WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric pressure fluctuations

  1. Effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on hill-side coal fires and surface anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Zeyang; Zhu Hongqing; Xu Jiyuan; Qin Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents numerical studies on the effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on hill-side coal fires and their surface anomalies. Based on the single-particle reaction–diffusion model, a formula to estimate oxygen consumption rate at high temperature controlled by oxygen transport is proposed. Daily fluctuant atmospheric pressure was imposed on boundaries, including the abandoned gallery and cracks. Simulated results show that the effects of atmospheric pressure fluctuations on coal fires and surface anomalies depend on two factors: the fluctuant amplitude and the pressure difference between inlet(s) and outlet(s) of the air ventilation system. If the pressure difference is close to the fluctuant amplitude, atmospheric pressure fluctuations greatly enhance gas flow motion and tempera-tures of the combustion zone and outtake(s). If the pressure difference is much larger than the fluctuant amplitude, atmospheric pressure fluctuations exert no impact on underground coal fires and surface anomalies.

  2. Fluctuation Pressure Assisted Ejection of DNA From Bacteriophage

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The role of thermal pressure fluctuation excited within tightly packaged DNA prior to ejection from protein capsid shells is discussed in a model calculation. At equilibrium before ejection we assume the DNA is folded many times into a bundle of parallel segments that forms an equilibrium conformation at minimum free energy, which presses tightly against internal capsid walls. Using a canonical ensemble at temperature T we calculate internal pressure fluctuations against a slowly moving or static capsid mantle for an elastic continuum model of the folded DNA bundle. It is found that fluctuating pressure on the capsid internal wall from thermal excitation of longitudinal acoustic vibrations in the bundle may have root-mean-square values which are several tens of atmospheres for typically small phage dimensions. Comparisons are given with measured data on three mutants of lambda phage with different base pair lengths and total genome ejection pressures.

  3. Vacuum Radiation Pressure Fluctuations and Barrier Penetration

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    We apply recent results on the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations to the problem of barrier penetration by quantum particles. The probability for large stress tensor fluctuations decreases relatively slowly with increasing magnitude of the fluctuation, especially when the quantum stress tensor operator has been averaged over a finite time interval. This can lead to large vacuum radiation pressure fluctuations on charged or polarizable particles, which can in turn push the particle over a potential barrier. The rate for this effect depends sensitively upon the details of the time averaging of the stress tensor operator, which might be determined by factors such as the shape of the potential. We make some estimates for the rate of barrier penetration by this mechanism and argue that in some cases this rate can exceed the rate for quantum tunneling through the barrier. The possibility of observation of this effect is discussed.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses observable phenomena related to air pressure. Describes a simple, unobtrusive, semiquantitative device to monitor the changes in air pressure that are associated with altitude, using a soft-drink bottle and a balloon. (JRH)

  5. Internal pressure fluctuations in coacervates and syneresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2006-12-01

    Syneresis exhibited by a heterogeneous polyampholyte coacervate (polymer-rich phase) is discussed through non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. It has been shown that the coacervate phase is associated with fluctuating excess internal pressure that gives rise to syneresis. It is proposed that energy is dissipated to the environment only by the surface of coacervate, whereas in the bulk, gelatin chains only exchange energy with each other with negligible or no dissipation. Consequently, the internal pressure inside the coacervate follows a damped oscillatory behaviour that relaxes slowly with time, independently of amplitude. We connect the volume of the supernatant released with time (exponential relaxation behavior) with the presence of long-lived nonlinear localized modes (the existence of breathers).

  6. Atmospheric Pressure During Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows the variation with time of pressure (dots) measured by the Pathfinder MET instrument during the landing period shown in image PIA00797. The two diamonds indicate the times of bridal cutting and 1st impact. The overall trend in the data is of pressure increasing with time. This is almost certainly due to the lander rolling downhill by roughly 10 m. The spacing of the horizontal dotted lines indicates the pressure change expected from 10 m changes in altitude. Bounces may also be visible in the data.

  7. Pressure Fluctuations in Turbulent Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, Ronald; Lee, Myoungkyu; Moser, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Pressure fluctuation profile data from the channel flow DNS of Lee and Moser extend to Reτ 5200 . In the outer region, with Y = y / h , the overlap layer pressure correlates very well by a log law; limY -> 0 + (1 / η) lnY +Do . The constant η = - 0 . 380 is remarkable like the von Kármán value. In the inner region, the defect variable P (y+) ≡ + - + |y=0 absorbs the Reτ dependence. The inner overlap equation is; limy + -> ∞ P (1 / η) lny+ +Di . Together, the overlap laws imply that the wall pressure relation is +|y=0 (- 1 / η) lnReτ +Di -Do . A completely equivalent expression, which is finite as Reτ -> ∞ , is obtained by rescaling the pressure variable; #|y=0 ≡ (uτ /Uo) + | y = 0 =C1 +C2 (uτ /Uo) . Here, the constants are related to η ,D0 , and Di . Additionally, it was found that the wavenumber spectrum Epp {kx / h } does not have a k-1 region. However, the trends do not rule out this at higher Re. This work was supported by NSF (OCI-0749223 and PRAC Grant 0832634), and computation resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility through the Early Science, INCITE 2013 and Directors Discretionary Programs.

  8. Similarity law of fluctuating pressure spectrum beneath hydraulic jump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN JiJian; WANG JiMin; GU JinDe

    2008-01-01

    Similarity law is the conversion rule between model and prototype, on which a lot of research works have been done, with no agreement reached referring to the similarity law of fluctuating pressure fre-quency spectrum. Experimental data of peak frequency and dominant frequency range of fluctuating pressure spectrum beneath hydraulic jump obtained from serial models of scales 1:1, 1:2 and 1:5 are compared. As a result, similarity law of fluctuating pressure spectrum in the strongly rolling area agrees with the gravity law. As peak frequency and dominant frequencies of fluctuating pressures in hydraulic normalized spectrums of fluctuating pressures show that the similarity nearly agrees with the gravity law.

  9. Magnetospheric Cavity Modes Driven by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Claudepierre, S G; Elkington, S R; Lotko, W; Hudson, M K; 10.1029/2009GL039045

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. We use these simulations to investigate the role that solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations play in the generation of magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations. The simulations presented in this study are driven with idealized solar wind input conditions. In four of the simulations, we introduce monochromatic ULF fluctuations in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure. In the fifth simulation, we introduce a continuum of ULF frequencies in the upstream solar wind dynamic pressure fluctuations. In this numerical experiment, the idealized nature of the solar wind driving conditions allows us to study the magnetospheric response to only a fluctuating upstream dynamic pressure, while holding all other solar wind driving parameters constant. The simulation results suggest that ULF fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure can drive magnet...

  10. Combustion instability detection using the wavelet detail of pressure fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjie JI; Yonghao LUO

    2008-01-01

    A combustion instability detection method that uses the wavelet detail of combustion pressure fluctuations is put forward. To confirm this method, combustion pressure fluctuations in a stoker boiler are recorded at stable and unstable combustion with a pressure transducer. Daubechies one-order wavelet is chosen to obtain the wavelet details for comparison. It shows that the wavelet approximation indicates the general pressure change in the furnace, and the wavelet detail magnitude is consistent with the intensity of turbulence and combustion noise. The magnitude of the wavelet detail is nearly constant when the combustion is stable, however, it will fluctuate much when the combustion is unstable.

  11. Numerical simulation of pressure fluctuation in Kaplan turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As it is almost impossible to carry out the prototype hydro-turbine experiment be- fore the power plant is built up, rational prediction of pressure fluctuations in the prototype turbine is very important at the design stage. From this viewpoint, we at first treated the unsteady turbulent flow computation based on the modified RNG k-ε turbulence model through the whole flow passage to simulate the pressure fluctuation in a model turbine. Since fair agreement was recognized between the numerical results and the experimental data, this numerical method was applied to simulate the pressure fluctuations in the prototype turbine. From the comparison of them with the model turbine results, it is seen that their qualitative trend of pres- sure fluctuations are similar, but an appreciable difference is observed between the amplitudes of pressure fluctuation of the prototype turbine and that of the model turbine. Though the present findings may be explained by the effect of Reynolds number, further studies are expected for quantitative interpretation. We paid atten- tion to the interaction between the fluid and turbine structure. Adopting a weak fluid-solid coupling method, we studied the pressure fluctuation in the prototype turbine to clarify how the elastic behavior of runner blades influenced the charac- teristics of pressure fluctuation.

  12. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p tests of the new deaerator prototypes of the capacity of 800 and 500 t/h in the HPP conditions showed their sustainable, reliable, and efficient work in the designed range of hydraulic and thermal loads. The content of solved oxygen and free carbon dioxide in make-up water after deaerators meets the requirements of State Standard GOST 16860-88, the operating rules and regulations, and the customer's specifications. Based on these results, the proposals were developed on the structure and the design of deaerators of the productivity of more than 800 t/h for the use in circuits of large heating systems and the preparation of feed water to the TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  13. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the…

  14. Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable dynamics influenced by pressure fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, A. K.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically study the effect of pressure fluctuations on the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interface in approximation of ideal incompressible immiscible fluids and two-dimensional flow. Pressure fluctuations are treated as an effective acceleration directed from the heavy to light fluid with inverse square time dependence. The group theory approach is applied to analyze large-scale coherent dynamics, solve the complete set of the governing equations, and find regular asymptotic solutions describing RM bubbles. A strong effect is found, for the first time to our knowledge, of pressure fluctuations on the interface morphology and dynamics. In the linear regime, a nearly flat bubble gets more curved, and its velocity increases for strong pressure fluctuations and decreases otherwise. In the nonlinear regime, solutions form a one-parameter family parameterized by the bubble front curvature. For the fastest stable solution in the family, the RM bubble is curved for strong pressure fluctuations and is flattened otherwise. The flow is characterized by the intense motion of the fluids in the vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion away from the interface, and presence of shear at the interface leading to formation of smaller scale vortical structures. Our theoretical results agree with and explain existing experiments and simulations and identify new qualitative and quantitative characteristics to evaluate the strength of pressure fluctuations in experiments and simulations.

  15. PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS IN GAS-SOLIDS FLUIDIZED BEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiaotao Bi; Aihua Chen

    2003-01-01

    Pressure fluctuation data measured in a series of fluidized beds with diameters of 0.05, 0.1, 0.29, 0.60 and 1.56 m showed that the maximum amplitude or standard deviation increased with increasing the superficial gas velocity and static bed height for relatively shallow beds and became insensitive to the increase in static bed height in relatively deep beds. The amplitude appeared to be less dependent on the measurement location in the dense bed. Predictions based on bubble passage, bubble eruption at the upper bed surface and bed oscillation all failed to explain all observed trends and underestimated the amplitude of pressure fluctuations, suggesting that the global pressure fluctuations in gas-solids bubbling fluidized beds are the superposition of local pressure variations, bed oscillations and pressure waves generated from the bubble formation in the distributor region, bubble coalescence during their rise and bubble eruption at the upper bed surface.

  16. Fluctuations of Quantum Radiation Pressure in Dissipative Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, C H; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lee, Da-Shin

    2003-01-01

    Using the generalized Langevin equations involving the stress tensor approach, quantum fluctuations of electromagnetic radiation pressure in the presence of a dissipative environment have been studied. We consider a perfectly reflecting mirror which is exposed to the electromagnetic radiation pressure in a fluid at finite temperature. The dynamics of velocity fluctuations of the mirror is studied analytically in both small time and large time limits. In the small time limit, the minimum uncertainty of the mirror's position measurement from both quantum and thermal noises effects including the photon counting error in the laser interferometer is obtained based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem as compared with the ''standard quantum limit''. In addition, the result of the large time behavior of fluctuations of the mirror's velocity in a dissipative environment can be applied to the laser interferometer of the ground-based gravitational wave detector. The role of the dissipative effects in this case is pla...

  17. Modelling surface pressure fluctuation on medium-rise buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snæbjörnsson, J.T.; Geurts, C.P.W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the results of two experiments into the fluctuating characteristics of windinduced pressures on buildings in a built-up environment. The experiments have been carried out independently in Iceland and The Netherlands and can be considered to represent two separate cases of buildi

  18. An Atmospheric Pressure Ping-Pong "Ballometer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachkov, Alexander; Kryuchkov, Dmitriy; Willis, Courtney; Moore, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Classroom experiments on atmospheric pressure focus largely on demonstrating its existence, often in a most impressive way. A series of amusing physics demonstrations is widely known and practiced by educators teaching the topic. However, measuring the value of atmospheric pressure(P[subscript atm]) is generally done in a rather mundane way,…

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF CORRELATION AND SPECTRUM BETWEEN WALL FLUCTUATING PRESSURE AND FLUCTUATING VELOCITY OF IMPING-ING JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The correlation, the spectrum and the turbu-lent scale between wall fluctuating pressure and fluctuating ve-locity, on the bed of plunging pool under the action of single and twin impinging jet, are investigated in the paper by using 2-D LDA and the dynamic pressure scanning system of multi-ple points. It is found that the cross correlation between the horizontal fluctuating velocity and the fluctuating pressure of twin jet is bigger than that of sinlge jet, and the spectrum be-tween horizontal fluctuating velocity and fluctuating pressure obviously has approximately dominant frequency. The rela-tionship between the fluctuation pressure coefficient on wall and the turbulent intensity near the wall can be described with logarithmic curve.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON INFLUENCE OF SUPPLIED PRESSURE FLUCTUATION ON OUTPUT ARACTERISTIC OF PRESSURE CONTROL SYSTEM OF ROLLING MILL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The infulence of supplied pressure fluctuation on output accuracy for the electro-hydraulic pressure control system of the rolling mill is discussed.Based on the bond graph theory and experimental study,the relationship between the variation of system output pressure and the supplied pressure fluctuation and the influence of the system bandwidth on system output pressure are provided.A theoretical base for determining the allowable fluctuation range of pressure and accurate design of constant pressure source system is obtained.

  1. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Systolic Blood Pressure Control Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Galhardo, C E C; de Menezes, M Argollo; Soares, P P S

    2009-01-01

    We use detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study the dynamics of blood pressure oscillations and its feedback control in rats by analyzing systolic pressure time series before and after a surgical procedure that interrupts its control loop. We found, for each situation, a crossover between two scaling regions characterized by exponents that reflect the nature of the feedback control and its range of operation. In addition, we found evidences of adaptation in the dynamics of blood pressure regulation a few days after surgical disruption of its main feedback circuit. Based on the paradigm of antagonistic, bipartite (vagal and sympathetic) action of the central nerve system, we propose a simple model for pressure homeostasis as the balance between two nonlinear opposing forces, successfully reproducing the crossover observed in the DFA of actual pressure signals.

  2. Dynamic damper pressure fluctuation in the pumping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Korolyov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Inertial part of any devices and equipment (e.g., pumps, hung or mounted on the resilient frame and being under the influence of the disturbing force that works at a constant frequency, may be subject to fluctuations, especially near of the resonance area. For elimination these fluctuations, you can resort to the use of a dynamic damper. Aim: The aim of the work is an analytical study of various dynamic dampers to reduce pressure fluctuation problems in pumping systems. Materials and Methods: A comparative analysis of efficiency of functioning was carried out for two types of dynamic dampers - hydraulic and mechanical. Results: The technique for calculating of dynamic damper of fluid pressure fluctuations in the hydraulic and mechanical pumps is presented. Algorithms of calculations are reported to engineering applications and implemented in the production process. The calculations show that the use of dynamic mechanical dampers is expedient at high frequency pumps, and, with increasing frequency of the pump by 6 times, winning in the dimensions of the damper in 3.5 times.

  3. Prediction of propeller-induced hull-pressure fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Van Wijngaarden, H.C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The cavitating propeller often forms the primary source of noise and vibration on board ships. The propeller induces hydroacoustic pressure fluctuations due to the passing blades and, more importantly, the dynamic activity of cavities in the propeller’s immediate vicinity. The accurate prediction of the resulting vibratory hull-excitation forces is indispensible in the ship design process, but is not always warranted. From this follows the main objective of the thesis, which is the developmen...

  4. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  5. Distribution of Pressure Fluctuations in a Prototype Pump Turbine at Pump Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yuekun; Zuo, Zhigang; Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Jintao; Wu, Yulin

    2014-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations are very important characteristics in pump turbine’s operation. Many researches have focused on the characteristics (amplitude and frequencies) of pressure fluctuations at specific locations, but little researches mentioned the distribution of pressure fluctuations in a pump turbine. In this paper, 3D numerical simulations using SST k-ω turbulence model were carried out to predict the pressure fluctuations distribution in a prototype pump turbine at pump mode. Three oper...

  6. Evaporation of urea at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Andreas M; Czekaj, Izabela; Elsener, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Kröcher, Oliver

    2011-03-31

    Aqueous urea solution is widely used as reducing agent in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR). Because reports of urea vapor at atmospheric pressure are rare, gaseous urea is usually neglected in computational models used for designing SCR systems. In this study, urea evaporation was investigated under flow reactor conditions, and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of gaseous urea was recorded at atmospheric pressure for the first time. The spectrum was compared to literature data under vacuum conditions and with theoretical spectra of monomolecular and dimeric urea in the gas phase calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) method. Comparison of the spectra indicates that urea vapor is in the monomolecular form at atmospheric pressure. The measured vapor pressure of urea agrees with the thermodynamic data obtained under vacuum reported in the literature. Our results indicate that considering gaseous urea will improve the computational modeling of urea SCR systems.

  7. Alternative theories of atmospheric telecommunications and low-frequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Webster, Peter J.

    1988-08-01

    Observational studies have revealed a rich low-frequency structure in the atmosphere. A review of the theories, observations, and model studies of this low-frequency atmospheric variability is presented. On time scales of weeks or longer the atmosphere appears to possess distinct oscillatory behavior in well-defined and persistent "centers of action." This behavior is also an endemic feature of surrogate atmospheric data sets emerging from experiments with complicated climate models. Many theories have attempted to determine the dominant physical processes responsible for the low-frequency variance but have usually failed when compared carefully with observations. For example, simple linear steady state and Rossby wave dispersion theories have been used in an attempt to explain the observed global response to low-latitude perturbation. However, the observed structures of mature anomalies are often quite distinct from the vertical structures of disturbances predicted in these theories. Also, in general circulation and model studies, the sign of the nonlinear response is not simply related to the sign of the forcing as predicted by linear steady state theories. It is argued that the theories fail because either the full three-dimensional complexity of the basic state is not considered or its inherent instability structure is not recognized or is, in fact, ignored. It is shown that three-dimensional instability theory provides a natural generalization and marriage of the zonally averaged instability theory of Charney and Eady and the Rossby wave dispersion theory of Rossby and Yeh. As such, it provides a formalism which may be used to understand a wide variety of atmospheric fluctuations including the locations of eddy flux covariance maxima and storm tracks in both the tropics and extratropics and the generation of blocking, teleconnection patterns, and other quasi-stationary anomaly features. Attention is focused on two particular mechanisms within this formalism

  8. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  9. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  10. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and all the measurements are perfectly reliable (Bland-Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  12. Fluctuations, Response, and Resonances in a Simple Atmospheric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsun, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    We study the response of a simple quasi-geostrophic barotropic model of the atmosphere to various classes of perturbations affecting its forcing and its dissipation using the formalism of the Ruelle response theory. We investigate the geometry of such perturbations using the covariant Lyapunov vectors on the unperturbed system and discover in one specific case - orographic forcing - a substantial projection of the perturbation onto the stable directions of the flow. As a result, we find a clear violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, in agreement with the basic tenets of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. This results into a very strong response in the form of a forced Rossby-like wave that has no resemblance to the natural variability in the same range of spatial and temporal scales. We further analyze such a feature and discover it can be interpreted as resonant response to a specific group of rarely visited unstable periodic orbits of the unperturbed system. Our results reinforce the idea of u...

  13. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherup, Robert S; Eren, Baran; Hao, Yibo; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel B

    2016-05-05

    Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu(2+) oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.

  14. The Unsteady Fluctuating Pressure and Velocity in a Cross Flow Fan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaye Gan; Fei Liu; Min Liu; Keqi Wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the relations between the fluctuating pressure and velocity of the source by means of nu-merical method and sound pressure in the far field obtained with an noise experiment for a novel cross flow fan. The frequency characteristics of the fluctuating pressure and velocity in a cross flow fan are analyzed by means of spectral analysis and wavelet transform. The fluctuating pressures obtained by large eddy simulation on the cas-ing wall are compared with that of experiments and show good agreement. From the spectral analysis of sound source, it is found that the pressure fluctuating peak is correspond with the sound pressure in the far field.

  15. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  16. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  17. Influence of tip clearance on pressure fluctuations in an axial flow pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jianjun; Luo, Xingqi; Guo, Pengcheng; Wu, Guangkuan [Xi' an University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-04-15

    Rotor-stator interaction in axial pumps can produce pressure fluctuations and further vibrations even damage to the pump system in some extreme case. In this paper, the influence of tip clearance on pressure fluctuations in an axial flow water pump has been investigated by numerical method. Three-dimensional unsteady flow in the axial flow water pump has been simulated with different tip clearances between the impeller blade tip and the casing wall. In addition to monitoring pressure fluctuations at some typical points, a new method based on pressure statistics was proposed to determine pressure fluctuations at all grid nodes inside the whole pump. The comparison shows that the existence of impeller tip clearance magnifies the pressure fluctuations in the impeller region, from the hub to shroud. However, the effect on pressure fluctuation in the diffuser region is not evident. Furthermore, the tip clearance vortex has also been examined under different tip clearances.

  18. Experimental Analysis of Pressure Fluctuations behind a Bottom Aerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Experimental observations show that the random process of two-phase flow beh ind an aerator is an ergodic process and its amplitude distribution is similar t o a normal distribution. The maximum pressure fluctuation is at the re-attachme n t point where the jet-trajectory flow over the aerator re-attaches to bottom o f the channel, and its amplitude is 2-3 times larger than when there is no aerato r. There is a dominant frequency of 1.24 Hz in the model, but the coherence in th e frequency domain is not obvious for other frequencies beside the dominant frequ ency. There is a large vortex at the re-attachment point behind the aerator but correlation among the measurement points is not obvious in the time domain.

  19. Atmospheric pressure does not influence acute diverticular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Velayos, Benito; Pons-Renedo, Fernando; Feranández-Salazar, Luis; Muñoz, María Fe; Olmo, Lourdes del; Almaraz Gómez, Ana; Beltrán de Heredia, Juan; Hernández-González, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Producción Científica The article offers information on a study which examines the influence of atmospheric pressure on the development of acute diverticular disease. The value of atmospheric pressure and its daily trends in 2012 was collected to prove whether atmospheric pressure influence this disease by raising intra-diverticular pressure in days with higher atmospheric pressure. The study involved patients with acute diverticulitis who underwent computed tomography.

  20. Detached eddy simulation of unsteady cavitation and pressure fluctuation around 3-D NACA66 hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady cavitating flow and pressure fluctuation around the 3-D NACA66 hydrofoil were simulated and validated based on detached eddy simulation turbulence model and a homogeneous cavitation model. Numerical results show that detached eddy simulation can predict the evolution of cavity inception, sheet cavitation growth, cloud cavitation shedding, and breakup, as well as the pressure fluctuation on the surface of hydrofoil. The sheet cavitation growth, detachment, cloud cavitation shedding are responsible for the features of the pressure fluctuation.

  1. A microwave pressure sounder. [for remote measurement of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, G. E.; Flower, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for the remote measurement of atmospheric surface pressure will be described. Such measurements could be made from a satellite in polar orbit and would cover many areas for which conventional meteorological data are not available. An active microwave instrument is used to measure the strength of return echoes from the ocean surface at a number of frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. Factors which affect the accuracy with which surface pressure can be deduced from these measurements will be discussed and an instrument designed to test the method by making measurements from an aircraft will be described.

  2. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  3. Derivation of Aero-Induced Fluctuating Pressure Environments for Ares I-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Michael Y.; Wilby, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A description is given of the external aero-inducted fluctuating pressure model which was fit and anchored to wind tunnel data from the past 40 years. This model is based upon the assumption that the flow around a vehicle can be divided into discrete flow zones with independent fluctuating pressure properties. The model is then used to derive fluctuating pressure environments during ascent for the Ares I-X test vehicle. A sensitivity study of the structural response to the spatial correlation of the fluctuating pressures is also performed.

  4. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  5. MINING PROCESS AND PRODUCT INFORMATION FROM PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN A FUEL PARTICLE COATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas W. Marshall; Charles M. Barnes

    2008-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Fuel Development and Qualification Program included the design, installation, and testing of a 6-inch diameter nuclear fuel particle coater to demonstrate quality TRISO fuel production on a small industrial scale. Scale-up from the laboratory-scale coater faced challenges associated with an increase in the kernel charge mass, kernel diameter, and a redesign of the gas distributor to achieve adequate fluidization throughout the deposition of the four TRISO coating layers. TRISO coatings are applied at very high temperatures in atmospheres of dense particulate clouds, corrosive gases, and hydrogen concentrations over 45% by volume. The severe environment, stringent product and process requirements, and the fragility of partially-formed coatings limit the insertion of probes or instruments into the coater vessel during operation. Pressure instrumentation were installed on the gas inlet line and exhaust line of the 6-inch coater to monitor the bed differential pressure and internal pressure fluctuations emanating from the fuel bed as a result of bed and gas “bubble” movement. These instruments are external to the particle bed and provide a glimpse into the dynamics of fuel particle bed during the coating process and data that could be used to help ascertain the adequacy of fluidization and, potentially, the dominant fluidization regimes. Pressure fluctuation and differential pressure data are not presently useful as process control instruments, but data suggest a link between the pressure signal structure and some measurable product attributes that could be exploited to get an early estimate of the attribute values.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing for Polymer Adhesion: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing has attracted significant interests over decades due to its usefulness and a variety of applications. Adhesion improvement of polymer surfaces is among the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Reflecting recent significant...... development of the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, this work presents its fundamental aspects, applications, and characterization techniques relevant to adhesion....

  7. Formation Mechanism of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet can protrude some 5.0 cm into air. It holds promise for multivarious innovative applications, but its formation mechanism remains unsettled. We show that the plasma jet is essentially a streamer corona totally independent of, but obscured by, dielectric barrier discharge. Consequently, the jets can be equally successfully generated even with one single bare metal electrode attached to the tube orifice, both downstream and upstream simultaneously, and at a significantly reduced voltage. These results will help understand the underlying physics and facilitate a safer and more flexible implementation of this marvelous plasma source.

  8. New development of atmospheric pressure plasma polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Jufan Zhang; Shen Dong

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma polishing (APPP) is a precision machining technology used for manufacturing high quality optical surfaces. The changes of surface modulus and hardness after machining prove the distinct improvement of surface mechanical properties. The demonstrated decrease of surfacc residual stresses testifies the removal of the former deformation layer.And the surface topographies under atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicate obvious amelioration of the surface status,showing that the 0.926-nm average surface roughness has been achieved.

  9. Influence of Tip Clearance on Pressure Fluctuation in Low Specific Speed Mixed-Flow Pump Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore the influence of tip clearance on pressure fluctuation in a low specific speed mixed-flow pump, tip clearances δ of 0.25 mm, 0.75 mm and 1.00 mm, along with no tip clearance, were selected. The reliability of the simulation was verified by comparison with the experimental data of external characteristics and fluctuation in the guide vane passage. Through ANSYS-CFX, MATLAB code and fast Fourier transform (FFT algorithm, pressure fluctuation characteristics in this pump were obtained. The results show that pressure fluctuation exists in all conditions due to the rotor-stator interaction. Under the no tip clearance and tip clearance conditions, the maximum fluctuation value was located near the guide inlet and impeller outlet, respectively. Clearance leakage had less influence on pressure fluctuation at the impeller inlet and central regions within a certain range of the clearance; beyond this range, fluctuations in the whole flow passage increased significantly, while the clearance variation had less effect on fluctuation in the guide vane. When the tip clearance value was 1.00 mm, pressure fluctuation of the shroud at the impeller inlet section suddenly increases, which was closely related to the obvious leakage vortexes and a larger low pressure area.

  10. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  11. Nanocapillary Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet: A Tool for Ultrafine Maskless Surface Modification at Atmospheric Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motrescu, Iuliana; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-05-18

    With respect to microsized surface functionalization techniques we proposed the use of a maskless, versatile, simple tool, represented by a nano- or microcapillary atmospheric pressure plasma jet for producing microsized controlled etching, chemical vapor deposition, and chemical modification patterns on polymeric surfaces. In this work we show the possibility of size-controlled surface amination, and we discuss it as a function of different processing parameters. Moreover, we prove the successful connection of labeled sugar chains on the functionalized microscale patterns, indicating the possibility to use ultrafine capillary atmospheric pressure plasma jets as versatile tools for biosensing, tissue engineering, and related biomedical applications.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Pressure Fluctuation around the Tongue Region in a Centrifugal Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. L.; Dou, H.-S.; Chen, X. P.; Zhu, Z. C.; Cui, B. L.

    2016-11-01

    Pressure fluctuation near the tongue is one of the primary sources of pump vibration and noise. In order to investigate the effect of pressure fluctuation near the tongue, the RANS equations and the RNG k-epsilon turbulence model are employed to simulate the flow in the pump. The SIMPLE algorithm is applied to couple the solutions of the system of equations. Flow field within the centrifugal pump under different flow rates are obtained by simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data to verify the reliability of the calculation model. It is found that the pressure fluctuation at each monitor point is a periodic wave but non-uniform under small flow rate. When the flow rate is larger than the design flow rate, average pressure and standard deviation at monitor points is relative uniform. The dominate frequency of pressure fluctuation is the blade passing frequency and the amplitude of pressure fluctuation is regular. At small flow rate, complex unstable flow makes average pressure and standard deviation at monitor points increasing obviously. Amplitude of pressure fluctuation is larger than that of design flow rate conditions and the maximum amplitude of pressure fluctuation in frequency domain exists at the monitor point just behind the tongue along the impeller rotation direction.

  13. Electron heating in atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-04-01

    The application of nanosecond voltage pulses to weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas allows heating the electrons without considerably increasing the gas temperature, provided that the duration of the pulses is less than the critical time for the development of glow-to-arc transitions. The shift in the electron energy distribution towards higher energies causes a temporary increase in the ionization rate, and consequently a strong rise in electron density. This increase in electron density is reflected in an increased decay time of the plasma after the pulse application. Experiments in atmospheric pressure air glow discharges with gas temperatures of approximately 2000 K have been performed to explore the electron heating effect. Measurements of the temporal development of the voltage across the discharge and the optical emission in the visible after applying a 10 ns high voltage pulse to a weakly ionized steady state plasma demonstrated increasing plasma decay times from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds when the pulsed electric field was raised from 10 to 40 kV/cm. Temporally resolved photographs of the discharge have shown that the plasma column expands during this process. The nonlinear electron heating effect can be used to reduce the power consumption in a repetitively operated air plasma considerably compared to a dc plasma operation. Besides allowing power reduction, pulsed electron heating also has the potential to enhance plasma processes, which require elevated electron energies, such as excimer generation for ultraviolet lamps.

  14. Enhancement in Surface Atmospheric Pressure Variability Associated with a Major Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M; Athale, S U; Tinmaker, M I R

    1998-01-01

    Observational studies indicate that there is a close association between geomagnetic storm and meteorological parameters. Geomagnetic field lines follow closely the isobars of surface pressure . A Physical mechanism linking upper atmospheric geomagnetic storm disturbances with tropospheric weather has been proposed by the author and her group where it is postulated that vertical mixing by turbulent eddy fluctuations results in the net transport upward of positive charges originating from lower levels accompanied simultaneously by downward flow of negative charges from higher levels. The present study reports enhancement of high frequency (<15 days period) fluctuations in daily surface pressure during March 1989 in association with major geomagnetic storm (Ap index = 246) on 13 march 1989.

  15. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W; Canfield, Don E

    2009-09-10

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between approximately 2.45 and 2.2 Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era ( approximately 800-542 Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean approximately 580 Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters approximately 2.8 to 2.6 Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In approximately 1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (delta(53)Cr up to +4.9 per thousand), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may

  16. Evaluation of the diurnal intraocular pressure fluctuations and blood pressure under dehydration due to fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonen Baser

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the diurnal intraocular pressure fluctuations under dehydration conditions and the relationship between the intraocular pressure fluctuations and blood pressure. Methods: The intraocular pressures (IOP, body weights, as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP of 36 fasting healthy volunteers were recorded at 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. in the Ramadan of 2014 and two weeks after it. The data were analyzed using paired Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation analysis. Results: As the results demonstrated, the mean diurnal IOP differences of IOP, SBP, DBP, and weight were 2.67±1.33 mmHg, 9.44±8.02 mmHg, 3.33±5.94 mmHg, and 0.90±0.46 kg during the fasting period, respectively. In addition, the mean diurnal IOP differences of IOP, SBP, DBP, and weight were -0.33±1.4 mmHg (P=0.001, 0.55±7.25mmHg (P=0.003, -3.33±5.94 mmHg (P=0.001, and 0.12±0.45 kg (P=0.001 during the control period, respectively. There was a moderate correlation between the diurnal IOP and SBP differences (r=0.517, P=0.028. Conclusion: Based on the findings of the current study, the total fluid volume might have a more dominant effect on IOP peaks than the sympathetic system activity. Furthermore, the SBP was found to correlate with the IOP.

  17. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  18. Structure formation of atmospheric pressure discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexey E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper it is shown, by analyzing the results of experimental studies, that the outer boundary of the atmospheric pressure discharge pinch is determined by the condition of equality of plasma flows based on the thermal and electric field energy. In most cases, the number of charged particles coming from near-electrode zones is sufficient to compensate for losses in the discharge bulk. At large currents and enhanced heating, plasma is in the diffusion mode of losses, with recombination of charged particles at the pinch boundary. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  19. Analysis on the Pressure Fluctuation Law of a Hydraulic Exciting System with a Wave-exciter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiu-ye; KOU Zi-ming; LU Zi-rong

    2011-01-01

    A hydraulic exciting system with a wave exciter has been constructed in order to study the hydraulic vibra- tion law. The system consists of an oil source, wave-exciter and oil cylinder, and is controlled by a wave-exciter. The working principle of the hydraulic exciting system and wave exciter has been analyzed, and its excitation process has been illustrated. The law of every pipe's pressure fluctuation of the system is obtained by experiment. The theo- retical analysis and experimental data prove that the pipeline pressure periodically changes and the pipeline pressure fluctuation frequency is independently controlled by the excitation frequency of the wave-exciter. Every pipelinc's pressure wave is produced by system flow fluctuation and water hammer coupling. The pressure fluctuation rules of the system provide a theoretical basis for the study of the associated liberation system.

  20. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  1. Mechanism study on pressure fluctuation of pump-turbine runner with large blade lean angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulin, Fan; Xuhe, Wang; Baoshan, Zhu; Dongyue, Zhou; Xijun, Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Excessive pressure fluctuations in the vaneless space can cause mechanical vibration and even mechanical failures in pump-turbine operation. Mechanism studies on the pressure fluctuations and optimization design of blade geometry to reduce the pressure fluctuations have important significance in industrial production. In the present paper, two pump-turbine runners with big positive and negative blade lean angle were designed by using a multiobjective design strategy. Model test showed that the runner with negative blade lean angle not only had better power performance, but also had lower pressure fluctuation than the runner with positive blade lean angle. In order to figure out the mechanism of pressure fluctuation reduction in the vaneless;jik8space, full passage model for both runners were built and transient CFD computations were conducted to simulate the flow states inside the channel. Detailed flow field analyses indicated that the difference of low-pressure area in the trailing edge of blade pressure side were the main causes of pressure fluctuation reduction in the vaneless space.

  2. PROPER ORTHOGONAL DECOMPOSITION AND LOW-DIMENSIONAL APPROXIMATION OF WALL PRESSURE FLUCTUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shi-he; DUAN Hong-dong; LU Jing

    2004-01-01

    Wall pressure fluctuation is one of the source terms which result in the vibration of hydraulic structures. To consider both the space and time correlation of the pressure field, the method of proper orthogonal decomposition and low-dimensional approximation were used here to describe the pressure signals of the turbulent boundary layer, the apron of the stilling pond and the vertically impinging jet.

  3. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  4. Spectral Measurement of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma by Means of Digital Camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛袁静; 张广秋; 刘益民; 赵志发

    2002-01-01

    A digital camera measuring system has been used successfully to measure the space fluctuation behaviors of Induced Dielectric Barrier Discharge (IDBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure. The experimental results showed that: (1) The uniformity of electron temperature in space depends on discharge condition and structure of web electrode. For a certain web electrode the higher the discharge voltage is, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be. For a certain discharge the finer and denser the holes on web electrode are, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be (2). Digital camera is an available equipment to measure some behaviors of the plasma working at atmospheric pressure.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Pressure Fluctuation Characteristics in a Centrifugal Pump with Variable Axial Clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clearance flows in the sidewall gaps of centrifugal pumps are unsteady as well as main flows in the volute casing and impeller, which may cause vibration and noise, and the corresponding pressure fluctuations are related to the axial clearance size. In this paper, unsteady numerical simulations were conducted to predict the unsteady flows within the entire flow passage of a centrifugal pump operating in the design condition. Pressure fluctuation characteristics in the volute casing, impeller, and sidewall gaps were investigated with three axial clearance sizes. Results show that an axial clearance variation affects the pressure fluctuation characteristics in each flow domain by different degree. The greatest pressure fluctuation occurs at the blade pressure surface and is almost not influenced by the axial clearance variation which has a certainly effect on the pressure fluctuation characteristics around the tongue. The maximum pressure fluctuation amplitude in the sidewall gaps is larger than that in the volute casing, and different spectrum characteristics show up in the three models due to the interaction between the clearance flow and the main flow as well as the rotor-stator interaction. Therefore, clearance flow should be taken into consideration in the hydraulic design of centrifugal pumps.

  6. A New Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Source (APMPS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Liang; ZHANG Guixin; LI Yinan; ZHU Zhijie; WANG Xinxin; LUO Chengmu

    2008-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma source (APMPS) that can generate a large volume of plasma at an atmospheric pressure has been developed at Tsinghua University. This paper presents the design of this APMPS, the theoretical consideration of microwave plasma ignition and the simulation results, including the distributions of the electric field and power density inside the cavity as well as the accuracy of the simulation results. In addition, a method of producing an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma and some relevant observations of the plasma are also provided. It. is expected that this research would be useful for further developing atmospheric pressure microwave plasma sources and expanding the scope of their applications.

  7. Calculations of Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) Pressure Fluctuations Transmitted into a Viscoelastic Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    NUSC Technical Memorandum 851103 85lllil3 lillillN 21 June 1985 Calculations of Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) Pressure Fluctuations Transmitted...into a Viscoelastic Layer Sung H. Ko Howard H. Schloemer Submarine Sonar Department ~ - ~ • .-L ....... ’t’-~-~ ::?,$~.. \\ I I •• "’.e. !{ ft...Calculations of Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) Pressure Fluctuations Transmitted into a Viscoelastic Layer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge with Liquid Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas in contact with liquid are widely studied aiming variety of plasma applications. DC glow discharge with liquid electrode is an easy method to obtain simple and stable plasma-liquid interface. When we focus attention on liquid-phase reaction, the discharge system is considered as electrolysis with plasma electrode. The plasma electrode will supply electrons and positive ions to the liquid surface in a different way from the conventional metal electrode. However, the phenomena at plasma-liquid interface have not been understood well. In this work, we studied physical and chemical effect in liquid induced by dc atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode. The experiment was carried out using H-shaped Hoffman electrolysis apparatus filled with electrolyte, to separate the anodic and cathodic reactions. Two nozzle electrodes made of stainless steel are set about 2 mm above the liquid surface. By applying a dc voltage between the nozzle electrodes, dc glow discharges as plasma electrodes are generated in contact with liquid. As electrolyte, we used aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, AgNO3 and HAuCl4. AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are to discuss the reduction process of metal ions for synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs). OH radical generation yield in liquid was measured by chemical probe method using terephthalic acid. Discharge-induced liquid flow was visualized by Schlieren method. Electron irradiation to liquid surface (plasma cathode) generated OH- and OH radical in liquid while positive ion irradiation (plasma anode) generated H+ and OH radical. The generation efficiency of OH radical was better with plasma anode. Both Ag NPs in AgNO3 and Au NPs in HAuCl4 were synthesized with plasma cathode while only Au NPs were generated with plasma anode. Possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. The discharge-induced liquid flow such as convection pattern was strongly influenced by the gas flow on the liquid surface. This work

  9. The study of pressure fluctuations in the pressure line of the pump and of the efficiency of the vibration absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Korolyov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of experimental studies of pressure fluctuations in the pipes of piston pumps. The relevance of these studies is due to the need to reduce the pressure fluctuations that create a positive displacement pumps, due to their negative impact not only on the reliability of the pump, but the accuracy of flow measurement and pressure of the medium supplied to such pumps. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the hydraulic characteristics of pulsating flows in pressure lines piston pumps of liquefied gas, as well as the study of the effectiveness of the dampers of pressure pulsations and conformity of their parameters to the calculation. Materials and Methods: As a drive used the piston pumps − single-line and trilinear. In the tests recorded pressure fluctuations in the pressure line. For this purpose the low-inertia pressure sensors 15.0 MPa working complete with strain test station, which allows registering the pressure fluctuations at frequencies up to 10 kHz. Strain test station output signal fed to the input of the oscilloscope operating in memory mode. In all tests the pressure sensor is mounted at three points - after the piston group on the pressure line before the damping device and after it. In the experiment, three different damper was used - two new, designed by the author's method and one regular damper, which are equipped with serial piston pumps. Dampers installed vertically, the flow entering to the lower cap, and an output through the side surface. Results: The experimental results confirmed the general position of the greater efficiency of complex composite filters and the correctness of chosen method of their calculation, proposed earlier by the authors. In particular, the actual level of weakening of pressure fluctuations on developed damper with a high degree coincided with the calculated results.

