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Sample records for atmospheric pressure chemical

  1. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-04-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  2. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred P M

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Applications of a versatile technique for trace analysis: atmospheric pressure negative chemical ionization.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, B A; Davidson, W R; Lovett, A M

    1980-01-01

    The ability to use ambient air as a carrier and reagent gas in an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source allows instantaneous air analysis to be combined with hypersensitivity toward a wide variety of compounds. The TAGA (Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyser) is an instrument which is designed to use both positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for trace gas analysis; this paper describes several applications of negative APCI which demonstrates that the techni...

  4. Laser induced chemical vapour deposition of TiN coatings at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Croonen, Y.; Verspui, G.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced Chemical Vapour Deposition of a wide variety of materials has been studied extensively at reduced pressures. However, for this technique to be economically and industrially applicable, processes at atmospheric pressure are preferred. A model study was made on the substrate-coating system molybdenum-titaniumnitride focussing on the feasibility to deposit TiN films locally at atmospheric pressure. The results of this study turned out to be very promising. A Nd-YAG laser beam ([MAT...

  5. Characterization of typical chemical background interferences in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P.; Covey, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and origins of typical chemical background noise ions in positive atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (API LC/MS) are investigated and summarized in this study. This was done by classifying chemical background ions using precursor and product ion sc

  6. Comparison of electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization for a lipidomic analysis of Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, Laurent; Gaudin, Mathieu; Libong, Danielle; Touboul, David; Abreu, Sonia; Loiseau, Philippe M; Laprévote, Olivier; Chaminade, Pierre

    2012-06-15

    A comparison of electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for the analysis of a wide range of lipids has been performed on standard mixtures and extracts of Leishmania donovani promastigotes resistant to Amphotericin B (AmB). Calibration model, precision, limits of detection and quantification (LOD and LOQ) were assessed for each source. APPI provided the highest signal, signal-to-noise (S/N), and sensitivity for non-polar and low-polarity lipids, while ESI and APCI gave better results for the most polar ones. The linear model was valid for all lipids, except for one class with APPI, six classes with ESI, and eleven classes with APCI. LODs ranged from 0.2 to 20 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.1 to 10 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.02 to 9.5 μg mL(-1) for APPI. LOQs ranged from 0.2 to 61 μg mL(-1) for ESI, from 0.4 to 31 μg mL(-1) for APCI, and from 0.1 to 29 μg mL(-1) for APPI. Each source provided similar lipid composition and variations in a comparison of three different L. donovani samples: miltefosine-treated, miltefosine-resistant and treated miltefosine-resistant parasites. A treated miltefosine-resistant sample was finally analyzed with each ion source in order to verify that the same lipid molecular species are detected. PMID:22560453

  7. Real-Time Flavor Release from French Fries Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burgering, M.J.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Flavor release from French fries was measured with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using both assessors (in vivo) and a mouth model system (in vitro). Several volatiles measured with APCI were identified with MS-MS. The effect of frying time, salt addition, and a

  8. Analysis of insect triacylglycerols using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kofroňová, Edita; Cvačka, Josef; Jiroš, Pavel; Sýkora, D.; Valterová, Irena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 5 (2009), s. 519-525. ISSN 1438-7697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055403; GA MŠk 2B06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : atmospheric pressure chemical ionization * bumblebees * fat body * NARP-HPLC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.831, year: 2009

  9. Surface chemical changes of atmospheric pressure plasma treated rabbit fibres important for felting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánová, Vlasta; Slavíček, Pavel; Stupavská, Monika; Jurmanová, Jana; Černák, Mirko

    2015-11-01

    We introduce the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment as a suitable procedure for in-line industrial application of rabbit fibres pre-treatment. Changes of rabbit fibre properties due to the plasma treatment were studied in order to develop new technology of plasma-based treatment before felting. Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) in ambient air at atmospheric pressure was used for plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy was used for determination of the fibres morphology before and after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used for evaluation of reactive groups. The concentration of carbon decreased and conversely the concentration of nitrogen and oxygen increased after plasma treatment. Aging effect of plasma treated fibres was also investigated. Using Washburn method the significant increase of fibres wettability was observed after plasma treatment. New approach of pre-treatment of fibres before felting using plasma was developed. Plasma treatment of fibres at atmospheric pressure can replace the chemical method which consists of application of strong acids on fibres.

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H2O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF2. • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of zinc oxide and aluminum zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kyle W. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Sailer, Robert A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Ahrenkiel, S. Phillip [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Schulz, Douglas L., E-mail: SBRconsulting@hotmail.com [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States)

    2013-12-02

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited via atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A second-generation precursor, bis(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato)(N,N′-diethylethylenediamine) zinc, exhibited significant vapor pressure and good stability at one atmosphere where a vaporization temperature of 110 °C gave flux ∼ 7 μmol/min. Auger electron spectroscopy confirmed that addition of H{sub 2}O to the carrier gas stream mitigated F contamination giving nearly 1:1 metal:oxide stoichiometries for both ZnO and AZO with little precursor-derived C contamination. ZnO and AZO thin film resistivities ranged from 14 to 28 Ω·cm for the former and 1.1 to 2.7 Ω·cm for the latter. - Highlights: • A second generation precursor was utilized for atmospheric pressure film growth. • Addition of water vapor to the carrier gas stream led to a marked reduction of ZnF{sub 2}. • Carbonaceous contamination from the precursor was minimal.

  12. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe—reactor design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Peter V.; Kee, Robert J.; Raja, Laxminarayan; Wolden, Colin A.; Aire, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of polycrystalline thin-film CdTe appears to offer several practical advantages over state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques. APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry utilized to produce 16% efficient CdTe cells (i.e., same reaction chemistry as Close Spaced Sublimation), avoids use of vacuum equipment, allows for physical separation of the source and substrate, and employs forced convection to ensure uniform delivery of source material over large-area substrates. Reactor design considerations and preliminary numerical simulations of mass transport are presented.

  13. Determination of sulfonamides in meat by liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS) has been used for the determination of sulfonamides in meat. Five typical sulfonamides were selected as target compounds, and beef meat was selected as a matrix sample. As internal standards, sulfapyridine and isotope labeled sulfamethazine (13C6-SMZ) were used. Compared to the results of recent reports, our results have shown improved precision to a RSD of 1.8% for the determination of sulfamethazine spiked with 75 ng/g level in meat

  14. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of electrochromic organonickel oxide thin films with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of electrochromic organonickel oxide (NiOxCy) films onto glass/indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates using atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under various precursor injection angles is investigated. A precursor [nickelocene, Ni(C5H5)2] vapor, carried by argon gas and mixed with oxygen gas, is injected into an air plasma torch for the deposition of NiOxCy films by a short exposure of the substrate, 20 s, in the plasma. Uniform light modulation on glass/ITO/NiOxCy is produced while the moving glass/ITO substrate is exposed to the plasma torch at room temperature (∼ 23 °C) and under atmospheric pressure. Light modulation with up to a 40.9% transmittance variation at a wavelength of 513.9 nm under Li+ intercalation and de-intercalation in a 1 M LiClO4–propylene carbonate electrolyte is achieved. - Highlights: ► Rapid deposition of electrochromic NiOxCy film by atmospheric pressure plasma jet ► Uniform light modulation on NiOxCy film is produced. ► Nano-grains in NiOxCy films offer fast coloration and bleaching

  15. Chemical pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Andreas; Amstutz, Nahid; Delahaye, Sandra; Sadki, Asmaâ; Schenker, Sabine; Sieber, Regula; Zerara, Mohamed

    2002-01-01

    The physical and photophysical properties of three classic transition metal complexes, namely [Fe(bpy)3]2+, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, and [Co(bpy)3]2+, can be tuned by doping them into a variety of inert crystalline host lattices. The underlying guest-host interactions are discussed in terms of a chemical pressure.

  16. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis due to its high heat and mass transfer efficiency and well-controlled flow parameters. Experimental studies of CVD microreactor technology are slow and expensive. Analytical solution of the governing equations is impossible due to the complexity of intertwined non-linear physical and chemical processes. Computer simulation is the most effective tool for design and optimization of microreactors. Our computational fluid dynamics model employs mass, momentum and energy balance equations for a laminar transient flow of a chemically reacting gas mixture at low Reynolds number. Simulation results show the influence of microreactor configuration and process parameters on SiO2 deposition rate and uniformity. We simulated three microreactors with the central channel diameter of 5, 10, 20 micrometers, varying gas flow rate in the range of 5-100 microliters per hour and temperature in the range of 300-800 °C. For each microchannel diameter we found an optimal set of process parameters providing the best quality of deposited material. The model will be used for optimization of the microreactor configuration and technological parameters to facilitate the experimental stage of this research

  17. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deelen, J. van, E-mail: joop.vandeelen@tno.nl [TNO, Department of Thin Film Technology, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands); Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A. [TNO, Department of Thin Film Technology, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands); Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A. [Celsian, De Rondom 1, 5612 AP Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-03-31

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction kinetics were studied and detailed process modeling based on a reaction mechanism that includes the formation of an alkylzinc alkoxide intermediate product is discussed. This mechanism can explain the temperature dependent variety in deposition profiles observed in the static deposition experiments. The capability of modeling to gain insight in the local process conditions inside a reactor is demonstrated. - Highlights: • ZnO deposition at high rates of 800 nm/min • Modeling based on two step mechanism gives good fit. • Modeling gives insight in the inside of the reactor. • Modeling can even predict static deposition profiles.

  18. Deposition of indium tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO) by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD). This process is potentially scalable for high throughput, large area production. We utilised a previously unreported precursor combination; dimethylindium acetylacetonate, [Me2In(acac)] and monobutyltintrichloride, MBTC. [Me2In(acac)] is a volatile solid. It is more stable and easier to handle than traditional indium oxide precursors such as pyrophoric trialkylindium compounds. Monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) is also easily handled and can be readily vaporised. It is compatible with the process conditions required for using [Me2In(acac)]. Cubic ITO was deposited at a substrate temperature of 550 °C with growth rates exceeding 15 nm/s and growth efficiencies of between 20 and 30%. Resistivity was 3.5 × 10−4 Ω cm and transmission for a 200 nm film was > 85% with less than 2% haze.

  19. Deposition of fluorine doped indium oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the deposition of fluorine doped indium oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) using a previously unreported precursor combination; dimethylindium acetylacetonate, [Me2In(acac)] and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). This process is potentially scalable for high throughput, large area production. [Me2In(acac)] is a volatile solid. It is more stable and easier to handle than traditional indium oxide precursors such as pyrophoric trialkylindium compounds. Cubic fluorine doped indium oxide (F.In2O3) was deposited at a substrate temperature of 550 °C with growth rates exceeding 8 nm/s. Resistivity was 8 × 10−4 Ω cm and transmission for a 200 nm film was > 80% with less than 1% haze.

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction kinetics were studied and detailed process modeling based on a reaction mechanism that includes the formation of an alkylzinc alkoxide intermediate product is discussed. This mechanism can explain the temperature dependent variety in deposition profiles observed in the static deposition experiments. The capability of modeling to gain insight in the local process conditions inside a reactor is demonstrated. - Highlights: • ZnO deposition at high rates of 800 nm/min • Modeling based on two step mechanism gives good fit. • Modeling gives insight in the inside of the reactor. • Modeling can even predict static deposition profiles

  1. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm−1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm

  2. Chemical and Physical Effects of the Carrier Gas on the Atmospheric Pressure PECVD of Fluorinated Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Hubert, Julie; Mertens, Jérémy; Viville, Pascal; Dufour, Thierry; Barroo, Cédric; de Bocarmé, Thierry Visart; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure PECVD deposition and texturization of hydrophobic coatings using liquid fluorinated C6F12 and C6F14 precursors are investigated. The effect of the carrier gas (argon and helium) is discussed in terms of the behavior of the gas phase and of the characteristics of the deposited film. Mass spectrom-etry measurements indicate that the fragmentation is higher with argon while helium reacts very easily with oxygen impurities leading to the formation of CxFyOz compounds. These observations are consistent with the chemical composition of the films determined by XPS and the variation in the deposition rate. Moreover, the streamers present in the argon discharge affect the morphology of the surface by increasing the roughness, which leads to the increase in the hydrophobicity of the coatings.

  3. Tracing origins of complex pharmaceutical preparations using surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinglei; Jia, Bin; Huang, Keke; Hu, Bin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Huanwen

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy to trace the origins of commercial pharmaceutical products has been developed based on the direct chemical profiling of the pharmaceutical products by surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS). Besides the unambiguous identification of active drug components, various compounds present in the matrixes are simultaneously detected without sample pretreatment, providing valuable information for drug quality control and origin differentiation. Four sources of commercial amoxicillin products made by different manufacturers have been successfully differentiated. This strategy has been extended to secerning six sources of Liuwei Dihuang Teapills, which are herbal medicine preparations with extremely complex matrixes. The photolysis status of chemical drug products and the inferior natural herd medicine products prepared with different processes (e.g., extra heating) were also screened using the method reported here. The limit of detection achieved in the MS/MS experiments was estimated to be 1 ng/g for amoxicillin inside the capsule product. Our experimental data demonstrate that DAPCI-MS is a useful tool for rapid pharmaceutical analysis, showing promising perspectives for tracking the entire pharmaceutical supply chain to prevent counterfeit intrusions. PMID:20809628

  4. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (plasma irradiation, and the high transfection efficiency of 53% is realized together with the high cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  6. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet

  7. Gas chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Luosujärvi, Laura; Haapala, Markus; Grigoras, Kestas; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Franssila, Sami; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-05-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) microchip is presented for combining a gas chromatograph (GC) to a mass spectrometer (MS). The chip includes capillary insertion channel, stopper, vaporizer channel, nozzle and nebulizer gas inlet fabricated on the silicon wafer, and a platinum heater sputtered on a glass wafer. These two wafers are joined by anodic bonding creating a two-dimensional version of an APCI microchip. The sample from GC is directed via heated transfer line capillary to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle forms narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona discharge needle, and the ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The GC-microchip APCI-MS combination provides an efficient method for qualitative and quantitative analysis. The spectra produced by microchip APCI show intensive protonated molecule and some fragmentation products as in classical chemical ionization for structure elucidation. In quantitative analysis the GC-microchip APCI-MS showed good linearity (r(2) = 0.9989) and repeatability (relative standard deviation 4.4%). The limits of detection with signal-to-noise ratio of three were between 0.5 and 2 micromol/L with MS mode using selected ion monitoring and 0.05 micromol/L with MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring. PMID:16642989

  8. Determination of kava lactones in food supplements by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Spies-Faber, E.J.; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography and detection with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation tandem mass spectrometry was used for the determination of kava extracts in herbal mixtures. One percent of kava extract can be detected, corresponding to approximately 0.05-0.2 mg/g of the individual ka

  9. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  10. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  11. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of titanium dioxide films from TiCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique to deposit titanium oxide films on silicon wafers. The growth is achieved by using TiCl·H2O2 and O2 at temperatures ranging from 140 to 280 deg. C. Addition of H2O2 yields a significant reduction in the surface roughness with an enhanced deposition rate at temperatures as low as 170 deg. C. Growth at temperatures below 140 deg. C results in insignificant growth whereas at high temperatures a hazy and three-dimensional growth is observed. Using this technique a growth rate as high as 0.5 μm/h can be obtained with little roughness on the surface of the substrate. XRD, SEM, and FTIR analyses have been exploited to study the physical behavior of the layers. The electrical characterization of the films reveals a relative permittivity (εr) of 19-21 for the samples prepared with H2O2. A breakdown field of 1x107 V/cm is also obtained

  12. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Fingerprinting the Macondo Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Maksimova, Ekaterina V; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2016-07-01

    We report the first application of a new mass spectrometry technique (gas chromatography combined to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry, GC/APCI-MS/MS) for fingerprinting a crude oil and environmental samples from the largest accidental marine oil spill in history (the Macondo oil spill, the Gulf of Mexico, 2010). The fingerprinting of the oil spill is based on a trace analysis of petroleum biomarkers (steranes, diasteranes, and pentacyclic triterpanes) naturally occurring in crude oil. GC/APCI enables soft ionization of petroleum compounds that form abundant molecular ions without (or little) fragmentation. The ability to operate the instrument simultaneously in several tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) modes (e.g., full scan, product ion scan, reaction monitoring) significantly improves structural information content and sensitivity of analysis. For fingerprinting the oil spill, we constructed diagrams and conducted correlation studies that measure the similarity between environmental samples and enable us to differentiate the Macondo oil spill from other sources. PMID:27281271

  13. Structural properties of zinc oxide deposited using atmospheric pressure combustion chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the deposition of thin zinc oxide (ZnO) films under atmospheric pressure conditions was investigated. The deposition technique applied was combustion chemical vapour deposition (CCVD), at which a propane–air mixture was combusted in a burner. Dissolved zinc nitrate was used as precursor, which was guided as aerosol droplets by the processing gas flow directly into the reaction zone. Fundamental investigations were performed to form undoped ZnO. The structural properties of the films were analysed in dependence of the substrate temperature during the coating process. The presence of crystalline ZnO structures was proved and differences in film growth and crystallite sizes are revealed. Additionally, the particles generated by the CCVD-flame are characterised. The thin films showed a slight excess of Zn and several states of binding energy could be observed by fitting the core level spectra. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy also indicated ordered structures and additionally different orientations of crystallites were observed. - Highlights: • Columnar growth structures of ZnO by CCVD were observed. • The presence of polycrystalline ZnO with (002) as main orientation was confirmed. • Initial particles significantly differ from crystallite sizes of the resulting films. • The films show an excess of Zn with a Zn-to-O ratio of around 1.7

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Inactivation of virus in solution by cold atmospheric pressure plasma: identification of chemical inactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; Gangal, Urvashi; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) inactivates bacteria and virus through in situ production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). While the bactericidal and virucidal efficiency of plasmas is well established, there is limited knowledge about the chemistry leading to the pathogen inactivation. This article describes a chemical analysis of the CAP reactive chemistry involved in the inactivation of feline calicivirus. We used a remote radio frequency CAP produced in varying gas mixtures leading to different plasma-induced chemistries. A study of the effects of selected scavengers complemented with positive control measurements of relevant RONS reveal two distinctive pathways based on singlet oxygen and peroxynitrous acid. The first mechanism is favored in the presence of oxygen and the second in the presence of air when a significant pH reduction is induced in the solution by the plasma. Additionally, smaller effects of the H2O2, O3 and \\text{NO}2- produced were also found. Identification of singlet oxygen-mediated 2-imidazolone/2-oxo-His (His  +14 Da)—an oxidative modification of His 262 comprising the capsid protein of feline calicivirus links the plasma induced singlet oxygen chemistry to viral inactivation.

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of explosives using alternating current corona discharge ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, D T; Chen, L C; Yu, Z; Yamabe, S; Sakaki, S; Hiraoka, K

    2015-04-01

    The high-sensitive detection of explosives is of great importance for social security and safety. In this work, the ion source for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry using alternating current corona discharge was newly designed for the analysis of explosives. An electromolded fine capillary with 115 µm inner diameter and 12 mm long was used for the inlet of the mass spectrometer. The flow rate of air through this capillary was 41 ml/min. Stable corona discharge could be maintained with the position of the discharge needle tip as close as 1 mm to the inlet capillary without causing the arc discharge. Explosives dissolved in 0.5 µl methanol were injected to the ion source. The limits of detection for five explosives with 50 pg or lower were achieved. In the ion/molecule reactions of trinitrotoluene (TNT), the discharge products of NOx (-) (x = 2,3), O3 and HNO3 originating from plasma-excited air were suggested to contribute to the formation of [TNT - H](-) (m/z 226), [TNT - NO](-) (m/z 197) and [TNT - NO + HNO3 ](-) (m/z 260), respectively. Formation processes of these ions were traced by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26149109

  17. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  18. Aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon thin films using liquid cyclic hydrosilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon (Si) thin films were produced using an aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique with liquid hydrosilane precursors cyclopentasilane (CPS, Si5H10) and cyclohexasilane (CHS, Si6H12). Thin films were deposited at temperatures between 300 and 500 °C, with maximum observed deposition rates of 55 and 47 nm/s for CPS and CHS, respectively, at 500 °C. Atomic force microscopic analyses of the films depict smooth surfaces with roughness of 4–8 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis indicates that the Si films deposited at 300 °C and 350 °C consist of a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) phase while the films deposited at 400, 450, and 500 °C are comprised predominantly of a hydrogenated nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) phase. The wide optical bandgaps of 2–2.28 eV for films deposited at 350–400 °C and 1.7–1.8 eV for those deposited at 450–500 °C support the Raman data and depict a transition from a-Si:H to nc-Si:H. Films deposited at 450 oC possess the highest photosensitivity of 102–103 under AM 1.5G illumination. Based on the growth model developed for other silanes, we suggest a mechanism that governs the film growth using CPS and CHS. - Highlights: • Si films via AA-APCVD are realized using cyclopentasilane (CPS) and cyclohexasilane (CHS). • Low activation energies of CPS and CHS allow Si thin films at low temperatures (300 °C). • High growth rates of 47–55 nm/s were obtained at 500 °C • Near device quality Si thin films with 2–3 orders of photosensitivity • Si thin films via AA-APCVD are amenable to continuous roll-to-roll manufacturing

  19. Carrier transport in undoped CdO films grown by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements were performed for the undoped CdO films with carrier concentrations (n) ranging from 2.4 × 1019 to 2.0 × 1020 cm−3 grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by the atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition using Cd powder and H2O as source materials. The n dependence of the optical gap energy (Eopt) could be explained by the combination of the band gap widening due to Burstein–Moss shift and the band gap shrinkages due to the electron–electron and electron–impurity interactions. For all the films, the carrier concentrations (n) were independent of measurement temperature (T), indicating that these films were n-type degenerate semiconductors. The barrier heights at grain boundaries determined from the 1000/T-ln(μT) curves were smaller than the thermal energy at 300 K, suggesting that the grain boundary scattering plays a minor role on the carrier transport in comparison with the intra-grain scattering. The n dependence of the gradient of the μ–T curve revealed the continuous transformation of the dominant intra-grain scattering mechanism from the phonon scattering to the ionized impurity scattering with increasing n. - Highlights: • Undoped CdO films were grown on c- and r-plane sapphire substrates by CVD. • Hall effect measurements were performed for the CdO films at 83–343 K. • For many CdO films, the carrier concentration n was independent of temperature. • The grain boundary scattering plays a minor role in the CdO films. • The dominant intra-grain scattering exhibited the continuous change with n

  20. Conductive zinc oxide thin film coatings by combustion chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a combustion chemical vapour deposition (C-CVD) system for the deposition of zinc oxide (ZnO) at atmospheric pressure. This C-CVD process has the advantage of a short exposure of the substrates to the flame. It is also potentially applicable as an inline coating system. Fundamental studies were performed on undoped ZnO. The specific resistivity of these layers strongly depends on the film thickness and decreases with increasing thickness. As the lowest resistivities, values of about 2.0 · 10−1 Ωcm are achieved. Ultra-violet photoemission spectra show the valence band structure of the deposited ZnO. The work function and valence band edge were determined. UV–vis spectra were taken to investigate the transmission of the coated glass samples. From these spectra the band gap energy was obtained. Raman spectroscopy as well as infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ordered ZnO crystallites. The X-ray diffraction verified this result and illustrates the hexagonal structure. In the mid-infrared range precursor deposits were detected for low substrate temperatures. - Highlights: ► Zinc oxide (ZnO) films are conductive in the range of 2.0 · 10−1 Ωcm. ► X-ray diffraction, Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate crystalline ZnO films. ► Precursor deposits were proved within the films for low growing temperatures. ► Band gap energy changes are achieved due to different growing temperatures

  1. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS. PMID:16804601

  2. On-line characterization of gaseous and particulate organic analytes using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion source is applied for direct analysis of volatile or low volatile organic compounds in air. The method is based on the direct introduction of the analytes in the gas phase and/or particle phase into the ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. Two methods are employed for the production of primary ions at atmospheric pressure, photoionization and corona discharge. It is shown that in the presence of a dopant, photoionization can be a highly efficient ionization method also for real-time analysis with detection limits for selected analytes in the lower ppt-range. Using corona discharge for the production of primary ions, which is instrumentally easier since no additional chemicals have to be added to the sample flow, we demonstrate the analytical potential of on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for reaction monitoring experiments. To do so, an atmospherically relevant gas phase reaction is carried out in a 500 l reaction chamber and gaseous and particulate compounds are monitored in the positive and negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer

  3. Quantitative analysis of adenosine using Liquid Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization - tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS/MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dycke, Annelies; Verstraete, Alain; Pil, Kristof; Raedt, Robrecht; Vonck, Kristl; Boison, Detlev; Boon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine-secreting cellular brain implants constitute a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of epilepsy. To engineer neural stem cells for therapeutic adenosine delivery, a reliable and fast analytical method is necessary to quantify cell-based adenosine release. Here we describe the development, optimization and validation of adenosine measurement using liquid chromatography – atmospheric pressure chemical ionization – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS in posit...

  4. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films for use in architectural glazing

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, C. S.; Piccirillo, C.; Binions, R.; Parkin, I. P.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of VCl4, WCl6 and water at 550 degrees C lead to the production of high quality tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films. Careful control of the gas phase precursors allowed for tungsten doping up to 8 at.%. The transition temperature of the thermochromic switch was tunable in the range 55 degrees C to - 23 degrees C. The films were analysed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spect...

  5. Aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon thin films using liquid cyclic hydrosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guruvenket, Srinivasan, E-mail: guruvenket.srinivasan@ndsu.edu [Center for Nanoscale Energy Related Materials, 1715 NDSU Research Park Drive N, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Hoey, Justin M.; Anderson, Kenneth J.; Frohlich, Matthew T.; Sailer, Robert A. [Center for Nanoscale Energy Related Materials, 1715 NDSU Research Park Drive N, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Boudjouk, Philip [Center for Nanoscale Energy Related Materials, 1715 NDSU Research Park Drive N, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ladd-Dunbar Hall, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    Silicon (Si) thin films were produced using an aerosol assisted atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition technique with liquid hydrosilane precursors cyclopentasilane (CPS, Si{sub 5}H{sub 10}) and cyclohexasilane (CHS, Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}). Thin films were deposited at temperatures between 300 and 500 °C, with maximum observed deposition rates of 55 and 47 nm/s for CPS and CHS, respectively, at 500 °C. Atomic force microscopic analyses of the films depict smooth surfaces with roughness of 4–8 nm. Raman spectroscopic analysis indicates that the Si films deposited at 300 °C and 350 °C consist of a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) phase while the films deposited at 400, 450, and 500 °C are comprised predominantly of a hydrogenated nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si:H) phase. The wide optical bandgaps of 2–2.28 eV for films deposited at 350–400 °C and 1.7–1.8 eV for those deposited at 450–500 °C support the Raman data and depict a transition from a-Si:H to nc-Si:H. Films deposited at 450 {sup o}C possess the highest photosensitivity of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} under AM 1.5G illumination. Based on the growth model developed for other silanes, we suggest a mechanism that governs the film growth using CPS and CHS. - Highlights: • Si films via AA-APCVD are realized using cyclopentasilane (CPS) and cyclohexasilane (CHS). • Low activation energies of CPS and CHS allow Si thin films at low temperatures (300 °C). • High growth rates of 47–55 nm/s were obtained at 500 °C • Near device quality Si thin films with 2–3 orders of photosensitivity • Si thin films via AA-APCVD are amenable to continuous roll-to-roll manufacturing.

  6. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Superconducting MgB2 film prepared by chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure of N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and effective chemical vapor deposition equipment was developed for deposition of superconducting MgB2 thin films. The pure precursor Boron films were prepared in base pressure of low vacuum and deposited in atmospheric pressure. After the precursor film annealed in Mg vapor, the superconducting MgB2 film was fabricated. During the precursor Boron films preparation, N2 and Ar were used as carrier gas. Compared to Ar gas, the films show better crystallization, surface morphology and superconducting performance when N2 is adopted as carrier gas. With flow rate of 200 sccm of N2 gas, the fabricated MgB2 films exhibit the highest superconducting transition temperature of 39.5 K, which is among the best results of MgB2 thin films. This method provides a suitable method to realize high quality MgB2 Josephson junctions and industrial manufacture of MgB2 superconducting thin films on a large scale. - Highlights: • Boron films were deposited in atmospheric pressure. • Boron films deposited in N2 atmosphere have better morphology than that of in Ar. • MgB2 films show better crystallization and superconductivity in N2 atmosphere

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Venu; Nair, Aswathi R.; Shivashankar, S. A.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2015-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  10. Remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of silicon nitride at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nitride films were deposited using an atmospheric pressure plasma source. The discharge was produced by flowing nitrogen and helium through two perforated metal electrodes that were driven by 13.56 MHz radio frequency power. Deposition occurred by mixing the plasma effluent with silane and directing the flow onto a rotating silicon wafer heated to between 100 deg. C and 500 deg. C. Film growth rates ranged from 90±10 to 1300±130 A min-1. Varying the N2/SiH4 feed ratio from 55.0 to 5.5 caused the film stoichiometry to shift from SiN1.45 to SiN1.2. Minimum impurity concentrations of 0.04% carbon, 3.6% oxygen and 13.6% hydrogen were achieved at 500 deg. C, and an N2/SiH4 feed ratio of 22.0. The growth rate increased with increasing silane and nitrogen partial pressures, but was invariant with respect to substrate temperature and rotational speed. The deposition rate also decreased sharply with distance from the plasma. These results combined with emission spectra taken of the afterglow suggest that gas-phase reactions between nitrogen atoms and silane play an important role in this process

  11. Synthesis of multi-layer graphene films on copper tape by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene films were successfully synthesized by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Methane (CH4) gas and copper (Cu) tapes were used as a carbon source and a catalyst, respectively. The CVD temperature and time were in the range of 800–1000 °C and 10 s to 45 min, respectively. The role of the CVD temperature and time on the growth of graphene films was investigated in detail via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The results of SEM images and Raman spectra show that the quality of the graphene films was improved with increasing of CVD temperature due to the increase of catalytic activity. (paper)

  12. Conversion of carbon dioxide to value-added chemicals in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work consists of the evaluation of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for the conversion of greenhouse gases into useful compounds. Therefore, pure CO2 feed flows are administered to the discharge zone at varying discharge frequency, power input, gas temperature and feed flow rates, aiming at the formation of CO and O2. The discharge obtained in CO2 is characterized as a filamentary mode with a microdischarge zone in each half cycle of the applied voltage. It is shown that the most important parameter affecting the CO2-conversion levels is the gas flow rate. At low flow rates, both the conversion and the CO-yield are significantly higher. In addition, also an increase in the gas temperature and the power input give rise to higher conversion levels, although the effect on the CO-yield is limited. The optimum discharge frequency depends on the power input level and it cannot be unambiguously stated that higher frequencies give rise to increased conversion levels. A maximum CO2 conversion of 30% is achieved at a flow rate of 0.05 L min-1, a power density of 14.75 W cm-3 and a frequency of 60 kHz. The most energy efficient conversions are achieved at a flow rate of 0.2 L min-1, a power density of 11 W cm-3 and a discharge frequency of 30 kHz.

  13. Conversion of carbon dioxide to value-added chemicals in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulussen, Sabine; Verheyde, Bert [VITO, Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek, Materials Technology, Mol (Belgium); Tu Xin; Sels, Bert [Center for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium); De Bie, Christophe; Martens, Tom; Petrovic, Dragana; Bogaerts, Annemie, E-mail: sabine.paulussen@vito.b [University of Antwerp, Research Group PLASMANT, Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this work consists of the evaluation of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for the conversion of greenhouse gases into useful compounds. Therefore, pure CO{sub 2} feed flows are administered to the discharge zone at varying discharge frequency, power input, gas temperature and feed flow rates, aiming at the formation of CO and O{sub 2}. The discharge obtained in CO{sub 2} is characterized as a filamentary mode with a microdischarge zone in each half cycle of the applied voltage. It is shown that the most important parameter affecting the CO{sub 2}-conversion levels is the gas flow rate. At low flow rates, both the conversion and the CO-yield are significantly higher. In addition, also an increase in the gas temperature and the power input give rise to higher conversion levels, although the effect on the CO-yield is limited. The optimum discharge frequency depends on the power input level and it cannot be unambiguously stated that higher frequencies give rise to increased conversion levels. A maximum CO{sub 2} conversion of 30% is achieved at a flow rate of 0.05 L min{sup -1}, a power density of 14.75 W cm{sup -3} and a frequency of 60 kHz. The most energy efficient conversions are achieved at a flow rate of 0.2 L min{sup -1}, a power density of 11 W cm{sup -3} and a discharge frequency of 30 kHz.

  14. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment. PMID:26554601

  15. A corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source with selective NO(+) formation and its application for monoaromatic VOC detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2013-11-21

    We have developed a new type of corona discharge (CD) for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) for application in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as well as in mass spectrometry (MS). While the other CD-APCI sources are able to generate H3O(+)·(H2O)n as the major reactant ions in N2 or in zero air, the present CD-APCI source has the ability to generate up to 84% NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions in zero air. The change of the working gas from zero air to N2 allows us to change the major reactant ions from NO(+)·(H2O)n to H3O(+)·(H2O)n. In this paper we present the description of the new CD-APCI and discuss the processes associated with the NO(+) formation. The selective formation of NO(+)·(H2O)n reactant ions offers chemical ionization based on these ions which can be of great advantage for some classes of chemicals. We demonstrate here a significant increase in the sensitivity of the IMS-MS instrument for monoaromatic volatile organic compound (VOC) detection upon NO(+)·(H2O)n chemical ionization. PMID:24081306

  16. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES BY PLASMA ENHANCED CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    OpenAIRE

    Jašek Ondřej; Synek Petr; Zajíčková Lenka; Eliáš Marek; Kudrle Vít

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures present leading field in nanotechnology research. Wide range of chemical and physical methods was used for carbon nanostructures synthesis including arc discharges, laser ablation and chemical vapour deposition. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) with its application in modern microelectronics industry became soon target of research in carbon nanostructures synthesis. The selection of the ideal growth process depends on the application. Most of PECVD tech...

  17. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry: a complementary approach for the chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parshintsev, J.; Vaikkinen, A.; Lipponen, K.; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, R.; Kotiaho, T.; Hartonen, K.; Riekkola, M. L.; Kauppila, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 13 (2015), s. 1233-1241. ISSN 0951-4198 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * mass spectrometry * ambient ionization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.253, year: 2014

  18. Exact Mass Measurements for a-Allenic Alcohol by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization/Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何萍; 郭寅龙; 陈国强; 徐代旺; 麻生明

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/time,of-flight mass speetrmtry (APEI/TOF-MS) was applied to determine the mass of five a.aIIenic alcohols via their vrotonated molecu.lar ions nslna Imsifive ion mode. Polyethylene Idycol (PEG) was used as the hlternal reference. All results were obtained under the resolution of about 5000 FWHM (full width at the half maximum). Solvent effects were studied and the satired results were obtained in acetonitrile. Comvared with the theoreflcal values, nun absolute errors were less thRn 1.0 mmu. The efTeets Of nozzle pote.Jldal, push pulse potential, pug pulse potentlai, puO bias potential and ic(lulsltion rate on exact mass determina/lon were also discussed. APCI/TOF.MS is proven to be a very semi/ire analytical technique and an alternative ionizafion mode in analytical technique lablle compounds with relatively weak polarity, such as a-allenic alcohol.

  19. Comparative analysis of different plant oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Annamaria; Héberger, Károly; Forgács, Esther

    2002-11-01

    Different vegetable oil samples (almond, avocado, corngerm, grapeseed, linseed, olive, peanut, pumpkin seed, soybean, sunflower, walnut, wheatgerm) were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. A gradient elution technique was applied using acetone-acetonitrile eluent systems on an ODS column (Purospher, RP-18e, 125 x 4 mm, 5 microm). Identification of triacylglycerols (TAGs) was based on the pseudomolecular ion [M+1]+ and the diacylglycerol fragments. The positional isomers of triacylglycerol were identified from the relative intensities of the [M-RCO2]+ fragments. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a common multivariate mathematical-statistical calculation was successfully used to distinguish the oils based on their TAG composition. LDA showed that 97.6% of the samples were classified correctly. PMID:12462617

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films for use in architectural glazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of VCl4, WCl6 and water at 550 oC lead to the production of high quality tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films. Careful control of the gas phase precursors allowed for tungsten doping up to 8 at.%. The transition temperature of the thermochromic switch was tunable in the range 55 oC to - 23 oC. The films were analysed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Their optical properties were examined using variable-temperature transmission and reflectance spectroscopy. It was found that incorporation of tungsten into the films led to an improvement in the colour from yellow/brown to green/blue depending on the level of tungsten incorporation. The films were optimized for optical transmission, thermochromic switching temperature, magnitude of the switching behaviour and colour to produce films that are suitable for use as an energy saving environmental glass product.

