rannik, U.; Vesala, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Hari, P.; Pohja, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1995-12-31

    The Vaerrioe environmental measurement station is founded in 1991. The aim of the station is to obtain more information on air quality influenced by Kola industrial areas and effects of pollutants on photosynthesis in subarctic climate. In the station air quality and meteorological quantities are measured together with photosynthesis, which makes it quite unique in comparison with other measurement stations located in northern Finland. The measurements also provide information of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in order to study the direct and indirect aerosol effects on climate. These measurements also increase the knowledge of atmospheric chemistry and deposition in subarctic conditions

  12. Detection of oxygen traces in nitrogen and hydrogen-rich atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Stéphanie; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Tournier, Guy; Breuil, Philippe; Pijolat, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Tin oxide sensors are evaluated to detect traces of oxygen in the range 0-100 ppm both in nitrogen and hydrogen (4.5 vol% H2 in N2) atmospheres. In nitrogen, significant relative responses to oxygen are measured at 623 K and 723 K. However, at lower temperature, 523 K, the response strongly decreases. In the presence of hydrogen, on the contrary, interesting responses are measured at 523 K. At higher temperature, 623 K and 723 K, on one hand SnO2 sensors begin to reduce, and on the other hand...

  13. Correlation of trace element content in air particulates with solar meteorological data in the atmosphere of Athens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relation between the trace element content in air particulates and solar meteorological data in the atmospheric environment of Athens, Greece, was studied. For this purpose, Sm, Br, As, Na, K, La, Ce, Cr, Ag, Sc, Fe, Zn, Co, Sb, Th were determined by INAA in respirable aerosols collected during winter 1993-1994. The results showed that the average cloudiness, sunshine, and the total solar radiation (sun and sky) on a horizontal surface, (3 variables) have no relation with trace element variation. However, diffuse solar radiation (sun and sky) on a horizontal surface seems to have statistically significant relationship with some of the trace element variation. It forms a single component with some trace elements after the application of the factor analysis. The increase of the same solar variable in the Athens City center, is one of the factors which cannot permit the emission of trace elements in the atmospheric environment from dust soil and car tires. (author)

  14. Comparison of ground-based FTIR measurements and EMAC model simulations of trace-gases columns near St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2009-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Yana; Makarova, Maria; Ionov, Dmitry; Polyakov, Alexander; Kirner, Oliver; Timofeyev, Yury; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Imhasin, Hamud

    2014-05-01

    The comparison of simulated atmospheric gases abundances with various experimental data is the very important stage of the numerical models validation and improvement process. In this study, we compare and discuss the observational data obtained from ground-based direct solar absorption measurements of high spectral-resolution FTIR spectrometer Bruker 125 HR operated at the Peterhof station (59.82 N, 29.88 E) with the 3-dimensional model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) calculations. The FTIR spectrometer has a maximum optical path difference of 180 cm, yielding a spectral resolution of unapodized spectra up to 0.005 cm-1. Two detectors, MCT (Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride) and InSb (Indium-Antimonide), cover the spectral range of 650-5400 cm-1 that includes many distinct and overlapping absorption lines, and allow the retrieval of a large number of atmospheric constituents. We applied two inversion codes using within NDACC infrared community: SFIT2 and PROFFIT for the retrieval of atmospheric gases column amounts from FTIR recorded spectra. The EMAC model is a numerical chemistry and climate simulation system that includes sub-models describing troposphere and middle atmosphere processes and their interaction with oceans, land and human influences. The simulation includes a comprehensive atmospheric chemistry setup for the troposphere, the stratosphere and the lower mesosphere. We applied the EMAC (ECHAM5 version 5.3.01, MESSy version 1.10) in the T42L39MA-resolution, i.e. with a spherical truncation of T42 (corresponding to a quadratic Gaussian grid of approximately 2.8 by 2.8 degrees in latitude and longitude) with 39 vertical hybrid pressure levels up to 0.01 hPa. The model simulation allows the comparison of the tropospheric gases (H2O, CO, CH4, and N2O) as well as the stratospheric gases (HCl, HNO3, NO2, O3 and ClONO2) that have been being continuously retrieved at the Peterhof station since 2009. In the study, we analyze the daily and monthly means of

  15. Atmospheric greenhouse gases retrieved from SCIAMACHY: comparison to ground-based FTS measurements and model results

    OpenAIRE

    Schneising, O.; Bergamaschi, P.; H. Bovensmann; M. Buchwitz; Burrows, J.P.; Deutscher, N.M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; J. Heymann; Macatangay, R.; J. Messerschmidt; Notholt, J.; M. Rettinger; Reuter, M.; Sussmann, R.; V. A. Velazco

    2012-01-01

    SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT (launched in 2002) enables the retrieval of global long-term column-averaged dry air mole fractions of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane (denoted XCO2 and XCH4). In order to assess the quality of the greenhouse gas data obtained with the recently introduced v2 of the scientific retrieval algorithm WFM-DOAS, we present validations with ground-based Fourier Tra...

  16. Calculations of relative optical air masses for various aerosol types and minor gases in Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Petkov, Boyan H.

    2014-02-01

    The dependence functions of relative optical air mass on apparent solar zenith angle θ have been calculated over the θ molecular number density in the Arctic and Antarctic atmospheres, extinction coefficients of different aerosol types, and molecular number density of water vapor, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and oxygen dimer. The calculations were made using as weight functions the seasonal average vertical profiles of (i) pressure and temperature derived from multiyear sets of radiosounding measurements performed at Ny-Ålesund, Alert, Mario Zucchelli, and Neumayer stations; (ii) volume extinction coefficients of background summer aerosol, Arctic haze, and Kasatochi and Pinatubo volcanic aerosol measured with lidars or balloon-borne samplings; and (iii) molecular number concentrations of the above minor gases, derived from radiosonde, ozonesonde, and satellite-based observations. The air mass values were determined using a formula based on a realistic atmospheric air-refraction model. They were systematically checked by comparing their mutual differences with the uncertainties arising from the seasonal and daily variations in pressure and temperature conditions within the various ranges, where aerosol and gases attenuate the solar radiation most efficiently. The results provide evidence that secant-approximated and midlatitude air mass values are inappropriate for analyzing the Sun photometer measurements performed at polar sites. They indicate that the present evaluations can be reliably used to estimate the aerosol optical depth from the Arctic and Antarctic measurements of total optical depth, after appropriate corrections for the Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption optical depths.

  17. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, S. P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker III, D. R.; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi

  18. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive program of experiments focused on biomass burning emissions began with a laboratory phase in which vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected in the southeastern and southwestern US and burned in a series of 71 fires at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5 emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured by an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS, proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS, negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS, and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS. 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC were identified and quantified with the above instruments. Many of the 182 species quantified by the GC-MS have rarely, if ever, been measured in smoke before. An additional 153 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species.

    In a second, "field" phase of this program, airborne and ground-based measurements were made of the emissions from prescribed fires that were mostly located in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5 was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The field measurements of emission factors (EF are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab EF/field EF ratio for

  19. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An extensive program of experiments focused on biomass burning emissions began with a laboratory phase in which vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected in the southeastern and southwestern US and burned in a series of 71 fires at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5 emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured by an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS, proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS, negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS, and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS. 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds – NMOC were identified and quantified with the above instruments. Many of the 182 species quantified by the GC-MS have rarely, if ever, been measured in smoke before. An additional 153 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species.

    In a second, "field" phase of this program, airborne and ground-based measurements were made of the emissions from prescribed fires that were mostly located in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5 was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The field measurements of emission factors (EF are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab EF/field EF ratio for

  20. An improved back-flush-to-vent gas chromatographic method for determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubyanov, Maxim M; Mochalov, Georgy M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Suvorov, Sergey S; Smirnov, Konstantin Y; Vorotyntsev, Vladimir M

    2016-05-20

    A novel method for rapid, quantitative determination of trace permanent gases and carbon dioxide in ultra-high purity ammonia by dual-channel two-dimensional GC-PDHID is presented. An improved matrix back-flush-to-vent approach combining back-flush column switching technique with auxiliary NaHSO4 ammonia trap is described. The NaHSO4 trap prevents traces of ammonia from entering the analytical column and is shown not to affect the impurity content of the sample. The approach allows shortening the analysis time and increasing the amount of measurements without extensive maintenance of the GC-system. The performance of the configuration has been evaluated utilizing ammonia- and helium-based calibration standards. The method has been applied for the analysis of 99.9999+% ammonia purified by high-pressure distillation at the production site. PMID:27083259

  1. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many inverse problems in the atmospheric sciences involve parameters with known physical constraints. Examples include non-negativity (e.g., emissions of some urban air pollutants or upward limits implied by reaction or solubility constants. However, probabilistic inverse modeling approaches based on Gaussian assumptions cannot incorporate such bounds and thus often produce unrealistic results. The atmospheric literature lacks consensus on the best means to overcome this problem, and existing atmospheric studies rely on a limited number of the possible methods with little examination of the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems and is also the first application of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC to estimation of atmospheric trace gas fluxes. The approaches discussed here are broadly applicable. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing alternative for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  2. Atmospheric dry deposition fluxes of trace elements measured in Queretaro City, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Hernandez, R.; Solis, S.; Perez, R.; Hernandez, G.; Morton, O.; Hernandez, E.; Torres, M. C.; Baez, A.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was made in the southern section of downtown Mexico City. Samples were collected with an Mini-Vol PM10 . Eight different sources were identified for PM10 aerosols: secondary sulfate, wood combustion, fireworks, road traffic, mineral dust, de-icing salt, industrial and local anthropogenic activities. The ions SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+,were analyzed by ion chromatography and the trace metals using an atomic absorption spectrometer. The result indicated that SO42- was the most abundant ion and with respect to trace metal. All the trace elements except Mn and V show statistically significant differences between monitoring sites. The Pearson's correlation applied to all data, showed a high correlation among SO42-, NO3- and NH4+, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition the correlation found between Ca2+ and Al indicated a crustal origin. On the other hand, in considering the total sampling period for particles as well as for all the metals, it is appreciable the significant differences between sites and meteorological seasons. The cluster analysis of air back-trajectories employed in the paper is a technique widely used to identify transport patterns and potential sources of both anthropogenic pollution and natural constituents of the atmosphere, including atmospheric aerosols. It is also used to determine how aerosol optical properties observed over the station differ depending on source region and transport pathways In order to gain a better insight into the origin of trace metal and major inorganic ions, a Principal Component Analysis was applied to the results for 6 elements and 8 ions, from the years 2009 and 2010. Further, the statistical analysis demonstrated the adequate selection of the monitoring areas, confirming that main emission source of these atmospheric pollutants is anthropogenic origin. Evidence suggests that the organic and inorganic species are not always internally mixed, especially in the small modes. The

  3. PREP-CHEM-SRC – 1.0: a preprocessor of trace gas and aerosol emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The preprocessor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emission fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in atmospheric-chemistry transport models. The considered emissions are from the most recent databases of urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources. For biomass burning, emissions can be also estimated directly from satellite fire detections using a fire emission model included in the tool. The preprocessor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The inclusion of these emissions in transport models is also presented. The preprocessor is coded using Fortran90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the databases.

  4. PREP-CHEM-SRC - 1.0: a preprocessor of trace gas and aerosol emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.; Alonso, M. F.; Pirre, M.; Marecal, V.; Grell, G.; Stockler, R.; Mello, R. F.; Sánchez Gácita, M.

    2011-05-01

    The preprocessor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emission fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in atmospheric-chemistry transport models. The considered emissions are from the most recent databases of urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources. For biomass burning, emissions can be also estimated directly from satellite fire detections using a fire emission model included in the tool. The preprocessor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The inclusion of these emissions in transport models is also presented. The preprocessor is coded using Fortran90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the databases.

  5. Critical Masses for Various Terrestrial Planet Atmospheric Gases and Water in/on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Lin-gun Liu

    2014-01-01

    The lower critical mass boundaries (CM) for various atmospheric gas species on terrestrial planets are estimated. The CM is different for different gas molecules. Except for He, the observed atmospheric compositions of the terrestrial planets are consistent with these estimates. The lower CM boundary for gaseous H2O is calculated as 8.06 ×× 1026 g, which is significantly greater than the Martian mass (6.419 ×× 1026 g). Thus, Mars is not capable of retaining H2O in its atmosphere. If the specu...

  6. Numerical simulation of the 'puffs' behavior for representing the heavy gases dispersion in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A presentation is made of a model, still under development, for dense gases behaviour released at ground level, appropriate to use with instantaneous, continuous or intermittent sources. The continuous and intermittent sources are modelled as succession of puffs. The starting model of the instantaneous release (puff) is a modified version of the Eidsvik's 'box model'. The procedure for combining puffs to describe a constant and continuous source is presented. The model results are compared with field experimental data available in the literature. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs

  7. The role of atmospheric greenhouse gases, orbital parameters, and southern ocean gateways: an idealized model study

    OpenAIRE

    Hertwig, Eileen; Lunkeit, Frank; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A set of idealized experiments are performed to analyze the competing effects of declining atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the opening of an ocean gateway, and varying orbital parameters. These forcing mechanisms, which influence the global mean climate state, may have played a role for triggering climate transitions of the past (for example during the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition and the build-up of the Antarctic Ice Sheet). Sensitivity simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean gene...

  8. A comparison of minor trace gas retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Gombos, D.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P. F.; Pommier, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth has allowed for detecting and measuring numerous trace gas species that play important roles in atmospheric chemistry and impact air quality, but for which there is a dearth of information on their distribution and temporal variability. Here we will present global and regional comparisons of measurements from the NASA TES and the European MetOp IASI instruments of three of these gases: ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH). Ammonia is highly reactive and thus very variable in space and time, while the sources and sinks of methanol and formic acid are poorly quantified: thus space-based measurements have the potential of significantly increasing our knowledge of the emissions and distributions of these gases. IASI and TES have many similarities but some significant differences. TES has significantly higher spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1), and its equator crossing times are ~1:30 am and 1:30 pm, local time, while IASI has lower resolution (0.5 cm-1) and an earlier equator crossing time (9:30 am and 9:30 pm), which leads to lower thermal contrast; however IASI provides much greater temporal and spatial coverage due to its cross-track scanning. Added to the instrumental differences are the differences in retrieval algorithms. The IASI team uses simple but efficient methods to estimate total column amounts of the species above, while the TES team performs full optimal estimation retrievals. We will compare IASI and TES total column measurements averaged on a 2.5x2.5 degree global grid for each month in 2009, and we will examine the seasonal cycle in some regions of interest, such as South America, eastern China, and the Midwest and the Central Valley in the US. In regions where both datasets are in agreement this analysis will provide confidence that the results are robust and reliable. In regions where there is disagreement we will look for the causes of the discrepancies, which will

  9. Spatial and temporal variation in domestic biofuel consumption rates and patterns in Zimbabwe: implications for atmospheric trace gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ecologically nationwide and all-year-round domestic biofuel consumption study was conducted in Zimbabwe from January 1996 to March 1997. The study aimed at (a) establishing the determinants and magnitudes of spatial and temporal variations in biofuel consumption rates, (b) estimating the overall mean national rural and urban consumption rates, and (c) estimating the contribution of domestic biomass burning in Zimbabwe to the emission of atmospheric trace gases. The main source of spatial variation in biofuel consumption rates was found to be settlement type (rural or urban). Within a settlement type, per capita consumption rates varied in time and space with household size, ambient temperature, and physical availability. In rural areas wood and agricultural residues were consumed at national average rates of 1.3±0.2 and 0.07±0.01 tonnes capita-1 year-1, respectively. In urban centres wood was consumed at an average rate of 0.4±0.26 tonnes capita-1 year-1. These consumption rates translate into emission outputs from Zimbabwe of 4.6 Tg CO2-C year-1, 0.4 Tg CO-C year-1, 5.3 Gg NO-N year-1, 14.5 Gg CH4-C year-1, 24.2 Gg NMHC-C year-1, 2.9 Gg organic acid-C year-1 (formic and acetic acids) and 48.4 Gg aerosol-C year-1. For CO2, CO, and NO, these domestic biofuel emissions represent 41±6%, 67±6%, and 8±1%, respectively, of the total output of all sources evaluated and documented in Zimbabwe to date. This means that of the studied sources, domestic biomass burning is the major source of CO2 and CO emission in Zimbabwe