  10. Electrode Configurations in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being studied for emerging medical applications including cancer treatment and wound healing. APPJs typically consist of a dielectric tube through which a rare gas flows, sometimes with an O2 or H2O impurity. In this paper, we present results from a computational study of APPJs using nonPDPSIM, a 2-D plasma hydrodynamics model, with the goal of providing insights on how the placement of electrodes can influence the production of reactive species. Gas consisting of He/O2 = 99.5/0.5 is flowed through a capillary tube at 2 slpm into humid air, and a pulsed DC voltage is applied. An APPJ with two external ring electrodes will be compared with one having a powered electrode inside and a ground electrode on the outside. The consequences on ionization wave propagation and the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) will be discussed. Changing the electrode configuration can concentrate the power deposition in volumes having different gas composition, resulting in different RONS production. An internal electrode can result in increased production of NOx and HNOx by increasing propagation of the ionization wave through the He dominated plume to outside of the tube where humid air is diffusing into the plume. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  11. Atmospheric pressure changes and unexplained variability in INR measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael E; Shaw, Robert F; Ernst, Erika J; Alexander, Bruce; Kaboli, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    Changes in atmospheric pressure may influence hepatic blood flow and drug metabolism. Anecdotal experience suggests international normalized ratio (INR) variability may be temporally related to significant atmospheric pressure changes. We investigated this potential association in a large sample of patients with multiple INRs. This is a retrospective review of outpatient anticoagulation records from the Iowa City Veteran's Affairs Medical Center and affiliated outpatient clinics from October 1999 to July 2007. All patients, receiving at least one prescription for warfarin and INR at least 30 days or more from the date of the first warfarin prescription, were identified. INRs during periods of hospitalization and vitamin K use were excluded. Proximity analysis using geocoding of ZIP codes of identified patients to the nearest National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration station was performed to assign atmospheric pressure with INR. Spearman's Rho and Pearson's correlation were used to evaluate atmospheric pressure and INR. Unique patients (1441) with 45 187 INRs were analyzed. When limited to nontherapeutic INRs following a previously therapeutic INR (1121 unique patients/5256 INRs), a small but clinically insignificant association between delta INR and delta atmospheric pressure was observed (r = -0.025; P = 0.038), but not for actual INR and atmospheric pressure (P = 0.06). Delta atmospheric pressure demonstrated greater variation during fall/winter months compared with spring/summer (0.23 vs. 0.15 inHg; P atmospheric pressure changes and INR variability. These findings refute the anecdotal experience seen in our anticoagulation clinic.

  12. PIV-based pressure fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Ragni, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2012-12-01

    The unsteady pressure field is obtained from time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) measurement within a fully developed turbulent boundary layer at free stream velocity of U ∞ = 9.3 m/s and Reθ = 2,400. The pressure field is evaluated from the velocity fields measured by Tomo-PIV at 10 kHz invoking the momentum equation for unsteady incompressible flows. The spatial integration of the pressure gradient is conducted by solving the Poisson pressure equation with fixed boundary conditions at the outer edge of the boundary layer. The PIV-based evaluation of the pressure field is validated against simultaneous surface pressure measurement using calibrated condenser microphones mounted behind a pinhole orifice. The comparison shows agreement between the two pressure signals obtained from the Tomo-PIV and the microphones with a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.6 while their power spectral densities (PSD) overlap up to 3 kHz. The impact of several parameters governing the pressure evaluation from the PIV data is evaluated. The use of the Tomo-PIV system with the application of three-dimensional momentum equation shows higher accuracy compared to the planar version of the technique. The results show that the evaluation of the wall pressure can be conducted using a domain as small as half the boundary layer thickness (0.5δ99) in both the streamwise and the wall normal directions. The combination of a correlation sliding-average technique, the Lagrangian approach to the evaluation of the material derivative and the planar integration of the Poisson pressure equation results in the best agreement with the pressure measurement of the surface microphones.

  13. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  14. Airfoil Trailing Edge Noise Generation and Its Surface Pressure Fluctuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulent flows over a NACA 0015 airfoil is performed. The purpose of such numerical study is to relate the aerodynamic surface pressure with the noise generation. The results from LES are validated against detailed surface pressure measurements...

  15. Distinguishing Thermal Fluctuations from Instrumental Error for High Pressure Charged Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Bedroya, Alek

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters such as temperature and pressure could be defined from the statistical behavior of the system. Therefore, always there exists a natural thermal fluctuations in these parameters which leads to fluctuations in experimental data. Analyzing these data fluctuations are very useful in studying systems in their critical points such as the phase transition points. But unfortunately it is hard to distinguish these fluctuations from the fluctuations due to the instrumental errors. In this article we have offered a method by which an experimenter can separate these fluctuations from each other. Additionally we have introduced a new computational idea which reduces the simulation time considerably. We have used the Euler algorithm which generally does not hold the internal energy conserved. However we have used this fact as a positive chance which allows us to travel in the phase space and reach different energies in much less time. This would be an acceptable only if system does spend enough tim...

  16. Wind-induced internal pressure fluctuations of structure with single windward opening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A frequency domain method for estimating wind-induced fluctuating internal pressure of structure with single windward opening is presented in this paper and wind tunnel tests were carried out to verify the theory. The nonlinear differential equation of intemal pressure dynamics and iteration algorithm were applied to calculate fluctuating internal pressure and time domain analysis was used to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. A simplified estimation method is also provided and its scope of application is clarified. The mechanism of internal pressure fluctuation is obtained by using the proposed method in the frequency domain and a new equivalent opening ratio is defined to evaluate internal pressure fluctuation. A series of low-rise building models with various openings and internal volumes were designed for wind tunnel tests with results agreeing well with analytical results. It is shown that the proposed frequency domain method based on Gaussian distribution of internal pressure fluctuations can be applied to predict the RMS internal pressure coefficient with adequate accuracy for any opening dimensions,while the simplified method can only be used for structure with single dominant opening. Helmholtz resonance is likely to occur when the equivalent opening ratio is adequately high, and controlling individual opening dimension is an effective strategy for avoiding Helmholtz resonance in engineering.

  17. The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Akio; Fukuda, Wakako; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cabin pressure change on the respiratory system during flight is well documented in the literature, but how the change in atmospheric pressure affects ventricular assist device (VAD) output flow has not been studied yet. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the change in VAD output using a mock circulatory system in a low-pressure chamber mimicking high altitude. Changes in output and driving pressure were measured during decompression from 1.0 to 0.7 atm and pressurization from 0.7 to 1.0 atm. Two driving systems were evaluated: the VCT system and the Mobart system. In the VCT system, output and driving pressure remained the same during decompression and pressurization. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped and recovered during pressurization. The lowest output was observed at 0.7 atm, which was 80% of the baseline driven by the Mobart system. Under a practical cabin pressure of 0.8 atm, the output driven by the Mobart system was 90% of the baseline. In the Mobart system, the output decreased as the atmospheric pressure dropped, and recovered during pressurization. However, the decrease in output was slight. In an environment where the atmospheric pressure changes, it is necessary to monitor the diaphragmatic motion of the blood pump and the driving air pressure, and to adjust the systolic:diastolic ratio as well as the positive and negative pressures in a VAD system.

  18. Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Rosat, Séverine; Rogister, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

  19. Lateral Stability Analysis of Hypersonic Vehicle under Pressure Fluctuation by Solving Mathieu Differential Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Qingkai

    2012-01-01

    Two recent test failures of Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 impose a strike to the increasingly growing enthusiasm, not only on the United States side. It is important to find out the exact failure reason, otherwise a solution is impossible. In this Note, we propose a potential failure reason from the perspective of lateral stability analysis. We argue that the time variant pressure fluctuations, which are normally omitted in classical aircraft dynamics analysis, could not be neglected in dynamic analysis of hypersonic vehicles. To demonstrate the idea, a hypersonic model is imagined in this work and its aerodynamic parameters are estimated using fundamental fluid principles. Pressure fluctuations are thereafter estimated by an empirical formula. A lateral dynamic equation is set up, taking those time variant fluctuations into account. The resulted equation is a Mathieu differential equation. Numerical solutions of this equation show that the inclusion of fluctuation terms generates more complicated dynamics ...

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma for surface modification

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Rory A

    2012-01-01

    This Book's focus and intent is to impart an understanding of the practical application of atmospheric plasma for the advancement of a wide range of current and emerging technologies. The primary key feature of this book is the introduction of over thirteen years of practical experimental evidence of successful surface modifications by atmospheric plasma methods. It offers a handbook-based approach for leveraging and optimizing atmospheric plasma technologies which are currently in commercial use. It also offers a complete treatment of both basic plasma physics and industrial plasma process

  1. Experimental research on pressure fluctuation and vibration in a mixed flow pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Houlin; Wang, Wenbo [National Research Center of Pumps and Pumping System Engineering and Technology, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China); Zhou, Xiaohua [Gree Electric Appliance Inc. of Zhuhai, Zhuhai (China)

    2016-01-15

    To study the pressure fluctuation and vibration in mixed flow pumps, we chose a mixed flow pump with specific speed of 436.1 to measure. The time domains and frequency domain at each monitoring point on diffuser and outlet elbow were analyzed, as well as the vibration frequency domain characteristics at the impeller outlet and near the motor. The results show that the peak value of pressure fluctuation peak decreased gradually with the increase of flow rate. The pressure fluctuation of each monitoring point had periodicity, and the frequency domain dominated by blade passing frequency and multiple shaft frequency. The vibration frequency of each monitoring point occurred at shaft frequency and its multiple shaft frequency. The dominant frequency and the second frequency were distributed in shaft frequency and double shaft frequency.

  2. Time series analysis of pressure fluctuation in gas-solid fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alberto S. Felipe

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to study the differentiation of states of typical fluidization (single bubble, multiple bubble and slugging in a gas-solid fluidized bed, using spectral analysis of pressure fluctuation time series. The effects of the method of measuring (differential and absolute pressure fluctuations and the axial position of the probes in the fluidization column on the identification of each of the regimes studied were evaluated. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT was the mathematic tool used to analysing the data of pressure fluctuations, which expresses the behavior of a time series in the frequency domain. Results indicated that the plenum chamber was a place for reliable measurement and that care should be taken in measurement in the dense phase. The method allowed fluid dynamic regimes to be differentiated by their dominant frequency characteristics.

  3. Spectrochemical analysis with DC glow discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekaert, J.A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Reinsberg, K.-G.

    2015-04-01

    A review on recent work and developments in dc glow discharges at atmospheric pressure when used as radiation sources for optical atomic spectrometry and mass spectrometry is given. Diagnostics and analytical features of dc glow discharges at atmospheric pressure between conductive solid electrodes as well as with a liquid as the cathode and flowing afterglow sources were described. Possibilities for the introduction of analytes in solutions, in the gaseous state and direct solids sampling were discussed. - Highlights: • The state-of-the-art and trends of development of dc glow discharges at atmospheric pressure for spectrochemical analysis are discussed.

  4. Wall pressure fluctuations in the reattachment region of a supersonic free shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary aim of this research program was to investigate the mechanisms which cause the unsteady wall-pressure fluctuations in shock wave turbulent shear layer interactions. The secondary aim was to find means to reduce the magnitude of the fluctuating pressure loads by controlling the unsteady shock motion. The particular flow under study is the unsteady shock wave interaction formed in the reattachment zone of a separated supersonic flow. Similar flows are encountered in many practical situations, and they are associated with high levels of fluctuating wall pressure. The free shear layer is formed by the flow over a backward facing step, using an existing model, with the base pressure on the step adjusted so that there is no pressure discontinuity at the lip. The shear layer therefore develops in a zero pressure gradient. The primary advantage of this flow configuration is that the reattachment process can be studied in the absence of a separation shock. The mean flow data, and some preliminary hot-wire measurements of the mass-flux fluctuations were made by Baca and Settles, Baca, Williams and Bogdonoff, who showed that the shear layer became self-similar at about 17 delta(sub 0) downstream of the lip, and that it grew at a rate typical of the observed Mach number difference (about 1/3rd the incompressible growth rate). The turbulence measurements were later extended by Hayakawa, Smits and Bogdonoff under NASA Headquarters support.

  5. WALL PRESSURE FLUCTUATIONS OF TURBULENT FLOW OVER BACKWARD-FACING STEP WITH AND WITHOUT ENTRAINMENT: MICROPHONE ARRAY MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Feng; LIU Ying-zheng; WANG Wei-zhe; CHEN Han-ping

    2006-01-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer flow over backward-facing step with and without entrainment were investigated. Digital array pressure sensors and multi-arrayed microphones were employed to acquire the time-averaged static pressure and fluctuating pressure, respectively. The differences of two flows were scrutinized in terms of static pressure characteristics, pressure fluctuations, cross-correlation and coherence of wall pressure. Introduction of the entrainment increased scale of large-scale vortical structure and reduced its convection velocity. However, shedding frequency of large-scale vortical structures was found to be the same for both flows.

  6. A root-mean-square pressure fluctuations model for internal flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1985-01-01

    A transport equation for the root-mean-square pressure fluctuations of turbulent flow is derived from the time-dependent momentum equation for incompressible flow. Approximate modeling of this transport equation is included to relate terms with higher order correlations to the mean quantities of turbulent flow. Three empirical constants are introduced in the model. Two of the empirical constants are estimated from homogeneous turbulence data and wall pressure fluctuations measurements. The third constant is determined by comparing the results of large eddy simulations for a plane channel flow and an annulus flow.

  7. Influence of the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation on the sound intensity measurement in a mean flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SHI, Xiao-jun; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    overwhelm the true source pressure in some cases. In this paper, the model of the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is described firstly. Based upon the developed model, the sound intensity caused by the TBL pressure fluctuation is calculated using the available models of the wave...

  8. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  9. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  10. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC's Non-Thermal Sanitation by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma technology sanitizes fresh fruits and vegetables without the use of consumable chemicals and without...

  11. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Comparison of the ocular perfusion pressure fluctuation between medically controlled and operated eyes with glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Engelbrecht

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the fluctuation of the OPP between eyes treated with glaucoma medication and eyes with a functioning filtering bleb. Design: cross-sectional controlled paired-eye design. Methods: Fourteen patients with POAG with one eye operated on (trabeculectomy and the fellow eye treated with medication enrolled the study. Blood pressure and intraocular pressure were measured at 7 a.m., 1 p.m., and 7 p.m. Systolic, diastolic and mean OPP were calculated for the three time points and the fluctuation (range between the highest and the lowest values compared between the eyes. Results: Mean values of the mean OPP fluctuation were 7.2 ± 3.9 mmHg and 8.5 ± 4.0 mmHg, for operated eyes and medically treated eyes, respectively (P = 0.149; mean systolic OPP fluctuation was 20.7 ± 11.2 mmHg for operated eyes and 21.2 ± 11.7 mmHg for medically treated eyes (P = 0.478; the mean diastolic OPP fluctuation was 8.4 ± 4.4 mmHg for operated eyes and 10.5 ± 5.4 mmHg for medically treated eyes (P= 0.085. Conclusion: In this small cohort of patients with POAG the mean, systolic and diastolic OPP fluctuation did not differ between the operated eyes and medically treated ones. Financial disclosure: none.

  13. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  14. Pore Pressure Response to Groundwater Fluctuations in Saturated Double-Layered Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Ying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytical solutions are developed for one-dimensional consolidation of double-layered saturated soil subjected to groundwater fluctuations. The solutions are derived by an explicit mathematical procedure using Duhamel’s theorem in conjunction with a Fourier series, when groundwater fluctuation is described by a general time-dependent function and assumed to be the pore water pressure variations at the upper boundary. Taking as an example the harmonic groundwater fluctuation, the relevant response of the excess pore water pressure is discussed in detail, and the main influencing factors of the excess pore pressure distribution are analyzed. A dimensionless parameter θ has been introduced because it significantly affects the phase and the amplitude of excess pore pressures. The influences of the coefficients of permeability and compressibility of soil on the excess pore pressure distribution are different and cannot be incorporated into the coefficient of consolidation in double-layered soil. The relative permeability ratio of two clayey soils also plays an important role on the curves of the distributions of the excess pore pressures. The effects of the thickness of the soil layer on the excess pore pressure distribution should be considered together with the dimensionless parameter θ and the permeability and compressibility of the double-layered soil system.

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced spatial ALD of silver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Bruele, F.J.; Smets, M.; Illiberi, A.; Creyghton, Y.; Buskens, P.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2014-01-01

    The authors have investigated the growth of thin silver films using a unique combination of atmospheric process elements: spatial atomic layer deposition and an atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma source. Silver films were grown on top of Si substrates with good purity a

  16. Pressure, density, temperature and entropy fluctuations in compressible turbulent plane channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the fluctuations of thermodynamic state-variables in compressible aerodynamic wall-turbulence, using results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent plane channel flow. The basic transport equations governing the behaviour of thermodynamic variables (density, pressure, temperature and entropy) are reviewed and used to derive the exact transport equations for the variances and fluxes (transport by the fluctuating velocity field) of the thermodynamic fluctuations. The scaling with Reynolds and Mach number of compressible turbulent plane channel flow is discussed. Correlation coefficients and higher-order statistics of the thermodynamic fluctuations are examined. Finally, detailed budgets of the transport equations for the variances and fluxes of the thermodynamic variables from a well-resolved DNS are analysed. Implications of these results both to the understanding of the thermodynamic interactions in compressible wall-turbulence and to possible improvements in statistical...

  17. Sulphate chemistry under pressurized oxidizing, reducing and fluctuating conditions; Sulfatkemi under trycksatta oxiderande, reducerande och fluktuerande foerhaallanden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P.; Backman, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    In the literature it has been reported that sulfur capture with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) under atmospheric fluidized bed combustion conditions reaches a maximum at about 850 deg C. Previously, the maximum has been attributed to the sintering of sorbent particles which decreases the reactive surface area. Lately, also another explanation has been reported. In this case the sulfur capture decrease at higher temperatures was concluded to be due to fluctuating oxidizing/reducing conditions in the atmospheric combustor. In this work the influence of alternating oxidizing/reducing conditions on SO{sub 2} capture at atmospheric and elevated pressure (15 bar) has been studied. In the pressurized case, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was kept high enough to prevent CaCO{sub 3} from calcining and therefore the CaSO{sub 4} would not form CaO but CaCO{sub 3} under reducing conditions. The experiments were done with a pressurized TGA by periodically changing the gas environment between oxidizing (O{sub 2}. SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and slightly reducing (CO, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) gas mixtures at different temperatures. The results from the experiments showed that under normal pressure and slightly reducing conditions CaO formation from CaSO{sub 4} increased with temperature as expected. However, no significant amounts of CaCO{sub 3} were formed from CaSO{sub 4} at elevated pressure. It was also concluded that since the formation of CaO from CaSO{sub 4} was relatively slow it could not explain the sharp sulfur capture maximum at about 850 deg C. Therefore, it was assumed that the strongly reducing zones, where CaS thermodynamically is the stable compound, play a more important role concerning the sulfur capture in fluidized bed combustors. (orig.)

  18. Buffering blood pressure fluctuations by respiratory sinus arrhythmia may in fact enhance them: a theoretical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Buchner, Teodor; Gielerak, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Using a three-compartment model of blood pressure dynamics, we analyze theoretically the short term cardiovascular variability: how the respiratory-related blood pressure fluctuations are buffered by appropriate heart rate changes: i.e. the respiratory sinus arrhythmia. The buffering is shown to be crucially dependent on the time delay between the stimulus (such as e.g. the inspiration onset) and the application of the control (the moment in time when the efferent response is delivered to the heart). This theoretical analysis shows that the buffering mechanism is effective only in the upright position of the body. It explains a paradoxical effect of enhancement of the blood pressure fluctuations by an ineffective control. Such a phenomenon was observed experimentally. Using the basis of the model, we discuss the blood pressure variability and heart rate variability under such clinical conditions as the states of expressed adrenergic drive and the tilt-test during the parasympathetic blockade or fixed rate atr...

  19. Comparison of model measured runner blade pressure fluctuations with unsteady flow analysis predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate prediction of pressure fluctuations in Francis turbines has become more and more important over the last years, due to the continuously increasing requirements of wide operating range capability. Depending on the machine operator, Francis turbines are operated at full load, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load. Each of these operating conditions is associated with different flow phenomena and pressure fluctuation levels. The better understanding of the pressure fluctuation phenomena and the more accurate prediction of their amplitude along the hydraulic surfaces can significantly contribute to improve the hydraulic and mechanical design of Francis turbines, their hydraulic stability and their reliability. With the objective to acquire a deeper knowledge about the pressure fluctuation characteristics in Francis turbines and to improve the accuracy of numerical simulation methods used for the prediction of the dynamic fluid flow through the turbine, pressure fluctuations were experimentally measured in a mid specific speed model machine. The turbine runner of a model machine with specific speed around nq,opt = 60 min-1, was instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers at the runner blades. The model machine shaft was equipped with a telemetry system able to transmit the measured pressure values to the data acquisition system. The transient pressure signal was measured at multiple locations on the blade and at several operating conditions. The stored time signal was also evaluated in terms of characteristic amplitude and dominating frequency. The dynamic fluid flow through the hydraulic turbine was numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for selected operating points. Among others, operating points at full load, part load and deep part load were calculated. For the fluid flow numerical simulations more advanced turbulence models were used, such as the detached eddy simulation (DES) and scale adaptive simulation (SAS). At the

  20. Similarity between chaos analysis and frequency analysis of pressure fluctuations in fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaaf, J; van Ommen, [No Value; Takens, F; Schouten, JC; van den Bleek, CM

    2004-01-01

    In literature the dynamic behavior of fluidized beds is frequently characterized by spectral analysis and chaos analysis of the pressure fluctuations that are caused by the gas-solids flow. In case of spectral analysis, most often the power spectral density (PSD) function is quantified, for example,

  1. Pressure Dependence of the Critical Fluctuations in the Singlet-Ground-State System, Pr3TI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Nielsen, Mourits; Buyers, W. J. L

    1979-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the magnetization and of the critical fluctuations in a polycrystalline sample of Pr3Tl have been studied by neutron scattering. Above Tc the quasielastic intensity is better reproduced by a theory In which the excitons are strongly damped by the conduction electrons th...

  2. A Spectacular Experiment Exhibiting Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Noxaïc, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The experiment described here is fairly easy to reproduce and dramatically shows the magnitude of ambient air pressure. Two circular plates of aluminum are applied one against the other. How do you make their separation very difficult? With only the help of an elastic band! You don't have to use a vacuum pump for this experiment.

  3. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above ∼140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma...... arc at atmospheric pressure to study adhesion improvement. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation with the frequency diapason between 20 and 40 kHz at the SPL of ∼150 dB was investigated. After the plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, the wettability was significantly improved...

  4. Temperature field simulation of gob influenced by atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 罗海珠; 梁运涛; 王继仁

    2015-01-01

    The current temperature field model of mine gob does not take the boundary conditions of the atmospheric pressure into account, while the actual atmospheric pressure is influenced by weather, so as to produce differences between ventilation negative pressure of the working face and the negative pressure of gas drainage in gob, thus interfering the calculated results of gob temperature field. According to the characteristics of the actual air flow and temperature change in gob, a two-dimensional temperature field model of the gob was built, and the relational model between the air pressure of intake and outlet of the gob and the atmospheric pressure was established, which was introduced into the boundary conditions of temperature field to conduct calculation. By means of analysis on the simulation example, and comparison with the traditional model, the results indicate that atmospheric pressure change had notable impact on the distribution of gob temperature field. The laboratory test system of gob temperature field was constructed, and the relative error between simulated and measured value was no greater than 9.6%, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. This work offers theoretical basis for accurate calculation of temperature and prediction of ignition source in mine gob, and has important implications on preventing spontaneous combustion of coal.

  5. Vortex dynamics and surface pressure fluctuations on a normal flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Arman; Wood, David H.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.; Ferrari, Simon W.; Hu, Yaoping

    2016-11-01

    The effect of vortex formation and interactions on surface pressure fluctuations is examined in the wake of a normal flat plate by analyzing Direct Numerical Simulations at Re =1200. A novel local maximum score-based 3D method is used to track vortex development in the region close to the plate where the major contributions to the surface pressure are generated. Three distinct vortex shedding regimes are identified by changes in the lift and drag fluctuations. The instances of maximum drag coincide with impingement of newly formed vortices on the plate. This results in large and concentrated areas of rotational and strain contributions to generation of pressure fluctuations. Streamwise vortex straining and chordwise stretching are correlated with the large ratios of streamwise to chordwise normal stresses and regions of significant rotational contribution to the pressure. In contrast at the minimum drag, the vorticity field close to the plate is disorganized, and vortex roll-up occurs farther downstream. This leads to a uniform distribution of pressure. This study was supported by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  6. Renal blood flow regulation and arterial pressure fluctuations: a case study in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    The arterial blood pressure, a physiological variable on which all renal excretory processes depend, fluctuates over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Much of this variation originates in nonrenal vascular beds to support nonrenal tasks, and the fluctuations provide a noisy environment...... a relatively noise-free environment in which to work. Because of the time-varying nature of the blood pressure, we have concentrated in this review on the now substantial body of work on the dynamics of renal blood flow regulation and the underlying mechanisms. Renal vascular control mechanisms are not simply...... of experimental hypertension provide tubular pressure records that pass statistical tests for ordered structure and sensitive dependence on initial conditions in the reconstructed state space, two of the hallmarks of deterministic chaos. These records also pass recent more stringent tests for chaos...

  7. Gas Line Pressure Fluctuation Analysis of a Gas-Liquid Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.J.J. CHEN; J.C. ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    To ensure efficient operation of metallurgical gas-liquid reactors, the gas bubbles must be uniformly distributed.For high temperature metallurgical reactors, it is impractical and unsafe to carry out visual observations.An air-water model was used to study the relationship between the bubble flow patterns and the pressure fluctuation signals.The fluctuation signals captured in the time domain were transformed into the frequency domain. Various parameters obtained from the transformed data were analysed for their suitability for delineating the bubble flow pqtterns observed.These parameters and the flow patterns were found to be well-correlated using the gas flow number.

  8. Decomposition of Chemical Chain Molecules with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansli, Murat; Tasal, Erol

    2016-10-01

    Chemical chain molecules' decomposition is an interesting subject area for the atmospheric pressure plasma applications. The effects of the atmospheric pressure argon plasma on 4-((2-methoxyphenyl)Diazenyl)Benzene-1,3,-Diol molecule at room temperature are investigated. This molecule is one of the industrial dye molecules used widely. When considering the ecological life, this molecule will be very harmful and danger. We suggest a different, easy and useful decomposing method for such molecules. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet was principally treated for this decomposing of the molecule. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) was used to characterization of the molecule after the plasma application to molecule in liquid phase with ethanol and methanol solvents. The atmospheric-pressure plasma jet of argon (Ar) as non-equilibrium has been formed by ac-power generator with frequency - 24 kHz and voltage - 12 kV. Characterizations for solutions prepared with ethanol and methanol solvents of molecule have been examined after applying (duration: 3 minutes) the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The molecule was broken at 6C-7N =8N-9C stretching peak after the plasma treatment. The new plasma photo-products for ethanol and methanol solutions were produced as 6C-7N-8N =9C (strong, varying) and 12C =17O (strong, wide) stretching peaks.

  9. Detection of atmospheric pressure loading using very long baseline interferometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, T. M.; Herring, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    Loading of the Earth by the temporal redistribution of global atmospheric mass is likely to displace the positions of geodetic monuments by tens of millimeters both vertically and horizontally. Estimates of these displacements are determined by convolving National Meteorological Center (NMC) global values of atmospheric surface pressure with Farrell's elastic Green's functions. An analysis of the distances between radio telescopes determined by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) between 1984 and 1992 reveals that in many of the cases studied there is a significant contribution to baseline length change due to atmospheric pressure loading. Our analysis covers intersite distances of between 1000 and 10,000 km and is restricted to those baselines measured more than 100 times. Accounting for the load effects (after first removing a best fit slope) reduces the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length residuals on 11 of the 22 baselines investigated. The slight degradation observed in the WRMS scatter on the remaining baselines is largely consistent with the expected statistical fluctuations when a small correction is applied to a data set having a much larger random noise. The results from all baselines are consistent with approximately 60% of the computed pressure contribution being present in the VLBI length determinations. Site dependent coefficients determined by fitting local pressure to the theoretical radial displacement are found to reproduce the deformation caused by the regional pressure to within 25% for most inland sites. The coefficients are less reliable at near coastal and island stations.

  10. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  11. Surface cleaning of metal wire by atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T., E-mail: tsubasa@oshima-k.ac.jp [Electronic-Mechanical Engineering Department, Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, 1091-1 Komatsu, Suo-Oshima, Yamaguchi (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka (Japan); Buttapeng, C. [School of Electrical and Energy Engineering, University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, 126/1, Vibhavadee-Rungsit, Dindaeng, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Furuya, S. [Faculty of Education, Gunma University, 4-2 Aramaki, Maebashi (Japan); Harada, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    In this study, the possible application of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma for the annealing of metallic wire is examined and presented. The main purpose of the current study is to examine the surface cleaning effect for a cylindrical object by atmospheric pressure plasma. The experimental setup consists of a gas tank, plasma reactor, and power supply with control panel. The gas assists in the generation of plasma. Copper wire was used as an experimental cylindrical object. This copper wire was irradiated with the plasma, and the cleaning effect was confirmed. The result showed that it is possible to remove the tarnish which exists on the copper wire surface. The experiment reveals that atmospheric pressure plasma is usable for the surface cleaning of metal wire. However, it is necessary to examine the method for preventing oxidization of the copper wire.

  12. Dynamic Runner Forces and Pressure Fluctuations on the Draft Tube Wall of a Model Pump-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Göde, E.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2016-11-01

    When Francis-turbines and pump-turbines operate at off-design conditions, typically a vortex rope develops. The vortex rope causes pressure oscillations leading to fluctuations of the forces affecting the runner. The presence of dynamic runner forces over a long period of time might damage the bearings and possibly the runner. In this experimental investigation, the fluctuating part of the runner forces and the pressure oscillations on the draft tube wall were measured on a model pump-turbine with a simplified straight cone draft tube in different operating conditions. The investigation focuses on the correlation of the pressure fluctuations frequency measured at the draft tube wall with the frequency of the fluctuating forces on the runner. The comparison between pressure fluctuations and dynamic forces shows a significant correlation in all operating points. For the comparison of different components in the spatial directions of the forces, the pressure fluctuations were separated in a synchronous part and a rotating part for operating points with higher amplitudes. The rotating pressure fluctuations correlate with the radial forces especially in the operating points with a rotating vortex rope. At frequencies with higher amplitudes in the pressure fluctuations caused by the vortex rope movement, there are also higher amplitudes in the radial forces at the same frequencies.

  13. Plant adaptation to low atmospheric pressures: potential molecular responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Gurley, William B.; Corey, Kenneth; Bucklin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing realization that it may be impossible to attain Earth normal atmospheric pressures in orbital, lunar, or Martian greenhouses, simply because the construction materials do not exist to meet the extraordinary constraints imposed by balancing high engineering requirements against high lift costs. This equation essentially dictates that NASA have in place the capability to grow plants at reduced atmospheric pressure. Yet current understanding of plant growth at low pressures is limited to just a few experiments and relatively rudimentary assessments of plant vigor and growth. The tools now exist, however, to make rapid progress toward understanding the fundamental nature of plant responses and adaptations to low pressures, and to develop strategies for mitigating detrimental effects by engineering the growth conditions or by engineering the plants themselves. The genomes of rice and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been sequenced in their entirety, and public sector and commercial DNA chips are becoming available such that thousands of genes can be assayed at once. A fundamental understanding of plant responses and adaptation to low pressures can now be approached and translated into procedures and engineering considerations to enhance plant growth at low atmospheric pressures. In anticipation of such studies, we present here the background arguments supporting these contentions, as well as informed speculation about the kinds of molecular physiological responses that might be expected of plants in low-pressure environments.

  14. MicroScale - Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, Mohan [Case Western Reserve University

    2012-01-25

    Low-temperature plasmas play an essential role in the manufacturing of integrated circuits which are ubiquitous in modern society. In recent years, these top-down approaches to materials processing have reached a physical limit. As a result, alternative approaches to materials processing are being developed that will allow the fabrication of nanoscale materials from the bottom up. The aim of our research is to develop a new class of plasmas, termed “microplasmas” for nanomaterials synthesis. Microplasmas are a special class of plasmas formed in geometries where at least one dimension is less than 1 mm. Plasma confinement leads to several unique properties including high-pressure stability and non-equilibrium that make microplasams suitable for nanomaterials synthesis. Vapor-phase precursors can be dissociated to homogeneously nucleate nanometer-sized metal and alloyed nanoparticles. Alternatively, metal salts dispersed in liquids or polymer films can be electrochemically reduced to form metal nanoparticles. In this talk, I will discuss these topics in detail, highlighting the advantages of microplasma-based systems for the synthesis of well-defined nanomaterials.

  15. Super-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-01

    Super-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry was performed using a commercial mass spectrometer by pressurizing the ion source with compressed air up to 7 atm. Similar to typical APCI source, reactant ions in the experiment were generated with corona discharge using a needle electrode. Although a higher needle potential was necessary to initiate the corona discharge, discharge current and detected ion signal were stable at all tested pressures. A Roots booster pump with variable pumping speed was installed between the evacuation port of the mass spectrometer and the original rough pumps to maintain a same pressure in the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer regardless of ion source pressure. Measurement of gaseous methamphetamine and research department explosive showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4-5 atm. Beyond 5 atm, the ion intensity decreased with further increase of pressure, likely due to greater ion losses inside the ion transport capillary. For benzene, it was found that besides molecular ion and protonated species, ion due to [M + 2H](+) which was not so common in APCI, was also observed with high ion abundance under super-atmospheric pressure condition.

  16. Measurement and Modeling of the Fluctuating Wall Pressure Field Beneath Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarski, Stephen R.

    2001-11-01

    Measurements have been performed to better understand the space-varying character of the fluctuating wall pressure field beneath a transitional boundary layer and to develop an appropriate model for the space-varying (nonhomogeneous) wavenumber-frequency wall pressure spectrum. Although a great deal is understood regarding the structure of the wall pressure field beneath turbulent boundary layers, the current understanding of the wall pressure field beneath the transitional boundary layer is incomplete. Overlooked have been critical issues concerning spatial variations in turbulence structure and the convection and decay of pressure producing disturbances—properties that define the character of the field and resulting form of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. The experiments involve measurement of the space-time fluctuating wall pressure field across the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer by means of a 64-element linear array of hearing-aid microphones and hot wire velocity measurements in the adjacent laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Because the field is nonhomogeneous, wavelet based transform methods are required to appropriately resolve the space-varying structure of the field and form of the nonhomogeneous wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  17. Posture change and intraocular pressure fluctuation%体位与眼压

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 邢小丽; 季健

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of glaucoma is complicated and multifactorial,elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the most important known risk factor.The higher the IOP and the larger the IOP fluctuation,the more damage to the optic nerve.IOP fluctuation can be affected by many factors,such as emotion,exercise and circadian rhythm,etc.Recently,the effects of postural change on IOP fluctuation are receiving more and more attention.This article reviews the effects of different body positions on IOP fluctuation,the effects of surgery,medications and aging on posture-induced IOP fluctuation and the effects of postural change on IOP fluctuation of certain special groups.The possible mechanisms of postureinduced IOP fluctuation are also discussed in this article.%青光眼的发病机制复杂,而眼压是已知的最重要的危险因素.眼压越高,眼压波动越大,青光眼性视神经损害越严重.眼压波动会受到多重因素的影响,如情绪、运动、昼夜节律等.近些年来,体位变化对眼压波动的影响得到越来越多的关注.本文主要综述各种不同体位对眼压的影响,药物和手术、年龄对眼压随体位变化的影响,体位变化对几类特殊人群眼压的影响,并对眼压随体位变化的机制进行了分析探讨.

  18. Characteristics of RF Cold Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liang; MENG Yuedong; SHU Xingsheng

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of a stable discharge at atmospheric pressure is investigated.The plasma source consisted of two closely spaced parallel-plated perforated electrodes,driven by a radio frequency power to generate a uniform cold plasma in Helium at atmospheric pressure.Both alpha and gamma modes were clearly observed.The hollow cathode effects were found in the discharge.The influence of the dielectric barrier on the discharge was also investigated by utilizing a surface-anodized aluminium electrode as the anode.

  19. Spectrum of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure and response of a polyvinylidence fluoride hydrophone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Huiliang; HE Zuoyong; BAO Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    The point power spectrum density and the wavenumber frequency spectrum density of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure were measured in water-tunnel by use of a φ8 mm hydrophone and a 20-element array, respectively. The non-dimensional representation of measured point power spectrum coincides with the measured results by Bull M. K. et. al. in wind tunnel. The convection peak can be seen clearly in the measured wavenumber frequencyspectrum and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.The response spectrum of a polyvinylidence fluoride (PVDF) hydrophone, which receiving area is 100 mm × 60 mm, was also measured. By comparing it with the response spectrum of the φ8 mm hydrophone, it is shown that the PVDF hyrdophone has a strong wavenumber filtering effect on turbulent-boundary-layer pressure fluctuation.

  20. Wavelet analysis of pressure fluctuation signals in a gas-solid fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄玲; 王晓萍; 黄海; 陈伯川; 黄春燕

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that much dynamic information is hidden in the pressure fluctuation signals of a gas-solid fluidized bed. Unfortunately, due to the random and capricious nature of this signal, it is hard to realize reliable analysis using traditional signal processing methods such as statistical analysis or spectral analysis, which is done in Fourier domain. Information in different frequency band can be extracted by using wavelet analysis. On the evidence of the composition of the pressure fluctuation signals, energy of low frequency (ELF) is proposed to show the transition of fluidized regimes from bubbling fluidization to turbulent fluidization. Plots are presented to describe the fluidized bed's evolution to help identify the state of different flow regimes and provide a characteristic curve to identify the fluidized status effectively and reliably.

  1. Phase-Plane Invariant Analysis of Pressure Fluctuations in Fluidized Beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaoliang; HE Rong; Toshiyuki Suda; Junichi Sato

    2007-01-01

    Partial agglomeration is a major problem in fluidized beds. A chaotic analytical method based on the phase-plane invariant of the pressure fluctuations in the fluidized beds has been used to warn of agglomeration at an early stage. Cold tests (no combustion) and hot tests (combustion) in fluidized beds show that the phase-plane invariant of the pressure fluctuations can distinguish the dynamic behavior of fluidized beds with different flow rates in cold tests. With combustion, when the flow rate was kept constant, agglomeration was detected very early by looking at the phase-plane invariant. The phase-plane invariant can be used to distinguish changes in fluidized beds due to changes in the flow rate, agglomeration, or various other factors. Therefore, this reliable agglomeration early warning system can be used for better control of circulating fluidized beds.