  1. Structural and Luminescent Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guo-Liang; LIN Bi-Xia; HONG Liang; MENG Xiang-Dong; FU Zhu-Xi

    2004-01-01

    ZnO thin films were successfully deposited on Si (100) substrates by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) at atmospheric pressure (1 atm). The only solid source used here is zinc acetate, (CHsCOO)2Zn, and the carrier gas is nitrogen. The sample, which was prepared at 550℃ during growth and then annealed in air at 900℃ , has only a ZnO (002) diffraction peak at 34.6° with its FWHM of 0.23° in the XRD pattern. The room-temperature PL spectrum shows a strong ultraviolet emission with the peak centred at 380nm. We analysed the effects of many factors, such as the source, substrates, growth and annealing temperatures, and annealing ambience, on the structural and optical properties of our prepared ZnO films.

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of NbSe2-TiSe2 composite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of titanium tetrachloride and niobium pentachloride with di-tert-butyl selenide at 550 deg. C was investigated for different precursors' flow rates. Scanning electron microscopy of the films showed that they were composed of two different kinds of plate-like crystallites. Point wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) analyses of the crystallites revealed that they either had the NbSe2 or the TiSe2 composition. The presence of the two phases was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the calculated cell parameters indicate that niobium or titanium was not incorporated into each others' lattice. WDX and XRD analyses highlighted how the NbSe2:TiSe2 ratio in the composite films could be controlled by precursor flow rate.

  3. Secondary ionization of chemical warfare agent simulants: atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; Clowers, Brian H; Haigh, Paul E; Hill, Herbert H

    2003-11-15

    For the first time, the use of a traditional ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry (radioactive nickel ((63)Ni) beta emission ionization) and three alternative ionization sources (electrospray ionization (ESI), secondary electrospray ionization (SESI), and electrical discharge (corona) ionization (CI)) were employed with an atmospheric pressure ion mobility orthogonal reflector time-of-flight mass spectrometer (IM(tof)MS) to detect chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants from both aqueous- and gas-phase samples. For liquid-phase samples, ESI was used as the sample introduction and ionization method. For the secondary ionization (SESI, CI, and traditional (63)Ni ionization) of vapor-phase samples, two modes of sample volatilization (heated capillary and thermal desorption chamber) were investigated. Simulant reference materials, which closely mimic the characteristic chemical structures of CWA as defined and described by Schedule 1, 2, or 3 of the Chemical Warfare Convention treaty verification, were used in this study. A mixture of four G/V-type nerve simulants (dimethyl methylphosphonate, pinacolyl methylphosphonate, diethyl phosphoramidate, and 2-(butylamino)ethanethiol) and one S-type vesicant simulant (2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide) were found in each case (sample ionization and introduction methods) to be clearly resolved using the IM(tof)MS method. In many cases, reduced mobility constants (K(o)) were determined for the first time. Ion mobility drift times, flight times, relative signal intensities, and fragmentation product signatures for each of the CWA simulants are reported for each of the methods investigated. PMID:14615983

  4. Properties of alumina films by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thin alumina films were deposited at low temperatures (290–420°C) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The deposition process was carried out in nitrogen by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using aluminum tri-sec-butoxide. The film properties including the protection of the underlying substrat

  5. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As(+)) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH(+)) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As(+) through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As(+) signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH(+) signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As(+). Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27098411

  6. Inline atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition for thin film CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study has been undertaken to assess the deposition of CdTe for thin film devices via an inline atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (AP-MOCVD) reactor. The precursors for CdTe synthesis were released from a showerhead assembly normal to a transparent conductive oxide (TCO)/glass substrate, previously coated with a CdZnS window layer using a conventional batch AP-MOCVD reactor with horizontal flow delivery. Under a simulated illumination with air mass coefficient 1.5 (AM1.5), the initial best cell conversion efficiency (11.2%) for such hybrid cells was comparable to a reference device efficiency (∼ 13%), grown entirely in the AP-MOCVD batch reactor. The performance and structure of the hybrid and conventional devices are compared for spectral response, CdTe grain morphology and crystal structure. These preliminary results reported on the transfer from a batch to an inline AP-MOCVD reactor which holds a good potential for the large-scale production of thin film photovoltaics devices and related materials. - Highlights: • Inline metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) used to grow CdTe films • Desired dopant profiles in CdTe:As achieved with inline MOCVD reactor • Initial conversion efficiency of 11.2% was comparable to batch devices (∼ 13%). • Inline MOCVD holds a good potential for large-scale thin film photovoltaics production

  7. In-Line Reactions and Ionizations of Vaporized Diphenylchloroarsine and Diphenylcyanoarsine in Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2016-07-01

    We propose detecting a fragment ion (Ph2As+) using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry for sensitive air monitoring of chemical warfare vomiting agents diphenylchloroarsine (DA) and diphenylcyanoarsine (DC). The liquid sample containing of DA, DC, and bis(diphenylarsine)oxide (BDPAO) was heated in a dry air line, and the generated vapor was mixed into the humidified air flowing through the sampling line of a mass spectrometer. Humidity effect on the air monitoring was investigated by varying the humidity of the analyzed air sample. Evidence of the in-line conversion of DA and DC to diphenylarsine hydroxide (DPAH) and then BDPAO was obtained by comparing the chronograms of various ions from the beginning of heating. Multiple-stage mass spectrometry revealed that the protonated molecule (MH+) of DA, DC, DPAH, and BDPAO could produce Ph2As+ through their in-source fragmentation. Among the signals of the ions that were investigated, the Ph2As+ signal was the most intense and increased to reach a plateau with the increased air humidity, whereas the MH+ signal of DA decreased. It was suggested that DA and DC were converted in-line into BDPAO, which was a major source of Ph2As+.

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  9. Ion suppression in the determination of clenbuterol in urine by solid-phase extraction atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion-trap mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, M.W.J.; Niederlander, H.A G; de Zeeuw, R.A.; de Jong, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ion suppression effects were observed during the determination of clenbuterol in urine with solid-phase extraction/multiple-stage ion-trap mass spectrometry (SPE/MS3), despite the use of atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation. During SPE, a polymeric stationary phase (polydivinylbenzene) was appli

  10. Application of gas chromatography–(triple quadrupole) massspectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for thedetermination of multiclass pesticides in fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherta, L.; Portoles, T.; Beltran, J.; Pitarch, E.; Mol, J.G.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue method for the determination of 142 pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables has been developed using a new atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for coupling gas chromatography (GC) to tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode has bee

  11. Analysis of vitamin K-1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot...

  12. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acq

  13. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  14. Self-Aspirated Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Direct Sampling of Analytes on Surfaces and in Liquid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Keiji G [ORNL; Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    A self-aspirating heated nebulizer probe is described and demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of analytes on surfaces and in liquid samples by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry. Functionality and performance of the probe as a self-aspirating APCI source is demonstrated using reserpine and progesterone as test compounds. The utility of the probe to sample analytes directly from surfaces was demonstrated first by scanning development lanes of a reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography plate in which a three-component dye mixture, viz., Fat Red 7B, Solvent Green 3, and Solvent Blue 35, was spotted and the components were separated. Development lanes were scanned by the sampling probe operated under computer control (x, y plane) while full-scan mass spectra were recorded using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. In addition, the ability to sample the surface of pharmaceutical tablets (viz., Extra Strength Tylenol(reg. sign) and Evista(reg. sign) tablets) and to detect the active ingredients (acetaminophen and raloxifene, respectively) selectively was demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Finally, the capability to sample analyte solutions from the wells of a 384-well microtiter plate and to perform quantitative analyses using MS/MS detection was illustrated with cotinine standards spiked with cotinine-d{sub 3} as an internal standard.

  15. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information. PMID:26560682

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films for use in architectural glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackman, Christopher S., E-mail: c.blackman@ucl.ac.u [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Piccirillo, C.; Binions, R.; Parkin, Ivan P. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-30

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of VCl{sub 4}, WCl{sub 6} and water at 550 {sup o}C lead to the production of high quality tungsten doped vanadium dioxide thin films. Careful control of the gas phase precursors allowed for tungsten doping up to 8 at.%. The transition temperature of the thermochromic switch was tunable in the range 55 {sup o}C to - 23 {sup o}C. The films were analysed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Their optical properties were examined using variable-temperature transmission and reflectance spectroscopy. It was found that incorporation of tungsten into the films led to an improvement in the colour from yellow/brown to green/blue depending on the level of tungsten incorporation. The films were optimized for optical transmission, thermochromic switching temperature, magnitude of the switching behaviour and colour to produce films that are suitable for use as an energy saving environmental glass product.

  17. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl4-C3H6-H2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm3 by Archimedes' principle.

  18. Photocatalytic Functional Coating of TiO2 Thin Film Deposited by Cyclic Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae; Rha, Jong-Joo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Park, Jin-Seong

    2011-08-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 thin films were prepared with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) using cyclic plasma chemical vapor deposition (CPCVD) at atmospheric pressure. The CPCVD TiO2 films contain carbon-free impurities up to 100 °C and polycrystalline anatase phases up to 200 °C, due to the radicals and ion-bombardments. The CPCVD TiO2 films have high transparency in the visible wavelength region and absorb wavelengths below 400 nm (>3.2 eV). The photocatalytic effects of the CPCVD TiO2 and commercial sprayed TiO2 films were measured by decomposing methylene blue (MB) solution under UV irradiation. The smooth CPCVD TiO2 films showed a relatively lower photocatalytic efficiency, but superior catalyst-recycling efficiency, due to their high adhesion strength on the substrates. This CPCVD technique may provide the means to produce photocatalytic thin films with low cost and high efficiency, which would be a reasonable candidate for practical photocatalytic applications, because of the reliability and stability of their photocatalytic efficiency in a practical environment.

  19. Production and Utilization of CO3- Produced by a Corona Discharge in Air for Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-12-14

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization is a multistep ionization process used in mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The formation of product ions depends upon interactions with the analyte and the reactant ion species formed in the ionization source. The predominant reactant ion observed in a point-to-plane corona discharge in air occurs at m/z 60. There have been multiple references in the literature to the identity of this ion with some disagreement. It was postulated to be either CO3- or N2O2-. The identity of this ion is important as it is a key to the ionization of analytes. It was determined here to be CO3- through the use of 18O labeled oxygen. Further confirmation was provided through MS/MS studies. The ionization of nitroglycerine (NG) with CO3- produced the adduct NG•CO3-. This was compared to ionization with NO3- and Cl- reactant ions that also formed adducts with NG. The fragmentation patterns of these three adducts provides insight into the charge distribution and indicates that CO3- has a relatively high electron affinity similar to that of nitrate.

  20. Synthesis and modeling of uniform complex metal oxides by close-proximity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Robert L Z; Muñoz-Rojas, David; Musselman, Kevin P; Vaynzof, Yana; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2015-05-27

    A close-proximity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) reactor is developed for synthesizing high quality multicomponent metal oxides for electronics. This combines the advantages of a mechanically controllable substrate-manifold spacing and vertical gas flows. As a result, our AP-CVD reactor can rapidly grow uniform crystalline films on a variety of substrate types at low temperatures without requiring plasma enhancements or low pressures. To demonstrate this, we take the zinc magnesium oxide (Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O) system as an example. By introducing the precursor gases vertically and uniformly to the substrate across the gas manifold, we show that films can be produced with only 3% variation in thickness over a 375 mm(2) deposition area. These thicknesses are significantly more uniform than for films from previous AP-CVD reactors. Our films are also compact, pinhole-free, and have a thickness that is linearly controllable by the number of oscillations of the substrate beneath the gas manifold. Using photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction measurements, we show that for Mg contents below 46 at. %, single phase Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O was produced. To further optimize the growth conditions, we developed a model relating the composition of a ternary oxide with the bubbling rates through the metal precursors. We fitted this model to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measured compositions with an error of Δx = 0.0005. This model showed that the incorporation of Mg into ZnO can be maximized by using the maximum bubbling rate through the Mg precursor for each bubbling rate ratio. When applied to poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) hybrid solar cells, our films yielded an open-circuit voltage increase of over 100% by controlling the Mg content. Such films were deposited in short times (under 2 min over 4 cm(2)). PMID:25939729

  1. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  2. On-line measurements of α-pinene ozonolysis products using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion-trap mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warscheid, Bettina; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    An on-line technique to investigate complex organic oxidation reactions in environmental chamber experiments is presented. The method is based on the direct introduction of the chamber air into an atmospheric pressure ion source of a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the analytical potential of the method (atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation/mass spectrometry, APCI/MS), the ozonolysis of α-pinene was investigated in a series of experiments performed in various sized reaction chambers at atmospheric pressure and 296 K in synthetic air. Investigations were focussed on the influence of the water vapour concentration on the formation of the predominant oxidation product, pinonaldehyde, derived from the α-pinene/ozone reaction. Quantification of pinonaldehyde was achieved by conducting a standard addition technique. The molar yield of pinonaldehyde was found to depend strongly on the actual water vapour concentration between ozonide, indicating a branching ratio of 0.35/0.65.

  3. Qualitative analysis of some carboxylic acids by ion-exclusion chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helale, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2002-05-17

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the determination of carboxylic acids has been developed. A mixture of formic, acetic, propionic, valeric, isovaleric, isobutyric, and isocaproic acids has been separated on a polymethacrylate-based weak acidic cation-exchange resin (TSK gel OA pak-A) based on an ion-exclusion chromatographic mechanism with detection using UV-photodiode array, conductivity and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). A mobile phase consisting of 0.85 mM benzoic acid in 10% aqueous methanol (pH 3.89) was used to separate the above carboxylic acids in about 40 min. For LC-MS, the APCI interface was used in the negative ionization mode. Linear plots of peak area versus concentration were obtained over the range 1-30 mM (r2=0.9982) and 1-30 mM (r2=0.9958) for conductimetric and MS detection, respectively. The detection limits of the target carboxylic acids calculated at S/N=3 ranged from 0.078 to 2.3 microM for conductimetric and photometric detection and from 0.66 to 3.82 microM for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The reproducibility of retention times was 0.12-0.16% relative standard deviation for ion-exclusion chromatography and 1.21-2.5% for ion-exclusion chromatography-APCI-MS. The method was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in red wine, white wine, apple vinegar, and Japanese rice wine. PMID:12108651

  4. Development of a general model for determination of thermal conductivity of liquid chemical compounds at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani‐Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Sattari, Mehdi;

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a general model for representation/presentation of the liquid thermal conductivity of chemical compounds (mostly organic) at 1 atm pressure for temperatures below normal boiling point and at saturation pressure for temperatures above the normal boiling point is developed...... model comprise temperature, acentric factor, critical pressure, normal boiling temperature, and molecular weight. Nearly 80% of the data set (15,221 data) is randomly assigned to develop the model equation, 10% of the data set (1902 data) is used to validate the model, and the remaining data (1902 data...

  5. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smart Katherine A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput.

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.; Herrmann, H.W.; Henins, I.; Selwyn, G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a non-thermal, high pressure plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O) which flows between two concentric cylindrical electrodes: an outer grounded electrode and an inner electrode powered at 13.56 MHz RF. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, ionized or dissociated by electron impact. The fast-flowing effluent consists of ions and electrons, which are rapidly lost by recombination, highly reactive radicals (e.g., O, OH), and metastable species (e.g., O2). The metastable O2, which is reactive to hydrocarbon and other organic species, has been observed through optical emission spectroscopy to decrease by a factor of 2 from the APPJ nozzle exit to a distance of 10 cm. Unreacted metastable O2, and that which does not impinge on a surface, will then decay back to ordinary ground state O2, resulting in a completely dry, environmentally-benign form of surface cleaning. Applications such as removal of photoresist, oxide films and organic residues from wafers for the electronics industry, decontamination of civilian and military areas and personnel exposed to chemical or biological warfare agents, and paint (e.g., graffiti) removal are being considered.

  7. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region. PMID:24850441

  8. Online measurement of biogenic organic acids in the boreal forest using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, A. L.; Brüggemann, M.; ńijälä, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Russell, L. M.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) by vegetation in the boreal forest and their subsequent atmospheric oxidation leads to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which has important impacts on climate and human health. Oxidation of BVOCs produces a variety of mostly unidentified species in oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA). Presently aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) are able to determine quantitative information about the relative oxygen to carbon content of organic aerosols and thereby reveal the photochemical age and volatility of organic aerosol by distinguishing between low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA) and hydrocarbon like organic aerosol (HOA)[1]. However, the AMS can usually not be used to measure and quantify single organic compounds such as individual biogenic organic marker compounds. Here we show the results of online measurements of gas and particle phase biogenic acids during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 at Hyytiälä, Finland. This was achieved by coupling a self built miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) as described by Geller et al. [2] with an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI IT MS; Hoffmann et al., [3]). The benefits of the on-line APCI-MS are soft ionization with little fragmentation compared to AMS, high measurement frequency and less sampling artifacts than in the common procedure of taking filter samples, extraction and detection with LC-MS. Furthermore, the ion trap of the instrument allows MS/MS experiments to be performed by isolation of single m/z ratios of selected molecular species. By subsequent addition of energy, the trapped ions form characteristic fragments which enable structural insight on the molecular level. Comparison of APCI-MS data to AMS data, acquired with a C-ToF-AMS [4], revealed a good correlation coefficient for total organics and sulphate. Furthermore, data show

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems

  10. Atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition reactor for 100 mm wafers, optimized for minimum contamination at low gas flow rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anand, Venu, E-mail: venuanand@cense.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: venuanand83@gmail.com; Shivashankar, S. A. [Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India); Nair, Aswathi R.; Mohan Rao, G. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics (IAP), Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-08-31

    Gas discharge plasmas used for thinfilm deposition by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) must be devoid of contaminants, like dust or active species which disturb the intended chemical reaction. In atmospheric pressure plasma systems employing an inert gas, the main source of such contamination is the residual air inside the system. To enable the construction of an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) system with minimal contamination, we have carried out fluid dynamic simulation of the APP chamber into which an inert gas is injected at different mass flow rates. On the basis of the simulation results, we have designed and built a simple, scaled APP system, which is capable of holding a 100 mm substrate wafer, so that the presence of air (contamination) in the APP chamber is minimized with as low a flow rate of argon as possible. This is examined systematically by examining optical emission from the plasma as a function of inert gas flow rate. It is found that optical emission from the plasma shows the presence of atmospheric air, if the inlet argon flow rate is lowered below 300 sccm. That there is minimal contamination of the APP reactor built here, was verified by conducting an atmospheric pressure PECVD process under acetylene flow, combined with argon flow at 100 sccm and 500 sccm. The deposition of a polymer coating is confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the polymer coating contains only 5% of oxygen, which is comparable to the oxygen content in polymer deposits obtained in low-pressure PECVD systems.

  11. Low temperature carrier transport study of monolayer MoS2 field effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition under an atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large size monolayer Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) was successfully grown by chemical vapor deposition method under an atmospheric pressure. The electrical transport properties of the fabricated back-gate monolayer MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated under low temperatures; a peak field effect mobility of 59 cm2V−1s−1 was achieved. With the assist of Raman measurement under low temperature, this work identified the mobility limiting factor for the monolayer MoS2 FETs: homopolar phonon scattering under low temperature and electron-polar optical phonon scattering at room temperature

  12. Low temperature carrier transport study of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition under an atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinke, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com; He, Jiazhu; Tang, Dan; Lu, Youming; Zhu, Deliang; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Sun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Technology of Ceramics, Nanshan District Key Lab for Biopolymer and Safety Evaluation, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Ave, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Qiang; Wen, Jiao; Yu, Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, CAS, 865 Chang Ning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu, Wenjun [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: xkliu@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: wujing026@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); He, Zhubing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, 1088 Xueyuan Road, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ang, Kah-Wee [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117583 Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-28

    Large size monolayer Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) was successfully grown by chemical vapor deposition method under an atmospheric pressure. The electrical transport properties of the fabricated back-gate monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated under low temperatures; a peak field effect mobility of 59 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} was achieved. With the assist of Raman measurement under low temperature, this work identified the mobility limiting factor for the monolayer MoS{sub 2} FETs: homopolar phonon scattering under low temperature and electron-polar optical phonon scattering at room temperature.

  13. Simultaneous determination of hydroxycinnamates and catechins in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Sandström, B.

    2003-01-01

    atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS using single ion monitoring (SIM) in negative mode. Linear calibration graphs were achieved in the dynamic range of 10-1000 ng/ml urine. The inter- and intraassay coefficients of variation (C.V.%) for the analysis of the four compounds in quality control...... urine samples were between 7.8 and 10.9, n=17 (reproducibility), and the repeatability of the assay was between 2.5 and 5.0% (n = 12). Analyses of urine samples from a human dietary intervention study with intake of 600 g of fruits and vegetables were demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first...

  14. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, Claus;

    2000-01-01

    column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  15. Development of open air silicon deposition technology by silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical transport under local ambient gas control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Teruki; Konno, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Yukihisa

    2016-07-01

    Open air silicon deposition was performed by combining silane-free atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical transport and a newly developed local ambient gas control technology. The effect of air contamination on silicon deposition was investigated using a vacuum chamber, and the allowable air contamination level was confirmed to be 3 ppm. The capability of the local ambient gas control head was investigated numerically and experimentally. A safe and clean process environment with air contamination less than 1 ppm was achieved. Combining these technologies, a microcrystalline silicon film was deposited in open air, the properties of which were comparable to those of silicon films deposited in a vacuum chamber.

  16. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet

  17. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure air plasmas are often thought to be in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) owing to fast interspecies collisional exchanges at high pressure. As will be seen here, this assumption cannot be relied upon, particularly with respect to optical diagnostics. Large velocity gradients in flowing plasmas and/or elevated electron temperatures created by electrical discharges can result in large departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium. Diagnostic techniques based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have been developed and applied at Stanford University to the investigation of atmospheric pressure plasmas under conditions ranging from thermal and chemical equilibrium to thermochemical nonequilibrium. This article presents a review of selected temperature and species concentration measurement techniques useful for the study of air and nitrogen plasmas

  18. Temporally resolved ozone distribution of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet: flow, chemical reaction, and transient vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2015-08-01

    The ozone density distribution in the effluent of a time modulated RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated by time and spatially resolved by UV absorption spectroscopy. The plasma jet is operated with an averaged dissipated power of 6.5 W and gas flow rate 2 slm argon  +2% O2. The modulation frequency of the RF power is 50 Hz with a duty cycle of 50%. To investigate the production and destruction mechanism of ozone in the plasma effluent, the atomic oxygen and gas temperature is also obtained by TALIF and Rayleigh scattering, respectively. A temporal increase in ozone density is observed close to the quartz tube exit when the plasma is switched off due to the decrease in O density and gas temperature. Ozone absorption at different axial positions indicates that the ozone distribution is dominated by the convection induced by the gas flow and allows estimating the on-axis local gas velocity in the jet effluent. Transient vortex structures occurring during the switch on and off of the RF power also significantly affect the ozone density in the far effluent.

  19. Investigation of deposition characteristics and properties of high-rate deposited silicon nitride films prepared by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nitride (SiN x) films have been prepared at extremely high deposition rates by the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition (AP-PCVD) technique on Si(001) wafers from gas mixtures containing He, H2, SiH4 and N2 or NH3. A 150 MHz very high frequency (VHF) power supply was used to generate high-density radicals in the atmospheric pressure plasma. Deposition rate, composition and morphology of the SiN x films prepared with various deposition parameters were studied by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy was also used to characterize the structure and the chemical bonding configurations of the films. Furthermore, etching rate with buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution, refractive index and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics were measured to evaluate the dielectric properties of the films. It was found that effective passivation of dangling bonds and elimination of excessive hydrogen atoms at the film-growing surface seemed to be the most important factor to form SiN x film with a dense Si-N network. The C-V curve of the optimized film showed good interface properties, although further improvement was necessary for use in the industrial metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) applications

  20. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of vanadium arsenide thin films via the reaction of VCl4 or VOCl3 with tBuAsH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of vanadium arsenide were deposited via the dual-source atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition reactions of VCl4 or VOCl3 with tBuAsH2. Using the vanadium precursor VCl4, films were deposited at substrate temperatures of 550–600 °C, which were black-gold in appearance and were found to be metal-rich with high levels of chlorine incorporation. The use of VOCl3 as the vanadium source resulted in films being deposited between 450 and 600 °C and, unlike when using VCl4, were silver in appearance. The films deposited using VOCl3 demonstrated vanadium to arsenic ratios close to 1:1, and negligible chlorine incorporation. Films deposited using either vanadium precursor were identified as VAs using powder X-ray diffraction and possessed borderline metallic/semiconductor resistivities. - Highlights: • Formation of VAs films via atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. • Films formed using VCl4 or VOCl3 and tBuAsH2. • Powder X-ray diffraction showed that crystalline VAs films were deposited. • Films from VOCl3 had a V:As ratio close to 1 with negligible Cl incorporation. • Films were silver and possessed borderline metallic/semiconductor resistivities

  1. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. PMID:25885756

  2. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  3. Porous Silicon & Titanium Dioxide Coatings Prepared by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique-A Novel Coating Technology for Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ is an alternative for wet processes used to make anti reflection coatings and smooth substrate surface for the PV module. It is also an attractive technique because of it’s high growth rate, low power consumption, lower cost and absence of high cost vacuum systems. This work deals with the deposition of silicon oxide from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO thin films and titanium dioxide from tetraisopropyl ortho titanate using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ system in open air conditions. A sinusoidal high voltage with a frequency between 19-23 kHz at power up to 1000 W was applied between two tubular electrodes separated by a dielectric material. The jet, characterized by Tg ~ 600-800 K, was mostly laminar (Re ~ 1200 at the nozzle exit and became partially turbulent along the jet axis (Re ~ 3300. The spatially resolved emission spectra showed OH, N2, N2+ and CN molecular bands and O, H, N, Cu and Cr lines as well as the NO2 chemiluminescence continuum (450-800 nm. Thin films with good uniformity on the substrate were obtained at high deposition rate, between 800 -1000 nm.s-1, and AFM results revealed that coatings are relatively smooth (Ra ~ 2 nm. The FTIR and SEM analyses were better used to monitor the chemical composition and the morphology of the films in function of the different experimental conditions.

  4. Identification and quantification of flavonoids in human urine samples by column switching liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Salka E.; Freese, R.; Cornett, C.;

    2000-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric (HPLC-MS) method is described for the determination and quantification of 12 dietary flavonoid glycosides and aglycons in human urine samples. Chromatographic separation of the analytes of interest was achieved by...... column-switching, using the first column (a Zorbax 300SB C-3 column) for sample cleanup and eluting the heart-cut flavonoid fraction onto the second column (a Zorbax SE C-18 column) for separation and detection by ultraviolet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization MS using single ion monitoring in...... variation for the analysis of the 12 different flavonoids in quality control urine samples were 12.3% on average (range 11.0-13.7%, n = 24, reproducibility) and the repeatability of the assay were 5.0% (mean, range 0.1-14.8%, it = 12). A subset of 10 urine samples from a human dietary intervention study...

  5. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  6. An investigation into the optimum thickness of titanium dioxide thin films synthesized by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition for use in photocatalytic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Geoffrey; Darr, Jawwad A; Mills, Andrew; Parkin, Ivan P

    2010-09-10

    Twenty eight films of titanium dioxide of varying thickness were synthesised by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of titanium(IV) chloride and ethyl acetate onto glass and titanium substrates. Fixed reaction conditions at a substrate temperature of 660 °C were used for all depositions, with varying deposition times of 5-60 seconds used to control the thickness of the samples. A sacrificial electron acceptor system composed of alkaline sodium persulfate was used to determine the rate at which these films could photo-oxidise water in the presence of 365 nm light. The results of this work showed that the optimum thickness for CVD films on titanium substrates for the purposes of water oxidation was ≈200 nm, and that a platinum coating on the reverse of such samples leads to a five-fold increase in the observed rate of water oxidation. PMID:20645333

  7. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zuber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS. Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols.

  8. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. PMID:26446274

  9. Chemical uncertainties in modeling hot Jupiters atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebrard, Eric; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Most predictions and interpretations of observations in beyond our Solar System have occurred through the use of 1D photo-thermo-chemical models. Their predicted atmospheric compositions are highly dependent on model parameters. Chemical reactions are based on empirical parameters that must be known at temperatures ranging from 100 K to above 2500 K and at pressures from millibars to hundreds of bars. Obtained from experiments, calculations and educated-guessed estimations, these parameters are always evaluated with substantial uncertainties. However, although of practical use, few models of exoplanetary atmospheres have considered these underlying chemical uncertainties and their consequences. Recent progress has been made recently that allow us to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of 1D models of planetary atmospheres, with quantifiable uncertainties on their predictions for the atmospheric composition and associated spectral features, (2) identify the ‘key parameters’ that contribute the most to the models predictivity and should therefore require further experimental or theoretical analysis, (3) reduce and optimize complex chemical networks for their inclusion in multidimensional atmospheric models.First, a global sampling approach based on low discrepancy sequences has been applied in order to propose error bars on simulations of the atmospheres HD 209458b and HD 189733b, using a detailed kinetic model derived from applied combustion models that was methodically validated over a range of temperatures and pressures typical for these hot Jupiters. A two-parameters temperature-dependent uncertainty factor has been assigned to each considered rate constant. Second, a global sensitivity approach based on high dimensional model representations (HDMR) has been applied in order to identify those reactions which make the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty of the simulated results. The HDMR analysis has been restricted to the most important

  10. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC's Non-Thermal Sanitation by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma technology sanitizes fresh fruits and vegetables without the use of consumable chemicals and without...

  11. Gas chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Dawei; Jogsten, Ingrid Ericson; Dunstan, Jody; Hagberg, Jessika; Wang, Thanh; Ruzzin, Jerome; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; van Bavel, Bert

    2016-07-01

    A method using a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source for coupling gas chromatography (GC/APCI) to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention is presented. One microliter injection of a six-point calibration curve of native PCBs and OCPs, ranging from 0.04 to 300pg/μL, was performed. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the relative response factors (RRFs) was less than 15% with a coefficient of determination (r(2))>0.995. Meanwhile, two calibration solutions (CS), CS 2 (0.4pg/μL) and CS 3 (4pg/μL) were analyzed to study the repeatability calculated for both area and RRFs. The RSD for RRF ranged from 3.1 to 16% and 3.6 to 5.5% for CS 2 and CS 3, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) determined by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 were compared between the GC/APCI/MS/MS and a GC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS) system. GC/APCI/MS/MS resulted in lower LOD for most of the compounds, except for PCB#74, cis-chlordane and trans-chlordane. GC/APCI/MS/MS and GC/HRMS were also compared by performing analysis on 75 human serum samples together with eight QA/QC serum samples. The comparison between GC/APCI/MS/MS system and GC/HRMS system for 16 of the targeted compounds was carried out. No statistically significant difference was discovered. Due to increased sensitivity and user friendly operation under atmospheric pressure, GC/APCI/MS/MS is a powerful alternative technique that can easily meet the specification of GC/HRMS. PMID:27236485

  12. Experimentation and simulation of tin oxide deposition on glass based on the SnCl4 hydrolysis in an in-line atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates in an in-line atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor under various conditions, which were numerically simulated using a commercial package. A soda-lime glass sheet was used as a deposition substrate, and SnCl4 and H2O in gas phase were separately supplied as the precursor and the oxidizer, respectively. By assuming that the main chemical reactions followed the Rideal–Eley mechanism, the experimentally determined deposition rates were fitted to obtain the reaction factors needed to describe the deposition process. The role of barrier gas injection for minimizing unwanted surface reaction or particle generation inside of the reactor, and not on the target (glass backplane itself) has been elucidated. Furthermore, the optimal operating conditions for the deposition on glass with the additives such as CH3OH and HF have been investigated. - Highlights: • Tin oxide deposition on glass based on the SnCl4 hydrolysis in an in-line reactor • Simulations using Rideal–Eley mechanism were compared to experimental observations. • Results: activation energy—79.3 kJ/mol and frequency factor—1.93 × 1010 m4/kmol·s • Influences of additives on transmittances, hazes, and electrical resistivities

  13. Transmission electron microscopy on early-stage tin oxide film morphology grown by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleation and morphology development during the early stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes are believed to be of major importance for the overall film properties. Here, the authors have investigated the nucleation of tin oxide films, comparing different tin precursors (tin tetrachloride (TTC) and monobutyl tin trichloride (MBTC)) and focusing on the effect of methanol addition on the film morphology. Employing electron transparent silicon oxide membranes as substrates and combining transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on the same set of samples, we describe a detailed picture of nucleation behavior and film growth during early stages of film formation. Our main conclusion is that methanol addition during deposition acts as surfactant, lowering the surface energy of the substrate and resulting in a higher nucleation grain density. Based on these results, we propose a film growth model based on surface energy to explain morphology differences in tin oxide films resulting from methanol addition.

  14. Quantitation of triacylglycerols in edible oils by off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Hu, Na; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-Yan; Chen, Hong

    2015-07-24

    In this investigation, off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a single column has been applied for the identification and quantification of triacylglycerols in edible oils. A novel mixed-mode phenyl-hexyl chromatographic column was employed in this off-line two-dimensional separation system. The phenyl-hexyl column combined the features of traditional C18 and silver-ion columns, which could provide hydrophobic interactions with triacylglycerols under acetonitrile conditions and can offer π-π interactions with triacylglycerols under methanol conditions. When compared with traditional off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography employing two different chromatographic columns (C18 and silver-ion column) and using elution solvents comprised of two phases (reversed-phase/normal-phase) for triacylglycerols separation, the novel off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography using a single column can be achieved by simply altering the mobile phase between acetonitrile and methanol, which exhibited a much higher selectivity for the separation of triacylglycerols with great efficiency and rapid speed. In addition, an approach based on the use of response factor with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for triacylglycerols quantification. Due to the differences between saturated and unsaturated acyl chains, the use of response factors significantly improves the quantitation of triacylglycerols. This two-dimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system was successfully applied for the profiling of triacylglycerols in soybean oils, peanut oils and lord oils. A total of 68 triacylglycerols including 40 triacylglycerols in soybean oils, 50 triacylglycerols in peanut oils and 44 triacylglycerols in lord oils have been identified and quantified. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data were analyzed

  15. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  16. Chemical characterization of atmospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the characterisation of complex environmental materials such as atmospheric particulate matter, analytical specificity is required to account for the many dimensions of information present in the sample. These dimensions include size, morphology, elemental composition, inorganic and organic chemical speciation, all to be performed on either single particles or on the population (or bulk sample) basis. Various techniques were developed for such measurements, including a number of bulk analysis procedures, methodologies for microscopical analysis of individual particles, and a variety of procedures for organic/inorganic chemical speciation. (author)

  17. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spetrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portoles, T.; Mol, J.G.J.; Sancho, J.V.; Hernandez, F.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC–(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promo

  18. Effect of the substrate on the properties of ZnO-MgO thin films grown by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Huerta, A.M., E-mail: atohuer@hotmail.com [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Grupo de Ingenieria en Procesamiento de Materiales CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira. C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Grupo de Ingenieria en Procesamiento de Materiales CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira. C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Brachetti-Sibaja, S.B. [Alumna del postgrado en Tecnologia Avanzada del CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira IPN, km 14.5, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira. C. P. 89600, Altamira, Tamps (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez-Pulido, A. [Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Luis Enrique Erro s/n, 07738, D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The ZnO-MgO alloys possess attractive properties for possible applications in optoelectronic and display devices; however, the optical properties are strongly dependent on the deposition parameters. In this work, the effect of the glassy and metallic substrates on the structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnO-MgO thin films using atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was investigated at relatively low deposition temperature, 500 deg. C. Magnesium and zinc acetylacetonates were used as the metal-organic source. X-ray diffraction experiments provided evidence that the kind of substrates cause a deviation of c-axis lattice constant due to the constitution of a oxide mixture (ZnO and MgO) in combination with different intermetallic compounds(Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} and Mg{sub 4}Zn{sub 7}) in the growth films. The substitutional and interstitial sites of Mg{sup 2+} instead of Zn{sup 2+} ions in the lattice are the most probable mechanism to form intermetallic compounds. The optical parameters as well as thickness of the films were calculated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry using the classical dispersion model based on the sum of the single and double Lorentz and Drude oscillators in combination with Kato-Adachi equations, as well as X-ray reflectivity.