  10. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT. PMID:26726401

  11. Influence of atmospheric 14CO2 on determination of the ratio of biogenic carbon to fossil one in exhaust gases using accelerator mass spectrometry. Experimental evaluation for industrial flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of atmospheric 14CO2 was evaluated on the determination of biogenic carbon ratios in industrial flue gases using accelerated mass spectrometry(AMS). Bioethanol, n-hexane, and their mixtures were combusted with a four-stroke engine, and 14CO2 in exhaust gases was analyzed by AMS. The experimental biogenic carbon ratio determined by ASTM D6866 method was 1.2 times higher than the theoretical value of mixed fuel containing 3.18% biogenic carbons. In general, the influence of atmospheric 14CO2 taken in combustion gases is neglected. It seems that the error cannot be neglected under international trading of emission allowances, where a large amount of carbons in the fuel were evaluated. The experimental value became to be the theoretical value by subtracting the amount of atmospheric 14C from that of the samples. As the contents of biofuel increased, the experimental biogenic carbon ratios reached the theoretical values and the influence of atmospheric 14CO2 decreased. We recommend that the influence of atmospheric 14CO2 should be corrected when fuel samples contain low amounts of 14C. (author)

  12. Estimated total emissions of trace gases from the Canberra wildfires of 2003: a new method using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth and the MOZART chemical transport model

    OpenAIRE

    Paton-Walsh, C.; L. K. Emmons; S. R. Wilson

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new method for estimating trace gas emissions from large vegetation fires using measurements of aerosol optical depth from the MODIS instruments onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, combined with the atmospheric chemical transport model MOZART. The model allows for an estimate of double counting of enhanced levels of aerosol optical depth in consecutive satellite overpasses. Using this method we infer an estimated total emission of 10±3 Tg of c...

  13. Estimated total emissions of trace gases from the Canberra Wildfires of 2003: a new method using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth & the MOZART chemical transport model

    OpenAIRE

    Paton-Walsh, C.; L. K. Emmons; S. R. Wilson

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new method for estimating trace gas emissions from large vegetation fires using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, combined with an atmospheric chemical transport model. The method uses a threshold value to screen out normal levels of AOD that may be caused by raised dust, sea salt aerosols or diffuse smoke transported from distant fires. Using this method we infer an estimated total emission of 15±5 Tg of carbon monoxide, 0...

  14. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at ten sites in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil and water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatio-temporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at ten sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites. In contrast, the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. The seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for K, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Cd, Se, Ag and Tl, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution and solubility of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As and Se were of the same magnitude as their increases in

  15. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at 10 sites in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil or water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatiotemporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at 10 sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites, while the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. In addition, the seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for potassium, nickel, arsenic, lead, zinc, cadmium, selenium, silver and thallium, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and

  16. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at ten sites in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Pan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs, especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil and water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatio-temporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at ten sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites. In contrast, the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. The seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for K, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Cd, Se, Ag and Tl, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution and solubility of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As and Se were of the same magnitude as

  17. Reusable In Situ AirCore System for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel design for an in situ atmospheric sensor for CO2 and trace gases is proposed. The sensor, named AirCore, provides the advantages of existing in situ sensors...

  18. Improvement of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nonwoven Hydrophilicity by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment with He and N2 Mixed Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ko-Shao; Liao, Shu-Chuan; Lin, Shen-Wei; Hung, Tsui-Shan; Tsao, Shao-Hsuan; Wu, Hsin-Ming; Inagaki, Norihiro; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nonwoven has good mechanical properties for use in biomaterial. However, its inherent hydrophobic nature restricts its application. In this study, atmospheric pressure plasma treatment with He and N2 gases was employed to TPU nonwoven material to improve the surface hydrophilicity while retaining the hydrophobicility on the back side of the material. The surface wettability was measured by water contact angle analysis, and the surface chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results reveal that oxygen-containing groups such as C-O and O-C=O are generated on the plasma-treated TPU surface, leading to improved wettablility of the material.

  19. GREENHOUSE GASES AND MEANS OF PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Stojanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse effect can be defined as the consequence of increased heating of the Earth's surface, as well as the lower atmosphere by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other trace amounts gases. It is well-known that human industrial activities have released large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, about 900 billion tons of carbon dioxide, and it is estimated that up to 450 billion are still in the atmosphere. In comparison to greenhouse gases water vapor is one of the greatest contributors to the greenhouse effect on Earth. Many projects, as does the PURGE project, have tendences to build on the already conducted research and to quantify the positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing of the population with greenhouse gas reduction strategies that are curently being implemented and should be increasingly applied in various sectors and urban areas, having offices in Europe, China and India.

  20. A survey of atmospheric trace elements in the U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of some 36 trace and major elements were measured in air particulate, rainwater and dry deposition samples collected each month at seven non-urban sites in the U.K. from January to December 1975. The samples were bulked for analysis each quarter year, and the majority were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The main objectives were to provide information on concentrations of elements in air to compare with urban measurements, to study the longer term trends in atmospheric concentrations, and to record the deposition inventory to the ground. Continuity of data from the sampling station network has been maintained since January 1972, but at the Wraymires site in north-west England operations began one year earlier. (author)

  1. Detection of atmospheric trace gas species by DOAS gas-analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    2014-11-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) gas-analyzer was successfully tested. A high pressure 150-W Xe arc lamp was employed as a light source This system consisted of a coaxial telescope, a spectrometer, an analyzer and retroreflector. In order to record the spectra, a monochrometer with a grating and photodiode array was adopted. Gas analyzer spectral data bank includes more than 30 moleculas absorbed in UV spectral region. The measured absorption spectra were evaluated by using a least-squares fit to determine the average mixing ratio of each species in the atmosphere. A number of air pollutants concentrations: SO2, NO2, O3, etc were trace measured. Minimally detected concentration on pathlength 400 m is the unit of ppb at the time of accumulation of 2 min. The results of the field test measurements of pollutants in Tomsk are presented.

  2. Tracing atmospheric nitrate in groundwater using triple oxygen isotopes: evaluation based on bottled drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nakagawa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopic compositions of nitrate dissolved in 49 brands of bottled drinking water collected worldwide were measured, to trace the fate of atmospheric nitrate (NO3− atm that had been deposited into subaerial ecosystems, using the 17O anomalies (Δ17O of nitrate as tracers. The use of bottled water enables collection of groundwater recharged at natural, background watersheds. The nitrate in groundwater had small Δ17O values ranging from −0.2‰ to +4.5‰ n = 49. The average Δ17O value and average mixing ratio of atmospheric nitrate to total nitrate in the groundwater samples were estimated to be 0.8‰ and 3.1%, respectively. These findings indicated that the majority of atmospheric nitrate had undergone biological processing before being exported from the surface ecosystem to the groundwater. Moreover, the concentrations of atmospheric nitrate were estimated to range from less than 0.1 μmol L−1 to 8.5 μmol L−1 with higher NO3−atm concentrations being obtained for those recharged in rocky, arid or elevated areas with little vegetation and lower NO3−atm concentrations being obtained for those recharged in forested areas with high levels of vegetation. Additionally, many of the NO3−atm-depleted samples were characterized by elevated δ15N values of more than +10‰. Uptake by plants and/or microbes in forested soils subsequent to deposition and the progress of denitrification within groundwater likely plays a significant role in the removal of NO3−atm.

  3. Impacts of greenhouse gases and aerosol direct and indirect effects on clouds and radiation in atmospheric GCM simulations of the 1930-1989 period

    OpenAIRE

    Quaas, Johannes; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Boucher, Olivier; Le Treut, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Among anthropogenic perturbations of the Earth\\'s atmosphere, greenhouse gases and aerosols are considered to have a major impact on the energy budget through their impact on radiative fluxes. We use three ensembles of simulations with the LMDZ general circulation model to investigate the radiative impacts of five species of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, CFC-11 and CFC-12) and sulfate aerosols for the period 1930-1989. Since our focus is on the atmospheric changes in clouds and radiation f...

  4. Temporal and spatial trends studied by lichen analysis: atmospheric deposition of trace elements in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspiazu, J.; Cervantes, L.; Ramirez, J.; Lopez, J.; Villasenor, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ramos, R.; Munoz, R. [Secretaria del Medio Ambiente, Gestion Ambiental del Aire, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Ball moss on Tillandsia recurvata (Bromeliaceae), collected in an area previously identified as unpolluted, was transplanted to thirteen bio-monitoring sites in the downtown and metropolitan areas of Mexico City (which cover a surface of 9,560 km{sup 2}) during the periods August 2002 - January 2003 and July 2003 - October 2003. A total of 52 lichens (weighing 300 g) were transplanted to each place. Two were analysed as zero or reference, El Chico National Park, a location 100 Km upwind from the city and the remaining 26 were hung in nylon net bags in order to be able to collect two transplanted tree month, out of every season over a one-year period. The concentrations were measured by the quantitative PIXE method based on an extemal beam facility. The atmospheric deposition for trace elements was inferred by its concentration in lichen samples collected in 2002 from 13 sites in Mexico and compared with data from a similar survey in 2003. The concentration of Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn and other elements was determined for each sample. Maps for each element were drawn after a geostatistical estimate of the metal concentration in the sample was made. Maps were drawn for all elements with the estimated values. Geographical distribution patterns were obtained for the different metals, reflecting the contribution of natural and anthropogenic emission sources. The deposition patterns of V, As, Se, Cd and Pb are substantially influenced by long-range transport from other parts of Mexico City. For Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, the deposition patterns are largely determined by contribution from point sources within Mexico and in the metropolitan area. The lichen data for Br and, in part, Se reflect an airborne supply from the environment. Contributions to trace element concentrations in lichen sources other than atmospheric deposition are identified and discussed. The Spatial and temporal variations in the distribution of metal concentration are discussed. (Author)

  5. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  6. The role of atmospheric greenhouse gases, orbital parameters, and southern ocean gateways: an idealized model study

    CERN Document Server

    Hertwig, Eileen; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A set of idealized experiments are performed to analyze the competing effects of declining atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the opening of an ocean gateway, and varying orbital parameters. These forcing mechanisms, which influence the global mean climate state, may have played a role for triggering climate transitions of the past (for example during the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition and the build-up of the Antarctic Ice Sheet). Sensitivity simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model are conducted to test these three forcings and their roles for the global climate. The simulations are carried out under idealized conditions to focus on the essentials. The combination of all three forcings triggers a climate transition which resembles the onset of the Antarctic glaciation. In particular, the temperatures in the southern high latitudes decrease and snow accumulates constantly. Moreover, the relative importance of each possible forcing is explored. All three of the mechanisms (atmosp...

  7. Atmospheric electrification in dusty, reactive gases in the solar system and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Ch; Honary, F; Diver, D A; Aplin, K; Dobbs-Dixon, I; Ebert, U; Inutsuka, S; Gordillo-Vazquez, F J; Littlefair, S

    2016-01-01

    Detailed observations of the solar system planets reveal a wide variety of local atmospheric conditions. Astronomical observations have revealed a variety of extrasolar planets none of which resembles any of the solar system planets in full. Instead, the most massive amongst the extrasolar planets, the gas giants, appear very similar to the class of (young) Brown Dwarfs which are amongst the oldest objects in the universe. Despite of this diversity, solar system planets, extrasolar planets and Brown Dwarfs have broadly similar global temperatures between 300K and 2500K. In consequence, clouds of different chemical species form in their atmospheres. While the details of these clouds differ, the fundamental physical processes are the same. Further to this, all these objects were observed to produce radio and X-ray emission. While both kinds of radiation are well studied on Earth and to a lesser extent on the solar system planets, the occurrence of emission that potentially originate from accelerated electrons o...

  8. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  9. [Errors Analysis and Correction in Atmospheric Methane Retrieval Based on Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Ting-ting; Wang, Xian-hua; Ye, Han-han; Jiang, Xin-hua

    2016-01-01

    High precision retrieval of atmospheric CH4 is influenced by a variety of factors. The uncertainties of ground properties and atmospheric conditions are important factors, such as surface reflectance, temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile. Surface reflectance is affected by many factors so that it is difficult to get the precise value. The uncertainty of surface reflectance will cause large error to retrieval result. The uncertainties of temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile are also important sources of retrieval error and they will cause unavoidable systematic error. This error is hard to eliminate only using CH4 band. In this paper, ratio spectrometry method and CO2 band correction method are proposed to reduce the error caused by these factors. Ratio spectrometry method can decrease the effect of surface reflectance in CH4 retrieval by converting absolute radiance spectrometry into ratio spectrometry. CO2 band correction method converts column amounts of CH4 into column averaged mixing ratio by using CO2 1.61 μm band and it can correct the systematic error caused by temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile. The combination of these two correction methods will decrease the effect caused by surface reflectance, temperature profile, humidity profile and pressure profile at the same time and reduce the retrieval error. GOSAT data were used to retrieve atmospheric CH4 to test and validate the two correction methods. The results showed that CH4 column averaged mixing ratio retrieved after correction was close to GOSAT Level2 product and the retrieval precision was up to -0.24%. The studies suggest that the error of CH4 retrieval caused by the uncertainties of ground properties and atmospheric conditions can be significantly reduced and the retrieval precision can be highly improved by using ratio spectrometry method and CO2 hand correction method. PMID:27228765

  10. Effect of atmospheric gases, surface albedo and cloud overlap on the absorbed solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Sinha

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided new evidence that models may systematically underestimate cloud solar absorption compared to observations. This study extends previous work on this "absorption anomaly'' by using observational data together with solar radiative transfer parameterisations to calculate fs (the ratio of surface and top of the atmosphere net cloud forcings and its latitudinal variation for a range of cloud types. Principally, it is found that (a the zonal mean behaviour of fs varies substantially with cloud type, with the highest values obtained for low clouds; (b gaseous absorption and scattering can radically alter the pattern of the variation of fs with latitude, but gaseous effects cannot in general raise fs to the level of around 1.5 as recently determined; (c the importance of the gaseous contribution to the atmospheric ASR is such that whilst fs rises with surface albedo, the net cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR falls; (d the assumed form of the degree of cloud overlap in the model can substantially affect the cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR whilst leaving the parameter fs largely unaffected; (e even large uncertainties in the observed optical depths alone cannot account for discrepancies apparent between modelled and newly observed cloud solar absorption. It is concluded that the main source of the anomaly may derive from the considerable uncertainties regarding impure droplet microphysics rather than, or together with, uncertainties in macroscopic quantities. Further, variable surface albedos and gaseous effects may limit the use of contemporaneous satellite and ground-based measurements to infer the cloud solar absorption from the parameter fs.