  2. Engineering a laser remote sensor for atmospheric pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A system for the remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature is described. Resonant lines in the 7600 Angstrom oxygen A band region are used and an organic dye laser beam is tuned to measure line absorption changes with temperature or pressure. A reference beam outside this band is also transmitted for calibration. Using lidar techniques, profiling of these parameters with altitude can be accomplished.

  3. Elimination of Fuel Pressure Fluctuation and Multi-injection Fuel Mass Deviation of High Pressure Common-rail Fuel Injection System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pimao; ZHANG Youtong; LI Tieshuan; XIE Lizhe

    2015-01-01

    The influence of fuel pressure fluctuation on multi-injection fuel mass deviation has been studied a lot, but the fuel pressure fluctuation at injector inlet is still not eliminated efficiently. In this paper, a new type of hydraulic filter consisting of a damping hole and a chamber is developed for elimination of fuel pressure fluctuation and multi-injection fuel mass deviation. Linear model of the improved high pressure common-rail system(HPCRS) including injector, the pipe connecting common-rail with injector and the hydraulic filter is built. Fuel pressure fluctuation at injector inlet, on which frequency domain analysis is conducted through fast Fourier transformation, is acquired at different target pressure and different damping hole diameter experimentally. The linear model is validated and can predict the natural frequencies of the system. Influence of damping hole diameter on fuel pressure fluctuation is analyzed qualitatively based on the linear model, and it can be inferred that an optimal diameter of the damping hole for elimination of fuel pressure fluctuation exists. Fuel pressure fluctuation and fuel mass deviation under different damping hole diameters are measured experimentally, and it is testified that the amplitude of both fuel pressure fluctuation and fuel mass deviation decreases first and then increases with the increasing of damping hole diameter. The amplitude of main injection fuel mass deviation can be reduced by 73%at most under pilot-main injection mode, and the amplitude of post injection fuel mass deviation can be reduced by 92%at most under main-post injection mode. Fuel mass of a single injection increases with the increasing of the damping hole diameter. The hydraulic filter proposed by this research can be potentially used to eliminate fuel pressure fluctuation at injector inlet and improve the stability of HPCRS fuel injection.

  4. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure in hypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T; Mendoza, B

    2017-03-30

    We performed a study of the systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. We worked with a group of eight adult hypertensive volunteers, four men and four women, with ages between 18 and 27 years in Mexico City during a geomagnetic storm in 2014. The data was divided by gender, age, and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: correlations, bivariate analysis, and superposed epoch (within a window of 2 days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the natural variables. The correlation analysis indicated a correlation between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the atmospheric pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analyses showed that the largest correlations are between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure and the horizontal geomagnetic field component. Finally, the superposed epoch analysis showed that the largest number of significant changes in the blood pressure under the influence of geomagnetic field occurred in the systolic blood pressure for men.

  5. Dimensional crossover in Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows in the presence of pressure fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We analyze Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interfacial dynamics in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The pressure fluctuations are scale invariant and are modeled by an effective time dependent acceleration field with power law exponent -2. The group theory based analysis is applied to 3D rectangular p2mm, 3D square p4mm and 2D pm1 RM flows. From the symmetry analysis, we find that 3D square and 2D bubbles form a one parameter family and 3D rectangular bubbles form a two parameter family. The families are parametrized by the principal curvature(s). The bubble velocity and Fourier amplitude profiles exhibit RM type behavior for weak accelerations and RT type behavior for strong accelerations. Under the dimensional crossover, the bubbles elongated in one of the directions reduce to the 2D solutions, whereas the bubbles elongated in the other direction flatten. Stability analysis shows that 3D square bubbles are stable with respect to isotropic as well as anisotropic perturbations. 2D bubbles are unstable to 3D perturbations. No continuous transition is possible between 3D square and 2D bubbles and the dimensional crossover is discontinuous for both strong and weak pressure fluctuations. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  6. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA.

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Based Flame Control and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Based Flame Control and Diagnostics 5a...to 10%)  Flame speed enhancement (>20%)  Extension of lean limit (factor of two)  Distributed ignition  Development of new diagnostics

  8. Einstein's Tea Leaves and Pressure Systems in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Amit; Marshall, John

    2010-01-01

    Tea leaves gather in the center of the cup when the tea is stirred. In 1926 Einstein explained the phenomenon in terms of a secondary, rim-to-center circulation caused by the fluid rubbing against the bottom of the cup. This explanation can be connected to air movement in atmospheric pressure systems to explore, for example, why low-pressure…

  9. Modes of Homogeneous Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure in Helium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-Hui; WANG De-Zhen

    2004-01-01

    @@ The discharge modes of a homogeneous barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure in helium are investigated with a one-dimensional fluid model It is found that, either in single peak discharge or in multipeak discharge, there are two discharge modes: glow and Townsend modes. The structure and features of the two modes are compared.The conditions forming the two modes are discussed.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Glassy carbon plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). He gas, gas mixtures of He and reactive gases such as O2, CO2 and NH3, Ar gas and Ar/NH3 gas mixture were used as treatment gases. The oxygen and nitrogen contents on the surface as well as defect...

  11. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods (P atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  12. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of carbon fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Michelsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibres are continuously treated with dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure in various gas conditions for adhesion improvement in mind. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis indicated that oxygen is effectively introduced onto the carbon fibre surfaces by He, He...

  14. Atmospheric pressure CVD of SNO2 and ZNO:AL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Kniknie, B.J.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Mannie, G.; Thune, P.; Illiberi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) is a highly cost effective method of depositing transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). In this work, insights in alcohol addition in the widely applied SnO2 process are discussed, including high resolution TEM images. Furthermore, the APCVD process of ZnO:Al was demon

  15. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, A., E-mail: alexandre.giuliani@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jamme, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Rouam, V.; Wien, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laprevote, O. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse, ICSN-CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Chimie-Toxicologie Analytique et cellulaire, IFR 71, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Refregiers, M. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with a vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) beamline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The set up allows photoionization up to 20 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared to classical atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), our set up offers spectral purity and tunability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allows photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile and hard to vaporize molecules. - Abstract: We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  16. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, P.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  17. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  18. The diversification of Paleozoic fire systems and fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew C; Glasspool, Ian J

    2006-07-18

    By comparing Silurian through end Permian [approximately 250 million years (Myr)] charcoal abundance with contemporaneous macroecological changes in vegetation and climate we aim to demonstrate that long-term variations in fire occurrence and fire system diversification are related to fluctuations in Late Paleozoic atmospheric oxygen concentration. Charcoal, a proxy for fire, occurs in the fossil record from the Late Silurian (approximately 420 Myr) to the present. Its presence at any interval in the fossil record is already taken to constrain atmospheric oxygen within the range of 13% to 35% (the "fire window"). Herein, we observe that, as predicted, atmospheric oxygen levels rise from approximately 13% in the Late Devonian to approximately 30% in the Late Permian so, too, fires progressively occur in an increasing diversity of ecosystems. Sequentially, data of note include: the occurrence of charcoal in the Late Silurian/Early Devonian, indicating the burning of a diminutive, dominantly rhyniophytoid vegetation; an apparent paucity of charcoal in the Middle to Late Devonian that coincides with a predicted atmospheric oxygen low; and the subsequent diversification of fire systems throughout the remainder of the Late Paleozoic. First, fires become widespread during the Early Mississippian, they then become commonplace in mire systems in the Middle Mississippian; in the Pennsylvanian they are first recorded in upland settings and finally, based on coal petrology, become extremely important in many Permian mire settings. These trends conform well to changes in atmospheric oxygen concentration, as predicted by modeling, and indicate oxygen levels are a significant control on long-term fire occurrence.

  19. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Bisbee, Patricia A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Birmele, Michele N.; Prior, Ronald L.; Perchonok, Michele; Dixon, Mike; Yorio, Neil C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12 kPa, respectively. Plants were harvested at 21 days after planting, with aerial shoots and swollen hypocotyls (edible portion of the radish referred to as the “root” hereafter) separated immediately upon removal from the chambers. Samples were subsequently evaluated for their sensory characteristics (color, taste, overall appearance, and texture), taste-determining factors (glucosinolate and soluble carbohydrate content and myrosinase activity), proximate nutrients (protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrate) and potential health benefit attributes (antioxidant capacity). In roots of control plants, concentrations of glucosinolate, total soluble sugar, and nitrate, as well as myrosinase activity and total antioxidant capacity (measured as ORACFL), were 2.9, 20, 5.1, 9.4, and 1.9 times greater than the amount in leaves, respectively. There was no significant difference in total antioxidant capacity, sensory characteristics, carbohydrate composition, or proximate nutrient content among the three pressure treatments. However, glucosinolate content in the root and nitrate concentration in the leaf declined as the atmospheric pressure decreased, suggesting perturbation to some nitrogen-related metabolism.

  20. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion

    Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high-power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above approximately 140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma...... and the material surface, and thus many reactive species generated in the plasma can reach the surface before inactivated, and be efficiently utilized for surface modification. In the present work polyester plates are treated using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and a gliding arc at atmospheric pressure...... irradiation, the water contact angle dropped markedly, and tended to decrease furthermore at higher power. The ultrasonic irradiation during the plasma treatment consistently improved the wettability. Oxygen containing polar functional groups were introduced at the surface by the plasma treatment...

  1. Fluctuation pressure on a bio-membrane confined within a parabolic potential well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. B. Freund

    2012-01-01

    A compliant bio-membrane with a nominally flat reference configuration is prone to random transverse deflections when placed in water,due primarily to the Brownian motion of the water molecules.On the average,these fluctuations result in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium between the entropic energy of the water and the total free energy of the membrane.When the membrane is in close proximity to a parallel surface,that surface restricts the fluctuations of the membrane which,in turn,results in an increase in its free energy.The amount of that increase depends on the degree of confinement,and the resulting gradient in free energy with degree of confinement implies the existence of a confining pressure.In the present study,we assume that the confinement is in the form of a continuous parabolic potential well resisting fluctuation.Analysis leads to a closed form expression for the mean pressure resulting from this confinement,and the results are discussed within the broader context of results in this area.In particular,the results provide insights into the roles of membrane stiffness,number of degrees of freedom in the model of the membrane and other system parameters.

  2. Atmospheric pressure loading parameters from very long baseline interferometry observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, D. S.; Gipson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loading produces a primarily vertical displacement of the Earth's crust. This displacement is correlated with surface pressure and is large enough to be detected by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. Using the measured surface pressure at VLBI stations, we have estimated the atmospheric loading term for each station location directly from VLBI data acquired from 1979 to 1992. Our estimates of the vertical sensitivity to change in pressure range from 0 to -0.6 mm/mbar depending on the station. These estimates agree with inverted barometer model calculations (Manabe et al., 1991; vanDam and Herring, 1994) of the vertical displacement sensitivity computed by convolving actual pressure distributions with loading Green's functions. The pressure sensitivity tends to be smaller for stations near the coast, which is consistent with the inverted barometer hypothesis. Applying this estimated pressure loading correction in standard VLBI geodetic analysis improves the repeatability of estimated lengths of 25 out of 37 baselines that were measured at least 50 times. In a root-sum-square (rss) sense, the improvement generally increases with baseline length at a rate of about 0.3 to 0.6 ppb depending on whether the baseline stations are close to the coast. For the 5998-km baseline from Westford, Massachusetts, to Wettzell, Germany, the rss improvement is about 3.6 mm out of 11.0 mm. The average rss reduction of the vertical scatter for inland stations ranges from 2.7 to 5.4 mm.

  3. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  4. Implications of high amplitude atmospheric CO2 fluctuations on past millennium climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Thomas; Kouwenberg, Lenny; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Visscher, Henk

    2010-05-01

    Stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores. Stomatal frequency based CO2 trends from the USA and NW European support the presence of significant CO2 variability during the first half of the last millennium (Kouwenberg et al., 2005; Wagner et al., 2004; van Hoof et al., 2008). The timing of the most significant perturbation in the stomata records (1200 AD) is in agreement with an observed CO2 fluctuation in the D47 Antarctic ice-core record (Barnola et al., 1995; van Hoof et al., 2005). The amplitude of the stomatal frequency based CO2 changes (> 34ppmv) exceeds the maximum amplitude of CO2 variability in the D47 ice core (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, v. 105, no. 41, pp. 15815-15818 Wagner F., L.L.R. Kouwenberg, T.B. van Hoof and H. Visscher 2004. Reproducibility of Holocene atmospheric CO2 records based on stomatal frequency. Quartenary Science Reviews. V. 23, pp. 1947-1954

  5. Removal of paper microbial contamination by atmospheric pressure DBD discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrajova, J.; Chalupova, L.; Novotny, O.; Cech, J.; Krcma, F.; Stahel, P.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper the removal of the microbial contamination from paper material using the plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure is investigated. The Aspergillus niger has been chosen as a bio-indicator enabling to evaluate the effect of plasma assisted microbial inactivation. Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operated at atmospheric pressure was used for the paper sterilization. The working gas (nitrogen, argon and helium), plasma exposition time and the plasma power density were varied in order to see the effect of the plasma treatment on the fungi removal. After the treatment, the microbial abatement was evaluated by the standard plate count method. This proved a positive effect of the DBD plasma treatment on fungi removal. Morphological and colorimetric changes of paper substrate after plasma treatment were also investigated.

  6. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  7. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  8. Peptide fragmentation induced by radicals at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Laiko, Victor V; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2009-04-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essential atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to electron capture dissociation/electron transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD), along with the y-/b-type fragments that are specific to collision-activated dissociation (CAD). In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source.

  9. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Linczer, John; Go, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach.

  10. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  11. Pressure Fluctuations in the Gasostatic Bearing Supply System on Supercritical Operation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodan Nikolay Vasilevich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the oscillatory mode occurring in the gap between the stator and the rotor in gas-static bearing during the outflow of under expanded gas jets out of the supply system, which interacts with the surface of the rotor. The results of studies on the oscillation regimes, their causes, mechanisms and frequency characteristics of pressure fluctuations in the working fluid supply system and the lubricating layer of gas bearing. A one-dimensional model of central shock oscillations in a gas jet leaking on a perpendicular barrier is considered. Experiments were carried out. The regions, where oscillation regimes exist are revealed.

  12. Model for energy transfer by coherent Fermi pressure fluctuations in quantum soft matter

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    A 1-dimensional model for coherent quantum energy transfer through a complex of compressible boxes is investigated by numerical integration of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation. Energy is communicated from one box to the next by the resonant fluctuating Fermi pressure of the electrons in each box pushing on the walls and doing work on adjacent boxes. Parameters are chosen similar to the chain molecules of typical light harvesting complexes. For some parameter choices the system is found to have an instability leading to self-induced coherent energy transfer transparency.

  13. Large-scale fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric and oceanic oxygen levels from the record of U in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, C. A.; Bekker, A.; Planavsky, N. J.; Scott, C. T.; Gill, B. C.; Li, C.; Podkovyrov, V.; Maslov, A.; Konhauser, K. O.; Lalonde, S. V.; Love, G. D.; Poulton, S. W.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-05-01

    The atmosphere-ocean system experienced a progressive change from anoxic to more oxidizing conditions through time. This oxidation is traditionally envisaged to have occurred as two stepwise increases in atmospheric oxygen at the beginning and end of the Proterozoic Eon. Here, we present a study of the redox-sensitive element, uranium, in organic-rich shales to track the history of Earth's surface oxidation at an unprecedented temporal resolution. Fluctuations in the degree of uranium enrichment in organic-rich shales suggest that the initial rise of atmospheric oxygen ~2.4 billion yr ago was followed by a decline to less oxidizing conditions during the mid-Proterozoic. This redox state persisted for almost 1 billion yr, ending with a second oxygenation event in the latest Neoproterozoic. The U record tracks major fluctuations in surface oxygen level and challenges conventional models that suggest the Earth underwent a unidirectional rise in atmospheric oxygen during the Precambrian.

  14. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan

    volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar......The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low...... alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles...

  15. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T

    2011-10-12

    The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the oxidation state of basalts and their mantle sources has remained constant since 3.5 billion years ago. Here we propose that a decrease in the average pressure of volcanic degassing changed the oxidation state of sulphur in volcanic gases, initiating the modern biogeochemical sulphur cycle and triggering atmospheric oxygenation. Using thermodynamic calculations simulating gas-melt equilibria in erupting magmas, we suggest that mostly submarine Archaean volcanoes produced gases with SO(2)/H(2)S atmosphere.

  16. Atmospheric pressure thermospray ionization using a heated microchip nebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Auriola, Seppo

    2009-10-30

    When a standard atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) ion source is used without applying the corona discharge or photoirradiation, atmospheric pressure thermospray ionization (APTSI) of various compounds can be achieved. Although largely ignored, this phenomenon has recently gained interest as an alternative ionization technique. In this study, this technique is performed for the first time on a miniaturized scale using a microchip nebulizer. Sample ionization with the presented microchip-APTSI (microAPTSI) is achieved by applying only heat and gas flow to a nebulizer chip, without any other methods to promote gas-phase ionization. To evaluate the performance of the described microAPTSI setup, ionization efficiency for a set of test compounds was monitored as the microchip positioning, temperature, nebulizer gas flow rate, sample solution composition, and solvent flow rate were varied. The microAPTSI mass spectra of the test compounds were also compared to those obtained with ESI and APCI. The microAPTSI produces ESI-like spectra with low background noise, favoring the formation of protonated or deprotonated molecules of compounds that are ionizable in solution. Multiple charging of peptides without in-source fragmentation was also observed. Unlike ESI, however, the microAPTSI source can tolerate the presence of mobile phase additives like trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) without significant ion suppression. The microAPTSI source can be used with standard mass spectrometer ion source hardware, being a unique alternative to the present interfacing techniques.

  17. Transmission geometry laserspray ionization vacuum using an atmospheric pressure inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Inutan, Ellen D; Manly, Cory D; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    This represents the first report of laserspray ionization vacuum (LSIV) with operation directly from atmospheric pressure for use in mass spectrometry. Two different types of electrospray ionization source inlets were converted to LSIV sources by equipping the entrance of the atmospheric pressure inlet aperture with a customized cone that is sealed with a removable glass plate holding the matrix/analyte sample. A laser aligned in transmission geometry (at 180° relative to the inlet) ablates the matrix/analyte sample deposited on the vacuum side of the glass slide. Laser ablation from vacuum requires lower inlet temperature relative to laser ablation at atmospheric pressure. However, higher inlet temperature is required for high-mass analytes, for example, α-chymotrypsinogen (25.6 kDa). Labile compounds such as gangliosides and cardiolipins are detected in the negative ion mode directly from mouse brain tissue as intact doubly deprotonated ions. Multiple charging enhances the ion mobility spectrometry separation of ions derived from complex tissue samples.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  19. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Topala, Ionut; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol No. 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Grigoras, Constantin, E-mail: andrei.nastuta@uaic.ro [Physiopathology Department, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2011-03-16

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  20. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  1. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilde, M.; Zardini, A. A.; Hong, J.; Tschiskale, M.; Emanuelsson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric partitioning between gas and condensed phase of organic molecules is poorly understood, and discrepancies exist between predicted and observed concentrations of secondary organic aerosols. A key problem is the lack of information about thermodynamic properties of semi- and low volatile organic molecules. Saturation vapor pressure and the associated temperature dependence (dH) are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. In this work we combine experiments and thermodynamic modeling to investigate these parameters for a series of polyols, so-called sugar alcohols. These polyols are common in the water soluble fraction of atmospheric aerosols. In our experimental system sub-micron particles are generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol is selected using a differential mobility analyzer. The particles are allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using thermodynamic modeling. Results are presented and discussed in context of atmospheric gas to particle partitioning.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of bubbling fluidization through recurrence rate analysis of pressure fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Sedighikamal; Reza Zarghami

    2013-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations signals of a lab-scale fluidized bed (15 cm inner diameter and 2 m height) at different superficial gas velocities were measured.Recurrence plot (RP) and recurrence rate (RR),and the simplest variable of recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) were used to analyze the pressure signals.Different patterns observed in RP reflect different dynamic behavior of the system under study.It was also found that the variance of RR (σ2RR) could reveal the peak dominant frequencies (PDF) of different dynamic systems:completely periodic,completely stochastic,Lorenz system,and fluidized bed.The results were compared with power spectral density.Additionally,the diagram of σ2RR provides a new technique for prediction of transition velocity from bubbling to turbulent fluidization regime.

  3. Time and space variability of spectral estimates of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavero, Flavio G.; Einaudi, Franco

    1987-01-01

    The temporal and spatial behaviors of atmospheric pressure spectra over the northern Italy and the Alpine massif were analyzed using data on surface pressure measurements carried out at two microbarograph stations in the Po Valley, one 50 km south of the Alps, the other in the foothills of the Dolomites. The first 15 days of the study overlapped with the Alpex Intensive Observation Period. The pressure records were found to be intrinsically nonstationary and were found to display substantial time variability, implying that the statistical moments depend on time. The shape and the energy content of spectra depended on different time segments. In addition, important differences existed between spectra obtained at the two stations, indicating a substantial effect of topography, particularly for periods less than 40 min.

  4. Atmospheric pressure ion focusing with a vortex stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Yuri N; Pervukhin, Viktor V

    2011-09-30

    For successful operation of ionization analysis techniques an efficient sampling and sample ion transportation into an analytical path are required. This is of particular importance for atmospheric pressure ionization sources like corona discharge, electrospray, MALDI, ionization with radioactive isotopes ((3)H, (63)Ni) that produce nonuniform spatial distribution of sample ions. The available methods of sample ion focusing with electric fields are either efficient at reduced pressure (to 1 Torr) or feature high sample losses. In this paper we suggest to use a highly whirled gas stream for atmospheric pressure ion focusing. We use a (63)Ni radioactive source to produce an ionized bipolar sample at atmospheric pressure. It is shown by experiments that compared to an aspiration method a forced highly whirled vortex stream allows one to enhance the efficiency of remote ionized sample collection at distances equal to the vortex sampler diameter by an order of magnitude. With a vortex stream, a sixfold increase in the efficiency of the radial ionized sample collection has been obtained. It may be deduced that with the vortex stream remote sampling obtains a new feature which is characterized by a considerable enhancement of the efficiency of the ionized sample collection and can be called as a "gas-dynamic" ionized sample focusing. Considered is the effect of recombination losses of the ionized sample during the remote sampling thereof with the vortex sampler. Prospects for a practical implementation of the vortex sampler for solving the problems of the customs control over the smuggling of radioactive α and β sources are made based on the research results.

  5. Deconstructing an Atmospheric Model: Variability and Response, Unstable Periodic Orbits, and the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, Andrei; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) provide the so-called skeletal dynamics of a sufficiently well-behaved chaotic dynamical system and provide a powerful tool for relating the response of the system to its variability. In fact, UPOs constitute natural modes of variability of the system, and resonant behaviour of the response of the system to can be associated to good correspondence between the geometry of one UPO and of the forcing term and between their periodicities. We have here analyzed a simple barotropic model of the atmosphere and constructed and found algorithmically a large number of UPOs. We have then studied the change in the climate resulting from changes in the forcing, in the orography, and in the Eckman friction. The most interesting result is the presence of a strong resonance in the orographic response on time scales of the order of about 3 days, corresponding to forced waves. Interestingly, such a spectral feature is entirely absent from the natural variability of the system and correspond to the excitation of a specific group of UPOs. This clarifies the fact that, as opposed to the case of quasi-equilibrium systems, it is far from obvious to associate forced and free variability in the spirit of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). Reassuringly, ysing the complementary point of view of covariant Lyapunov vectors, we discover that the forcing projects substantially in the stable direction of the flow, which is exactly the mathematical setting under which the FDT cannot be applied.

  6. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper.

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced spatial ALD of silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruele, Fieke J. van den, E-mail: Fieke.vandenBruele@tno.nl; Smets, Mireille; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul [Holst Centre/TNO, High Tech Campus 31, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creyghton, Yves [TNO, High Tech Campus 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Buskens, Pascal [TNO, Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven, The Netherlands and DWI Leibniz-Institut für Interaktive Materialien, Aachen (Germany); Roozeboom, Fred [TNO, High Tech Campus 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    The authors have investigated the growth of thin silver films using a unique combination of atmospheric process elements: spatial atomic layer deposition and an atmospheric pressure surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma source. Silver films were grown on top of Si substrates with good purity as revealed by resistivity values as low as 18 μΩ cm and C- and F-levels below detection limits of energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The growth of the silver films starts through the nucleation of islands that subsequently coalesce. The authors show that the surface island morphology is dependent on surface diffusion, which can be controlled by temperature within the deposition temperature range of 100–120 °C.

  8. [Spectral diagnosis of plasma jet at atmospheric pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi; Tang, Xiao-liang; Qiu, Gao

    2008-12-01

    A new approach to surface modification of materials using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is presented in the present paper. The emission spectral lines of argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure were recorded by the grating spectrograph HR2000 and computer software. The argon plasma emission spectra, ranging from 300nm to 1000 nm, were measured at different applied voltage. Compared to air plasma emission spectra under the same circumstance, it is shown that all of the spectral lines are attributed to neutral argon atoms. The spectral lines 763.51 and 772.42 nm were chosen to estimate the electron excitation temperature. The purpose of the study is to research the relationship between the applied voltage and temperature to control the process of materials' surface modification promptly. The results show that electron excitation temperature is in the range of 0.1-0.5 eV and increases with increasing applied voltage. In the process of surface modification under the plasma jet, the infrared radiation thermometer was used to measure the material surface temperature under the plasma jet. The results show that the material surface temperature is in the range of 50-100 degrees C and it also increases with increasing applied voltage. Because the material surface was under the plasma jet and its temperature was decided by the plasma, and the material surface temperature increased with increasing the macro-temperature of plasma jet, the relationship between the surface temperature and applied voltage indicates the relationship between the macro-temperature of the plasma jet and the applied voltage approximately. The experimental results indicate that DBD plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is a new approach to improving the quality of materials' surface modification, and spectral diagnosis has proved to be a kind of workable method by choosing suitable applied voltage.

  9. Diagnostics of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Discharge Plasmas in Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锐; 詹如娟; 温晓辉

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure surface discharge is shown to have great prospects for a number of industrial applications.To acquire better results in application fields and considering that the study of the basic parameters including electron temperature and electron density is desirable,we develop an equivalent circuit model and the diagnostic techniques based on optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurement in our laboratory.The electron temperature has been determined to be about 0.7eV by a Fermi-Dirac model.The electron density has been calculated to be near 1010 cm-3 from a time resolved electrical measurement(Ohmic heating method).

  10. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  11. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  12. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  13. Improvements of model-test method for cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation in marine propeller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Jeung-Hoon; HAN Jae-Moon; PARK Hyung-Gil; SEO Jong-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Although the prediction of propeller cavitation-induced pressure fluctuation strongly depends on the model-scalemeasurement in a cavitation tunnel,there is still a lack of correlation with full-scale data.This paper deals with the enhancement of such a correlation deficiency by improving the conventional model-test technique,two majors of which are in the following.One is to take into account the boundary layer effect of wooden fairing plate at the ceiling of water cavitation tunnel.The other is to avoid the resonance frequency range of model-ship via adjusting the revolution speed of model propeller.Through a case study,for which both model and full-scale test data are available,the improved method in this study shows its validness,and furthermore a close correlation with full scale measurement.

  14. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  15. Charging of aerosol and nucleation in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The paper focuses on applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc corona, streamer, spark and ac dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) in aerosol processes for materials and environment. Since aerosol kinematics depends mainly on electric forces acting on charged particles, the two mechanisms of aerosol charging by the collection of ions are presented in corona, post-corona and DBDs. In such defined charging conditions, field and diffusion charging laws are depicted, with respect to applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol. Then key parameters controlling the formation by nucleation and the growth by coagulation of particles in plasmas are presented. Sources of vapor leading to nucleated nanoparticles are depicted in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: (i) when filamentary dc streamer and spark as well as ac-DBDs interact with metal or dielectric surfaces and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The composition, size and structure of primary nanoparticles as well as the final size of agglomerates are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients around each filament as well as the transit time).

  16. Parametric study of radiofrequency helium discharge under atmospheric pressure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAFDAR HUSSAIN; HAFIZ IMRAN AHMAD QAZI; SHANAWER NIAZ; MANZOOR AHMAD BADAR

    2016-12-01

    The parameters of radio frequency helium discharge under atmospheric pressure were studied by electrical and optical measurements using high voltage probe, current probe and optical emission spectroscopy. Two discharge modes $\\alpha$ and $\\gamma$ were observed within certain limits. During $\\alpha$ to $\\gamma$ mode transition, a decrease in voltage (280–168 V), current (2.05–1.61 A) and phase angle (76$^{\\rm o}-56^{\\rm o}$) occurred. The discharge parameters such as resistance, reactance, sheath thickness, electron density, excitation temperature and gas temperature were assessed by electrical measurements using equivalent circuit model and optical emission spectroscopy. In $\\alpha$ mode, the discharge current increased from 1.17 to 2.05 A, electron density increased from $0.19 \\times 10^{12} {\\rm to} 0.47 \\times 10^{12} {\\rm cm}^{−3}$ while sheath thickness decreased from 0.40 to 0.25 mm. The excitation temperatures in the $\\alpha$ and $\\gamma$ modes were 3266 and 4500 K respectively, evaluated by Boltzmann’s plot method. The estimated gas temperature increased from 335 K in the α mode to 485 K in the γ mode, suggesting that the radio frequency atmospheric pressure helium discharge can be used for surface treatment applications.

  17. Microwave heating systems for atmospheric pressure: Nonequilibrium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, G.E.; Dandl, R.A. (AMPC, Inc., Carlsbad, CA (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma-chemical processing is attracting increasing interest because of the possibility of creating mixtures of active species that would not be available in thermal equilibrium. For significant throughput of reactants it would be advantageous to create nonequilibrium plasmas in large volumes of atmospheric-pressure mixtures of gases. Techniques for accomplishing this are very limited at present. Here they describe a novel microwave approach to creating nonequilibrium plasmas in large volumes of atmospheric-pressure gases using pulses of microwave radiation with very high peak power that are focused by quasi-optical techniques at one or more points in the interior of the reaction chamber. A new type of microwave source, the Plasma Electron Microwave Source (PEMS), is able to produce the require power levels by storing cw microwave power in a mirror-confined, relativistic-electron plasma and periodically transforming a fraction of that stored energy into intense microwave pulses. This approach avoids many of the limitations inherent in resonant cavity approaches and is expected to permit ultrahigh purity discharges to be produced.

  18. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guimin; ZHANG Guanjun; SHI Xingmin; MA Yue; WANG Ning; LI Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet Was designed,which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply,and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge Was achieved.Two kinds of typical bacteria,i.e.,the Staphylococcus aureus(S.aurens)and Escherichia coil(E.coil),were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma.The killing log value (KLV)of S.aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E.coil up to 5.36 with 60 s,respectively.According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment.it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation,while the heat,electric field and UV photons had little effect.

  19. Surface modification of polycarbonate in homogeneous atmospheric pressure discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIra, M; Trunec, D; St' ahel, P; BursIkova, V; Navratil, Z [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2008-01-07

    A homogeneous atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge was used for the surface modification of polycarbonate (PC). The discharge was generated between two planar metal electrodes, the top electrode was covered by glass and the bottom electrode was covered by a polymer sample. The discharge burned in pure nitrogen or in a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen. The surface properties of both treated and untreated polymers were characterized by atomic force microscopy, surface free energy (SFE) measurements and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The influence of the treatment time and power input to the discharge on the surface properties of polymers was studied. The ageing of treated samples was also investigated. The treatment of polymers in the homogeneous atmospheric pressure discharge was homogeneous and the polymer surfaces showed a smaller degree of roughness in comparison with the polymer surfaces treated in a filamentary discharge. The SFE of the treated PC obtained at optimum conditions was 53 mJ m{sup -2} and the corresponding contact angle of water was 38{sup 0}. The maximum decrease in the SFE during ageing was about 13%. The analysis of the chemical composition showed an increase in the nitrogen concentration in the surface layer, but almost a zero increase in the oxygen concentration. This result was discussed concerning the measured values of the SFE measurement.

  20. Body position and intraocular pressure fluctuation%体位与眼压波动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯瑞莉; 李金瑛

    2013-01-01

    眼压较大波动是造成青光眼视神经损伤的重要因素,而眼压波动受多重因素影响,体位是其中之一.本文通过介绍体位变化时间对眼压的影响、连续体位变化对眼压的影响、不同卧位对眼压的影响、倒立举重等对眼压的影响、正常人与青光眼患者体位变化眼压比较等来阐述体位变化与眼压的关系,从上巩膜静脉压、血压、眼内容物与前房深度、眼灌注压、激素等五个方面解释体位变化如何影响眼压,并阐述了体位影响眼压的意义.%The fluctuation of intraocular pressure(IOP) is an important factor causing glaucomatous optic nerve injury,and posture is one of the most important factors affecting IOP.The effects of body posision on IOP is receiving more and more attention.This article reviews the research progress about the posture impacts on IOP.The objective is to explain the relationship between position change and IOP by presenting the effects of postural changing time,continuous postural change,different supine position,handstand and weightlifling,and summarize how the postural change affect the IOP from five aspects:episcleral venous pressure,blood pressure,intraocular contents and anterior chamber depth,ocular perfusion pressure,and the change of adrenalin.

  1. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  2. Surface Modification by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma for Improved Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas Scott

    An atmospheric pressure plasma source operating at temperatures below 150?C and fed with 1.0-3.0 volume% oxygen in helium was used to activate the surfaces of the native oxide on silicon, carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024. Helium and oxygen were passed through the plasma source, whereby ionization occurred and ˜10 16 cm-3 oxygen atoms, ˜1015 cm -3 ozone molecules and ˜1016 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecules (O21Deltag) were generated. The plasma afterglow was directed onto the substrate material located 4 mm downstream. Surface properties of the plasma treated materials have been investigated using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The work presented herein establishes atmospheric-pressure plasma as a surface preparation technique that is well suited for surface activation and enhanced adhesive bond strength in a variety of materials. Atmospheric plasma activation presents an environmentally friendly alternative to wet chemical and abrasive methods of surface preparation. Attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy was used to study the aging mechanism of the native oxide on silicon. During storage at ambient conditions, the water contact angle of a clean surface increased from composite, stainless steel type 410, and aluminum alloy 2024 was demonstrated with the atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma. All surfaces studied were converted from a hydrophobic state with a water contact angle of 65° to 80° into a hydrophilic state with a water contact angle between 20° and 40° within 5 seconds of plasma exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the carbon atoms on the carbon-fiber/epoxy composite were oxidized, yielding 17 atom% carboxylic acid groups, 10% ketones or aldehydes and 9% alcohols. Analysis of stainless steel and aluminum by XPS illustrate oxidation of the metal

  3. Centrifugal compressor surge detecting method based on wavelet analysis of unsteady pressure fluctuations in typical stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmaylov, R.; Lebedev, A.

    2015-08-01

    Centrifugal compressors are complex energy equipment. Automotive control and protection system should meet the requirements: of operation reliability and durability. In turbocompressors there are at least two dangerous areas: surge and rotating stall. Antisurge protecting systems usually use parametric or feature methods. As a rule industrial system are parametric. The main disadvantages of anti-surge parametric systems are difficulties in mass flow measurements in natural gas pipeline compressor. The principal idea of feature method is based on the experimental fact: as a rule just before the onset of surge rotating or precursor stall established in compressor. In this case the problem consists in detecting of unsteady pressure or velocity fluctuations characteristic signals. Wavelet analysis is the best method for detecting onset of rotating stall in spite of high level of spurious signals (rotating wakes, turbulence, etc.). This method is compatible with state of the art DSP systems of industrial control. Examples of wavelet analysis application for detecting onset of rotating stall in typical stages centrifugal compressor are presented. Experimental investigations include unsteady pressure measurement and sophisticated data acquisition system. Wavelet transforms used biorthogonal wavelets in Mathlab systems.

  4. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  5. Optical properties of the atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet generated by alternative current (a.c.) power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilik, Erkan; Akan, Tamer

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was produced to generate cold flowing post-discharge plasma of pure helium gas. The main aim of this study was to generate cold flowing APPJ of pure helium gas and to determine how their optical emission spectrum change influences varying different flow rates. Lengths of early, middle, and late post-discharge plasma (jet) regions and their fluctuations were determined, respectively. Then, ignition condition dependence of the post-discharge plasma for flow rate was specified at a constant voltage. Spectroscopic studies of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet of helium were presented via analyzing OH, N2, N2+, oxygen, and helium intensities for various flow rates.

  6. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of < 100 microseconds. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  7. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  8. Synthesis of silicon nanocones using rf microplasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    2005-10-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon nanocones using the rf microplasma discharge at atmospheric pressure. The products formed underneath the tube electrode on Fe-coated crystalline silicon were constituted mainly of silicon and silicon oxide despite the use of a methane-argon mixture. Carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires were also formed around the silicon nanocones. The number density and average size of silicon nanocones increased with the plasma exposure time accompanied by the enlargement of their surface distribution. The growth mechanism of silicon nanocones is discussed in terms of the catalytic growth via diffusion of silicon with nanocrystalline Si particle through FeSix nanoclusters, and enhanced Si oxidation by the plasma heating.

  9. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.; Jidenko, N.; Bourgeois, E.

    2009-08-01

    The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamentary dielectric barrier discharges interact with metal or dielectric surfaces, and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. It is shown how composition, size and structure of primary nano-particles are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients). Then the growth by coagulation controls the final size of agglomerates versus plasma parameters and transit time in and after the plasma. Charging and electro-thermal collection are depicted to account for the related potential applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol.

  11. Polymerization of acrylic acid using atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, M.; Bashir, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper polymerization of acrylic acid was performed using non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet technology. The goal of this study is to deposit organic functional coatings for biomedical applications using a low cost and rapid growth rate plasma jet technique. The monomer solution of acrylic acid was vaporized and then fed into the argon plasma for coating. The discharge was powered using a laboratory made power supply operating with sinusoidal voltage signals at a frequency of 10 kHz. The optical emission spectra were collected in order to get insight into the plasma chemistry during deposition process. The coatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and growth rates analysis. A high retention of carboxylic functional groups of the monomer was observed at the surface deposited using this low power technique.

  12. Destruction mechanisms for formaldehyde in atmospheric pressure low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Daniel G.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is a common pollutant of indoor air in residences and commercial buildings. The removal of CH2O from atmospheric pressure gas streams (N2/O2/H2O/CH2O) using plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier discharge has been theoretically investigated with the goal of cleansing indoor air. The model consists of a full accounting of the electron, ion, and neutral chemical kinetics in contaminated humid air. We find that the destruction of CH2O results dominantly from chemical attack by OH and O radicals, with the primary end products being CO and H2O. The predicted destruction rates for CH2O are typically 2-8 ppm/(mJ cm-3) (parts per million of CH2O in air/energy deposition). The elimination of the unwanted byproducts, CO and NO, using a platinum catalyst is discussed.

  13. Investigation of atmospheric pressure streamer discharges for methane reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, M. V.; Stefani, F.; Rosocha, L. A.; Raja, L. L.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen has several valuable uses in transportation: it can lower the coefficient of variation under lean burn conditions in internal combustion engines, and it is essential for the operation of fuel cells. Currently hydrogen can only be produced efficiently by reducing fossil fuels in large facilities. However, on-board production is desirable to reduce the infrastructure associated with storing and distributing hydrogen. Plasma dry reforming processes are viable candidates for onboard production. Our current work investigates the fundamental behavior of a single streamer discharge in methane. The electron temperature, and active species generation are determined through time resolved spectroscopy. This work will hopefully accelerate the development of non-thermal plasma based devices that include: dielectric barrier discharges, pulsed corona discharges, and other atmospheric-pressure plasma devices.