  19. Effect of the substrate on the properties of ZnO-MgO thin films grown by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ZnO-MgO alloys possess attractive properties for possible applications in optoelectronic and display devices; however, the optical properties are strongly dependent on the deposition parameters. In this work, the effect of the glassy and metallic substrates on the structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnO-MgO thin films using atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was investigated at relatively low deposition temperature, 500 deg. C. Magnesium and zinc acetylacetonates were used as the metal-organic source. X-ray diffraction experiments provided evidence that the kind of substrates cause a deviation of c-axis lattice constant due to the constitution of a oxide mixture (ZnO and MgO) in combination with different intermetallic compounds(Mg2Zn11 and Mg4Zn7) in the growth films. The substitutional and interstitial sites of Mg2+ instead of Zn2+ ions in the lattice are the most probable mechanism to form intermetallic compounds. The optical parameters as well as thickness of the films were calculated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry using the classical dispersion model based on the sum of the single and double Lorentz and Drude oscillators in combination with Kato-Adachi equations, as well as X-ray reflectivity.

  20. Characterization of gamma-irradiated polyethylene terephthalate by liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-molecular-weight (low-MW) constituents of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), irradiated with 6Co gamma rays at 25 and 50 kGy, were analyzed by HPLC-MS with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). Consistent with earlier results, the concentrations of the major compounds that are present in the non-irradiated PET do not change perceptibly. However, we find a small but significant increase in terephthalic acid ethylester, from less than 1 mg/kg in the non-irradiated control to ca. 2 mg/kg after 50 kGy, which has not been described before. The finding is important because it gives an impression of the sensitivity of the analytical method. Additionally, it shows that even very radiation-resistant polymers can form measurable amounts of low-MW radiolysis products. The potential and limitations of LC-MS for the analysis of radiolysis products and unidentified migrants are briefly discussed in the context of the question: How can we validate our analytical methods for unknown analytes?

  1. Analysis of vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäpelt, Rie Bak; Jakobsen, Jette

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rapid, sensitive, and specific analytical method to study vitamin K1 in fruits and vegetables. Accelerated solvent extraction and solid phase extraction was used for sample preparation. Quantification was done by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in selected reaction monitoring mode with deuterium-labeled vitamin K1 as an internal standard. The precision was estimated as the pooled estimate of three replicates performed on three different days for spinach, peas, apples, banana, and beetroot. The repeatability was 5.2% and the internal reproducibility was 6.2%. Recovery was in the range 90-120%. No significant difference was observed between the results obtained by the present method and by a method using the same principle as the CEN-standard i.e. liquid-liquid extraction and post-column zinc reduction with fluorescence detection. Limit of quantification was estimated to 0.05 μg/100g fresh weight. PMID:26304366

  2. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa. PMID:25701424

  3. Effect of glass tempering on microstructure and functional properties of SnO2:F thin film prepared by atmosphere pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-emission glass was prepared via depositing fluorine-doped tin oxide thin film on glass substrate by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method. The as-deposited low-emission glass was found to present a SnO2:F/SiCxOy/glass sandwich structure via focused ion beam technique and transmission microscopic measurement. After tempering process at ∼ 650 °C with varied periods, the electrical and optical properties of the SnO2:F thin film remained stable for less than 10 min, but decreased dramatically when the tempering period exceeded 10 min, which was mainly due to the oxygen chemisorptions and fluorine ion diffusion. It was observed that the SnO2:F thin films presented uniform polycrystalline nature of cassiterite structure throughout the tempering process. The study has therefore suggested the appropriate tempering conditions for the SnO2:F low-emission glass, and provided a critical guidance for further energy-saving glass applications. - Highlights: • The sandwich structural low-e glass was prepared on an industrial line. • The film showed stable morphology and functional property under low temperature. • The functional property decreased dramatically after long time tempering at 650 °C

  4. An evaluation of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the rapid and simultaneous measurement of carbamate pesticides and organophorus pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface (LC/APCI/MS) is evaluated for the simultaneous determination of carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides in a single chromatographic analysis. APCI mass spectra of those compounds were obtained to study their ionization characteristics. APCI provided abundant ions such as protonated molecules and characteristic fragment ions for carbamate pesticides and organophosphorus pesticides. To evaluate the feasibility of the LC/APCI/MS for a routine quantitative analysis, the linearity and repeatability of LC/APCI/MS were examined by measuring standard solution mixtures of five carbamate pesticides and four organophosphorus pesticides over the range of 1 to 100 μg/mL. The peak areas in chromatograms of characteristic ions for those compounds showed less than 3% of variation from run to tun. The standard calibration curves for the nine pesticides show good linearity in the concentration range. The detection limits of the LC/APCI/MS system for those compounds range from 0.006 to 0.2 ng

  5. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant. PMID:22967548

  6. Determination of the mycotoxin moniliformin in cultures of Fusarium subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewram, V; Nieuwoudt, T W; Marasas, W F; Shephard, G S; Ritieni, A

    1999-07-01

    A LC-MS method employing triethylamine as ion-pairing reagent for the determination of moniliformin in culture material and naturally contaminated maize samples is described. Mass spectrometric detection of moniliformin was accomplished following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to yield the deprotonated molecular ion [M-H]- at m/z 97. The moniliformin response was found to be linear over the injected range 10 ng to 700 ng and a detection limit of 10 ng was attainable at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 4. Five South African strains of Fusarium subglutinans were grown on maize kernels and moniliformin extracted with an acetonitrile-water (95:5) mixture. Following sample clean up with reversed-phase (C18) solid-phase extraction cartridges, the extracts were subjected to LC-MS analysis. Triethylamine was used as an ion-pair reagent and found to improve the retention characteristics of moniliformin without any detrimental effects to the instrument. Moniliformin concentrations ranged between 130 mg/kg and 1460 mg/kg culture. Application of this method to naturally contaminated maize samples from Transkei showed that it was capable of measuring moniliformin levels down to 10 micrograms/kg in selected moldy maize cobs. This is the first report on the application of LC-MS to the analysis of moniliformin in cultures of F. subglutinans and in naturally contaminated maize. PMID:10427758

  7. Effect of glass tempering on microstructure and functional properties of SnO{sub 2}:F thin film prepared by atmosphere pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qian [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Liu, Qiying [Hangzhou Bluestar New Materials Technology Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, 310012 (China); Li, Ming [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Li, Xiang, E-mail: xiang.li@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Liu, Yong; Song, Chenlu; Wang, Jianxun [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Liu, Junbo [Hangzhou Bluestar New Materials Technology Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, 310012 (China); Shen, Ge [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Han, Gaorong, E-mail: hgr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Silicon Materials and Center for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The low-emission glass was prepared via depositing fluorine-doped tin oxide thin film on glass substrate by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method. The as-deposited low-emission glass was found to present a SnO{sub 2}:F/SiC{sub x}O{sub y}/glass sandwich structure via focused ion beam technique and transmission microscopic measurement. After tempering process at ∼ 650 °C with varied periods, the electrical and optical properties of the SnO{sub 2}:F thin film remained stable for less than 10 min, but decreased dramatically when the tempering period exceeded 10 min, which was mainly due to the oxygen chemisorptions and fluorine ion diffusion. It was observed that the SnO{sub 2}:F thin films presented uniform polycrystalline nature of cassiterite structure throughout the tempering process. The study has therefore suggested the appropriate tempering conditions for the SnO{sub 2}:F low-emission glass, and provided a critical guidance for further energy-saving glass applications. - Highlights: • The sandwich structural low-e glass was prepared on an industrial line. • The film showed stable morphology and functional property under low temperature. • The functional property decreased dramatically after long time tempering at 650 °C.

  8. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time. PMID:27425757

  9. The updated bottom up solution applied to atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Updated Bottom Up Solution (UBUS) was recently applied to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) of triacylglycerols (TAGs). This report demonstrates that the UBUS applies equally well to atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS and to electrospray ionizatio...

  10. The Use of Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry with High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Other Separation Techniques for Identification of Triacylglycerols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 252-271. ISSN 1573-4110 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : triacylglycerols * atmospheric presssure chemical ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2007

  11. Characterization of nonpolar lipids and steroids by using laser-induced acoustic desorption/chemical ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Z; Daiya, S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H{sub 2}O) upon reaction with the ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H{sub 2}O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H{sub 2}O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H{sub 2}O){sup +} chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of CdTe for High-Efficiency Thin-Film PV Devices; Annual Report, 26 January 1998-25 January 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITN's 3-year project, titled ''Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of CdTe for High-Efficiency Thin-Film Photovoltaic (PV) Devices,'' has the overall objectives of improving thin-film CdTe PV manufacturing technology and increasing CdTe PV device power conversion efficiency. CdTe deposition by APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry as has been used to deposit 16%-efficient CdTe PV films, i.e., close-spaced sublimation, but employs forced convection rather than diffusion as a mechanism of mass transport. Tasks of the APCVD program center on demonstrating APCVD of CdTe films, discovering fundamental mass-transport parameters, applying established engineering principles to the deposition of CdTe films, and verifying reactor design principles that could be used to design high-throughput, high-yield manufacturing equipment. Additional tasks relate to improved device measurement and characterization procedures that can lead to a more fundamental understanding of CdTe PV device operation, and ultimately, to higher device conversion efficiency and greater stability. Specifically, under the APCVD program, device analysis goes beyond conventional one-dimensional device characterization and analysis toward two-dimension measurements and modeling. Accomplishments of the first year of the APCVD subcontract include: selection of the Stagnant Flow Reactor design concept for the APCVD reactor, development of a detailed reactor design, performance of detailed numerical calculations simulating reactor performance, fabrication and installation of an APCVD reactor, performance of dry runs to verify reactor performance, performance of one-dimensional modeling of CdTe PV device performance, and development of a detailed plan for quantification of grain-boundary effects in polycrystalline CdTe devices

  13. A high-performance liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, David E; Laycock, John D; Huang, Wei; Foltz, Rodger L

    2004-09-01

    Risperidone, a benzisoxazole derivative, is an antipsychotic agent used for the treatment of schizophrenia. We developed a liquid chromatographic-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-APCI-MS-MS) method with improved sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range for determination of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma. A structural analogue of risperidone, RO68808 (5 ng/mL), is added as the internal standard to 1 mL of human plasma. Plasma is made basic, extracted with pentane/methylene chloride (3:1), the organic phase evaporated to dryness, and the residue is reconstituted in water with 0.1% formic acid/acetonitrile (20:1). For LC-MS-MS analysis, a Metachem Inertsel HPLC column (2.1 x 150 mm, 5-microm particle size) is connected to a Finnigan TSQ7000 tandem MS via the Finnigan API interface. Both electrospray (ESI) and APCI produced predominantly MH(+) ions for the two analytes and the internal standard. Ions detected by selected reaction monitoring correspond to the following transitions: m/z 411 to 191 for risperidone, m/z 427 to 207 for 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and m/z 421 to 201 for the internal standard. APCI provided a larger dynamic range (0.1 to 25 ng/mL) and better precision and accuracy than ESI. Intrarun accuracy and precision determined at 0.1, 0.25, 2.5, and 15 ng/mL were within 12% of target with %CVs not exceeding 10.9%. Interrun accuracy and precision determined at the same concentrations were within 9.6% of target with %CVs not exceeding 6.7%. Analytes were stable in plasma after 24 h at room temperature, 2 freeze-thaw cycles, and 490 days at -20 degrees C. PMID:15516302

  14. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  15. Determination of talinolol in human plasma using automated on-line solid phase extraction combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Grivet, Chantal; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2005-06-01

    A specific LC-MS/MS assay was developed for the automated determination of talinolol in human plasma, using on-line solid phase extraction system (prospekt 2) combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) tandem mass spectrometry. The method involved simple precipitation of plasma proteins with perchloric acid (contained propranolol) as the internal standard (IS) and injection of the supernatant onto a C8 End Capped (10 mmx2 mm) cartridge without any evaporation step. Using the back-flush mode, the analytes were transferred onto an analytical column (XTerra C18, 50 mmx4.6 mm) for chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry detection. One of the particularities of the assay is that the SPE cartridge is used as a column switching device and not as an SPE cartridge. Therefore, the same SPE cartridge could be used more than 28 times, significantly reducing the analysis cost. APCI ionization was selected to overcome any potential matrix suppression effects because the analyte and IS co-eluted. The mean precision and accuracy in the concentration range 2.5-200 ng/mL was found to be 103% and 7.4%, respectively. The data was assessed from QC samples during the validation phase of the assay. The lower limit of quantification was 2.5 ng/mL, using a 250 microL plasma aliquot. The LC-MS/MS method provided the requisite selectivity, sensitivity, robustness accuracy and precision to assess pharmacokinetics of the compound in several hundred human plasma samples. PMID:15866498

  16. A dilute Cu(Ni) alloy for synthesis of large-area Bernal stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bilayer graphene film obtained on copper (Cu) foil is known to have a significant fraction of non-Bernal (AB) stacking and on copper/nickel (Cu/Ni) thin films is known to grow over a large-area with AB stacking. In this study, annealed Cu foils for graphene growth were doped with small concentrations of Ni to obtain dilute Cu(Ni) alloys in which the hydrocarbon decomposition rate of Cu will be enhanced by Ni during synthesis of large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Ni doped concentration and the Ni homogeneous distribution in Cu foil were confirmed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and proton-induced X-ray emission. An electron backscatter diffraction map showed that Cu foils have a single (001) surface orientation which leads to a uniform growth rate on Cu surface in early stages of graphene growth and also leads to a uniform Ni surface concentration distribution through segregation kinetics. The increase in Ni surface concentration in foils was investigated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The quality of graphene, the number of graphene layers, and the layers stacking order in synthesized bilayer graphene films were confirmed by Raman and electron diffraction measurements. A four point probe station was used to measure the sheet resistance of graphene films. As compared to Cu foil, the prepared dilute Cu(Ni) alloy demonstrated the good capability of growing large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene film by increasing Ni content in Cu surface layer

  17. A dilute Cu(Ni) alloy for synthesis of large-area Bernal stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madito, M. J.; Bello, A.; Dangbegnon, J. K.; Oliphant, C. J.; Jordaan, W. A.; Momodu, D. Y.; Masikhwa, T. M.; Barzegar, F.; Fabiane, M.; Manyala, N.

    2016-01-01

    A bilayer graphene film obtained on copper (Cu) foil is known to have a significant fraction of non-Bernal (AB) stacking and on copper/nickel (Cu/Ni) thin films is known to grow over a large-area with AB stacking. In this study, annealed Cu foils for graphene growth were doped with small concentrations of Ni to obtain dilute Cu(Ni) alloys in which the hydrocarbon decomposition rate of Cu will be enhanced by Ni during synthesis of large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Ni doped concentration and the Ni homogeneous distribution in Cu foil were confirmed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and proton-induced X-ray emission. An electron backscatter diffraction map showed that Cu foils have a single (001) surface orientation which leads to a uniform growth rate on Cu surface in early stages of graphene growth and also leads to a uniform Ni surface concentration distribution through segregation kinetics. The increase in Ni surface concentration in foils was investigated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The quality of graphene, the number of graphene layers, and the layers stacking order in synthesized bilayer graphene films were confirmed by Raman and electron diffraction measurements. A four point probe station was used to measure the sheet resistance of graphene films. As compared to Cu foil, the prepared dilute Cu(Ni) alloy demonstrated the good capability of growing large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene film by increasing Ni content in Cu surface layer.

  18. A dilute Cu(Ni) alloy for synthesis of large-area Bernal stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madito, M. J.; Bello, A.; Dangbegnon, J. K.; Momodu, D. Y.; Masikhwa, T. M.; Barzegar, F.; Manyala, N., E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARCHI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Oliphant, C. J.; Jordaan, W. A. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa, Private Bag X34, Lynwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040 (South Africa); Fabiane, M. [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARCHI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Department of Physics, National University of Lesotho, P.O. Roma 180 (Lesotho)

    2016-01-07

    A bilayer graphene film obtained on copper (Cu) foil is known to have a significant fraction of non-Bernal (AB) stacking and on copper/nickel (Cu/Ni) thin films is known to grow over a large-area with AB stacking. In this study, annealed Cu foils for graphene growth were doped with small concentrations of Ni to obtain dilute Cu(Ni) alloys in which the hydrocarbon decomposition rate of Cu will be enhanced by Ni during synthesis of large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Ni doped concentration and the Ni homogeneous distribution in Cu foil were confirmed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and proton-induced X-ray emission. An electron backscatter diffraction map showed that Cu foils have a single (001) surface orientation which leads to a uniform growth rate on Cu surface in early stages of graphene growth and also leads to a uniform Ni surface concentration distribution through segregation kinetics. The increase in Ni surface concentration in foils was investigated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The quality of graphene, the number of graphene layers, and the layers stacking order in synthesized bilayer graphene films were confirmed by Raman and electron diffraction measurements. A four point probe station was used to measure the sheet resistance of graphene films. As compared to Cu foil, the prepared dilute Cu(Ni) alloy demonstrated the good capability of growing large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene film by increasing Ni content in Cu surface layer.

  19. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. PMID:26772132

  20. Determination of eight nitrosamines in water at the ng L{sup -1} levels by liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripolles, Cristina; Pitarch, Elena; Sancho, Juan V.; Lopez, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Hernandez, Felix, E-mail: felix.hernandez@qfa.uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {center_dot} Eight N-nitrosamines in water by LC(APCI)MS/MS QqQ analysis. {center_dot} Validation at two levels: 10 ng L{sup -1} (LOQ) and 100 ng L{sup -1} in drinking water. {center_dot} Developed method applied to different types of water samples. {center_dot} NDMA was the analyte more frequently detected and at the highest concentration levels. - Abstract: In this work, we have developed a sensitive method for detection and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMor), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosopirrolidine (NPyr), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPip), N-nitroso-n-dipropylamine (NDPA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) in drinking water. The method is based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode with a triple quadrupole analyzer (QqQ). The simultaneous acquisition of two MS/MS transitions in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) for each compound, together with the evaluation of their relative intensity, allowed the simultaneous quantification and reliable identification in water at ppt levels. Empirical formula of the product ions selected was confirmed by UHPLC-(Q)TOF MS accurate mass measurements from reference standards. Prior to LC-MS/MS QqQ analysis, a preconcentration step by off-line SPE using coconut charcoal EPA 521 cartridges (by passing 500 mL of water sample) was necessary to improve the sensitivity and to meet regulation requirements. For accurate quantification, two isotope labelled nitrosamines (NDMA-d{sub 6} and NDPA-d{sub 14}) were added as surrogate internal standards to the samples. The optimized method was validated at two concentration levels (10 and 100 ng L{sup -1}) in drinking water samples, obtaining satisfactory recoveries (between 90 and 120%) and precision (RSD < 20%). Limits of detection were found to be in the range of 1-8 ng L{sup -1

  1. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg−1 for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MSE). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg−1 for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg−1 level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg−1 level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second ion was the main reason for the inability to

  2. Determination of benzoylurea insecticide residues in tomatoes by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-diode array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoglou, Anastasios N; Bempelou, Eleftheria D; Liapis, Konstantinos S; Ziogas, Basil N

    2007-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method using high-performance liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 5 benzoylurea insecticides-diflubenzuron, triflumuron, teflubenzuron, lufenuron, and flufenoxuron-in tomatoes. Residues were successfully separated on a C18 column by methanol-water isocratic elution. Detection was carried out by an ultraviolet diode array detector (UV-DAD) coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in negative-ion mode. The main ions were the deprotonated molecules [M-H]- for triflumuron, and the anions formed by elimination of hydrofluoric acid [M-H-HF]- for diflubenzuron and flufenoxuron, and [M-2H-HF] for lufenuron and teflubenzuron. The calibration plots were linear for both detectors over the range 0.05 to 10 microg/mL, and the method presented good quality parameters. The limits of detection for standard solutions were 0.008-0.01 mg/L (equivalent to 0.08-0.1 ng injected) for both detectors, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were approximately 10 times lower than national maximum residue levels (MRLs). Depending on the compound and the detector, the LOQ values ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 ng injected. The optimum LC-UV-DAD/APCI-MS conditions were applied to the analysis of benzoylureas in tomatoes. The obtained recoveries from fortified tomato samples (50 g), extracted with ethyl acetate and purified by solid-phase extraction on silica sorbent, were 88-100 and 92.9-105% for the UV-DAD and MS detectors, respectively, with precision values (relative standard deviations) of 2.9-11 and 3.7-14%, respectively. The method was applied to 12 tomato samples from local markets, and diflubenzuron and lufenuron were detected in only one sample at concentrations lower than the MRLs. The results indicate that the developed LC/MS method is accurate, precise, and sensitive for quantitative and qualitative analysis at low levels of benzoylureas

  3. Validation of a qualitative screening method for pesticides in fruits and vegetables by gas chromatography quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portolés, T. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Mol, J.G.J. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Akkermaalsbos 2, 6708 WB Wageningen (Netherlands); Sancho, J.V.; López, Francisco J. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain); Hernández, F., E-mail: hernandf@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Applicability of GC-(APCI)QTOF MS as new tool for wide-scope screening of pesticides in fruits and vegetables demonstrated. • Validation of screening method according to SANCO/12571/2013. • Detection of the pesticides based on the presence of M+·/MH+ in most cases. • Screening detection limit 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. • Successful identification at 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 70% of the pesticides/matrix combinations. - Abstract: A wide-scope screening method was developed for the detection of pesticides in fruit and vegetables. The method was based on gas chromatography coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). A non-target acquisition was performed through two alternating scan events: one at low collision energy and another at a higher collision energy ramp (MS{sup E}). In this way, both protonated molecule and/or molecular ion together with fragment ions were obtained in a single run. Validation was performed according to SANCO/12571/2013 by analysing 20 samples (10 different commodities in duplicate), fortified with a test set of 132 pesticides at 0.01, 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1}. For screening, the detection was based on one diagnostic ion (in most cases the protonated molecule). Overall, at the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, 89% of the 2620 fortifications made were detected. The screening detection limit for individual pesticides was 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} for 77% of the pesticides investigated. The possibilities for identification according to the SANCO criteria, requiring two ions with a mass accuracy ≤±5 ppm and an ion-ratio deviation ≤±30%, were investigated. At the 0.01 mg kg{sup −1} level, identification was possible for 70% of the pesticides detected during screening. This increased to 87% and 93% at the 0.05 and 0.20 mg kg{sup −1} level, respectively. Insufficient sensitivity for the second

  4. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  5. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Williams

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards – pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94 demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a

  6. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  7. Computational investigations of atmospheric pressure discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Muhammad Munawar

    2010-01-01

    This research work presents the numerical simulations of multispecies multi-dimensional fluid model of atmospheric pressure discharge. The semi-implicit sequential iterative scheme is used to solve the coupled system of plasma fluid model equations with a proper set of boundary conditions. A one- dimensional self consistent drift-diffusion fluid model is developed to investigate the characteristics of atmospheric pressure discharge in pure helium and He-N2 gases. The uniform atmos...

  8. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  9. Special issue: diagnostics of atmospheric pressure microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2013-11-01

    In recent decades, a strong revival of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma studies has developed in the form of microplasmas. Microplasmas have typical scales of 1 mm or less and offer a very exciting research direction in the field of plasma science and technology as the discharge physics can be considerably different due to high collisionality and the importance of plasma-surface interaction. These high-pressure small-scale plasmas have a diverse range of physical and chemical properties. This diversity coincides with various applications including light/UV sources [1], material processing [2], chemical analysis [3], material synthesis [4], electromagnetics [5], combustion [6] and even medicine [7]. At atmospheric pressure, large scale plasmas have the tendency to become unstable due to the high collision rates leading to enhanced heating and ionization compared to their low-pressure counterparts. As low-pressure plasmas typically operate in reactors with sizes of tens of centimetres, scaling up the pressure to atmospheric pressure the size of the plasma reduces to typical sizes below 1 mm. A natural approach of stabilizing atmospheric pressure plasmas is thus the use of microelectrode geometries. Traditionally microplasmas have been produced in confined geometries which allow one to stabilize dc excited discharges. This stabilization is intrinsically connected to the large surface-to-volume ratio which enhances heat transfer and losses of charged and excited species to the walls. Currently challenging boundaries are pushed by producing microcavity geometries with dimensions of the order of 1 µm [8]. The subject of this special issue, diagnostics of microplasmas, is motivated by the many challenges in microplasma diagnostics in view of the complex chemistry and strong spatial (and even temporal) gradients of species densities and plasma properties. Atmospheric pressure plasmas have a very long history dating back more than 100 years, with early work of

  10. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) b...

  11. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol – a laboratory and field study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J.; Kulmala, M.; D. R. Worsnop; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Ehn, M.; Brüggemann, M; M. Äijälä; Vogel, A. L.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m−3 for pinonic ac...

  12. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkin, E. V.; Barengolts, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma research activity in korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma is generated by electrical discharge. Most plasma generation has been carried out at low-pressure gas typically less than one millionth of atmospheric pressure. Plasmas are in general generated from impact ionizations of neutral gas molecules by accelerated electrons. The energy gain of electrons accelerated in an electrical field is proportional to the mean free path. Electrons gain more energy at low-pressure gas and generate plasma easily by the ionization of neutrals, because the mean free path is longer. For this reason conventional plasma generation is carried out at low pressures. However, many practical applications require plasmas at high-pressure. In order to avoid the requirement for vacuum pump, researchers in Korea start to develop plasmas in high-pressure chambers where the pressure is 1 atmosphere or greater. Material processing, environmental protection/restoration and improved energy production efficiency using plasma are only possible for inexpensive bulk plasmas. We thus generate plasmas by new methods and plan to set foundations for new plasma technologies for 21st century industries. This technological research will play a central role in material processing, environmental and energy production industries

  14. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Yu, Qingni; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Ren, Jin; Guo, Shuangsheng

    2014-10-01

    Maintaining a low pressure environment in a controlled ecological life support system would reduce the technological complexity and resupply cost in the course of the construction of a future manned lunar base. To estimate the effect of a hypobaric environment in a lunar base on biological components, such as higher plants, microbes, and algae, cyanobacteria was used as the model by determining their response of growth, morphology, and physiology when exposed to half of standard atmospheric pressure for 16 days (brought back to standard atmospheric pressure 30 minutes every two days for sampling). The results indicated that the decrease of atmospheric pressure from 100 kPa to 50 kPa reduced the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia sp., Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The ratio of carotenoid to chlorophyll a content in the four tested strains increased under low pressure conditions compared to ambient conditions, resulting from the decrease of chlorophyll a and the increase of carotenoid in the cells. Moreover, low pressure induced the reduction of the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and Anabaena flos-aquae. The result from the ultrastructure observed using SEM indicated that low pressure promoted the production of more extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) compared to ambient conditions. The results implied that the low pressure environment of 50 kPa in a future lunar base would induce different effects on biological components in a CELSS, which must be considered during the course of designing a future lunar base. The results will be a reference for exploring the response of other biological components, such as plants, microbes, and animals, living in the life support system of a lunar base.

  15. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E; Borra, J-P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary Dielectric Barrier Discharge (f-DBD) depend on its electrical characteristics and thermal profile. In this paper, a method for separating thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well defined electrical characteristics of filaments: all filaments are quasi identical with a controlled spatio-temporal density. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and pl...

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    OpenAIRE

    Borra, J.P.; Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamenta...

  17. Assessment of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment for Implant Osseointegration

    OpenAIRE

    Danna, Natalie R.; Beutel, Bryan G.; Nick Tovar; Lukasz Witek; Charles Marin; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Rodrigo Granato; Marcelo Suzuki; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the osseointegrative effects of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment for implants in a canine model. Control surfaces were untreated textured titanium (Ti) and calcium phosphate (CaP). Experimental surfaces were their 80-second air-based APP-treated counterparts. Physicochemical characterization was performed to assess topography, surface energy, and chemical composition. One implant from each control and experimental group (four in total) was placed in one ...

  18. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  19. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Deguillaume

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  20. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing for Polymer Adhesion: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing has attracted significant interests over decades due to its usefulness and a variety of applications. Adhesion improvement of polymer surfaces is among the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Reflecting recent significant de...

  2. Reduced atmospheric pressure in Radish: Alteration of NCER and transpiration at decreased oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehkamp, Cara Ann; Stasiak, Michael; Wheeler, Raymond; Dixon, Mike

    Fundamental to the future of space exploration is the development of advanced life support systems capable of maintaining crews for significant periods without re-supply from Earth. Significant research is focused on the development of bioregenerative life support systems to be used in conjunction with the current physico-chemical methods. These bioregenerative life support systems harness natural ecosystem processes and employ plant photosynthesis and transpiration to produce food, oxygen and regenerate water while consuming carbon dioxide. The forthcoming exploration of the Moon and Mars has prompted interest into the effects of hypobaria on plant development. Reduced atmospheric pressures will lessen the pressure gradient between the structure and the local environment thereby decreasing gas leakage and possibly the structural mass of the plant growth facility. In order to establish the optimal specifications for reduced pressure plant growth structures it is essential to determine the atmospheric pressure limits required for conventional plant development and growth. Due to its physiological importance, oxygen will compose a significant portion of these minimal environments. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced atmospheric pressure and decreased oxygen partial pressures had no effect on radish productivity. Radishes (Raphanus sativa L. cv. Cherry Bomb II) were grown from seed in the University of Guelph's Hypobaric Plant Growth Chambers for a period of 21 days. Treatments included total pressures of 10, 33, 66 and 96 kPa and oxygen partial pressures of 2, 7, 14 and 20 kPa. Experiments demonstrated that reduced partial pressures of oxygen had a greater effect on radish growth than hypobaria. Results showed a reduction in net carbon exchange rate and transpiration with decreasing oxygen partial pressures leading to diminished productivity. Keywords: hypobaric, radish, oxygen partial pressure, variable pressure chamber

  3. The Performance Improvement of N2 Plasma Treatment on ZrO2 Gate Dielectric Thin-Film Transistors with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition IGZO Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Hung; Huang, Bo-Wen; Chang, Kow-Ming; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Lin, Jian-Hong; Hsu, Jui-Mei

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the N2 plasma treatment for high-κ ZrO2 gate dielectric stack (30 nm) with indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). Experimental results reveal that a suitable incorporation of nitrogen atoms could enhance the device performance by eliminating the oxygen vacancies and provide an amorphous surface with better surface roughness. With N2 plasma treated ZrO2 gate, IGZO channel is fabricated by atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD) technique. The best performance of the AP-PECVD IGZO TFTs are obtained with 20 W-90 sec N2 plasma treatment with field-effect mobility (μ(FET)) of 22.5 cm2/V-s, subthreshold swing (SS) of 155 mV/dec, and on/off current ratio (I(on)/I(off)) of 1.49 x 10(7). PMID:27427669

  4. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  5. Formation Mechanism of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet can protrude some 5.0 cm into air. It holds promise for multivarious innovative applications, but its formation mechanism remains unsettled. We show that the plasma jet is essentially a streamer corona totally independent of, but obscured by, dielectric barrier discharge. Consequently, the jets can be equally successfully generated even with one single bare metal electrode attached to the tube orifice, both downstream and upstream simultaneously, and at a significantly reduced voltage. These results will help understand the underlying physics and facilitate a safer and more flexible implementation of this marvelous plasma source.

  6. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in helium plasmas in atmosphere environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳建明; 郭伟; 王龙; 邵福球

    2005-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in plasmas generated in helium with trace amounts of air at atmospheric pressure or low pressures. The plasma lifetimes and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented. The plasma lifetimes are longer than that in air plasma at atmospheric pressure, but this is not true at low pressures. The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a longer period.

  7. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Jian-Ming; Guo Wei; Wang Long; Shao Fu-Qiu

    2004-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas at low altitude (high pressure) and at high altitude (low pressure). The plasma lifetime and the temporal evolution of the main charged species are presented.The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a long period. The heavy charged species are dominant at low altitude in comparison with the light species at high altitude. Some species of small amount in natural air play an important role in the processes.

  8. Response of cyanobacteria to low atmosphere pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuangsheng; Tang, Yongkang; Yu, Qingni; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin

    Maintaining a low pressure environment would reduce the technological complexity and constructed cost of future lunar base. To estimate the effect of hypobaric of controlled ecological life support system in lunar base on terrestrial life, cyanobacteria was used as the model to exam the response of growth, morphology, physiology to it. The decrease of atmosphere pressure from 100 KPa to 50 KPa reducing the growth rates of Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the chlorophyll a content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp, Anabaena Hos-aquae, the carotenoid content in Microcystis aeruginosa, Merismopedia.sp and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the phycocyanin content in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study explored the biological characteristics of the cyanobacteria under low pressure condition, which aimed at understanding the response of the earth's life to environment for the future moon base, the results enrich the research contents of the lunar biology and may be referred for the research of other terrestrial life, such as human, plant, microbe and animal living in life support system of lunar base.

  9. Use of electron ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening and identification of organic pollutants in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Mol, Johannes G J; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Félix

    2014-04-25

    A new approach has been developed for multiclass screening of organic contaminants in water based on the use of gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-(APCI)QTOF MS). The soft ionization promoted by the APCI source allows effective and wide-scope screening based on the investigation of the molecular ion and/or protonated molecule. This is in contrast to electron ionization (EI) where ionization typically results in extensive fragmentation, and diagnostic ions and/or spectra need to be known a priori to facilitate detection of the analytes in the raw data. Around 170 organic contaminants from different chemical families were initially investigated by both approaches, i.e. GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and a notable number of pesticides and relevant metabolites. The new GC-(APCI)QTOF MS approach easily allowed widening the number of compounds investigated (85 additional compounds), with more pesticides, personal care products (UV filters, musks), polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs), antimicrobials, insect repellents, etc., most of them considered as emerging contaminants. Both GC-(EI)TOF and GC-(APCI)QTOF methodologies have been applied, evaluating their potential for a wide-scope screening in the environmental field. PMID:24674644

  10. The role of physical and chemical properties of Pd nanostructured materials immobilized on inorganic carriers on ion formation in atmospheric pressure laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silina, Yuliya E; Koch, Marcus; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-06-01

    Fundamental parameters influencing the ion-producing efficiency of palladium nanostructures (nanoparticles [Pd-NP], nanoflowers, nanofilms) during laser irradiation were studied in this paper. The nanostructures were immobilized on the surface of different solid inorganic carrier materials (porous and mono-crystalline silicon, anodic porous aluminum oxide, glass and polished steel) by using classical galvanic deposition, electroless local deposition and sputtering. It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of both the nanoparticular layer as well as the carrier material on ion production for selected analyte molecules. Our experiments demonstrated that the dimensions of the synthesized nanostructures, the thickness of the active layers, surface disorders, thermal conductivity and physically or chemically adsorbed water influenced signal intensities of analyte ions during surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) while no effects such as plasmon resonance, photoelectric effect or catalytic activity were expected to occur. Excellent LDI abilities were seen for Pd-NPs immobilized on steel, while Pd nanoflowers on porous silicon exhibited several disadvantages; viz, strong memory effects, dependency of the analytical signal on amount of physically and chemically adsorbed water inside porous carrier, reduced SALDI activity from unstable connections between Pd and semiconductor material, decrease of the melting point of pure silicon after Pd immobilization and resulting strong laser ablation of metal/semiconductor complex, as well as significantly changed surface morphology after laser irradiation. The analytical performance of Pd-NP/steel was further improved by applying a hydrophobic coating to the steel surface before galvanic deposition. This procedure increased the distance between Pd-NPs, thus reducing thermal stress upon LDI; it simultaneously decreased spot sizes of deposited sample solutions. PMID:24913399

  11. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  12. The Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2010-11-01

    Astrochemistry or Astrochemical Dynamics presents a newly emerging, interdisciplinary and innovative field comprising scientists in chemistry, physics, biology, astronomy, and planetary chemistry. The prime directive of Astrochemical Dynamics is to understand the origin and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium and of our Solar System. Here, the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and thick atmosphere - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. Titan's most prominent optically visible features are the aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation, have been the least understood to date. This talk reviews recent laboratory studies on the role of polyacetylenes (polyynes) and (hetero)aromatic molecules like the phenyl radical, benzene, and pyridine in the formation of Titan's organic haze layers utilizing crossed molecular beam experiments. Those investigations provide key concepts on the formation mechanisms of unsaturated hydrocarbon molecules - in particular polyynes and aromatic compounds - together with their hydrogen deficient precursors from the "bottom up" in the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan. A brief outline to future research directions tackling also the heterogeneous chemistry on Titan and in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres in the outer Solar System in general will also be presented.

  13. Bisulphate-cluster based atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer for ultra-high sensitivity (10 ppq) detection of atmospheric amines: proof-of-concept and first ambient data from boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; N. Sarnela; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J.; Rissanen, M. P.; T. Petäjä; Worsnop, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric amines may play a crucial role in formation of new aerosol particles via nucleation with sulphuric acid. Recent studies have revealed that concentrations below 1 ppt can significantly promote nucleation of sulphuric acid particles. While sulphuric acid detection is relatively straightforward, no amine measurements to date have been able to reach the critical sub-ppt concentration range and atmospheric amine concentrations are in general poorly ch...