  11. Critical Masses for Various Terrestrial Planet Atmospheric Gases and Water in/on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-gun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower critical mass boundaries (CM for various atmospheric gas species on terrestrial planets are estimated. The CM is different for different gas molecules. Except for He, the observed atmospheric compositions of the terrestrial planets are consistent with these estimates. The lower CM boundary for gaseous H2O is calculated as 8.06 ×× 1026 g, which is significantly greater than the Martian mass (6.419 ×× 1026 g. Thus, Mars is not capable of retaining H2O in its atmosphere. If the speculated ocean on Mars and the claimed H2O ice in the Martian soil are true, both the ocean and ice had to be derived earlier from H2O degassed from the Martian interior after the surface temperature cooled much below 100°C.100°C. These watery bodies cannot be sustained for long durations because evaporation and sublimation would turn them into gaseous H2O, which would be lost to outer-space. It is concluded that H2O in/on Mars is inherent and that the primordial planetesimals that formed Mars must have contained appreciable amounts of hydrous minerals, if the oceans and/or H2O ice on Mars are true.

  12. Tracing industrial ammonium in atmospheric deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B.; Proemse, B. C.; Fenn, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    The expanding industrial development in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR) in northeastern Alberta, Canada, has raised concerns about increasing nitrogen (N) emissions from oil sands operations and their potential effects on the surrounding terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Stable isotope techniques may help to trace industrial emissions provided that they are isotopically distinct from background isotope ratios of atmospheric N compounds. Ammonium deposition rates (NH4-N) typically exceed nitrate deposition rates (NO3-N) in the AOSR (Proemse et al., 2013), suggesting that emissions of reduced nitrogen compounds play a significant role for the atmospheric nitrogen budget in the AOSR. We collected atmospheric ammonium in open field bulk deposition and throughfall using ion exchange resins over ~6 months time periods from summer 2007 to summer 2011 located at distances between 3 to 113 km to one of the major oil sands developments in the AOSR. Ammonium deposition rates and δ15N-NH4 values were determined using ion chromatography and the ammonium diffusion method (Sebilo et al., 2004) on resin extracts. Atmospheric ammonium deposition rates in open field bulk collectors and throughfall collectors ranged from 1.0 to 4.7 kg ha-1 yr-1 NH4-N, and from 1.0 to 18.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 NH4-N, respectively. δ15N-NH4 values varied from -6.3 to +14.8‰ with the highest δ15N values typically associated with elevated NH4-N deposition rates. δ15N-NH4 values of up to +20.1‰ were observed for industrially emitted NH4 in particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions (Proemse et al., 2012) suggesting that industrial NH3 and NH4 emissions are associated with elevated δ15N values providing a potential tracer. Applying a two-end-member mixing analysis using a background δ15N-NH4 value of -3.6‰ for summer and -3.2‰ for winter periods revealed that particularly sites within ~30 km radius from the main oil sands developments are significantly affected by industrial contributions to

  13. Direct current breakdown in gases for complex geometries from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for improved performances of power transmission devices requires ever smaller dimensions and higher working voltages which lead to increased risk of breakdown, for example, in satellite slip rings. Previous works are mostly limited to breakdown in simple geometries such as parallel plates or pin to plate. Here we discuss the effect of more complex geometries for dc breakdown in gases over a large pressure range (2 × 10−5 to 103 mbar). Experimental measurements of dc gas discharge breakdown in a ring assembly geometry are compared with a numerical simulation model for gas breakdown using a fluid model. Starting with parallel plates (1 and 100 mm gap width representing approximately the shortest and longest electric field path lengths in the ring assembly geometry) and extending to double gap and multi-gap geometries, an understanding of the overall shape of the breakdown voltage versus pressure curve is established. The high (low) pressure thresholds of gas discharge are determined by the shortest (longest) electric field path length in a complex geometry. Moreover, the availability of multiple path lengths leads to a breakdown voltage minimum over a wide range of intermediate pressure because breakdown can occur in the most favourable gap. Finally, the numerical simulation in the ring assembly shows the importance of parameters such as the secondary electron emission coefficient which play a major role in determining the breakdown voltage value. (paper)

  14. Numerical sensitivity study of the nocturnal low-level jet over a forest canopy and implications for nocturnal surface exchange of carbon dioxide and other trace gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, M.Y.; Duarte, H.F.;

    2010-01-01

    2009). A battery of sensitive tests was carried out to examine the response of the low-level jet to forcing mechanisms at the air-forest interface. Results show that SCADIS captures the most prominent features of the LLJ, including its vertical structure as well as its diurnal phase and amplitude: i...... simplicity and low computational demand, has potential as a research tool regarding surface–atmosphere gaseous exchange in the nocturnal boundary layer, especially if carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and other gases are released or deposited inside the forest canopy....

  15. Barometric pumping of burial trench soil gases into the atmosphere at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991, a soil gas survey was performed at the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill as part of the characterization efforts required under the integrated Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation and Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation (RFI/RI) program. This report details the findings of this survey, which identified several areas of the landfill that were releasing volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere at levels exceeding regulatory standards. Knowledge of the rates of VOC outgassing is necessary to protect site workers, provide input into the human health and environmental risk assessment documents and provide input into the remedial design scenario

  16. Impact features tracing hypervelocity airbursts on earth from the atmosphere to the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    In the absence of deep craters, impact features have been debated to possibly tracing proximal ejecta from yet undetected structure or airburst debris from a meteorite collision with the terrestrial atmosphere or lithosphere. We examine the possibility for impact features to have originated from the shock layer formed ahead of a hypervelocity collider in the earth atmosphere. This hypothesis is approached by comparing impact features from controlled materials to puzzling geological ones: (1) debris collected at the ground from a high altitude meteor airburst recorded on 2011 August 2nd in Southern France; (2) laboratory experiments performed for defense purposes at the CEA Gramat Center (France) with the Persephone hypervelocity light gas gun; (3) the Zhamanshin impact breccia, the Lybian glass, the Egyptian Dakhleh glass, the Tasmanian Darwin glass, the Australasian tektite strewnfield and the Australian Henbury crater field. The Persephone experiments include collisions from 4.1 to 7.9 km/s by a steel projectile embedded into a polycarbonate holder with a polystyrene separator on to a 40 mm thick aluminum target. The impact features been characterized by coupling Environmental SEM with EDS, Raman micro-spectrometry, XRD, TEM, Tof-SIMS, ICP-MS and isotope analyses. Similar carbonaceous polymorphs that are closely imbricated at meso to nano-scales to the crystallized components (including the metal blebs) and to the glass phases (spherules or matrix) are present in all the impact features studied. They dominantly consist of aliphatic polymers, rare aromatic compounds, with graphite-lonsdaleite inclusions. The Persephone experiments help relating the graphite-lonsdaleite couple to transformed organic residues by the transient high pressure shock (a few tens MPa) and the transient heating (ca 100°C) and the aliphatic polymers to new hydrocarbons that formed from the pulverized polycarbonate and polystyrene. The Persephone experiments provide the controlled situation

  17. Atmospheric Electrification in Dusty, Reactive Gases in the Solar System and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Christiane; Harrison, R. Giles; Honary, Farideh; Diver, Declan A.; Aplin, Karen; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Ebert, Ute; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Gordillo-Vazquez, Francisco J.; Littlefair, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Detailed observations of the solar system planets reveal a wide variety of local atmospheric conditions. Astronomical observations have revealed a variety of extrasolar planets none of which resembles any of the solar system planets in full. Instead, the most massive amongst the extrasolar planets, the gas giants, appear very similar to the class of (young) brown dwarfs which are amongst the oldest objects in the Universe. Despite this diversity, solar system planets, extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs have broadly similar global temperatures between 300 and 2500 K. In consequence, clouds of different chemical species form in their atmospheres. While the details of these clouds differ, the fundamental physical processes are the same. Further to this, all these objects were observed to produce radio and X-ray emissions. While both kinds of radiation are well studied on Earth and to a lesser extent on the solar system planets, the occurrence of emissions that potentially originate from accelerated electrons on brown dwarfs, extrasolar planets and protoplanetary disks is not well understood yet. This paper offers an interdisciplinary view on electrification processes and their feedback on their hosting environment in meteorology, volcanology, planetology and research on extrasolar planets and planet formation.

  18. Atmospheric Electrification in Dusty, Reactive Gases in the Solar System and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Christiane; Harrison, R. Giles; Honary, Farideh; Diver, Declan A.; Aplin, Karen; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Ebert, Ute; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Gordillo-Vazquez, Francisco J.; Littlefair, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Detailed observations of the solar system planets reveal a wide variety of local atmospheric conditions. Astronomical observations have revealed a variety of extrasolar planets none of which resembles any of the solar system planets in full. Instead, the most massive amongst the extrasolar planets, the gas giants, appear very similar to the class of (young) brown dwarfs which are amongst the oldest objects in the Universe. Despite this diversity, solar system planets, extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs have broadly similar global temperatures between 300 and 2500 K. In consequence, clouds of different chemical species form in their atmospheres. While the details of these clouds differ, the fundamental physical processes are the same. Further to this, all these objects were observed to produce radio and X-ray emissions. While both kinds of radiation are well studied on Earth and to a lesser extent on the solar system planets, the occurrence of emissions that potentially originate from accelerated electrons on brown dwarfs, extrasolar planets and protoplanetary disks is not well understood yet. This paper offers an interdisciplinary view on electrification processes and their feedback on their hosting environment in meteorology, volcanology, planetology and research on extrasolar planets and planet formation.

  19. Sources of Sahelian-Sudan moisture: Insights from a moisture-tracing atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Abubakr A. M.; Zhang, Qiong; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Tjernström, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The summer rainfall across Sahelian-Sudan is one of the main sources of water for agriculture, human, and animal needs. However, the rainfall is characterized by large interannual variability, which has attracted extensive scientific efforts to understand it. This study attempts to identify the source regions that contribute to the Sahelian-Sudan moisture budget during July through September. We have used an atmospheric general circulation model with an embedded moisture-tracing module (Community Atmosphere Model version 3), forced by observed (1979-2013) sea-surface temperatures. The result suggests that about 40% of the moisture comes with the moisture flow associated with the seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and originates from Guinea Coast, central Africa, and the Western Sahel. The Mediterranean Sea, Arabian Peninsula, and South Indian Ocean regions account for 10.2%, 8.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Local evaporation and the rest of the globe supply the region with 20.3% and 13.2%, respectively. We also compared the result from this study to a previous analysis that used the Lagrangian model FLEXPART forced by ERA-Interim. The two approaches differ when comparing individual regions, but are in better agreement when neighboring regions of similar atmospheric flow features are grouped together. Interannual variability with the rainfall over the region is highly correlated with contributions from regions that are associated with the ITCZ movement, which is in turn linked to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Our result is expected to provide insights for the effort on seasonal forecasting of the rainy season over Sahelian Sudan.

  20. ALTIUS, a future small mission for O3 and other atmospheric trace species concentration profiles retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Pieroux, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Errera, Quentin; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Neefs, Eddy; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    The ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) mission aims at the retrieval of atmospheric trace species concentration profiles with a good vertical resolution and a global coverage. It will be flown on a PROBA-type platform on a Sun-synchronous orbit with a 10:00 AM typical local time. The instrument exploits the concept of hyperspectral imaging of different light sources: limb-scattered radiance, Sun, Moon, stars, planets. These sources are observed sequentially, depending on their availability and good positioning. This multi-mode observation capability enables measurements in both bright and dark side of the orbit, extending the coverage to virtually all latitudes and different illumination conditions (including polar night). The instrument concept relies on three independent spectral channels: UV, VIS and NIR. The imaging technique alleviates the need for scanning systems as the field of view will capture the atmosphere from cloud top to the lower thermosphere at once. It also makes the pointing calibration more easy and robust, an important feature knowing that tangent altitude misregistration is one of the major sources of bias in the retrieved products. In each channel, the wavelength selection for each image will be performed by a tunable filter: an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) for the VIS and NIR, and a FPI (Fabry-Perot Interferometer) in the UV. ALTIUS has recently completed a phase B1 under ESA supervision. The next milestone will be the preliminary design review (PDR) that will take place within a few months from now. Launch is expected for 2020 with a 3-5 years design lifetime. We will present the scientific objectives of the mission, and the current status of the payload and platform concepts. An overview of the main in-flight calibration strategies will be given, and the expected performance of the O3 level-2 product for the different modes of observation will be shown.

  1. Measurements of trace gases that may indicate or influence the tropospheric oxidising capacityusing a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Bannan, Thomas James

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of primary emitted species such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) acts as a source of ozone and therefore has detrimental effects on air quality and climate. In order to understand at what rate oxidation is occurring in the troposphere, i.e. the oxidation capacity, an understanding of the contributors to oxidation and possible markers of oxidation are imperative. Formic acid, a ubiquitous trace gas, which contributes significantly to the acidity of precipitation, could, becau...

  2. Note: A dual temperature closed loop batch reactor for determining the partitioning of trace gases within CO{sub 2}-water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warr, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.warr@earth.ox.ac.uk; Ballentine, Christopher J. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Rochelle, Christopher A. [British Geological Survey, Environmental Science Centre, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Masters, Andrew J. [School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    An experimental approach is presented which can be used to determine partitioning of trace gases within CO{sub 2}-water systems. The key advantages of this system are (1) The system can be isolated with no external exchange, making it ideal for experiments with conservative tracers. (2) Both phases can be sampled concurrently to give an accurate composition at each phase at any given time. (3) Use of a lower temperature flow loop outside of the reactor removes contamination and facilitates sampling. (4) Rapid equilibration at given pressure/temperature conditions is significantly aided by stirring and circulating the water phase using a magnetic stirrer and high-pressure liquid chromatography pump, respectively.

  3. How are Gases Transferred from the Atmosphere to Snow and Ice Surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbatt, J.

    2005-12-01

    Aside from mass transfer through the gas phase, the rate-determining step for transferring a gas from the atmosphere to ice or snow is frequently determined by the chemistry of the gas-ice surface interaction. What are the kinetics of this uptake process? How are they affected as the surface becomes coated? What is the capacity of the surface to adsorb gaseous species? How does the uptake change if the ice is growing or evaporating? Does uptake to polycrystalline snow differ from that to ice of large crystal size? How does the uptake capacity of ice change at high temperatures, as the quasi-liquid layer thickness grows? To investigate these effects, this talk will focus on some recent studies we have performed in the laboratory using nitric acid and small oxygenated organics as the adsorbing molecules, and using both ice and polycrystalline snow samples.

  4. A laser based procedure for the detection of atmospheric NOx gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been known for some time that the combustion of fossil fuels, biomass burning and the automobile, have principally lead to the increased presence of NOX (x=1,2) in the atmosphere especially in the urban environment. The average concentrations of NOX in American, European cities and specifically in Glasgow is about 35 ppb. A laser based procedure, using ionization chambers, has been developed, which will detect NO down to sub ppb levels and NO2 to a few parts per billion. A number of wavelengths can be used but a three photon process at 380 nm is likely to be the most sensitive and selective wavelength for this analysis. This procedure can also be used for a number of other urban pollutants with a single laser operating in the range 200-400 nm

  5. Cosmic-ray induced production of radioactive noble gases in the atmosphere, ground, and seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of an MCNP6 model and a suite of supporting MATLAB scripts being developed to conduct detailed studies of the radioactive noble gas background activity concentrations resulting from cosmic-neutron-induced reactions in the Earth's atmosphere, in various geologies, and in seawater. Initial results generated using the MCNP6 model and the suite of supporting MATLAB scripts indicate that the cosmic-neutron-induced 133Xe background activity concentrations at a depth of 1 m in a geology representative of the Earth's upper crust and a depth of 5 m in seawater are about 3.48 × 10-1 and 8.49 × 10-7 mBq m-3, respectively. (author)

  6. On the marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Denny P Alappattu; D Bala Subrahamanyam; P K Kunhikrishnan; K M Somayaji; G S Bhat; R Venkatesan; C B S Dutt; A Bagavath Singh; V K Soni; A S Tripathi

    2008-07-01

    Detailed measurements were carried out in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) which covered both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal during March to May 2006. In this paper, we present the meteorological observations made during this campaign. The latitudinal variation of the surface layer turbulent fluxes is also described in detail.