  14. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm‑3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  15. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure capillary DBD oxygen plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Pramanik, B K

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure capillary dielectric barrier oxygen discharge plasma jet is developed to generate non-thermal plasma using unipolar positive pulse power supply. Both optical and electrical techniques are used to investigate the characteristics of the produced plasma as function of applied voltage and gas flow rate. Analytical results obtained from the optical emission spectroscopic data reveal the gas temperature, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and electron density. Gas temperature and rotational temperature are found to decrease with increasing oxygen flow rate but increase linearly with applied voltage. It is exposed that the electron density is boosting up with enhanced applied voltage and oxygen flow rate, while the electron excitation temperature is reducing with rising oxygen flow rate. Electrical characterization demonstrates that the discharge frequency is falling with flow rate but increasing with voltage. The produced plasma is applied preliminarily to study the inactivation yie...

  16. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setareh, Salarieh; Davoud, Dorranian

    2013-11-01

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment.

  17. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, O. H.; Lai, C. K.; Choo, C. Y.; Wong, C. S.; Nor, R. M. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Thong, K. L. [Microbiology Division, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film.

  18. Plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Mitev, D.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    In this study a novel plasma reactor for deposition of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure is constructed and characterized. A low power microwave discharge is used as a plasma source and working gas of Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. The substrate is heated by plasma flame and its temperature is in the range 600-700 C. The chemical composition of the plasma and the gas mixture effect on the concentration of the various particles in the plasma is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The emission spectrum of the plasma jet in Ar/H2/CH4 mixture shows the presence of carbon (Swan band) and an intensive line of CH (388 nm), which are necessary species for deposition of carbon nanostructures. Additional voltage in the range from -20 V to -100 V is applied in order to ensure the vertical growth of graphene walls. Results of deposited carbon nanostructures on metal substrate are shown.

  19. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1δg), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1σ^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1δg) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  20. On the phase between pressure and heat release fluctuations for propane/hydrogen flames and its role in mode transitions

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation into mode-transitions observed in a 50-kW, atmospheric pressure, backward-facing step combustor burning lean premixed C3H8/H2 fuel mixtures over a range of equivalence ratios, fuel compositions and preheat temperatures. The combustor exhibits distinct acoustic response and dynamic flame shape (collectively referred to as "dynamic modes") depending on the operating conditions. We simultaneously measure the dynamic pressure and flame chemiluminescence to examine the phase between pressure (p\\') and heat release fluctuations (q\\') in the observed dynamic modes. Results show that the heat release is in phase with the pressure oscillations (θqp≈0) at the onset of a dynamic mode, while as the operating conditions change within the mode, the phase grows until it reaches a critical value θqp=θc, at which the combustor switches to another dynamic mode. According to the classical Rayleigh criterion, this critical phase (θc) should be π/2, whereas our data show that the transition occurs well below this value. A linear acoustic energy balance shows that this critical phase marks the point where acoustic losses across the system boundaries equal the energy addition from the combustion process to the acoustic field. Based on the extended Rayleigh criterion in which the acoustic energy fluxes through the system boundaries as well as the typical Rayleigh source term (p\\'q\\') are included, we derive an extended Rayleigh index defined as Re=θqp/θc, which varies between 0 and 1. This index, plotted against a density-weighted strained consumption speed, indicates that the impact of the operating parameters on the dynamic mode selection of the combustor collapses onto a family of curves, which quantify the state of the combustor within a dynamic mode. At Re=0, the combustor enters a mode, and switches to another as Re approaches 1. The results provide a metric for quantifying the instability margins of fuel

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Cryogenic Storage Tank Boil-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; Frontier, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) routinely utilizes cryostat test hardware to evaluate comparative and absolute thermal conductivities of a wide array of insulation systems. The test method is based on measurement of the flow rate of gas evolved due to evaporative boil-off of a cryogenic liquid. The gas flow rate typically stabilizes after a period of a couple of hours to a couple of days, depending upon the test setup. The stable flow rate value is then used to calculate the thermal conductivity for the insulation system being tested. The latest set of identical cryostats, 1,000-L spherical tanks, exhibited different behavior. On a macro level, the flow rate did stabilize after a couple of days; however the stable flow rate was oscillatory with peak to peak amplitude of up to 25 percent of the nominal value. The period of the oscillation was consistently 12 hours. The source of the oscillation has been traced to variations in atmospheric pressure due to atmospheric tides similar to oceanic tides. This paper will present analysis of this phenomenon, including a calculation that explains why other cryostats are not affected by it.

  2. Fluctuations of the peak pressure level of man-made impulsive sound signals propagating in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Romero, Marta; Gavrilov, Alexander; Duncan, Alec J

    2017-02-01

    The theory of wave propagation and fluctuations in random media has been broadly studied; however the works studying the influence of a changing underwater acoustic environment on the spatial decay and fluctuations of the peak pressure in broadband and impulsive signals are limited. Using a method based on the formulation developed by Dyer and Makris to estimate intensity fluctuations of sound signals in the ocean in conditions of saturated multipath propagation, this paper presents an approach to model peak pressure fluctuations of transient signals propagating underwater. In contrast to the formulation of Dyer and Makris, the approach presented in this work applies extreme value theory using the properties of the peak pressure as a maximum value taken from a Rayleigh distributed amplitude. The location and scale parameters obtained from the best fit to a Gumbel distribution are used to estimate the probability of the peak pressure level staying below a certain threshold. The theory was applied to measurements of signals from an airgun array and offshore impact pile driving, resulting in good agreement in both cases.

  3. Trends in surface engineering of biomaterials: atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of coatings for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Ponte, G.; Sardella, E.; Fanelli, F.; D'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.

    2011-11-01

    Cold plasma processes for surface engineering of biomaterials and biomedical devices are traditionally performed at low pressure; more and more, though, surface modification plasma processes at atmospheric pressure are also gaining popularity. This short review is aimed to list briefly atmospheric pressure plasma processes reported, in the last decade, for adapting the surface of materials to the best interactions with cells, bacteria and biomolecules.

  4. Fluid front displacement dynamics affecting pressure fluctuations and phase entrapment in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Many natural and engineering processes involve motion of fluid fronts in porous media, from infiltration and drainage in hydrology to reservoir management in petroleum engineering. Macroscopically smooth and continuous motion of displacement fronts involves numerous rapid interfacial jumps and local reconfigurations. Detailed observations of displacement processes in micromodels illustrate the wide array of fluid interfacial dynamics ranging from irregular jumping-pinning motions to gradual pore scale invasions. The pressure fluctuations associated with interfacial motions reflect not only pore geometry (as traditionally hypothesized) but there is a strong influence of boundary conditions (e.g., mean drainage rate). The time scales associated with waiting time distribution of individual invasion events and decay time of inertial oscillations (following a rapid interfacial jump) provide a means for distinguishing between displacement regimes. Direct observations using high-speed camera combined with concurrent pressure signal measurements were instrumental in clarifying influences of flow rates, pore size, and gravity on burst size distribution and waiting times. We compared our results with the early experimental and theoretical study on burst size and waiting time distribution during slow drainage processes of Måløy et al. [Måløy et al., 1992]. Results provide insights on critical invasion events that exert strong influence on macroscopic phenomena such as front morphology and residual phase entrapment behind leading to hysteresis. Måløy, K. J., L. Furuberg, J. Feder, and T. Jossang (1992), Dynamics of Slow Drainage in Porous-Media, Phys Rev Lett, 68(14), 2161-2164.

  5. The ionization mechanisms in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A novel, gas-tight API interface for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to study the ionization mechanism in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI). Eight analytes (ethylbenzene, bromobenzene, naphthalene, anthracene, benzaldehyde, pyridine, quinolone, and acridine) with varying ionization energies (IEs) and proton affinities (PAs), and four common APPI dopants (toluene, acetone, anisole, and chlorobenzene) were chosen. All the studied compounds were ionized by direct APPI, forming mainly molecular ions. Addition of dopants suppressed the signal of the analytes with IEs above the IE of the dopant. For compounds with suitable IEs or Pas, the dopants increased the ionization efficiency as the analytes could be ionized through dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions, such as charge exchange, proton transfer, and other rather unexpected reactions, such as formation of [M + 77](+) in the presence of chlorobenzene. Experiments with deuterated toluene as the dopant verified that in case of proton transfer, the proton originated from the dopant instead of proton-bound solvent clusters, as in conventional open or non-tight APPI sources. In direct APLI using a 266 nm laser, a narrower range of compounds was ionized than in direct APPI, because of exceedingly high IEs or unfavorable two-photon absorption cross-sections. Introduction of dopants in the APLI system changed the ionization mechanism to similar dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions with the dopant as in APPI, which produced mainly ions of the same form as in APPI, and ionized a wider range of analytes than direct APLI.

  6. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  7. Effects of Pressure Fluctuation on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in the Downstream of Orifice Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kugimoto, Mitsuo; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    In the piping system of power plants, pipe wall thinning caused by flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), liquid droplet impingement (LDI) erosion, and cavitation Erosion (C/E), is a very serious problem because it leads to serious damage and eventual destruction of the piping system [1]-[6]. In this study, pipe wall thinning caused by FAC in the downstream of an orifice nozzle (flow meter) was examined. Experimental Analyses were performed to clarify the characteristics of FAC, its generation mechanism, and the prediction of the thinning and reduction of the pipe wall. The corrosion pattern on the pipe wall was also examined through an experimental simulation. This simulation clarified that the occurrence of thinning mainly depend on the amount of pressure fluctuation p' on the pipe wall. It was also found that the wall thinning rate can be estimated using p' and that the suppression of p' can be realized by replacing the orifice nozzle with a tapered one having an angle to the upstream.

  8. Comparison of Intraocular Pressure, Blood Pressure, Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Blood Flow Fluctuations During Dorzolamide Versus Timolol Add-On Therapy in Prostaglandin Analogue Treated Glaucoma Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruta Barsauskaite

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effects of dorzolamide and timolol add-on therapy in open-angle glaucoma (OAG patients previously treated with prostaglandin analogue (Pg, by evaluating fluctuations in the intraocular (IOP, blood (BP, ocular perfusion pressures (OPP and retrobulbar blood flow (RBF parameters. Methods: 35 OAG patients (35 eyes, 31 women (88.6% age 63.3 (8.9 years were evaluated in a 3 month randomized, cross-over, single-masked study. During the experiments BP, heart rate, IOP and OPP were assessed 4 times per day (8–12–16–20 h. RBF was measured twice per day (8–20 h using Color Doppler imaging in the ophthalmic (OA, central retinal (CRA, nasal (nSPCA and temporal (tSPCA posterior ciliary arteries. In each vessel, peak systolic velocity (PSV and end-diastolic velocity (EDV were assessed and vascular resistance (RI calculated. Results: Both add-on therapies lowered IOP in a statistically significant manner from 15.7 ± 2.4 mmHg at latanoprost baseline to 14.9 ± 2.2 mmHg using dorzolamide (p < 0.001 and 14.2 ± 1.9 mmHg using timolol (p < 0.001. The IOP lowering effect was statistically significant at 20 h, favoring timolol as compared to dorzolamide (1.4 ± 2.4 vs. 0.2 ± 2.1 mmHg, (p < 0.05. Dorzolamide add-on therapy showed smaller IOP (2.0 ± 1.4, SPP (13.3 ± 7.9, systolic BP (13.5 ± 8.7 and diastolic BP (8.4 ± 5.4 fluctuations as compared to both latanoprost baseline or timolol add-on therapies. Higher difference between morning and evening BP was correlated to decreased evening CRA EDV in the timolol group (c = −0.41; p = 0.01. With increased MAP in the morning or evening hours, we found increased evening OA RI in timolol add-on group (c = 0.400, p = 0.02; c = 0.513, p = 0.002 accordingly. Higher MAP fluctuations were related to impaired RBF parameters during evening hours-decreased CRA EDV (c = −0.408; p = 0.01, increased CRA RI (c = 0.576; p < 0.001 and tSPCA RI (c = 0.356; p = 0.04 in the dorzolamide group and

  9. ENSO-correlated fluctuations in ocean bottom pressure and wind-stress curl in the North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Chambers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine the magnitude of ENSO-correlated variations in wind-stress curl and ocean bottom pressure in the North Pacific between 1992 until 2010, using satellite observations and model output. Our analysis indicates that while there are significant fluctuations correlated with some El Niño and La Niña events, the correlation is still relatively low. Moreover, the ENSO-correlated variability explains only 50 % of the non-seasonal, low-frequency variance. There are significant residual fluctuations in both wind-stress curl and ocean bottom pressure in the region with periods of 4-years and longer. One such fluctuation began in late 2002 and has been observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE. Even after accounting for ENSO variations, there is a significant trend in ocean bottom pressure in the region, equivalent to 0.7 ± 0.3 cm yr−1 of sea level from January 2003 until December 2008, which is confirmed with steric-corrected altimetry. Although this low-frequency fluctuation does not appear in an ocean model, we show that the winds used to force the model have a significantly reduced trend that is inconsistent with satellite observations over the same time period.

  10. ENSO-correlated fluctuations in ocean bottom pressure and wind-stress curl in the North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Chambers

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the output of an ocean model forced by ECMWF winds to study the theoretical relationship between wind-induced changes in ocean bottom pressure in the North Pacific between 1992 until 2010 and ENSO. Our analysis indicates that while there are significant fluctuations correlated with some El Niño and La Niña events, the correlation is still relatively low. Moreover, the ENSO-correlated variability explains only 50 % of the non-seasonal, low-frequency variance. There are significant residual fluctuations in both wind-stress curl and ocean bottom pressure in the region with periods of 4-years and longer. One such fluctuation began in late 2002 and has been observed by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE. Even after accounting for possible ENSO-correlated variations, there is a significant trend in ocean bottom pressure in the region, equivalent to 0.7 ± 0.3 cm yr−1 of sea level from January 2003 until December 2008, which is confirmed with steric-corrected altimetry. Although this low-frequency fluctuation does not appear in the ocean model, we show that ECMWF winds have a significantly reduced trend that is inconsistent with satellite observations over the same time period, and so it appears that the difference is due to a forcing error in the model and not an intrinsic error.

  11. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  12. PRESSURE COMPENSATION METHOD OF UNDERWATER HYDRAULIC SYSTEM WITH HYDRAULIC POWER UNIT BEING UNDER ATMOSPHERIC CIRCUMSTANCE AND PRESSURE COMPENSATED VALVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qingfeng; Li Yanmin; Zhong Tianyu; Xu Guohua

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the-state-of-the-art of pressure compensation of underwater hydraulic systems (UHSs), a new method of pressure compensation of UHSs, whose hydraulic power unit is in the atmospheric circumstance, is proposed. And a pilot-operated relief valve with pressure compensation is realized. The pressure compensation precision is guaranteed by direct detection. Its dynamic performance and stability are improved by a dynamic feedback. Theoretical study, simulation and experiment show that the pilot-operated relief valve with pressure compensation has a fine property of tracking underwater ambient pressure and meet the requirement of underwater ambient pressure compensation.

  13. Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a Very Fast Response Concentration Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    VOLUME 33 Experimental Measurements of Concentration Fluctuations and Scales in a Dispersing Plume in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Obtained Using a...final form 22 December 1993) ABSTRACT High-frequency fluctuations of concentration in a plume dispersing in the atmospheric surface layer have... layer is of critical importance in many industrial and envi- ronmental fluid mechanics problems, ranging from air quality control and regulation of

  14. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  15. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  16. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure on human arterial pressure during the solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Levi, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We performed a study of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure (AtmP) and the horizontal geomagnetic field component (H). We worked with a sample of 304 healthy normotense volunteers, 152 men and 152 women, with ages between 18 and 84 years in Mexico City during the period 2008-2014, corresponding to the minimum, ascending and maximum phases of the solar cycle 24. The data was divided by gender, age and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: Correlations, bivariate and superposed epochs (within a window of three days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the SBP and DBP and the natural variables (AtmP and H). The correlation analysis indicated correlation between the SBP and DBP and AtmP and H, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analysis showed that the largest correlations are between the SBP and DBP and the AtmP. The superposed epoch analysis found that the largest number of significant SBP and DBP changes occurred for women. Finally, the blood pressure changes are larger during the solar minimum and ascending solar cycle phases than during the solar maximum; the storms of the minimum were more intense than those of the maximum and this could be the reason of behavior of the blood pressure changes along the solar cycle.

  17. The effects of atmospheric pressure on infrared reflectance spectra of Martian analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Pratt, Stephen F.; Patterson, William

    1993-01-01

    The use of terrestrial samples as analogs of Mars soils are complicated by the Martian atmosphere. Spectral features due to the Martian atmosphere can be removed from telescopic spectra of Mars and ISM spectra of Mars, but this does not account for any spectral differences resulting from atmospheric pressure or any interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. We are examining the effects of atmospheric pressure on reflectance spectra of powdered samples in the laboratory. Contrary to a previous experiment with granite, no significant changes in albedo or the Christiansen feature were observed from 1 bar pressure down to a pressure of 8 micrometers Hg. However, reducing the atmospheric pressure does have a pronounced affect on the hydration features, even for samples retained in a dry environment for years.

  18. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  19. Power modulation in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Power modulation in an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma jet is investigated by numerical modelling. The dynamics of successively pulsing the applied power on and off for a helium-oxygen (˜0.6%) plasma is investigated. The impact of power pulsing on reactive species generation and gas heating is discussed with control opportunities emphasized. Power modulation shows linear control for reactive species and heat flux delivery to a treatment surface above an initial phase of power growth. Power is found to be coupled primarily to the electrons with electron loss rates determining the interference between successive power modulation phases. Plasma decay in the power off phase is characterized by a large initial electron loss in the first 0.5 µs followed by ambipolar decay dominated by ions of opposite charge. Power modulation effects on gas heating show a larger range of temperature control when compared with convection cooling. Reactive oxygen species reaching a treatment surface are shown to typically vary over an order of magnitude for variation in the duty cycle.

  20. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Small surface wave discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss'ovski, Zh; Kolev, M.; Ivanov, A.; Lishev, St.; Koleva, I.

    2009-09-01

    A small surface wave driven source produces plasma at atmospheric pressure. Microwave power at frequency 2.45 GHz is coupled with the source and a discharge is ignited at power levels below 10 W. The coaxial exciter of the surface waves has a length of 10 mm because its dielectric is a high permittivity discharge tube. The plasma source operates as a plasma jet in the case of plasma columns longer than the tube length. The source maintains stable plasma columns over a wide range of neutral gas flow and applied power in continuous and pulse regimes. An additional advantage of this source is the discharge self-ignition. An electron temperature of Te ~ 1.9 eV and a density of ne ~ 3.9 × 1014 cm-3 are estimated by the probe diagnostics method. The emission spectra in the wavelength range 200-1000 nm under different experimental conditions are analysed and they prove the applicability of the source for analytical spectroscopy. The dependences of column length, reflected power and plasma parameters on the gas flow and the input power are discussed.

  1. On the mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longwei; Zhao, Peng; Shu, Xingsheng; Shen, Jie; Meng, Yuedong

    2010-08-01

    For the purpose of unveiling the parameters influencing the length of atmospheric pressure plasma plume, an over 165 cm long argon plasma plume is generated in the quartz tube attached to the nozzle of the device. Dependence of plasma length on discharge parameters such as applied voltage, frequency of power supply, and argon gas flow rate was investigated. Experimental results indicated that (a) the applied voltage plays crucial roles on plasma plume length, that is, the plasma plume length exponentially increases with the applied voltage, (b) the plasma plume length increases with frequency, more obviously when the applied voltage is higher, (c) the plasma plume length increases with argon gas flow rate, reaches its maximum at critical value of the gas flow rate, and then decreases again. An evaluation of the physical phenomena involved in streamer propagation, particularly of the energy balance, was investigated. The numerical results were qualitatively consistent with previous experimental results by successfully indicating the high velocity of "plasma bullet" and providing physical mechanism of energy balance determining streamer length.

  2. Atmospheric pressure thermal dissociation of phospho- and sulfopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlin, Lívia S; Xia, Yu; Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-12-01

    Several phospho- and sulfopeptides were subjected to atmospheric pressure thermal dissociation (APTD), which was effected by passing peptide ions generated by electrosonic spray ionization (ESSI) through a heated coiled metal tube. Sequence informative fragment ions including a-, b-, c-, and y-types of ions were observed with increased relative intensities under APTD compared with collision-induced dissociation (CID), performed inside the ion trap. A certain degree of preservation of phosphate and sulfate ester moieties was observed for some fragments ions under APTD. The neutral fragments generated outside the mass spectrometer were further analyzed via on-line corona discharge to provide rich and complementary sequence information to that provided by the fragment ions directly obtained from APTD, although complete losses of the modification groups were noted. Improved primary sequence information for phospho- and sulfopeptides was typically obtained by analyzing both ionic and neutral fragments from APTD compared with fragment ions from CID alone. Localization of the modification sites of phospho- and sulfopeptides was achieved by combining the structural information acquired from APTD and CID.

  3. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, V. A. [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale Campus, FL, 33309, USA; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  4. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; ZHU Fengsen; TU Xin; BO Zheng; CEN Kefa; LI Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    In this work,a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions.The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals,high speed photography,and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics.Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g.,10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone,in this RGA system,a lower gas flow rate (e.g.,2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions.Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas.The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes,the arc restrike mode,takeover mode,and combined modes,can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas.The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate.

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma assisted calcination of composite submicron fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvecká, Veronika; Kováčik, Dušan; Tučeková, Zlata; Zahoranová, Anna; Černák, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    The plasma assisted calcination of composite organic/inorganic submicron fibers for the preparation of inorganic fibers in submicron scale was studied. Aluminium butoxide/polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers prepared by electrospinning were treated using low-temperature plasma generated by special type of dielectric barrier discharge, so called diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge (DCSBD) at atmospheric pressure in ambient air, synthetic air, oxygen and nitrogen. Effect of plasma treatment on base polymer removal was investigated by using Attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Influence of working gas on the base polymer reduction was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and CHNS elemental analysis. Changes in fibers morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High efficiency of organic template removal without any degradation of fibers was observed after plasma treatment in ambient air. Due to the low-temperature approach and short exposure time, the plasma assisted calcination is a promising alternative to the conventional thermal calcination. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  7. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet for Chem/Bio Warfare Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Henins, Ivars; Park, Jaeyoung; Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-11-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) technology may provide a much needed method of CBW decontamination which, unlike traditional decon methods, is dry and nondestructive to sensitive equipment and materials. The APPJ discharge uses a high-flow feedgas consisting primarily of an inert carrier gas, such as He, and a small amount of a reactive additive, such as O2, which flows between capacitively-coupled electrodes powered at 13.56 MHz. The plasma generates highly reactive metastable and atomic species of oxygen which are then directed onto a contaminated surface. The reactive effluent of the APPJ has been shown to effectively neutralize VX nerve agent as well as simulants for anthrax and mustard blister agent. Research efforts are now being directed towards reducing He consumption and increasing the allowable stand-off distance. Recent results demonstrate that by replacing the O2 reactive additive with CO2, ozone formation is greatly reduced. This has the result of extending the lifetime of atomic oxygen by an order of magnitude or more. A recirculating APP Decon Chamber which combines heat, vacuum, forced convection and reactivity is currently being developed for enhanced decontamination of sensitive equipment. Several techniques are also being evaluated for use in an APP Decon Jet for decontamination of items which cannot be placed inside a chamber.

  8. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  9. Methane coupling in microwave plasma under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsheng Shen; Dekun Sun; Hongsheng Yang

    2011-01-01

    Methane coupling in microwave plasma under atmospheric pressure has been investigated.The effects of molar ratio n(CH4)/n(H2),flow rate and microwave power on the reaction have been studied.(1) With the decrease of n(CH4)/n(H2) ratio,methane conversion,C2 hydrocarbon yield,energy yield and space-time yield of acetylene increased,but the yield of carbon deposit decreased.(2) With the increase of microwave power,energy yield of acetylene decreased,but space-time yield of acetylene increased.(3) With the increase of flow rate,energy yield and space-time yield of acetylene increased first and then decreased.Finally,under the reaction conditions of CH4 flow rate of 700 mL/min,n(CH4)/n(H2) ratio of 1/4 and microwave power of 400 W,the energy yield and space-time yield of acetylene could reach 0.337 mmol/kJ and 12.3 mol/(s·m3),respectively.The reaction mechanism of methane coupling in microwave plasma has been investigated based on the thermodynamics of chemical reaction.Interestingly,the acetylene yield of methane coupling in microwave plasma was much higher than the maximum thermodynamic yield of acetylene.This phenomenon was tentatively explained from non-expansion work in the microwave plasma system.

  10. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  11. Basic characteristics of an atmospheric pressure rf generated plasma jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shou-Guo; Li Hai-Jiang; Ye Tian-Chun; Zhao Ling-Li

    2004-01-01

    A plasma jet has been developed which operates using radio frequency (rf) power and produces a stable homogeneous discharge at atmospheric pressure. Its discharge characteristics, especially the dependence of stable discharge operating range on the feed gas, were studied, and the electric parameters such as RMS current, RMS voltage and reflected power were obtained with different gas flows. These studies indicate that there is an optimum range of operation of the plasma jet for a filling with a gas mixture of He and O2. Two "failure" modes of the discharge are identified.One is a filamentary arc when the input power is raised above a critical level, another is that the discharge disappears gradually as the addition of O2 approaches 3.2%. Possible explanations for the two failure modes have been given. The current and voltage waveform measurements show that there is a clear phase shift between normal and failure modes.In addition, Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves as a function of pure helium and for 1% addition of oxygen have been studied.

  12. Dynamics of apokamp-type atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnin, Eduard A.; Panarin, Victor A.; Skakun, Victor S.; Baksht, Evgeny Kh.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes a new discharge source of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in air with no gas supply through the discharge region. In this discharge mode, plasma jets develop from the bending point of a bright current channel between two electrodes and are therefore termed an apokamp (from Greek `off' and `bend'). The apokamp can represent single plasma jets of length up 6 cm or several jets, and the temperature of such jets can range from more than 1000 °C at their base to 100-250 °C at their tip. Apokamps are formed at maximum applied voltage of positive polarity, provided that the second electrode is capacitively decoupled with ground. According to high-speed photography with time resolution from several nanoseconds to several tens of nanoseconds, the apokamp consists of a set of plasma bullets moving with a velocity of 100-220 km/s, which excludes the convective mechanism of plasma decay. Estimates on a 100-ns scale show that the near-electrode zones and the zones from which apokamps develop are close in temperature.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Pressure Fluctuations in the Thermo-acoustic Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Uglanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the features of numerical simulation of acoustic oscillation excitation in the resonators with a foam insert (regenerator to study the excitation of thermo-acoustic oscillations in the circuit of small-sized engine model on the pulse tube.The aim of this work is the numerical simulation of the emerging oscillations in thermoacoustic engine resonator at the standing wave. As a basis, the work takes a thermo-acoustic resonator model with the open end (without piston developed in DeltaEC software. The precalculated operation frequency of the given resonator model, as a quarter of the wave resonator, is ν = 560 Hz.The paper offers a simplified finite element resonator model and defines the harmonic law of the temperature distribution on regenerator. The time dependences of the speed and pressure amplitude for the open end of the resonator are given; the calculated value of the process operating frequency is approximately equal to the value of the frequency for a given length of the resonator. Key findings, as a result of study, are as follows:1. The paper shows a potential for using this ESI-CFD Advanced software to simulate the processes of thermal excitation of acoustic oscillations.2. Visualization of turbulent flow fluctuations in the regenerator zone extends the analysis capability of gas-dynamic processes.3. Difference between operating frequency of the process simulated by ESI-CFD Advanced and frequency value obtained by analytical methods is about 4%, which is evidence of the model applicability to study the acoustic parameters of thermo-acoustic transducers. Experimental results have proved these data.

  14. Use of Heated Helium to Simulate Surface Pressure Fluctuations on the Launch Abort Vehicle During Abort Motor Firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; James, George H.; Burnside, Nathan J.; Fong, Robert; Fogt, Vincent A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid-rocket plumes from the Abort motor of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV, also know as Orion) were simulated using hot, high pressure, Helium gas to determine the surface pressure fluctuations on the vehicle in the event of an abort. About 80 different abort situations over a wide Mach number range, (0.3abort case, typically two different Helium plume and wind tunnel conditions were used to bracket different flow matching critera. This unique, yet cost-effective test used a custom-built hot Helium delivery system, and a 6% scale model of a part of the MPCV, known as the Launch Abort Vehicle. The test confirmed the very high level of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the vehicle expected during an abort. In general, the fluctuations were found to be dominated by the very near-field hydrodynamic fluctuations present in the plume shear-layer. The plumes were found to grow in size for aborts occurring at higher flight Mach number and altitude conditions. This led to an increase in the extent of impingement on the vehicle surfaces; however, unlike some initial expectations, the general trend was a decrease in the level of pressure fluctuations with increasing impingement. In general, the highest levels of fluctuations were found when the outer edges of the plume shear layers grazed the vehicle surface. At non-zero vehicle attitudes the surface pressure distributions were found to become very asymmetric. The data from these wind-tunnel simulations were compared against data collected from the recent Pad Abort 1 flight test. In spite of various differences between the transient flight situation and the steady-state wind tunnel simulations, the hot-Helium data were found to replicate the PA1 data fairly reasonably. The data gathered from this one-of-a-kind wind-tunnel test fills a gap in the manned-space programs, and will be used to establish the acoustic environment for vibro-acoustic qualification testing of the MPCV.

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its application for polymer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sarani, Abdollah

    2010-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet is a suitable source for polymer treatment. The main characteristic of this plasma jet is the remote operation and its scalable dimension, thus, allowing local treatment of 3D surfaces. In this work an atmospheric pressure DBD plasma jet has been constructed and the application of the plasma jet for polymer treatment is investigated.

  16. Interannual Fluctuations in Atmospheric Angular Momentum Simulated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Medium Range Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Kingtse C.; Dickey, Jean O.; Marcus, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    An earlier study established the existence of globally coherent interannual fluctuations in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM), associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. In this paper, we pursue the origin and the structure of these fluctuations using an ensemble of experiments generated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, medium range forecast model version 9. In the control experiments, where the observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) were used as the lower boundary conditions, the model captures the characteristic V-like structure in time-latitude plots of zonally averaged AAM, while experiments with climatological SSTs and those with either perpetual warm or cold ENSO conditions superimposed on the climatological SSTs failed to reproduce this structure. The numerical results indicate that these AAM structures are related to SST variations associated with transitions between different phases of the ENSO cycle and have both propagating and standing components. The largest zonal wind contribution from the levels studied (850, 500, and 200 hPa) is at 200 hPa, where the tropical convective outflow is the strongest. Composites of zonal wind and geopotential height show a clear relationship between the stages of the global AAM oscillation and the ENSO cycle. The strong similarity between the simulated and observed AAM series attests to the model's ability to realistically simulate the interannual response of the atmosphere to ENSO SST anomalies.

  17. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norberg, Seth A., E-mail: norbergs@umich.edu; Johnsen, Eric, E-mail: ejohnsen@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2125 (United States); Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  18. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  19. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Eden, James Gary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  20. Pore pressure fluctuations of overlying aquifer during residual coal mining and water-soil stress coupling analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qing-hong; SUI Wang-hua; ZHANG Xiao-cui; MAO Zeng-min

    2009-01-01

    Three test models and a simulation model were constructed based on the prevailing conditions of the Taiping coalmine in order to analyze pore pressure fluctuations of an overlying aquifer during residual coal mining. As well, the relation between pore pressure and soil stress was evaluated. The model tests show the vibrations of pore pressure and soil stress as a result of mining activities. The simulation model tells of the response characteristics of pore pressure after mining and its distribution in the sand aquifer. The comparative analysis reveals that pore pressure and soil stress vibration are activated by unexpected events occurring in mines, such as collapsing roofs. An increased pore pressure zone always lies above the wall in front or behind the working face of a mine. Both pore pressure and vertical stress result in increasing and decreasing processes during movements of the working face of a mine. The vibration of pore pressure always precedes soil stress in the same area and ends with a sharp decline. Changes in pore pressure of sand aquifer are limited to the area of stress changes. Obvious changes are largely located in a very small frame over the mining face.

  1. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  2. The Effect of Diurnal Fluctuation in Intraocular Pressure on the Evaluation of Risk Factors of Progression in Normal Tension Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Eun Jung; Han, Jong Chul; Sohn, Sae Woon; Rhee, Taekkwan; Kee, Changwon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether diurnal fluctuation in intraocular pressure (IOP) can influence the result of the correlations between IOP-related factors and progression of normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods Glaucoma progression was defined as visual field (VF) progression and changes in the optic disc and/or retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Two different methods were used to evaluate the impact of the diurnal fluctuation in IOP. ‘Conventional method’ used in previous studies included all IOP measurements during the follow up time. ‘Time adjusted method’ was used to adjust diurnal fluctuation in IOP with the preferred time. Mean IOP, long term IOP fluctuation and the difference between the lowest and highest IOP were calculated using both methods. Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between IOP-related factors and NTG progression. Results One hundred and forty eyes of 140 patients with NTG were included in this study. 41% (58 of 140 eyes) of eyes underwent NTG progression. Long term IOP variation calculated by conventional method was not a significant risk factor for NTG progression (hazard ratio[HR], 0.311; 95% confidence interval[CI], 0.056–1.717; P = 0.180). Long term IOP variation calculated by time adjusted method, however, was related to progression, with an HR of 5.260 (95% CI,1.191–23.232; P = 0.029). Conclusion Although having the same IOP-related factors, if diurnal fluctuation is included, different results may be found on the relationship between IOP-related factors and NTG progression. Based on our results, diurnal fluctuation in IOP should be considered when IOP-related factors are studied in the future. PMID:27776182

  3. Altered phase interactions between spontaneous blood pressure and flow fluctuations in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Nonlinear assessment of cerebral autoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Peng, C. K.; Huang, Norden E.; Wu, Zhaohua; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Cavallerano, Jerry; Novak, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is an important mechanism that involves dilatation and constriction in arterioles to maintain relatively stable cerebral blood flow in response to changes of systemic blood pressure. Traditional assessments of autoregulation focus on the changes of cerebral blood flow velocity in response to large blood pressure fluctuations induced by interventions. This approach is not feasible for patients with impaired autoregulation or cardiovascular regulation. Here we propose a newly developed technique-the multimodal pressure-flow (MMPF) analysis, which assesses autoregulation by quantifying nonlinear phase interactions between spontaneous oscillations in blood pressure and flow velocity during resting conditions. We show that cerebral autoregulation in healthy subjects can be characterized by specific phase shifts between spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations, and the phase shifts are significantly reduced in diabetic subjects. Smaller phase shifts between oscillations in the two variables indicate more passive dependence of blood flow velocity on blood pressure, thus suggesting impaired cerebral autoregulation. Moreover, the reduction of the phase shifts in diabetes is observed not only in previously-recognized effective region of cerebral autoregulation (type 2 diabetes mellitus alters cerebral blood flow regulation over a wide frequency range and that this alteration can be reliably assessed from spontaneous oscillations in blood pressure and blood flow velocity during resting conditions. We also show that the MMPF method has better performance than traditional approaches based on Fourier transform, and is more suitable for the quantification of nonlinear phase interactions between nonstationary biological signals such as blood pressure and blood flow.

  4. Atmospheric radiocarbon calibration to 45,000 yr BP : Late glacial fluctuations and cosmogenic isotope production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present), The results confirm the

  5. Fast PSP measurements of wall-pressure fluctuation in low-speed flows: improvements using proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Yingzheng

    2016-04-01

    Fast pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is very useful in flow diagnostics due to its fast response and high spatial resolution, but its applications in low-speed flows are usually challenging due to limitations of paint's pressure sensitivity and the capability of high-speed imagers. The poor signal-to-noise ratio in low-speed cases makes it very difficult to extract useful information from the PSP data. In this study, unsteady PSP measurements were made on a flat plate behind a cylinder in a low-speed wind tunnel (flow speed from 10 to 17 m/s). Pressure fluctuations (Δ P) on the plate caused by vortex-plate interaction were recorded continuously by fast PSP (using a high-speed camera) and a microphone array. Power spectrum of pressure fluctuations and phase-averaged Δ P obtained from PSP and microphone were compared, showing good agreement in general. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was used to reduce noise in PSP data and extract the dominant pressure features. The PSP results reconstructed from selected POD modes were then compared to the pressure data obtained simultaneously with microphone sensors. Based on the comparison of both instantaneous Δ P and root-mean-square of Δ P, it was confirmed that POD analysis could effectively remove noise while preserving the instantaneous pressure information with good fidelity, especially for flows with strong periodicity. This technique extends the application range of fast PSP and can be a powerful tool for fundamental fluid mechanics research at low speed.

  6. Multi-scale and multi-fractal analysis of pressure fluctuation in slurry bubble column bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Daubechies second order wavelet was applied to decompose pressure fluctuation signals with the gas flux varying from 0.18 to 0.90 m3/h and the solid mass fraction from 0 to 20% and scales 1-9 detail signals and the 9th scale approximation signals. The pressure signals were studied by multi-scale and R/S analysis method. Hurst analysis method was applied to analyze multi-fractal characteristics of different scale signals. The results show that the characteristics of mono-fractal under scale 1 and scale 2, and bi-fractal under scale 3-9 are effective in deducing the hydrodynamics in slurry bubbling flow system. The measured pressure signals are decomposed to micro-scale signals, meso-scale signals and macro-scale signals. Micro-scale and macro-scale signals are of mono-fractal characteristics, and meso-scale signals are of bi-fractal characteristics. By analyzing energy distribution of different scale signals, it is shown that pressure fluctuations mainly reflects meso-scale interaction between the particles and the bubble.

  7. Gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (GC-API-MS): review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du-Xin; Gan, Lin; Bronja, Amela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-09-03

    Although the coupling of GC/MS with atmospheric pressure ionization (API) has been reported in 1970s, the interest in coupling GC with atmospheric pressure ion source was expanded in the last decade. The demand of a "soft" ion source for preserving highly diagnostic molecular ion is desirable, as compared to the "hard" ionization technique such as electron ionization (EI) in traditional GC/MS, which fragments the molecule in an extensive way. These API sources include atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI), electrospray ionization (ESI) and low temperature plasma (LTP). This review discusses the advantages and drawbacks of this analytical platform. After an introduction in atmospheric pressure ionization the review gives an overview about the history and explains the mechanisms of various atmospheric pressure ionization techniques used in combination with GC such as APCI, APPI, APLI, ESI and LTP. Also new developments made in ion source geometry, ion source miniaturization and multipurpose ion source constructions are discussed and a comparison between GC-FID, GC-EI-MS and GC-API-MS shows the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques. The review ends with an overview of applications realized with GC-API-MS.

  8. Atmospheric-pressure plasma activation and surface characterization on polyethylene membrane separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Chien; Li, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Chun

    2017-01-01

    The surface hydrophilic activation of a polyethylene membrane separator was achieved using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. The surface of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator was found to be highly hydrophilic realized by adjusting the plasma power input. The variations in membrane separator chemical structure were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Chemical analysis showed newly formed carbonyl-containing groups and high surface concentrations of oxygen-containing species on the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated polymeric separator surface. It also showed that surface hydrophilicity primarily increased from the polar component after atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment. The surface and pore structures of the polyethylene membrane separator were examined by scanning electron microscopy, revealing a slight alteration in the pore structure. As a result of the incorporation of polar functionalities by atmospheric-pressure plasma activation, the electrolyte uptake and electrochemical impedance of the atmospheric-pressure-plasma-treated membrane separator improved. The investigational results show that the separator surface can be controlled by atmospheric-pressure plasma surface treatment to tailor the hydrophilicity and enhance the electrochemical performance of lithium ion batteries.

  9. Quantum polarization fluctuations of partially coherent dark hollow beams in non-Kolmogorov turbulence atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiang; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Qiao, Chun-Hong; Fan, Cheng-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Non-classical polarization properties of dark hollow beams propagating through non-Kolmogorov turbulence are studied. The analytic equation for the polarization degree of the quantization partially coherent dark hollow beams is obtained. It is found that the polarization fluctuations of the quantization partially coherent dark hollow beams are dependent on the turbulence factors and beam parameters with the detection photon numbers. Furthermore, an investigation of the changes in the on-axis propagation point and off-axis propagation point shows that the polarization degree of the quantization partially coherent dark hollow beams presents oscillation for a short propagation distance and gradually returns to zero for a sufficiently long distance. Project supported by the Major Research Plan of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405205).