  14. Bisulfate – cluster based atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer for high-sensitivity (< 100 ppqV) detection of atmospheric dimethyl amine: proof-of-concept and first ambient data from boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, M.; N. Sarnela; Jokinen, T; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J.; Rissanen, M. P.; Praplan, A.; M. Simon; A. Kürten; BIANCHI, F.; Dommen, J; J. Curtius; T. Petäjä; Worsnop, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric amines may play a crucial role in formation of new aerosol particles via nucleation with sulfuric acid. Recent studies have revealed that concentrations below 1 pptV can significantly promote nucleation of sulfuric acid particles. While sulfuric acid detection is relatively straightforward, no amine measurements to date have been able to reach the critical sub-pptV concentration range and atmospheric amine concentrations are in general poorly characterized. In th...

  15. CHEMICAL TIMESCALES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF HIGHLY ECCENTRIC EXOPLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close-in exoplanets with highly eccentric orbits are subject to large variations in incoming stellar flux between periapse and apoapse. These variations may lead to large swings in atmospheric temperature, which in turn may cause changes in the chemistry of the atmosphere from higher CO abundances at periapse to higher CH4 abundances at apoapse. Here, we examine chemical timescales for CO↔CH4 interconversion compared to orbital timescales and vertical mixing timescales for the highly eccentric exoplanets HAT-P-2b and CoRoT-10b. As exoplanet atmospheres cool, the chemical timescales for CO↔CH4 tend to exceed orbital and/or vertical mixing timescales, leading to quenching. The relative roles of orbit-induced thermal quenching and vertical quenching depend upon mixing timescales relative to orbital timescales. For both HAT-P-2b and CoRoT-10b, vertical quenching will determine disequilibrium CO↔CH4 chemistry at faster vertical mixing rates (Kzz > 107 cm2 s–1), whereas orbit-induced thermal quenching may play a significant role at slower mixing rates (Kzz 7 cm2 s–1). The general abundance and chemical timescale results—calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity—can be applied for different atmospheric profiles in order to estimate the quench level and disequilibrium abundances of CO and CH4 on hydrogen-dominated exoplanets. Observations of CO and CH4 on highly eccentric exoplanets may yield important clues to the chemical and dynamical properties of their atmospheres.

  16. The growth of organosilicon film using a hexamethyldisilazane/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet, using a hexamethyldisilazane and oxygen mixture, was used to deposit an organosilicon thin film on polycarbonate (PC) substrates. The atmospheric pressure plasma jet deposited homogeneous thin films without unfavorable contamination from the plasma source. The surface properties of the organosilicon thin films were studied as a function of oxygen gas flow rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma deposited organosilicon thin films were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrometry and atomic forced microscopy. Surface analysis showed that atmospheric pressure plasma deposited films are more inorganic as the oxygen flow rate increases. The UV–vis spectra, detected in the range 300–800 nm, demonstrated improved transparency in the visible region and increased absorption in UV region of the spectrum. The improved hardness of the atmospheric pressure plasma deposited PC substrates was measured using a pencil hardness testing method and this was related to the chemical composition of the plasma deposited organosilicon thin films. The plasma jet allowed deposition of the coating without a chamber. - Highlights: ► Organosilicon thin films on polycarbonate (PC) by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. ► Properties of SiOx films vary with the injected oxygen flow rate in the plasma jet. ► Improved hardness of atmospheric pressure plasma deposited SiOx films achieved. ► Double-pipe atmospheric pressure plasma jet suitable for chamberless deposition

  17. The growth of organosilicon film using a hexamethyldisilazane/oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun, E-mail: chunhuang@saturn.yzu.edu.tw; Wu, Shin-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Wei-Ting

    2013-02-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet, using a hexamethyldisilazane and oxygen mixture, was used to deposit an organosilicon thin film on polycarbonate (PC) substrates. The atmospheric pressure plasma jet deposited homogeneous thin films without unfavorable contamination from the plasma source. The surface properties of the organosilicon thin films were studied as a function of oxygen gas flow rate. The atmospheric pressure plasma deposited organosilicon thin films were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrometry and atomic forced microscopy. Surface analysis showed that atmospheric pressure plasma deposited films are more inorganic as the oxygen flow rate increases. The UV–vis spectra, detected in the range 300–800 nm, demonstrated improved transparency in the visible region and increased absorption in UV region of the spectrum. The improved hardness of the atmospheric pressure plasma deposited PC substrates was measured using a pencil hardness testing method and this was related to the chemical composition of the plasma deposited organosilicon thin films. The plasma jet allowed deposition of the coating without a chamber. - Highlights: ► Organosilicon thin films on polycarbonate (PC) by atmospheric pressure plasma jet. ► Properties of SiOx films vary with the injected oxygen flow rate in the plasma jet. ► Improved hardness of atmospheric pressure plasma deposited SiOx films achieved. ► Double-pipe atmospheric pressure plasma jet suitable for chamberless deposition.

  18. Method development for the determination of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma without derivatization by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Kakehi, Masaaki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Kamiguchi, Hidenori; Jinno, Fumihiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface to determine 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a major metabolite of cholesterol formed by cytochrome P450 family 46A1, in human plasma without any derivatization step. Phosphate buffered saline including 1% Tween 80 was used as the surrogate matrix for preparation of calibration curves and quality control samples. The saponification process to convert esterified 24S-hydroxycholesterol to free sterols was optimized, followed by liquid-liquid extraction using hexane. Chromatographic separation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol from other isobaric endogenous oxysterols was successfully achieved with gradient mobile phase comprised of 0.1% propionic acid and acetonitrile using L-column2 ODS (2 μm, 2.1 mm id × 150 mm). This assay was capable of determining 24S-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma (200 μL) ranging from 1 to 100 ng/mL with acceptable intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The potential risk of in vitro formation of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by oxidation from endogenous cholesterol in human plasma was found to be negligible. The stability of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in relevant solvents and human plasma was confirmed. This method was successfully applied to quantify the plasma concentrations of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in male and female volunteers. PMID:26249017

  19. High-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection characterization of Delta5-polyenoic fatty acids in triacylglycerols from conifer seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal; Rezanka, Tomás; Kabátová, Nadezda

    2007-03-30

    Edible conifer seeds can serve as a source of triacylglycerols (TGs) with unusual Delta5 unsaturated polymethylene interrupted fatty acids (UPIFAs), such as cis-5,9-octadecadienoic (taxoleic), cis-5,9,12-octadecatrienoic (pinolenic), cis-5,11-eicosadienoic (keteleeronic) and cis-5,11,14-eicosatrienoic acids (sciadonic). Conifer seed oils from European Larch (Larix decidua), Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and European Silver Fir (Abies alba) have been analyzed by non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NARP-HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI)-MS detection. The influence of different positions of double bonds in Delta5-UPIFAs on the retention and fragmentation behavior is described and used for the successful identification of TGs in each oil. TGs containing Delta5-UPIFAs have a higher retention in comparison with common TGs found in plant oils with single methylene interrupted Delta6(9)-FAs and also significantly changed relative abundances of fragment ions in APCI mass spectra. Results obtained from HPLC/MS analyses are supported by validated GC/FID analyses of fatty acid methyl esters after the transesterification. The total content of Delta5-UPIFAs is about 32% for European Larch, 27% for Norway Spruce and 20% for European Silver Fir. In total, 20 FAs with acyl chain lengths from 16 to 24 carbon atoms and from 0 to 3 double bonds have been identified in 64 triacylglycerols from 3 conifer seed oils. PMID:17307191

  20. Quality classification of Spanish olive oils by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and metabolomics-based statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, C; Cervera, M I; Gil, R; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Beltran, J

    2017-02-01

    The novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source has been used in combination with gas chromatography (GC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for determination of volatile components of olive oil, enhancing its potential for classification of olive oil samples according to their quality using a metabolomics-based approach. The full-spectrum acquisition has allowed the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in olive oil samples, including Extra Virgin, Virgin and Lampante qualities. A dynamic headspace extraction with cartridge solvent elution was applied. The metabolomics strategy consisted of three different steps: a full mass spectral alignment of GC-MS data using MzMine 2.0, a multivariate analysis using Ez-Info and the creation of the statistical model with combinations of responses for molecular fragments. The model was finally validated using blind samples, obtaining an accuracy in oil classification of 70%, taking the official established method, "PANEL TEST", as reference. PMID:27596432

  1. Low-voltage back-gated atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based graphene-striped channel transistor with high-κ dielectric showing room-temperature mobility > 11 000 cm2/V·s

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Casey

    2013-07-23

    Utilization of graphene may help realize innovative low-power replacements for III-V materials based high electron mobility transistors while extending operational frequencies closer to the THz regime for superior wireless communications, imaging, and other novel applications. Device architectures explored to date suffer a fundamental performance roadblock due to lack of compatible deposition techniques for nanometer-scale dielectrics required to efficiently modulate graphene transconductance (gm) while maintaining low gate capacitance-voltage product (CgsVgs). Here we show integration of a scaled (10 nm) high-κ gate dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) with an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD)-derived graphene channel composed of multiple 0.25 μm stripes to repeatedly realize room-temperature mobility of 11 000 cm 2/V·s or higher. This high performance is attributed to the APCVD graphene growth quality, excellent interfacial properties of the gate dielectric, conductivity enhancement in the graphene stripes due to low t ox/Wgraphene ratio, and scaled high-κ dielectric gate modulation of carrier density allowing full actuation of the device with only ±1 V applied bias. The superior drive current and conductance at Vdd = 1 V compared to other top-gated devices requiring undesirable seed (such as aluminum and poly vinyl alcohol)-assisted dielectric deposition, bottom gate devices requiring excessive gate voltage for actuation, or monolithic (nonstriped) channels suggest that this facile transistor structure provides critical insight toward future device design and process integration to maximize CVD-based graphene transistor performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Clouds Composition in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2015-12-01

    Attempts to determine the composition of super-Earth atmospheres have so far been plagued by the presence of clouds. Yet the theoretical framework to understand these clouds is still in its infancy. For the super-Earth archetype GJ 1214b, KCl, Na2S, and ZnS have been proposed as condensates that would form under the condition of chemical equilibrium, if the planet’s atmosphere has a bulk composition near solar. Condensation chemistry calculations have not been presented for a wider range of atmospheric bulk composition that is to be expected for super-Earth exoplanets. Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds in atmospheres of varied composition by determining which condensates are likely to form, under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We model super-Earth atmospheres assuming they are formed by degassing of volatiles from a solid planetary core of chondritic material. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temperature range of 350-3,000 K. Clouds should form along the temperature-pressure boundaries where the condensed species appear in our calculations. The super-Earth atmospheres that we study range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both sub-solar and super-solar, thereby spanning a diverse range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Some condensates appear across all of our models. However, the majority of condensed species appear only over specific ranges of H:O and C:O ratios. We find that for GJ 1214b, KCl is the primary cloud-forming condensate at solar composition, in agreement with previous work. However, for oxidizing atmospheres, where H:O is less than unity, K2SO4 clouds form instead. For carbon-rich atmospheres with super-solar C:O ratios, graphite clouds additionally appear. At

  3. Charging of aerosol and nucleation in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borra, J P [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Univ. Paris-Sud, F-91405, SUPELEC, 3 Rue Joliot Curie, Gif-sur-Yvette, F-91192 (France)], E-mail: jp.borra@pgp.u-psud.fr

    2008-12-15

    The paper focuses on applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc corona, streamer, spark and ac dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) in aerosol processes for materials and environment. Since aerosol kinematics depends mainly on electric forces acting on charged particles, the two mechanisms of aerosol charging by the collection of ions are presented in corona, post-corona and DBDs. In such defined charging conditions, field and diffusion charging laws are depicted, with respect to applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol. Then key parameters controlling the formation by nucleation and the growth by coagulation of particles in plasmas are presented. Sources of vapor leading to nucleated nanoparticles are depicted in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: (i) when filamentary dc streamer and spark as well as ac-DBDs interact with metal or dielectric surfaces and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The composition, size and structure of primary nanoparticles as well as the final size of agglomerates are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients around each filament as well as the transit time)

  4. Characterization of a steam plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric steam plasma jet generated by an original dc water plasma torch is investigated using electrical and spectroscopic techniques. Because it directly uses the water used for cooling electrodes as the plasma-forming gas, the water plasma torch has high thermal efficiency and a compact structure. The operational features of the water plasma torch and the generation of the steam plasma jet are analyzed based on the temporal evolution of voltage, current and steam pressure in the arc chamber. The influence of the output characteristics of the power source, the fluctuation of the arc and current intensity on the unsteadiness of the steam plasma jet is studied. The restrike mode is identified as the fluctuation characteristic of the steam arc, which contributes significantly to the instabilities of the steam plasma jet. In addition, the emission spectroscopic technique is employed to diagnose the steam plasma. The axial distributions of plasma parameters in the steam plasma jet, such as gas temperature, excitation temperature and electron number density, are determined by the diatomic molecule OH fitting method, Boltzmann slope method and Hβ Stark broadening, respectively. The steam plasma jet at atmospheric pressure is found to be close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state by comparing the measured electron density with the threshold value of electron density for the LTE state. Moreover, based on the assumption of LTE, the axial distributions of reactive species in the steam plasma jet are estimated, which indicates that the steam plasma has high chemical activity.

  5. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for treatment of polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wolter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Polymers are commonly used as packing materials as well as for optical and microelectronic applications. For these purposes different requirements like impermeability for different gases, scratching firmness and electrical conductivity are demanded. Since, polymers usually do not exhibit these attributes a surface modification is necessary.Design/methodology/approach: This paper describes possibilities for coating of polymers with a cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ. Due to the rather low temperature of the process the plasma jet is suitable for the treatment of temperature-sensitive materials with melting points below 150°C. For coating of polymers the organic precursor Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO has been used to deposit silicon oxide layers on surface.Findings: Spatial distributions of reactive species have been measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES in the range between 280 and 1100 nm during the plasma process. The energy influx to the substrate was determined by thermal probe measurements. For the affirmation of the chemical composition of the surface X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS has been performed.Practical implications: It could be confirmed that SiOx thin film deposition on polymeric substrate using commercially available APPJ with no internal precursor feeding is possible.Originality/value: The examinations of atmospheric pressure plasma jet for treatment of polymers.

  6. Requirements for plasma synthesis of nanocrystals at atmospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While well-defined high quality semiconductor nanocrystals have been synthesized successfully in low pressure nonthermal plasmas, moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for some industrial applications. Here we present a heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles during their synthesis in plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 − 105 Pa). We consider three collisionality regimes and determine the dominant contribution of each regime to heating and charging of nanoparticles under various plasma conditions. For plasmas maintained at atmospheric pressures we find that the ion current is mainly due to the collisional hydrodynamic contribution. Based on the model, we predict that the formation of nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure requires significantly higher plasma densities than those at low pressures. Strong nanoparticle cooling at atmospheric pressures necessitates high ion densities to reach temperatures required for crystallization of nanoparticles. Using experimentally determined plasma properties from the literature we estimate the nanoparticle temperature that can be achieved during synthesis at atmospheric pressures and predict that temperatures well above those required for crystallization can be achieved. Based on these results we suggest design principles for nanocrystal synthesis at atmospheric pressures. (paper)

  7. Evaluation of the capabilities of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls in complex-matrix food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, T; Sales, C; Abalos, M; Sauló, J; Abad, E

    2016-09-21

    The use of the novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography (GC) coupled to triple quadrupole using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and its potential for the simultaneous determination of the 12 dioxin-like polychlorobiphenyls (DL-PCBs) in complex food and feed matrices has been evaluated. In first place, ionization and fragmentation behavior of DL-PCBs on the APCI source under charge transfer conditions has been studied followed by their fragmentation in the collision cell. Linearity, repeatability and sensitivity have been studied obtaining instrumental limits of detection and quantification of 0.0025 and 0.005 pg μL(-1) (2.5 and 5 fg on column) respectively for every DL-PCB. Finally, application to real samples has been carried out and DL-PCB congeners (PCB 77, 81, 105, 114, 118, 123, 126, 156, 157, 167, 169, 189) have been detected in the different samples in the range of 0.40-10000 pg g(-1). GC-(APCI)MS/MS has been proved as a suitable alternative to the traditionally accepted confirmation method based on the use of high resolution mass spectrometry and other triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry techniques operating with electron ionization. The development of MS/MS methodologies for the analysis of dioxins and DL-PCBs is nowadays particularly important, since this technique was included as a confirmatory method in the present European Union regulations that establish the requirements for the determination of these compounds in food and feed matrices. PMID:27590550

  8. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51). PMID:26805597

  9. Low-voltage back-gated atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based graphene-striped channel transistor with high-κ dielectric showing room-temperature mobility > 11,000 cm(2)/V·s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Casey; Qaisi, Ramy; Liu, Zhihong; Yu, Qingkai; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-07-23

    Utilization of graphene may help realize innovative low-power replacements for III-V materials based high electron mobility transistors while extending operational frequencies closer to the THz regime for superior wireless communications, imaging, and other novel applications. Device architectures explored to date suffer a fundamental performance roadblock due to lack of compatible deposition techniques for nanometer-scale dielectrics required to efficiently modulate graphene transconductance (gm) while maintaining low gate capacitance-voltage product (CgsVgs). Here we show integration of a scaled (10 nm) high-κ gate dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) with an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD)-derived graphene channel composed of multiple 0.25 μm stripes to repeatedly realize room-temperature mobility of 11,000 cm(2)/V·s or higher. This high performance is attributed to the APCVD graphene growth quality, excellent interfacial properties of the gate dielectric, conductivity enhancement in the graphene stripes due to low tox/Wgraphene ratio, and scaled high-κ dielectric gate modulation of carrier density allowing full actuation of the device with only ±1 V applied bias. The superior drive current and conductance at Vdd = 1 V compared to other top-gated devices requiring undesirable seed (such as aluminum and poly vinyl alcohol)-assisted dielectric deposition, bottom gate devices requiring excessive gate voltage for actuation, or monolithic (nonstriped) channels suggest that this facile transistor structure provides critical insight toward future device design and process integration to maximize CVD-based graphene transistor performance. PMID:23777434

  10. Part-per-trillion level determination of antifouling pesticides and their byproducts in seawater samples by off-line solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, K; Ferrer, I; Barceló, D

    2000-05-19

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of antifouling pesticides and some of their byproducts such as dichlofluanid, diuron and its byproducts [demethyldiuron and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea], (2-thiocyanomethylthio)ben: zothiazole, chlorothalonil, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol 1051 and one of its byproducts (2-methylthio-4-tert.-butylamino-s-triazine) in seawater was developed. The extraction of these compounds from the filtered seawater samples was performed off-line with different solid-phase extraction sorbents using (I) a 500 mg graphitized carbon black cartridge (ENVI-Carb) and (II) 200 mg polymeric cartridges (LiChrolut EN and Isolute ENV+) and passing 500 ml of the sample through these cartridges. The detection was carried out by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry both in the negative and positive ion modes. The recovery ranged from 76 to 96% for the whole antifouling group with the ENVI-Carb cartridges and the detection limit was at the part-per-trillion level except for TCMTB. The method utilizing the polymeric cartridge proved to be very useful, time saving and with good recoveries when only Irgarol and its byproduct, Sea-nine 211 and diuron and its byproducts, have to be analyzed. The different cartridges were applied to the analysis of these pesticides in different marinas of the Catalan coast; diuron, dichlofluanid, Sea-nine 211, Irgarol as well as demethyldiuron and the Irgarol byproduct being the must ubiquitous pollutants. Maximum concentration levels were 2-3.5 microg/l of diuron and Sea-nine 211, respectively. PMID:10870693

  11. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision. PMID:23140957

  12. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  13. Sterilization of Surfaces with a Handheld Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Robert; Habib, Sara; Chan, Wai; Gonzalez, Eleazar; Tijerina, A.; Sloan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for decontaminating the surfaces of materials and equipment. In this study, an atmospheric pressure, oxygen and argon plasma was investigated for the destruction of viruses, bacteria, and spores. The plasma was operated at an argon flow rate of 30 L/min, an oxygen flow rate of 20 mL/min, a power density of 101.0 W/cm^3 (beam area = 5.1 cm^2), and at a distance from the surface of 7.1 mm. An average 6log10 reduction of viable spores was obtained after only 45 seconds of exposure to the reactive gas. By contrast, it takes more than 35 minutes at 121^oC to sterilize anthrax in an autoclave. The plasma properties were investigated by numerical modeling and chemical titration with nitric oxide. The numerical model included a detailed reaction mechanism for the discharge as well as for the afterglow. It was predicted that at a delivered power density of 29.3 W/cm^3, 30 L/min argon, and 0.01 volume% O2, the plasma generated 1.9 x 10^14 cm-3 O atoms, 1.6 x 10^12 cm-3 ozone, 9.3 x 10^13 cm-3 O2(^1δg), and 2.9 x 10^12 cm-3 O2(^1σ^+g) at 1 cm downstream of the source. The O atom density measured by chemical titration with NO was 6.0 x 10^14 cm-3 at the same conditions. It is believe that the oxygen atoms and the O2(^1δg) metastables were responsible for killing the anthrax and other microorganisms.

  14. Atmospheric pressure plasma for surface modification

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Rory A

    2012-01-01

    This Book's focus and intent is to impart an understanding of the practical application of atmospheric plasma for the advancement of a wide range of current and emerging technologies. The primary key feature of this book is the introduction of over thirteen years of practical experimental evidence of successful surface modifications by atmospheric plasma methods. It offers a handbook-based approach for leveraging and optimizing atmospheric plasma technologies which are currently in commercial use. It also offers a complete treatment of both basic plasma physics and industrial plasma process

  15. Perspectives on atmospheric-pressure plasmas for nanofabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-pressure, low-temperature plasmas are widely used for materials applications in industries ranging from electronics to medicine. To avoid the high costs associated with vacuum equipment, there has always been a strong motivation to operate plasmas at higher pressures, up to atmospheric. However, high-pressure operation of plasmas often leads to instabilities and gas heating, conditions that are unsuitable for materials applications. The recent development of microscale plasmas (i.e. microplasmas) has helped realize the sustainment of stable, non-thermal plasmas at atmospheric pressure and enable low-cost materials applications. There has also been an unexpected benefit of atmospheric-pressure operation: the potential to fabricate nanoscale materials which is not possible by more conventional, low-pressure plasmas. For example, in a high-pressure environment, nanoparticles can be nucleated in the gas phase from vapour (or solid metal) precursors. Alternatively, non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasmas can be coupled with liquids such as water or ethanol to nucleate and modify solution-phase nanoparticles. In this perspective paper, we review some of these recent efforts and provide an outlook for the rapidly emerging field of atmospheric-pressure plasmas for nanofabrication.

  16. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  17. Quantitative millimetre wavelength spectrometry at pressures approaching atmospheric II. Determination of oxygen at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A millimetre wavelength (MMW) Fabry-Perot cavity spectrometer described in earlier work has been applied to the measurement of oxygen absorption at 60 GHz and atmospheric pressure in a gas matrix of nitrogen. The spectrometer has also been modified such that the MMW source is stabilised by a sub-harmonic microwave signal transmitted by an infrared carrier on a single mode telecommunications fibre optic. This is a step towards developing an instrument comprising minimal electronic components that can perform MMW spectrometry remotely. Oxygen determinations were achieved by monitoring the change in the quality factor (Q) of a resonant Fabry-Perot cavity due to the presence of an absorbing sample. The MMW absorption of the sample was determined by incrementing the frequency modulation (FM) deviation of the source frequency scanning the cavity resonance profile. The response curve of absorption signal versus fraction of oxygen in nitrogen was found to be linear throughout the working range of 1-100% O2 (v/v) in N2 with a slope of (1.407±0.007)x10-4 m-1 (% O2)-1. The detection limit (3x standard deviation of the background) was found to be ∼0.8% (v/v). The MMW technique employed is advantageous since, unlike common MMW techniques, there is no vacuum requirement. Application of this method, to the monitoring of oxygen in gas mixtures of practical importance, is proposed. Values of the oxygen spectral absorption coefficients of lines between 55 and 60 GHz were measured at reduced pressure and found to be within ±2% of previous literature values. A pressure correction coefficient for O2 absorption at 60 GHz in the 45-121 kPa range was obtained and found to be (1.354±0.014)x10-4 m-1 kPa-1

  18. Comparison of various liquid chromatographic methods involving UV and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection for the efficient trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in various types of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heeft, E; Dijkman, E; Baumann, R A; Hogendoorn, E A

    2000-05-19

    The performance of mass spectrometric (MS) detection and UV detection in combination with reversed-phase liquid chromatography without and with the use of coupled column RPLC (LC-LC) has been compared for the trace analysis of phenylurea herbicides in environmental waters. The selected samples of this comparative study originated from an inter-laboratory study. For both detection modes, a 50 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column and a 100 mm x 4.6 mm I.D. column packed with 3 microm C18 were used as the first (C-1) and second (C-2) column, respectively. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry was performed on a magnetic sector instrument. The LC-LC-MS analysis was carried out on-line by means of direct large volume (11.7 ml) injection (LVI). The performance of both on-line (LVI, 4 ml of sample) and off-line LC-LC-UV (244 nm) analysis was investigated. The latter procedure consisted of a solid-phase extraction (SPE) of 250 ml of water sample on a 500 mg C18 cartridge. The comparative study showed that LC-LC-MS is more selective then LC-LC-UV and, in most cases, more sensitive. The LVI-LC-LC-MS approach combines direct quantification and confirmation of most of the analytes down to a level of 0.01 microg/l in water samples in less then 30 min. As regards LC-LC-UV, the off-line method appeared to be a more viable approach in comparison with the on-line procedure. This method allows the screening of phenylurea's in various types of water samples down to a level of at least 0.05 microg/l. On-line analysis with LVI provided marginal sensitivity (limits of detection of about 0.1 microg/l) and selectivity was sometimes less in case of surface water samples. Both the on-line LVI-LC-LC-MS method and the LC-LC-UV method using off-line SPE were validated by analysing a series of real-life reference samples. These samples were part of an inter-laboratory test and contained residues of herbicides ranging from 0.02 to 0.8 microg/l. Beside good correlation between the methods

  19. Rapid Screening of Inferior Quality Oils by Surface Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry%表面解吸常压化学电离质谱法快速筛查劣质食用油

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方小伟; 张丽丽; 贾滨; 张兴磊; 陈焕文

    2011-01-01

    采用自行研制的表面解吸常压化学电离源(SDAPCI),在无需样品预处理的前提下用质谱法直接分析不同品质油品(地沟油、市售品牌食用油),获得其化学指纹图谱,并通过主成分分析(PCA)方法,对指纹谱图信息进行数据分析,进而对不同品质油品进行筛查。结果表明:(1)地沟油与品牌食用油的指纹谱图间存在差异(;2)SDAPCI-MS结合PCA方法,能较好地将地沟油样品与正常的食用油样品进行区分(;3)本方法无需前处理、灵敏度高,分析速度快(单个样品分析时间约1.0 min),实现了高通量油样的快速筛查,为食品安全中快速筛查地沟油提供了一种快速、高效、灵敏的分析方法。%By using a home-made surface desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source,illicit cooking oils and normal edible oils were directly analyzed by mass spectrometry without any sample pretreatment.The MS data were further analyzed using principal component analysis(PCA).The SDAPCI-MS fingerprints of illicit cooking oils were different from those of normal edible oils.With the application of PCA,illicit cooking oils were successfully differentiated from normal oils.The method developed here is attractive by showing the advantages of no need for sample pretreatment,high sensitivity and high analytical speed(1.0 min per sample),and thus provides a fast and effective method to screen illicit cooking oils for the sake of food safety.

  20. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10–20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  1. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao; ZHU Fengsen; TU Xin; BO Zheng; CEN Kefa; LI Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    In this work,a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions.The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals,high speed photography,and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics.Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g.,10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone,in this RGA system,a lower gas flow rate (e.g.,2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions.Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas.The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes,the arc restrike mode,takeover mode,and combined modes,can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas.The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate.

  2. Using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment for treating grey cotton fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Chui-Fung; Chan, Chee-Kooi; Ng, Sun-Pui

    2014-02-15

    Conventional wet treatment, desizing, scouring and bleaching, for grey cotton fabric involves the use of high water, chemical and energy consumption which may not be considered as a clean process. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of the atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on treating grey cotton fabric when compared with the conventional wet treatment. Grey cotton fabrics were treated with different combinations of plasma parameters with helium and oxygen gases and also through conventional desizing, scouring and bleaching processes in order to obtain comparable results. The results obtained from wicking and water drop tests showed that wettability of grey cotton fabrics was greatly improved after plasma treatment and yielded better results than conventional desizing and scouring. The weight reduction of plasma treated grey cotton fabrics revealed that plasma treatment can help remove sizing materials and impurities. Chemical and morphological changes in plasma treated samples were analysed by FTIR and SEM, respectively. Finally, dyeability of the plasma treated and conventional wet treated grey cotton fabrics was compared and the results showed that similar dyeing results were obtained. This can prove that plasma treatment would be another choice for treating grey cotton fabrics. PMID:24507269

  3. A Spectacular Experiment Exhibiting Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Noxaïc, Armand

    2014-01-01

    The experiment described here is fairly easy to reproduce and dramatically shows the magnitude of ambient air pressure. Two circular plates of aluminum are applied one against the other. How do you make their separation very difficult? With only the help of an elastic band! You don't have to use a vacuum pump for this experiment.

  4. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  5. Temperature field simulation of gob influenced by atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 罗海珠; 梁运涛; 王继仁

    2015-01-01

    The current temperature field model of mine gob does not take the boundary conditions of the atmospheric pressure into account, while the actual atmospheric pressure is influenced by weather, so as to produce differences between ventilation negative pressure of the working face and the negative pressure of gas drainage in gob, thus interfering the calculated results of gob temperature field. According to the characteristics of the actual air flow and temperature change in gob, a two-dimensional temperature field model of the gob was built, and the relational model between the air pressure of intake and outlet of the gob and the atmospheric pressure was established, which was introduced into the boundary conditions of temperature field to conduct calculation. By means of analysis on the simulation example, and comparison with the traditional model, the results indicate that atmospheric pressure change had notable impact on the distribution of gob temperature field. The laboratory test system of gob temperature field was constructed, and the relative error between simulated and measured value was no greater than 9.6%, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. This work offers theoretical basis for accurate calculation of temperature and prediction of ignition source in mine gob, and has important implications on preventing spontaneous combustion of coal.

  6. On detecting biospheres from chemical thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Bergsman, David S.; Catling, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in Solar System atmospheres, in which we quantify the available Gibbs energy: the Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosph...

  7. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    formation is of great importance. In this context, establishing accurate sequencing of structural units for the DOM shall be attempted. The present work is focused on small organic molecules that are present in the COx formation and that could also play a key role in the migration processes. It would be valuable to develop rapid analytical methods that require only a small sample volume and minimal pretreatment. Of particular importance is the ability to analyze bulk pore water samples as opposed to samples subjected to specific extraction techniques, fractionation, and/or concentration. Mass Spectrometry with either the Electro-Spray or the Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization modes has been proved to be a powerful tool for aquatic humic substances since it allows the determination of the molecular weight distribution and the access to the different molecular weights. In this study, we have employed ESI-MS and APCI-MS to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock. Due to the very small quantities of COx pore water available from boreholes, these techniques are thus very suitable. The DOM in pore water has never been characterized on a well preserved pore water sample. The following aspects were considered in the present work: (1) the use of either ESI or APCI to select the most appropriated mode of ionization for providing the best information depending on the class of compound examined (2) a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample (3) the determination of concentration of dissolved organic matter and the evaluation of the organic matter maturity by Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and (4) the application of the proposed instrumental methods for the characterization of organic components from natural pore waters. For the first time to our knowledge, a quite exhaustive inventory of the small organic compounds presents is given without proceeding to any

  8. Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Assisted Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Chemat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heatingphenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a toolwhich will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as “My reaction yields90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes undermicrowaves?” and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted undermicrowaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reactionkinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, inagreement with experimental data and procedures.

  9. Application of Relationship Between Groundwater Level and Atmospheric Pressure Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. J.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Change in atmospheric pressure affects ground water levels. Barometric efficiency, which is an indicator for different exposure to the atmospheric pressure of observation well and adjacent ground cover, can be used as an effective tool for estimating some groundwater properties. If the top of an observation well is sealed and contact with the atmosphere is blocked, there would be no pressure difference between the well and adjacent ground cover. As a result, the difference between barometric efficiency values of sealed and unsealed well of identical condition can indicates the effect of atmospheric pressure changes on the groundwater level. One month observation data of hydraulic head and atmospheric pressure at Wonju-si in Gangwon-do, Korea are used. Two different methods, Clark's method and graphical method, are adopted to estimate the barometric efficiency. Because the efficiency has implication on the properties of aquifer covering condition, mapping of this efficiency might be used for estimating groundwater vulnerability of contamination from surface-loaded sources.

  10. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma in polymer and composite adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The temperature of the plasm gas reaching the surface of the substrate did not exceed 150 °C, which makes it suitable for polymer processing. The reactive species in the plasma downstream includes ~ 1016-1017 cm-3 atomic oxygen, ~ 1015 cm-3 ozone molecule, and ~ 10 16 cm-3 metastable oxygen molecule (O2 1Deltag). The substrates were treated at 2-5 mm distance from the exit of the plasma. Surface properties of the substrates were characterized using water contact angle (WCA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the plasma treated samples were bonded adhesively or fabricated into composites. The increase in mechanical strength was correlated to changes in the material composition and structure after plasma treatment. The work presented hereafter establishes atmospheric pressure plasma as an effective method to activate and to clean the surfaces of polymers and composites for bonding. This application can be further expanded to the activation of carbon fibers for better fiber-resin interactions during the fabrication of composites. Treating electronic grade FR-4 and polyimide with the He/O2 plasma for a few seconds changed the substrate surface from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, which allowed complete wetting of the surface by epoxy in underfill applications. Characterization of the surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows formation of oxygenated functional groups, including hydroxyl, carbonyl, and

  11. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary dielectric barrier discharges (f-DBD) depend on coupled electrical characteristics and thermal profiles. In this paper, a method for studying thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well-defined electrical characteristics of quasi-identical filaments with controlled distribution in time and space. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and plasma depend on the surface density and on the temporal frequency of filaments, defining the input power, and can be tuned by controlling heat transfers. Different methods to control these temperatures are depicted. Moreover, heat transfer through conduction and convection from dielectric surface is shown to be the dominant heating mechanism of the flowing gas in the reactor. Finally, experimental results show that the local temperature gradient around each filament can be controlled by the frequency of the applied voltage. Actually, the temperature difference between the filament and the surrounding gas is constant below 10 kHz but increases linearly with the frequency above 10 kHz. At high frequency, the time between two successive filaments occurring at the same position becomes smaller than the relaxation time constant of thermal exchanges (∼0.1 ms). Hence, this rise in local temperature can be attributed to time-limited heat transfers from the filament axis.

  12. Temperature profiles in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jidenko, N; Bourgeois, E; Borra, J-P [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (UMR 8578 CNRS-Univ Paris-Sud Orsay, F-91405) SUPELEC, Plateau Moulon, F-91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-07-28

    Physico-chemical properties of atmospheric pressure filamentary dielectric barrier discharges (f-DBD) depend on coupled electrical characteristics and thermal profiles. In this paper, a method for studying thermal and electrical effects is developed. Therefore, thermal profiles of f-DBD are studied for well-defined electrical characteristics of quasi-identical filaments with controlled distribution in time and space. The temperatures of gas, dielectric surface and plasma depend on the surface density and on the temporal frequency of filaments, defining the input power, and can be tuned by controlling heat transfers. Different methods to control these temperatures are depicted. Moreover, heat transfer through conduction and convection from dielectric surface is shown to be the dominant heating mechanism of the flowing gas in the reactor. Finally, experimental results show that the local temperature gradient around each filament can be controlled by the frequency of the applied voltage. Actually, the temperature difference between the filament and the surrounding gas is constant below 10 kHz but increases linearly with the frequency above 10 kHz. At high frequency, the time between two successive filaments occurring at the same position becomes smaller than the relaxation time constant of thermal exchanges ({approx}0.1 ms). Hence, this rise in local temperature can be attributed to time-limited heat transfers from the filament axis.

  13. Gas flow dependence of atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Chen, Xiaochang; Ni, Gengsong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is presented to explain the gas flow dependence of discharge characteristics in helium plasma needle at atmospherics pressure. The diffusional mixing layer between the helium jet core and the ambient air has a moderate effect on the streamer propagation. The obtained simulation results present that the streamer shows the ring-shaped emission profile at a moderate gas flow rate. The key chemical reactions which drive the streamer propagation are electron-impact ionization of helium neutral, nitrogen and oxygen molecules. At a moderate gas flow rate of 0.5 slm, a significant increase in propagation velocity of the streamer is observed due to appropriate quantity of impurities air diffuse into the helium. Besides, when the gas flow rate is below 0.35 slm, the radial density of ground-state atomic oxygen peaks along the axis of symmetry. However, when the gas flow rate is above 0.5 slm, a ring-shaped density distribution appears. The peak density is on the order of 1020 m-3 at 10 ns in our work.