  7. Historical record of concentrations of atmospheric trace components deduced from a glacier in the Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 109 m ice core from a high-alpine glacier (Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa massif, 4440 m a.s.l., Switzerland) was used to reconstruct the history of atmospheric trace components. Concentrations of the anions chloride, nitrate, sulfate and the cations sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium were measured with 2.5-5.0 cm resolution in the top 70 m of a 109 m long of the ice core. Dating of the ice core was performed using stratigraphic markers such as historically known Saharan dust events, the atomic bomb horizon and volcanic eruptions and supplemented with the 210Pb nuclear dating. The record covers the time period from about 1755-1981. The concentrations of nitrate and sulfate show an exponential increase from 1930 and 1870 until 1965, respectively. The factors of increase were 2.3±0.3 and 5.8±0.9, respectively. The chloride concentrations remained constant during this period. A good agreement between the concentrations of sulfate, which were corrected for the contribution of seasalt and mineral dust and the European SO2-emissions was found for the last 100 years. The concentrations of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium did not show a trend. The concentrations of ammonium increased exponentially between 1870 and 1960 by a factor of 2.2±0.4. The different sources of the trace components were identified using correlation analysis. Sodium and chloride originated from seasalt, magnesium and calcium from geologic erosion. For both, the industrial and pre-industrial period, the dominant source of ammonium and nitrate was conversion of the gaseous precursors NH3 and HNO3. Sulfate concentrations in the industrial period originated from the anthropogenically emitted SO2, whereas in the pre-industrial period the geologic source dominated. The Colle Gnifetti accumulates mainly summer snow, and therefore, several test drillings were performed to find a new site with higher accumulation rate. (author) figs., 17 tabs., 50 refs

  8. Atmospheric greenhouse gases retrieved from SCIAMACHY: comparison to ground-based FTS measurements and model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schneising

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT (launched in 2002 enables the retrieval of global long-term column-averaged dry air mole fractions of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane (denoted XCO2 and XCH4. In order to assess the quality of the greenhouse gas data obtained with the recently introduced v2 of the scientific retrieval algorithm WFM-DOAS, we present validations with ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS measurements and comparisons with model results at eight Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON sites providing realistic error estimates of the satellite data. Such validation is a prerequisite to assess the suitability of data sets for their use in inverse modelling.

    It is shown that there are generally no significant differences between the carbon dioxide annual increases of SCIAMACHY and the assimilation system CarbonTracker (2.00 ± 0.16 ppm yr−1 compared to 1.94 ± 0.03 ppm yr−1 on global average. The XCO2 seasonal cycle amplitudes derived from SCIAMACHY are typically larger than those from TCCON which are in turn larger than those from CarbonTracker. The absolute values of the northern hemispheric TCCON seasonal cycle amplitudes are closer to SCIAMACHY than to CarbonTracker and the corresponding differences are not significant when compared with SCIAMACHY, whereas they can be significant for a subset of the analysed TCCON sites when compared with CarbonTracker. At Darwin we find discrepancies of the seasonal cycle derived from SCIAMACHY compared to the other data sets which can probably be ascribed to occurrences of undetected thin clouds. Based on the comparison with the reference data, we conclude that the carbon dioxide data set can be characterised by a regional relative precision (mean standard deviation of the differences of about 2.2 ppm and a relative accuracy (standard deviation of the mean differences

  9. Correlations between atmospheric aerosol trace element concentrations and red tide at Port Aransas, Texas, on the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was employed as an analytical technique to measure atmospheric aerosol concentrations of trace metals in Port Aransas, TX on the Gulf of Mexico. The sources of atmospheric aerosols and the seasonal variation of the sources are explored. High atmospheric iron concentrations are then shown to have a possible correlation to the occurrences of red tide in this region. The data shows that this correlation is plausible, but due to the many factors that affect red tide growth a definitive conclusion may not be reached. The period of study for these measurements was September 12, 2000 to January 4, 2002. (author)

  10. Evidence for multiple magma ocean outgassing and atmospheric loss episodes from mantle noble gases

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The energy associated with giant impacts is large enough to generate global magma oceans during Earth's accretion. However, geochemical evidence requiring a terrestrial magma ocean is scarce. Here we present evidence for at least two separate magma ocean outgassing episodes on Earth based on the ratio of primordial 3He to 22Ne in the present-day mantle. We demonstrate that the depleted mantle 3He/22Ne ratio is at least 10 while a more primitive mantle reservoir has a 3He/22Ne ratio of 2.3 to 3. The 3He/22Ne ratios of the mantle reservoirs are higher than possible sources of terrestrial volatiles, including the solar nebula ratio of 1.5. Therefore, a planetary process must have raised the mantle's 3He/22Ne ratio. We show that long-term plate tectonic cycling is incapable of raising the mantle 3He/22Ne ratio and may even lower it. However, ingassing of a gravitationally accreted nebular atmosphere into a magma ocean on the proto-Earth explains the 3He/22Ne and 20Ne/22Ne ratios of the primitive mantle reservoir....

  11. Monitoring and modelling of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of gases and aerosols in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring and modelling of deposition of air pollutants is essential to develop and evaluate policies to abate the effects related to air pollution and to determine the losses of pollutants from the atmosphere. Techniques for monitoring wet deposition fluxes are widely applied. A recent intercomparison experiment, however, showed that the uncertainty in wet deposition is relatively high, up to 40%, apart from the fact that most samplers are biased because of a dry deposition contribution. Wet deposition amounts to about 80% of the total deposition in Europe with a range of 10-90% and uncertainty should therefore be decreased. During recent years the monitoring of dry deposition has become possible. Three sites have been operational for 5 years. The data are useful for model development, but also for model evaluation and monitoring of progress in policy. Data show a decline in SO2 dry deposition, whereas nitrogen deposition remained constant. Furthermore, surface affinities for pollutants changed leading to changes in deposition. Deposition models have been further developed and tested with dry deposition measurements and total deposition measurements on forests as derived from throughfall data. The comparison is reasonable given the measurement uncertainties. Progress in ozone surface exchange modelling and monitoring shows that stomatal uptake can be quantified with reasonable accuracy, but external surface uptake yields highest uncertainty. - Monitoring and modelling of the deposition of sulphur and nitrogen components and the exposure of ozone has gained much progress through the research within BIATEX

  12. Monitoring and modelling of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of gases and aerosols in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erisman, Jan Willem [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: erisman@ecn.nl; Vermeulen, Alex [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hensen, Arjan [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Flechard, Chris [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Daemmgen, Ulrich [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, D-38116 Braunschweig, (Germany); Fowler, David [CEH, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Sutton, Mark [CEH, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Gruenhage, Ludger [Institute for Plant Ecology, Justus-Liebig-University, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka [Finnish Meteorological Institute, FIN-00810 Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring and modelling of deposition of air pollutants is essential to develop and evaluate policies to abate the effects related to air pollution and to determine the losses of pollutants from the atmosphere. Techniques for monitoring wet deposition fluxes are widely applied. A recent intercomparison experiment, however, showed that the uncertainty in wet deposition is relatively high, up to 40%, apart from the fact that most samplers are biased because of a dry deposition contribution. Wet deposition amounts to about 80% of the total deposition in Europe with a range of 10-90% and uncertainty should therefore be decreased. During recent years the monitoring of dry deposition has become possible. Three sites have been operational for 5 years. The data are useful for model development, but also for model evaluation and monitoring of progress in policy. Data show a decline in SO{sub 2} dry deposition, whereas nitrogen deposition remained constant. Furthermore, surface affinities for pollutants changed leading to changes in deposition. Deposition models have been further developed and tested with dry deposition measurements and total deposition measurements on forests as derived from throughfall data. The comparison is reasonable given the measurement uncertainties. Progress in ozone surface exchange modelling and monitoring shows that stomatal uptake can be quantified with reasonable accuracy, but external surface uptake yields highest uncertainty. - Monitoring and modelling of the deposition of sulphur and nitrogen components and the exposure of ozone has gained much progress through the research within BIATEX.

  13. Factors controlling the solubility of trace metals in atmospheric aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Panagiota; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric input of aerosols is recognized, as an important source of nutrients, for the oceans. The chemical interactions between aerosols and varying composition of air masses lead to different coating of their surfaces with sulfate, nitrate and organic compounds, increasing their solubility and their role as a carrier of nutrients and pollutants in ecosystems. Recent works have highlighted that atmospheric inputs of nutrients and trace metals can considerably influence the marine ecosystem functioning at semi-enclosed or enclosed water bodies such as the eastern Mediterranean. The current work aims to determine the sources and the factors controlling the variability of nutrients in the eastern Mediterranean. Special focus has been given on trace elements solubility, considered either as key nutrients for phytoplankton growth such as iron (Fe), phosphorus (P) or inhibitors such as copper (Cu). This has been accomplished by analyzing size segregated aerosol samples collected at the background site of Finokalia in Crete for an entire year. Phosphorus concentrations indicate important increases in air masses influenced both by anthropogenic activities in the northeast European countries and by dust outbreaks. The last is confirmed by the correlation observed between total P and dust concentrations and by the air mass backward trajectories computed by running the NOAA Hysplit Model (Hybrid Single - Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready/hysplit4.html). Overall 73% of total P has been found to be associated with anthropogenic sources. The solubility of P and Fe has been found to be closely related to the acidity (pH) and dust amount in aerosols. The aerosol pH was predicted using thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II), meteorological observations (RH, T), and gas/particle observations. More specifically P and Fe solubility appears to be inversely related to the crustal elements levels, while it increases in acidic environment. The

  14. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) - a novel imaging DOAS device for 2-D and 3-D imaging of trace gases and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    General, S.; Pöhler, D.; Sihler, H.; Bobrowski, N.; Frieß, U.; Zielcke, J.; Horbanski, M.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Simpson, W. R.; Weber, K.; Fischer, C.; Platt, U.

    2014-10-01

    Many relevant processes in tropospheric chemistry take place on rather small scales (e.g., tens to hundreds of meters) but often influence areas of several square kilometer. Thus, measurements of the involved trace gases with high spatial resolution are of great scientific interest. In order to identify individual sources and sinks and ultimately to improve chemical transport models, we developed a new airborne instrument, which is based on the well established Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) is a passive imaging DOAS spectrometer, which is capable of recording horizontal and vertical trace gas distributions with a resolution of better than 100 m. Observable species include NO2, HCHO, C2H2O2, H2O, O3, O4, SO2, IO, OClO and BrO. Here we give a technical description of the instrument including its custom-built spectrographs and CCD detectors. Also first results from measurements with the new instrument are presented. These comprise spatial resolved SO2 and BrO in volcanic plumes, mapped at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy), NO2 emissions in the metropolitan area of Indianapolis (Indiana, USA) as well as BrO and NO2 distributions measured during arctic springtime in context of the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) campaign, which was performed 2012 in Barrow (Alaska, USA).

  15. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI – a novel Imaging DOAS device for 2-D and 3-D imaging of trace gases and aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. General

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many relevant processes in tropospheric chemistry take place on rather small scales (e.g. tens to hundreds of meters but often influence areas of several square kilometer. Thus, measurements of the involved trace gases with high spatial resolution are of great scientific interest. In order to identify individual sources and sinks and ultimately to improve chemical transport models, we developed a new airborne instrument, which is based on the well established DOAS method. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer Instrument (HAIDI is a passive imaging DOAS spectrometer, which is capable of recording horizontal and vertical trace gas distributions with a resolution of better than 100 m. Observable species include NO2, HCHO, C2H2O2, H2O, O3, O4, SO2, IO, OClO and BrO. Here we report a technical description of the instrument including its custom build spectrographs and CCD detectors. Also first results from measurements with the new instrument are presented. These comprise spatial resolved SO2 and BrO in volcanic plumes, mapped at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy, NO2 emissions in the metropolitan area of Indianapolis (Indiana, USA as well as BrO and NO2 distributions measured during arctic springtime in context of the BROMEX campaign, which was performed 2012 in Barrow (Alaska, USA.

  16. Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around Ulan Bator city studied by moss and lichen biomonitoring technique and INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time the moss and lichen biomonitoring technique has been applied to air pollution in Mongolia (Ulan-Bator, the capital city). INAA at the IBR-2 reactor has made it possible to determine the content of 35 elements in moss and lichen biomonitors. Samples collected at sites located 10-15 km from the center of Ulan-Bator were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using epithermal neutrons. The mosses (Rhytidium rugosum, Thuidium abietinum, Entodon concinnus) and lichens (Cladonia stellaris, Parmelia separata) were used to study the atmospheric deposition of trace elements. It was shown that the suggested types of mosses could be used as suitable biomonitors to estimate the concentration levels of heavy metals and trace elements in Ulan-Bator atmospheric deposition. The results are compared to the data of atmospheric deposition of some European countries

  17. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements Around Ulan-Bator City Studied by Moss and Lichen Biomonitoring Technique and INAA

    CERN Document Server

    Ganbold, G; Gundorina, S F; Frontasyeva, M V; Ostrovnaya, T M; Pavlov, S S; Tsendeekhuu, T

    2005-01-01

    For the first time the moss and lichen biomonitoring technique has been applied to air pollution in Mongolia (Ulan-Bator, the capital city). INAA at the IBR-2 reactor has made it possible to determine the content of 35 elements in moss and lichen biomonitors. Samples collected at sites located 10-15 km from the center of Ulan-Bator were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using epithermal neutrons. The mosses (\\textit{Rhytidium rugosum}, \\textit{Thuidium abietinum}, \\textit{Entodon concinnus}) and lichens (\\textit{Cladonia stellaris}, \\textit{Parmelia separata}) were used to study the atmospheric deposition of trace elements. It was shown that the suggested types of mosses could be used as suitable biomonitors to estimate the concentration levels of heavy metals and trace elements in Ulan-Bator atmospheric deposition. The results are compared to the data of atmospheric deposition of some European countries.

  18. Atmospheric trace elements in aerosols observed over the Southern Ocean and coastal East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojie Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected over the Southern Ocean (SO and coastal East Antarctica (CEA during the austral summer of 2010/11. Samples were analysed for trace elements, including Na, Mg, K, Al, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd and Se, by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The mean atmospheric concentrations over the SO were 1100 ng m−3 for Na, 190 ng m−3 for Mg, 150 ng m−3 for Al, 14 ng m−3 for Fe, 0.46 ng m−3 for Mn and 0.25 ng m−3 for Se. Over CEA, the mean concentrations were 990 ng m−3 for Na, 180 ng m−3 for Mg, 190 ng m−3 for Al, 26 ng m−3 for Fe, 0.70 ng m−3 for Mn and 0.29 ng m−3 for Se. Particle size distributions, enrichment factors (EFs and correlation analysis indicate that Na, Mg and K mainly came from the marine source, while Al, Fe and Mn were mainly from the crustal source, which also contributed to Mg and K over CEA. High EFs were associated with Ni, Cd and Se, suggesting likely contributions from mixed sources from the Antarctic continent, long-range transport, marine biogenic emissions and anthropogenic emissions. Sea-salt elements (Na, Mg, K were mainly accumulated in the coarse mode, and crustal elements (Al, Fe, Mn presented a bimodal size distribution pattern. Bioactive elements (Fe, Ni, Cd were enriched in the fine mode, especially with samples collected over the SO, possibly affecting biogeochemical cycles in this oceanic region.