  10. Fluctuations in late Neoproterozoic atmospheric oxidation — Cr isotope chemostratigraphy and iron speciation of the late Ediacaran lower Arroyo del Soldado Group (Uruguay)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Stolper, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two major steps, near the beginning and near the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 Ma ago), but the details of this history are unclear. Chromium isotopes in iron-rich chemical sediments offer a potential to highlight fine-scale fluctuations...... in the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere and to add a further dimension in the use of redox-sensitive tracers to solve the question regarding fluctuations of atmospheric oxygen levels and their consequences for Earth's climate. We observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (d53Cr up to + 5.......0‰) in iron-rich cherts and banded iron formation horizons within the Arroyo del Soldado Group (Ediacaran; Uruguay) that can be explained by rapid, effective oxidation of Fe(II)-rich surface waters. These fluctuations are correlated with variations in ratios of highly reactive iron (FeHR) to total iron (Fetot...

  11. Simulation of rarefied gas flows in atmospheric pressure interfaces for mass spectrometry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the gas dynamics of the atmospheric pressure interface is very important for the development of mass spectrometry systems with high sensitivity. While the gas flows at high pressure (>1 Torr) and low pressure (pressure stage (1 to 10(-3) Torr) remains challenging. In this study, we used the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) method to develop the gas dynamic simulations for the continuous and discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (API), with different focuses on the ion transfer by gas flows through a skimmer or directly from the atmospheric pressure to a vacuum stage, respectively. The impacts by the skimmer location in the continuous API and the temporal evolvement of the gas flow with a discontinuous API were characterized, which provide a solid base for the instrument design and performance improvement.

  12. Investigation of Wall Pressure Fluctuations in a Turbulent Boundary Layer by Large Eddy Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) was used to investigate the space-time field of the low Mach number, fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a smooth, rigid flat plate. The wall-pressure field simulated by LES was analyzed to obtain the pressure statistics , including the wall-pressure root-mean square, skewness and flatness factors, which show the wall pressure distribution was not Gaussian. The profile of the auto-power spectral density and the contour of the streamwise wavenumber-frequency spectral density of wall-pressure were plotted. The "convection ridge" can be observed clearly and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.

  13. The effect of atmospheric temperature and pressure on the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction in Kaunas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radišauskas, Ričardas; Vaičiulis, Vidmantas; Ustinavičienė, Rūta; Bernotienė, Gailutė

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of meteorological variables (atmospheric temperature and pressure) on the daily occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study used the daily values of atmospheric temperature and pressure in 2000-2007. The meteorological data were obtained from the Lithuanian Hydrometeorological Service for Kaunas. The relative risks of event occurrence were computed for 5°C atmospheric temperature and for 10-hPa atmospheric pressure variations by means of the Poisson regression model. RESULTS. The occurrence of AMI and atmospheric temperature showed an inverse linear relationship, while the occurrence of AMI and atmospheric pressure, a positive linear relationship. Among the youngest subjects (25-44 years old), no relationships were detected. Contrary, among the subjects aged 45-64 years and those aged 65 years and older, the occurrence of AMI significantly decreased with higher temperature (P=0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). A decrease in atmospheric temperature by 10ºC reduced the risk of AMI by 8.7% in the age groups of 45-64 and 65 years and older and by 19% in the age group of 25 years and older. Among the first AMI cases, the risk increased by 7.5% in the age group of 45-64-year olds and by 6.4% in the age group of 25-64-year olds. The relationship between atmospheric temperature and pressure, and AMI occurrence was found to be linear but inverse. An increase in atmospheric pressure by 10 hPa resulted in an increase in risk by 4% among the subjects aged 65 years and more and by 3% among the subjects aged 25 years and more. CONCLUSIONS. Atmospheric temperature and pressure variations had the greatest effect on middle-aged and aging subjects (starting from 45 years). At younger age, the effect of such factors on the AMI risk was considerably lower.

  14. Super-Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources: Application and Coupling to API Mass Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Rahman, Md Matiur; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pressurizing the ionization source to gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a new tactic aimed at further improving the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources. In principle, all API sources, such as ESI, APCI and AP-MALDI, can be operated at pressure higher than 1 atm if suitable vacuum interface is available. The gas pressure in the ion source can have different role for different ionization. For example, in the case of ESI, stable electrospray could be sustained for high surface tension liquid (e.g., pure water) under super-atmospheric pressure, owing to the absence of electric discharge. Even for nanoESI, which is known to work well with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity were found to be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source was pressurized. For the gas phase ionization like APCI, measurement of gaseous compound also showed an increase in ion intensity with the ion source pressure until an optimum pressure at around 4-5 atm. The enhancement was due to the increased collision frequency among reactant ion and analyte that promoted the ion/molecule reaction and a higher intake rate of gas to the mass spectrometer. Because the design of vacuum interface for API instrument is based on the upstream pressure of 1 atm, some coupling aspects need to be considered when connecting the high pressure ion source to the mass spectrometer. Several coupling strategies are discussed in this paper.

  15. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  16. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  17. Ion-ion reactions for charge reduction of biopolymer at atmospheric pressure ambient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Ming Zhou; Jian Hua Ding; Xie Zhang; Huan Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization source (EESI) was adapted for ion-ion reaction, which was demonstrated by using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for the first ion-ion reaction of biopolymers in the atmospheric pressure ambient.

  18. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.

    2003-01-01

    were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil......-water content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...... permeability whereas variations in CH4 oxidation rate and molecular coefficients had less influence. Fluxes appeared to be most sensitive to atmospheric pressure at intermediate distances from the landfill edge. Also overall CH4 fluxes out of the soil over longer periods (years) were largest during periods...

  19. Adhesion improvement of fibres by continuous plasma treatment at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon fibres and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibres were continuously treated by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure for adhesion improvement with epoxy resins. The plasma treatment improved wettability, increased the oxygen containing polar...

  20. Keratinocytes at the uppermost layer of epidermis might act as sensors of atmospheric pressure change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    It has long been suggested that climate, especially atmospheric pressure change, can cause health problems ranging from migraine to myocardial infarction. Here, I hypothesize that the sensory system of epidermal keratinocytes mediates the influence of atmospheric pressure change on the human physiological condition. We previously demonstrated that even subtle changes of atmospheric pressure (5-20 hPa) induce elevation of intracellular calcium level in cultured human keratinocytes (excitation of keratinocytes). It is also established that communication occurs between epidermal keratinocytes and peripheral nerve systems. Moreover, various neurotransmitters and hormones that influence multiple systems (nervous, cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune systems) are generated and released from epidermal keratinocytes in response to various external stimuli. Thus, I suggest that pathophysiological phenomena induced by atmospheric pressure changes might be triggered by epidermal keratinocytes.

  1. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  3. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  4. Intraocular pressure fluctuation after water drinking test in primary angle-closure glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Poon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Only a few studies have assessed intraocular pressure (IOP changes during the water drinking test (WDT in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate IOP changes during WDT in patients with PACG versus primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG. Settings and Design: This was a prospective and single tertiary center study. Materials and Methods: PACG and POAG patients (n = 15 each without prior glaucoma surgery were enrolled and subjected to WDT, wherein they consumed an amount of water proportional to their body weight within 10 min. IOP was measured at baseline and every 15 min for 1 h after water intake. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup comparisons were performed using Mann–Whitney U-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used for comparisons of IOP before and after water intake in the two groups. Regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with IOP fluctuations during WDT. Results: IOP changes over 1 h after water intake showed no significant differences between groups. The mean maximum fluctuation from baseline was 3.61 ± 2.49 and 3.79 ± 1.91 mmHg, respectively, in the PACG and POAG groups. The mean peak IOP was 19.17 ± 4.32 and 19.87 ± 3.44 mmHg in the PACG and PAOG groups, respectively. The axial length and anterior chamber depth showed no correlations with IOP fluctuations. Conclusions: We found similar IOP fluctuation curves and peak IOP values in both PACG and POAG patients subjected to WDT. These findings suggest that WDT is a useful test to induce IOP peaks in both POAG and PACG patients.

  5. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  6. Application of fractal characteristic quantities of pressure fluctuation in subcooled boiling regime recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the subcoole d boiling two-phase system ws introduced and discussed. With the introduction of fractal concept, an analysis of the fractal feature of pressure wave signals fiom nonlinear dynamics point of view. was carried out. Meanwhile, the pseudo phase diagrans of typical time series of sound pressure were given. Finally, through dynamic clustering and on the basis of calculating correlation dimension and Hurst exponent of pressure wave time series on different subcooling conditions, the recognition of developing regime of the two-phase system was delivered, which might provide a promising approach of recognition and diagnosis of a boiling system.

  7. Watching the wind: seismic data contamination at long-periods due to atmospheric pressure-field-induced tilting

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, S.; Bodin, P.; Hagel, K.; Fletcher, D.

    2010-12-01

    Long-period noise generated by the elastic response of the Earth to atmospheric pressure fluctuations has long been recognized as a limiting factor for seismic investigations. The quality of seismic data recorded by sensitive, near-surface broadband seismometers can be severely corrupted by this effect. During the recent installation of a new broadband site on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network recorded and investigated elevated daytime noise levels at periods exceeding 30 seconds. Substantial power spectral density variations of the background noise field, 15-20 dB, were observed in the horizontal component seismograms. The pattern of the long-period noise exhibited striking correlations with local fluctuations of the air temperature and wind speed as measured nearby the seismic station by the National Weather Service Forecast Office, Seattle, Washington, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Several past studies have demonstrated that local wind systems may lead to variations of the atmospheric pressure field that deform the ground and perturb seismograms. The rotational component of this motion is detected by horizontal-component seismometers because at periods longer than the sensor’s low corner frequency the sensor is acting essentially as a tiltmeter. We obtained a transfer function that describes the response of the broadband seismometer to a tilt step change and estimated the amplitude of tilt noise to be on the order of 10-9 - 10-8 radians. Within the seismic pass-band of the sensor, it is not possible to remove the tilt signal from the observed seismograms because the details of the tilting depend on the pressure field variations, the compliance of the near surface to pressure variations, and the design and construction of the seismometer vault itself. At longer periods, using the seismic data to recover tilts of tectonic origin is made challenging because of the needed instrument correction

  8. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  9. Flow Reactor Studies with Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Higher

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Image of Discharge Reactor with Viewport Inlet Cap • Modular plasma discharge reactor can be interchanged with redesigned pressure shell to perform...Flow Reactor Studies with Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges at Atmospheric Pressure and Higher Nicholas Tsolas, Kuni Togai and Richard Yetter...Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA, 16801 Fourth Annual Review Meeting of the

  10. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .1. INSTRUMENTATION AND IONIZATION TECHNIQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. Such low-pressure ion sources can make use of a range of different ionization methods and are in routine use in analytical mass spectrometers. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, and may b

  11. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  12. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, V. M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A. P.; Devyatkin, S. I.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Ignatova, S. I.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V. I.; Sanotskiy, Y. V.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  13. Decontamination of objects in a sealed container by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    The decontamination of objects (food) in a sealed container by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua, is used....... The ambient atmosphere was air at atmospheric pressure. A plasma is generated inside the bag forming ozone from the oxygen. The maximum ozone concentration in the bag was found to be 140 ppm. A log 6 reduction of L. innocua is obtained after 15 min of exposure time. The temperature of the slides after...

  14. Experimental investigation on unsteady pressure fluctuation of rotor tip region in high pressure stage of a vaneless counter-rotating turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO QingJun; LIU XiYang; WANG HuiShe; ZHAO XiaoLu; XU JianZhong

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to study the unsteady pressure fluctuation of rotor tip region in high pressure stage of a vaneless counter-rotating turbine. The experiment is carried out on a blow-down short duration turbine facility. The investigation indicates that the blow-down short duration turbine facility is capable of substituting continuous turbine facilities in most turbine testing. Through this experimental investigation, a distinct blade-to-blade variation is observed. The results indicate that the combined effects of vane wake, tip leakage flow, complicated wave systems and rotor wake induce the remarkable blade-to-blade variations. The results also show that the unsteady effect is intensified along the flow direction.

  15. Experimental investigation on unsteady pressure fluctuation of rotor tip region in high pressure stage of a vaneless counter-rotating turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to study the unsteady pressure fluctuation of rotor tip region in high pressure stage of a vaneless counter-rotating turbine.The experiment is carried out on a blow-down short duration turbine facility.The investigation indicates that the blow-down short duration turbine facility is capable of substituting continuous turbine facilities in most turbine testing.Through this experimental investigation,a distinct blade-to-blade variation is observed.The results indicate that the combined effects of vane wake,tip leakage flow,complicated wave systems and rotor wake induce the remarkable blade-to-blade variations.The results also show that the unsteady effect is intensified along the flow direction.

  16. Fluctuations of ice cover and sea water pressure nearby the Tunabreen Glacier front at Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Muzylev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of oceanographic measurements carried out in February, 2011, from the sea ice surface in the Tempelfjorden near the Tunabreen front in Svalbard are presented. Two temperature and pressure recorders SBE-39 were deployed on a wire from the ice approximately 300 m from the glacier front. The sampling time interval was 1 s. A pressure recorder SBE-37 was located under them on the bottom with a sampling interval of 6 s. Pressure oscillations on the bottom with a period of 90 s and ice cover oscillations with periods of 10 s and 14 s were recorded. The conclusion is made that the recorded oscillations of pressure in the sea water are related to the glacier microsurges, and the observed profiles of temperature, density, and salinity show the absence or insignificant inflow of fresh water from the glacier in the fjord during the winter season. The measurements allowed us to estimate the Young's modulus of the ice.

  17. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  18. Subtarget Effect on Laser Plasma Generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser at Atmospheric Gas Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lie, Tjung Jie; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmajid, Syahrun Nur; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Kurniawan, Hendrik

    2000-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the dynamical process taking place in the laser plasma generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 laser (100 mJ, 50 ns) irradiation of a soft sample at surrounding helium pressure of 1 atm. It is shown that the presence of a copper subtarget behind the soft sample is crucial in raising the gushing speed of the atoms to the level adequate for the generation of shock wave laser plasma even at atmospheric pressure. It is also found that the time profiles of spatially integrated emission intensity of the target’s atoms and gas atoms exhibit a characteristic dynamical process that consists of successive excitation and cooling stages even at such a high pressure, which is typical of shock wave laser plasma. It is therefore suggested that the generation of the laser plasma at atmospheric pressure is more likely due to the shock wave mechanism than to the widely known breakdown mechanism. Initial spectrochemical analysis of water from the blow off of a boiler system was also carried out, showing a detection limit of as low as 5 ppm for calcium.

  19. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  20. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  1. Research progress in the study of atmospheric pressure glow barrier discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xuechen; DONG Lifang; JIA Pengying

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow barrier discharge (APGBD) can operate at high pressure, and so vacuum device is not necessary. Furthermore, the produced plasma by APGBD has moderate electron temperature and density besides good uniformity. Therefore,APGBD has extensive potential applications in industry and has been becoming a hot issue in the research of low temperature plasma. In this paper, the main problems in the study of atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated by dielectric barrier discharge, including the experimental setup, judging criterion, discharging conditions, physical mechanisms, and parameter diagnoses, are discussed, and further research prospects of APGBD are proposed.

  2. Simulations of sonic boom ray tube area fluctuations for propagation through atmospheric turbulence including caustics via a Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Pierce, Allan D.

    1992-01-01

    A theory which gives statistical predictions for how often sonic booms propagating through the earth's turbulent boundary layer will encounter caustics, given the spectral properties of the atmospheric turbulence, is outlined. The theory is simple but approximately accounts for the variation of ray tube areas along ray paths. This theory predicts that the variation of ray tube areas is determined by the product of two similar area factors, psi (x) and phi (x), each satisfying a generic harmonic oscillator equation. If an area factor increases the peak acoustic pressure decreases, and if the factor decreases the peak acoustic pressure increases. Additionally, if an area factor decreases to zero and becomes negative, the ray has propagated through a caustic, which contributes a phase change of 90 degrees to the wave. Thus, it is clear that the number of times that a sonic boom wave passes through a caustic should be related to the distorted boom waveform received on the ground. Examples are given based on a characterization of atmospheric turbulence due to the structure function of Tatarski as modified by Crow.

  3. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-08-31

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  4. Atmospheric oxygenation caused by a change in volcanic degassing pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Scaillet, Bruno; Arndt, Nicholas T.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The Precambrian history of our planet is marked by two major events: a pulse of continental crust formation at the end of the Archaean eon and a weak oxygenation of the atmosphere (the Great Oxidation Event) that followed, at 2.45 billion years ago. This oxygenation has been linked to the emergence of oxygenic cyanobacteria1,2 and to changes in the compositions of volcanic gases3,4, but not to the composition of erupting lavas--geochemical constraints indicate that the...

  5. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

  6. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  8. Chain elongation of diacylphosphatidylcholine induces fully bilayer interdigitation under atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masaki; Wilk, Agnieszka; Kazama, Akira; Chodankar, Shirish; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Matsuki, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    The phase transitions of dibehenoylphosphatidylcholine (C22PC) bilayer membrane were observed by differential scanning calorimetry under atmospheric pressure and light-transmittance measurements under high pressure. The constructed temperature-pressure phase diagram suggests that the gel phase at low temperatures is the interdigitated gel phase. To confirm the phase state, we performed small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence measurements using a polarity-sensitive probe Prodan for the C22PC bilayer membrane under atmospheric pressure. The peaks obtained in both measurements clearly showed the characteristic patterns of the fully interdigitated gel phase. Taking into account of previous studies on the gel phase for long-chain PC bilayers under atmospheric pressure and our studies on the pressure-induced bilayer interdigitaion of diacyl-PCs, it turned out that the interdigitation of diacyl-PC bilayer membranes occurs when the carbon number of acyl chain reaches at least 22. The present study revealed that the interdigitation of PC bilayer membranes occurs not only by weakening the attractive force of polar head groups but also by strengthening the cohesive force of acyl chains. When dominating the force of acyl chains, the interdigitation can be induced even in a diacyl-PC bilayer membrane by only hydration under atmospheric pressure.

  9. Pressure Fluctuation of 1/fα in the Film Boiling of He Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 村上正秀; 王如竹

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study of the pressure oscillation induced by the film boiling of He Ⅱ is presented. The film boiling state and the stability of the vapour film are determined by the governing parameter (i.e. the immersion depth). It is found that the power density spectrum of the pressure oscillation induced by the film boiling displays the 1/fα-behaviour. The exponent α was found to be within the range from one to two, which indicates the existence of self-organized criticality in the film boiling of He Ⅱ.

  10. Space-time characteristics of wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fluctuations in wall-modeled large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-06-01

    We report the space-time characteristics of the wall-pressure fluctuations and wall shear-stress fluctuations from wall-modeled large eddy simulation (WMLES) of a turbulent channel flow at Reτ=2000 . Two standard zonal wall models (equilibrium stress model and nonequilibrium model based on unsteady RANS) are employed, and it is shown that they yield similar results in predicting these quantities. The wall-pressure and wall shear-stress fields from WMLES are analyzed in terms of their r.m.s. fluctuations, spectra, two-point correlations, and convection velocities. It is demonstrated that the resolution requirement for predicting the wall-pressure fluctuations is more stringent than that for predicting the velocity. At least δ /Δ x >20 and δ /Δ z >30 are required to marginally resolve the integral length scales of the pressure-producing eddies near the wall. Otherwise, the pressure field is potentially aliased. Spurious high wave number modes dominate in the streamwise direction, and they contaminate the pressure spectra leading to significant overprediction of the second-order pressure statistics. When these conditions are met, the pressure statistics and spectra at low wave number or low frequency agree well with the DNS and experimental data. On the contrary, the wall shear-stress fluctuations, modeled entirely through the RANS-based wall models, are largely underpredicted and relatively insensitive to the grid resolution. The short-time, small-scale near-wall eddies, which are neither resolved nor modeled adequately in the wall models, seem to be important for accurate prediction of the wall shear-stress fluctuations.

  11. Seasonal emanation of radon at Ghuttu, northwest Himalaya: Differentiation of atmospheric temperature and pressure influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamra, Leena

    2015-11-01

    Continuous monitoring of radon along with meteorological parameters has been carried out in a seismically active area of Garhwal region, northwest Himalaya, within the frame work of earthquake precursory research. Radon measurements are carried out by using a gamma ray detector installed in the air column at a depth of 10m in a 68m deep borehole. The analysis of long time series for 2006-2012 shows strong seasonal variability masked by diurnal and multi-day variations. Isolation of a seasonal cycle by minimising short-time by 31 day running average shows a strong seasonal variation with unambiguous dependence on atmospheric temperature and pressure. The seasonal characteristics of radon concentrations are positively correlated to atmospheric temperature (R=0.95) and negatively correlated to atmospheric pressure (R=-0.82). The temperature and pressure variation in their annual progressions are negatively correlated. The calculations of partial correlation coefficient permit us to conclude that atmospheric temperature plays a dominant role in controlling the variability of radon in borehole, 71% of the variability in radon arises from the variation in atmospheric temperature and about 6% of the variability is contributed by atmospheric pressure. The influence of pressure variations in an annual cycle appears to be a pseudo-effect, resulting from the negative correlation between temperature and pressure variations. Incorporation of these results explains the varying and even contradictory claims regarding the influence of the pressure variability on radon changes in the published literature. Temperature dependence, facilitated by the temperature gradient in the borehole, controls the transportation of radon from the deep interior to the surface.

  12. An analysis of the errors associated with the determination of atmospheric temperature from atmospheric pressure and density data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzner, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A graph was developed for relating delta T/T, the relative uncertainty in atmospheric temperature T, to delta p/p, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric pressure p, for situations, when T is derived from the slope of the pressure-height profile. A similar graph relates delta T/T to delta roh/rho, the relative uncertainty in the atmospheric density rho, for those cases when T is derived from the downward integration of the density-height profile. A comparison of these two graphs shows that for equal uncertainties in the respective basic parameters, p or rho, smaller uncertainties in the derived temperatures are associated with density-height rather than with pressure-height data. The value of delta T/T is seen to depend not only upon delta p or delta rho, and to a small extent upon the value of T or the related scale height H, but also upon the inverse of delta h, the height increment between successive observations of p or rho. In the case of pressure-height data, delta T/T is dominated by 1/delta h for all values of delta h; for density-height data, delta T/T is dominated by delta rho/rho for delta h smaller than about 5 km. In the case of T derived from density-height data, this inverse relationship between delta T/T and delta h applies only for large values of delta h, that is, for delta h 35 km. No limit exists in the fineness of usable height resolution of T which may be derived from densities, while a fine height resolution in pressure-height data leads to temperature with unacceptably large uncertainties.

  13. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  14. Atmospheric Refraction Predictions Based on Actual Atmospheric Pressure and Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere that assumes the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate L from sea level up to a height {h}t≈ 11 {km}, and that afterward it remains constant. In this model, the ratio T o /L, where T o is the temperature at the observer’s location, determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes h≤slant {h}t. But daily balloon measurements across the USA show that in some cases there is an inversion so that the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height {h}p≈ 1 {km}, and only after reaching a plateau with temperature {T}o\\prime at this height, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Hence, in such cases the relevant length scale for atmospheric refraction calculations in the range {h}p≤slant hatmospheric refraction based on this actual atmospheric data are compared with the results of current simplified models.

  15. Atmospheric pressure growth of graphene on SiC(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyller, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Graphene, a single monolayer of sp^2-bonded carbon, is a very unique 2-dimensional electron gas system with electronic properties fundamentally different to other 2DEG systems [1]. Several production routes exist for graphene. Among them, the solid-state decomposition of hexagonal silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces [2] is particularly attractive for the development of graphene based electronics [3,4]. The first part of the presentation gives a brief summary of recent studies on the structural and electronic properties of graphene and few-layer graphene grown on SiC(0001) under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The second part of the talk is devoted to recent progress in the growth of large domain graphene films on SiC(0001) in Ar atmosphere. It is shown that growth in Ar ambient leads to a significant improvement of the surface morphology and domain size as well as carrier mobility. [4pt] [1] A.H. Castro Neto, et al., Reviews of Modern Physics, in print (arXiv:0709.1163v2); and references therein. [0pt] [2] A. Charrier, et al., J. Appl. Phys. 92 (2002) 2479. [0pt] [3] C. Berger et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 19912; C. Berger, et al., Science 312 (2006) 1191. [0pt] [4] A.K. Geim and K.S. Novoselov, Nature Mat. 6 (2007) 183.

  16. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  17. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  18. Plasma polymerization of acrylic acid onto polystyrene by cyclonic plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Jan; Lin, Chin-Ho; Huang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The cyclonic atmospheric-pressure plasma is developed for chamberless deposition of poly(acrylic acid) film from argon/acrylic acid mixtures. The photoemission plasma species in atmospheric-pressure plasma polymerization was identified by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The OES diagnosis data and deposition results indicated that in glow discharge, the CH and C2 species resulted from low-energy electron-impact dissociation that creates deposition species, but the strong CO emission lines are related to nondeposition species. The acrylic acid flow rate is seen as the key factor affecting the film growth. The film surface analysis results indicate that a smooth, continuous, and uniform surface of poly(acrylic acid) films can be formed at a relatively low plasma power input. This study reveals the potential of chamberless film growth at atmospheric pressure for large-area deposition of poly(acrylic acid) films.

  19. Polymer Surface Treatment by Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Surface Discharge Plasma:Its Characteristics and Comparison with Low Pressure Oxygen Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi KUWABARA; Shin-ichi KURODA; Hitoshi KUBOTA

    2007-01-01

    The polymer treatment with a low-temperature plasma jet generated on the atmospheric pressure surface discharge (SD) plasma is performed.The change of the surface property over time,in comparison with low pressure oxygen (O2) plasma treatment,is examined.As one compares the treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma to that by the low pressure O2 plasma of PS (polystyrene) the treatment effects were almost in complete agreement.However,when the atmospheric pressure plasma was used for PP(polypropylene),it produced remarkable hydrophilic effects.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma System for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew; Staack, David

    2016-09-01

    There is growing interest in using plasmas for additive manufacturing, however these methods use high temperature plasmas to melt the material. We have developed a novel technique of additive manufacturing using a low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet. The jet is attached to the head of a 3D printer to allow for precise control of the plasma's location. Various methods are employed to deposit the material, including using a vaporized precursor or depositing a liquid precursor directly onto the substrate or into the plasma via a nebulizer. Various materials can be deposited including metals (copper using copper (II) acetylacetonate), polymers (PMMA using the liquid monomer), and various hydrocarbon compounds (using alcohols or a 100% methane DBD jet). The rastering pattern for the 3D printer was modified for plasma deposition, since it was originally designed for thermoplastic extrusion. The design constraints for fill pattern selection for the plasma printer are influenced by substrate heating, deposition area, and precursor consumption. Depositions onto pressure and/or temperature sensitive substrates can be easily achieved. Deposition rates range up to 0.08 cm3/hr using tris(2-methoxyethoxy)(vinyl)silane, however optimization can still be done on the system to improve the deposition rate. For example higher concentration of precursor can be combined with faster motion and higher discharge powers to increase the deposition rate without overheating the substrate.

  1. Source of temperature and pressure pulsations during sessile droplet evaporation into multicomponent atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Aaron H; Sefiane, Khellil; Ward, Charles A

    2013-10-29

    During sessile droplet evaporation, studies with IR thermography and shadowgraphs have indicated temperature pulsations. We confirm those observations with microthermocouples, but microthermocouples also indicate temperature pulsations in the atmosphere of the droplet. The pressure in this atmosphere pulsated as well and was correlated with the temperature pulsations in the droplet. Also, we find that if a droplet evaporates into its own vapor, there are no temperature or pressure pulsations. The pulsations occur only if the droplet evaporates into an atmosphere with a component having a heat of solution with the droplet when it adsorbs-absorbs. None of the currently proposed mechanisms for the temperature pulsations provide an explanation for the coupling between the temperature pulsations in the droplet and the vapor-phase pressure pulsations, and for the absence of the pulsations when the system is single-component. As a mechanism for the pulsations, we propose that when a droplet is exposed to an atmosphere containing a component that has a heat of solution with the droplet, energy will be released from adsorption-absorption. This energy will cause pulsations in the evaporation flux, and these pulsations could cause the observed temperature and pressure pulsations. We examine this mechanism by showing that, if the measured temperature pulsations in a water droplet exposed to a methanol atmosphere are used as the input to a theory of evaporation kinetics (statistical rate theory), the pressure pulsations of the water vapor in the methanol atmosphere are predicted and agree with those measured with a quadrupole mass analyzer. When the inputs and outputs are reversed in the theory, we find that the temperature pulsations in the droplet are correctly predicted from the measured water vapor pulsations in the atmosphere.

  2. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jiamping,; Kawa, Stephan R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  3. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg.

  4. Relation among Summer Rainfall in South Shandong and High Pressure in South Asia and Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relation among summer rainfall in south Shandong and high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation.[Method] Taking the precipitation in south Shandong along the Yellow River and Huaihe River,using the NCEP/NCAR data and summer rainfall data in south Shandong in summer from 1961 to 2005,the characteristics of high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation in drought year and flood year in summer in south Shandong Province were expounded.The mechanism of...

  5. Plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, A.; Leipold, F.; Kusano, Y.

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in Ar/NH3 (0.1 - 10%) mixtures with a parallel plate electrode geometry was studied. The plasma was investigated by emission and absorption spectroscopy in the UV spectral range. Discharge current and voltage were measured as well. UV...... of an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 DBD are H-2, N-2 and N2H4. The hydrazine (N2H4) concentration in the plasma and in the exhaust gases at various ammonia concentrations and different discharge powers was measured. Thermal N2H4 decomposition into NH2 radicals may be used for NOx reduction processes....

  6. Decontamination of a rotating cutting tool during operation by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Hansen, F.

    2010-01-01

    The decontamination of a rotating cutting tool used for slicing in the meat industry by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua......, is used for the experiments. A rotating knife was inoculated with L. innocua. The surface of the rotating knife was partly exposed to an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge operated in air, where the knife itself served as a ground electrode. The rotation of the knife ensures a treatment...

  7. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF CALCIUM ENRICHED OSMO-DEHYDRATED APPLE SLICES BY IMPREGNATION AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop calcium enriched osmo-dehydrated apple slices by impregnation at atmospheric pressure. Osmotic dehydration (OD) was carried out using 50°Bx sucrose solutions with 4% and 8% calcium lactate (CL) at atmospheric pressure for 16 hours followed ...

  9. Differential equations governing slip-induced pore-pressure fluctuations in a water-saturated granular medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Macroscopic frictional slip in water-saturated granular media occurs commonly during landsliding, surface faulting, and intense bedload transport. A mathematical model of dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations that accompany and influence such sliding is derived here by both inductive and deductive methods. The inductive derivation shows how the governing differential equations represent the physics of the steadily sliding array of cylindrical fiberglass rods investigated experimentally by Iverson and LaHusen (1989). The deductive derivation shows how the same equations result from a novel application of Biot's (1956) dynamic mixture theory to macroscopic deformation. The model consists of two linear differential equations and five initial and boundary conditions that govern solid displacements and pore-water pressures. Solid displacements and water pressures are strongly coupled, in part through a boundary condition that ensures mass conservation during irreversible pore deformation that occurs along the bumpy slip surface. Feedback between this deformation and the pore-pressure field may yield complex system responses. The dual derivations of the model help explicate key assumptions. For example, the model requires that the dimensionless parameter B, defined here through normalization of Biot's equations, is much larger than one. This indicates that solid-fluid coupling forces are dominated by viscous rather than inertial effects. A tabulation of physical and kinematic variables for the rod-array experiments of Iverson and LaHusen and for various geologic phenomena shows that the model assumptions commonly are satisfied. A subsequent paper will describe model tests against experimental data. ?? 1993 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  10. Using Dimers to Measure Biosignatures and Atmospheric Pressure for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Amit; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earthlike planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earthlike atmospheres, and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers, and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 $\\mu$m dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bars, and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present day lev...

  11. Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure at Ground Level using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angshuman Ray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure is one important and challenging task that needs lot of attention and study for analyzing atmospheric conditions. Advent of digital computers and development of data driven artificial intelligence approaches like Artificial Neural Networks (ANN have helped in numerical prediction of pressure. However, very few works have been done till now in this area. The present study developed an ANN model based on the past observations of several meteorological parameters like temperature, humidity, air pressure and vapour pressure as an input for training the model. The novel architecture of the proposed model contains several multilayer perceptron network (MLP to realize better performance. The model is enriched by analysis of alternative hybrid model of k-means clustering and MLP. The improvement of the performance in the prediction accuracy has been demonstrated by the automatic selection of the appropriate cluster

  12. Phase Synchronization of Pressure-Flow Fluctuations: A measure of cerebral autoregulation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Z; Ivanov, P C; Novák, V; Stanley, H E

    2006-01-01

    We employ a synchronization method to investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during four different physiologic conditions: supine, head-up tilt, hyperventilation and CO$_2$ rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes are synchronized with changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a function of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced and more variable. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are cross-correlated even within a single heartbeat cycle. The maximum correlation str...

  13. EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas for processing and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massines, Françoise

    2005-02-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for surface treatment, thin film coating, sterilization, decontamination, etc. Many interesting questions have arisen that are related to both fundamental and applied research in this field. Many concern the generation of a large volume discharge which remains stable and uniform at atmospheric pressure. At this pressure, depending on the experimental conditions, either streamer or Townsend breakdown may occur. They respectively lead to micro-discharges or to one large radius discharge, Townsend or glow. However, the complexity arises from the formation of large radius streamers due to avalanche coupling and from the constriction of the glow discharge due to too low a current. Another difficulty is to visually distinguish many micro-discharges from one large radius discharge. Other questions relate to key chemical reactions in the plasma and at the surface. Experimental characterization and modelling also need to be developed to answer these questions. This cluster collects up-to-date research results related to the understanding of different discharges working at atmospheric pressure and the application to polymer surface activation and thin film coating. It presents different solutions for generating and sustaining diffuse discharges at atmospheric pressure. DC, low-frequency and radio-frequency excitations are considered in noble gases, nitrogen or air. Two specific methods developed to understand the transition from Townsend to streamer breakdown are also presented. They are based on the cross-correlation spectroscopy and an electrical

  14. Collision-induced dissociation analysis of negative atmospheric ion adducts in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2013-05-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed on atmospheric ion adducts [M + R](-) formed between various types of organic compounds M and atmospheric negative ions R(-) [such as O2(-), HCO3(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO2(-), NO3(-), and NO3(-)(HNO3)] in negative-ion mode atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. All of the [M + R](-) adducts were fragmented to form deprotonated analytes [M - H](-) and/or atmospheric ions R(-), whose intensities in the CID spectra were dependent on the proton affinities of the [M - H](-) and R(-) fragments. Precursor ions [M + R](-) for which R(-) have higher proton affinities than [M - H](-) formed [M - H](-) as the dominant product. Furthermore, the CID of the adducts with HCO3(-) and NO3(-)(HNO3) led to other product ions such as [M + HO](-) and NO3(-), respectively. The fragmentation behavior of [M + R](-) for each R(-) observed was independent of analyte type (e.g., whether the analyte was aliphatic or aromatic, or possessed certain functional groups).

  15. Self-sustained carbon monoxide oxidation oscillations on size-selected platinum nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Robert; Andersen, Thomas; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev

    2013-01-01

    High-quality mass spectrometry data of the oscillatory behavior of CO oxidation on SiO2 supported Pt-nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been acquired as a function of pressure, coverage, gas composition and nanoparticle size. The oscillations are self-sustained for several days at constant......, temperature, pressure and CO/O2 ratio. The frequency of the oscillations is very well defined and increases over time. The oscillation frequency is furthermore strongly temperature dependent with increasing temperature resulting in increasing frequency. A plausible mechanism for the oscillations is proposed...

  16. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma synthesis of submicrometer-sized pharmaceuticals with improved physicochemical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radacsi, N.; Ambrus, R.; Szabó-Révész, P.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Horst, J.H. ter

    2012-01-01

    A reduction in particle size is one of the strategies to enhance the dissolution behavior of low water-soluble drugs such as niflumic acid. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma crystallization is a novel technique to achieve such submicrometer particles. This technique uses a surface dielectric barrier

  17. Characterization of typical chemical background interferences in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P.; Covey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and origins of typical chemical background noise ions in positive atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (API LC/MS) are investigated and summarized in this study. This was done by classifying chemical background ions using precursor and product ion sc

  18. Atmospheric pressure photoionisation : An ionization method for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, DB; Covey, TR; Bruins, AP

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) has been successfully demonstrated to provide high sensitivity to LC-MS analysis. A vacuum-ultraviolet lamp designed for photoionization detection in gas chromatography is used as a source of 10-eV photons. The mixture of samples and solvent eluting from a

  19. Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a gliding arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A gliding arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the gliding arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events...

  20. Surface modification of nanofibrillated cellulose films by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siró, Istvan; Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion

    2013-01-01

    of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment, the water contact angle of NFC films increased and the values were comparable with those of PLA films. On the other hand, surface chemical characterization revealed inhomogeneity of the plasma treatment and limited improvement in adhesion between NFC and PLA films...

  1. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  2. Sustained diffusive alternating current gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Li, Zhongshan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid transition from glow discharge to thermal arc has been a common problem in generating stable high-power non-thermal plasmas especially at ambient conditions. A sustained diffusive gliding arc discharge was generated in a large volume in atmospheric pressure air, driven by an alternating...

  3. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röd, Sara Katrine Solhøj; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank

    Sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products are susceptible to growth of the foodborne pathogenic bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may be applicable for surface decontamination in sealed bags thus avoiding recontamination. Plasmas (Fig. 1), created in neutral...

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the contac

  5. Synthesis of 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine from 2-naphthol under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Feng; Chao Zhang; Qiang Tang; Mei Ming Luo

    2009-01-01

    A practical protocol to obtain 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamine was developed from 2-naphthol and 2-naphthylhydrazine under mild conditions: solvent-free, 125-130 ℃, atmospheric pressure. The convenient procedure makes the process amenable for large-scale synthesis of the versatile compound.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .2. APPLICATIONS IN PHARMACY, BIOCHEMISTRY AND GENERAL-CHEMISTRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, it not essential, for a growing number of applications. MS analysis of samples pyrolyzed under controlled conditions makes use of chemical ionization at

  7. Development of atmospheric pressure CVD processes for highquality transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Grob, F.; Kuypers, A.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade TNO has been involved in the research and development of atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) and plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) processes for deposition of transparent conductive oxides (TCO), such as tin oxide and zinc oxide. It is shown that by combining precursor development, fundam

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glass fibre composite for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, H.; Stenum, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Glass-fibre-reinforced polyester composite plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge. Synthetic air was used as the treatment gas. The water contact angle dropped markedly from 84 to 22° after a 2-s treatment, and decreased to 0° when the composite plates were...

  9. DNA strand scission induced by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptasińska, Sylwia; Bahnev, Blagovest; Stypczyńska, Agnieszka; Bowden, Mark; Mason, Nigel J; Braithwaite, Nicholas St J

    2010-07-28

    The DNA molecule is observed to be very susceptible to short-term exposures to an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The DNA damage induced by plasma-generated species, i.e. excited atoms, charged particles, electrons and UV light is determined.

  10. Pressure-Induced Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in the Pnictide Superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5: 125Te NMR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takato; Takami, Tsuyoshi; Niitaka, Seiji; Takagi, Hidenori; Itoh, Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between superconductivity and low-energy spin fluctuations in the iron-based superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5, we have conducted 125Te NMR measurements at ambient pressure and 2 GPa. As the superconducting transition temperature Tc is increased by applying pressure, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by temperature, 1/T1T, shows the development of antiferromagnetic fluctuations upon lowering temperature toward Tc. This supports the scenario that spin fluctuations promote superconducting pairing. The depressed Knight shift 125K and the absence of a coherence peak in 1/T1 below Tc are consistent with spin-singlet superconducting pairing with an anisotropic order parameter. In the normal metallic state, the comparison between the uniform and dynamic spin susceptibilities suggests the existence of a Fermi level located near the singularity of the band structure.