  14. Characteristics of RF Cold Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Liang; MENG Yuedong; SHU Xingsheng

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of a stable discharge at atmospheric pressure is investigated.The plasma source consisted of two closely spaced parallel-plated perforated electrodes,driven by a radio frequency power to generate a uniform cold plasma in Helium at atmospheric pressure.Both alpha and gamma modes were clearly observed.The hollow cathode effects were found in the discharge.The influence of the dielectric barrier on the discharge was also investigated by utilizing a surface-anodized aluminium electrode as the anode.

  15. A simplified nitrogen laser setup operated at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangsri, Artit; Wungmool, Piyachat; Tesana, Siripong; Suwanatus, Suchat; Hormwantha, Tongchai; Chiangga, Surasak; Luengviriya, Chaiya

    2015-07-01

    A transversely excited atmospheric pressure nitrogen laser (TEA N2 Laser) is a molecular pulse gas laser, operated at atmospheric pressure, which generates an electromagnetic wave in ultraviolet wavelength of 337.1 nm. It can operate without an optical resonator. We present a TEA N2 laser setup excited by an electronic discharge circuit known as the Blumlein circuit. Our setup is composed of simple components commonly found in everyday life. The setup can be utilized in classroom to demonstrate the dependence of the laser intensity on the flow rate of nitrogen gas.

  16. On Detecting Biospheres from Chemical Thermodynamic Disequilibrium in Planetary Atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Bergsman, David S; Catling, David C

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in Solar System atmospheres, in which we quantify the available Gibbs energy: the Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere minus that of atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere is mostly attributable to O2 and CH4. The available Gibbs energy is not unusual compared to other Solar System atmospheres and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's fluid envelope contains an ocean, allowing gases to react with water and requiring a multiphase calculation with aqueous species. The disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole of atmosphere) ranges from ∼20 to 2 × 10(6) times larger than the disequilibria of other atmospheres in the Solar System, where Mars is second to Earth. Only on Earth is the chemical disequilibrium energy comparable to the thermal energy per mole of atmosphere (excluding comparison to Titan with lakes, where quantification is precluded because the mean lake composition is unknown). Earth's disequilibrium is biogenic, mainly caused by the coexistence of N2, O2, and liquid water instead of more stable nitrate. In comparison, the O2-CH4 disequilibrium is minor, although kinetics requires a large CH4 flux into the atmosphere. We identify abiotic processes that cause disequilibrium in the other atmospheres. Our metric requires minimal assumptions and could potentially be calculated from observations of exoplanet atmospheres. However, further work is needed to establish whether thermodynamic disequilibrium is a practical exoplanet biosignature, requiring an assessment of false positives, noisy

  17. Breaking the pumping speed barrier in mass spectrometry: discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2008-06-01

    The performance of mass spectrometers with limited pumping capacity is shown to be improved through use of a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface (DAPI). A proof-of-concept DAPI interface was designed and characterized using a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The interface consists of a simple capillary directly connecting the atmospheric pressure ion source to the vacuum mass analyzer region; it has no ion optical elements and no differential pumping stages. Gases carrying ionized analytes were pulsed into the mass analyzer for short periods at high flow rates rather than being continuously introduced at lower flow rates; this procedure maximized ion transfer. The use of DAPI provides a simple solution to the problem of coupling an atmospheric pressure ionization source to a miniature instrument with limited pumping capacity. Data were recorded using various atmospheric pressure ionization sources, including electrospray ionization (ESI), nano-ESI, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. The interface was opened briefly for ion introduction during each scan. With the use of the 18 W pumping system of the Mini 10, limits of detection in the low part-per-billion levels were achieved and unit resolution mass spectra were recorded. PMID:18461971

  18. Diagnostics of plasma-biological surface interactions in low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-surface interaction are required to understand in order to control the reactions precisely. Recent progress in atmospheric pressure plasma provides to apply as a tool of sterilization of contaminated foodstuffs. To use the plasma with safety and optimization, the real time in situ detection of free radicals - in particular dangling bonds by using the electron-spin-resonance (ESR) technique has been developed because the free radical plays important roles for dominantly biological reactions. First, the kinetic analysis of free radicals on biological specimens such as fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge. We have obtained information that the in situ real time ESR signal from the spores was observed and assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal was correlated with a link to the inactivation of the fungal spore. Second, we have studied to detect chemical modification of edible meat after the irradiation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) and ESR, signals give qualification results for chemical changes on edible liver meat. The in situ real-time measurements have proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  19. Atmospheric pressure and suicide attempts in Helsinki, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, Laura; Ruuhela, Reija; Ostamo, Aini; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Suominen, Kirsi; Partonen, Timo

    2012-11-01

    The influence of weather on mood and mental health is commonly debated. Furthermore, studies concerning weather and suicidal behavior have given inconsistent results. Our aim was to see if daily weather changes associate with the number of suicide attempts in Finland. All suicide attempts treated in the hospitals in Helsinki, Finland, during two separate periods, 8 years apart, were included. Altogether, 3,945 suicide attempts were compared with daily weather parameters and analyzed with a Poisson regression. We found that daily atmospheric pressure correlated statistically significantly with the number of suicide attempts, and for men the correlation was negative. Taking into account the seasonal normal value during the period 1971-2000, daily temperature, global solar radiation and precipitation did not associate with the number of suicide attempts on a statistically significant level in our study. We concluded that daily atmospheric pressure may have an impact on suicidal behavior, especially on suicide attempts of men by violent methods ( P suicide attempts. Men seem to be more vulnerable to attempt suicide under low atmospheric pressure and women under high atmospheric pressure. We show only statistical correlations, which leaves the exact mechanisms of interaction between weather and suicidal behavior open. However, suicidal behavior should be assessed from the point of view of weather in addition to psychiatric and social aspects.

  20. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, A., E-mail: alexandre.giuliani@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jamme, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Rouam, V.; Wien, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laprevote, O. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse, ICSN-CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Chimie-Toxicologie Analytique et cellulaire, IFR 71, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Refregiers, M. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with a vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) beamline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The set up allows photoionization up to 20 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared to classical atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), our set up offers spectral purity and tunability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allows photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile and hard to vaporize molecules. - Abstract: We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  1. Einstein's Tea Leaves and Pressure Systems in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Amit; Marshall, John

    2010-01-01

    Tea leaves gather in the center of the cup when the tea is stirred. In 1926 Einstein explained the phenomenon in terms of a secondary, rim-to-center circulation caused by the fluid rubbing against the bottom of the cup. This explanation can be connected to air movement in atmospheric pressure systems to explore, for example, why low-pressure…

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne; Goutianos, Stergios; Mitra, Susanta; Ghanbari-Siahkali, Afshin; Kingshott, Peter; Sørensen, Bent F.; Bindslev, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Glassy carbon plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). He gas, gas mixtures of He and reactive gases such as O2, CO2 and NH3, Ar gas and Ar/NH3 gas mixture were used as treatment gases. The oxygen and nitrogen contents on the surface as well as defect...

  3. Electrolytic synthesis of ammonia in molten salts under atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tsuyoshi; Nishikiori, Tokujiro; Nohira, Toshiyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-15

    Ammonia was successfully synthesized by using a new electrochemical reaction with high current efficiency at atmospheric pressure and at lower temperatures than the Haber-Bosch process. In this method, nitride ion (N3-), which is produced by the reduction from nitrogen gas at the cathode, is anodically oxidized and reacts with hydrogen to produce ammonia at the anode. PMID:12517136

  4. Modeling Chemical Growth Processes in Titan's Atmosphere: 1. Theoretical Rates for Reactions between Benzene and the Ethynyl (C2H) and Cyano (CN) Radicals at Low Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level were employed to characterize the critical points for adducts, isomers, products, and intervening transition states for the reactions between benzene and the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radicals. Both addition reactions were found to have no barriers in their entrance channels, making them efficient at the low temperature and pressure conditions that prevail in the haze-forming region of Titan's atmosphere as well as in the dense interstellar medium (ISM). The dominant products are ethynylbenzene (C6H5C2H) and cyanobenzene (C6H5CN). Hydrogen abstraction reactions were also characterized but found to be non-competitive. Trajectory calculations based on potentials fit to about 600 points calculated at the ROMP2/6-31+G** level for each interaction surface were used to determine reaction rates. The rates incorporated any necessary corrections for back reactions as ascertained from a multiwell treatment used to determine outcome distributions over the range of temperatures and pressures pertinent to Titan and the ISM and are in good agreement with the limited available experimental data.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, P.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  6. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  7. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Matrali, S. H. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Gazeli, K. [High Voltage Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Clement, F. [IPREM-LCABIE, Plasmas et Applications, UPPA, 64000 Pau (France); Antimisiaris, S. G. [Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion 26504 (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (ICES)-FORTH, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to 0. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  9. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≅ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number

  10. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-03-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron—ion pair, electron—neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer ven, and gas temperature Tg. The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature Tg are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≈ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W—the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number.

  11. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Bisbee, Patricia A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Birmele, Michele N.; Prior, Ronald L.; Perchonok, Michele; Dixon, Mike; Yorio, Neil C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12 kPa, respectively. Plants were harvested at 21 days after planting, with aerial shoots and swollen hypocotyls (edible portion of the radish referred to as the “root” hereafter) separated immediately upon removal from the chambers. Samples were subsequently evaluated for their sensory characteristics (color, taste, overall appearance, and texture), taste-determining factors (glucosinolate and soluble carbohydrate content and myrosinase activity), proximate nutrients (protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrate) and potential health benefit attributes (antioxidant capacity). In roots of control plants, concentrations of glucosinolate, total soluble sugar, and nitrate, as well as myrosinase activity and total antioxidant capacity (measured as ORACFL), were 2.9, 20, 5.1, 9.4, and 1.9 times greater than the amount in leaves, respectively. There was no significant difference in total antioxidant capacity, sensory characteristics, carbohydrate composition, or proximate nutrient content among the three pressure treatments. However, glucosinolate content in the root and nitrate concentration in the leaf declined as the atmospheric pressure decreased, suggesting perturbation to some nitrogen-related metabolism.

  12. Ir/thz Double Resonance Signatures at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dane J.; Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Everitt, Henry O.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; Holt, Jennifer; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-06-01

    IR/THz double resonance (DR) spectroscopy, historically used to investigate molecular collision dynamics and THz molecular lasers at low pressures (remote sensing at atmospheric pressure. Molecular specificity is obtained through the rare coincidence(s) between molecule-specific ro-vibrational energy levels and CO2 laser lines. The resulting molecule-specific, DR-induced, THz spectroscopic signatures strongly depend on the type of ro-vibrational transition involved (P, Q, or R), the type of vibrational level excited (stretching or bending), and the molecular mass. To illustrate these sensitivities, calculated DR spectra of prototypical molecules such as methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, and methyl cyanide will be discussed. Although atmospheric pressure broadening obfuscates pure rotational spectra, we show how it can enhance the DR signature in two ways: by relaxing the pump coincidence requirement and by adding the DR signatures of multiple nearby transitions. We will present estimates of this enhancement, including cases where the coincidences that produce the strongest DR signatures at atmospheric pressure do not exist at low pressures.

  13. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the last decades, plasma technology has been established in a series of surface treatment applications, e.g. for semiconductor processing or optical coatings. The majority of plasma assisted technologies is based on low pressure processes. In recent years, however, non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges have attracted considerable interest because of their simplified technical devices for industrial applications as compared to low pressure processes which require vacuum equipment. Hence, batch processing can be avoided, thus facilitating the implementation of plasma process steps into production lines. Investment costs are cut down significantly. The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas for technical applications dates back to the ozone production with dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) by Siemens in 1857. Lately, the application of atmospheric pressure plasmas for surface treatment has been reported, e.g. for the treatment of foils to improve printability, for surface cleaning and protective coatings. The DBD is known as a strongly inhomogeneous, filamentary discharge. A non filamentary, homogeneous DBD was observed in He, N2, other gases, and mixtures. An example of this discharge type and its application for the deposition of thin films by plasma polymerization is discussed in more detail. The standard planar electrode geometry of the DBD is characterized by a narrow inter-electrode gap in the mm-Region. Hence, surface treatment has been restricted to thin, flat substrates. Attempts to overcome these limitations involve micro discharge arrays and jet geometries, which are evoked by an enhanced gas flow, partly in combination with the electric field. Jets are created out of several plasma types, among them corona discharge, DBD, microwave discharge and RF discharge. With these plasma sources, substrate geometries displaying 3-dimensional features can be treated, too. Critical parameters for the comparison of atmospheric pressure surface

  14. A Micromachined Pressure Sensor with Integrated Resonator Operating at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel resonant pressure sensor with an improved micromechanical double-ended tuning fork resonator packaged in dry air at atmospheric pressure is presented. The resonator is electrostatically driven and capacitively detected, and the sensor is designed to realize a low cost resonant pressure sensor with medium accuracy. Various damping mechanisms in a resonator that is vibrating at atmospheric pressure are analyzed in detail, and a formula is developed to predict the overall quality factor. A trade-off has been reached between the quality factor, stress sensitivity and drive capability of the resonator. Furthermore, differential sense elements and the method of electromechanical amplitude modulation are used for capacitive detection to obtain a large signal-to-noise ratio. The prototype sensor chip is successfully fabricated using a micromachining process based on a commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafer and is hermetically encapsulated in a custom 16-pin Kovar package. Preliminary measurements show that the fundamental frequency of the resonant pressure sensor is approximately 34.55 kHz with a pressure sensitivity of 20.77 Hz/kPa. Over the full scale pressure range of 100–400 kPa and the whole temperature range of −20–60 °C, high quality factors from 1,146 to 1,772 are obtained. The characterization of the prototype sensor reveals the feasibility of a resonant pressure sensor packaged at atmospheric pressure.

  15. Atmospheric pressure loading parameters from very long baseline interferometry observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmillan, D. S.; Gipson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric mass loading produces a primarily vertical displacement of the Earth's crust. This displacement is correlated with surface pressure and is large enough to be detected by very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. Using the measured surface pressure at VLBI stations, we have estimated the atmospheric loading term for each station location directly from VLBI data acquired from 1979 to 1992. Our estimates of the vertical sensitivity to change in pressure range from 0 to -0.6 mm/mbar depending on the station. These estimates agree with inverted barometer model calculations (Manabe et al., 1991; vanDam and Herring, 1994) of the vertical displacement sensitivity computed by convolving actual pressure distributions with loading Green's functions. The pressure sensitivity tends to be smaller for stations near the coast, which is consistent with the inverted barometer hypothesis. Applying this estimated pressure loading correction in standard VLBI geodetic analysis improves the repeatability of estimated lengths of 25 out of 37 baselines that were measured at least 50 times. In a root-sum-square (rss) sense, the improvement generally increases with baseline length at a rate of about 0.3 to 0.6 ppb depending on whether the baseline stations are close to the coast. For the 5998-km baseline from Westford, Massachusetts, to Wettzell, Germany, the rss improvement is about 3.6 mm out of 11.0 mm. The average rss reduction of the vertical scatter for inland stations ranges from 2.7 to 5.4 mm.

  16. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Eden, James Gary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  17. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  18. Effect of ambient pressure and radiation reabsorption of atmosphere on the flame spreading over thermally thin combustibles in microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU; Wenfeng; (杜文峰); HU; Wenrui; (胡文瑞)

    2003-01-01

    For the flame spread over thermally thin combustibles in an atmosphere, if the atmosphere cannot emit and absorb the thermal radiation (e.g. for atmosphere of O2-N2), the conductive heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface dominates the flame spread at lower ambient atmosphere. As the ambient pressure increases, the flame spread rate increases, and the radiant heat transfer from the flame to the fuel surface gradually becomes the dominant driving force for the flame spread. In contrast, if the atmosphere is able to emit and absorb the thermal radiation (e.g. for atmosphere of O2-CO2), at lower pressure, the heat transfer from flame to the fuel surface is enhanced by the radiation reabsorption of the atmosphere at the leading edge of the flame, and both conduction and thermal radiation play important roles in the mechanism of flame spread. With the increase in ambient pressure, the oxygen diffuses more quickly from ambient atmosphere into the flame, the chemical reaction in the flame is enhanced, and the flame spread rate increases. When the ambient pressure is greater than a critical value, the thermal radiation from the flame to the solid surface is hampered by the radiation reabsorption of ambient atmosphere with the further increase in ambient pressure. As a result, with the increase in ambient pressure, the flame spread rate decreases and the heat conduction gradually dominates the flame spread over the fuel surface.

  19. Propagation of atmospheric pressure fronts in long vacuum tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental work was undertaken during the development of a system using fast acting valves to protect the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) vacuum chamber at CERN against damage from the implosion of thin wall vacuum chambers. A 30 m cylindrical tube with a diameter of 130 mm and similar to that used on the ISR, was evacuated to 10-2 torr. Following the sudden entry of atmospheric pressure at one end the pressure versus time diagram was observed a several points along the tube. These diagrams show a characteristic 'staircase' function which permits the determination of the propagation velocity. There is an initial weak pressure front of a few torr, propagated at 950 m s-1, which presents little mechanical danger, even to delicate components such as ionisation gauges. After a formation time of 0.1 s, one or more large amplitude (several tens of torr) and potentially dangerous pressure fronts are propagated with a velocity of 770 m s-1

  20. Sequential Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Assisted Laser Ablation of Photovoltaic Cover Glass for Improved Contour Accuracy

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Gerhard; Maximilian Dammann; Stephan Wieneke; Wolfgang Viöl

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present sequential atmospheric pressure plasma-assisted laser ablation of photovoltaic cover glass. First, glass samples were plasma pre-treated using a hydrogenous plasma process gas in order to accomplish a modification of the near-surface glass network by a chemical reduction and the implantation of hydrogen. As a result, the transmission at a wavelength of 355 nm was reduced by approximately 2% after plasma treatment duration of 60 min. Further, the surface polarity was ...

  1. Study of atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition by using a double discharge system for SiOx thin-film deposition with a HMDS/Ar/He/O2 gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiOx thin films were deposited at atmospheric pressure by using a double discharge system composed of a remote-type dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) formed above the substrate and a direct-type DBD formed by applying an AC power to the substrate with a gas mixture of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS)/O2/He/Ar. Instead of using a single DBD, the use of the double discharge system not only showed higher SiOx thin film deposition rates but also produced fewer impurities in the deposited SiOx thin film. The improvement was partially related to the increased gas dissociation near the substrate through the direct-type DBD and to the remote-type DBD. A 7-kV, 30-kHz AC voltage was applied to the remote-type DBD and a 5-kV, 20-kHz AC voltage was applied to the direct-type DBD, with a gas mixture of HMDS (400 sccm)/O2 (20 slm)/He (5 slm)/Ar (3 slm). As a result, a SiOx deposition rate of 58.29 nm/scan could be obtained while moving the substrate at a speed of 0.25 meter/min.

  2. Simultaneous extraction of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid from human plasma and simultaneous estimation by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry detection. Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Ajjala, Devender; Suraneni, Ramakrishna; Thoddi, Parthasarathi

    2011-01-01

    A simple analytical method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in atmospheric chemical ionization mode (APCI) for the simultaneous estimation of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, CAS 50-78-2) and its active metabolite salicylic acid (SA, CAS 69-72-7) in human plasma has been developed and validated. ASA and SA were analyzed simultaneously despite differences in plasma concentration ranges of ASA and SA after oral administration of ASA. In spite of having different chemical, ionization and chromatographic properties, ASA and SA were extracted simultaneously from the plasma sample using acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by liquid-liquid extraction. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase column with rapid gradient program using mobile phase consisting of ammonium acetate buffer and methanol. The structural analogue diclofenac was used as an internal standard. The multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions m/z 179 --> 137 for ASA, m/z 137 --> 65 for SA and m/z 294 --> 250 for IS were used. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.02-10 microg/mL for ASA and 0.1-50 microg/mL for SA. The between-batch precision (%CV) ranged from 2.1 to 7.9% for ASA and from 0.2 to 5.2% for SA. The between-batch accuracy ranged from 95.4 to 96.7% for ASA and from 94.6 to 111.3% for SA. The validated method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of ASA after single oral administration of 650 mg test formulation versus two 325 mg reference formulations of ASA in human subjects. PMID:21755814

  3. Deposition of anti-corrosion coatings by atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric-pressure, non-equilibrium plasma jet is currently under investigation at Chalk River Laboratories for the application of anti-corrosion coatings. This device produces concentrations of chemically-active species, similar to those observed in low-pressure plasma deposition systems, with the advantage of operating in an ambient pressure atmosphere. This paper describes measurements of the properties of a bench-scale plasma jet operating in etch and deposition mode. The jet effluent was characterized by various methods, including optical emission spectroscopy. Films deposited on metallic and insulating substrates have been characterized by optical microscopy and surface analytical techniques. The potential for scale-up of this process to treatment of reactor components is discussed. (author)

  4. Optimizing a remote sensing instrument to measure atmospheric surface pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, G. E.; Gatley, C.; Flower, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric surface pressure can be remotely sensed from a satellite by an active instrument which measures return echoes from the ocean at frequencies near the 60 GHz oxygen absorption band. The instrument is optimized by selecting its frequencies of operation, transmitter powers and antenna size through a new procedure baesd on numerical simulation which maximizes the retrieval accuracy. The predicted standard deviation error in the retrieved surface pressure is 1 mb. In addition the measurements can be used to retrieve water vapor, cloud liquid water and sea state, which is related to wind speed.

  5. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  6. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Pencheva, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  7. The main properties of microwave argon plasma at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benova, E; Pencheva, M, E-mail: benova_phys@deo.uni-sofia.b [Department for Language Teaching and International Students, University of Sofia, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-01-01

    Plasma torch sustained by surface wave at atmospheric pressure is theoretically studied by means of 1D model. A steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge is numerically solved together with Maxwell's equations for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave. The axial dependences of the electrons, excited atoms, atomic and molecular ions densities as well as the electron temperature, the mean power per electron and the effective electron-neutral collision frequency are determined. A strong dependence of the plasma properties on the discharge conditions and the gas temperature is obtained.

  8. Dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Gu, Biao; Wang, Wenchun; Wang, Dezhen; Peng, Xuwen

    2009-07-01

    An experimental study on the dynamics behavior of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (HDBD) at atmospheric pressure is described in this paper. Two kinds of discharge mode, glow and Townsend discharge modes, can be easily identified according to the differential conductivity of current-voltage relationship in the ascent stage of discharge current for the atmospheric HDBD. A (three-dimensional) 3D phase space made by discharge current, gas gap voltage, and charge density of dielectric-plate surface was utilized in the study. By projecting the discharge evolution trajectory in the 3D space, the 3D trajectory of multiple current peaks discharge in atmospheric helium shows a limited cycle with convolutions and undergoes a series of bifurcation process; however, the 3D trajectory of atmospheric N2 HDBD is a limited cycle without any convolution and bifurcation process. In addition, the first ionization coefficient of working gas plays a key role to determine the discharge mode of atmospheric HDBD, the transition of discharge mode and the dynamics stability of atmospheric HDBD.

  9. Thermally induced atmospheric pressure gas discharges using pyroelectric crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a heated pyroelectric crystal, an atmospheric pressure gas discharge was generated through the input of heat. When put through a change in temperature, the polarization of a pyroelectric can change significantly, creating a substantial electric potential at its surface. When configured with a grounded sharp counter electrode, a large inhomogeneous electric field forms in the interstitial gas to initiate a corona-like discharge. Under constant heating conditions, gaseous ions drifting to the pyroelectric accumulate and screen the electric field, extinguishing the discharge. By thermally cycling the pyroelectric, negative and positive discharges are generated during heating and cooling, respectively, with peak currents on the order of 80 nA. Time-integrated visualization confirmed the generation of both a corona-like discharge and a surface discharge on the pyroelectric. Parametric studies identified that thermal cycling conditions significantly influence discharge formation for this new atmospheric pressure discharge approach. (paper)

  10. Atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs) have attracted great interest and have been widely applied in biomedical applications, as due to their non-thermal and reactive properties, they interact with living tissues, cells and bacteria. Various types of plasma sources generated at atmospheric pressure have been developed to achieve better performance in specific applications. This article presents an overview of the general characteristics of APPs and a brief summary of their biomedical applications, and reviews a wide range of these sources developed for biomedical applications. The plasma sources are classified according to their power sources and cover a wide frequency spectrum from dc to microwaves. The configurations and characteristics of plasma sources are outlined and their biomedical applications are presented. (invited review)

  11. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo, E-mail: jsjlee@ajou.ac.kr, E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  12. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells

  13. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  14. Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Toshiki; Hidaka, Hiroki; Muguruma, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is presented. A system with a re-entrant microwave cavity realizes simple matching, stable plasma, and free space under the orifice of plasma steam. Hexamethyldisiloxane is employed as a monomer, while argon is used as a carrier gas. The effective area of the hydrophobic coating film used corresponds to a circle of 20 mm diameter and the deposition rate considered is 5 nm/min. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy shows that the coating film has a large molecular weight (>200 kDa), suggesting that a high-crosslinking and three-dimensional polymer matrix is formed and microwave-assisted atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization is fulfilled.

  15. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet was designed, which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply, and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge was achieved. Two kinds of typical bacteria, i.e., the Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coil (E. coil), were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma. The killing log value (KLV) of S. aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E. coil up to 5.36 with 60 s, respectively. According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment, it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation, while the heat, electric field and UV photons had little effect. (plasma technology)

  16. The first experiments on dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain uniform and stable discharge plasma in atmospheric pressure, dielectric barrier discharge experiments were carried out. Main purpose is to examine the applicability of dielectric barrier discharge to production processes of semi-conductors. LSIs and flat display panels. In the experiments, at first, quite stable and uniform discharge was obtained at atmospheric pressure. Effects of applied voltage and frequency on plasma uniformity were studied. Improvement of discharge uniformity by introducing gas flow of helium or nitrogen between the discharge gap was observed. Finally, surface cleaning effect of the present plasma was confirmed by observing contact angle of liquid droplet. At least for cleaning process, possibility of application as process plasma was suggested

  17. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for liquid spray treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitić, S.; Philipps, J.; Hofmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have been intensively studied in recent years due to growing interest in their use for biomedical applications and surface treatments. Either surfaces can be treated by a plasma jet afterglow for cleaning or activation or a material can be deposited by a reactive gas component activated by plasma. Effects of plasma on liquid have been reported several times where the electron spin trapping method was used for radical detection. Here we propose another method of liquid treatment using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. In the device presented here, liquid was sprayed in droplets from an inner electrode directly into a plasma jet where it was treated and sprayed out by gas flow. Optical end electrical measurements were done for diagnostics of the plasma while electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were used for detection of radicals (\\text{OH},\\text{OOH},\\text{CH} ) produced by plasma treatment of liquids.

  18. Laser ablation of zirconium in gas atmospheres at low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed nitrogen laser induced ablation of solid zirconium targets was monitored using laser induced fluorescence. Starting from 'new' surfaces, the density evolution under the influence of different gas atmospheres (oxygen, helium, hydrogen and nitrogen) with pressures up to 10-3 mbar has been studied. It was observed that even small amounts of gas lead to a large increase in the velocity and the density of the ablated atomic cloud. (author)

  19. Electrical, Optical and acoustic diagnostics of atmospheric pressure gas discharges

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Niall

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents original diagnostic investigations of atmospheric pressure gaseous discharges, operating in owing helium and helium with low concentrations (0.1 - 1 %) of gas admixtures, together with novel biomedical surface functionalisations. The initial body of this work focuses on comprehensive electrical and optical diagnostics of the operation of an industrial scale dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), maintained in a 10 l/min w of both helium and helium with 1% admixed ...

  20. BIOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE DIELECTRIC BARRIER DISCHARGES

    OpenAIRE

    Dodet, Bénédicte; Odic, Emmanuel; Salamitou, Sylvie; Goldman, Alice; Goldman, Max

    2006-01-01

    A reduction of more than 4 orders of magnitude of survivors was obtained by exposing a Bacillus Stearothermophilus spores - contaminated surface to an atmospheric pressure DBD post-discharge for 20 minutes. Decontamination mechanisms are investigated assuming that (i) inactivation is obtained when the bacteria DNA is fragmented, (ii) the protein coats are the main protection of the cell core DNA in the case of bacteria spores. The degradation of DNA (plasmid) and protein (RNAse A) samples sub...

  1. Plasma deposition of thiophene derivatives under atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    DAMS, Roel; VANGENEUGDEN, Dirk; Vanderzande, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    Plasma deposition of conjugated polymer films under atmospheric pressure is described. Three thiophene derivatives (thiophene, 3-methylthiophene, and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) are used as monomers. The plasma depositions with the various precursors are compared using analytical techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and resistance measurements. Good results are obtained with pulsed plasma depositions of...

  2. Thin film deposition on powder surfaces using atmospheric pressure discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of SiOx containing films on NaCl and KBr particles in dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure was investigated. As precursor hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in argon-oxygen gas mixtures were used. The deposited layers were studied by means of light microscopy, SEM and XPS investigations. The particles could be completely covered by SiOx. With increasing oxygen content in the coating the carbon content decreases

  3. Atmospheric pressure plasma analysis by modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractional number density measurements for a rf plasma 'needle' operating at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system designed for diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas. The MBMS system comprises three differentially pumped stages and a mass/energy analyzer and includes an automated beam-to-background measurement facility in the form of a software-controlled chopper mechanism. The automation of the beam modulation allows the neutral components in the plasma to be rapidly and accurately measured using the mass spectrometer by threshold ionization techniques. Data are reported for plasma generated by a needle plasma source operated using a helium/air mixture. In particular, data for the conversion of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen into nitric oxide are discussed with reference to its significance for medical applications such as disinfecting wounds and dental cavities and for microsurgery

  4. Clouds in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Mbarek, Rostom; Kempton, Eliza M. -R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have unequivocally proven the existence of clouds in super-Earth atmospheres (Kreidberg et al. 2014). Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds by determining which condensates are likely to form under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We study super-Earth atmospheres of diverse bulk composition, which are assumed to form by outgassing from a solid core of chondritic material, following Schaefer & Fegley (2010). The super-Earth atmosphe...

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Electrospin Hybrid Process for Protective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitchuli Gangadharan, Narendiran

    2011-12-01

    Chemical and biological (C-B) warfare agents like sarin, sulfur mustard, anthrax are usually dispersed into atmosphere in the form of micro aerosols. They are considered to be dangerous weapon of mass destruction next to nuclear weapons. The airtight protective clothing materials currently available are able to stop the diffusion of threat agents but not good enough to detoxify them, which endangers the wearers. Extensive research efforts are being made to prepare advanced protective clothing materials that not only prevent the diffusion of C-B agents, but also detoxify them into harmless products thus ensuring the safety and comfort of the wearer. Electrospun nanofiber mats are considered to have effective filtration characteristics to stop the diffusion of submicron level particulates without sacrificing air permeability characteristics and could be used in protective application as barrier material. In addition, functional nanofibers could be potentially developed to detoxify the C-B warfare threats into harmless products. In this research, electrospun nanofibers were deposited on fabric surface to improve barrier efficiency without sacrificing comfort-related properties of the fabrics. Multi-functional nanofibers were fabricated through an electrospinning-electrospraying hybrid process and their ability to detoxify simulants of C-B agents was evaluated. Nanofibers were also deposited onto plasma-pretreated woven fabric substrate through a newly developed plasma-electrospinning hybrid process, to improve the adhesive properties of nanofibers on the fabric surface. The nanofiber adhesion and durability properties were evaluated by peel test, flex and abrasion resistance tests. In this research work, following tasks have been carried out: i) Controlled deposition of nanofiber mat onto woven fabric substrate Electrospun Nylon 6 fiber mats were deposited onto woven 50/50 Nylon/Cotton fabric with the motive of making them into protective material against submicron

  6. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Topala, Ionut; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol No. 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Grigoras, Constantin, E-mail: andrei.nastuta@uaic.ro [Physiopathology Department, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2011-03-16

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  7. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  8. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  9. EDITORIAL: Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas for processing and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massines, Françoise

    2005-02-01

    Interest has grown over the past few years in applying atmospheric pressure plasmas to plasma processing for the benefits this can offer to existing and potential new processes, because they do not require expensive vacuum systems and batch processing. There have been considerable efforts to efficiently generate large volumes of homogeneous atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for surface treatment, thin film coating, sterilization, decontamination, etc. Many interesting questions have arisen that are related to both fundamental and applied research in this field. Many concern the generation of a large volume discharge which remains stable and uniform at atmospheric pressure. At this pressure, depending on the experimental conditions, either streamer or Townsend breakdown may occur. They respectively lead to micro-discharges or to one large radius discharge, Townsend or glow. However, the complexity arises from the formation of large radius streamers due to avalanche coupling and from the constriction of the glow discharge due to too low a current. Another difficulty is to visually distinguish many micro-discharges from one large radius discharge. Other questions relate to key chemical reactions in the plasma and at the surface. Experimental characterization and modelling also need to be developed to answer these questions. This cluster collects up-to-date research results related to the understanding of different discharges working at atmospheric pressure and the application to polymer surface activation and thin film coating. It presents different solutions for generating and sustaining diffuse discharges at atmospheric pressure. DC, low-frequency and radio-frequency excitations are considered in noble gases, nitrogen or air. Two specific methods developed to understand the transition from Townsend to streamer breakdown are also presented. They are based on the cross-correlation spectroscopy and an electrical

  10. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  11. New directions: Atmospheric chemical mechanisms for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduwela, Ajith; Luecken, Deborah; Carter, William; Derwent, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric chemical reaction scheme, commonly referred to as the chemical mechanism, is the portion of an air quality model that represents the atmospheric chemistry of the pollutants. It is at the heart of every air quality model used in research and policy applications to predict and analyse the complex air pollutants: ozone, air toxics and PM2.5. The chemical mechanism should incorporate available information on chemical kinetics and reaction pathways and be the conduit through which the fundamental science of atmospheric chemistry is applied to solve real-world problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of policies developed to reduce exposure to harmful pollutants depend on how well the mechanisms reflect the actual chemistry. If the mechanism has reaction pathways that are incorrectly characterised or completely missing, the resulting predictions may underestimate emission reduction requirements needed to meet public health and ecosystem protection targets, or may overstate the emission reductions needed and cause unnecessary implementation costs. It is therefore essential that mechanisms utilise the best, most up-to-date atmospheric chemistry information available so that policy development is based on air quality model predictions that are robust, transparent and free from scientific challenge. We are concerned that this may not continue to be the case.

  12. Development of superhydrophobic surface on glass substrate by multi-step atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Duksun [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn, E-mail: symoon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Plasma Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum system Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Superhydrophobic surface was prepared on a glass by helium based CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} atmospheric pressure plasmas, and its water wettability was investigated by a water droplet contact angle method. The water droplet spread over on the untreated glasses that showed the initial hydrophilic property of the glass surface. Then, the static contact angles became about 85° and 98° after a single step CH{sub 4} plasma treatment and a single step C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment, respectively. The contact angle was remarkably increased to 152°, indicating a superhydrophobic property, after a sequential multi-step CH{sub 4} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma treatment. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the field emission scanning electron microscope measurements, it was found that the physical morphologies and the chemical compositions were depending on the substrate materials, which were important factors for the superhydrophobicity. - Highlights: • Development of rapid and simple method for superhydrophobic surface • Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma for superhydrophobic surface preparation • Observation of chemical and physical surface modification by atmospheric pressure plasma • Effects of substrate properties for plasma–surface interaction.

  13. Development of superhydrophobic surface on glass substrate by multi-step atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superhydrophobic surface was prepared on a glass by helium based CH4 and C4F8 atmospheric pressure plasmas, and its water wettability was investigated by a water droplet contact angle method. The water droplet spread over on the untreated glasses that showed the initial hydrophilic property of the glass surface. Then, the static contact angles became about 85° and 98° after a single step CH4 plasma treatment and a single step C4F8 plasma treatment, respectively. The contact angle was remarkably increased to 152°, indicating a superhydrophobic property, after a sequential multi-step CH4 and C4F8 plasma treatment. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the field emission scanning electron microscope measurements, it was found that the physical morphologies and the chemical compositions were depending on the substrate materials, which were important factors for the superhydrophobicity. - Highlights: • Development of rapid and simple method for superhydrophobic surface • Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma for superhydrophobic surface preparation • Observation of chemical and physical surface modification by atmospheric pressure plasma • Effects of substrate properties for plasma–surface interaction

  14. Wet precipitation scavenging of soluble atmospheric trace gases due to chemical absorption in inhomogeneous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the effects of irreversible chemical reactions of the first and higher orders and aqueous-phase dissociation reactions on the rate of trace gas scavenging by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform concentration and temperature. We employ an one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of chemically active soluble gaseous pollutants that is valid for small gradients of temperature and concentration in the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that transient altitudinal distribution of concentration under the influence of rain is determined by the partial hyperbolic differential equation of the first order. Scavenging coefficients are calculated for wet removal of chlorine, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide for the exponential and linear initial altitudinal distributions of trace gases concentration in the atmosphere and linear and uniform altitudinal temperature distributions. Theoretical predictions of the dependence of the magnitude of the scavenging coefficient on rain intensity for sulfur dioxide are in a good agreement with the available atmospheric measurements.