  19. Atmospheric trace metal pollution in the Naples urban area based on results from moss and lichen bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of trace element content analysed in Sphagnum capillifolium and Pseudevernia furfuracea exposed in bags in 1999 are reconsidered to evaluate the reliability of moss and lichen transplants to detect urban trace element atmospheric pollution, using Naples as a case example. After 4 months' exposure, trace element concentrations were at least twice as high as the pre-exposure values and in general higher in Sphagnum than in Pseudevernia. Moss samples were enriched in the following order: As = Cu > Mo > Pb > V > Co > Cr > Zn; lichen samples in the order: Mo > Cu > As = Co = Ni > V > Pb. Based on the calculation of a cumulative load factor, all sites located along the coast had higher trace element loads compared to sites in the hilly inland area. Complementary SEM, TEM and EDS observations showed, despite significant damage to tissue and cell integrity, the recurrent presence of particulate matter in moss and lichen, indicating the considerable presence of dust in the urban atmosphere which, according to chemical composition, may be due both to anthropogenic and natural sources such as volcanic rock and soil and sea salts. - Despite significant damage to tissue and cell integrity, moss and lichen in bags efficiently intercept airborne trace elements

  20. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions. PMID:20809628

  1. Atmospheric wet deposition of mercury and other trace elements in Pensacola, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Landing

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to understand and quantify the impact of local, regional, and far-distant atmospheric mercury sources to rainfall mercury deposition in the Pensacola, Florida watershed, a program of event-based rainfall sampling was started in late 2004. Modified Aerochem-Metrics wet/dry rainfall samplers were deployed at three sites in the region around the Crist coal-fired power plant and event-based samples were collected continuously for three years. Samples were analyzed for total Hg and a suite of trace elements including Al, As, Ba, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Th, U, V, and Zn. Nutrients (ammonia and nitrate and major anions (chloride and sulfate were also measured on each sample. Multivariate statistical methods were used to sort these tracers into factors that represent potential source categories contributing to the rainfall chemistry. As, Hg, Sb, Se, Sn, and non sea-salt sulfate were all significantly correlated (R>0.6 with one factor which we interpret as an anthropogenic source term reflecting input from coal combustion throughout the southeastern US. Using ratios of total Hg to volatile elements, we estimate that 22–33% of the rainfall Hg results from coal combustion in the southeastern US with the majority coming from the global background.

  2. Atmospheric wet deposition of mercury and other trace elements in Pensacola, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Landing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To understand and quantify the impact of local, regional, and distant atmospheric mercury sources to rainfall mercury deposition in the Pensacola, Florida watershed, a program of event-based rainfall sampling was started in late 2004. Modified Aerochem-Metrics wet/dry rainfall samplers were deployed at three sites in the region around the Crist coal-fired power plant and event-based samples were collected continuously for three years. Samples were analyzed for total mercury, volatile elements As, Se, and Sn, and a suite of trace elements including Al, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ho, Ga, Gd, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pr, Rb, Sb, Sc, Si, Sm, Sr, Tb, Th, Ti, Tm, U, V, Y, Yb, and Zn. Nutrients and major ions were also measured on each sample.

    Multivariate statistical methods are used to sort these tracers into factors that represent potential source components that contribute to the rainfall chemistry. Hg, As, Se, Sn, Sb, and non sea-salt sulfate were all significantly correlated with one anthropogenic factor. Using various Hg/element ratios, we can estimate that 22–33% of the rainfall mercury in the region results from coal combustion.

  3. Heavy Metals and Trace Elements Atmospheric Deposition Studies in Tula Region Using Moss Biomonitors Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ermakova, E V; Steinnes, E

    2002-01-01

    For the first time the moss biomonitors technique was used in air pollution studies in Tula Region (Central Russia), applying NAA, AAS. Moss samples were collected at 83 sites in accordance with the sampling strategy adopted in European projects on biomonitoring atmospheric deposition. A wide set of trace elements in mosses was determined. The method of epithermal neutron activation at IBR-2 reactor of FLNP JINR has made it possible to identify 33 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U) in the large-scale concentration range - from 10000 ppm for K to 0,001 ppm for Tb and Ta. Cu, Cd and Pb were determined by the flame AAS in the Norwegian Institute of Science and Technology. Using the graphical technique and principal component analysis allowed to separate plant, crustal and general pollution components in the moss. The obtained data will be used for constructing coloured maps of the distribution of elements over t...

  4. Accelerated line-by-line calculations for the radiative transfer of trace gases related to climate studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we are studying the effects of including carbon dioxide, ozone, methane, and the halocarbons in addition to water vapor in the radiating atmosphere. The study has focused on two principal issues: the effect on the spectral fluxes and cooling rates of carbon dioxide, ozone and the halocarbons at 1990 concentration levels and the change in fluxes and cooling rates as a consequence of the anticipated ten year change in the profiles of these species. For the latter study the water vapor profiles have been taken as invariant in time. The radiative line-by-line calculations using LBLRTM (Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model) have been performed for tropical (TRP), mid-latitude winter (MLW) and mid-latitude summer (MLS) model atmospheres. The halocarbons considered in the present study are CCl4, CFC-11, CFC-12 and CFC-22. In addition to considering the radiative effects of carbon dioxide at 355 ppM, the assumed current level, we have also obtained results for doubled carbon dioxide at 710 ppM. An important focus of the current research effort is the effect of the ozone depletion profile on atmospheric radiative effects

  5. Impacts of an African Green Revolution on Greenhouse Gases and Pollution Precursors: Nonlinear Trace N Gas Emission Responses to Incremental Increases in Fertilizer Inputs in a Western Kenyan Maize Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, J. E.; Palm, C.

    2011-12-01

    Over the last several decades, agricultural soils in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa have become depleted of nitrogen (N) and other nutrients, creating challenges to achieving food security in many countries. At only 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1, average fertilizer application rates in the region are an order of magnitude lower than typical rates in the United States, and well below optimal levels. Increased use of nutrient inputs is a centerpiece of most African Green Revolution strategies, making it important to quantify the impacts of this change in practices as farmers begin moving towards 50-80 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Increased N inputs are invariably accompanied by losses of trace N gases to the atmosphere, including the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide (NO), a precursor to tropospheric ozone pollution. Several investigations of greenhouse gas emissions and one investigation of NO emissions from sub-Saharan agricultural systems have been conducted over the last 20 years, but they are few in number and were not designed to identify potentially important thresholds in the response of trace gas emissions to fertilization rate. Here we examine the response function of NO and N2O emissions to 6 different levels of inorganic fertilizer additions in a maize field in Yala, Kenya during the 2011 long rainy season. We used a randomized complete block design incorporating inorganic fertilizer treatments of 0, 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200 kg N ha-1 in 4 blocks. After each of 2 fertilizer applications, we measured trace gas fluxes daily, and conducted weekly measurements until trace gas emissions subsided to control levels. We fit the data to linear and exponential models relating N gas emissions to N input levels, and conducted a model comparison using AIC. Preliminary analysis suggests that NO emissions do respond in a non-linear fashion over the course of 67 days, as has been found in several commercial agroecosystems for N2O. Although N2O emissions responded linearly

  6. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  7. Source-receptor metrology and modeling of trace amounts of atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with acid pollution and with its long distance transport using the metrology of trace amounts of pollutants in rural environment and the identification of the emission sources at the origin of acid atmospheric fallouts. Several French and foreign precipitation collectors have been evaluated and tested on the field. The measurement efficiency and limitations of four sampling systems for gas and particulate sulfur, ammonia and nitrous compounds have been evaluated. The limits of methods and the measurement uncertainties have been determined and calculated. A second aspect concerns the development of oriented receptor-type statistical models with the aim of improving the research of emission sources in smaller size areas defined by the cells of a geographical mesh. The construction of these models combines the pollution data of the sites with the informations about the trajectories of air masses. Results are given as probability or concentration fields revealing the areas potentially at the origin of pollutant emissions. Areas with strong pollutant emissions have been detected at the Polish, Czech and German borders and have been identified as responsible of pollution events encountered in Morvan region. Quantitative source-receptor relations have been also established. The different atmospheric transport profiles, their related frequency and concentration have been also evaluated using a dynamical clouds classification of air mass retro-trajectories. Finally, the first medium-term exploitation results (14 years) of precipitation data from measurement stations allow to perfectly identify the different meteorological regimes of the French territory by establishing a relation with the chemical composition of rainfalls. A west-east oriented increase of rainfall acidity is observed over the French territory. The pluviometry of the north-east area being among the highest of France, it generates more important deposits of acidifying compounds. The analysis

  8. Water soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol compounds in the tropical boundary layer. An analysis based on real time measurements at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trebs, I.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the behavior of water-soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol species in the tropical boundary layer. Mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO;,) and the corresponding water-soluble a

  9. Continental export efficiencies and delineation of sources for trace gases and black carbon in North-East India: Seasonal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Chutia, Lakhima; Bharali, Chandrakala; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) has been identified from back-trajectory analyses, as one of the most potential region affecting the species transport to the Northeastern region of India (NER). The continental export efficiency (εε) of BC, NOx and SO2 within the boundary layer is estimated in order to examine how efficiently these chemical species are transported towards the NER. For this the measurements carried out at Dibrugarh, a wet tropical location in NER during 2012-2013 have been used as the references in the estimation of the species enhancements above their background. CO is used as a passive tracer of transport due to its longer lifetime in the atmosphere. The emission estimates of BC, NOx, SO2 and CO in the IGP region are adopted from the emission inventories REAS and INTEX-B. The estimated export efficiency is highest in winter (DJF) for BC and NOx, whereas SO2 shows maximum efficiency in monsoon (JJAS). BC due to efficient transportation/removal from the IGP region exhibits highest εε values compared to the other species. NOx and SO2 on the other hand get transformed to other chemical species shortly after emission into the atmosphere and hence are less efficiently transported towards the study region. The export of BC, CO, NOx and SO2 are expected to supplement the chemical atmosphere in NER, which is further studied through the annual variability in their distribution in Dibrugarh. Pearson correlation analyses of BC, NOx and SO2 with CO is carried out to examine the similarity or dissimilarity among the sources.

  10. A system for measuring fluxes of trace gases to and from soil and vegetation with a chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mobile system for measurements of gaseous fluxes of SO2 NOx, O3 and water vapour between the atmosphere and the vegetation soil system using a chamber technique is described. Equipment, instruments and instrumental sensitivities are listed. A gas-handling system including calibration procedures and information on the chamber construction is also presented. With this system it is possible to make measurements using a wide range of concentrations including subambient levels. The environment in the chamber can be kept very close to ambient conditions. The mechanisms regulating the flux can be studied. A limitation of this system is the problem of extrapolating the fluxes obtained to larger areas. (author)

  11. Feasibility of determining surface emissions of trace gases using an inverse method in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Dana; Prinn, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The paper investigates the feasibility of using an inverse method based on a linear Kalman filter in a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model, for the determination of regional surface fluxes with rapid convergence, using data from a finite number of observation sites. It was found that the inverse method used was capable to accurately determine regional surface fluxes using the present ALE/GALE sites, and to converge to the correct solution within a year or two, using initial conditions very different from the final solution.

  12. Estimation of the atmosphere-ocean fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols at the finer resolution of the coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Vasco; Sahlée, Erik; Jurus, Pavel; Clementi, Emanuela; Pettersson, Heidi; Mateus, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    The balances and fluxes of greenhouse gases and aerosols between atmosphere and ocean are fundamental for Earth's heat budget. Hence, the scientific community needs to know and simulate them with accuracy in order to monitor climate change from Earth-Observation satellites and to produce reliable estimates of climate change using Earth-System Models (ESM). So far, ESM have represented earth's surface with coarser resolutions so that each cell of the marine domain is dominated by the open ocean. In such case it is enough to use simple algorithms considering the wind speed 10m above sea-surface (u10) as sole driver of the gas transfer velocity. The formulation by Wanninkhof (1992) is broadly accepted as the best. However, the ESM community is becoming increasingly aware of the need to model with finer resolutions. Then, it is no longer enough to only consider u10 when modelling gas transfer velocities across the coastal oceans' surfaces. More comprehensive formulations are required that adjust better to local conditions by also accounting for the effects of sea-surface agitation, wave breaking, atmospheric stability of the Surface Boundary Layer, current drag with the bottom, surfactants and rain. Accurate algorithms are also fundamental to monitor atmosphere and ocean greenhouse gas concentrations using satellite data and reverse modelling. Past satellite missions ERS, Envisat, Jason-2, Aqua, Terra and Metop, have already been remotely sensing the ocean's surface at much finer resolutions than ESM using instruments like MERIS, MODIS, AMR, AATSR, MIPAS, Poseidon-3, SCIAMACHY, SeaWiFS, and IASI. The planned new satellite missions Sentinel-3, OCO-2 and GOSAT will further increase the resolutions. We developed a framework to congregate competing formulations for the estimation of the solubility and transfer velocity of virtually any gas on the biosphere taking into consideration the atmosphere and ocean fundamental variables and their derived geophysical processes

  13. Investigation of reactions between trace gases and functional CuO nanospheres and octahedrons using NEXAFS-TXM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzler, Katja; Heilemann, Axel; Kneer, Janosch; Guttmann, Peter; Jia, He; Bartsch, Eckhard; Lu, Yan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In order to take full advantage of novel functional materials in the next generation of sensorial devices scalable processes for their fabrication and utilization are of great importance. Also understanding the processes lending the properties to those materials is essential. Among the most sought-after sensor applications are low-cost, highly sensitive and selective metal oxide based gas sensors. Yet, the surface reactions responsible for provoking a change in the electrical behavior of gas sensitive layers are insufficiently comprehended. Here, we have used near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with x-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) for ex-situ measurements, in order to reveal the hydrogen sulfide induced processes at the surface of copper oxide nanoparticles, which are ultimately responsible for triggering a percolation phase transition. For the first time these measurements allow the imaging of trace gas induced reactions and the effect they have on the chemical composition of the metal oxide surface and bulk. This makes the new technique suitable for elucidating adsorption processes in-situ and under real operating conditions.

  14. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis – Part 2: Evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, acyl peroxy nitrate (APN and particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM were simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. The model predictions of the diurnal trends of the gases were well correlated with the measurements before the regional mixed layer (RML reached the measurement site but underestimated the concentration after that time. The differences are caused by an over rapid growth of the boundary layer by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being actually produced by photochemical production downwind of the emission sources than predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSDs compare very well with respect to their general shape and diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are lognormal with most of the mass in the accumulation mode and the geometric diameter centered at 200±20 nm, showing little observed or predicted change with respect to the time when the RML is above the Altzomoni research station. Only the total mass changed with time and air mass origin. The invariability of average diameter of the accumulation mode suggests that there is very little growth of the particles by condensation or coagulation past about six hours of aging downwind of the major sources of anthropogenic emissions in Mexico's Megapolis. This could greatly simplify parameterization in climate models although it is not known at this time if this invariance can be extended to other megacity regions.