  11. Polysilicon Prepared from SIC14 by Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma%Polysilicon Prepared from SIC14 by Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小松; 王楠; 杨晋华; 王友年; 朱爱民

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure was explored for the preparation of polysilicon from SiCl4. The power supply sources of positive pulse and alternating current (8 kHz and 100 kHz) were compared for polysilicon preparation. The samples prepared by using the 100 kHz power source were crystalline silicon. The effects of H2 and SiCl4 volume fractions were investigated. The optical emission spectra showed that silicon species played an important role in polysilicon deposition

  12. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Emma J.; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S.; Lavrentieva, Nina N.

    2017-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H216O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H2- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number J up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300-2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for J ‧ J ″ -dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution (Δ ν ˜ = 0.01cm-1) pressure broadened cross sections for a fixed range of temperatures and pressures between 300 and 2000 K and 0.001-10 bar. An interpolation procedure which can be used to determine cross sections at intermediate temperature and pressure is described. Pressure broadening parameters and cross sections are presented in new ExoMol format.

  13. Surface-initiated graft polymerization on multiwalled carbon nanotubes pretreated by corona discharge at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Fang, Zhengping; Song, Ping'an; Peng, Mao

    2010-03-01

    Surface-initiated graft polymerization on multi-walled carbon nanotubes pretreated with a corona discharge at atmospheric pressure was explored. The mechanism of the corona-discharge-induced graft polymerization is discussed. The results indicate that MWCNTs were encapsulated by poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA), demonstrating the formation of PGMA-grafted MWCNTs (PGMA-g-MWCNTs), with a grafting ratio of about 22 wt%. The solubility of PGMA-g-MWCNTs in ethanol was dramatically improved compared to pristine MWCNTs, which could contribute to fabricating high-performance polymer/MWCNTs nanocomposites in the future. Compared with most plasma processes, which operate at low pressures, corona discharge has the merit of working at atmospheric pressure.

  14. Airborne and ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Weng, Chi Y.

    1989-01-01

    The first high accuracy remote measurements of the atmospheric pressure profile have been made. The measurements were made with a differential absorption lidar system that utilizes tunable alexandrite lasers. The absorption in the trough between two lines in the oxygen A-band near 760 nm was used for probing the atmosphere. Measurements of the two-dimensional structure of the pressure field were made in the troposphere from an aircraft looking down. Also, measurements of the one-dimensional structure were made from the ground looking up. Typical pressure accuracies for the aircraft measurements were 1.5-2 mbar with a 30-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average (20 s), which corresponds to a 2-km horizontal resolution. Typical accuracies for the upward viewing ground based measurements were 2.0 mbar for a 30-m resolution and a 100-shot average.

  15. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Lukas, E-mail: lhoffmann@uni-wuppertal.de; Theirich, Detlef; Hasselmann, Tim; Räupke, André; Schlamm, Daniel; Riedl, Thomas, E-mail: t.riedl@uni-wuppertal.de [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-Str. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2}d{sup −1}.

  16. Assessing fluctuating evolutionary pressure in yeast and mammal evolutionary rate covariation using bioinformatics of meiotic protein genetic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    The evolutionary rate co-variation in meiotic proteins has been reported for yeast and mammal using phylogenic branch lengths which assess retention, duplication and mutation. The bioinformatics of the corresponding DNA sequences could be classified as a diagram of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. The identification of adaptive selection using entropy marker and functional-structural diversity using fractal dimension would support a regression analysis where the coefficient of determination would serve as evolutionary pathway marker for DNA sequences and be an important component in the astrobiology community. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, clinical trial targeted cancer gene CD47, SIRT6 in spermatogenesis, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology demonstrate the diagram classification methodology. Comparisons to the SEPT4-XIAP pair in stem cell apoptosis, testesexpressed taste genes TAS1R3-GNAT3 pair, and amyloid beta APLP1-APLP2 pair with the yeast-mammal DNA sequences for meiotic proteins RAD50-MRE11 pair and NCAPD2-ICK pair have accounted for the observed fluctuating evolutionary pressure systematically. Regression with high R-sq values or a triangular-like cluster pattern for concordant pairs in co-variation among the studied species could serve as evidences for the possible location of common ancestors in the entropy-fractal dimension diagram, consistent with an example of the human-chimp common ancestor study using the FOXP2 regulated genes reported in human fetal brain study. The Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Rad-A could be viewed as an outlier in the RAD50 diagram and also in the free energy versus fractal dimension regression Cook's distance, consistent with a non-Earth source for this radiation resistant bacterium. Convergent and divergent fluctuating evolutionary

  17. Weather forecasting by insects: modified sexual behaviour in response to atmospheric pressure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Ana Cristina; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Nardi, Cristiane; Bezner-Kerr, Wayne; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Bento, José Maurício Simões; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2013-01-01

    Prevailing abiotic conditions may positively or negatively impact insects at both the individual and population levels. For example while moderate rainfall and wind velocity may provide conditions that favour development, as well as movement within and between habitats, high winds and heavy rains can significantly decrease life expectancy. There is some evidence that insects adjust their behaviours associated with flight, mating and foraging in response to changes in barometric pressure. We studied changes in different mating behaviours of three taxonomically unrelated insects, the curcurbit beetle, Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera), the true armyworm moth, Pseudaletia unipuncta (Lepidoptera) and the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Hemiptera), when subjected to natural or experimentally manipulated changes in atmospheric pressure. In response to decreasing barometric pressure, male beetles exhibited decreased locomotory activity in a Y-tube olfactometer with female pheromone extracts. However, when placed in close proximity to females, they exhibited reduced courtship sequences and the precopulatory period. Under the same situations, females of the true armyworm and the potato aphid exhibited significantly reduced calling behaviour. Neither the movement of male beetles nor the calling of armyworm females differed between stable and increasing atmospheric pressure conditions. However, in the case of the armyworm there was a significant decrease in the incidence of mating under rising atmospheric conditions, suggesting an effect on male behaviour. When atmospheric pressure rose, very few M. euphorbiae oviparae called. This was similar to the situation observed under decreasing conditions, and consequently very little mating was observed in this species except under stable conditions. All species exhibited behavioural modifications, but there were interspecific differences related to size-related flight ability and the diel periodicity of mating activity. We

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Contrasting characteristics of sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air and atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. L.; Liu, D. X.; Iza, F.; Rong, M. Z.; Kong, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    Glow discharges in air are often considered to be the ultimate low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas for numerous chamber-free applications. This is due to the ubiquitous presence of air and the perceived abundance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in air plasmas. In this paper, sub-microsecond pulsed atmospheric air plasmas are shown to produce a low concentration of excited oxygen atoms but an abundance of excited nitrogen species, UV photons and ozone molecules. This contrasts sharply with the efficient production of excited oxygen atoms in comparable helium-oxygen discharges. Relevant reaction chemistry analysed with a global model suggests that collisional excitation of O2 by helium metastables is significantly more efficient than electron dissociative excitation of O2, electron excitation of O and ion-ion recombination. These results suggest different practical uses of the two oxygen-containing atmospheric discharges, with air plasmas being well suited for nitrogen and UV based chemistry and He-O2 plasmas for excited atomic oxygen based chemistry.

  19. Pulmonary and heart diseases with inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Murata, Shigeru; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kondo, Akane; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    We examined blood pressure in the abdominal aorta of mini pig under plasma inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow. The coaxial atmospheric pressure plasma source has a tungsten wire inside a glass capillary, that is surrounded by a grounded tubular electrode. Plasma was generated under the following conditions; applied voltage: 8 kVpp, frequency: 3 kHz, and helium (He) gas flow rate: 1 L/min. On the other hand, sphygmomanometry of a blood vessel proceeded using a device comprising a disposable force transducer, and a bedside monitor for simultaneous electrocardiography and signal pressure measurements. We directly measured Nitric oxide (NO) using a catheter-type NO sensor placed in the coronary sinus through an angiography catheter from the abdomen. Blood pressure decreased from 110/65 to 90/40 mm Hg in the animals in vivo under plasma inhalation. The NO concentration in the abdominal aorta like the blood pressure, reached a maximum value at about 40 s and then gradually decreased.

  20. Direct probe atmospheric pressure photoionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry for fast screening of flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Brandsma, S H; de Boer, J; Leonards, P E G

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we develop fast screening methods for flame retardants and plasticizers in products and waste based on direct probe (DP) atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a high-resolution (HR) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. DP-APPI is reported for the first time in this study, and DP-APCI that has been scarcely exploited is optimized for comparison. DP-APPI was more selective than DP-APCI and also more sensitive for the most hydrophobic compounds. No sample treatment was necessary, and only a minimal amount of sample (few milligrams) was used for analysis that was performed within a few minutes. Both methods were applied to the analysis of plastic products, electronic waste, and car interiors. Polybrominated diphenylethers, new brominated flame retardants, and organophosphorus flame retardants were present in most of the samples. The combination of DP with HR mass spectra and data processing based on mass accuracy and isotopic patterns allowed the unambiguous identification of chemicals at low levels of about 0.025 % (w/w). Under untargeted screening, resorcinol bis(biphenylphosphate) and bisphenol A bis(bisphenylphosphate) were identified in many of the consumer products of which literature data are still very limited.

  1. LC-MS analysis of estradiol in human serum and endometrial tissue: Comparison of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Huhtinen, Kaisa; Desai, Reena; Harwood, D Tim; Handelsman, David J; Poutanen, Matti; Auriola, Seppo

    2013-09-01

    Accurate measurement of estradiol (E2) is important in clinical diagnostics and research. High sensitivity methods are critical for specimens with E2 concentrations at low picomolar levels, such as serum of men, postmenopausal women and children. Achieving the required assay performance with LC-MS is challenging due to the non-polar structure and low proton affinity of E2. Previous studies suggest that ionization has a major role for the performance of E2 measurement, but comparisons of different ionization techniques for the analysis of clinical samples are not available. In this study, female serum and endometrium tissue samples were used to compare electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) in both polarities. APPI was found to have the most potential for E2 analysis, with a quantification limit of 1 fmol on-column. APCI and ESI could be employed in negative polarity, although being slightly less sensitive than APPI. In the presence of biological background, ESI was found to be highly susceptible to ion suppression, while APCI and APPI were largely unaffected by the sample matrix. Irrespective of the ionization technique, background interferences were observed when using the multiple reaction monitoring transitions commonly employed for E2 (m/z 271 > 159; m/z 255 > 145). These unidentified interferences were most severe in serum samples, varied in intensity between ionization techniques and required efficient chromatographic separation in order to achieve specificity for E2.

  2. Atmospheric pressure as a natural climate regulator for a terrestrial planet with a biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, King-Fai; Pahlevan, Kaveh; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Yung, Yuk L

    2009-06-16

    Lovelock and Whitfield suggested in 1982 that, as the luminosity of the Sun increases over its life cycle, biologically enhanced silicate weathering is able to reduce the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) so that the Earth's surface temperature is maintained within an inhabitable range. As this process continues, however, between 100 and 900 million years (Ma) from now the CO(2) concentration will reach levels too low for C(3) and C(4) photosynthesis, signaling the end of the solar-powered biosphere. Here, we show that atmospheric pressure is another factor that adjusts the global temperature by broadening infrared absorption lines of greenhouse gases. A simple model including the reduction of atmospheric pressure suggests that the life span of the biosphere can be extended at least 2.3 Ga into the future, more than doubling previous estimates. This has important implications for seeking extraterrestrial life in the Universe. Space observations in the infrared region could test the hypothesis that atmospheric pressure regulates the surface temperature on extrasolar planets.

  3. Fluctuation of Brain Tissue Oxygen Partial Pressure: A Biochemical Landmark in the Arctic Ground Squirrel's Spontaneous Arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi L. Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hibernation in the Arctic ground Squirrel (AGS is a regulated, adaptive response to arctic environmental conditions. Problem statement: Regional brain Blood Flow (rCBF has been observed to increase dramatically during arousal in hibernators. However, the real time dynamic change in PtO2 during arousal has not been studied, we hypothesized that PtO2 is Interdependent of Tbrain and a key component in the arousal process. Approach: Simultaneous in vivo measurements of PtO2 and brain temperature (Tbrain in conjunction with oxygen consumption (V02 were conducted in the striatum of non-sedated, non-anesthetized Arctic ground squirrels during spontaneous arousal from hibernation. Results: A dramatic fluctuation of brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtO2 is associated with the complex phenomena of spontaneous arousal. In this study, we observed that: (1 a PtO2 elevation precedes changes in Tbrain and V02; (2 PtO2 changes do not correlate with changes in V02 during arousal and (3, endogenous O2 shift from O2 enriched blood to brain in hibernating AGS induces an arousal with the pharmaceutical chemical, efaproxiral (RSR-13. Conclusion: The four turning points of PtO2 appearing at different Tbrain during arousal suggest that changes in PtO2 are Tbrain interdependent and support the concept that arousal from hibernation is complex process invoking different feedbacks.

  4. Identification of defluidization region in a gas-solid fluidized bed using a method based on pressure fluctuation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Parise

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial applications that involve fluidized bed operations must prevent the undesirable phenomenon of partial or complete bed defluidization. Defluidization can be avoided by increasing the gas velocity and/or, in some cases, changing the solid feed conditions in the system, provided that the changes in the hydrodynamics of the flow are detected early enough. The use of a technique that can perform an early detection of the defluidization condition in industrial applications is important, in order to avoid the loss of efficiency or even an undesirable shutting down of the process. The objective of this work is to show the application of a method for early detection of the condition where the bed is tending to the defluidization, in a gas-solid fluidized bed flow. The method is based on pressure fluctuation measurements. Experimental tests are carried out using two solid particles: microcrystalline cellulose and sand. Results show that the proposed method is efficient in detecting the fluidization condition in a conventional bubbling bed regime. The potential of application of the technique is also shown for the control of the defluidization phenomenon in industry.

  5. Simulation of atmospheric pressure microplasma in Ar on the basis of heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masanori; Yagisawa, Takashi; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2011-10-01

    In a decade, atmospheric pressure microplasmas have been applied to wide range of fields based on the characteristics of high plasma density. The underlying mechanism for sustaining a stable glow discharge, however, is not well understood. In this study, the microplasma characteristics at atmospheric pressure are numerically investigated, particularly focusing on a heat transfer in the whole system. We consider a capacitively coupled plasma with the characteristic size of several hundred micrometers, driven by radio frequency (13.56 MHz) in a cylindrical reactor under atmospheric pressure of pure Ar. A plasma fluid model is coupled with a neutral gas dynamics model including the temperature and flow in gas phase. A wall heating caused by energetic ions and metastables coming from the plasma is also incorporated in the model. Under a constant gas pressure, the local depletion of a neutral gas density occurs due to a gas heating, simply shown by ideal gas law. The influence of the local gas density on the structure of the microplasma will be mainly discussed in a periodic steady state.

  6. A novel approach to scanning electron microscopy at ambient atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ominami, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shinsuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Ito, Sukehiro

    2015-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing samples at ambient atmospheric pressure is introduced in this study. An additional specimen chamber with a small window is inserted in the main specimen chamber, and the window is separated with a thin membrane or diaphragm allowing electron beam propagation. Close proximity of the sample to the membrane enables the detection of back-scattered electrons sufficient for imaging. In addition to the empirical imaging data, a probability analysis of the un-scattered fraction of the incident electron beam further supports the feasibility of atmospheric SEM imaging over a controlled membrane-sample distance.

  7. Characteristics of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge with dielectric electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, S., E-mail: shussain@uos.edu.pk, E-mail: shussainuos@yahoo.com; Qazi, H. I. A.; Badar, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15

    An experimental investigation to characterize the properties and highlight the benefits of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency dielectric-barrier discharge (rf DBD) with dielectric electrodes fabricated by anodizing aluminium substrate is presented. The current-voltage characteristics and millisecond images are used to distinguish the α and γ modes. This atmospheric rf DBD is observed to retain the discharge volume without constriction in γ mode. Optical emission spectroscopy demonstrates that the large discharge current leads to more abundant reactive species in this plasma source.

  8. An upper limit on Early Mars atmospheric pressure from small ancient craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, E. S.; Williams, J.; Lucas, A.; Aharonson, O.

    2012-12-01

    Planetary atmospheres brake, ablate, and disrupt small asteroids and comets, filtering out small hypervelocity surface impacts and causing fireballs, airblasts, meteors, and meteorites. Hypervelocity craters 90% of the kinetic energy of >240 kg iron impactors; Titan's paucity of small craters is consistent with a model predicting atmospheric filtering of craters smaller than 6-8km; and on Venus, craters below ~20 km diameter are substantially depleted. Changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration are believed to be the single most important control on Mars climate evolution and habitability. Existing data requires an early epoch of massive atmospheric loss to space; suggests that the present-day rate of escape to space is small; and offers only limited evidence for carbonate formation. Existing evidence has not led to convergence of atmosphere-evolution models, which must balance poorly understood fluxes from volcanic degassing, surface weathering, and escape to space. More direct measurements are required in order to determine the history of CO2 concentrations. Wind erosion and tectonics exposes ancient surfaces on Mars, and the size-frequency distribution of impacts on these surfaces has been previously suggested as a proxy time series of Mars atmospheric thickness. We will present a new upper limit on Early Mars atmospheric pressure using the size-frequency distribution of 20-100m diameter ancient craters in Aeolis Dorsa, validated using HiRISE DTMs, in combination with Monte Carlo simulations of the effect of paleo-atmospheres of varying thickness on the crater flux. These craters are interbedded with river deposits, and so the atmospheric state they record corresponds to an era when Mars was substantially wetter than the present, probably >3.7 Ga. An important caveat is that our technique cannot exclude atmospheric collapse-reinflation cycles on timescales much shorter than the sedimentary basin-filling time, so it sets an upper limit on the density of a thick

  9. High-pressure synchrotron Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction studies: Exploring the structure-related valence fluctuation in EuNi2P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyu; Yu, Zhenhai; Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jinggeng; Wu, Wei; Luo, Jianlin; Yan, Hao; Alp, Esen E.; Liu, Haozhe

    2016-11-01

    The high-pressure effect on valence fluctuation of the ThCr2Si2-type intermetallic compound EuNi2P2 has been investigated using in situ synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). The isomer shift of 151Eu in EuNi2P2 increases monotonically with increasing pressure up to 50 GPa, suggesting a valence transition of the Eu from mixed toward trivalent. The synchrotron angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (AD-XRD) experiment shows that EuNi2P2 remains in the tetragonal structure up to 32.5 GPa at room temperature. We propose that the evolutions of bonding distance with pressure have an obvious effect on the valence fluctuation.

  10. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  11. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  12. Restraint Effect of Filaments on Applied Voltage in Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge%Restraint Effect of Filaments on Applied Voltage in Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 陈强; 刘忠伟

    2012-01-01

    In this study, argon and nitrogen were used as the discharge gases in radio-frequency (RF: 13.56 MHz) powered dielectric barrier atmospheric plasma. It was noticed that in single dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with nitrogen as the discharge gas, or in argon plasma with a high applied power, micro-filament channels were easily formed. The channels in these two kinds of discharge were both constrictive on the bare metallic electrode and expansive on the opposite electrode covered with a quartz layer. The number of micro-channels was increased along with the input power, which caused the change in the I-V curve shape, i.e., the current kept increasing and the voltage fluctuated within a confined range. With double dielectric layers, however, no micro-channels appeared in the ICCD images, and the I-V curve demonstrated a totally different shape. It was assumed that micro-filaments exhibited a restraining effect on the discharge voltage. The mechanism of this restraining effect was explored in this work.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray from low to atmospheric pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulois, Mélissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Pouzalgues, Romain; Garrigues, Alain; Delbos, Christophe; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    This research work is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of air plasmas induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray for a large pressure range of humid air background gas varying from 20 mbar to atmospheric pressure. The time evolution of the electron density of the air plasma is determined by electromagnetic wave absorption measurements. The measurements have uncertainties of about ±30%, taking into account the precision of the dose measurement and also the shot to shot fluctuations of the generator. The experimental electron density is obtained by comparing the measurements of the transmitted microwave signals to the calculated ones. The calculations need the knowledge of the time evolution of the electron mean energy, which is determined by a chemical kinetic model based on a reaction scheme involving 39 species interacting following 265 reactions. During the X-ray pulse, a good agreement is obtained between time evolution of the electron density obtained from absorption measurements and calculations based on the kinetic model. The relative deviation on the maximum electron density and the corresponding plasma frequency is always lower than 10%. The maximum electron density varies from 4 × 1011 to 3.5 × 1013 cm-3 between 30 mbar to atmospheric pressure, while the peak of the electron mean energy decreases from 5.64 eV to 4.27 eV in the same pressure range.

  14. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L C; Ninomiya, S; Hiraoka, K

    2016-06-01

    Pressure is a key parameter for an ionization source. In this Special Feature article, Lee Chuin Chen and colleagues review super-atmospheric pressure ionization MS with electrospray, corona-discharge-based chemical ionization, and field desorption. They routinely run their mass spectrometer with ion source pressures ranging from several to several tens of atmospheres. A number of strategies have been used to preserve the high vacuum of the instrument while working with a high-pressure (HP) ion source. A recent prototype uses a booster pump with variable pumping speed added to the first pumping stage of the mass spectrometer to regulate a constant vacuum pressure. Further, a new HP-ESI source allowing rapid (a few seconds) online protein digestion MS is also reported. Dr. Lee Chuin Chen is Associate Professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Yamanashi (Yamanashi, Japan). His main research interest is the development of novel mass spectrometric methods for in-situ medical diagnosis.

  15. RANDOM ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE AT THE FREE SURFACE AND MICROSEISMS IN DEEP OCEAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A general stochastic model of the atmospheric pressure at the ocean surface was proposed, in which the pressure variation was represented by a spectral decomposition through a random process of orthogonal increments. From the basic equations of ideal and incompressible fluid a set of perturbation equations up to second order had been derived and solved. The pressure variation in the flow field had been calculated using the explicit solutions obtained, and which demonstrated a clear relation between the atmospheric pressure and the one at the bottom of deep ocean. It can be seen that there is a part of the pressure variation which is not attenuating with the depth. The result had been compared with those of Longuet-Higgins and Kadota et al. and all previous results are contained in the solution given in this artice. The restriction on the previous works with regard to the probability law has been removed, and all conclusions are deduced without specific assumptions. The flexibility of the proposed model allows for further generalization and extension in the physical aspects and statistical treatment.

  16. High frequency glow discharges at atmospheric pressure with micro-structured electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars-Hibbe, L.; Sichler, P.; Schrader, C.; Lucas, N.; Gericke, K.-H.; Büttgenbach, S.

    2005-02-01

    Micro-structured electrode (MSE) arrays allow the generation of large-area uniform glow discharges over a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure. The electrode widths, thicknesses and distances in the micrometre range are realized by means of modern micro-machining and galvanic techniques. The electrode distance, the gap width d, is small enough to generate sufficiently high electric field strengths to ignite gas discharges by applying only moderate radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) voltages (80-390 V in Ne, He, Ar, N2 and air). The non-thermal plasma system is characterized by a special probe measuring the electric parameters. We tested MSE arrays with d = 70, 25 and 15 µm. The MSE driven plasmas show a different behaviour from conventional RF discharge plasmas. Due to the very small electrode gap width we can describe the behaviour of the charged particles in the RF field of our system with the dc Townsend breakdown theory, depending on the pressure range and gas. With decreasing pressure, the gas discharges, especially in Ne and He, are increasingly dominated by field electron emission. With the MSE arrays as plasma sources several applications were developed and successfully tested, e.g. decomposition of waste gases and sterilization of food packaging materials at atmospheric pressure.

  17. Effect of ambient pressure and radiation reabsorption of atmosphere on the flame spreading over thermally thin combustibles in microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜文峰; 胡文瑞

    2003-01-01

    For the flame spread over thermally thin combustibles in an atmosphere, if the atmosphere cannot emit and absorb the thermal radiation (e.g. for atmosphere of O2-N2), the conductive heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface dominates the flame spread at lower ambient atmosphere. As the ambient pressure increases, the flame spread rate increases, and the radiant heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface gradually becomes the dominant driving force for the flame spread. In contrast, if the atmosphere is able to emit and absorb the thermal radiation (e.g. for atmosphere of O2-CO2), at lower pressure, the heat transfer from flame to the fuel surface is enhanced by the radiation reabsorption of the atmosphere at the leading edge of the flame, and both conduction and thermal radiation play important roles in the mechanism of flame spread. With the increase in ambient pressure, the oxygen diffuses more quickly from ambient atmosphere into the flame, the chemical reaction in the flame is enhanced, and the flame spread rate increases. When the ambient pressure is greater than a critical value, the thermal radiation from the flame to the solid surface is hampered by the radiation reabsorption of ambient atmosphere with the further increase in ambient pressure. As a result, with the increase in ambient pressure, the flame spread rate decreases and the heat conduction gradually dominates the flame spread over the fuel surface.

  18. Black pepper powder microbiological quality improvement using DBD systems in atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Maciej; Hołub, Marcin; Balcerak, Michał; Kalisiak, Stanisław; Dąbrowski, Waldemar

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary results are given regarding black pepper powder decontamination using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in atmospheric pressure. Three different DBD reactor constructions were investigated, both packaged and unpackaged material was treated. Due to potential, industrial applications, in addition to microbiological results, water activity, loss of mass and the properties of packaging material, regarding barrier properties were investigated. Argon based treatment of packed pepper with DBD reactor configuration is proposed and satisfactory results are presented for treatment time of 5 min or less. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  19. 50-Hz plasma treatment of glass fibre reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Leipold, Frank; Morgen, P.; Bardenshtein, A.; Krebs, N.

    2011-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50-Hz dielectric barrier discharge at peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonicirradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency of around 30 kHz with the sound pressure level of approximately 155 dB were introduced vertically to the GFRP surface through a cylindrical waveguide. The polar component of the surface energy was almost unch...

  20. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopic Study on Reaction between Self-Assembled Monolayers and Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Shinohara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma is becoming increasingly adopted in bioapplications such as plasma medicine and agriculture. This study investigates the interaction between plasma and molecules in living tissues, focusing on plasma-protein interactions. To this end, the reaction of air-pressure air plasma with NH2-terminated self-assembled monolayer is investigated by infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry. The atmospheric-pressure plasma decomposed the NH2 components, the characteristic units of proteins. The decomposition is attributed to water clusters generated in the plasma, indicating that protein decomposition by plasma requires humid air.

  1. 50-Hz plasma treatment of glass fibre reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50-Hz dielectric barrier discharge at peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency of around...... 30 kHz with the sound pressure level of approximately 155 dB were introduced vertically to the GFRP surface through a cylindrical waveguide. The polar component of the surface energy was almost unchanged after the plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, but drastically increased...

  2. Ultrasound enhanced 50 Hz plasma treatment of glass-fiber-reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Norrman, Kion; Singh, Shailendra Vikram

    2013-01-01

    Glass-fiber-reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50Hz dielectric barrier discharge at a peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency...... of around 30 kHz with the sound pressure level of approximately 155 dB were introduced vertically to the GFRP surface through a cylindrical waveguide. The polar component of the surface energy was almost unchanged after the plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, but drastically increased...

  3. Experimental characterization of an argon laminar plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois-Bertrand, Emilie; De Izarra, Charles, E-mail: charles.de_izarra@univ-orleans.fr [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans - CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 BOURGES Cedex (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with a dc laminar pure argon plasma jet operating at atmospheric pressure in ambient air that was experimentally studied in order to obtain temperature and velocity. Plasma jet temperature was evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy and the plasma jet velocity was determined by various methods using a pressure sensor. It is shown that the maximum plasma jet temperature is 15 000 K and the maximum plasma jet velocity is 250 m s{sup -1} at the plasma jet centre. Finally, a study of the ambient air amount entrained into the plasma jet is presented.

  4. Eradication of Bacterial Biofilms Using Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud; Gilmore, Brendan; Gorman, Sean; Algwari, Qais; Graham, William; O'Connell, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous in natural and clinical settings and form a major health risk. Biofilms are recognised to be the predominant mode of bacterial growth, and are an immunological challenge compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Eradication of biofilms with atmospheric pressure plasma jets is investigated. Cold non-equilibrium plasmas, operated at ambient atmospheric pressure and temperature, are efficient sources for controlled energy transport through highly reactive neutrals (e.g. ROS, RNS), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. A focused panel of clinically significant biofilms, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus, are exposed to various plasma jet configurations operated in helium and oxygen mixtures. Viability of surviving cells was determined using both standard plate counting method and XTT viability assay. These are correlated with measurements and simulations of relevant reactive plasma species.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure non-thermal plasmas for surface treatment of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiao-Feng; Wen, Chun-Hsiang; Wei, Hsiao-Kuan; Kou, Chwung-Shan

    2006-10-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to surface treatment. In this work, we used an asymmetric glow dielectric-barrier discharge (GDBD), at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen, to improve the surface hydrophilicity of three kinds of polymer films, biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP), polyimide (PI), and triacetyl cellulose (TAC). This set-up consists of two asymmetric electrodes covered by dielectrics. And to prevent the filamentary discharge occur, the frequency, gas flow rate and uniformity of gas flow distribution should be carefully controlled. The discharge performance is monitored through an oscilloscope, which is connected to a high voltage probe and a current monitor. The physical and chemical properties of polymer surfaces before and after GDBD treatment were analyzed via water contact angle (CA) measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON TOURISTS AND TOURISM ACTIVITIES IN THE PRAHOVA CORRIDOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAVRIŞ LOREDANA-ELENA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the climate literature it is known that the atmospheric temperature directly and permanently acts on the all organisms and all geographical environment components, influencing the wellness of the weather sensitive persons and implicitly the wellness of tourists in this region. In the same time, its evolution is a good indicator in shaping the short and medium term meteorological forecast, considering that the region chosen for research is a very tripper one, especially during the winter season when the atmospheric pressure variation trend is much more pronounced. Within this framework, the present paper tries to develop a climatic diagnosis on the reference climate parameters (annual and monthly average pressure values, seasonal values, minimum and maximum absolute values and their emergence probability but also the non-periodic variability based on data recorded during 1961-2007 at Câmpina, Sinaia 1500, Predeal, Omu Peak and Braşov weather stations.

  7. Synergistic effects of atmospheric pressure plasma-emitted components on DNA oligomers: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edengeiser, Eugen; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Bründermann, Erik; Schneider, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E; Havenith, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas have become of increasing importance in sterilization processes especially with the growing prevalence of multi-resistant bacteria. Albeit the potential for technological application is obvious, much less is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation. X-jet technology separates plasma-generated reactive particles and photons, thus allowing the investigation of their individual and joint effects on DNA. Raman spectroscopy shows that particles and photons cause different modifications in DNA single and double strands. The treatment with the combination of particles and photons does not only result in cumulative, but in synergistic effects. Profilometry confirms that etching is a minor contributor to the observed DNA damage in vitro. Schematics of DNA oligomer treatment with cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  8. Discharge Characteristics in Atmospheric Pressure Glow Surface Discharge in Helium Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Chen; WANG Long

    2005-01-01

    @@ Atmospheric pressure glow discharge is observed for the first time in a surface discharge generator in flowing helium. Electrical and optical methods are used to measure the characteristics of atmospheric pressure glow discharge for different voltages. The results show that discharge current waveforms are asymmetric for the different polarities of the applied voltage. A continuous discharge profile with a width of several microseconds appears for per half cycle of the applied voltage when the voltage is increased to a certain value. The short-pulsed discharge and the continuous current would result from the Townsend breakdown and glow discharge mechanisms respectively. The properties of surface discharge in stagnant helium are completely different from that in flowing helium.

  9. Gas Diffusion Barriers Prepared by Spatial Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced ALD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lukas; Theirich, Detlef; Pack, Sven; Kocak, Firat; Schlamm, Daniel; Hasselmann, Tim; Fahl, Henry; Räupke, André; Gargouri, Hassan; Riedl, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) gas permeation barriers prepared by spatial ALD (SALD) at atmospheric pressure. We compare the growth characteristics and layer properties using trimethylaluminum (TMA) in combination with an Ar/O2 remote atmospheric pressure plasma for different substrate velocities and different temperatures. The resulting Al2O3 films show ultralow water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) on the order of 10(-6) gm(-2)d(-1). In notable contrast, plasma based layers already show good barrier properties at low deposition temperatures (75 °C), while water based processes require a growth temperature above 100 °C to achieve equally low WVTRs. The activation energy for the water permeation mechanism was determined to be 62 kJ/mol.

  10. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  12. Electrical and optical properties of Ar/NH3 atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zheng-Shi; Yao, Cong-Wei; Chen, Si-Le; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Inspired by the Penning effect, we obtain a glow-like plasma jet by mixing ammonia (NH3) into argon (Ar) gas under atmospheric pressure. The basic electrical and optical properties of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are investigated. It can be seen that the discharge mode transforms from filamentary to glow-like when a little ammonia is added into the pure argon. The electrical and optical analyses contribute to the explanation of this phenomenon. The discharge mode, power, and current density are analyzed to understand the electrical behavior of the APPJ. Meanwhile, the discharge images, APPJ's length, and the components of plasma are also obtained to express its optical characteristics. Finally, we diagnose several parameters, such as gas temperature, electron temperature, and density, as well as the density number of metastable argon atoms of Ar/NH3 APPJ to help judge the usability in its applications.

  13. Spatially resolved simulation of a radio frequency driven micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its effluent

    CERN Document Server

    Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency driven plasma jets are frequently employed as efficient plasma sources for surface modification and other processes at atmospheric pressure. The \\textit{radio-frequency driven micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet} ($\\mu$APPJ) is a particular variant of that concept whose geometry allows direct optical access. In this work, the characteristics of a $\\mu$APPJ operated with a helium-oxygen mixture and its interaction with a helium environment are studied by numerical simulation. The density and temperature of the electrons, as well as the concentration of all reactive species are studied both in the jet itself and in its effluent. It is found that the effluent is essentially free of charge carriers but contains a substantial amount of activated oxygen (O, O$_3$ and O$_2(^1\\Delta)$).

  14. Using dimers to measure biosignatures and atmospheric pressure for terrestrial exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Amit; Meadows, Victoria; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2014-02-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earth-like planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earth-like atmospheres and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 μm dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bar and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present-day level. Furthermore, unlike observations of Rayleigh scattering, this method can be used at wavelengths longer than 0.6 μm and is therefore potentially applicable, although challenging, to near-term planet characterization missions such as JWST. We also performed detectability studies for JWST transit transmission spectroscopy and found that the 1.06 and 1.27 μm dimer features could be detectable (SNR>3) for an Earth analogue orbiting an M5V star at a distance of 5 pc. The detection of these features could provide a constraint on the atmospheric pressure of an exoplanet and serve as biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. We calculated the required signal-to-noise ratios to detect and characterize O2 monomer and dimer features in direct imaging-reflected spectra and found that signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 at a spectral resolving power of R=100 would be required.

  15. Collaborative Research: Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources shows greatly expanded range of applications of each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by addition of photons and associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. The project combines construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling.

  16. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge Treatment on Polymerization of Acrylic Fabric and Its Printing Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D M El-Zeer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic fibers have been treated by atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD plasma in open air to enhance surface antistatic properties. The treated surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier-Transition Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM. Plasma treatment of acrylic fabric has been found to increase the surface roughness, modify the nature and density of surface functionalities, and drastically improve the wettability and antistatic ability of acrylic fibers.

  17. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  18. TiOxNy coatings grown by atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, Francis; Duminica, Florin-Daniel

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Titanium oxynitride coatings were deposited on various substrates by an original atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process using titanium tetra-iso-propoxide as titanium and oxygen precursors and hydrazine as a nitrogen source. The films composition was monitored by controlling the N2H4 mole fraction in the initial reactive gas phase. The variation of the N content in the films results in significant changes in morphological, structur...

  19. Ionic wind generation by a wire-cylinder-plate corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Colas, Dorian,; Ferret, Antoine; Pai, David,; Lacoste, Deanna,; Laux, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A wire-cylinder-plate electrode configuration is presented to generate ionic wind with a dc corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The objective of the work is to maximize the power supplied to the flow in order to increase acceleration while avoiding breakdown. Thus, the proposed experimental setup addresses the problem of decoupling the mechanism of ion generation from that of ion acceleration. Using a wire-plate configuration as a reference, we have focuse...

  20. Self-Organized Filaments in Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-Fang; LI Xue-Chen; YINZeng-Qian; QIAN Sheng-Fa; OUYANG Ji-Ting; WANG Long

    2001-01-01

    The self-organized filament pattern created by dielectric barrier discharges in air at atmospheric pressure is investigated experimentally. The density and dimension of filament are analysed quantitatively. The experimental results show that the distance between neighbouring filaments decreases with the increased applied voltage or with the decreased width of the gas gap. Also, the diameter of the filament decreases with the increased applied voltages or with the decreased width of the gas gap.

  1. Concentric-Ring Patterns in a Helium Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Wan-Li; WANG De-Zhen

    2007-01-01

    We perform the theoretical simulation of the concentric-ring patterns between two parallel electrodes covered with thin dielectric layers within the scope of a two-dimensional diffusion-drift model at atmospheric pressure. The time evolution of the discharge patterns is studied and the concentric-ring patterns with different radii shift alternately. The spatial-temporal evolution of electron density in a cycle at different time scales is performed.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Cleaning Shown to Remove Organic Contaminants at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed and filed for a patent on a method to produce atomic oxygen at atmospheric pressure by using a direct current arc in a gas flow mixture of oxygen and helium. A prototype device has been tested for its ability to remove various soot residues from surfaces exposed to fire, and various varnishes such as acrylic and egg white.

  3. Characterization of a Dielectric Barrier Plasma Gun Discharging at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guang-Qiu; GE Yuan-Jing; ZHANG Yue-Fei; CHEN Guang-Liang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We develop a plasma gun based on dielectric barrier discharge and working at atmospheric pressure. A theoretical model to predict the gun discharge voltage is built, which is in agreement with the experimental results. After investigating the characterization of discharging gun and utilizing it for polymerization, we find that the gun can be used as a source to generate a stable uniform plasma for different plasma-processing technologies.

  4. An Experimental Petrological Study of Gabbro in Chintan, Taipei County, at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Wei Hsu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A gab bro from Chintan, Sindian, was subjected to experiments at atmospheric pressure to study the fractional crystallization of the gabbroic melt. The range of experimental temperatures was from 1120 to 1262°C, and the durations were from about 16 to 150 hours. The mineral phases and the glass compositions in the quenching products were analyzed with the SEM-EDS.

  5. Modeling of asymmetric pulsed phenomena in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha Yan [College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang Huijuan [School of Mathematics and Physics, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071003 (China); Wang Xiaofei [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Asymmetric current pulses in dielectric-barrier atmospheric-pressure glow discharges are investigated by a self-consistent, one-dimensional fluid model. It is found that the glow mode and Townsend mode can coexist in the asymmetric discharge even though the gas gap is rather large. The reason for this phenomenon is that the residual space charge plays the role of anode and reduces the gap width, resulting in the formation of a Townsend discharge.

  6. Properties of Atmospheric Pressure Ar Plasma Jet Depending on Treated Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Ricci Castro, Alonso H.; Kostov, Konstantin G.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in argon was utilized to modify surfaces of glass, acrylic, and PTFE dielectrics. This paper describes the influence of the dielectric substrate on operation and properties of plasma. Two modes of operation (each of those have two patterns) were described. The transition from one mode to another, values of the dissipated power, and spreading of plasma over the dielectric surfaces strongly depended on the substrate material. Additionally, three methods of plasma spreading estimation were presented and discussed.

  7. Effect of Pressure Broadening on Molecular Absorption Cross Sections in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Hedges, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of exoplanets are leading to unprecedented constraints on their atmospheric compositions. However, molecular abundances derived from spectra are degenerate with the absorption cross sections which form critical input data in atmospheric models. Therefore, it is important to quantify the uncertainties in molecular cross sections to reliably estimate the uncertainties in derived molecular abundances. However, converting line lists into cross sections via line broadening involves a series of prescriptions for which the uncertainties are not well understood. We investigate and quantify the effects of various factors involved in line broadening in exoplanetary atmospheres - the profile evaluation width, pressure versus thermal broadening, broadening agent, spectral resolution, and completeness of broadening parameters - on molecular absorption cross sections. We use H$_2$O as a case study as it has the most complete absorption line data. For low resolution spectra (R$\\lesssim$100) for re...