  15. Chemical transport modeling of potential atmospheric CO2 sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration via engineered chemical sinks is investigated using a three dimensional chemical transport model (CTM). Meteorological and chemical constraints for flat or vertical systems that would absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, as well as an example chemical system of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) proposed by Elliott et al. [Compensation of atmospheric CO2 buildup through engineered chemical sinkage, Geophys. Res. Lett. 28 (2001) 1235] are reviewed. The CTM examines land based deposition sinks, with 4ox5o latitude/longitude resolution at various locations, and deposition velocities (v). A maximum uptake of ∼20 Gton (1015 g) C yr-1 is attainable with v>5 cm s -1 at a mid-latitude site. The atmospheric increase of CO2 (3 Gton yr-1) can be balanced by an engineered sink with an area of no more than 75,000 km2 at v of 1 cm s-1. By building the sink upwards or splitting this area into narrow elements can reduce the active area by more than an order of magnitude as discussed in Dubey at el. [31]. (author)

  16. UTMTOX, Toxic Chemical Transport in Atmosphere, Ground Water, Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of program or function: UTMTOX is a unified transport model for toxic materials. It combines hydrologic, atmospheric, and sediment transport in one computer code and extends the scope to predict the transport of not only trace metals but also many chemical compounds, including organics. UTMTOX is capable of calculating 1) the atmospheric dispersion of up to 20 chemicals from a maximum of 10 point, 10 line, and 10 area sources; 2) deposition of one chemical at a time in both wet and dry form on foliage or the surface of the earth; 3) surface flow and erosion; 4) percolation through the soil to a stream channel; and 5) flow in the stream channel to the outfall of a watershed. B - Method of solution: UTMTOX calculates rates of flux of chemicals from release to the atmosphere, through deposition on a watershed, infiltration, and runoff from the soil to flow in the stream channel and the associated sediment transport. From these values, mass balances can be established, budgets for the chemical can be made, and concentrations in many environmental compartments can be estimated. Since the coupling is established among three major submodels, they can share data

  17. The puzzling chemical composition of GJ 436b's atmosphere: influence of tidal heating on the chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Selsis, F; Iro, N

    2013-01-01

    The dissipation of the tidal energy deposited on eccentric planets may induce a heating of the planet that affects its atmospheric thermal structure. Here we study the influence of tidal heating on the atmospheric composition of the eccentric (e = 0.16) "hot Neptune" GJ 436b, for which inconclusive chemical abundances are retrieved from multiwavelength photometric observations carried out during primary transit and secondary eclipse. We build up a one-dimensional model of GJ 436b's atmosphere in the vertical direction and compute the pressure-temperature and molecular abundances profiles for various plausible internal temperatures of the planet (up to 560 K) and metallicities (from solar to 100 times solar), using a radiative-convective model and a chemical model which includes thermochemical kinetics, vertical mixing, and photochemistry. We find that the CO/CH4 abundance ratio increases with metallicity and tidal heating, and ranges from 1/20 to 1000 within the ranges of metallicity and internal temperature ...

  18. Modelling atmospheric chemical transformations under South African conditions / Gerhardus Dirk Fourie

    OpenAIRE

    Fourie, Gerhardus Dirk

    2000-01-01

    South Africa is in the process of adapting to new social and economical structures. The government has made it clear that the creation of work and economic growth is of the utmost importance. This policy will put South Africa's limited resources under enormous pressure and will have an adverse impact on the environment. In order to facilitate sound decision making, all aspects of the environmental impacts must be investigated, e.g. the necessary knowledge on atmospheric chemical transformatio...

  19. Surface analysis of polymers treated by remote atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Eleazar; Hicks, Robert F

    2010-03-01

    The surfaces of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and polyethersulfone (PES) were treated with a low-temperature, atmospheric pressure oxygen and helium plasma. The polymers were exposed to the downstream afterglow of the plasma, which contained primarily oxygen atoms and metastable oxygen molecules ((1)Delta(g) O(2)), and no ions or electrons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of HDPE revealed that 20% of the carbon atoms were converted into oxidized functional groups, with about half of these being carboxylic acids. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of all three polymers was obtained in order to determine the types of functional groups formed by atmospheric plasma exposure. It was found that the polymers were rapidly oxidized with addition of alcohols, ketones, and carboxylic acids to the carbon backbone. Chain scission occurred on HDPE and PMMA, while on PES the aromatic groups underwent ring-opening and insertion of carboxylic acid. PMID:19950952

  20. Decomposition of benzene in a corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kohki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Centre of Environmental Science and Disaster Mitigation for Advanced Research, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Toshiharu; Itoh, Hidenori [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the decomposition characteristics of benzene in a positive DC corona discharge between multineedle and plane electrodes with a background gas of nitrogen-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. We obtained C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, HCOOH, CO and CO{sub 2} as benzene fragments and by-products, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and HCN as minor intermediate products. Benzene was primarily converted into CO{sub 2} via CO at low oxygen concentrations (0.2%) and via CO and HCOOH at the atmospheric oxygen concentration (20%). Further, 57% and 24% of carbon atoms were deposited on the plane electrode and the discharge chamber at oxygen concentrations of 0.2% and 20%, respectively.

  1. Plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, A.; Leipold, F.; Kusano, Y.;

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in Ar/NH3 (0.1 - 10%) mixtures with a parallel plate electrode geometry was studied. The plasma was investigated by emission and absorption spectroscopy in the UV spectral range. Discharge current and voltage were measured as well. UV...... absorption spectroscopy was also employed for the detection of stable products in the exhaust gas. To clarify the different processes for ammonia decomposition, N-2(2 - 10%) was added to the plasma. Modeling of the chemical kinetics in an Ar/NH3 plasma was performed as well. The dominant stable products of...... an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 DBD are H-2, N-2 and N2H4. The hydrazine (N2H4) concentration in the plasma and in the exhaust gases at various ammonia concentrations and different discharge powers was measured. Thermal N2H4 decomposition into NH2 radicals may be used for NOx reduction processes....

  2. Excitation dynamics of micro-structured atmospheric pressure plasma arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Boettner, H; Waskoenig, J.; Connell, D O '; Winter, J; Schulz-von der Gathen, V

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The spatial dynamics of the optical emission from an array of 50 times 50 individual micro cavity plasma devices are investigated. The array is operated in argon and argon-neon mixtures close to atmospheric pressure with an AC voltage. The optical emission is analysed with phase and space resolution. It has been found that the emission is not continuous over the entire AC period, but occurs once per half period. Each of the observed emission phases shows a self-pulsing of the disc...

  3. Heat transport of nitrogen in helium atmospheric pressure microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Shaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Stable DC atmospheric pressure normal glow discharges in ambient air were produced between the water surface and the metallic capillary coupled with influx of helium gas. Multiple independent repeated trials indicated that vibrational temperature of nitrogen rises from 3200 to 4622 K, and rotational temperature of nitrogen decreases from 1270 to 570 K as gas flux increasing from 20 to 80 sccm and discharge current decreasing from 11 to 3 mA. Furthermore, it was found that the vibrational degree of the nitrogen molecule has priority to gain energy than the rotational degree of nitrogen molecule in nonequilibrium helium microplasma.

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    density increased with the plasma treatments. Adhesion test of the treated glassy carbon covered with cured epoxy showed cohesive failure, indicating strong bonding after the treatments. This is in contrast to the adhesion tests of untreated samples where the epoxy readily peeled off the glassy carbon.......Glassy carbon plates were treated with an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). He gas, gas mixtures of He and reactive gases such as O2, CO2 and NH3, Ar gas and Ar/NH3 gas mixture were used as treatment gases. The oxygen and nitrogen contents on the surface as well as defect...

  5. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes

  6. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  7. Electrical characterization of atmospheric pressure DBD in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air was generated between two rectangular copper electrodes covering the lower electrode with a dielectric (glass or polycarbonate -PC) using low frequency (line frequency-50Hz) high voltage power supply. The discharge was studied for inter-electrode gap spacing in the range of 2 mm – 5 mm and their influence on breakdown voltage. Voltage-current characteristics and the analysis of the distribution of current pulses per half cycle of the current waveform indicated that the discharge is more uniform in 3 mm inter-electrode gap spacing with PC as a dielectric rather than glass. (author)

  8. Microwave generation of stable atmospheric-pressure fireballs in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of stable buoyant fireballs in a microwave cavity in air at atmospheric pressure without the use of vaporized solids is described. These fireballs have some of the characteristics of ball lightning and resemble those reported by Dikhtyar and Jerby [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 045002 (2006)], although of a different color, and do not require the presence of molten or vaporized material. Mechanisms of microwave plasma formation and fluid dynamics can account for the observed behavior of the fireballs, which do not appear to meet the accepted definition of dusty plasmas in this case. Relevance to models of ball lightning and industrial applications are discussed

  9. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  10. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  11. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Polymer and Composite Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure helium and oxygen plasma was used to investigate surface activation and bonding in polymer composites. This device was operated by passing 1.0-3.0 vol% of oxygen in helium through a pair of parallel plate metal electrodes powered by 13.56 or 27.12 MHz radio frequency power. The gases were partially ionized between the capacitors where plasma was generated. The reactive species in the plasma were carried downstream by the gas flow to treat the substrate surface. The...

  12. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of carbon fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Michelsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    Carbon fibres are continuously treated with dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure in various gas conditions for adhesion improvement in mind. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis indicated that oxygen is effectively introduced onto the carbon fibre surfaces by He, He...... temperature for a month the O/C ratio at the plasma treated surfaces decreased to 0.151, which is close to that of the untreated ones. It can be attributed to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contamination at the plasma treated surfaces....

  14. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion;

    2012-01-01

    Efficiency of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above ∼140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma....... The ultrasonic irradiation during the plasma treatment consistently enhanced the treatment efficiency. The principal effect of ultrasonic irradiation can be attributed to enhancing surface oxidation during plasma treatment. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation can suppress arcing, and the uniformity of...... and the material surface, and thus, many reactive species generated in the plasma can reach the surface before they are inactivated and can be efficiently utilised for surface modification. In the present work, glass fibre reinforced polyester plates were treated using a dielectric barrier discharge...

  15. Ultrasound enhanced plasma surface modification at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Norrman, Kion;

    Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment can be highly enhanced by simultaneous high-power ultrasonic irradiation onto the treating surface. It is because ultrasonic waves with a sound pressure level (SPL) above approximately 140 dB can reduce the thickness of a boundary gas layer between the plasma...... air are separated using a polyethylene film. The gliding arc was extended by a high speed air flow into ambient air, directed the polyester surface at an angle of approximately 30o. The ultrasonic waves were introduced vertically to the surface. After the plasma treatment using each plasma source...... without ultrasonic irradiation, the water contact angle dropped markedly, and tended to decrease furthermore at higher power. The ultrasonic irradiation during the plasma treatment consistently improved the wettability. Oxygen containing polar functional groups were introduced at the surface by the plasma...

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Kartick K; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K, E-mail: ashwini@smita-iitd.co, E-mail: manjeet.jassal@smita-iitd.co [Smart and Innovative Textile Materials Group (SMITA), Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 {mu}l took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to < 1 s in the untreated samples. The plasma modified samples showed water contact angle of around 134{sup 0}. Both top and bottom sides of the fabric showed similar hydrophobic results in terms of water absorbency and contact angle. The results may be attributed to chemical reaction of butadiene with the cellulosic textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under <100 nm. The results showed that atmospheric pressure plasma can be successfully used for carrying out reaction of 1,3-butadiene with cellulosic textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  17. Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy apparatus: Bridging the pressure gap

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Vélez, J.; Pfeifer, V.; Hävecker, M.; R. Wang; Centeno, A.; Zurutuza, A.; Algara-Siller, G.; Stotz, E.; Skorupska, K.; Teschner, D; Kube, P.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Hofmann, S.; Schlögl, R.; Knop-Gericke, A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals in catalysis is the characterization of solid/gas interfaces in a reaction environment. The electronic structure and chemical composition of surfaces become heavily influenced by the surrounding environment. However, the lack of surface sensitive techniques that are able to monitor these modifications under high pressure conditions hinders the understanding of such processes. This limitation is known throughout the community as the “pressure gap”. We have developed a nov...

  18. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p Altman coefficient is 4.8 %). It appears from this study that changes in absolute intracranial pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  19. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ∼120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas. (paper)

  20. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, V. J.; Anghel, S. D.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency.

  1. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Hicks; Hans W. Herrmann

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas.

  2. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate a practical, environmentally benigh technology for the surface decontamination and decommissioning of radioactive waste. A low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed with initial support from the DOE, Environmental Management Sciences Program. This devise selectively etches radioactive metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. The technology shows a great potential for accelerating the clean-up effort for the equipment and structures contaminated with radioactive materials within the DOE complex. The viability of this technology has been demonstrated by selectively and rapidly stripping uranium from stainless steel surfaces at low temperature. Studies on uranium oxide have shown that etch rates of 4.0 microns per minute can be achieved at temperature below 473 K. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the atmospheric pressure plasma source. We are now able to scale up the plasma source to treat large surface areas

  3. Etching process of silicon dioxide with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrahigh etch rate (14 μm/min) of SiO2 and a high selectivity of SiO2/Si over 200 were achieved using a microwave-excited nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma source employing He, NF3, and H2O gases, which have been developed for application to microelectromechanical systems and other bionanotechnology fields. In order to clarify the etching mechanism, two diagnostic methods have been performed: (1) imaging of plasma emission with an intensified charge-coupled device camera, and (2) absorption measurements using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The etching characteristics are discussed in relation to the spatial distributions of the species involved. The etch rate depended considerably on the distance between the plasma and the substrate. Some radicals generated from the feed gases reached the substrate directly, while other radicals recombined into different species, which reached the substrate. An abundance of HF molecules were produced through a reaction between radicals generated by the atmospheric pressure discharge of NF3 and H2O. From these measurements, it has been found that the HF molecules generated played a role in producing the high etch rate of SiO2 and high etch selectivity of SiO2/Si

  4. Nonlinear lumped circuit modeling of an atmospheric pressure rf discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapke, M.; Ziegler, D.; Mussenbrock, T.; Gans, T.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2006-10-01

    The subject of our modeling approach is a specifically modified version of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ, originally proposed by Selwyn and coworkers^1) with reduced discharge volume, the micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ). The μ-APPJ is a homogeneous nonequilibrium discharge operated with Argon or Helium as the feedstock gas and a percentage volume admixture of a molecular gas (O2, H2, N2). The efficiency of the discharge is mainly due to the dissociated and activated molecules in the effluent that can be selected depending on the application. A variety of applications in surface treatment have already been demonstrated, e.g., in semiconductor technology, restoration and bio-medicine. In this contribution we present and analyze a nonlinear lumped circuit model of the μ-APPJ. We apply a two-scale formalism. The bulk is modeled by a generalized Ohm's law, whereas the sheath is described on a considerably higher level of mathematical sophistication. The main focus lies on the spectrum of the discharge current in order to support the characterization of the discharge via model-based diagnostics, i.e., the estimation of the spatially averaged electron density from the frequency of certain self-excitated collective resonance modes. J. Park et al., Appl. Phy. Lett. 76, 288 (2000)

  5. Hazardous gas treatment using atmospheric pressure microwave discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasinski, Mariusz; Zakrzewski, Zenon [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing non-thermal plasmas for control of gaseous pollutants are described in this paper. The main part of the paper is concerned with microwave torch discharges (MTDs). Results of laboratory experiments on plasma abatement of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in their mixtures with either synthetic air or nitrogen in low ({approx}100 W) and moderate (200-400 W) microwave torch plasmas at atmospheric pressure are presented. Three types of MTD generators, i.e. low-power coaxial-line-based MTDs, moderate-power waveguide-based coaxial-line MTDs and moderate-power waveguide-based MTDs were used. The gas flow rate and microwave (2.45 GHz) power delivered to the discharge were in the range of 1-3 litre min{sup -1} and 100-400 W, respectively. The concentrations of the processed gaseous pollutants were from several to several tens of per cent. The results showed that the MTD plasmas fully decomposed the VOCs at a relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of decomposition of several gaseous pollutants reached 1000 g (kW-h){sup -1}. This suggests that MTD plasmas can be useful tools for decomposition of highly concentrated VOCs.

  6. Compact atmospheric pressure plasma self-resonant drive circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on compact solid-state self-resonant drive circuits that are specifically designed to drive an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge of small volume (0.5 cm3). The atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) device can be operated with helium, argon or a mixture of both. Equivalent electrical models of the self-resonant drive circuits and discharge are developed and used to estimate the plasma impedance, plasma power density, current density or electron number density of three APP devices. These parameters and the kinetic gas temperature are dependent on the self-resonant frequency of the APP device. For a fixed switching frequency and APP device geometry, the plasma parameters are controlled by adjusting the dc voltage at the primary coil and the gas flow rate. The resonant frequency is controlled by the selection of the switching power transistor and means of step-up voltage transformation (ferrite core, flyback transformer, or Tesla coil). The flyback transformer operates in the tens of kHz, the ferrite core in the hundreds of kHz and Tesla coil in the MHz range. Embedded within this work is the principle of frequency pulling which is exemplified in the flyback transformer circuit that utilizes a pickup coil for feedback control of the switching frequency. (paper)

  7. Clouds in Super-Earth Atmospheres: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Mbarek, Rostom

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have unequivocally proven the existence of clouds in super-Earth atmospheres (Kreidberg et al. 2014). Here we provide a theoretical context for the formation of super-Earth clouds by determining which condensates are likely to form under the assumption of chemical equilibrium. We study super-Earth atmospheres of diverse bulk composition, which are assumed to form by outgassing from a solid core of chondritic material, following Schaefer & Fegley (2010). The super-Earth atmospheres that we study arise from planetary cores made up of individual types of chondritic meteorites. They range from highly reducing to oxidizing and have carbon to oxygen (C:O) ratios that are both subsolar and super-solar, thereby spanning a range of atmospheric composition that is appropriate for low-mass exoplanets. Given the atomic makeup of these atmospheres, we minimize the global Gibbs free energy of formation for over 550 gases and condensates to obtain the molecular composition of the atmospheres over a temper...

  8. The influence of atmospheric pressure on landfill methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere in the United States. However, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. Here, we present the results of a multi-season study of whole landfill CH4 emissions using atmospheric tracer methods at the Nashua, New Hampshire Municipal landfill in the northeastern United States. The measurement data include 12 individual emission tests, each test consisting of 5-8 plume measurements. Measured emissions were negatively correlated with surface atmospheric pressure and ranged from 7.3 to 26.5 m3 CH4 min-1. A simple regression model of our results was used to calculate an annual emission rate of 8.4x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These data, along with CH4 oxidation estimates based on emitted landfill gas isotopic characteristics and gas collection data, were used to estimate annual CH4 generation at this landfill. A reported gas collection rate of 7.1x106 m3 CH4 year-1 and an estimated annual rate of CH4 oxidation by cover soils of 1.2x106 m3 CH4 year-1 resulted in a calculated annual CH4 generation rate of 16.7x106 m3 CH4 year-1. These results underscore the necessity of understanding a landfill's dynamic environment before assessing long-term emissions potential

  9. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry: The journey from the planar to the non-planar surface analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Pokorný, Vít; Přibyl, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    Blankenberge: Royal Flemish Chemical Society, 2016. s. 47. [ChemCYS 2016. Chemistry Conference for Young Scientists /13./. 16.03.2016-18.03.2016, Blankenberge] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * ambient mass spectrometry * thin layer chromatography * insect Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  10. Cost Pressure Hurts Chemical Fiber Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The constant oil price rise in the international market in recent years has directly or indirectly triggered a drastic price rise of all commodities worldwide and in turn led to a global cost increase of raw materials. In the chemical fiber sector,raw materials hold a very high proportion in the production cost. For example, in polyester fiber PTA and MEG account for more than 80% of the production cost and in viscose fiber pulp also accounts for more than 60% of the production cost.

  11. Chemical Coupling Between Atmospheric Ozone and Particulate Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Z.; DABDUB, D; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    A major fraction of ambient particulate matter arises from atmospheric gas-to-particle conversion. Attempts to reduce particulate matter levels require control of the same organic and nitrogen oxide (NO_x) emissions that are precursors to urban and regional ozone formation. Modeling of the gas-aerosol chemical interactions that govern levels of particulate components showed that control of gas-phase organic and NO_x precursors does not lead to proportionate reductions of the gas-phase–derived...

  12. Quantifying drivers of chemical disequilibrium in the Earth's atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Simoncini, E.; Virgo, N.; Kleidon, A.

    2012-01-01

    It has long been observed that Earth's atmosphere is uniquely far from its thermochemical equilibrium state in terms of its chemical composition. Studying this state of disequilibrium is important both for understanding the role that life plays in the Earth system, and for its potential role in the detection of life on exoplanets. Here we present a methodology for assessing the strength of the biogeochemical cycling processes that drive disequilibrium in planetary systems. We apply it to the ...

  13. Measurement of viscosity of gaseous mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; Mall, G. H.; Chegini, H.

    1986-01-01

    Coefficients of viscosity of various types of gas mixtures, including simulated natural-gas samples, have been measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a modified capillary tube method. Pressure drops across the straight capillary tube section of a thermal mass flowmeter were measured for small, well-defined, volume flow rates for the test gases and for standard air. In this configuration, the flowmeter provides the volumetric flow rates as well as a well-characterized capillary section for differential pressure measurements across it. The coefficients of viscosity of the test gases were calculated using the reported value of 185.6 micro P for the viscosity of air. The coefficients of viscosity for the test mixtures were also calculated using Wilke's approximation of the Chapman-Enskog (C-E) theory. The experimental and calculated values for binary mixtures are in agreement within the reported accuracy of Wilke's approximation of the C-E theory. However, the agreement for multicomponent mixtures is less satisfactory, possible because of the limitations of Wilkes's approximation of the classical dilute-gas state model.

  14. Growth of carbon nanowalls at atmospheric pressure for one-step gas sensor fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yanwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional "graphitic" platelets that are typically oriented vertically on a substrate, can exhibit similar properties as graphene. Growth of CNWs reported to date was exclusively carried out at a low pressure. Here, we report on the synthesis of CNWs at atmosphere pressure using "direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition" by taking advantage of the high electric field generated in a pin-plate dc glow discharge. CNWs were grown on silicon, stainless steel, and copper substrates without deliberate introduction of catalysts. The as-grown CNW material was mainly mono- and few-layer graphene having patches of O-containing functional groups. However, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies confirmed that most of the oxygen groups could be removed by thermal annealing. A gas-sensing device based on such CNWs was fabricated on metal electrodes through direct growth. The sensor responded to relatively low concentrations of NO2 (g and NH3 (g, thus suggesting high-quality CNWs that are useful for room temperature gas sensors. PACS: Graphene (81.05.ue, Chemical vapor deposition (81.15.Gh, Gas sensors (07.07.Df, Atmospheric pressure (92.60.hv

  15. Iron Thin Films from Fe„CO…5 and FeCp2/H2O under Atmospheric Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Senocq, François; Duminica, Florin-Daniel; Maury, Francis; Delsol, Thomas; Vahlas, Constantin

    2006-01-01

    Iron layers were first obtained from iron pentacarbonyl in metallorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD process under atmospheric pressure, in the temperature range 473–773 K, in a vertical cold wall reactor. Films of good purity were obtained with or without hydrogen as co-reactant, no chemical additives being used. The experiments showed that the velocity of the gas stream and, to a lower extent, the precursor molar fraction are the key parameters to be controlled, in order to monitor f...

  16. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of 1,3-butadiene for hydrophobic finishing of textile substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Kartick K.; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of textile has both ecological and economical advantages over the wet-chemical processing. However, reaction in atmospheric pressure plasma has important challenges to be overcome before it can be successfully used for finishing applications in textile. These challenges are (i) generating stable glow plasma in presence liquid/gaseous monomer, and (ii) keeping the generated radicals active in the presence of contaminants such as oxygen and air. In this study, a stable glow plasma was generated at atmospheric pressure in the mixture of gaseous reactive monomer-1,3-butadiene and He and was made to react with cellulosic textile substrate. After 12 min of plasma treatment, the hydrophilic surface of the cellulosic substrate turned into highly hydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic finish was found to be durable to soap washing. After soap washing, a water drop of 37 μl took around 250 s to get absorbed in the treated sample compared to textile substrate. The surface characterization of the plasma modified samples under SEM and AFM revealed modification of the surface under textile substrates for producing hydrophobic surface finish.

  17. Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by altering gas flow rate in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by varying gas flow rate is proposed in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma treatment. • Without employing additional reactive gas, requiring more plasma power and longer treatment time, hydrophilicity of polyimide films was improved after the low-gas-flow plasma treatment. • The gas flow rate affects the hydrophilic properties of polymer surface by changing the discharge atmosphere in the particular geometry of the reactor developed. • Low-gas-flow induced wettability control suggests effective and economical plasma treatment. - Abstract: This paper reports on controlling the hydrophilicity of polyimide films using atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasmas by changing only the gas flow rate. The gas flow changed the discharge atmosphere by mixing the feed gas with ambient air because of the particular geometry of the reactor developed for the study, and a low gas flow rate was found to be favorable because it generated abundant nitrogen or oxygen species that served as sources of hydrophilic functional groups over the polymer surface. After low-gas-flow plasma treatment, the polymer surface exhibited hydrophilic characteristics with increased surface roughness and enhanced chemical properties owing to the surface addition of functional groups. Without adding any reactive gases or requiring high plasma power and longer treatment time, the developed reactor with low-gas-flow operation offered effective and economical wettability control of polyimide films

  18. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-02-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C6H5CH3) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C6H5CH3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N2: O2: H2O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C6H5CH3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C6H5CH3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  19. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc

  20. Genetic effects of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Wang, Li-Yan; Wang, Sen; Zhao, Hong-Xin; Sun, Wen-Ting; Xing, Xin-Hui; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2008-06-01

    Due to low gas temperatures and high densities of active species, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGDs) would have potential applications in the fields of plasma-based sterilization, gene mutation, etc. In this letter, the genetic effects of helium radio-frequency APGD plasmas with the plasmid DNA and oligonucleotide as the treated biomaterials are presented. The experimental results show that it is the chemically active species, instead of heat, ultraviolet radiation, intense electric field, and/or charged particles, that break the double chains of the plasmid DNA. The genetic effects depend on the plasma operating parameters, e.g., power input, helium flow rate, processing distance, time, etc.

  1. Fabrication of transparent antifouling thin films with fractal structure by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Hayato; Yamauchi, Koji; Kim, Yoon-Kee; Ogawa, Kazufumi; Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Suzaki, Yoshifumi

    2012-12-21

    Antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency has been fabricated on glass substrate by forming fractal microstructure(s). The fractal microstructure was constituted by transparent silica particles of 100 nm diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles by atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition. The sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. We found that one sample has the superhydrophobic ability with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°, while another sample has a high transmittance of more than 85% in a wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm. PMID:23186100

  2. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion. PMID:22528201

  3. Chemical Fractionation in the Silicate Vapor Atmosphere of the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Eiler, John; 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.10.03

    2010-01-01

    Despite its importance to questions of lunar origin, the chemical composition of the Moon is not precisely known. In recent years, however, the isotopic composition of lunar samples has been determined to high precision and found to be indistinguishable from the terrestrial mantle despite widespread isotopic heterogeneity in the Solar System. In the context of the giant-impact hypothesis, this level of isotopic homogeneity can evolve if the proto-lunar disk and post-impact Earth undergo turbulent mixing into a single uniform reservoir while the system is extensively molten and partially vaporized. In the absence of liquid-vapor separation, such a model leads to the lunar inheritance of the chemical composition of the terrestrial magma ocean. Hence, the turbulent mixing model raises the question of how chemical differences arose between the silicate Earth and Moon. Here we explore the consequences of liquid-vapor separation in one of the settings relevant to the lunar composition: the silicate vapor atmosphere...

  4. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment

  5. Sterilization of Turmeric by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setareh, Salarieh; Davoud, Dorranian

    2013-11-01

    In this study atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma has been employed for sterilizing dry turmeric powders. A 6 kV, 6 kHz frequency generator was used to generate plasma with Ar, Ar/O2, He, and He/O2 gases between the 5 mm gap of two quartz covered electrodes. The complete sterilization time of samples due to plasma treatment was measured. The most important contaminant of turmeric is bacillus subtilis. The results show that the shortest sterilization time of 15 min is achieved by exposing the samples to Ar/O2 plasma. Survival curves of samples are exponential functions of time and the addition of oxygen to plasma leads to a significant increase of the absolute value of time constant of the curves. Magnitudes of protein and DNA in treated samples were increased to a similar value for all samples. Taste, color, and solubility of samples were not changed after the plasma treatment.

  6. Electrical characterization of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the electrical characterization of dielectric barrier discharge produced at atmospheric pressure using a high voltage power supply operating at 50Hz. The characteristics of the discharge have been studied under different values as such applied voltage and the electrode gap width. The results presented in this work can be helpful in understanding the influence of dielectric material on the nature of the discharge. An attempt has also been made to investigate the influence of ballast resistor on the magnitude of discharge current and also the density of micro-discharges. Our results indicated that with this power supply and electrode geometry, a relatively more homogenous discharge is observed for 3 mm spacing. (author)

  7. A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dielectric barrier discharge in neon at atmospheric pressure is investigated with electrical measurement and fast photography. It is found that a stable diffuse discharge can be easily generated in a gap with a gap space of 0.5-6 mm and is identified with a glow discharge. The first breakdown voltage of the gap is considerably higher than that of the same gap working in a stable diffuse discharge mode, which indicates that Penning ionization of neon metastables from the previous discharge with inevitable gas impurities plays an important role in the decrease in the breakdown voltage. Discharge patterns are observed in a gap shorter than 1 mm. From the experiments with a wedge-like gap, it is found that the discharge patterns are formed in the area with a higher applied electric field, which suggests that a higher applied electric field may cause a transition from a diffuse glow to discharge patterns.

  8. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of < 100 microseconds. The maximum gas temperature, determined from nitrogen spectral lines, was below 400 K and the observed droplet size reduction implies additional factors beyond standard evaporation, including charge and surface chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  9. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  10. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film

  11. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  12. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance

  13. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Hicks; Gary S. Selwyn

    2001-01-09

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field.

  14. Controlling the NO production of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of NO radicals by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet has been investigated by means of absorption spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region (IR) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the ultraviolet (UV) part of the spectrum. The plasma jet investigated here operates in argon with air admixtures up to 1%. The study shows that OES can be used to characterize the relative NO production at small air admixtures. The Production of NO radicals can be controlled by variation of air admixture. Important to note—especially for operation in ambient conditions—is that a small addition of water vapour strongly affects the production of NO radicals especially at higher air admixtures (greater than 0.2%). (paper)

  15. Analysis of the cathodic region of atmospheric pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cathodic region of atmospheric pressure arcs is dominated by a number of different mechanisms. This makes a theoretical model extremely difficult. A description of this region based on fundamental physical principles is given. Using a previously published model of the inhomogeneous boundary layer of a Saha plasma (Schmitz H and Riemann K-U 2001 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 34 1193), the description is set on a firm theoretical basis. A number of equations including the energy balances of plasma boundary and cathode body lead to a maximum closure of the system. The values for the boundary conditions toward the plasma column could be motivated by a simple minimum principle argument thus eliminating all arbitrary fitting parameters. Results are given for a variety of external parameters and three different discharge gases. The comparison with experimental results shows excellent agreement. (author)

  16. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  17. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Benova, E [Department for Language Teaching and International Students, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-04-15

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency ({nu}/{omega}) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption {nu}/{omega} = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary {nu}/{omega}. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  18. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges for sterilization and surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, O. H.; Lai, C. K.; Choo, C. Y.; Wong, C. S.; Nor, R. M. [Plasma Technology Research Centre, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Thong, K. L. [Microbiology Division, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal dielectric barrier discharges can be generated in different configurations for different applications. For sterilization, a parallel-plate electrode configuration with glass dielectric that discharges in air was used. Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus cereus) were successfully inactivated using sinusoidal high voltage of ∼15 kVp-p at 8.5 kHz. In the surface treatment, a hemisphere and disc electrode arrangement that allowed a plasma jet to be extruded under controlled nitrogen gas flow (at 9.2 kHz, 20 kVp-p) was applied to enhance the wettability of PET (Mylar) film.

  19. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Cleaning of Contaminated Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project was to develop a low-cost, environmentally benign technology for the decontamination and decommissioning of transuranic waste. With the invention of the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet the goal was achieved. This device selectively etches heavy metals from surfaces, rendering objects radiation free and suitable for decommissioning. The volatile reaction products are captured on filters, which yields a tremendous reduction in the volume of the waste. Studies on tantalum, a surrogate material for plutonium, have shown that etch rate of 6.0 microns per minute can be achieved under mild conditions. Over the past three years, we have made numerous improvements in the design of the plasma jet. It may now be operated for hundreds of hours and not undergo any degradation in performance. Furthermore, small compact units have been developed, which are easily deployed in the field

  20. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure capillary DBD oxygen plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Pramanik, B K

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure capillary dielectric barrier oxygen discharge plasma jet is developed to generate non-thermal plasma using unipolar positive pulse power supply. Both optical and electrical techniques are used to investigate the characteristics of the produced plasma as function of applied voltage and gas flow rate. Analytical results obtained from the optical emission spectroscopic data reveal the gas temperature, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and electron density. Gas temperature and rotational temperature are found to decrease with increasing oxygen flow rate but increase linearly with applied voltage. It is exposed that the electron density is boosting up with enhanced applied voltage and oxygen flow rate, while the electron excitation temperature is reducing with rising oxygen flow rate. Electrical characterization demonstrates that the discharge frequency is falling with flow rate but increasing with voltage. The produced plasma is applied preliminarily to study the inactivation yie...

  1. Development of ac corona discharge modes at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corona discharges in gases exist under several distinctive forms. In this paper, a survey study has been made of ac corona discharge modes generated in some different gases fed in a wire-duct reactor with a constant rate of flowing at atmospheric pressure. The properties of different corona modes are analyzed under some condition transitions from Trichel pulses to a steady glow. In the course of the presented experimental work, numerous apparent contradictions with earlier observations necessitated further study and are given to provide more information on the physical mechanisms of the ac corona discharges. Furthermore, we have gained insight into some new technologies and applications of the environmentally friendly corona and plasma discharges.

  2. Electron-ion recombination study in argon at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with a wall-stabilized arc burning in argon at atmospheric pressure. A transient mode is obtained using a fast thyristor connected to the electrodes, which short-circuits the discharge. By means of two wavelengths laser interferometry and spectroscopy measurements we have determined the temporal changes of the electron density, ground state atom density and excited atom density. We have shown that, when the electric field is suppressed, the electron temperature rapidly decreases to the gas temperature before changing electron and atom densities. This phenomenon is applied to determine the gas temperature and to evaluate the role played by ionization in electron density balance. The coefficients of ambipolar diffusion, ionization and recombination and an apparent recombination coefficient are determined versus electron temperature and compared with theoretical values

  3. Bacterial Inactivation by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sanxi; Cheng, Cheng; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Chen, Hua

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli seeded in two media (agar and filter papers) were exposed to after-glow plasma emitted from a atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator in open air with a temperature of about 30-80 °C. In order to estimate the inactivation of microorganism using DBD plasma jet, various plasma conditions (such as treatment time and feed-gas composition of plasma jet) were changed. The results shown that the effective area of inactivation increased with the plasma treatment time as the bacteria seeded in Agar medium. The effective area of inactivation was much bigger than plasma jet treatment area after 5 min treatment. With the use of filter papers as the supporting media, the addition of reactive gases (oxygen, hydrogen peroxide vapor) into the plasma jet system, compared with only pure noble gas, led to a significant improvement in the bacterial Inactivation efficacy.