  15. Atmospheric inorganic trace contaminants in Finland, especially in the Gulf of Finland area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Utoe and Virolahti in the Gulf of Finland area and Aehtaeri in Central Finland during 1991-1992 using a filter pack which divides the samples between fine and coarse fractions. The concentrations of 33 elements in the samples were analysed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS). A simple and quantitative acid digestion method based on HNO3-HF (3+1) dissolution at room temperature was developed for the ICP-MS analysis of the aerosol samples. The average total (fine + coarse) atmospheric concentrations range from 0.083 ng m-3 for Cd at Utoe (0.095 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 0.066 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri), 0.59 ng m-3 for As (0.75 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 0.46 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri), 0.80 ng m-3 for Cu (1.0 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 0.82 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri), 1.1 ng m-3 for Ni ( 1.3 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 0.6 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri), 7.1 ng m-3 for Pb (7.1 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 6.3 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri), 10 ng m-3 for Zn (12 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 8.6 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri) to 87 ng m-3 for Ca (430 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 53 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri) and 730 ng m-3 for Na at Utoe (250 ng m-3 at Virolahti and 190 ng m-3 at Aehtaeri). Analysis of the elemental data is given using trajectories, principal component analysis and longrange transport modelling. The sea areas (Utoe, Virolahti, Hailuoto) have most of the heavy metal air pollution in Finland, as witnessed by the aerosol concentration and wet deposition data, due to the location of the sites in relative proximity to the concentration of population and industrial plants in coastal areas and to long-range transport. There is a clear decreasing gradient in the deposition of As, Cd, Cr. Pb, and V from South to North in Finland. In general, the trace element concentrations and deposition are lower in Finland than in Central Europe. It has been shown that the effect of large particulate emission sources in Estonia can be seen in

  16. Emission factors of fine particles, carbonaceous aerosols and traces gases from road vehicles: Recent tests in an urban tunnel in the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Li, Guanghui; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Zhonghui; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Xinyu; Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Huang, Zuzhao; Zhang, Zhanyi

    2015-12-01

    Motor vehicles contribute primarily and secondarily to air quality problems due to fine particle (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) pollution in China's megacities. Characterizing vehicle emission with the rapid change of vehicle numbers and fleet compositions is vital for both bottom-up emission survey and top-down source apportioning. To obtain emission factors (EFs) of PM2.5, carbonaceous aerosols and trace gases for road vehicles, in urban Guangzhou we conducted a field campaign in 2014 in the Zhujiang Tunnel, a heavily burdened tunnel with about 40,000 motor vehicles passing through each of its two separated bores per day. PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled for offline analysis while trace gases including SO2, NOx and CO were measured online and in situ. An eddy covariance system with an integrated 3-D sonic anemometer was also adopted to measure CO2 and winds inside the tunnel. We recorded an average fleet composition of 61% light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDVs) + 12% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDVs) + 27% liquefied petroleum gas vehicles (LPGVs), and EFs of 82.7 ± 28.3, 19.3 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 3.3 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively, for PM2.5, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). These EFs were respectively 23.4%, 18.3% and 72.3% lower when compared to that measured in the same tunnel in 2004. EFs of PM2.5, OC and EC were higher at night time (148 ± 126, 29 ± 24 and 21 ± 18 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively) due to significantly elevated fractions of HDVs in the traffic fleets. An average ratio of OC to EC 1.45 from this tunnel study was much higher than that of ∼0.5 in previous tunnel studies. The EFs of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2 and NMHCs for road traffic were also obtained from our tunnel tests, and they were 20.7 ± 2.9, (1.29 ± 0.2)E+03, (3.10 ± 0.68)E+03, (3.90 ± 0.49)E+05, and 448 ± 39 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively.

  17. Physical and chemical properties of the regional mixed layer of Mexico's Megapolis Part II: evaluation of measured and modeled trace gases and particle size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ochoa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study extends the work of Baumgardner et al. (2009 in which measurements of trace gases and particles, at a remote, high altitude mountain site, 60 km from Mexico City were analyzed with respect to the origin of the air masses. In the current evaluation, the temperature, water vapor mixing ratio (WMR, ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2 and acyl peroxy nitrate (APN are simulated with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model and compared with the measurements at the mountain site. Comparisons between the model and measurements are also evaluated for particle size distributions (PSDs of the mass concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organic mass (OM. The model predictions of the diurnal trends in temperature, WMR and trace gases were generally well correlated; 13 of the 18 correlations were significant at a confidence level of <0.01. Less satisfactory were the average hourly differences between model and measurements that showed predicted values within expected, natural variation for only 10 of the 18 comparisons. The model performed best when comparing with the measurements during periods when the air originated from the east. In that case all six of the parameters being compared had average differences between the model and measurements less than the expected standard deviation. For the cases when the air masses are from the southwest or west northwest, only two of the comparisons from each case showed differences less than the expected standard deviation. The differences appear to be a result of an overly rapid growth of the boundary layer predicted by the model and too much dilution. There also is more O3 being produced, most likely by photochemical production, downwind of the emission sources than is predicted by the model.

    The measured and modeled PSD compare very well with respect to their general shape and the diameter of the peak concentrations. The spectra are log

  18. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted by prescribed fires in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Burling

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5 from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as conifer forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous observations that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured both the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform and the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions with our ground-based platform. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including high 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level. We also show that the often ignored unlofted emissions can significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence suggests large emissions of monoterpenes in the residual smoldering smoke. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar temperate ecosystems.

  19. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted by prescribed fires in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Burling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have measured emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5 from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as conifer forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps to close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous observations that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured both the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform and the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions with our ground-based platform. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including high 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts for smoke that disperses at ground level. We also show that the often ignored unlofted emissions can significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence suggests large emissions of monoterpenes in the residual smoldering smoke. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar temperate ecosystems.

  20. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James; Weise, David

    2011-12-07

    We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5) from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous suggestions that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform at the same time the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions were measured with our ground-based platform after the flame front passed through. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including significant 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level, and we show that the normally-ignored unlofted emissions can also significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence of large emissions of monoterpenes was seen in the residual smoldering spectra, but we have not yet quantified these emissions. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar

  1. On the role of atmosphere-ocean interactions in the expected long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer caused by greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    It is well known that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere produce a global warming of the troposphere and a global cooling of the stratosphere. The expected stratospheric cooling essentially influences the ozone layer via increased polar stratospheric cloud formation and via temperature dependences of the gas phase reaction rates. One more mechanism of how greenhouse gases influences the ozone layer is enhanced water evaporation from the oceans into the atmosphere because of increasing temperatures of the ocean surface due to greenhouse effect. The subject of this paper is a study of the influence of anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and ozone-depleting chlorine and bromine compounds on the expected long-term changes of the ozone layer with taking into account an increase of water vapour content in the atmosphere due to greenhouse effect. The study based on 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The model allows to self-consistently calculating diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of two types. It was supposed in the model that an increase of the ocean surface temperature caused by greenhouse effect is similar to calculated increase of atmospheric surface temperature. Evaporation rate from the ocean surface was computed in dependence of latitude. The model time-dependent runs were made for the period from 1975 to 2100 using two IPCC scenarios depicting maximum and average expected increases of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The model calculations show that anthropogenic increasing of water vapour abundance in the atmosphere due to heating of the ocean surface caused by greenhouse effect gives a sensible contribution to the expected ozone

  2. Atmospheric deposition of trace elements recorded in snow from the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region, southern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Guoshuai; Tripathee, Lekhendra

    2013-08-01

    In May 2009, snowpit samples were collected from a high-elevation glacier in the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region on the southern Tibetan Plateau. A set of elements (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb) was analyzed to investigate the concentrations, deposition fluxes of trace elements, and the relative contributions from anthropogenic and natural sources deposited on the southern Tibetan Plateau. Concentrations of most of the trace elements in snowpit samples from the Zhadang glacier are significantly lower than those examined from central Asia (e.g., eastern Tien Shan), with higher concentrations during the non-monsoon season than during the monsoon season. The elements of Al, V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni display low crustal enrichment factors (EFs), while Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, and Pb show high EF values in the snow samples, suggesting anthropogenic inputs are potentially important for these elements in the remote, high-elevation atmosphere on the southern Tibetan Plateau. Together with the fact that the concentration levels of such elements in the Mt. Nyainqêntanglha region are significantly higher than those observed on the south edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our results suggest that the high-elevation atmosphere on the southern Tibetan Plateau may be more sensitive to variations in the anthropogenic emissions of atmospheric trace elements than that in the central Himalayas. Moreover, the major difference between deposition fluxes estimated in our snow samples and those recently measured at Nam Co Station for elements such as Cr and Cu may suggest that atmospheric deposition of some of trace elements reconstructed from snowpits and ice cores could be grossly underestimated on the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:23535470

  3. Carbon monoxide and related trace gases and aerosols over the Amazon Basin during the wet and dry seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of airborne measurements of carbon monoxide (CO and aerosol particle number concentration (CN made during the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA program. The primary goal of BARCA is to address the question of basin-scale sources and sinks of CO2 and other atmospheric carbon species, a central issue of the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA program. The experiment consisted of two aircraft campaigns during November–December 2008 (BARCA-A and May–June 2009 (BARCA-B, which covered the altitude range from the surface up to about 4500 m, and spanned most of the Amazon Basin.

    Based on meteorological analysis and measurements of the tracer, SF6, we found that airmasses over the Amazon Basin during the late dry season (BARCA-A, November 2008 originated predominantly from the Southern Hemisphere, while during the late wet season (BARCA-B, May 2009 low-level airmasses were dominated by northern-hemispheric inflow and mid-tropospheric airmasses were of mixed origin. In BARCA-A we found strong influence of biomass burning emissions on the composition of the atmosphere over much of the Amazon Basin, with CO enhancements up to 300 ppb and CN concentrations approaching 10 000 cm−3; the highest values were in the southern part of the Basin at altitudes of 1–3 km. The ΔCN/ΔCO ratios were diagnostic for biomass burning emissions, and were lower in aged than in fresh smoke. Fresh emissions indicated CO/CO2 and CN/CO emission ratios in good agreement with previous work, but our results also highlight the need to consider the residual smoldering combustion that takes place after the active flaming phase of deforestation fires.

    During the late wet season, in contrast, there was little evidence for a significant presence of biomass smoke. Low CN concentrations (300–500 cm−3 prevailed basinwide, and CO mixing ratios were enhanced

  4. Carbon monoxide and related trace gases and aerosols over the Amazon Basin during the wet and dry seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of airborne measurements of carbon monoxide (CO and aerosol particle number concentration (CN made during the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA program. The primary goal of BARCA is to address the question of basin-scale sources and sinks of CO2 and other atmospheric carbon species, a central issue of the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA program. The experiment consisted of two aircraft campaigns during November–December 2008 (BARCA-A and May 2009 (BARCA-B, which covered the altitude range from the surface up to about 4500 m, and spanned most of the Amazon Basin.

    Based on meteorological analysis and measurements of the tracer, SF6, we found that airmasses over the Amazon Basin during the late dry season (BARCA-A, November 2008 originated predominantly from the Southern Hemisphere, while during the late wet season (BARCA-B, May 2009 low-level airmasses were dominated by northern-hemispheric inflow, and mid-tropospheric airmasses were of mixed origin. In BARCA-A we found strong influence of biomass burning emissions on the composition of the atmosphere over much of the Amazon Basin, with CO enhancements up to 300 ppb and CN concentrations approaching 10 000 cm−3; the highest values were in the southern part of the Basin at altitudes of 1–3 km. The ΔCN/ΔCO ratios were diagnostic for biomass burning emissions, and were lower in aged than in fresh smoke. Fresh emissions indicated CO/CO2 and CN/CO emission ratios in good agreement with previous work, but our results also highlight the need to consider the residual smoldering combustion that takes place after the active flaming phase of deforestation fires.

    During the late wet season, in contrast, there was little evidence for a significant presence of biomass smoke. Low CN concentrations (300–500 cm−3 prevailed basinwide, and CO mixing ratios were enhanced by

  5. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position

  6. Simulations of atmospheric pressure discharge in a high-voltage nanosecond pulse using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Dezhen; Ren, Chunsheng

    2008-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge nonequilibrium plasmas have been applied to plasma processing with modern technology. Simulations of discharge in pure Ar and pure He gases at one atmospheric pressure by a high voltage trapezoidal nanosecond pulse have been performed using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) model coupled with a renormalization and weighting procedure (mapping algorithm). Numerical results show that the characteristics of discharge in both inert gases are very similar. There exist the effects of local reverse field and double-peak distributions of charged particles' density. The electron and ion energy distribution functions are also observed, and the discharge is concluded in the view of ionization avalanche in number. Furthermore, the independence of total current density is a function of time, but not of position.

  7. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan’s Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, S.; Sicardy, B.; Bézard, B.; Sotin, C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 µm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution ( 10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 8 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 µm, and CO, at 4.7 µm. We can extract methane’s abundance between 70 and 700 km and CO’s between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 µm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 µm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  8. Variability of atmospheric greenhouse gases as a biogeochemical processing signal at regional scale in a karstic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borràs, Sílvia; Vazquez, Eusebi; Morguí, Josep-Anton; Àgueda, Alba; Batet, Oscar; Cañas, Lídia; Curcoll, Roger; Grossi, Claudia; Nofuentes, Manel; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The South-eastern area of the Iberian Peninsula is an area where climatic conditions reach extreme climatic conditions during the year, and is also heavily affected by the ENSO and NAO. The Natural Park of Cazorla, Segura de la Sierra and Las Villas is located in this region, and it is the largest protected natural area in Spain (209920 Ha). This area is characterized by important climatic and hydrologic contrasts: although the mean annual precipitation is 770 nm, the karstic soils are the main cause for water scarcity during the summer months, while on the other hand it is in this area where the two main rivers of Southern Spain, the Segura and the Guadalquivir, are born. The protected area comprises many forested landscapes, karstic areas and reservoirs like Tranco de Beas. The temperatures during summer are high, with over 40°C heatwaves occurring each year. But during the winter months, the land surface can be covered by snow for periods of time up until 30 days. The ENSO and NAO influences cause also an important inter annual climatic variability in this area. Under the ENSO, autumnal periods are more humid while the following spring is drier. In this area vegetal Mediterranean communities are dominant. But there are also a high number of endemic species and derelict species typical of temperate climate. Therefore it is a protected area with high specific diversity. Additionally, there is an important agricultural activity in the fringe areas of the Natural Park, mainly for olive production, while inside the Park this activity is focused on mountain wheat production. Therefore the diverse vegetal communities and landscapes can easily be under extreme climatic pressures, affecting in turn the biogeochemical processes at the regional scale. The constant, high-frequency monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHG) (CO2 and CH4) integrates the biogeochemical signal of changes in this area related to the carbon cycle at the regional scale, capturing the high diversity of

  9. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hea Min Joh; Sun Ja Kim; Chung, T. H.; Leem, S H

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz) ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-c...

  10. Atmospheric station Křešín u Pacova, Czech Republic – a Central European research infrastructure for studying greenhouse gases, aerosols and air quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorská, A.; Sedlák, Pavel; Schwarz, J.; Fusek, M.; Hanuš, V.; Vodička, P.; Trusina, J.

    Vol. 12. Göttingen: Copernicus GmbH, 2015, s. 79-83. ISSN 1992-0628. [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ and European Conference on Applied Climatology /10./. Praha (CZ), 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : air quality * atmospheric station Křešín * greenhouse gases * Czech Republic * aerosols Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.adv-sci-res.net/12/79/2015/asr-12-79-2015.pdf

  11. Turbulent fluxes and transfer of trace gases from ship-based measurements during TexAQS 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Fairall, Christopher W.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; Helmig, Detlev; Hueber, Jacques; Lang, E. Kathrin

    2011-07-01

    Air-sea/land turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone are discussed on the basis of eddy covariance measurements made aboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) in August-September 2006. The TexAQS 2006 field campaign focused on air pollution meteorology associated primarily with ozone and aerosol transport in the Houston/Galveston region and the nearby coastal zone. The ship-based complement of instrumentation was used for the boundary layer measurements over water (the Gulf of Mexico and various harbors/bay areas) and "over land" (specifically, 80 km inside the Houston Ship Channel). In this study we focus on direct comparisons of TexAQS 2006 flux observations with the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) bulk flux algorithm to investigate possible coastal and urban area influences. It is found that the average neutral drag coefficient can be about an order of magnitude larger over very rough urban areas than over the sea surface. However, a similar effect was not observed for the scalar transfer; that is, the neutral Stanton and Dalton numbers do not change significantly over different footprint surfaces. Our data suggest that the TexAQS 2006 region was generally a sink for surface ozone whether over water or over land. The turbulent flux of carbon dioxide was mostly negative (uptake by the surface) for measurements over waters of the Gulf of Mexico and some bays, but the flux becomes positive (release to the air) for inland regions. Both ozone and carbon dioxide turbulent fluxes above land were larger in magnitude compared to the over water measurements.