  8. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Emma J; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S; Lavrentieva, Nina N

    2016-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H$_2{}^{16}$O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H$_2$- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number $J$ up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300 - 2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for $J$\\p $J$\\pp-dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  9. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  10. Development of superhydrophobic surface on glass substrate by multi-step atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Duksun [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn, E-mail: symoon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum system Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Superhydrophobic surface was prepared on a glass by helium based CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} atmospheric pressure plasmas, and its water wettability was investigated by a water droplet contact angle method. The water droplet spread over on the untreated glasses that showed the initial hydrophilic property of the glass surface. Then, the static contact angles became about 85° and 98° after a single step CH{sub 4} plasma treatment and a single step C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment, respectively. The contact angle was remarkably increased to 152°, indicating a superhydrophobic property, after a sequential multi-step CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the field emission scanning electron microscope measurements, it was found that the physical morphologies and the chemical compositions were depending on the substrate materials, which were important factors for the superhydrophobicity. - Highlights: • Development of rapid and simple method for superhydrophobic surface • Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma for superhydrophobic surface preparation • Observation of chemical and physical surface modification by atmospheric pressure plasma • Effects of substrate properties for plasma–surface interaction.

  11. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  12. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  13. THE CONCEPT OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF UNDERGRADUATE GEOGRAPHY STUDENTS: A PHENOMENOGRAPHIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret TUNA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this study is to determine the geography and geography education students’ perceptions of "atmospheric pressure" by the method of phenomenographic analysis. Total of 150 undergraduate geography students in Marmara University Faculty of Education and Faculty of Arts and Science were included in the study in the academic year 2011-2012. Of 150 students, 103 were male (68.67% and 47 were female (31.33%. Of these students, 57 were studying in the department of geography (38% and 93 (62% were geography education.In the study, a semi-structured questionnaire was used for data collection. In order to analyze the data, followings stages were conducted respectively: (1 coding and classification, (2 the creation of leading categories, (3 the creation of description categories and (4 creation of description map. As a result of the analysis of the data obtained, it was revealed that the students described atmospheric pressure in eight different categories and six different ways. Among the categories, the metaphor of "atmospheric pressure is the air force that is exerted on the earth" hasthe highest number of metaphors with total of 42 records (28%.

  14. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer's solution for anti-tumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-08

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer's solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer's lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer's lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  15. An Experimental Study on Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Different Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹏; 詹如娟; 等

    2002-01-01

    Usually,the electrical breakdown of dielectric barrier discharge(DBD) at atmospheric pressure leads to a filamentary non-homogeneous discharge,However,it is also possible to obtain a diffuse DBD in homogeneous form,called atmospheric pressure glow discharge(APGD).We obtained a uniform APGD in helium and in the mixture of argon with alcohol,and studied the electrical characteristics of helium APGD.It if found that the relationship between discharge current and source frequency is different depending on the difference in gas gap when the applied voltage is kept constant.The discharge current shows an increasing trend with the increased frequency when gas gap is 0.8cm ,but the discharge current tends to decrease with the increased frequency when the gas gap increases.The discharge current always increases with the increased applied voltage when the source frequency is kept constant.We also observed a glow-like discharge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Efficacy of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma as an Antibacterial Agent Against Enterococcus Faecalis in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yingguang; Yang, Ping; Lu, Xinpei; Xiong, Zilan; Ye, Tao; Xiong, Qing; Sun, Ziyong

    2011-02-01

    Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is a microorganism that can survive extreme challenges in obturated root canals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma plume against E. faecalis in vitro. A non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet device which could generate a cold plasma plume carrying a peak current of 300 mA was used. The antibacterial efficacy of this device against E. faecalis and its biofilm under different conditions was detected. The antibacterial efficacy of the plasma against E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was also evaluated. After plasma treatment, the average diameter of inhibition zone on S. aureus and E. faecalis was 2.62±0.26 cm and 1.06±0.30 cm, respectively (P faecalis biofilm (P faecalis were observed after treatment for 2 min. It is concluded that the non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma could serve as an effective adjunct to standard endodontic microbial treatment.

  17. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaq, M., E-mail: ishaqmusarat@gmail.com [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bazaka, K. [Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ostrikov, K. [Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  18. Power dissipated in a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet measured by miniaturized electrical probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda, Judith; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets are used in bio-medicine, because they generate reactive species at a low gas temperature. Knowledge and control of plasma parameters is required for stable and reliable operation. Therefore, measuring dissipated power in these plasmas is necessary. However, this is challenging because the delivered sender power is often orders of magnitudes higher than the power dissipated in the discharge itself. To measure this dissipated power, we built miniaturized electrical probes directly attached to the jet device. We observed that the dissipated power is a more comprehensive parameter than the common parameter voltage: For example, gas temperature and emission line intensities rose exponentially with increasing voltage but linearly with increasing power. Our analyses further revealed that a substantial proportion of the dissipated power is transformed into heat. In conclusion, miniaturized electrical probes give a fundamental insight into the energy balance of atmospheric pressure plasmas. In the future, these probes can also be adapted to different types of atmospheric pressure plasmas. This work was supported by DFG within the frameworks of the Package Project PAK 816.

  19. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  20. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  1. Reconstruction of Full-Field Wall Pressure Fluctuations on a Flat Plate in the Wake of a Step Cylinder: Applications of Linear Stochastic Estimation (LSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Chen, Yujia; Wang, Shaofei; Liu, Yingzheng; Wang, Weizhe

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that it is possible to reconstruct the full flow field based on time-resolved measurements at discrete locations using linear stochastic estimation (LSE). The objective of this study is to develop and apply this technique to wall pressure fluctuation measurements in low speed flows. Time-resolved wall pressure fluctuations on a flat plate in the wake of a step cylinder at low speed (V PSP). The microphone arrays are arranged properly to capture the dominant features in the flow field at 10 kHz. The PSP is excited using a continuous UV-LED, and the luminescent signal is recorded by a high-speed camera at 2 kHz. The microphone data at discrete locations are used to reconstruct the full-field wall pressure fluctuations based on LSE. The PSP results serve as basis for improvement of the LSE scheme and also for validation of the reconstructed pressure field. Other data processing techniques including proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) are also used for analyzing the unsteady flow features. This LSE technique has great potential in real-time flow diagnostics and control.

  2. Pressure fluctuation prediction in pump mode using large eddy simulation and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes in a pump–turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-You Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For pump–turbines, most of the instabilities couple with high-level pressure fluctuations, which are harmful to pump–turbines, even the whole units. In order to understand the causes of pressure fluctuations and reduce their amplitudes, proper numerical methods should be chosen to obtain the accurate results. The method of large eddy simulation with wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity model was chosen to predict the pressure fluctuations in pump mode of a pump–turbine compared with the method of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes with two-equation turbulence model shear stress transport k–ω. Partial load operating point (0.91QBEP under 15-mm guide vane opening was selected to make a comparison of performance and frequency characteristics between large eddy simulation and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes based on the experimental validation. Good agreement indicates that the method of large eddy simulation could be applied in the simulation of pump–turbines. Then, a detailed comparison of variation for peak-to-peak value in the whole passage was presented. Both the methods show that the highest level pressure fluctuations occur in the vaneless space. In addition, the propagation of amplitudes of blade pass frequency, 2 times of blade pass frequency, and 3 times of blade pass frequency in the circumferential and flow directions was investigated. Although the difference exists between large eddy simulation and unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes, the trend of variation in different parts is almost the same. Based on the analysis, using the same mesh (8 million, large eddy simulation underestimates pressure characteristics and shows a better result compared with the experiments, while unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes overestimates them.

  3. Associations of Sleep Quality and Awake Physical Activity with Fluctuations in Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kadoya

    Full Text Available Sleep quality and awake physical activity are important behavioral factors involved in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, potentially through nocturnal blood pressure (BP changes. However, the impacts of quantitatively measured sleep quality and awake physical activity on BP fluctuation, and their relationships with several candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension are not well elucidated.This cross-sectional study included 303 patients registered in the HSCAA study. Measurements included quantitatively determined sleep quality parameters and awake physical activity obtained by actigraph, nocturnal systolic BP (SBP fall [100 × (1- sleep SBP/awake SBP ratio], apnea hypopnea index, urinary sodium and cortisol secretion, plasma aldosterone concentration and renin activity, insulin resistance index, parameters of heart rate variability (HRV, and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF.Simple regression analysis showed that time awake after sleep onset (r = -0.150, a parameter of sleep quality, and awake physical activity (r = 0.164 were significantly correlated with nocturnal SBP fall. Among those, time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.179 and awake physical activity (β = 0.190 were significantly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP fall in multiple regression analysis. In a subgroup of patients without taking anti-hypertensive medications, both time awake after sleep onset (β = -0.336 and awake physical activity (β = 0.489 were more strongly and independently associated with nocturnal SBP falls.Sleep quality and awake physical activity were found to be significantly associated with nocturnal SBP fall, and that relationship was not necessarily confounded by candidate causal factors for nocturnal hypertension.

  4. ANNEALING OF POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILM SILICON SOLAR CELLS IN WATER VAPOUR AT SUB-ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pikna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thin film polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si solar cells were annealed in water vapour at pressures below atmospheric pressure. PN junction of the sample was contacted by measuring probes directly in the pressure chamber filled with steam during passivation. Suns-VOC method and a Lock-in detector were used to monitor an effect of water vapour to VOC of the solar cell during whole passivation process (in-situ. Tested temperature of the sample (55°C – 110°C was constant during the procedure. Open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at these temperatures is lower than at room temperature. Nevertheless, voltage response of the solar cell to the light flash used during Suns-VOC measurements was good observable. Temperature dependences for multicrystalline wafer-based and polycrystalline thin film solar cells were measured and compared. While no significant improvement of thin film poly-Si solar cell parameters by annealing in water vapour at under-atmospheric pressures was observed up to now, in-situ observation proved required sensitivity to changing VOC at elevated temperatures during the process.

  5. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Silva, Laura [INAF-Trieste Astronomical Observatory, Trieste (Italy); Provenzale, Antonello [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate-CNR, Torino (Italy); Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio, E-mail: vladilo@oats.inaf.it [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-04-10

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  6. Acute Positive Effects of Exercise on Center-of-Pressure Fluctuations During Quiet Standing in Middle-Aged and Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukusaki, Chiho; Masani, Kei; Miyasaka, Maya; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Acute effects of exercise on postural stability have been studied with a focus on fatigue. This study investigated the acute effects of moderate-intensity exercise on center-of-pressure (COP) fluctuation measures in middle-aged and elderly women. Thirty-five healthy women volunteered: 18 women performed a moderate aquatic exercise session for 80 minutes and 17 remained calm in a sitting position for the same duration. Center-of-pressure fluctuations during quiet standing were recorded for 60 seconds with eyes open and closed before and after the exercise and sitting tasks. The time- and frequency-domain measures of the COP time series were calculated. The frequency-domain measures were also calculated for the COP velocity time series. According to 2-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests with a Bonferroni's correction, mean velocity of COP fluctuations, mean velocity of COP fluctuations in the medial-lateral (ML) direction, and total power of the COP velocity time series in the ML direction exhibited significant reductions after 1 session of exercise. These results indicated that a moderate-intensity aquatic exercise decreased COP velocity, counteracting age-related and fatigue-inducing postural deterioration. Therefore, we concluded that a single session of moderate-intensity aquatic exercise has acute positive effects on postural stability in middle-aged and elderly women.

  7. An improved film evaporation correlation for saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzada, Muhammad Wakil

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents an investigation of heat transfer correlation in a falling-film evaporator working with saline water at sub-atmospheric pressures. The experiments are conducted at different salinity levels ranging from 15000 to 90000 ppm, and the pressures were maintained between 0.92 to 2.81 kPa (corresponds to saturation temperatures of 5.9 – 23 0C). The effect of salinity, saturation pressures and chilled water temperatures on the heat transfer coefficient are accounted in the modified film evaporation correlations. The results are fitted to the Han & Fletcher\\'s and Chun & Seban\\'s falling-film correlations which are used in desalination industry. We modify the said correlations by adding salinity and saturation temperature corrections with respective indices to give a better agreement to our measured data.

  8. Blow-out of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames at sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2016-12-09

    Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in quiescent air at sub-atmospheric pressures (50–100 kPa) were studied experimentally using propane fuel with nozzle diameters ranging 0.8–4 mm. Results showed that the fuel jet velocity at blow-out limit increased with increasing ambient pressure and nozzle diameter. A Damköhler (Da) number based model was adopted, defined as the ratio of characteristic mixing time and characteristic reaction time, to include the effect of pressure considering the variations in laminar burning velocity and thermal diffusivity with pressure. The critical lift-off height at blow-out, representing a characteristic length scale for mixing, had a linear relationship with the theoretically predicted stoichiometric location along the jet axis, which had a weak dependence on ambient pressure. The characteristic mixing time (critical lift-off height divided by jet velocity) adjusted to the characteristic reaction time such that the critical Damköhler at blow-out conditions maintained a constant value when varying the ambient pressure.

  9. Meteorology in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: an institutional study and a meta-analysis of published studies reporting atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, H; Watanabe, T; Mizuno, Y; Kawai, N; Umemoto, T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine whether weather factors including atmospheric pressure are associated with the occurrence of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). We investigated our institutional experiences of RAAA in more than 150 patients during 8 years. Further, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies reporting the influence of atmospheric pressure on RAAA. We retrospectively evaluated 152 patients who underwent surgery for RAAA (including ruptured iliac arterial aneurysm) at our institute between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013. Daily regional meteorological data (in the nearest weather station located 3.5 km from the hospital) were obtained online from Japan Meteorological Agency. To identify comparative studies of mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA versus that on the day without RAAA, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through January 2014 using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Mean sea level atmospheric pressure, delta mean atmospheric pressure (difference between mean sea level atmospheric pressure on the day and that on the previous day), and sunshine duration on the day with RAAA were significantly lower than those on the day without RAAA: 1012.43±7.44 versus 1013.71±6.49 hPa, P=0.039, -1.18±5.15 versus 0.05±5.62 hPa, P=0.005; and 4.76±3.76 versus 5.47±3.88 h, P=0.026; respectively. A pooled analysis of 8 studies (including our institutional study) demonstrated that mean atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA was significantly lower than that on the day without RAAA: standardized mean difference, -0.09; 95% confidence interval, -0.14 to -0.04; P=0.0009. Atmospheric pressure on the day with RAAA appears lower than that on the day without RAAA. Atmospheric pressure may be associated with the occurrence of RAAA.

  10. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  11. Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Pressure Made Using the Oxygen A-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriquez, Michael D.; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark A.; Abshire, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios on a global scale are currently needed to gain a better understanding of climate change and its possible impact on our planet. In order to remotely measure greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere with regard to dry air, the air number density in the atmosphere is also needed in deriving the greenhouse gas concentrations. Since oxygen is stable and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere at 20.95%, the measurement of an oxygen absorption in the atmosphere can be used to infer the dry air density and used to calculate the dry air mixing ratio of a greenhouse gas, such as carbon dioxide or methane. OUT technique of measuring Oxygen uses integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) with an Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDF A) laser system and single photon counting module (SPCM). It measures the absorbance of several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to an O2 absorption line in the A-band at 764.7 nm. The choice of wavelengths allows us to maximize the pressure sensitivity using the trough between two absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm uses ancillary meteorological and aircraft altitude information to fit the experimentally obtained lidar O2 line shapes to a model atmosphere and derives the pressure from the profiles of the two lines. We have demonstrated O2 measurements from the ground and from an airborne platform. In this paper we will report on our airborne measurements during our 2011 campaign for the ASCENDS program.

  12. Low-temperature and low atmospheric pressure infrared reflectance spectroscopy of Mars soil analog materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared reflectance spectra of carefully selected Mars soil analog materials have been measured under low atmospheric pressures and temperatures. Chemically altered montmorillonites containing ferrihydrite and hydrated ferric sulfate complexes are examined, as well as synthetic ferrihydrite and a palagonitic soil from Haleakala, Maui. Reflectance spectra of these analog materials exhibit subtle visible to near-infrared features, which are indicative of nanophase ferric oxides or oxyhydroxides and are similar to features observed in the spectra of the bright regions of Mars. Infrared reflectance spectra of these analogs include hydration features due to structural OH, bound H2O, and adsorbed H2O. The spectral character of these hydration features is highly dependent on the sample environment and on the nature of the H2O/OH in the analogs. The behavior of the hydration features near 1.9 micron, 2.2 micron, 2.7 micron, 3 micron, and 6 microns are reported here in spectra measured under a Marslike atmospheric environment. In spectra of these analogs measured under dry Earth atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron band depth is 8-17%; this band is much stronger under moist conditions. Under Marslike atmospheric conditions the 1.9-micron feature is broad and barely discernible (1-3% band depth) in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil samples. In comparable spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonite the 1.9-micron feature is also broad, but stronger (6% band depth). In the low atmospheric pressure and temperature spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite this feature is sharper than the other analogs and relatively stronger (6% band depth). Although the intensity of the 3-micron band is weaker in spectra of each of the analogs when measured under Marslike conditions, the 3-micron band remains a dominant feature and is especially broad in spectra of the ferrihydrite and palagonitic soil. The structural OH features observed in these materials

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma CVD as a tool to functionalise wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spange, Sebastian; Pfuch, Andreas; Wiegand, Cornelia; Beier, Oliver; Hipler, Uta C; Grünler, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    The main goal of this investigation was the preparation of an antibacterial layer system for additional modification of wound dressings with atmospheric plasma. Furthermore, the modified wound dressings were checked on there bactericidal and cytotoxic activity. The layer system was applied by using a novel atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition technique on a variety of textile substrates which are suitable as wound dressing materials. The layer system composed of silicon dioxide with in situ generated embedded silver nanoparticles. The bactericidal activity of the produced wound dressings was investigated against different bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae while the cytotoxic potential of the coated wound dressings was verified using human keratinocytes. Even at low concentrations of silver precursor a strong antibacterial effect was observed in direct contact with S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Furthermore, extractions produced from the coated textiles showed a good antibacterial effect. By means of optimised coating parameters a therapeutic window for those wound dressings could be identified. Consequently, the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapour deposition technique promise an effective and low cost modification of wound dressing materials.

  14. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  15. Pressure effect on the competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in TmTe investigated by 125Te-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Wada, S.; Matsumura, T.

    2007-03-01

    To elucidate from a microscopic point of view the initial evolution of spin fluctuations in TmTe from the semiconducting state at ambient pressure with an antiferroquadrupole ordering (TQ=1.8 K) to the intermediate-valence metallic state at high pressures P⩾2 GPa with a ferromagnetic (FM) ordering (TC≃14 K), we have carried out 125Te-NMR study at pressures P=0 and 0.9 GPa. The spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements revealed a pronounced increase of the staggered susceptibility below T*≃14 K, in addition to the Curie-Weiss-type increase of the uniform susceptibility. Below ˜T*, a wipe-out decrease of the NMR intensity and the finding of an unconventional NMR signal around ˜10 MHz that is insensitive to applied field lead to the conclusion that a field-induced short-range FM ordering caused by the competition of FM and antiferromagnetic fluctuations takes place. Pressure of 0.9 GPa hardly affects the anomalous NMR behaviors below ˜T*, leading to speculate that the short-range FM ordering in the semiconducting state shares the origin with the long-range FM ordering at ≃14 K in the high-pressure metallic state.

  16. The habitable zone of Earth-like planets with different levels of atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Silva, Laura; Provenzale, Antonello; Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a 1-D Energy Balance Model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p=1/3 bar to p=3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is...

  17. Treatment of polycarbonate by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, K. G.; Hamia, Y. A. A.; Mota, R. P.; dos Santos, A. L. R.; Nascente, P. A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Generally most plastic materials are intrinsically hydrophobic, low surface energy materials, and thus do not adhere well to other substances. Surface treatment of polymers by discharge plasmas is of great and increasing industrial application because it can uniformly modify the surface of sample without changing the material bulk properties and is environmentally friendly. The plasma processes that can be conducted under ambient pressure and temperature conditions have attracted special attention because of their easy implementation in industrial processing. Present work deals with surface modification of polycarbonate (PC) by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. The treatment was performed in a parallel plate reactor driven by a 60Hz power supply. The DBD plasmas at atmospheric pressure were generated in air and nitrogen. Material characterization was carried out by contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface energy of the polymer surface was calculated from contact angle data by Owens-Wendt method using distilled water and diiodomethane as test liquids. The plasma-induced chemical modifications are associated with incorporation of polar oxygen and nitrogen containing groups on the polymer surface. Due to these surface modifications the DBD-treated polymers become more hydrophilic. Aging behavior of the treated samples revealed that the polymer surfaces were prone to hydrophobic recovery although they did not completely recover their original wetting properties.

  18. Shock Formation by Plasma Filaments of Microwave Discharge under Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-03-01

    A one-dimensional compressible fluid calculation was coupled with a finite- difference time-domain code and a particle-in-cell code with collision to reproduce propagation of electromagnetic wave, ionization process of plasma, and shock wave formation in atmospheric microwave discharge. Plasma filaments are driven toward the microwave source at 1 atm, and the distance between each filament is one-fifth of the wavelength of the incident microwave. The strong shock wave is generated due to the high plasma density at the atmospheric pressure. A simple analysis of the microwave propagation into the plasma shows that cut-off density of the microwave becomes smaller with the pressure decrease in a collisional plasma. At the lower pressure, the smaller density plasma is obtained with a diffusive pattern because of the smaller cut-off density and the larger diffusion effect. In contrast with the 1-atm case, the weak shock wave is generated at a rarefied condition, which lowers performance of microwave thruster.

  19. [Spatial distribution of electrons with high energy in atmospheric pressure glow discharge excited by DC voltage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-qiang; Jia, Peng-ying; Liu, Tie

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharge excited by a DC voltage was realized in a 6 mm air gap by using a needle-water electrode discharge device. The atompheric pressure glow discharge has characteristic regions such as a cathode fall, a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, a positive column and an anode glow. The discharge is a normal glow through analyzing its voltage-current curve. The emission intensity of 337.1 nm spectral line from the second positive system of N2 was investigated because it can indicate the electron density with high energy. Results show that the maxima of high energy electrons appears in the vicinity of the needle tip, and it almost remains constant at other locations. The density of high energy electrons decreases with increasing the voltage. Similarly, it decreases with increasing the value of the ballast resistor. Oxygen atom is important for the sterilization and disinfection. The distribution of oxygen atom was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. It was found that the oxygen distribution is similar with the distribution of high energy electrons. These results are important for the application of atmospheric pressure glow discharge in environmental protection and biological treatment.

  20. Constraints on early Mars atmospheric pressure inferred from small ancient craters

    CERN Document Server

    Kite, Edwin S; Lucas, Antoine; Aharonson, Oded

    2013-01-01

    The single most important control on long-term climate change on Mars is thought to be decay of the CO2-dominated atmosphere, but direct constraints on paleoatmospheric pressure P are lacking. Of particular interest is the climate that allowed rivers to flow early in Mars history, which was affected by P via direct and indirect greenhouse effects. The size of craters embedded within ancient layered sediments is a proxy for P: the smaller the minimum-sized craters that form, the thinner the past atmosphere. Here we use high-resolution orthophotos and Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) to identify ancient craters among the river deposits of Aeolis, and compare their sizes to models of atmospheric filtering of impactors by thicker atmospheres. The best fit is P <= 760+/-70 mbar, rising to P <= 1640+/-180 mbar if rimmed circular mesas are excluded. Surveys tend to undercount smaller craters, so these fits are upper limits. Our work assumes target properties appropriate for desert alluvium: if sediment developed ...

  1. Pressure and Humidity Measurements at the MSL Landing Site Supported by Modeling of the Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, A.; Savijarvi, H. I.; Schmidt, W.; Genzer, M.; Paton, M.; Kauhanen, J.; Atlaskin, E.; Polkko, J.; Kahanpaa, H.; Kemppinen, O.; Haukka, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) called Curiosity Rover landed safely on the Martian surface at the Gale crater on 6th August 2012. Among the MSL scientific objectives are investigations of the Martian environment that will be addressed by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) instrument. It will investigate habitability conditions at the Martian surface by performing a versatile set of environmental measurements including accurate observations of pressure and humidity of the Martian atmosphere. This paper describes the instrumental implementation of the MSL pressure and humidity measurement devices and briefly analyzes the atmospheric conditions at the Gale crater by modeling efforts using an atmospheric modeling tools. MSL humidity and pressure devices are based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. Humidity observations make use of Vaisala Humicap® relative humidity sensor heads and Vaisala Barocap® sensor heads are used for pressure observations. Vaisala Thermocap® temperature sensors heads are mounted in a close proximity of Humicap® and Barocap® sensor heads to enable accurate temperature measurements needed for interpretation of Humicap® and Barocap® readings. The sensor heads are capacitive. The pressure and humidity devices are lightweight and are based on a low-power transducer controlled by a dedicated ASIC. The transducer is designed to measure small capacitances in order of a few pF with resolution in order of 0.1fF (femtoFarad). The transducer design has a good spaceflight heritage, as it has been used in several previous missions, for example Mars mission Phoenix as well as the Cassini Huygens mission. The humidity device has overall dimensions of 40 x 25 x 55 mm. It weighs18 g, and consumes 15 mW of power. It includes 3 Humicap® sensor heads and 1 Thermocap®. The transducer electronics and the sensor heads are placed on a single multi-layer PCB protected by a metallic Faraday cage. The Humidity device has measurement range

  2. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Naidis, G.V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Laroussi, M. [Plasma Engineering & Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Reuter, S. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Graves, D.B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ostrikov, K. [Institute for Future Environments, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); School of Physics, Chemistry, and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, P.O.Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-05-04

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors’ vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  3. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  4. In situ modification of chromatography adsorbents using cold atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, P.; Willett, T. C.; Theodosiou, E.; Thomas, O. R. T.; Walsh, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Efficient manufacturing of increasingly sophisticated biopharmaceuticals requires the development of new breeds of chromatographic materials featuring two or more layers, with each layer affording different functions. This letter reports the in situ modification of a commercial beaded anion exchange adsorbent using atmospheric pressure plasma generated within gas bubbles. The results show that exposure to He-O2 plasma in this way yields significant reductions in the surface binding of plasmid DNA to the adsorbent exterior, with minimal loss of core protein binding capacity; thus, a bi-layered chromatography material exhibiting both size excluding and anion exchange functionalities within the same bead is produced.

  5. A Novel Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Fluidized Bed and Its Application in Mutation of Plant Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guang-Liang; WANG Zhen-Quan; HAN Er-Li; FU Ya-Bo; YANG Si-Ze; FAN Song-Hua; LI Chun-Ling; GU Wei-Chao; FENG Wen-Ran; ZHANG Gu-Ling; WANG Jiu-Li; Latif K.; ZHANG Shu-Gen

    2005-01-01

    @@ An atmospheric pressure plasma fluidized bed (APPFB) is designed to generate plasma using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with one liquid electrode. In the APPFB system, the physical properties of DBD discharge and its application in plant-seed mutating are studied fundamentally. The results show that the generated plasma is a typical glow discharge free from filament and arc plasma, and the macro-temperature of the plasma fluidized bed is nearly at room temperature. There are no obvious changes in the pimientos when their seeds are treated by APPFB, but great changes are found for coxcombs.

  6. Enhancement of antioxidant effects of naringin after atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Jang, Soo Jeung; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Yong, Hae In; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-03-15

    Naringin is the natural chief bitter flavonoid found in Citrus species. Herein, bitter naringin was treated with atmospheric pressure plasma to afford two new converted flavonoids, narinplasmins A (2) and B (3), along with the known compound, 2R-naringin. The structures of the two new naringin derivatives were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant activity of all isolates was evaluated based on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenging assays. The new flavanone glycoside 2 containing a methoxyalkyl group exhibited significantly improved antioxidant properties in these assays relative to the parent naringin.

  7. Fabrication of transparent antifouling thin films with fractal structure by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Hayato; Yamauchi, Koji; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Ogawa, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Suzaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-12-21

    Antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency has been fabricated on glass substrate by forming fractal microstructure(s). The fractal microstructure was constituted by transparent silica particles of 100 nm diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition. The sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. We found that one sample has the superhydrophobic ability with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°, while another sample has a high transmittance of more than 85% in a wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm.

  8. Synthesis of Crystalline Carbon Nitride Thin Films by Pulsed Arc Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Changyong; MA Zhibin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of crystalline C3N4 films was investigated using pulsed arc discharge from mixed methanol and ammonia water at atmospheric pressure.The X-ray diffraction(XRD)patterns of the films prepared at a substrate temperature of 450℃ suggested that the film was composed of α-C3N4 and β-C3N4 crystallites.Raman spectra exhibited distinct peaks which are in good agreement with those predicted theoretically for C3N4 crystallites.

  9. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duten, X; Redolfi, M; Aggadi, N; Vega, A; Hassouni, K, E-mail: duten@lspm.cnrs.fr [LSPM-CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris Nord, 90 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  10. Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Non-equilibrium Plasmas on Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂亚庭; 许莉; 俞莺; 谭明; 李娟; 陈宏翔

    2010-01-01

    In this study,the sterilizing effect of atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas(APNPs) on Neisseria gonorrhoeae(N.gonorrhoeae) was preliminarily examined and the possible mechanisms were explored.N.gonorrhoeae FA1090,FA19 and MS11 were treated by APNPs and their survival rate was analyzed by using CFUs counting and structurally studied by laser scanning confocal microscopy.The morphological changes of bacterial cell membrane and wall were studied under TEM.Our results showed that APNPs had strong steril...

  11. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  12. Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, R. Kenneth; Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick; Russo, Richard E.; Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Carado, Anthony J.

    2017-01-03

    A liquid sampling, atmospheric pressure, glow discharge (LS-APGD) device as well as systems that incorporate the device and methods for using the device and systems are described. The LS-APGD includes a hollow capillary for delivering an electrolyte solution to a glow discharge space. The device also includes a counter electrode in the form of a second hollow capillary that can deliver the analyte into the glow discharge space. A voltage across the electrolyte solution and the counter electrode creates the microplasma within the glow discharge space that interacts with the analyte to move it to a higher energy state (vaporization, excitation, and/or ionization of the analyte).

  13. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as a Dry Alternative to Inkjet Printing in Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Lopez, Arlene; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an atmospheric pressure plasma jet printing system that works at room temperature to 50 deg C unlike conventional aerosol assisted techniques which require a high temperature sintering step to obtain desired thin films. Multiple jets can be configured to increase throughput or to deposit multiple materials, and the jet(s) can be moved across large areas using a x-y stage. The plasma jet has been used to deposit carbon nanotubes, graphene, silver nanowires, copper nanoparticles and other materials on substrates such as paper, cotton, plastic and thin metal foils.

  14. Characteristics of liquid flow induced by atmospheric-pressure DC glow discharge in contact with liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Aoki, Takuya; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the characteristics of liquid flow induced by atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with a liquid. The spatiotemporal development of liquid flow was visualized by the schlieren method, and the temperature distribution was measured using microencapsulated thermotropic liquid crystal particles dispersed in a liquid. We confirmed the appearance of specific downward liquid flow immediately below the dc glow discharge. The characteristics of downward liquid flow were reproduced by fluid simulation considering a downward driving force at the plasma–liquid interface. Our results suggest that the probable driving force for the downward liquid flow was the momentum transfer of charged species at the liquid surface.

  15. Effect of microwave frequency on plasma formation in air breakdown at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵朋程; 郭立新; 李慧敏

    2015-01-01

    Microwave breakdown at atmospheric pressure causes the formation of a discrete plasma structure. The one-dimensional fluid model coupling Maxwell equations with plasma fluid equations is used to study the effect of the mi-crowave frequency on the formation of air plasma. Simulation results show that, the filamentary plasma array propagating toward the microwave source is formed at different microwave frequencies. As the microwave frequency decreases, the ratio of the distance between two adjacent plasma filaments to the corresponding wavelength remains almost unchanged (on the order of 1/4), while the plasma front propagates more slowly due to the increase in the formation time of the new plasma filament.

  16. Radial Evolution of the Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Helium Controlled by Dielectric Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-Tao; WANG De-Zhen; WANG Yan-Hui; LIU Cheng-Sen

    2005-01-01

    @@ The radial evolution of atmospheric pressure glow discharge in helium is presented by numerical simulation. The calculations reveal the mechanism of two current peaks per half cycle. The first breakdown occurs firstly in the central region of the electrode, and then spreads to the edge, while the second breakdown ignites at the periphery firstly, and then propagates toward the discharge central region. The simulations indicate that radial electric fields and radial sheath play an important role in the evolution of the second peak. These results agree fundamentally with the experimental observations.

  17. Energy distribution of runaway electrons generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Lomaev, M. I.; Petin, V. K.; Rybka, D. V.; Shlyakhtun, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The spectra of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam generated by a nanosecond discharge in atmospheric-pressure air were investigated. The temporal characteristics of the beam current pulses, gap voltage, and discharge current in a gas diode were measured with a time resolution of ˜0.1 ns. A simple technique was developed for recovering electron spectra from the curves of beam attenuation by aluminum foils. The effect of the cathode design, electrode gap length, and generator parameters on the electron spectra were studied using seven setups. It is shown that generation of electrons with anomalously high energies requires the use of cathodes with increased curvature radius.

  18. Plasma Disinfection and the Deterioration of Surgical Tools at Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaba, Siti Khadijah; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Katayama-Hirayama, Keiko; Tsuji, Masao; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichirou

    The purpose of this paper is to present and compare disinfection effect of plasma by means of Atmospheric Pressure Glow plasma and streamer discharge. Geobacillus stearothermophilus was used as biological indicator for disinfection process. The effect of blades after irradiated in plasma was also studied by SEM analysis. It was found that the disinfection process was effective when the cylindrical configuration was applied. Carbon steel blade was also found to be deteriorated after immersed in plasma irradiation. Results indicate that disinfection can be achieved and at the same time deteriorations of the tools were observed.

  19. Role of secondary emission on discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, W. H.; Kausik, S. S.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S., E-mail: cswong@um.edu.my [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-04-15

    The discharge dynamics in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is studied in a DBD reactor consisting of a pair of stainless steel parallel plate electrodes. The DBD discharge has been generated by a 50 Hz ac high voltage power source. The high-speed intensified charge coupled device camera is used to capture the images of filaments occurring in the discharge gap. It is observed that frequent synchronous breakdown of micro discharges occurs across the discharge gap in the case of negative current pulse. The experimental results reveal that secondary emissions from the dielectric surface play a key role in the synchronous breakdown of plasma filaments.

  20. Theoretical Computation for Non-Equilibrium Air Plasma Electrical Conductivity at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Dong; GUO Wen-Kang; XU Ping; LIANG Rong-Qing

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the Chapman-Enskog theory, we calculate the electrical conductivity of non-equilibrium air plasma in the two-temperature model. We consider different degrees of non-equilibrium, which is defined by the ratio of electronic temperature to heavy particles temperature. The method of computing the composition of air plasma is demonstrated. After calculating the electrical conductivity from electron temperature 1000 K to 15000K, the present result is compared with Murphy's study [Plasma Chem. Plasma Process 15 (1994) 279] for equilibrium case. All the calculation is completed at atmospheric pressure. The present results may have potential applications in numerical calculation of non-equilibrium air plasma.

  1. Titanium Alloy Surface Modification by a Spatio-Temporal Atmospheric Pressure DBD Afterglow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.PANOUSIS; F.CLEMENT; J.F.LOISEAU; N.SPYROU; B.HELD1; J.LARRIEU; F.GUERTON

    2007-01-01

    The experimental work reported here is devoted to the study of the modifications inflicted on the surface of titanium alloy specimens by an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge(DBD) reactor in both spatial and temporal afterglow conditions.A commercially available (AcXys Technologies) modified reactor system was used for the surface treatment of the TiA6V4 titanium alloy that is widely used in the aeronautical industry.Wettability surface characterisation and XPS analyses are performed to give a macroscopic and microscopic insight to the surface modifications.Best operating conditions,at constant input energy,were obtained for a duty cycle equal to 10%.

  2. Synthesis of PPy-like Nanocrystallines by Oriented Plasma Polymerization at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Xin-sheng; GUO Ying; XU Jin-zhou; ZHANG Jing

    2006-01-01

    Polymeric polypyrrole-like (PPy-like) nanocrystallines were fast synthesized through oriented plasma polymerization at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The effects of discharge power on the nanocrystalline morphology were investigated. Larger power tends to produce longer nanocrystallines. 3 mm long nanowires were produced at the largest power in our experiment. TEM image and the sharp electronic diffraction spots in SAD suggest that the nanoparticles have a single crystal phase. The chemical structure of the nanocrystalline has been studied through FTIR, EDX etc. This novel polymerization method could have great applications in fabricating functional polymeric nanocrystallines.

  3. Bacterial inactivation using atmospheric pressure single pin electrode microplasma jet with a ground ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Bae, S. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    Bacterial inactivation experiment was performed using atmospheric pressure microplasma jets driven by radio-frequency wave of 13.56 MHz and by low frequency wave of several kilohertz. With addition of a ground ring electrode, the discharge current, the optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, and the sterilization efficiency were enhanced significantly. When oxygen gas was added to helium at the flow rate of 5 SCCM, the sterilization efficiency was enhanced. From the survival curve of Escherichia coli, the primary role in the inactivation was played by reactive species with minor aid from heat, UV photons, charged particles, and electric fields.

  4. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  5. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  6. Surface modification of polyester film by glow discharge tunnel at atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiang-yu; WANG Shou-guo; YE Tian-chun; JING Guang-yin; YU Da-peng

    2004-01-01

    A large-area improved dielectric barrier glow discharge tunnel has been developed for modifying the surface of polyester film at atmospheric pressure with argon and oxygen gas mixtures. The electrical properties of the glow discharge tunnel were studied by simultaneous measurement of the voltage and current. In addition, the effect of the glow discharge tunnel treatment on the surface of polyester film were studied. The resultant modifications of the surface properties of the treated samples were investigated through scanning probe microscopy and contact angle measurement.

  7. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  8. Selective growth of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, R.; Dugrand, L.

    1991-01-01

    Complete selective epitaxy of GaAs by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure was achieved by using TMG, AsH3, and AsCl3 as starting gases. Selectivity was observed at growth temperatures ranging from 650 to 750 °C. The blocking of polycrystal deposition on the mask, Si3N4, or W, is attributed to the adsorption of HCl on the mask, thus preventing the nucleation of GaAs. On the openings, the growth rate may be adjusted by controlling the TMG/AsCl3 ratio. When TMG/AsCl3<1, no growth occurs, but etching is observed.

  9. Study on an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet and its Application in Etching Photo-Resistant Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海江; 王守国; 赵玲利; 叶甜春

    2004-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet that can eject cold plasma has been developed. In this paper, the configuration of this type of plasma jet is illustrated and its discharge characteristics curves are studied with a current and a voltage probe. A thermal couple is used to measure the temperature distribution along the axis of the jet stream. The temperature distribution curve is generated for the He/O2 jet stream at the discharge power of 150W. This jet can etch the photo-resistant material at an average rate of 100nm/min on the surface of silicon wafers at a right angle.

  10. Deposition of SiOx films by means of atmospheric pressure microplasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, Jan; Ellerweg, Dirk; Rügner, Katja; von Keudell, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet sources are currently in the focus of many researchers for their promising applications in medical industry (e.g. treatment of living tissues), surface modification or material etching or synthesis. Here we report on the study of fundamental principles of deposition of SiOx films from microplasma jets with admixture of hexamethyldisiloxane [(CH3)3SiOSi(CH3)3, HMDSO] molecules and oxygen. The properties of the deposited films, the composition of the plasma as measured by molecular beam mass spectrometry and the effect of additional treatment of grown film by oxygen or hydrogen atoms will be presented.

  11. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  12. Bullet-to-streamer transition on the liquid surface of a plasma jet in atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S.-Y.; Kim, G.-H.; Kim, S.-J.; Bae, B.; Kim, N.-K.; Lee, H.; Bae, N.; Ryu, S.; Yoo, S. J.; Kim, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the transition of the plasma shape from a ring-shaped bullet to a pin-like streamer adjacent to the electrolyte surface in a kHz-driven helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The transition was observed by synchronized fast images, plasma propagation speed, time-resolved emission profile of Hβ, and spatially and temporally resolved helium metastable density. The transition height increased when electrolyte evaporation was enhanced. The plasma continued to discharge on the electrolyte surface even in the absence of metastable species, i.e., the discharge mechanism changed from Penning ionization between helium metastable and ambient nitrogen to electron collision on evaporated water.