  4. Deposition of carbon nanostructures on metal substrates at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-03-01

    The microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD of carbon nanostructures at atmospheric pressure allows shorter deposition times and reduces the complexity of the experimental set-up. In our study, the substrate temperature was varied in a wide range (300 – 700 C) using microwave plasma heating, as well as an additional heater. The distance between the substrate and the plasma flame was also varied in order to establish the conditions for an efficient deposition process, the latter being carried out at specific argon/hydrogen/methane gas mixtures. Optical measurements of the plasma flame spectrum were conducted to obtain the gas temperature and the plasma density and to analyze the existence of reactive species. The carbon nanostructures deposited on the metal samples were investigated by SEM. The relation between the morphology and the gas-discharge conditions is discussed.

  5. Mass Spectrometry of Atmospheric Pressure Surface Wave Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Souza-Corrêa, J. A.; Amorim, J.

    2016-05-01

    By applying mass spectrometry techniques, we carried out measurements of ionic mass spectrum and their energy distribution in order to investigate an atmospheric argon discharge by using a surfatron surface-wave device. The mass and energy distribution measurements were performed with fixed flow rate (2.5 SLM) of pure argon gas (99.999%) and different Ar-O2 gas mixture compositions (99-1, 98-2 and 97-3). The mass spectra and energy distributions were recorded for Ar+, O+, O+ 2, N+ and N2 +. The axial distribution profiles of ionic mass and their energy were obtained for different experimental conditions as a function of the plasma length. The results showed that the peak of the positive ion energy distributions shifted to higher energies and also that the distribution width increased as the distance between the sampling orifice and the launcher gap was increased. It was also found that under certain experimental conditions the ion flux of atomic species were higher than the ion flux of their diatomic counterpart. The motivation of this study was to obtain a better understanding of a surface wave discharge in atmospheric pressure that may play a key role on new second generation biofuel technologies.

  6. Development of Simplified Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Maeda, Akihide; Yamanouchi, Kenta; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji; Oita University Team

    2015-09-01

    Nitriding treatment is one of the surface hardening technologies, applied to dies and automobile components. In recent industry, low-pressure nitriding treatment using vacuum system is mainstream. On the other hand, we have originally developed an atmospheric-pressure plasma nitriding which do not need vacuum system. However we needed an air-tight container to purge residual oxygen and external heater to control treatment temperature. To make this technique practical, we addressed to construct a simplified treatment system, where treatment temperature is controlled by thermal plasma itself and oxygen purging is achieved by a simple cover. This means that any air-tight container and external heater is not necessary. As a result, surface temperature is controlled by changing treatment gap from nozzle tip to steel surface. We succeeded in controlling well thickness of hardened layer by adjusting treatment temperature even in such a simplified system. In the conference, we also discuss experimental results for hardening complex shaped materials by using our simplified nitriding.

  7. Controlling hydrophilicity of polymer film by altering gas flow rate in atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Hur, Min; Lee, Jae-Ok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on controlling the hydrophilicity of polyimide films using atmospheric-pressure homogeneous plasmas by changing only the gas flow rate. The gas flow changed the discharge atmosphere by mixing the feed gas with ambient air because of the particular geometry of the reactor developed for the study, and a low gas flow rate was found to be favorable because it generated abundant nitrogen or oxygen species that served as sources of hydrophilic functional groups over the polymer surface. After low-gas-flow plasma treatment, the polymer surface exhibited hydrophilic characteristics with increased surface roughness and enhanced chemical properties owing to the surface addition of functional groups. Without adding any reactive gases or requiring high plasma power and longer treatment time, the developed reactor with low-gas-flow operation offered effective and economical wettability control of polyimide films.

  8. The pressure of QCD at finite temperatures and chemical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Aleksi R

    2003-01-01

    The perturbative expansion of the pressure of hot QCD is computed here to order g^6ln(g) in the presence of finite quark chemical potentials. In this process all two- and three-loop one-particle irreducible vacuum diagrams of the theory are evaluated at arbitrary T and mu, and these results are then used to analytically verify the outcome of an old order g^4 calculation of Freedman and McLerran for the zero-temperature pressure. The results for the pressure and the different quark number susceptibilities at high T are compared with recent lattice simulations showing excellent agreement especially for the chemical potential dependent part of the pressure.

  9. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI. PMID:25828352

  10. Combined Effects of Long-Living Chemical Species during Microbial Inactivation Using Atmospheric Plasma-Treated Water▿

    OpenAIRE

    Naïtali, Murielle; Kamgang-Youbi, Georges; Herry, Jean-Marie; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Brisset, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Electrical discharges in humid air at atmospheric pressure (nonthermal quenched plasma) generate long-lived chemical species in water that are efficient for microbial decontamination. The major role of nitrites was evidenced together with a synergistic effect of nitrates and H2O2 and matching acidification. Other possible active compounds are considered, e.g., peroxynitrous acid.

  11. Diamond-like films deposited in the plasma of barrier and surface discharges at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and properties were investigated of carbon coatings deposited in the plasma of barrier and surface discharges at atmospheric pressure. To examine the structure of the coatings, methods of transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis were used. The coatings produced in a barrier discharge in methane and in acetylene-hydrogen mixtures are similar in chemical and phase composition to amorphous diamond-like carbon films produced at low pressures by conventional deposition techniques. However, the coatings have a significant number of defects, evidently caused by the inherent microstructure of the barrier discharge. From this point of view, the use of a surface discharge is much more promising. The coatings produced in a surface discharge have almost no microdefects and both the spatial distribution of the energy delivered to the discharge and the transport of film-forming particles towards the substrate are more efficient. (J.U.)

  12. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  13. Study of short atmospheric pressure dc glow microdischarge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Chirtsov, Alexander; Emelin, Sergey

    2011-10-01

    The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen and oxygen atoms; ozone molecule; and different nitrogen and oxygen ions with different plasmochemical reactions between them. Simulations predicted the main regions of the dc glow discharges including cathode and anode sheath and plasma of negative glow, Faraday dark space and transition region. Gas heating plays an important role in shaping the discharge profiles. The results of experiments and simulations of short (without positive column) atmospheric pressure dc glow discharge in air are presented. We used metal steel electrodes with a gap of 5-100 microns. The experimental voltage-current characteristic's (VAC) have a constant or slightly increasing form at low gap. The most stable microdischarges were burning with a flat cathode and rounded anode, when the length of the discharge is automatically established near the minimum of the Paschen curve by changing their binding on the anode. In this case microdischarge was stable and it had growing VAC. For simulations we used 2D fluid model with kinetic description of electrons. We solved the balance equations for the vibrationally- and the electronically-excited states of a nitrogen and oxygen molecules; nitrogen

  14. Repetitive nanosecond glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packan, Denis

    Nonequilibrium, weakly ionized plasmas are widely used in the industry, but they are restricted to the domain of continuous discharges at low gas pressure or with specialty gases because of stability and power budget constraints. In this study, repetitively pulsed discharges were investigated as a way to decrease the power budget of atmospheric air plasmas by several orders of magnitude compared to continuous discharges, for an electron density of 1012 cm-3. The principle of the pulsed scheme is to use nanosecond electrical pulses to ionize air diffusely and with high efficiency, and to match the pulse interval with the recombination time of the plasma in order to maintain an elevated average electron density. Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian models of the physical processes in the discharge were examined, and the discharge parameters were chosen to minimize the power. Using a 10 ns, 12 kV, 100 kHz repetitive pulse generator, it was found that a repetitive nanosecond glow discharge could be operated in stable manner in atmospheric pressure air at 2000 K at an electron density of about 10 12 cm-3. Two pulsed discharges, with repetition frequencies of 100 kHz and 30 kHz, are described in this work. The electrode gap is 1 cm and the pulsed voltage is about 5 kV/cm. Electrical and optical methods were developed to measure the electron density in the discharge. The electron density was measured from the electrical conductivity during both the pulse and recombination phases, from the absolute intensity of the N2 Second Positive system during the pulse phase, and from the NO-gamma system during the recombination phase. The average electron density was found to be 1.4 x 1012 cm -3 for the 100 kHz discharge, and 1.8 x 102 cm-3 for the 30 kHz discharge, with peak values of 2 x 1012 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. The power budget for the 30 kHz discharge was measured, from the voltage and current during the pulse phase, to be about 10 W/cm3, which represents an improvement of

  15. Treatment of polycarbonate by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, K. G.; Hamia, Y. A. A.; Mota, R. P.; dos Santos, A. L. R.; Nascente, P. A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Generally most plastic materials are intrinsically hydrophobic, low surface energy materials, and thus do not adhere well to other substances. Surface treatment of polymers by discharge plasmas is of great and increasing industrial application because it can uniformly modify the surface of sample without changing the material bulk properties and is environmentally friendly. The plasma processes that can be conducted under ambient pressure and temperature conditions have attracted special attention because of their easy implementation in industrial processing. Present work deals with surface modification of polycarbonate (PC) by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. The treatment was performed in a parallel plate reactor driven by a 60Hz power supply. The DBD plasmas at atmospheric pressure were generated in air and nitrogen. Material characterization was carried out by contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface energy of the polymer surface was calculated from contact angle data by Owens-Wendt method using distilled water and diiodomethane as test liquids. The plasma-induced chemical modifications are associated with incorporation of polar oxygen and nitrogen containing groups on the polymer surface. Due to these surface modifications the DBD-treated polymers become more hydrophilic. Aging behavior of the treated samples revealed that the polymer surfaces were prone to hydrophobic recovery although they did not completely recover their original wetting properties.

  16. Chemical composition measurements of the atmosphere of Jupiter with the Galileo Probe mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D. N.; Hartle, R. E.; Hunten, D. M.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Owen, T. C.; Spencer, N. W.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Probe entered the atmosphere of Jupiter on December 7, 1995. Measurements of the chemical and isotopic composition of the Jovian atmosphere were obtained by the mass spectrometer during the descent over the 0.5 to 21 bar pressure region over a time period of approximately 1 hour. The sampling was either of atmospheric gases directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer through capillary leaks or of gas, which had been chemically processed to enhance the sensitivity of the measurement to trace species or noble gases. The analysis of this data set continues to be refined based on supporting laboratory studies on an engineering unit. The mixing ratios of the major constituents of the atmosphere hydrogen and helium have been determined as well as mixing ratios or upper limits for several less abundant species including: methane, water, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, propane, hydrogen sulfide, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Analysis also suggests the presence of trace levels of other 3 and 4 carbon hydrocarbons, or carbon and nitrogen containing species, phosphine, hydrogen chloride, and of benzene. The data set also allows upper limits to be set for many species of interest which were not detected. Isotope ratios were measured for 3He/4He, D/H, 13C/12C, 20Ne/22Ne, 38Ar/36Ar and for isotopes of both Kr and Xe.

  17. Quantifying drivers of chemical disequilibrium in the Earth's atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Simoncini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been observed that Earth's atmosphere is uniquely far from its thermochemical equilibrium state in terms of its chemical composition. Studying this state of disequilibrium is important both for understanding the role that life plays in the Earth system, and for its potential role in the detection of life on exoplanets. Here we present a methodology for assessing the strength of the biogeochemical cycling processes that drive disequilibrium in planetary systems. We apply it to the simultaneous presence of CH4 and O2 in Earth's atmosphere, which has long been suggested as a sign of life that could be detected from far away. Using a simplified model, we identify that the most important property to quantify is not the distance from equilibrium, but the power required to drive it. A weak driving force can maintain a high degree of disequilibrium if the residence times of the compounds involved are long; but if the disequilibrium is high and the kinetics fast, we can conclude that the disequilibrium must be driven by a substantial source of energy. Applying this to Earth's atmosphere, we show that the biotically-generated portion of the power required to maintain the methane-oxygen disequilibrium is around 0.67 TW, although the uncertainty in this figure is about 50% due to uncertainty in the global CH4 production. Compared to the chemical energy generated by the biota by photosynthesis, 0.67 TW represents only a very small fraction and, perhaps surprisingly, is of a comparable magnitude to abiotically-driven geochemical processes at the Earth's surface. We discuss the implications of this new approach, both in terms of enhancing our understanding of the Earth system, and in terms of its impact on the possible detection of distant photosynthetic biospheres.

  18. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied

  19. Basic characteristics of an atmospheric pressure rf generated plasma jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shou-Guo; Li Hai-Jiang; Ye Tian-Chun; Zhao Ling-Li

    2004-01-01

    A plasma jet has been developed which operates using radio frequency (rf) power and produces a stable homogeneous discharge at atmospheric pressure. Its discharge characteristics, especially the dependence of stable discharge operating range on the feed gas, were studied, and the electric parameters such as RMS current, RMS voltage and reflected power were obtained with different gas flows. These studies indicate that there is an optimum range of operation of the plasma jet for a filling with a gas mixture of He and O2. Two "failure" modes of the discharge are identified.One is a filamentary arc when the input power is raised above a critical level, another is that the discharge disappears gradually as the addition of O2 approaches 3.2%. Possible explanations for the two failure modes have been given. The current and voltage waveform measurements show that there is a clear phase shift between normal and failure modes.In addition, Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves as a function of pure helium and for 1% addition of oxygen have been studied.

  20. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  1. Mass spectrometric diagnosis of an atmospheric pressure helium microplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) has been used to study how different capillary widths (530 µm and 2.4 mm) and excitation waveforms (continuous wave kHz and pulsed dc) affect the ionic composition of atmospheric pressure plasma jets. It is shown from time-averaged ion intensities that reducing the width of the jet capillary results in a significant increase in the variety of both positive and negative ions detected within the discharge. We discuss this in terms of changes in flow velocity and the onset of turbulence within the plasma plume. Changing the mode of excitation had little effect on the ionic species detected from the microplasma jet; however, there was a notable shift in dominance towards higher mass ions when operated in a continuous wave kHz mode. The temporal evolution of the ions within the microplasma jet was observed for both excitation sources, operated at 5 and 15 kHz. Positive ions were created during periods correlated with the positive and negative peaks in discharge current, while negative ions were predominantly created at times when the discharge current peak was negative. This phenomenon was independent of the driving waveform. For pulsed dc excitation, considerably fewer positive ions were created in periods related to the negative current peaks, especially at higher frequencies. We propose a simple explanation for these processes based on ideas of streamer propagation and the influence of self-induced electric fields in the plasma plume. (paper)

  2. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, V. A. [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale Campus, FL, 33309, USA; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  3. Ultrasonic nebulization atmospheric pressure glow discharge - Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greda, Krzysztof; Jamroz, Piotr; Pohl, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge (μAPGD) generated between a small-sized He nozzle jet anode and a flowing liquid cathode was coupled with ultrasonic nebulization (USN) for analytical optical emission spectrometry (OES). The spatial distributions of the emitted spectra from the novel coupled USN-μAPGD system and the conventional μAPGD system were compared. In the μAPGD, the maxima of the intensity distribution profiles of the atomic emission lines Ca, Cd, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na and Sr were observed in the near cathode region, whereas, in the case of the USN-μAPGD, they were shifted towards the anode. In the novel system, the intensities of the analytical lines of the studied metals were boosted from several to 35 times. As compared to the conventional μAPGD-OES with the introduction of analytes through the sputtering and/or the electrospray-like nebulization of the flowing liquid cathode solution, the proposed method with the USN introduction of analytes in the form of a dry aerosol provides improved detectability of the studied metals. The detection limits of metals achieved with the USN-μAPGD-OES method were in the range from 0.08 μg L- 1 for Li to 52 μg L- 1 for Mn.

  4. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography hyphenated to atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappler, Julie; Guillarme, Davy; Rudaz, Serge; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    CZE is an appropriate technique for separating charged species, but lacks selectivity for neutral compounds. Alternative approaches such as microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) have been developed to broaden its range of applications. Hyphenation of MEEKC with MS is an attractive perspective since it can enhance sensitivity and selectivity. The on-line coupling of MEEKC with MS, however, is not straightforward due to the low compatibility of non-volatile surfactant additives (e.g. SDS) and the commonly used API source, namely ESI. In order to hyphenate MEEKC with MS detection, the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source was investigated. Possibilities offered by the coupling of MEEKC with APPI-MS were highlighted for the complex separation of ionized and neutral compounds in both the positive and negative modes. MEEKC-APPI-MS performance, in terms of selectivity, efficiency and sensitivity was compared to CZE-ESI-MS and MEEKC-ESI-MS for the screening of doping substances (beta-blockers, central stimulants, diuretics, etc). Relevant selectivity and detectability, particularly for neutral, structurally related and isobaric compounds was demonstrated with the MEEKC-APPI-MS approach opening new avenues for CE-MS, in addition to the well-established CZE-ESI-MS technique. PMID:18161697

  5. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  6. Blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in a cross flow at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qiang

    2015-07-22

    The blow-out limits of nonpremixed turbulent jet flames in cross flows were studied, especially concerning the effect of ambient pressure, by conducting experiments at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures. The combined effects of air flow and pressure were investigated by a series of experiments conducted in an especially built wind tunnel in Lhasa, a city on the Tibetan plateau where the altitude is 3650 m and the atmospheric pressure condition is naturally low (64 kPa). These results were compared with results obtained from a wind tunnel at standard atmospheric pressure (100 kPa) in Hefei city (altitude 50 m). The size of the fuel nozzles used in the experiments ranged from 3 to 8 mm in diameter and propane was used as the fuel. It was found that the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow first increased (“cross flow dominant” regime) and then decreased (“fuel jet dominant” regime) as the fuel jet velocity increased in both pressures; however, the blow-out limit of the air speed of the cross flow was much lower at sub-atmospheric pressure than that at standard atmospheric pressure whereas the domain of the blow-out limit curve (in a plot of the air speed of the cross flow versus the fuel jet velocity) shrank as the pressure decreased. A theoretical model was developed to characterize the blow-out limit of nonpremixed jet flames in a cross flow based on a Damköhler number, defined as the ratio between the mixing time and the characteristic reaction time. A satisfactory correlation was obtained at relative strong cross flow conditions (“cross flow dominant” regime) that included the effects of the air speed of the cross flow, fuel jet velocity, nozzle diameter and pressure.

  7. The Effects of Consistent Chemical Kinetics Calculations on the Pressure-Temperature Profiles and Emission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, Benjamin; Baraffe, Isabelle; Amundsen, David S; Mayne, Nathan J; Venot, Olivia; Goyal, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of calculating non-equilibrium chemical abundances consistently with the temperature structure for the atmospheres of highly-irradiated, close-in gas giant exoplanets. Chemical kinetics models have been widely used in the literature to investigate the chemical compositions of hot Jupiter atmospheres which are expected to be driven away from chemical equilibrium via processes such as vertical mixing and photochemistry. All of these models have so far used pressure--temperature (P-T) profiles as fixed model input. This results in a decoupling of the chemistry from the radiative and thermal properties of the atmosphere, despite the fact that in nature they are intricately linked. We use a one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model, ATMO, which includes a sophisticated chemistry scheme to calculate P-T profiles which are fully consistent with non-equilibrium chemical abundances, including vertical mixing and photochemistry. Our primary conclusion is that, in case...

  8. Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers in atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been studied in an atmospheric pressure radio frequency discharge without dielectric barrier covering the metallic electrodes. When the frequency is sufficiently high so that ions reside in the gap for more than one rf cycle ('trapped ions'), the operating voltage decreases remarkably and the transition from a uniform glow discharge to an arc discharge is suppressed even without dielectric barriers. More importantly, the trapped ions are able to build up a cathodic ion sheath. A large potential drop is created in the sheath between the bulk plasma and the electrode, which is essential for aligning growing CNFs. At the same time, the damage to CNFs due to ion bombardment can be minimized at atmospheric pressure. The primary interest of the present work is in identifying the cathodic ion sheath and investigating how it influences the alignment of growing CNFs in atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Spectral emission profiles of He (706 nm), Hα (656 nm), and CH (432 nm) clearly showed that a dark space is formed between the cathode layer and the heated bottom electrode. However, increasing the rf power induced the transition to a nonuniform γ-mode discharge which creates intense plasma spots in the dark space. Aligned CNFs can be grown at moderate input power during the initial stage of the deposition process. Catalyst particles were heavily contaminated by precipitated carbon in less than 5 min. Alignment deteriorates as CNFs grow and deposition was virtually terminated by the deactivation of catalyst particles

  9. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-Ox product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions

  10. Atmospheric pressure synthesis of photoluminescent hybrid materials by sequential organometallic vapor infiltration into polyethylene terephthalate fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyildiz, Halil I. [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Mousa, Moataz Bellah M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Jur, Jesse S., E-mail: jsjur@ncsu.edu [Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Exposing a polymer to sequential organometallic vapor infiltration (SVI) under low pressure conditions can significantly modify the polymer's chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. We demonstrate that SVI of trimethylaluminum into polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can also proceed readily at atmospheric pressure, and at 60 °C the extent of reaction determined by mass uptake is independent of pressure between 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr. At 120 °C, however, the mass gain is 50% larger at 2.5 Torr relative to that at 760 Torr, indicating that the precursor diffusion in the chamber and fiber matrix decreases at higher source pressure. Mass gain decreases, in general, as the SVI process temperature increases both at 2.5 Torr and 760 Torr attributed to the faster reaction kinetics forming a barrier layer, which prevents further diffusion of the reactive species. The resulting PET/Al-O{sub x} product shows high photoluminescence compared to untreated fibers. A physical mask on the polymer during infiltration at 760 Torr is replicated in the underlying polymer, producing an image in the polymer that is visible under UV illumination. Because of the reduced precursor diffusivity during exposure at 760 Torr, the image shows improved resolution compared to SVI performed under typical 2.5 Torr conditions.

  11. Forbush-effects and atmospheric pressure dynamics at high-altitude Tien Shan station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present atmospheric pressure dynamics studies at the high-altitude Tien Shan station (3340 m above sea level) during 23rd cycle of solar activity after Forbush-effects. It is established that 80 % of Forbush effects with delay 1 ÷ 3 days are accompanied with steady depression of atmospheric pressure irrespective of geomagnetic field conditions. We found that atmospheric pressure dynamics at mountains and ground levels during investigated periods is different. Experimental results are compared with possible mechanisms of influence of sporadic effects of solar activity on circulation of the lower atmosphere.

  12. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of flat aluminum surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DCSBD plasma is applicable for activation and cleaning of flat aluminum surfaces. • Decrease in the value of the contact angle after 1 s plasma treatment was 93%. • EDX measurements confirmed removal of oil contamination by 50% decreasing of carbon. • XPS analyze shown decrease of carbon content and increase of aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide. - Abstract: The atmospheric pressure ambient air and oxygen plasma treatment of flat aluminum sheets using the so-called Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) were investigated. The main objective of this study is to show the possibility of using DCSBD plasma source to activate and clean aluminum surface. Surface free energy measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used for the characterization of the aluminum surface chemistry and changes induced by plasma treatment. Short plasma exposure times (several seconds) led to a significant increase in the surface free energy due to changes of its polar components. Various ageing effects, depending on the storage conditions were observed and discussed. Effects of air and oxygen plasmas on the removal of varying degrees of artificial hydrocarbon contamination of aluminum surfaces were investigated by the means of EDX, ATR-FTIR and XPS methods. A significant decrease in the carbon surface content after the plasma treatment indicates a strong plasma cleaning effect, which together with high energy efficiency of the DCSBD plasma source points to potential benefits of DCSBD application in processing of the flat aluminum surfaces

  13. Pulsed microwave discharge at atmospheric pressure for NOx decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3.0 GHz pulsed microwave source operated at atmospheric pressure with a pulse power of 1.4 MW, a maximum repetition rate of 40 Hz, and a pulse length of 3.5 μs is experimentally studied with respect to the ability to remove NOx from synthetic exhaust gases. Experiments in gas mixtures containing N2/O2/NO with typically 500 ppm NO are carried out. The discharge is embedded in a high-Q microwave resonator, which provides a reliable plasma ignition. Vortex flow is applied to the exhaust gas to improve gas treatment. Concentration measurements by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirm an NOx reduction of more than 90% in the case of N2/NO mixtures. The admixture of oxygen lowers the reductive potential of the reactor, but NOx reduction can still be observed up to 9% O2 concentration. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique is applied to measure the vibrational and rotational temperature of N2. Gas temperatures of about 400 K are found, whilst the vibrational temperature is 3000-3500 K in pure N2. The vibrational temperature drops to 1500 K when O2 and/or NO are present. The randomly distributed relative frequency of occurrence of selected breakdown field intensities is measured by a calibrated, short linear-antenna. The breakdown field strength in pure N2 amounts to 2.2x106 V m-1, a value that is reproducible within 2%. In the case of O2 and/or NO admixture, the frequency distribution of the breakdown field strength scatters more and extends over a range from 3 to 8x106 V m-1

  14. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed

  15. Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges interacting with liquid covered tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of plasmas with liquids is of increasing importance in biomedical applications. Tissues treated by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in plasma medicine are often covered by a thin layer of liquid, typically a blood serum like water with dissolved gases and proteins up to hundreds of micrometres thick. The liquid processes the plasma-produced radicals and ions prior to their reaching the tissue. In this paper, we report on a computational investigation of the interaction of DBDs in humid air with a thin water layer covering tissue. The water layer, 50–400 µm thick, contains dissolved O2aq (aq means an aqueous species) and alkane-like hydrocarbons (RHaq). In the model, the DBDs are operated with multiple pulses at 100 Hz followed by a 1 s afterglow. Gas phase reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) intersect the water-vapour saturated air above the liquid and then solvate when reaching the water. The photolysis of water by plasma-produced UV/VUV plays a significant role in the production of radicals. Without RHaq, O2aq−, ONOOaq−, NO3aq− and hydronium (H3Oaq+) dominate the water ions with H3Oaq+ determining the pH. The dominant RONS in the liquid are O3aq, H2O2aq, and HNOxaq. Dissolved O2aq assists the production of HNO3aq and HOONOaq during the afterglow. With RHaq, reactive oxygen species are largely consumed, leaving an R·aq (alkyl radical) to reach the tissue. These results are sensitive to the thickness of the water layer. (paper)

  16. Common 0.1 bar Tropopause in Thick Atmospheres Set by Pressure-Dependent Infrared Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D

    2014-01-01

    A minimum atmospheric temperature, or tropopause, occurs at a pressure of around 0.1 bar in the atmospheres of Earth, Titan, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, despite great differences in atmospheric composition, gravity, internal heat and sunlight. In all these bodies, the tropopause separates a stratosphere with a temperature profile that is controlled by the absorption of shortwave solar radiation, from a region below characterised by convection, weather, and clouds. However, it is not obvious why the tropopause occurs at the specific pressure near 0.1 bar. Here we use a physically-based model to demonstrate that, at atmospheric pressures lower than 0.1 bar, transparency to thermal radiation allows shortwave heating to dominate, creating a stratosphere. At higher pressures, atmospheres become opaque to thermal radiation, causing temperatures to increase with depth and convection to ensue. A common dependence of infrared opacity on pressure, arising from the shared physics of molecular absorption, sets t...

  17. A new multiplex method for the diagnosis of peroxisomal disorders allowing simultaneous determination of plasma very-long-chain fatty acids, phytanic, pristanic, docosahexaenoic and bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Michela; Rizzo, Cristiano; Boenzi, Sara; Cappa, Marco; Bertini, Enrico; Antonetti, Giacomo; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisomal disorders (PDs) present with wide phenotypic variability. An appropriate diagnosis requires a complete analysis of peroxisomal metabolites. We developed a multiplex LC-MS/MS method, using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization allowing the simultaneous determination in plasma of very-long-chain fatty acids, phytanic, pristanic, docosahexaenoic acids and di- and tri-hydroxycolestanoic bile acids. Two hundred microliters of plasma extracted with acetonitrile and 200μl extracted with hexane after an acid hydrolysis were combined, evaporated, dissolved in 10μl of methanol and analyzed. The acquisition was in negative-ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring. The method was validated analytically and clinically. Linearity was 0.1-200μmol/l for docosanoic, cis-13-docosenoic, tetracosanoic, cis-15-tetracosenoic and phytanic acids; 0.01-10μmol/l for hexacosanoic acid; 0.02-20μmol/l for di-hydroxycolestanoic, tri-hydroxycolestanoic and pristanic acids; 0.3-300μmol/l for docosahexaenoic acid. Intra-day and inter-day CVs were below 3.88 and 3.98 respectively for all compounds. Samples from patients with known peroxisomal disorders were compared with controls and the method allowed to confirm the diagnosis in all subjects with a 100% sensitivity. The advantage of this multiplex method is to allow in a single chromatographic run the simultaneous determination of a large number of peroxisome biomarkers with a simple preparative phase without derivatization. PMID:27189059

  18. The detection and mapping of the spatial distribution of insect defense compounds by desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Hanus, Robert; Vaikkinen, A.; Haapala, M.; Kauppila, T. J.; Kostiainen, R.; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 886, Jul 30 (2015), s. 91-97. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25137P Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551204 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * ambient mass spectrometry * insect chemical defense * exocrine glands * termite * stink bug Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014

  19. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  20. Repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharge treatment of rough polymer surfaces: I. Humid air discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas generated at atmospheric pressure are used to functionalize the surfaces of polymers by creating new surface-resident chemical groups. The polymers used in textiles and biomedical applications often have non-planar surfaces whose functionalization requires penetration of plasma generated species into sometimes complex surface features. In this regard, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of a rough polypropylene surface was computationally investigated using a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model integrated with a surface kinetics model. Repetitively pulsed discharges produced in a dielectric barrier-corona configuration in humid air were considered to affix O. Macroscopic non-uniformities in treatment result from the spatial variations in radical densities which depend on the polarity of the discharge. Microscopic non-uniformities arise due to the higher reactivity of plasma produced species, such as OH radicals, which are consumed before they can diffuse deeper into surface features. The consequences of applied voltage magnitude and polarity, and the relative humidity on discharge dynamics and radical generation leading to surface functionalization, are discussed.

  1. Repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharge treatment of rough polymer surfaces: I. Humid air discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoj, Ananth N.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2008-08-01

    Plasmas generated at atmospheric pressure are used to functionalize the surfaces of polymers by creating new surface-resident chemical groups. The polymers used in textiles and biomedical applications often have non-planar surfaces whose functionalization requires penetration of plasma generated species into sometimes complex surface features. In this regard, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of a rough polypropylene surface was computationally investigated using a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model integrated with a surface kinetics model. Repetitively pulsed discharges produced in a dielectric barrier-corona configuration in humid air were considered to affix O. Macroscopic non-uniformities in treatment result from the spatial variations in radical densities which depend on the polarity of the discharge. Microscopic non-uniformities arise due to the higher reactivity of plasma produced species, such as OH radicals, which are consumed before they can diffuse deeper into surface features. The consequences of applied voltage magnitude and polarity, and the relative humidity on discharge dynamics and radical generation leading to surface functionalization, are discussed.

  2. Diagnosis of Emission Spectra on Chemical Vapor Deposition of TiO2 System with Atmospheric-Pressure Radio Frequency Plasma%大气压射频等离子体化学气相沉积TiO2体系的发射光谱诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常大磊; 李小松; 赵天亮; 朱爱民

    2013-01-01

      开展了大气压射频(RF)等离子体化学气相沉积(PCVD)TiO2放电体系的发射光谱诊断研究,分别考察了氧气分压、钛酸四异丙酯(TTIP)分压和输入功率对氧原子谱线相对强度、氩原子激发温度、OH振动温度以及转动温度的影响。结果表明:随着氧气分压的增加,氧原子谱线相对强度先迅速增加至峰值后缓慢下降, OH振动温度缓慢增加,而氩原子激发温度和OH转动温度基本不变。随着TTIP分压的增加,氧原子谱线相对强度下降,氩原子激发温度没有明显变化,而OH振动温度和转动温度增加。随着输入功率的增加,氧原子谱线相对强度下降,氩原子激发温度、OH振动温度和转动温度升高。%Diagnosis of emission spectroscopy on chemical vapor deposition (PCVD) of TiO2 with atmospheric-pressure radio frequency (RF) plasma was studied. The dependences of relative intensity of atomic oxygen line, Ar excitation temperature, OH rotational and vibrational temperatures were investigated on partial pressures of O2 and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and input power, respectively. The relative intensity of the atomic oxygen line rapidly increased to a maximum and slowly decreased with increasing O2 partial pressure. OH vibrational temperature gradual y increased, whereas Ar excitation temperature and OH rotational temperature showed little change. The relative intensity of the atomic oxygen line decreased, Ar excitation temperature remained constant, and OH vibrational and rotational temperatures increased with increasing TTIP partial pressure. The relative intensity of atomic oxygen line decreased, whereas the Ar excitation temperature and OH vibrational and rotational temperatures increased with increasing input power.

  3. Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges: A Low-Cost System for Surface Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma treatment is a common way for modifying the surface of a material. A simple but effective source for a low-temperature nonequilibrium plasma is dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), also referred to as silent discharges. DBDs are characterized by the presence of at least one insulating (dielectric) layer in the discharge gap between two metal electrodes. When a high voltage is applied to the DBD configuration, tiny breakdown channels are formed in the discharge gap. These microdischarges are characterized as a weakly ionized plasma containing electrons with energies up to 10 eV and ions at room temperature. The energetic electrons provide an effective tool for chemical surface modification. Typical setups for DBD treatments consist of vacuum chambers and vacuum equipment, and so are very cost-intensive. Atmospheric pressure discharges provide a possibility for low-cost surface chemistry, because the setup consists only of the discharge set-up in normal air or in a specified inert gas atmosphere and a high-voltage amplifier coupled with a frequency generator. Silent discharges in air increase the wettability of polymer foils such as PTFE and FEP, sufficient for cell growth and further for surface-chemical binding of proteins onto the polymer. Thereby a simple and low-cost process to achieve protein chips for biomedical applications may be envisaged

  4. High-quality epitaxial Si growth at low temperatures by atmospheric pressure plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the epitaxial Si growth on 4-inch-(001) Si wafers by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition (AP-PCVD) using a porous-carbon electrode. Defect-free growth of epitaxial Si is confirmed in the temperature range 470-570 deg. C by transmission electron microscopy. High minority carrier generation lifetime (2.0 ms) is observed in the Si film grown at 570 deg. C with a rate of 0.35 μm/min. In situ H2 AP-plasma cleaning of the substrate surface is effective for eliminating O and C concentration peaks at the film/substrate interface. Effects of plasma heating and ion bombardment of the growing-film surface have been discussed

  5. Effect of Swirling Desolvation Gas Flow in an Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savtchenko, Serguei; Ashgriz, Nasser; Jolliffe, Chuck; Cousins, Lisa; Gamble, Heather

    2014-09-01

    A numerical study is performed to examine the effect of introducing a swirling desolvation gas flow on the flow transport characteristics in an electrospray and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) system. An ion source having three coaxial tubes is considered: (1) an inner capillary tube to inject the liquid sample, (2) a center coaxial tube to provide a room temperature gas flow to nebulize the liquid, referred to as the nebulizing gas flow, and (3) an outer coaxial tube having a converging exit to supply a high temperature gas for droplet desolvation, referred to as the desolvation gas flow. The results show that a swirling desolvation gas flow reduces the dispersion of the nebulizing gas and suppresses turbulent diffusion. The effect of swirling desolvation flow on the trajectory of a range of droplet sizes emitted from a source is also considered.

  6. Antifouling Transparent ZnO Thin Films Fabricated by Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzaki, Yoshifumi; Du, Jinlong; Yuji, Toshifumi; Miyagawa, Hayato; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2015-09-01

    One problem with outdoor-mounted solar panels is that power generation efficiency is reduced by face plate dirt; a problem with electronic touch panels is the deterioration of screen visibility caused by finger grease stains. To solve these problems, we should fabricate antifouling surfaces which have superhydrophobic and oil-repellent properties without spoiling the transparency of the transparent substrate. In this study, an antifouling surface with both superhydrophobicity and oil-repellency was fabricated on a glass substrate by forming a fractal microstructure. The fractal microstructure was constituted of transparent silica particles 100 nm in diameter and transparent zinc-oxide columns grown on silica particles through atmospheric pressure cold plasma deposition; the sample surface was coated with a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. Samples were obtained which had a superhydrophobic property (with a water droplet contact angle of more than 150°) and a high average transmittance of about 90% (with wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 780 nm).

  7. Reduced VOC emissions from birch sawdust dried in a steam drier at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstrom, K.M. [Karlstad Univ., Karlstad (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental and Energy Systems, Div. of Engineering Sciences, Physics and Mathematics

    2003-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the quantity and composition of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from birch sawdust when it is dried in a steam dryer at atmospheric pressure. Sawdust is commonly dried for production of wood pellets and particle board. VOCs, which are emitted during the drying process, contribute to the formation of ground level ozone and other hazardous photochemical oxidants. The chemical composition of VOCs emitted from drying softwood is different from that emitted during the drying of hardwoods such as birch. The dryer used in this study was a pilot scale spouted bed in continuous operation. Sawdust was dried to different moisture contents. Two drying medium temperatures (170 degrees C and 200 degrees C) were applied. The results were then compared to the emissions from softwoods dried under similar conditions.