  12. An evaluation of atmospheric deposition of trace elements into the Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegalski, S; Landsberger, S

    1999-01-01

    High-volume air samplers were used to collect aerosol samples on Whatman 41 air filters at the Canadian air sampling stations Burnt Island, Egbert, and Point Petre. Once collected, the samples were analyzed for trace elements by neutron activation analysis. Air concentrations of over 30 trace elements were determined. A special focus was made to utilize Compton suppression gamma-ray spectroscopy and epithermal irradiations to enhance the detection limits of neutron activation analysis. These techniques allowed for the determination of trace elements at very low levels. Results of the study of the trace-metal dry deposition into Lakes Huron and Ontario indicated that the majority of the total deposition resulted from crustal materials. However, dry deposition is also a significant pathway for many toxic anthropogenic trace metals into the Great Lakes. PMID:10676498

  13. Evaluation of trace elemental composition of aerosols in the atmosphere of Rawalpindi and Islamabad using radio analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qadir, Muhammad Abdul, E-mail: mabdulqadir@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan); Zaidi, Jamshaid Hussain [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad Capital Territory (Pakistan); Ahmad, Shaikh Asrar; Gulzar, Asad [Division of Science and Technology, University of Education, Township, Lahore (Pakistan); Yaseen, Muhammad [Department of Chemistry, Gugrat University, Gugrat (Pakistan); Atta, Sadia; Tufail, Asma [Institute of Chemistry, University of the Punjab, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2012-05-15

    Geological and anthropogenic contributions to air pollution were monitored by analyzing aerosol particulates present in the atmosphere of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan, using instrumental neutron activation for trace elemental analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to study particulate size distribution and morphology. Twenty two elements were analyzed and their likely sources were identified. It was found that 69% of the suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere of Islamabad, and 52% in Rawalpindi, were of a diameter less than 3 {mu}m. The presence of Yb, Cs, Sc, Rb, Co, Eu, La, Ba, Zn and Hf indicates that a major portion of the trace elements in the aerosol particulates was due to the geological nature of the land, while Sc was considered to be arising from coal burning. The presence of Cr, Fe, Ce, Pb and Cd was attributed to anthropogenic activities at Rawalpindi and Islamabad. Unusually high concentrations of Mo and Nb were found in the atmosphere of Islamabad, based on soil derived aerosols. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussion is made on Total suspended Particulate (TSP) matter in the atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of Radio active elements in the TSP by using SSNTD which was found non significant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 23 Trace element analysis of the TSPs in the atmosphere of twin cities i.e. Rawalpindi and Islamabad and their relation to their sources by using Neutron activation analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mountain of Islamabad has some unique and important deposits of Nb and Gd , this paper will help the Geological survey of Pakistan to explore their deposits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is high level of TSPs>10 um, which is a great threat to the peoples of Islamabad.

  14. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, A.; Xie, P. H.; Wagner, T.; Chen, H.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013). The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al., 2013): first, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically DOAS) instrument in the north-west outskirts near Hefei in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations. Good agreement is found (squares of the correlation coefficients for NO2, SO2, and HCHO were 0.92, 0.85, and 0.60, respectively), verifying the reliability of this novel method. Similar agreement is found for the comparison of the aerosol extinction with results from visibility meters. Future studies may conduct measurements using a larger number of azimuth angles to increase the spatial resolution.

  15. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange from tropical oil palm plantations on peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn Teh, Yit; Manning, Frances; Zin Zawawi, Norliyana; Hill, Timothy; Chocholek, Melanie; Khoon Kho, Lip

    2015-04-01

    Oil palm is the largest agricultural crop in the tropics, accounting for 13 % of all tropical land cover. Due to its large areal extent, oil palm cultivation may have important implications not only for terrestrial stores of C and N, but may also impact regional and global exchanges of material and energy, including fluxes of trace gases and water vapor. In particular, recent expansion of oil palm into tropical peatlands has raised concerns over enhanced soil C emissions from degradation of peat, and elevated N-gas fluxes linked to N fertilizer application. Here we report our preliminary findings on soil carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from a long-term, multi-scale project investigating the C, N and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics of oil palm ecosystems established on peat soils in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Flux chamber measurements indicate that soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes averaged 20.0 ± 16.0 Mg CO2-C ha-1 yr-1, 37.4 ± 29.9 kg CH4-C ha-1 yr-1 and 4.7 ± 4.2 g N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Soil CO2 fluxes were on par with other drained tropical peatlands; whereas CH4 fluxes exceeded observations from similar study sites elsewhere. Nitrous oxide fluxes were in a similar range to fluxes from other drained tropical peatlands, but lower than emissions from mineral-soil plantations by up to three orders of magnitude. Fluxes of soil CO2 and N2O were spatially stratified, and contingent upon the distribution of plants, deposited harvest residues, and soil moisture. Soil CO2 fluxes were most heavily influenced by the distribution of palms and their roots. On average, autotrophic (root) respiration accounted for approximately 78 % of total soil CO2 flux, and total soil respiration declined steeply away from palms; e.g. soil CO2 fluxes in the immediate 1 m radius around palms were up to 6 times greater than fluxes in inter-palm spaces due to higher densities of roots. Placement of harvest residues played an important - but secondary

  16. Detailed history of atmospheric trace elements from the Quelccaya ice core (Southern Peru) during the last 1200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglietti, C.; Gabrielli, P.; Thompson, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The recent increase in trace element concentrations, for example Cr, Cu, Zn, Ag, Pb, Bi, and U, in polar snow and ice has provided compelling evidence of a hemispheric change in atmospheric composition since the nineteenth century. This change has been concomitant with the expansion of the Industrial Revolution and points towards an anthropogenic source of trace elements in the atmosphere. There are very few low latitude trace element ice core records and these are believed to be sensitive to perturbations of regional significance. To date, these records have not been used to document a preindustrial anthropogenic impact on atmospheric composition at low latitudes. Ice cores retrieved from the tropical Andes are particularly interesting because they have the potential to reveal detailed information about the evolution and environmental consequences of mineral exploitation related to the Pre Inca Civilizations, the Inca Empire (1438-1533 AD) and the subsequent Spanish invasion and dominance (1532-1833 AD). The chemical record preserved in the ice of the Quelccaya ice cap (southern Peruvian Andes) offers the exceptional opportunity to geochemically constrain the composition of the tropical atmosphere at high resolution over the last ~1200 years. Quantification of twenty trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Ti, Tl, U, V, and Zn) was performed by ICP-SFMS over 105 m of the Quelccaya North Dome core (5600 m asl, 128.57 m) by analyzing 2450 samples. This provides the first atmospheric trace element record in South America spanning continuously and at high resolution for the time period between 1990 and 790 AD. Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Sb, Sn, Pb and Zn show increases in concentration and crustal enrichment factor starting at different times between 1450 and 1550 AD, in concomitance with the expansions of the Inca Empire and, subsequently, the Spanish Empire well before the inception of the Industrial Revolution. This

  17. Emission of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere of the Manaus city due to burning of fossil fuels; Emissao de gases poluentes na atmosfera urbana da cidade de Manaus devida a queima de combustiveis fosseis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valois, I.M. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Fac. de Tecnologia], E-mail: ivalois@ufam.edu.br; Cartaxo, E.F. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (NIEMA/UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Fac. de Tecnologia. Nucleo de Energia, Meio Ambiente e Agua], E-mail: ecartaxo@ufam.edu.br; Chaar, Jamal da Silva [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (ICE/UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas

    2009-07-01

    This paper intends to think over the impacts of pollutants gases in the atmosphere of the city of Manaus, caused by the thermal, the main electricity source in the State of Amazonas. The focus of the study is the urban atmosphere where physical and chemical phenomenon accelerate the effects of increased concentration of some components and secondary pollutants, which are produced due to human activities. It is based on two studies: monitoring the exhaust gas applied at a factory in the district of Aparecida, located in the urban area, and monitoring conducted by the energy operating company, about the influence of exhaust gas around the district of Mauazinho, also in urban area. It is a preliminary research that seeks to demonstrate the inconsistency of some studies and the need to make progress in search for more efficient methods and techniques. This is an important step toward a policy of environmental management that will complement future studies about air pollution in the city. (author)

  18. Production and reactivity of the hydroxyl radical in homogeneous high pressure plasmas of atmospheric gases containing traces of light olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photo-triggered discharge has been used to study the production kinetic mechanisms and the reactivity of the hydroxyl radical in a N2/O2 mixture (5% oxygen) containing ethane or ethene for hydrocarbon concentration values in the range 1000-5000 ppm, at 460 mbar total pressure. The discharge (current pulse duration of 60 ns) has allowed the generation of a transient homogeneous non-equilibrium plasma, and the time evolution of the OH density has been measured (relative value) in the afterglow (up to 200 μs) by laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Experimental results have been explained using predictions of a self-consistent 0D discharge and plasma reactivity modelling, and reduced kinetic schemes for OH have been validated. It has been shown that recombination of H- and O-atoms, as well as reaction of O with the hydroperoxy radical HO2, plays a very important role in the production of OH radicals in the mixture with ethane. H is a key species for production of OH and HO2 radicals. As for ethane, O, H and HO2 are key species for the production of OH in the case of ethene, but carbonated radicals, following the partial oxidation of the hydrocarbon molecule by O, also play a non-negligible role. The rate constant for O- and H-atom recombination has been estimated to be 3 x 10-30 cm6 s-1 at near ambient temperature, consistent with LIF measurements on OH for both mixtures with ethane and ethene

  19. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: Fiscal year 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    Fiscal year 1995 was both a very productive year for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and a year of significant change. This document presents information about the most notable accomplishments made during the year. Topics include: high-lights; statistics; future plans; publications, presentations, and awards; and change in organization and staff.

  20. Modeling surface-atmosphere exchange of trace gases and energy within and above the Amazon rain forest

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Die vorliegende Dissertation untersucht die biogeochemischen Vorgänge in der Vegetationsschicht (Bestand) und die Rückkopplungen zwischen physiologischen und physikalischen Umweltprozessen, die das Klima und die Chemie der unteren Atmosphäre beeinflussen. Ein besondere Schwerpunkt ist die Verwendung theoretischer Ansätze zur Quantifizierung des vertikalen Austauschs von Energie und Spurengasen (Vertikalfluss) unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Wechselwirkungen der beteiligten Prozesse. ...

  1. Atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of particulate trace metals in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de P. Pereira, Pedro A.; Lopes, Wilson A.; Carvalho, Luiz S.; da Rocha, Gisele O.; de Carvalho Bahia, Nei; Loyola, Josiane; Quiterio, Simone L.; Escaleira, Viviane; Arbilla, Graciela; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    Respiratory system is the major route of entry for airborne particulates, being the effect on the human organism dependent on chemical composition of the particles, exposure time and individual susceptibility. Airborne particulate trace metals are considered to represent a health hazard since they may be absorbed into human lung tissues during breathing. Fossil fuel and wood combustion, as well as waste incineration and industrial processes, are the main anthropic sources of metals to the atmosphere. In urban areas, vehicular emissions—and dust resuspension associated to road traffic—become the most important manmade source. This work investigated the atmospheric concentrations of TSP, PM 10 and elements such as iron, manganese, copper and zinc, from three different sites around Salvador Region (Bahia, Brazil), namely: (i) Lapa Bus Station, strongly impacted by heavy-duty diesel vehicles; (ii) Aratu harbor, impacted by an intense movement of goods, including metal ores and concentrates and near industrial centers and; (iii) Bananeira Village located on Maré Island, a non-vehicle-influenced site, with activities such as handcraft work and fishery, although placed near the port. Results have pointed out that TSP concentrations ranged between 16.9 (Bananeira) and 354.0 μg m -3 (Aratu#1), while for PM 10 they ranged between 30.9 and 393.0 μg m -3, both in the Lapa Bus Station. Iron was the major element in both Lapa Station and Aratu (#1 and #2), with average concentrations in the PM 10 samples of 148.9, 79.6 and 205.0 ng m -3, respectively. Zinc, on the other hand, was predominant in samples from Bananeira, with an average concentration of 145.0 ng m -3 in TSP samples, since no PM 10 sample was taken from this site. The main sources of iron in the Lapa Station and Aratu harbor were, respectively, soil resuspension by buses and discharge of solid granaries, as fertilizers and metal ores. On the other hand, zinc and copper in the bus station were mainly from

  2. Evaluation of plasma melting method for treatment of low level miscellaneous solid wastes. Influence of atmospheric gases on material properties of treated waste forms and behavior of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For evaluating the possibility of applying a thermal plasma method to treatment of low level miscellaneous solid wastes, the effect of heating atmospheric gases on the material properties of the treated waste forms and the behavior of radionuclides were examined by conducting plasma melting tests of simulated miscellaneous solid wastes (iron, fly ash and wood) with surrogate nuclides. We found that the material properties of the treated waste forms have a homogeneous distribution of surrogate nuclides and low leaching rate of them: from the slag layers the rate was less than 10-7 (g·cm-2·d-1) and from the metallic layers was less than 10-5 (g·cm-2·d-1) in every atmospheric condition. The compressive strengths of the slag layers obtained in the oxidisation conditions were over 50 MPa. The migration behavior of Co, Ni, Nb, Sr and Ce was not influenced by the heating atmospheric conditions, and almost 100% of these nuclides migrated to the treated waste forms. Migration rate of Cs to the slag layers was also not influenced by the heating atmospheric gases except under extremely high reductive conditions, and a high residual rate of over 60% was obtained. These results show that a plasma melting method can be used for treatment of miscellaneous solid wastes. (author)

  3. Features of motivation of the crewmembers in an enclosed space at atmospheric pressure changes during breathing inert gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarevcev, Sergey

    Since the 1960s, our psychologists are working on experimenting with small groups in isolation .It was associated with the beginning of spaceflight and necessity to study of human behaviors in ways different from the natural habitat of man .Those, who study human behavior especially in isolation, know- that the behavior in isolation markedly different from that in the natural situаtions. It associated with the development of new, more adaptive behaviors (1) What are the differences ? First of all , isolation is achieved by the fact ,that the group is in a closed space. How experiments show - the crew members have changed the basic personality traits, such as motivation Statement of the problem and methods. In our experimentation we were interested in changing the features of human motivation (strength, stability and direction of motivation) in terms of a closed group in the modified atmosphere pressure and breathing inert gases. Also, we were interested in particular external and internal motivation of the individual in the circumstances. To conduct experimentation , we used an experimental barocomplex GVK -250 , which placed a group of six mаns. A task was to spend fifteen days in isolation on barokomplex when breathing oxigen - xenon mixture of fifteen days in isolation on the same complex when breathing oxygen- helium mixture and fifteen days of isolation on the same complex when breathing normal air All this time, the subjects were isolated under conditions of atmospheric pressure changes , closer to what you normally deal divers. We assumed that breathing inert mixtures can change the strength and stability , and with it , the direction and stability of motivation. To check our results, we planned on using the battery of psychological techniques : 1. Schwartz technique that measures personal values and behavior in society, DORS procedure ( measurement of fatigue , monotony , satiety and stress ) and riffs that give the test once a week. Our assumption is

  4. Water soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol compounds in the tropical boundary layer. An analysis based on real time measurements at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin

    OpenAIRE

    I. Trebs

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the behavior of water-soluble inorganic trace gases and related aerosol species in the tropical boundary layer. Mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO;,) and the corresponding water-soluble aerosol species, ammonium (NH,,1), nitrate (NO3 ), nitrite (NO,), chloride (CI) and sulfate (SO,") were measured at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondónia, Brazil). Sampling was performed from...