  13. Simulation of ion motion at atmospheric pressure: particle tracing versus electrokinetic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissdorf, Walter; Pohler, Larissa; Klee, Sonja; Müller, David; Benter, Thorsten

    2012-02-01

    Results obtained with two computational approaches for the simulation of ion motion at elevated pressure are compared with experimentally derived ion current data. The computational approaches used are charged particle tracings with the software package SIMION ver. 8 and finite element based calculations using the software package Comsol Multiphysics ver. 4.0/4.0a. The experimental setup consisted of a tubular corona discharge ion source coupled to a cylindrical measurement chamber held at atmospheric pressure. Generated ions are flown into the chamber at essentially subsonic laminar isothermal conditions. In the simulations, strictly stationary conditions were assumed. The results show very good agreement between the SIMION/SDS model and experimental data. For the Comsol model, only qualitative agreement is observed.

  14. Plasma polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, K.; Wydeven, T.

    1979-01-01

    The polymerization of ethylene in an atmospheric pressure-pulsed discharge has been studied. Partial pressures of ethylene up to 4 kN/sq m were used with helium as a diluent. Deposition rates (on glass slides) were the same throughout the discharge volume over a wide range of operating conditions. These rates were in the 1-2 A/sec range. The films were clear, soft, and showed good adhesion to the glass substrates. Oligomers large enough to visibly scatter 637.8-nm light were observed in the gas phase under all conditions in which film deposition occurred. The experimental results suggest that Brownian diffusion of these oligomers was the rate-limiting step in the film deposition process.

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  16. Measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of dicarboxylic acids using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Emily A; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-06-21

    Vapor pressures of low volatility compounds are important parameters in several atmospheric processes, including the formation of new particles and the partitioning of compounds between the gas phase and particles. Understanding these processes is critical for elucidating the impacts of aerosols on climate, visibility, and human health. Dicarboxylic acids are an important class of compounds in the atmosphere for which reported vapor pressures often vary by more than an order of magnitude. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS), a relatively new atmospheric pressure ionization technique, is applied for the first time to the measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of a series of dicarboxylic acids. Pyrene was also studied because its vapor pressures and heat of sublimation are relatively well-known. The heats of sublimation measured using ASAP-MS were in good agreement with published values. The vapor pressures, assuming an evaporation coefficient of unity, were typically within a factor of ∼3 lower than published values made at similar temperatures for most of the acids. The underestimation may be due to diffusional constraints resulting from evaporation at atmospheric pressure. However, this study establishes that ASAP-MS is a promising new technique for such measurements.

  17. An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Setup to Investigate the Reactive Species Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Soriano, Robert; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-11-03

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure ('cold') plasmas have received increased attention in recent years due to their significant biomedical potential. The reactions of cold plasma with the surrounding atmosphere yield a variety of reactive species, which can define its effectiveness. While efficient development of cold plasma therapy requires kinetic models, model benchmarking needs empirical data. Experimental studies of the source of reactive species detected in aqueous solutions exposed to plasma are still scarce. Biomedical plasma is often operated with He or Ar feed gas, and a specific interest lies in investigation of the reactive species generated by plasma with various gas admixtures (O2, N2, air, H2O vapor, etc.) Such investigations are very complex due to difficulties in controlling the ambient atmosphere in contact with the plasma effluent. In this work, we addressed common issues of 'high' voltage kHz frequency driven plasma jet experimental studies. A reactor was developed allowing the exclusion of ambient atmosphere from the plasma-liquid system. The system thus comprised the feed gas with admixtures and the components of the liquid sample. This controlled atmosphere allowed the investigation of the source of the reactive oxygen species induced in aqueous solutions by He-water vapor plasma. The use of isotopically labelled water allowed distinguishing between the species originating in the gas phase and those formed in the liquid. The plasma equipment was contained inside a Faraday cage to eliminate possible influence of any external field. The setup is versatile and can aid in further understanding the cold plasma-liquid interactions chemistry.

  18. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyildiz, Halil I. [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Mousa, Moataz Bellah M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Jur, Jesse S., E-mail: jsjur@ncsu.edu [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-O{sub x} product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  19. Atmospheric Radiocarbon Calibration to 45,000 yr B.P. : Late Glacial Fluctuations and Cosmogenic Isotope Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H.; Plicht, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present). The results confirm the

  20. The joint influence of topography and atmosphere on the meridional transport fluctuations in the Southern Ocean and its link with the ENSO events

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, V N

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the investigation of the influence of topography and coastlines on the dynamics of the depth averaged Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), driven by wind and atmospheric pressure. This is achieved with the help of a global barotropic circulation model, under idealized and real atmospheric conditions. It is shown that the variability of meridional mass fluxes due to the atmospheric conditions over the ACC can induce short-period density anomalies in the Southern Ocean to the north in the vicinity of 47S, which can be transferred to low latitudes by the wave mechanism described by Ivchenko et al. 2004, that could have significance with respect to rapid extra-tropical oceanic links. The results of the barotropic modeling demonstrate that changes in wind strength over the ACC, together with the effect of bottom topography and coastlines, induce some meridional flow variability in the Southern Ocean, and this meridional flux variability in the Pacific Ocean is anticorrelated with the streng...

  1. Non-Thermal Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Glow-Like Discharge Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhengshi; Yao, Congwei; Zhang, Guanjun

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications, and the uniform APPJ is more favored. Glow discharge is one of the most effective methods to obtain the uniform discharge. Compared with the glow dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure, pure helium APPJ shows partial characteristics of both the glow discharge and the streamer. In this paper, considering the influence of the Penning effect, the electrical and optical properties of He APPJ and Ar/NH3 APPJ were researched. A word “Glow-like APPJ” is used to characterize the uniformity of APPJ, and it was obtained that the basic characteristics of the glow-like APPJ are driven by the kHz AC high voltage. The results can provide a support for generating uniform APPJ, and lay a foundation for its applications. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307133, 51125029, 51221005) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. xjj2012132, xkjc2013004)

  2. Superhydrophobic treatment using atmospheric-pressure He/C4F8 plasma for buoyancy improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sooryun; Moon, A.-Young; Moon, Se Youn

    2015-04-01

    A superhydrophobic miniature boat was fabricated with aluminum alloy plates treated with atmospheric-pressure helium (He)/octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma using 13.56 MHz rf power. When only 0.13% C4F8 was added to He gas, the contact angle of the surface increased to 140° and the surface showed superhydrophobic properties. On the basis of chemical and morphological analyses, fluorinated functional groups (CF, CF2, and CF3) and nano-/micro-sized particles were detected on the Al surface. These features brought about superhydrophobicity similar to the lotus effect. While the miniature boat, assembled with plasma-treated plates, was immersed in water, a layer of air (i.e., a plastron) surrounded the superhydrophobic surfaces. This effect contributed to the development of a 4.7% increase in buoyancy. In addition, the superhydrophobic properties lasted for two months under the submerged condition. These results demonstrate that treatment with atmospheric-pressure He/C4F8 plasma is a promising method of improving the load capacity and antifouling properties, and reducing the friction of marine ships through a fast and low-cost superhydrophobic treatment process.

  3. Formation and characterization of hydrophobic glass surface treated by atmospheric pressure He/CH4 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Sooryun; Youn Moon, Se

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasmas, generated in the open air by 13.56 MHz rf power, were applied for the glass surface wettability modification. The plasma gas temperature, measured by the spectroscopic method, was under 400 K which is low enough to treat the samples without thermal damages. The hydrophobicity of the samples determined by the water droplet contact angle method was dependent on the methane gas content and the plasma exposure time. Adding the methane gas by a small amount of 0.25%, the contact angle was remarkably increased from 10° to 83° after the 10 s plasma treatment. From the analysis of the treated surface and the plasma, it was shown that the deposition of alkane functional groups such as C-H stretch, CH2 bend, and CH3 bend was one of the contributing factors for the hydrophobicity development. In addition, the hydrophobic properties lasted over 2 months even after the single treatment. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment promises the fast and low-cost method for the thermally-weak surface modification.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Using a High Voltage Target Compared to Electrospray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Arnaud; Bajic, Steve; Cabooter, Deirdre; Augustijns, Patrick; Cuyckens, Filip

    2016-11-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source, viz. UniSpray, was evaluated for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of pharmaceutical compounds by head-to-head comparison with electrospray ionization (ESI) on the same high-resolution MS system. The atmospheric pressure ionization source is composed of a grounded nebulizer spraying onto a high voltage, cylindrical stainless steel target. Molecules are ionized in a similar fashion to electrospray ionization, predominantly producing protonated or deprotonated species. Adduct formation (e.g., proton and sodium adducts) and in-source fragmentation is shown to be almost identical between the two sources. The performance of the new API source was compared with electrospray by infusion of a mix of 22 pharmaceutical compounds with a wide variety of functional groups and physico-chemical properties (molecular weight, logP, and pKa) in more than 100 different conditions (mobile phase strength, solvents, pH, and flow rate). The new API source shows an intensity gain of a factor 2.2 compared with ESI considering all conditions on all compounds tested. Finally, some hypotheses on the ionization mechanism, similarities, and differences with ESI, are discussed.

  5. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-02-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C6H5CH3) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C6H5CH3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N2: O2: H2O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C6H5CH3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C6H5CH3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  6. Effects of a Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet on Human Gingival Fibroblasts for Biomedical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ have been developed and applied in biomedical research as a cancer treatment or bacterial sterilization. However, the drawback of APPJ on normal oral cells during plasma treatment and underlying cell death mechanisms have not been studied and clearly explained, although there is known to be an influence from reactive oxygen species (ROS. Hence, this study investigates whether and how a nonthermal atmospheric pressure air plasma jet kills human normal gingival cells using immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF cells. In this study, a set of physicochemical or biological methods were used to illuminate the killing mechanisms. It was found that ROS were induced intracellularly without a breakdown of the cell wall and apoptosis was involved in cell death when an air APPJ treatment was performed on the cells directly without media; the air treatment only supported a detachment of the cells without increase of ROS. It was also revealed that a correlation between intracellular ROS concentration and cells viability existed. These results indicated that the direct air APPJ treatment possibly raises safety issue to normal tissue and thereby APPJ application in biomedical field needs more in vitro and in vivo study to optimize it.

  7. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  8. Simulation of the propagation and reignition of atmospheric pressure air discharges behind a dielectric plane obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, Francois; Jansky, Jaroslav; Bourdon, Anne

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, experimental studies on flue gas treatment have demonstrated the efficiency of plasma assisted catalysis for the treatment of a wide range of pollutants at a low energetic cost. In plasma reactors, usual catalyst supports are pellets, monoliths or porous media, and then atmospheric pressure discharges have to interact with many obstacles and to propagate in microcavities and pores. As a first step to better understand atmospheric pressure discharge dynamics in these complex geometries, in this work, we have carried out numerical simulations using a 2D-axisymmetric fluid model for a point-to-plane discharge with a dielectric plane obstacle placed in the path of the discharge. First, we have simulated the discharge ignition at the point electrode, its propagation in the gap and its impact and expansion on the dielectric plane. Depending on the applied voltage, the dielectric plane geometry and permittivity, we have identified conditions for the reignition of a second discharge behind the plane obstacle. These conditions will be discussed and compared with recent experimental results on the same configuration.

  9. Pyroelectricity Assisted Infrared-Laser Desorption Ionization (PAI-LDI) for Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wei, Zhenwei; Gong, Xiaoyun; Yang, Chengdui; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-08-01

    A new atmospheric pressure ionization method termed pyroelectricity-assisted infrared laser desorption ionization (PAI-LDI) was developed in this study. The pyroelectric material served as both sample target plate and enhancing ionization substrate, and an IR laser with wavelength of 1064 nm was employed to realize direct desorption and ionization of the analytes. The mass spectra of various compounds obtained on pyroelectric material were compared with those of other substrates. For the five standard substances tested in this work, LiNbO3 substrate produced the highest ion yield and the signal intensity was about 10 times higher than that when copper was used as substrate. For 1-adamantylamine, as low as 20 pg (132.2 fmol) was successfully detected. The active ingredient in (Compound Paracetamol and 1-Adamantylamine Hydrochloride Capsules), 1-adamantylamine, can be sensitively detected at an amount as low as 150 pg, when the medicine stock solution was diluted with urine. Monosaccharide and oligosaccharides in Allium Cepa L. juice was also successfully identified with PAI-LDI. The method did not require matrix-assisted external high voltage or other extra facility-assisted set-ups for desorption/ionization. This study suggested exciting application prospect of pyroelectric materials in matrix- and electricity-free atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry research.

  10. Rapid differentiation of tea products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Liang, Huazheng; Ding, Jianhua; Lai, Jinhu; Huan, Yanfu; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2007-12-12

    Protonated water molecules generated by an ambient corona discharge were directed to impact tea leaves for desorption/ionization at atmospheric pressure. Thus, a novel method based on surface desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS) has been developed for rapid analysis of tea products without any sample pretreatment. Under the optimized experimental conditions, DAPCI MS spectra of various tea samples are recorded rapidly, and the resulting mass spectra are chemical fingerprints that characterize the tea samples. On the basis of the mass spectral fingerprints, 40 tea samples including green tea, oolong tea, and jasmine tea were successfully differentiated by principal component analysis (PCA) of the mass spectral raw data. The PCA results were also validated with cluster analysis and supervised PCA analysis. The alteration of signal intensity caused by rough surfaces of tea leaves did not cause failure in the separation of the tea products. The experimental findings show that DAPCI-MS creates ions of both volatile and nonvolatile compounds in tea products at atmospheric pressure, providing a practical and convenient tool for high-throughput differentiation of tea products.

  11. Optical diagnostics of reactive species in atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews optical measurements of reactive species in atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasmas: streamer discharge, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), plasma jet, and plasma-assisted ignition and combustion. Measurements of OH, O, N, {{\\text{O}}3} , NO, {{\\text{N}}2} (A, B, C), {{\\text{O}}2} (a, b), {{\\text{N}}2}(v) , {{\\text{O}}2}(v) , He*, Ar*, \\text{N}2+ , CH, and CH2O by laser-induced fluorescence, absorption, optical emission spectroscopy, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering methods are included. Reactive species measurement in low-frequency (\\cong 1 Hz) pulsed streamer discharge is introduced, and reactive species production and reaction processes indicated by these measurements are described in detail. Measurements in high-frequency DBD, atmospheric-pressure diffuse discharge, and dc corona discharge are described. Measurements in plasma jets are also reviewed: rf plasma jets, kHz plasma jets, and additional plasma jets. Finally, measurements in plasma-assisted ignition and combustion are described and reviewed in addition to measurements in conventional spark ignition. A comprehensive list of the reviewed measurements is provided.

  12. Ion kinetics and self pulsing in DC microplasma discharges at atmospheric and higher pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamud, Rajib; Farouk, Tanvir I.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure microplasma devices have been the subject of considerable interest and research during the last decade. Most of the operation regime of the plasma discharges studied fall in the ‘abnormal’, ‘normal’ and ‘corona’ modes—increasing and a ‘flat’ voltage current characteristics. However, the negative differential resistance regime at atmospheric and high pressures has been less studied and possesses unique characteristics that can be employed for novel applications. In this work, the role of ion kinetics especially associated with trace impurities; on the self pulsing behavior has been investigated. Detailed numerical simulations have been conducted with a validated model for a helium-nitrogen feed gas mixture. Different oscillatory modes were observed where the discharge was found to undergo complete or partial relaxation. Trace amount of nitrogen was found to significantly alter the pulsing characteristics. External parameters influencing these self oscillations are also studied and aspects of the ion kinetics on the oscillatory behavior are discussed.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymers for tuned QCM detection of protein adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, G B; Asandulesa, M; Topala, I; Pohoata, V; Dumitrascu, N; Barboiu, M

    2014-03-15

    Our efforts have been concentrated in preparing plasma polymeric thin layers at atmospheric pressure grown on Quartz Crystal Microbalance-QCM electrodes for which the non-specific absorption of proteins can be efficiently modulated, tuned and used for QCM biosensing and quantification. Plasma polymerization reaction at atmospheric pressure has been used as a simple and viable method for the preparation of QCM bioactive surfaces, featuring variable protein binding properties. Polyethyleneglycol (ppEG), polystyrene (ppST) and poly(ethyleneglycol-styrene) (ppST-EG) thin-layers have been grown on QCM electrodes. These layers were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The plasma ppST QCM electrodes present a higher adsorption of Concanavalin A (ConA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) proteins when compared with the commercial coated polystyrene (ppST) ones. The minimum adsorption was found for ppEG, surface, known by their protein anti-fouling properties. The amount of adsorbed proteins can be tuned by the introduction of PEG precursors in the plasma discharge during the preparation of ppST polymers.

  14. Ionization instability induced striations in atmospheric pressure He/H2O RF and DC discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a 1 mm gap atmospheric pressure He/2%{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} rf capacitive discharge showed standing striations in the bulk (Kawamura et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054009). We found that these striations were consistent with an ionization instability induced by non-local electron kinetics. We developed a theoretical instability criterion in good agreement with the numerical results which showed that discharges with larger bulk recombination rates tend to be more unstable. We also determined a critical wavelength such that shorter wavelengths are suppressed by diffusion while longer wavelengths may be restricted by the gap width. In this paper, we extend the gap size of the atmospheric pressure He/2%{{\\text{H}}2}\\text{O} discharges in the PIC simulations to 2 and 4 mm and drive them by either dc or rf current sources. We compare the results to the 1 mm gap rf simulations and theoretical model in Kawamura et al (2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 054009). We find that wider gap discharges tend to be more unstable as they can accommodate a wider range of wavelengths. Furthermore, the mixture of the various excited modes in the wider gaps can lead to distinctly non-sinusoidal spatial oscillations.

  15. Electrical and optical characterization of an atmospheric pressure, uniform, large-area processing, dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniou, A.; Puač, N.; Škoro, N.; Selaković, N.; Dimitrakellis, P.; Gogolides, E.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2017-04-01

    A printed-circuit-board (PCB) based atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) capable of uniform processing over a large area was constructed consisting of two parallel plates. The first perforated plate is comprised of four layers: a RF powered metal layer, a polymeric dielectric layer, a floating metal grid and another dielectric layer. The second, grounded, plate was fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass plate with surface of 100  ×  100 mm2 and thickness of 2 mm. The PCB based atmospheric pressure DBD was characterized by (a) measuring electrical characteristics of the device using derivative I–V probes, (b) ICCD imaging and (c) optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Optical and electrical characteristics, as well as plasma uniformity were measured by changing He flow rate and input power, while keeping the gap between the PCB and the FTO glass plate ground electrode constant at 2 mm. The plasma uniformity strongly depends on the applied power and on the flow rate of the buffer gas. When increasing the flow rate, the intensity of the nitrogen-dominated emission drops, while emission of helium and oxygen lines increases. The source allows low temperature, uniform plasma operation over a wide area of 100  ×  100 mm2, which could be essential for numerous applications. Examples of etching rate and hydrophilization are demonstrated.

  16. Surface Treatment of Polyethylene Terephthalate Film Using Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方志; 邱毓昌; 王辉

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in polymer surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface for improving hydrophilicity using the non-thermal plasma generated by atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) in air is conducted.The discharge characteristics of APGD are shown by measurement of their electrical discharge parameters and observation of light-emission phenomena, and the surface properties of PET before and after the APGD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that the APGD is homogeneous and stable in the whole gas gap, which differs from the commonly filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A short time (several seconds) APGD treatment can modify the surface characteristics of PET film markedly and uniformly. After 10 s APGD treatment, the surface oxygen content of PET surface increases to 39%, and the water contact angle decreases to 19°, respectively.

  17. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  18. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  19. LIF diagnostics of hydroxyl radical in a methanol containing atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Liu, San-Qiu; Pei, Xue-Kai; Lu, Xin-Pei; Zhang, Jia-Liang; Wang, De-Zhen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed-dc CH3OH/Ar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure is studied by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A gas-liquid bubbler system is proposed to introduce the methanol vapor into the argon gas, and the CH3OH/Ar volume ratio is kept constant at about 0.1%. Discharge occurs in a 6-mm needle-to-ring gap in an atmospheric-pressure CH3OH/Ar mixture. The space-resolved distributions of OH LIF inside and outside the nozzle exhibit distinctly different behaviors. And, different production mechanisms of OH radicals in the needle-to-ring discharge gap and afterglow of plasma jet are discussed. Besides, the optical emission lines of carbonaceous species, such as CH, CN, and C2 radicals, are identified in the CH3OH/Ar plasma jet. Finally, the influences of operating parameters (applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulsewidth) on the OH radical density are also presented and analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11465013 and 11375041), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20151BAB212012 and 20161BAB201013), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  20. Atmospheric pressure microplasmas in ZnO nanoforests under high voltage stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa Noor

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure ZnO microplasmas have been generated by high amplitude single pulses and DC voltages applied using micrometer-separated probes on ZnO nanoforests. The high voltage stress triggers plasma breakdown and breakdown in the surrounding air followed by sublimation of ZnO resulting in strong blue and white light emission with sharp spectral lines and non-linear current-voltage characteristics. The nanoforests are made of ZnO nanorods (NRs grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO glass, poly-crystalline silicon and bulk p-type silicon substrates. The characteristics of the microplasmas depend strongly on the substrate and voltage parameters. Plasmas can be obtained with pulse durations as short as ∼1 μs for FTO glass substrate and ∼100 ms for the silicon substrates. Besides enabling plasma generation with shorter pulses, NRs on FTO glass substrate also lead to better tunability of the operating gas temperature. Hot and cold ZnO microplasmas have been observed with these NRs on FTO glass substrate. Sputtering of nanomaterials during plasma generation in the regions surrounding the test area has also been noticed and result in interesting ZnO nanostructures (‘nano-flowers’ and ‘nano-cauliflowers’. A practical way of generating atmospheric pressure ZnO microplasmas may lead to various lighting, biomedical and material processing applications.

  1. Surface modification of polyester synthetic leather with tetramethylsilane by atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, C.W., E-mail: tccwk@polyu.edu.hk [Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Kwong, C.H. [Institute of Textiles and Clothing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Ng, S.P. [Hong Kong Community College, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment improved surface performance of polyester synthetic leather with tetramethylsilane. • XPS and FTIR confirmed the deposition of organosilanes on the sample's surface. • Contact angle increases to 138° after plasma treatment. - Abstract: Much works have been done on synthetic materials but scarcely on synthetic leather owing to its surface structures in terms of porosity and roughness. This paper examines the use of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment for improving the surface performance of polyester synthetic leather by use of a precursor, tetramethylsilane (TMS). Plasma deposition is regarded as an effective, simple and single-step method with low pollution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirm the deposition of organosilanes on the sample's surface. The results showed that under a particular combination of treatment parameters, a hydrophobic surface was achieved on the APP treated sample with sessile drop static contact angle of 138°. The hydrophobic surface is stable without hydrophilic recovery 30 days after plasma treatment.

  2. Development of a new atmospheric pressure cold plasma jet generator and application in sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Cheng; Liu Peng; Xu Lei; Zhang Li-Ye; Zhan Ru-Juan; Zhang Wen-Rui

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that a new plasma generator at atmospheric pressure, which is composed of two homocentric cylindrical all-metal tubes, successfully generates a cold plasma jet. The inside tube electrode is connected to ground,the outside tube electrode is connected to a high-voltage power supply, and a dielectric layer is covered on the outside tube electrode. When the reactor is operated by low-frequency (6 kHz-20 kHz) AC supply in atmospheric pressure and argon is steadily fed as a discharge gas through inside tube electrode, a cold plasma jet is blown out into air and the plasma gas temperature is only 25-30 ℃. The electric character of the discharge is studied by using digital real-time oscilloscope (TDS 200-Series), and the discharge is capacitive. Preliminary results are presented on the decontamination of E.colis bacteria and Bacillus subtilis bacteria by this plasma jet, and an optical emission analysis of the plasma jet is presented in this paper. The ozone concentration generated by the plasma jet is 1.0 × 1016cm-3 which is acquired by using the ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy.

  3. Novel focal point multipass cell for absorption spectroscopy on small sized atmospheric pressure plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Jörn; Hänel, Mattis; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    A novel focal point multipass cell (FPMPC) was developed, in which all laser beams propagate through a common focal point. It is exclusively constructed from standard optical elements. Main functional elements are two 90(∘) off-axis parabolic mirrors and two retroreflectors. Up to 17 laser passes are demonstrated with a near-infrared laser beam. The number of laser passes is precisely adjustable by changing the retroreflector distance. At the focal point beams are constricted to fit through an aperture of 0.8 mm. This is shown for 11 beam passes. Moreover, the fast temporal response of the cell permits investigation of transient processes with frequencies up to 10 MHz. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the FPMPC for atmospheric pressure plasma jets, laser absorption spectroscopy on the lowest excited argon state (1s5) was performed on a 1 MHz argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. From the obtained optical depth profiles, the signal-to-noise ratio was deduced. It is shown that an elevation of the laser pass number results in an proportional increase of the signal-to-noise ratio making the FPMPC an appropriate tool for absorption spectroscopy on plasmas of small dimensions.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanofibrous Polyaniline Thin Film Prepared by Novel Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Polymerization Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon-Sang Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the preparation of plasma-polymerized aniline (pPANI nanofibers and nanoparticles by an intense plasma cloud type atmospheric pressure plasma jets (iPC-APPJ device with a single bundle of three glass tubes. The nano size polymer was obtained at a sinusoidal wave with a peak value of 8 kV and a frequency of 26 kHz under ambient air. Discharge currents, photo-sensor amplifier, and optical emission spectrometer (OES techniques were used to analyze the plasma produced from the iPC-APPJ device. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, and gel permeation chromatography (GPC techniques were used to analyze the pPANI. FE-SEM and TEM results show that pPANI has nanofibers, nanoparticles morphology, and polycrystalline characteristics. The FT-IR and GC-MS analysis show the characteristic polyaniline peaks with evidence that some quinone and benzene rings are broken by the discharge energy. GPC results show that pPANI has high molecular weight (Mw, about 533 kDa with 1.9 polydispersity index (PDI. This study contributes to a better understanding on the novel growth process and synthesis of uniform polyaniline nanofibers and nanoparticles with high molecular weights using the simple atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization technique.

  5. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  6. Atmospheric pressure microwave sample preparation procedure for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and kjeldahl nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, L W; Chalk, S J; Kingston, H M

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave digestion method has been developed for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and Kjeldahl nitrogen in complex matrices. In comparison to the digestion steps in EPA Methods 365.4 (total phosphorus) and 351.x (Kjeldahl nitrogen), this method requires less time, eliminates the need for a catalyst, and reduces the toxicity of the waste significantly. It employs a microwave-assisted digestion step, using refluxing borosilicate glass vessels at atmospheric pressure. Traditionally, this method has a time-consuming sample preparation step and generates toxic waste through the use of heavy metal catalysts. These advantages are gained by the combination of a high boiling point acid (sulfuric acid) and the application of focused microwave irradiation, which enhances the digestion process by direct energy coupling. NIST standard reference materials 1572 (citrus leaves), 1577a (bovine liver), and 1566 (oyster tissue) and tryptophan were analyzed to validate the method. Phosphorus concentrations were determined by the colorimetric ascorbic acid method outlined in EPA Method 365.3. Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were determined using EPA Method 351.1. The results of the analyses showed good precision and are in excellent agreement with the NIST published values for both elements.

  7. Novel focal point multipass cell for absorption spectroscopy on small sized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Jörn; Hänel, Mattis; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    A novel focal point multipass cell (FPMPC) was developed, in which all laser beams propagate through a common focal point. It is exclusively constructed from standard optical elements. Main functional elements are two 90∘ off-axis parabolic mirrors and two retroreflectors. Up to 17 laser passes are demonstrated with a near-infrared laser beam. The number of laser passes is precisely adjustable by changing the retroreflector distance. At the focal point beams are constricted to fit through an aperture of 0.8 mm. This is shown for 11 beam passes. Moreover, the fast temporal response of the cell permits investigation of transient processes with frequencies up to 10 MHz. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the FPMPC for atmospheric pressure plasma jets, laser absorption spectroscopy on the lowest excited argon state (1s5) was performed on a 1 MHz argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. From the obtained optical depth profiles, the signal-to-noise ratio was deduced. It is shown that an elevation of the laser pass number results in an proportional increase of the signal-to-noise ratio making the FPMPC an appropriate tool for absorption spectroscopy on plasmas of small dimensions.

  8. Controlling the nitric and nitrous oxide production of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douat, Claire; Hubner, Simon; Engeln, Richard; Benedikt, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are non-thermal plasmas and have the ability to create reactive species. These features make it a very attractive tool for biomedical applications. In this work, we studied NO and N2O production, which are two species having biomedical properties. NO plays a role in the vascularization and in ulcer treatment, while N2O is used as anesthetic and analgesic gas. In this study, the plasma source is similar to the COST Reference Microplasma Jet (µ-APPJ). Helium is used as feed gas with small admixtures of molecular nitrogen and oxygen of below 1%. The absolute densities of NO and N2O were measured in the effluent of an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet by means of ex-situ quantum-cascade laser absorption spectroscopy via a multi-pass cell in Herriot configuration. We will show that the species' production is dependent on several parameters such as power, flow and oxygen and nitrogen admixture. The NO and N2O densities are strongly dependent on the N2-O2 ratio. Changing this ratio allows for choosing between a NO-rich or a N2O-rich regime.

  9. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  10. Surface modification of tube inner wall by transferred atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Faze; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Jiyu; Huang, Shuai; Xia, Guangqing; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin

    2016-12-01

    Tubes are indispensable in our daily life, mechanical engineering and biomedical fields. However, the practical applications of tubes are sometimes limited by their poor wettability. Reported herein is hydrophilization of the tube inner wall by transferred atmospheric pressure plasma (TAPP). An Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to induce He TAPP inside polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube to perform inner wall surface modification. Optical emission spectrum (OES) is used to investigate the distribution of active species, which are known as enablers for surface modification, along the TAPP. Tubes' surface properties demonstrate that after TAPP treatment, the wettability of the tube inner wall is well improved due to the decrease of surface roughness, the removal of surface fluorine and introduction of oxygen. Notably, a deep surface modification can significantly retard the aging of the obtained hydrophilicity. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of TAPP for surface modification of the inner wall of tube or other hollow bodies, and thus a uniform, effective and long-lasting surface modification of tube with any length can be easily realized by moving the tube along its axis.

  11. Effects of a Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet on Human Gingival Fibroblasts for Biomedical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) have been developed and applied in biomedical research as a cancer treatment or bacterial sterilization. However, the drawback of APPJ on normal oral cells during plasma treatment and underlying cell death mechanisms have not been studied and clearly explained, although there is known to be an influence from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, this study investigates whether and how a nonthermal atmospheric pressure air plasma jet kills human normal gingival cells using immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (hTERT-hNOF cells). In this study, a set of physicochemical or biological methods were used to illuminate the killing mechanisms. It was found that ROS were induced intracellularly without a breakdown of the cell wall and apoptosis was involved in cell death when an air APPJ treatment was performed on the cells directly without media; the air treatment only supported a detachment of the cells without increase of ROS. It was also revealed that a correlation between intracellular ROS concentration and cells viability existed. These results indicated that the direct air APPJ treatment possibly raises safety issue to normal tissue and thereby APPJ application in biomedical field needs more in vitro and in vivo study to optimize it.

  12. Crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films prepared using atmospheric pressure plasma annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong-Ying, E-mail: hychen@cc.kuas.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chiken Kuang Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Yu-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chiken Kuang Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Jiann-Shing [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University, 4-18 Minsheng Road, Pingtung City 900, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films were formed at atmospheric pressure plasma with N{sub 2}–(5–10)%O{sub 2}. • The binding energy of Cu-2p spectrum of the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films was 932.3 eV (Cu{sup +}). • The binding energies of Mn-3p spectrum were 48.1 ± 0.2 eV (Mn{sup 3+}) and 50.0 ± 0.2 eV (Mn{sup 4+}). • The cation distribution in the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films was Cu{sub 1.0}{sup +}(Mn{sub 0.6}{sup 3+}Mn{sub 0.4}{sup 4+})O{sub 2}. • The electrical conductivity of CuMnO{sub 2} thin films was (2.61–2.65) × 10{sup 4} Ω cm. - Abstract: This study reports the preparation of crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films using atmospheric pressure plasma annealing. The pristine thin films were deposited onto a quartz substrate using the sol–gel process. The specimens were then annealed using atmospheric pressure plasma at N{sub 2}–(0–20%)O{sub 2} for 20 min. Crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films were obtained using atmospheric pressure plasma annealing at N{sub 2}–5%O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}–10%O{sub 2}. The lattice parameters of the thin films were a = 0.5574–0.5580 nm, b = 0.2874–0.2879 nm, c = 0.5878–0.5881 nm, and β = 104.15–104.25°, which agree well with previous reports. The Raman shifts of the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films were 688 ± 2 cm{sup −1}, 381 ± 2 cm{sup −1}, and 314 ± 2 cm{sup −1}. The binding energy of Cu-2p spectrum of the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin films was 932.3 ± 0.2 eV representing the Cu{sup +} in the thin films. The binding energies of Mn-3p spectrum were 48.1 ± 0.2 eV (Mn{sup 3+}) and 50.0 ± 0.2 eV (Mn{sup 4+}). Furthermore, the cation distribution in the thin films was Cu{sup +}{sub 1.0}(Mn{sup 3+}{sub 0.6}Mn{sup 4+}{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. When the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} phase was formed, the surface morphology exhibited a compact/dense granular morphology. The optical bandgap of the crednerite-CuMnO{sub 2} thin

  13. The annual pressure cycle on Mars: Results from the LMD Martian atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdin, Frederic; Forget, Francois; Talagrand, O.

    1993-01-01

    We have been developing a General Circulation Model (GCM) of the martian atmosphere since 1989. The model has been described rather extensively elsewhere and only the main characteristics are given here. The dynamical part of the model, adapted from the LMD terrestrial climate model, is based on a finite-difference formulation of the classical 'primitive equations of meteorology.' The radiative transfer code includes absorption and emission by CO2 (carefully validated by comparison to line-by-line calculations) and dust in the thermal range and absorption and scattering by dust in the visible range. Other physical parameterizations are included: modeling of vertical turbulent mixing, dry convective adjustment (in order to prevent vertical unstable temperature profiles), and a multilayer model of the thermal conduction in the soil. Finally, the condensation-sublimation of CO2 is introduced through specification of a pressure-dependent condensation temperature. The atmospheric and surface temperatures are prevented from falling below this critical temperature by condensation and direct precipitation onto the surface of atmospheric CO2. The only prespecified spatial fields are the surface thermal inertia, albedo, and topography.

  14. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Makarieva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in the lower atmosphere. This decline occurs up to a certain height, which ranges from 3 to 4 km for surface temperatures from 10 to 30 °C. We then estimate the horizontal pressure differences associated with water vapor condensation and find that these are comparable in magnitude with the pressure differences driving observed circulation patterns. The water vapor delivered to the atmosphere via evaporation represents a store of potential energy available to accelerate air and thus drive winds. Our estimates suggest that the global mean power at which this potential energy is released by condensation is around one per cent of the global solar power – this is similar to the known stationary dissipative power of general atmospheric circulation. We conclude that condensation and evaporation merit attention as major, if previously overlooked, factors in driving atmospheric dynamics.

  15. The critical assessment of vapour pressure estimation methods for use in modelling the formation of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Barley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A selection of models for estimating vapour pressures have been tested against experimental data for a set of compounds selected for their particular relevance to the formation of atmospheric aerosol by gas-liquid partitioning. The experimental vapour pressure data (all <100 Pa of 45 multifunctional compounds provide a stringent test of the estimation techniques, with a recent complex group contribution method providing the best overall results. The effect of errors in vapour pressures upon the formation of organic aerosol by gas-liquid partitioning in an atmospherically relevant example is also investigated. The mass of organic aerosol formed under typical atmospheric conditions was found to be very sensitive to the variation in vapour pressure values typically present when comparing estimation methods.

  16. Characteristics of meter-scale surface electrical discharge propagating along water surface at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Petr; Sugiyama, Yuki; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Akiyama, Hidenori; Lukes, Petr; Akiyama, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports physical characteristics of water surface discharges. Discharges were produced by metal needle-to-water surface geometry, with the needle electrode driven by 47 kV (FWHM) positive voltage pulses of 2 µs duration. Propagation of discharges along the water surface was confined between glass plates with 2 mm separation. This allowed generation of highly reproducible 634 mm-long plasma filaments. Experiments were performed using different atmospheres: air, N2, and O2, each at atmospheric pressure. Time- and spatially-resolved spectroscopic measurements revealed that early spectra of discharges in air and nitrogen atmospheres were dominated by N2 2nd positive system. N2 radiation disappeared after approx. 150 ns, replaced by emissions from atomic hydrogen. Spectra of discharges in O2 atmosphere were dominated by emissions from atomic oxygen. Time- and spatially-resolved emission spectra were used to determine temperatures in plasma. Atomic hydrogen emissions showed excitation temperature of discharges in air to be about 2  ×  104 K. Electron number densities determined by Stark broadening of the hydrogen H β line reached a maximum value of ~1018 cm-3 just after plasma initiation. Electron number densities and temperatures depended only slightly on distance from needle electrode, indicating formation of high conductivity leader channels. Direct observation of discharges by high speed camera showed that the average leader head propagation speed was 412 km · s-1, which is substantially higher value than that observed in experiments with shorter streamers driven by lower voltages.

  17. The Relationship of the MOLA Topography of Mars to the Mean Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    1999-01-01

    The MOLA topography of Mars is based on a new mean radius of the planet and new equipotential surface for the areoid. The mean atmospheric pressure surface of 6.1mbars that has been used in the past as a reference level for topography does not apply to the zero level of MOLA elevations. The MOLA mean radius of the planet is 3389508 meters and the mean equatorial radius is 339600 meters. The areoid of the zero level of the MOLA altimetry is defined to be the potential surface with the same potential as the mean equatorial radius. The MOLA topography differs from the USGS digital elevation data by approximately 1.6 km, with MOLA higher. The average pressure on the MOLA reference surface for Ls =0 is approximately 5.1 mbars and has been derived from occultation data obtained from the tracking of Viking, Mariner, and MGS spacecraft and interpolated with the aid of the Ames Mars GCM. The new topography and the new occultation data are providing a more reliable relationship between elevation and surface pressure.

  18. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  19. Radial profile measurements of plasma pressure-like fluctuations with the heavy ion beam diagnostic on the tokamak ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, R. B., E-mail: rhenriques@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Coelho, R.; Figueiredo, H.; Fernandes, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    The Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic (HIBD) on the tokamak ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Técnico TOKamak) has been modified, in terms of signal conditioning, to measure the local fluctuations of the n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) product (plasma density times the effective ionization cross-section) along the tokamak minor diameter, in 12 sample volumes in the range of −0.7a < r < 0.7a, with a maximum delay time of 1 μs. The corresponding signals show high correlation with the magnetic Mirnov coils in the characteristic MHD frequency range of ISTTOK plasmas and enable the identification of tearing modes. This paper describes the HIBD signal conditioning system and presents a preliminary analysis of the radial profile measurements of local n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) fluctuations.

  20. Application of the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis method to the trajectory of the centre of pressure of the human body; Aplicacion del metodo Detrended Fluctuation Analysis a la trayectoria del centro de presion del cuerpo humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez, M. T.; Anguiano, M.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Lallena, A. M.; Carpena, P.

    2009-07-01

    The Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is a signal analyzing method which permits to study the correlation properties of the signal analyzed. This algorithm admits different variants which can be used to eliminate trends of different order existing in the signal. In this work we show the results obtained when two of these different variants, the so-called DFA-1 and DFA-2, are applied to the time series of the position and velocity of the centre of pressure of the human body in static conditions. The results show that the correlation exponents {alpha} obtained for each of the four types of analysis performed, depend on the scale studied. For the scales corresponding to large time intervals (above 35 s) the {alpha} values found in the four analyses coincide. (Author) 24 refs.