  5. Biomonitoring of atmospheric pollution (with emphasis on trace elements) - BioMAP. Proceedings of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some organisms accumulate atmospheric contaminants over certain periods of time and concentrate them, thus allowing reliable analytical measurements if the organisms are suitably chosen. Measurements of contaminants accumulated by such organisms (biomonitors) provide information on the integrated exposure over an extended period of time. They may also be present in remote areas, and no expensive technical equipment is involved in collecting them. Therefore, biomonitoring can be an effective tool for pollutant mapping and trend monitoring by real time and retrospective analysis. The IAEA is making concerted efforts to promote the practical use of nuclear and related analytical techniques in studies of non-radioactive environmental pollutants that may impact human health, and one of the main emphases is on studying air contaminants. The idea of organizing a workshop on biomonitoring atmospheric pollution arose during an IAEA Technical Co-operation Project on Monitoring of Trace Element Air Pollution, carried out at the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Portugal, with substantial technical support by the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology (TUDelft), Netherlands. The International Workshop on Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution (With Emphasis on Trace Elements) - BioMAP, was held in Lisbon, Portugal, from 21 to 24 September 1997. The meeting was organized in co-operation with the Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear

  6. Continental pollution in the western Mediterranean basin: vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gases measured over the sea during TRAQA 2012 and SAFMED 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Biagio, C.; Doppler, L.; Gaimoz, C.; Grand, N.; Ancellet, G.; Raut, J.-C.; Beekmann, M.; Borbon, A.; Sartelet, K.; Attié, J.-L.; Ravetta, F.; Formenti, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present airborne observations of aerosol and trace gases obtained over the sea in the western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean) campaigns in summer 2012 and 2013. A total of 23 vertical profiles were measured up to 5000 m above sea level over an extended area (40-45° N and 2° W-12° E) including the Gulf of Genoa, southern France, the Gulf of Lion, and the Spanish coast. During TRAQA and SAFMED the study area experienced a wide range of meteorological conditions which favoured pollution export from different sources located around the basin. Also, several events of dust outflows were measured during the campaigns. Observations from the present study show that continental pollution largely affects the western Mediterranean both close to coastal regions and in the open sea as far as ~ 250 km from the coastline. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient varies between ~ 20 and 120 Mm-1, while carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) mixing ratios are in the range of 60-165 and 30-85 ppbv, respectively. Pollution reaches 3000-4000 m in altitude and presents a very complex and highly stratified structure characterized by fresh and aged layers both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Within pollution plumes the measured particle concentration in the Aitken (0.004-0.1 μm) and accumulation (0.1-1.0 μm) modes is between ~ 30 and 5000-6000 scm-3 (standard cm-3), which is comparable to the aerosol concentration measured in continental areas under pollution conditions. Additionally, our measurements indicate the presence of highly concentrated Aitken layers (10 000-15 000 scm-3) observed both close to the surface and in the free troposphere, possibly linked to the influence of new particle formation (NPF) episodes over the basin.

  7. Application of the LIRIC algorithm for the characterization of aerosols during the Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanie, Horatiu; Nicolae, Doina; Nemuc, Anca; Belegante, Livio; Toanca, Florica; Ajtai, Nicolae; Ozunu, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    The ESA/ESTEC AROMAT campaign (Airborne Romanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) was held between 1st and 14th of September 2014 with the purpose to test and inter-compare newly developed airborne and ground-based instruments dedicated to air quality studies in the context of validation programs of the forthcoming European Space Agency satellites (Sentinel 5P, ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE). Ground-based remote sensing and airborne in situ measurements were made in southern Romania in order to assess the level and the variability of NO2 and particulate matter, focusing on two areas of interest: SW (Turceni), where many coal based power plants are operating, and SE (Bucharest), affected by intense traffic and partially by industrial pollution. In this paper we present the results obtained after the application of the Lidar - Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) algorithm on combined lidar and sunphotometer data collected at Magurele, 6 km South Bucharest. Full lidar data sets in terms of backscatter signals at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, as well as depolarization at 532 nm were used and combined with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, in order to retrieve the profiles of aerosol volume concentrations, separated as fine, spherical and spheroidal coarse modes. Preliminary results showed that aerosols generated by traffic and industrial activities were present in the Planetary Boundary Layer, while biomass burning aerosols transported from the Balkan Peninsula were detected in the upper layers. Acknowledgements: ***This work has been supported by Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project number 55/2013 - CARESSE. ***The financial support by the European Community's FP7 - PEOPLE 2011 under ITaRS Grant Agreement n° 289923 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Trace metal determination in total atmospheric deposition in rural and urban areas

    OpenAIRE

    Azimi, Sam; Ludwig, Alexandre; Thevenot, Daniel,; Colin, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    International audience The wet, dry and total atmospheric depositions of some metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Na, Pb and Zn) were sampled at two sites and atmospheric fallout fluxes were determined for these locations. This work, led by two different research groups, allowed to reach two main goals: to define a simple analytical procedure to secure accurate shipboard sampling and analysis of atmospheric deposition, and to assess anthropogenic impacts of heavy metals to the environment. The fir...

  9. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akagi, S. K.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, A.; Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S.; Urbanski, S.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured the trace gas emission factors from 7 prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analyses. The fires were intended to emulate high-intensity burns as they were lit during the dry season and in most cases represented stands that had not been treated with prescribed burns in 10+ years, if at all. A total of 97 trace gas species are reported here from both airborne and ground-based platforms making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements included the first data for a suite of monoterpene compounds emitted via distillation of plant tissues during real fires. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of ~0.40% of CO (molar basis), ~3.9% of NMOC (molar basis), and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis), suggests that they impacted post-emission formation of ozone, aerosol, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes. The variability in the terpene emissions in South Carolina (SC) fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the emitted gas-phase non-methane organic compounds was surprisingly different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that the slightly different ecosystems, time of year and the precursor variability all contributed to the variability in plume chemistry observed in this study and in the literature. The ΔHCN/ΔCO emission ratio, however, is fairly consistent at 0.9 ± 0.06 % for airborne fire measurements in coniferous-dominated ecosystems further confirming the value of HCN as a good biomass burning indicator/tracer. The SC results also support an earlier finding that C3-C4 alkynes may be of use as biomass burning indicators on the time-scale of

  10. Atmospheric wet deposition of trace elements to a suburban environment, Reston, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conko, K.M.; Rice, K.C.; Kennedy, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Wet deposition from a suburban area in Reston, Virginia was collected during 1998 and analyzed to assess the anion and trace-element concentrations and depositions. Suburban Reston, approximately 26km west of Washington, DC, is densely populated and heavily developed. Wet deposition was collected bi-weekly in an automated collector using trace-element clean sampling and analytical techniques. The annual volume-weighted concentrations of As, Cd, and Pb were similar to those previously reported for a remote site on Catoctin Mt., Maryland (70km northwest), which indicated a regional signal for these elements. The concentrations and depositions of Cu and Zn at the suburban site were nearly double those at remote sites because of the influence of local vehicular traffic. The 1998 average annual wet deposition (??gm-2yr -1) was calculated for Al (52,000), As (94), Cd (54), Cr (160), Cu (700), Fe (23,000), Mn (2000), Ni (240), Pb (440), V (430), and Zn (4100). The average annual wet deposition (meqm-2yr-1) was calculated for H+ (74), Cl- (8.5), NO3- (33), and SO42- (70). Analysis of digested total trace-element concentrations in a subset of samples showed that the refractory elements in suburban precipitation comprised a larger portion of the total deposition of trace elements than in remote areas. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of particulate matter, atmospheric gases, temperature, and humidity on respiratory and circulatory diseases’ trends in Lisbon, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, M.C.; Pacheco, A.M.G.; Verburg, T.G.; Wolterbeek, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the significant effects of both well-known contaminants (particles, gases) and less-studied variables (temperature, humidity) on serious, if relatively common, respiratory and circulatory diseases. The area of study is Lisbon, Portugal, and time series of health outcome (daily a

  12. Estimated total emissions of trace gases from the Canberra Wildfires of 2003: a new method using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth & the MOZART chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paton-Walsh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method for estimating trace gas emissions from large vegetation fires using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm, combined with an atmospheric chemical transport model. The method uses a threshold value to screen out normal levels of AOD that may be caused by raised dust, sea salt aerosols or diffuse smoke transported from distant fires. Using this method we infer an estimated total emission of 15±5 Tg of carbon monoxide, 0.05±0.02 Tg of hydrogen cyanide, 0.11±0.03 Tg of ammonia, 0.25±0.07 Tg of formaldehyde, 0.03±0.01 of acetylene, 0.10±0.03 Tg of ethylene, 0.03±0.01 Tg of ethane, 0.21±0.06 Tg of formic acid and 0.28±0.09 Tg of methanol released to the atmosphere from the Canberra fires of 2003. An assessment of the uncertainties in the new method is made and we show that our estimate agrees (within expected uncertainties with estimates made using current conventional methods of multiplying together factors for the area burned, fuel load, the combustion efficiency and the emission factor for carbon monoxide. A simpler estimate derived directly from the satellite AOD measurements is also shown to be in agreement with conventional estimates, suggesting that the method may, under certain meteorological conditions, be applied without the complication of using a chemical transport model. The new method is suitable for estimating emissions from distinct large fire episodes and although it has some significant uncertainties, these are largely independent of the uncertainties inherent in conventional techniques. Thus we conclude that the new method is a useful additional tool for characterising emissions from vegetation fires.

  13. Annual input fluxes and source identification of trace elements in atmospheric deposition in Shanxi Basin: the largest coal base in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cong; Yang, Zhongfang; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Tao; Hou, Qingye; Li, Desheng; Wang, Jianwu

    2014-11-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to a great deterioration of air quality and provoked some serious environmental concerns. One hundred and five samples of atmospheric deposition were analyzed for their concentrations of 13 trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Se, and Zn) in Shanxi Basin, which includes six isolate basins. The input fluxes of the trace elements in atmospheric deposition were observed and evaluated. Geostatistical analysis (EF, PCA, and CA ) were conducted to determine the spatial distribution, possible sources, and enrichment degrees of trace elements in atmospheric deposition. Fe/Al and K/Al also contribute to identify the sources of atmospheric deposition. The distribution of trace elements in atmospheric deposition was proved to be geographically restricted. The results show that As, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Se mainly come from coal combustion. Fe, Cu, Mn, Hg, and Co originate mainly from interactions between local polluted soils and blowing dust from other places, while the main source of Al, Cr, and Mo are the soil parent materials without pollution. This work provides baseline information to develop policies to control and reduce trace elements, especially toxic elements, from atmospheric deposition. Some exploratory analytical methods applied in this work are also worth considering in similar researches. PMID:24929552

  14. Atmospheric station Křešín u Pacova, Czech Republic – a Central European research infrastructure for studying greenhouse gases, aerosols and air quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorská, Alice; Sedlák, Pavel; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Fusek, M.; Hanuš, Vlastimil; Vodička, Petr; Trusina, Jan

    Vol. 12. Göttingen: Copernicus GmbH, 2015, s. 79-83. ISSN 1992-0628. [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ and European Conference on Applied Climatology /10./. Praha (CZ), 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : air quality * atmospheric station Křešín * greenhouse gases * Czech Republic * aerosols Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality ; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UCHP-M)

  15. Remote Sensing of Greenhouse Gases by Combining Lidar and Optical Correlation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo C.; Thomas B; Miffre A.; Francis M; Cariou J.P.; Rairoux P.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we present recent work on the ability to achieve range-resolved greenhouse gases concentration measurements in the Earth’s atmosphere (CH4, H2O) by combining broadband optical correlation spectroscopy (OCS) with lidar. We show that OCS-Lidar is a robust methodology, allowing trace gases remote sensing with a low dependence on the temperature and pressure-variation absorption cross section. Moreover, we evaluate, as an experimental proof, the water vapor profile in the pl...

  16. Iterative maximum a posteriori (IMAP-DOAS for retrieval of strongly absorbing trace gases: Model studies for CH4 and CO2 retrieval from near infrared spectra of SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Frankenberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS has mostly been employed for atmospheric trace gas retrieval in the UV/Vis spectral region. New spectrometers such as SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT also provide near infrared channels and thus allow for the detection of greenhouse gases like CH4, CO2, or N2O. However, modifications of the classical DOAS algorithm are necessary to account for the idiosyncrasies of this spectral region, i.e. the temperature and pressure dependence of the high resolution absorption lines. Furthermore, understanding the sensitivity of the measurement of these high resolution, strong absorption lines by means of a non-ideal device, i.e. having finite spectral resolution, is of special importance. This applies not only in the NIR, but can also prove to be an issue for the UV/Vis spectral region. This paper presents a modified iterative maximum a posteriori-DOAS (IMAP-DOAS algorithm based on optimal estimation theory introduced to the remote sensing community by rodgers76. This method directly iterates the vertical column densities of the absorbers of interest until the modeled total optical density fits the measurement. Although the discussion in this paper lays emphasis on satellite retrieval, the basic principles of the algorithm also hold for arbitrary measurement geometries. This new approach is applied to modeled spectra based on a comprehensive set of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles. This analysis reveals that the sensitivity of measurement strongly depends on the prevailing pressure-height. The IMAP-DOAS algorithm properly accounts for the sensitivity of measurement on pressure due to pressure broadening of the absorption lines. Thus, biases in the retrieved vertical columns that would arise in classical algorithms, are obviated. Here, we analyse and quantify these systematic biases as well as errors due to variations in the temperature and pressure profiles, which is indispensable for

  17. Tracing the fate of carbon and the atmospheric evolution of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Renyu; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-01-01

    The climate of Mars likely evolved from a warmer, wetter early state to the cold, arid current state. However, no solutions for this evolution have previously been found to satisfy the observed geological features and isotopic measurements of the atmosphere. Here we show that a family of solutions exist, invoking no missing reservoirs or loss processes. Escape of carbon via CO photodissociation and sputtering enriches heavy carbon (13C) in the Martian atmosphere, partially compensated by moderate carbonate precipitation. The current atmospheric 13C/12C and rock and soil carbonate measurements indicate an early atmosphere with a surface pressure <1 bar. Only scenarios with large amounts of carbonate formation in open lakes permit higher values up to 1.8 bar. The evolutionary scenarios are fully testable with data from the MAVEN mission and further studies of the isotopic composition of carbonate in the Martian rock record through time.

  18. Urban deciduous tree leaves as biomonitors of trace element (As, V and Cd atmospheric pollution in Belgrade, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATARINA M. ŠUĆUR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Leaves of common deciduous trees: horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum and linden (Tilia spp. from three parks within the urban area of Belgrade were studied as biomonitors of trace element (As, V, and Cd atmospheric pollution. The May–September trace element accumulation in the leaves, and their temporal trends, were assayed in a multi-year period (2002–2006. Significant accumulation in the leaves was evident for As and V, but not so regularly for Cd. Slightly decreasing temporal trends of V and As ac-cumulated in the leaf tissues were observed over the years. During the time span, the concentrations of Cd remained approximately on the same level, except in May 2002 and September 2005, when a rapid increase was observed. The May–September accumulations of As and V were higher in horse chestnut than in linden, although both may be used as biomonitors for these elements, and optionally for Cd in conditions of its high atmospheric loadings.

  19. Trace elements in the atmospheric particulate of Milan and suburban areas. A study carried out by INAA