  8. The Research on Atmospheric Pressure Water Vapour Plasma Generation and Application for the Destruction of Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija Grigaitiene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Lithuanian Energy Institute an experimental atmospheric pressure Ar/water vapour plasma torch has been designed and tested. The power of plasma torch was estimated 40 ÷ 69 kW, the mean temperature of plasma jet at the exhaust nozzle was 2300÷2900K. The chemical compositionof water vapour plasma was established from the emission spectrum lines at 300 ÷ 800nm range. The main species observed in Ar/water vapour plasma were: Ar, OH, H, O, Cu. The experiments on water vapour steam reforming were performed. The results confirmed that water vapour plasma has the unique properties – high enthalpy and environmentally friendly conditions. It could be employed for environmental purposes such as destruction of wastes into simple molecules or conversion to synthetic gas.

  9. Influence of longitudinal argon flow on DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sha; Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Xu, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the influence of longitudinal argon flow on the DC glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. It is found that the charges exhibit distinct dynamic behaviors at different argon flow velocities, accompanied by a considerable change in the discharge structure. The positive argon flow allows for the reduction of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions, and even leads to the disappearance of negative glow. The negative argon flow gives rise to the enhancement of charge densities in the positive column and negative glow regions. These observations are attributed to the fact that the gas flow convection influences the transport of charges through different manners by comparing the argon flow velocity with the ion drift velocity. The findings are important for improving the chemical activity and work efficiency of the plasma source by controlling the gas flow in practical applications.

  10. Modelling the Role of Charge in Atmospheric Particle Formation Using Quantum Chemical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusuvuori, Kai

    2015-01-01

    New particle formation is an important process in the atmosphere. As ions are constantly produced in the atmosphere, the behaviour and role of charged particles in atmospheric processes needs to be understood. In order to gain insight on the role of charge in atmospheric new particle formation, the electron structure of the molecules taking part in this process needs to be taken into account using quantum chemical methods. Quantum chemical density functional theory was employed in an eff...

  11. VULCAN: an Open-Source, Validated Chemical Kinetics Python Code for Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Grosheintz, Luc; Rimmer, Paul B; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source and validated chemical kinetics code for studying hot exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name VULCAN. It is constructed for gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K using a reduced C- H-O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry. We have provided a full description of the rate coefficients and thermodynamic data used. We validate VULCAN by reproducing chemical equilibrium and by comparing its output versus the disequilibrium-chemistry calculations of Moses et al. and Rimmer & Helling. It reproduces the models of HD 189733b and HD 209458b by Moses et al., which employ a network with nearly 1600 reactions. Further validation of VULCAN is made by examining the theoretical trends produced when the temperature-pressure profile and carbon-to-oxygen ratio are varied. Assisted by a sensitivity test designed to identify the key reactions responsible for producing a specific molecule, we revisit the quenching ap...

  12. Modeling accidental releases to the atmosphere of a dense reactive chemical (Uranium hexafluoride)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Chang, Joseph C.; Zhang, Xiaoming J.

    In order to model the atmospheric transport and dispersion of dense reactive chemicals such as uranium hexafluoride (UF 6), it is necessary to include algorithms that account for heat exchanges due to chemical reactions and phase changes. UF 6 may be released accidentally at uranium-enrichment plants as a warm gas from a pipeline rupture, or as a flashing liquid from a pressurized tank or line break. The resulting plume is initially very dense due to the large molecular weight of UF 6, but may become lighter-than-air as the UF 6 reacts with water vapor to form HF, which has a molecular weight less than that of air, and which may cause an increase in plume temperature due to the exothermic reaction. The major chemical and thermodynamic processes related to UF 6 have been incorporated in a modified version of an existing dense gas model, HGSYSTEM. The same general approach could be used to include other reactive chemicals in the modeling system. New modules that are applicable to any type of chemical release have also been added to HGSYSTEM to account for building downwash, lift-off of warm plumes from the ground, and deposition. The revised HGSYSTEM/UF 6 model has been evaluated with field data from UF 6 tests. The sensitivities of the model predictions to variations in input parameters have been assessed.

  13. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  14. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  15. Relating landfill gas emissions to atmospheric pressure using numerical modeling and state-space analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T.G.; Christophersen, Mette; Moldrup, P.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    were applied: (I) State-space analysis was used to identify relations between gas flux and short-term (hourly) variations in atmospheric pressure. (II) A numerical gas transport model was fitted to the data and used to quantify short-term impacts of variations in atmospheric pressure, volumetric soil-water...... content, soil gas permeability, soil gas diffusion coefficients, and biological CH4 degradation rate upon landfill gas concentration and fluxes in the soil. Fluxes and concentrations were found to be most sensitive to variations in volumetric soil water content, atmospheric pressure variations and gas...

  16. Irradiated ignition of solid materials in reduced pressure atmosphere with various oxygen concentrations for fire safety in space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Aoki, A.

    concentrations are preferable for plant growth in depressurized environments. Our results imply that there is an optimum pressure level to achieve less fire chance with acceptable plant growth. An increase of the flammable range in middle pressure level might be explained by following two effects: one is a physical effect, such as a weak convective thermal removal from ignitable domain (near the hot surface) to the ambient of atmosphere, and the other is chemical effect which causes so-called "explosion peninsula" as a result of depleting radical consumption due to third-body recombination reaction. Further studies are necessary to determine the controlling factor on the observed flammable trend in depressurized conditions.

  17. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  18. A non-chemical spectroscopic determination of atmospheric beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium in the atmosphere is determined by emission spectroscopy using a non-chemical method of analysis. Long term effects of beryllium poisoning result in respiratory and skin disease, and this is partly reflected by the low threshold limits (0.002 mg/m3). In comparison the threshhold values for lead and cadmium are 0.2 and 0.16 mg/m3 respectively. Air samples are collected at 2 litres/ minute using cellulose filters, and sampling time is dependent on the individual process being monitored, but can be as short as five minutes, eg. dental laboratories. The filters are initially divided in two parts, and one portion is carefully pelletised using a steel press. The pellet is placed in an electrode cup and 'wetted' using isopropanol and ethylene glycol. Wetting is necessary because the pellets tended to explode out of the arcing zone. Calibration graphs were produced using an internal cobalt standard, and the 234.8 nm, 313.0 nm emission lines were used. No spectral and inter-element effects were observed, and the minimum detection limit was one nanogram. Under normal working conditions a 25% precision was obtained. (author)

  19. The atmospheric chemical vapour deposition of coatings on glass

    CERN Document Server

    Sanderson, K D

    1996-01-01

    The deposition of thin films of indium oxide, tin doped indium oxide (ITO) and titanium nitride for solar control applications have been investigated by Atmospheric Chemical Vapour Deposition (APCVD). Experimental details of the deposition system and the techniques used to characterise the films are presented. Results from investigations into the deposition parameters, the film microstructure and film material properties are discussed. A range of precursors were investigated for the deposition of indium oxide. The effect of pro-mixing the vaporised precursor with an oxidant source and the deposition temperature has been studied. Polycrystalline In sub 2 O sub 3 films with a resistivity of 1.1 - 3x10 sup - sup 3 OMEGA cm were obtained with ln(thd) sub 3 , oxygen and nitrogen. The growth of ITO films from ln(thd) sub 3 , oxygen and a range of tin dopants is also presented. The effect of the dopant precursor, the doping concentration, deposition temperature and the effect of additives on film growth and microstr...

  20. Effect that atmospheric pressure exerts to DC tracking of polyethylene irradiated with gamma ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the testing method of tracking resistance carried out generally, particular stipulation is not made on atmospheric pressure. But there is the case that electric and electronic equipments are used in the place of low pressure. The lowering of atmospheric pressure affects the phenomenon of tracking deterioration, and it is sufficiently conceivable that tracking resistance changes. So far, the effect that atmospheric pressure exerts on tracking resistance at the time of applying AC voltage has been mainly studied, however recently, DC voltage has become widely utilized, and the elucidation of DC tracking phenomena has become important. The experiment of irradiating Co-60 gamma ray to polyethylene and obtaining the basic data on the effect that atmospheric pressure exerts to DC tracking using those samples was carried out. The experimental setup, the samples and the tracking resistance test are reported. The relation of the weight loss with atmospheric pressure, the relation of the maximum erosion depth and atmospheric pressure, the measurement of the amount of residual carbide and the tracking resistance using brass electrodes are described. (K.I.)

  1. Applications of tunable high energy/pressure pulsed lasers to atmospheric transmission and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. V.; Seals, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy C12 O2(16) lasers were improved by pulsed high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening of laser lines, permits tuning the laser 'off' atmospheric C12 O2(16) absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers, and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. The atmospheric transmission of tuned C12 O2(16) lasers compares favorably with C12 O2(18) isotope lasers and CO lasers. The advantages of tunable, high energy, high pressure pulsed lasers over tunable diode lasers and waveguide lasers, in combining high energies with a large tuning range, are evaluated for certain applications to remote sensing of atmospheric constituents and pollutants. Pulsed operation considerably increases the signal to noise ratio without seriously affecting the high spectral resolution of signal detection obtained with laser heterodyning.

  2. Ion-ion reactions for charge reduction of biopolymer at atmospheric pressure ambient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Ming Zhou; Jian Hua Ding; Xie Zhang; Huan Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization source (EESI) was adapted for ion-ion reaction, which was demonstrated by using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for the first ion-ion reaction of biopolymers in the atmospheric pressure ambient.

  3. A Minimized Mutual Information retrieval for simultaneous atmospheric pressure and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Koner, Prabhat K.; Drummond, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of the Mars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) collaboration between NASA and ESA is the detection of the temporal and spatial variation of the atmospheric trace gases using a solar occultation Fourier transform spectrometer. To retrieve any trace gas mixing ratios from these measurements, the atmospheric pressure and temperature have to be known accurately. Thus, a prototype retrieval model for the determination of pressure and temperature from a broadband high resolution infrared Fou...

  4. Functionalization of graphene by atmospheric pressure plasma jet in air or H2O2 environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weixin; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    The functionalization of graphene, which deforms its band structure, can result in a metal-semiconductor transition. In this work, we report a facile strategy to oxidize single-layer graphene using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that generates a variety of reactive plasma species at close to ambient temperature. We systematically characterized the oxygen content and chemical structure of the graphene films after plasma treatment under different oxidative conditions (ambient air atmosphere or hydrogen peroxide solution) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Plasma-treated graphene films containing more than 40% oxygen were obtained in both oxidative environments. Interestingly, prolonged irradiation led to the reduction of graphene oxides. N-doping of graphene also occurred during the APPJ treatment in H2O2 solution; the nitrogen content of the doped graphene was dependent on the duration of irradiation and reached up to 8.1% within 40 min. Moreover, the H2O2 solution served as a buffer layer that prevented damage to the graphene during plasma irradiation. Four-point probe measurement revealed an increase in sheet resistance of the plasma-treated graphene, indicating the transition of the material property from semi-metallic to semiconducting.

  5. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  6. Development of propulsion for high atmospheric pressure or dense environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsi, G.; Back, L. H.; Dowler, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a propulsion system that employs a detonating propellant is described, and the need for such a system and its use in certain planetary atmospheres are demonstrated. A theoretical formulation of the relevant gas-dynamic processes was developed, and a related series of experimental tests were pursued.

  7. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y.; Fowler, Philip A.; Metz, Joannah M.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Bucklin, Ray A.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from 1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  8. Super-atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry and its application to ultrafast online protein digestion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2016-06-01

    Ion source pressure plays a significant role in the process of ionization and the subsequent ion transmission inside a mass spectrometer. Pressurizing the ion source to a gas pressure greater than atmospheric pressure is a relatively new approach that aims to further improve the performance of atmospheric pressure ionization sources. For example, under a super-atmospheric pressure environment, a stable electrospray can be sustained for liquid with high surface tension such as pure water, because of the suppression of electric discharge. Even for nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI), which is known to work with aqueous solution, its stability and sensitivity can also be enhanced, particularly in the negative mode when the ion source is pressurized. A brief review on the development of super-atmospheric pressure ion sources, including high-pressure electrospray, field desorption and superheated ESI, and the strategies to interface these ion sources to a mass spectrometer will be given. Using a recent ESI prototype with an operating temperature at 220 °C under 27 atm, we also demonstrate that it is possible to achieve an online Asp-specific protein digestion analysis in which the whole processes of digestion, ionization and MS acquisition could be completed on the order of a few seconds. This method is fast, and the reaction can even be monitored on a near-real-time basis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270863

  9. Measurement of the First Townsend's Ionization Coefficients in Helium, Air, and Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Junxia; Luo, Haiyun; Yue, Yang; Wang, Xinxin

    2014-07-01

    In the past the first Townsend’s ionization coefficient α could only be measured with Townsend discharge in gases at low pressure. After realizing Townsend discharge in some gases at atmospheric pressure by using dielectric barrier electrodes, we had developed a new method for measuring α coefficient at atmospheric pressure, a new optical method based on the discharge images taken with ICCD camera. With this newly developed method α coefficient in helium, nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure were measured. The results were found to be in good agreement with the data obtained at lower pressure but same reduced field E/p by other groups. It seems that the value of α coefficient is sensitive to the purity of the working gas.

  10. The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, Lev M.; Gerasimov, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Earth's initial atmosphere; (2) continuous degassing; (3) impact processes and the Earth's protoatmosphere; and (4) the evolution of an impact-generated atmosphere.

  11. A new humane method of stunning broilers using low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research project evaluated an alternative method of controlled atmosphere stunning of commercial broilers to induce anoxia utilizing a vacuum pump to reduce the oxygen tension, low atmospheric pressure stun (LAPS). A custom built 2 cage-module system (holding a total of 600 broilers each) with...

  12. Development and Characterization of a Hybrid Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Electrospinning System for Nanofiber Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Joshua Michael

    A hybrid atmospheric pressure-electrospinning plasma system was developed to be used for the production of nanofibers and enhance their performance for various applications. Electrospun nanofibers are excellent candidates for protective clothing in the field of chemical and biological warfare defense; however, nanofibers are structurally weak and easily abrade and tear. They can be strengthened through the support of a substrate fabric, but they do not adhere well to substrates. Through the use of the developed hybrid system with either pure He or He/O2 (99/1) feed gas, adherence to the substrate along with abrasion and flex resistance were improved. The plasma source was diagnosed electrically, thermally, and optically. An equivalent circuit model was developed for non-thermal, highly collisional plasmas that can solve for average electron temperature and electron number density. The obtained temperatures (~ 3eV) correlate very well with the results of a neutral Bremsstrahlung continuum matching technique that was also employed. Using the temperatures and number densities obtained from the circuit model and the optical spectroscopy, a global chemical kinetics code was written in order to solve for radical and ion concentrations. This code shows that there are significant concentrations of oxygen radicals present. The XPS analysis confirmed that there was an increase of surface oxygen from 11.1% up to 16.6% for the He/O2 plasma and that the C-O bonding, which was not present in the control samples, has increased to 45.4%. The adhesive strength to the substrate has a significant increase of 81% for helium plasma and 144% for He/O2 plasma; however, these values remain below the desired values for protective clothing applications. The hybrid system displayed the ability to oxygenate nanofibers as they are being electrospun and shows the feasibility of making other surface modifications. The developed circuit model and chemical kinetics code both show promise as tools

  13. Simulation of Electron-Beam Generating Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LI Hong; LI Benben; ZHOU Junqing; YAN Hong; SU Tie; WANG Huihui; LIUWandong

    2007-01-01

    As electron-beam generating plasma is widely applied,the software tool EGS4(Electron-Gamma Shower) was used to simulate the transmission and energy deposition of electron-beam in air.The simulation results indicated that the range of the electron-beam was inversely proportional to the gas pressure in a wide range of gas pressure,and the electron-beam of 200 keV could generate a plasma with a density 1011 cm-3 in air of latm.In addition,the energy distribution of the beam-electron and plasma density profile produced by the beam were achieved.

  14. Basic data for atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma investigations in environmental and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, M.; Bekstein, A.; Merbahi, N.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Benhenni, M.; Gardou, J. P.

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss some aspects of the optimization of the active species generated by corona or DBD discharges at atmospheric pressure which are very useful in the field of plasma environmental and biomedical applications. For such an optimization, this paper targets, in particular, the use of discharge modeling tools and the problem of accuracy of the required basic data. First of all, an overview on the different experimental diagnostics used for the characterization of these non-thermal plasmas is given followed by a short description of the different models (streamer dynamics, gas dynamics and chemical kinetics coupled with models of basic data calculation) required for complementing such experimental investigations. Then, emphasis is placed on the basic data of charged particles (electrons and ions) needed for streamer dynamics modeling and particularly on the necessity to use accurate and validated basic data in order to have a quantitative (not only qualitative) description of the phenomena and processes occurring in such discharges. An overview is given on the calculations and the fitting methods of collision cross sections and swarm coefficients of the data of charged particles and their validation using, in particular, pulsed Townsend measurements for experimental comparisons. Swarm coefficients are calculated from a multi-term solution of the Boltzmann equation or from Monte Carlo simulation. Some illustrative results are given in the case of the simulations of a dc positive point-to-plane corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of consideration of some basic data, particularly those of polyatomic ions, is shown on the discharge development and the radical production.

  15. Basic data for atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma investigations in environmental and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to discuss some aspects of the optimization of the active species generated by corona or DBD discharges at atmospheric pressure which are very useful in the field of plasma environmental and biomedical applications. For such an optimization, this paper targets, in particular, the use of discharge modeling tools and the problem of accuracy of the required basic data. First of all, an overview on the different experimental diagnostics used for the characterization of these non-thermal plasmas is given followed by a short description of the different models (streamer dynamics, gas dynamics and chemical kinetics coupled with models of basic data calculation) required for complementing such experimental investigations. Then, emphasis is placed on the basic data of charged particles (electrons and ions) needed for streamer dynamics modeling and particularly on the necessity to use accurate and validated basic data in order to have a quantitative (not only qualitative) description of the phenomena and processes occurring in such discharges. An overview is given on the calculations and the fitting methods of collision cross sections and swarm coefficients of the data of charged particles and their validation using, in particular, pulsed Townsend measurements for experimental comparisons. Swarm coefficients are calculated from a multi-term solution of the Boltzmann equation or from Monte Carlo simulation. Some illustrative results are given in the case of the simulations of a dc positive point-to-plane corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. The effect of consideration of some basic data, particularly those of polyatomic ions, is shown on the discharge development and the radical production.

  16. Form control in atmospheric pressure plasma processing of ground fused silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo; Wang, Bo; Xin, Qiang; Jin, Huiliang; Wang, Jun; Dong, Wenxia

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing (APPP) using inductively coupled plasma has demonstrated that it can achieve comparable removal rate on the optical surface of fused silica under the atmosphere pressure and has the advantage of inducing no sub-surface damage for its non-contact and chemical etching mechanism. APPP technology is a cost effective way, compared with traditional mechanical polishing, magnetorheological finishing and ion beam figuring. Thus, due to these advantages, this technology is being tested to fabricate large aperture optics of fused silica to help shorten the polishing time in optics fabrication chain. Now our group proposes to use inductively coupled plasma processing technology to fabricate ground surface of fused silica directly after the grinding stage. In this paper, form control method and several processing parameters are investigated to evaluate the removal efficiency and the surface quality, including the robustness of removal function, velocity control mode and tool path strategy. However, because of the high heat flux of inductively coupled plasma, the removal depth with time can be non-linear and the ground surface evolvement will be affected. The heat polishing phenomenon is founded. The value of surface roughness is reduced greatly, which is very helpful to reduce the time of follow-up mechanical polishing. Finally, conformal and deterministic polishing experiments are analyzed and discussed. The form error is less 3%, before and after the APPP, when 10μm depth of uniform removal is achieved on a 60×60mm ground fused silica. Also, a basin feature is fabricated to demonstrate the figuring capability and stability. Thus, APPP is a promising technology in processing the large aperture optics.

  17. Atmospheric transport of persistent semi-volatile organic chemicals to the Arctic and cold condensation at the mid-troposphere – Part 1: 2-D modeling in mean atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this study for revisiting the cold condensation effect on global distribution of semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs, the atmospheric transport of SVOCs to the Arctic at the mid-troposphere in a mean meridional atmospheric circulation over Northern Hemisphere was simulated by a two-dimensional atmospheric transport model. Results show that under the mean meridional atmosphere the long-range atmospheric transport of SVOCs from warm latitudes to the Arctic occurs primarily at the mid-troposphere. Accordingly, the cold condensation of the chemicals is likely also to take place at the mid-troposphere over a source region of the chemicals in warm low latitudes. We demonstrate that the temperature dependent vapour pressure and atmospheric degradation rate of SVOCs exhibit similarities between lower atmosphere over the Arctic and the mid-troposphere over a tropical region. Frequent occurrence of atmospheric ascending motion and convection over warm latitudes carry the chemicals to a higher altitude where some of these chemicals may condense/partition to particle or aqueous phase through the interaction with atmospheric aerosols, cloud water droplets and ice particles, and become more persistence in the lower temperatures. Stronger winds at the mid-troposphere then convey the condensed chemicals to the Arctic where they are brought down to the surface by large-scale descending motion and wet deposition. Using calculated water droplet-air partitioning coefficient of several persistent organic semi-volatile chemicals under a mean air temperature profile from the equator to the North Pole we propose that clouds are likely important sorbing media for SVOCs and pathway of the cold condensation effect and poleward atmospheric transport. The role of deposition and atmospheric descending motion in the cold condensation effect over the Arctic was also discussed.

  18. Nucleation and aerosol processing in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: powders production, coatings and filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review addresses the production of nano-particles and the processing of particles injected in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges (APED). The mechanisms of formation and the evolution of particles suspended in gases are first presented, with numerical and experimental facilities. Different APED and related properties are then introduced for dc corona, streamer and spark filamentary discharges (FD), as well as for ac filamentary and homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges (DBD). Two mechanisms of particle production are depicted in APED: when FD interact with the surface of electrodes or dielectrics and when filamentary and homogeneous DBD induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The evolution of the so-formed nano-particles, i.e. the growth by coagulation/condensation, the charging and the collection are detailed for each APED, with respect to fine powders production and thin films deposition. Finally, when particles are injected in APED, they undergo interfacial processes. Non-thermal plasmas charge particles for electro-collection and trigger heterogeneous chemical reactions for organic and inorganic films deposition. Heat exchanges in thermal plasmas enable powder purification, shaping, melting for hard coatings and fine powders production by reactive evaporation. (topical review)

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nucleation and aerosol processing in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges: powders production, coatings and filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Jean-Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the production of nano-particles and the processing of particles injected in atmospheric pressure electrical discharges (APED). The mechanisms of formation and the evolution of particles suspended in gases are first presented, with numerical and experimental facilities. Different APED and related properties are then introduced for dc corona, streamer and spark filamentary discharges (FD), as well as for ac filamentary and homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges (DBD). Two mechanisms of particle production are depicted in APED: when FD interact with the surface of electrodes or dielectrics and when filamentary and homogeneous DBD induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. In both cases, condensable gaseous species are produced, leading to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation. The evolution of the so-formed nano-particles, i.e. the growth by coagulation/condensation, the charging and the collection are detailed for each APED, with respect to fine powders production and thin films deposition. Finally, when particles are injected in APED, they undergo interfacial processes. Non-thermal plasmas charge particles for electro-collection and trigger heterogeneous chemical reactions for organic and inorganic films deposition. Heat exchanges in thermal plasmas enable powder purification, shaping, melting for hard coatings and fine powders production by reactive evaporation.

  20. First steps towards the reaction kinetics of HMDSO in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffhagen, Detlef; Becker, Markus M.; Foest, Rüdiger; Schäfer, Jan; Sigeneger, Florian

    2014-10-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) is a silicon-organic compound which is often used as precursor for thin-film deposition by means of plasma polymerization because of its high deposition rate and low toxicity. To improve the physical understanding of the deposition processes, fundamental investigations have been performed to clarify the plasma-chemical reaction pathways of HMDSO and their effect on the composition and structure of the deposited film. The current contribution represents the main primary and secondary plasma-chemical processes and their reaction products in the effluent region of an argon plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The importance of the different collision processes of electrons and heavy particles are discussed. Results of numerical modelling of the plasma jet and the Ar-HMDSO reaction kinetics indicate that the fragmentation of HMDSO is mainly initiated by collisions with molecular argon ions, while Penning ionization processes play a minor role for the reaction kinetics in the effluent region of the jet. The work has been supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) under Grant LO 623/3-1.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  2. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan;

    allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using...

  3. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  4. Vertical thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere from temperature and pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkin, V.M.; Blamon, Z.; Lipatov, A.P.; Devyatkin, S.I.; Dyachkov, A.V.; Ignatova, S.I.; Kerzhanovich, V.V.; Malyk, K.; Stadny, V.I.; Sanotskiy, Y.V.

    1986-05-01

    Accurate temperature and pressure measurements were made on the Vega-2 lander during its entire descent. The temperature and pressure at the surface were 733 K and 89.3 bar, respectively. A strong temperature inversion was found in the upper troposphere. Several layers with differing static stability were visible in the atmospheric structure.

  5. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .1. INSTRUMENTATION AND IONIZATION TECHNIQUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. Such low-pressure ion sources can make use of a range of different ionization methods and are in routine use in analytical mass spectrometers. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, and may b

  6. Self-sustained carbon monoxide oxidation oscillations on size-selected platinum nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Robert; Andersen, Thomas; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev;

    2013-01-01

    High-quality mass spectrometry data of the oscillatory behavior of CO oxidation on SiO2 supported Pt-nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been acquired as a function of pressure, coverage, gas composition and nanoparticle size. The oscillations are self-sustained for several days at constan...

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma cleaning of contamination surfaces. 1997 mid-year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Goals of the project are to (1) identify the key physics and chemistry underlying the use of high pressure plasmas for etching removal of actinides and actinide surrogates; and (2) identify key surface reactions and plasma physics necessary for optimization of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. Technical description of the work decommissioning of transuranic waste (TRU) into low-level radioactive waste (LLW) represents the largest cleanup cost associated with the nuclear weapons complex. This work is directed towards developing a low-cost plasma technology capable of converting TRU into LLW, based upon highly selective plasma etching of plutonium and other actinides from contaminated surfaces. In this way, only the actinide material is removed, leaving the surface less contaminated. The plasma etches actinide material by producing a volatile halide compound, which may be efficiently trapped using filters. To achieve practical, low-cost operation of a plasma capable of etching actinide materials, the authors have developed a y-mode, resonant-cavity, atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). In contrast to conventional, low pressure plasmas, the APPJ produces a purely-chemical effluent free of ions, and so achieves very high selectivity and produces negligible damage to the surface. Since the jet operates outside a chamber, many nuclear wastes may be treated including machinery, duct-work, concrete and other building materials. In some cases, it may be necessary to first remove paint from contaminated surfaces using a plasma selective for that surface, then to switch to the actinide etching chemistry for removal of actinide contamination. The goal of this work is to develop the underlying science required for maturation of this technology and to establish early version engineering prototypes. Accomplishments to Date The authors have made significant progress in this program. The work conducted jointly at Los Alamos and at UCLA. This has been facilitated by exchange

  8. VULCAN: an Open-Source, Validated Chemical Kinetics Python Code for Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shang-Min; Lyons, James R.; Grosheintz, Luc; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source and validated chemical kinetics code for studying hot exoplanetary atmospheres, which we name VULCAN. It is constructed for gaseous chemistry from 500 to 2500 K using a reduced C- H-O chemical network with about 300 reactions. It uses eddy diffusion to mimic atmospheric dynamics and excludes photochemistry. We have provided a full description of the rate coefficients and thermodynamic data used. We validate VULCAN by reproducing chemical equilibrium and by comparing ...

  9. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  10. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-12-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  12. Silicon-based quantum dots: synthesis, surface and composition tuning with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Maguire, Paul; Svrcek, Vladmir; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of silicon and silicon-based quantum dots (diameter plasmas is reviewed and the most recent developments are also reported. Atmospheric pressure plasmas are then compared with other synthesis methods that include low pressure plasmas, wet chemistry, electrochemical etching and laser-based methods. Finally, progress in the synthesis of alloyed silicon QDs is discussed where the nanoscale Si-Sn and Si-C systems are reported. The report also includes a theoretical analysis that highlights some fundamental differences offered by plasmas at atmospheric pressure and that may provide opportunities for novel materials with advantageous properties.

  13. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  14. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrova, Ts [Berkeley Research Associate, Inc., Beltsville MD 20705 (United States); Benova, E [Department of Language Learning, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-07-15

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  15. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  16. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) at low atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanarkel, Robert; Drew, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) to low atmospheric pressure was examined during the initial 5 days of germination and emergence, and also during subsequent growth to vegetative maturity at 30 days. Growth took place inside a 66-l-volume low pressure chamber maintained at 70 kPa, and plant response was compared to that of plants in a second, matching chamber that was at ambient pressure (approximately 101 kPa) as a control. In other experiments, to determine short-term effects of low pressure transients, plants were grown at ambient pressure until maturity and then subjected to alternating periods of 24 h of low and ambient atmospheric pressures. In all treatments the partial pressure of O2 was maintained at 21 kPa (approximately the partial pressure in air at normal pressure), and the partial pressure of CO2 was in the range 66.5-73.5 Pa (about twice that in normal air) in both chambers, with the addition of CO2 during the light phase. With continuous exposure to low pressure, shoot and root growth was at least as rapid as at ambient pressure, with an overall trend towards slightly greater performance at the lower pressure. Dark respiration rates were greater at low pressure. Transient periods at low pressure decreased transpiration and increased dark respiration but only during the period of exposure to low pressure. We conclude that long-term or short-term exposure to subambient pressure (70 kPa) was without detectable detriment to vegetative growth and development.

  17. Silicon-based quantum dots: synthesis, surface and composition tuning with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of silicon and silicon-based quantum dots (diameter < 5 nm) is discussed. Specifically the synthesis of Si-based quantum dots (QDs) by atmospheric pressure plasmas is reviewed and the most recent developments are also reported. Atmospheric pressure plasmas are then compared with other synthesis methods that include low pressure plasmas, wet chemistry, electrochemical etching and laser-based methods. Finally, progress in the synthesis of alloyed silicon QDs is discussed where the nanoscale Si–Sn and Si–C systems are reported. The report also includes a theoretical analysis that highlights some fundamental differences offered by plasmas at atmospheric pressure and that may provide opportunities for novel materials with advantageous properties. (review article)

  18. Crossed molecular beam studies of atmospheric chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingsong

    1993-04-01

    The dynamics of several elementary chemical reactions that are important in atmospheric chemistry are investigated. The reactive scattering of ground state chlorine or bromine atoms with ozone molecules and ground state chlorine atoms with nitrogen dioxide molecules is studied using a crossed molecular beams apparatus with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. The Cl + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at four collision energies ranging from 6 kcal/mole to 32 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions show that the reaction has a direct reaction mechanism and that there is a strong repulsion on the exit channel. The ClO product is sideways and forward scattered with respect to the Cl atom, and the translational energy release is large. The Cl atom is most likely to attack the terminal oxygen atom of the ozone molecule. The Br + O{sub 3} {yields} ClO + O{sub 2} reaction has been studied at five collision energies ranging from 5 kcal/mole to 26 kcal/mole. The derived product center-of-mass angular and translational energy distributions are quite similar to those in the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The Br + O{sub 3} reaction has a direct reaction mechanism similar to that of the Cl + O{sub 3} reaction. The electronic structure of the ozone molecule seems to play the central role in determining the reaction mechanism in atomic radical reactions with the ozone molecule. The Cl + NO{sub 2} {yields} ClO + NO reaction has been studied at three collision energies ranging from 10.6 kcal/mole to 22.4 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass angular distribution has some forward-backward symmetry, and the product translational energy release is quite large. The reaction proceeds through a short-lived complex whose lifetime is less than one rotational period. The experimental results seem to show that the Cl atom mainly attacks the oxygen atom instead of the nitrogen atom of the NO{sub 2} molecule.

  19. Multiscale simulation of atmospheric pressure pulsed discharges used in polymer surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoj, Ananth N.

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma discharges are widely used for surface functionalization or treatment of commodity polymers to improve properties such as adhesion and wettability. Newer applications include textile fabric treatment to improve color fastness and biomedical surface functionalization. In this work, an unstructured mesh-based two-dimensional Plasma Equipment Model (PEM) was developed to investigate the physical and chemical processes in these discharges, which occur on temporal and spatial scales spanning many orders of magnitude and affect their interaction with polymer surfaces. Better insight into these processes will enable the tailoring and optimization of processing conditions. Transient phenomena (time variation of plasma properties) during breakdown in atmospheric pressure discharges are addressed, since the spatial distribution of radicals generated in the discharge is determined by the dynamics of breakdown. The breakdown dynamics is governed by a multitude of physical and chemical processes such as reaction kinetics, photoionization, electron energy transport, charged species and neutral transport. The ability to address non-equilibrium electron energy transport in plasma discharges was developed by enhancing an existing electron Monte-Carlo simulation to address multiple regions of nonequilibrium, and was demonstrated for breakdown in high pressure discharges. A high degree of uniformity in surface treatment is important for value-added materials. Increasing the proximity of reactive plasma produced species to the surface enables better uniformity, especially with polymers having complex surface shapes. The propagation of atmospheric pressure discharges in microchannels, such as those used in lab-on-a-chip devices was investigated to determine the possibility of producing reactive gas-phase radicals within small spaces, close to the surfaces requiring treatment. An integrated surface kinetics module was developed to address the

  20. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols between Moscow and Vladivostok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kuokka

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The TROICA-9 expedition (Trans-Siberian Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere was carried out at the Trans-Siberian railway between Moscow and Vladivostok in October 2005. Measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were made from an observatory carriage connected to a passenger train. Black carbon (BC concentrations in fine particles (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm were measured with an aethalometer using a five-minute time resolution. Concentrations of inorganic ions and some organic compounds (Cl, NO3, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, oxalate and methane sulphonate were measured continuously by using an on-line system with a 15-min time resolution. In addition, particle volume size distributions were determined for particles in the diameter range 3–850 nm using a 10-min. time resolution. The continuous measurements were completed with 24-h. PM2.5 filter samples which were stored in a refrigerator and later analyzed in chemical laboratory. The analyses included mass concentrations of PM2.5, ions, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V and Zn. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 varied in the range of 4.3–34.8 μg m−3 with an average of 21.6 μg m−3. Fine particle mass consisted mainly of BC (average 27.6%, SO42− (13.0%, NH4+ (4.1%, and NO3 (1.4%. One of the major constituents was obviously also organic carbon which was not determined. The contribution of BC was high compared with other studies made in Europe and Asia. High concentrations of ions, BC and particle volume were observed between Moscow and roughly 4000 km east of it, as well as close to

  1. The chemical composition and climatology of the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1983-01-01

    The earth's climate as it relates to the evolution of life is discussed.. Seven fundamental characteristics of the early evolutionary environment are examined, including a carbon dioxide and water vapor atmosphere, atmospheric mass between 500 and 1000 mb, a global hydrosphere, lowered solar luminosity, hospitable average global temperatures, a convectively active atmosphere, and trace gases. The influence of the early earth's extensive hydrosphere on the origin of life is considered. The warming of that hydrosphere due to radiative fluxes and the greenhouse effect is examined, and the nature of the feedback between clouds and climate is addressed.

  2. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  3. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chima C. Ngumah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD, while the other was not inoculated. The bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure, ambient atmospheric pressure without inoculum, and ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculum showed the following for biogas and biomethane yields respectively: 16.8 cm3 g-1 VS and 15.46 cm3 g 1 VS, 25.10 cm3 g-1 VS and 12.85 cm3 g-1 VS, 21.44 cm3 g-1 VS and 14.88 cm3 g 1 VS. In the same order, after AD, the following values were recorded for volatile solids and total viable counts (prokaryotes and fungi in the digestates: 40.33% and 23.22 x 106 cfu mL-1, 43.42% and 22.17 x 106 cfu mL-1, 41.11% and 13.3 x 106 cfu mL-1. The feedstock showed values of 83.93% and 3.98 x 106 cfu mL-1 for volatile solids and total viable count respectively. There was a slight difference in the volatile solids of the digestates of the three bioreactors after AD. The pH recorded for the feedstock slurry before AD was 7.9 at 30oC, while after AD, the digestates from all the three bioreactors showed the same pH of 5.9 at 29 0C. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed no significant difference in biogas yields of the feedstock for the three bioreactors (A, B, C. ANOVA showed no significant difference for biomethane yields in the bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and for those initiated at ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculums. However, it showed significant difference in the bioreactor initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and that initiated at ambient atmospheric

  4. Effect of melting pressure and superheating on chemical composition and contamination of yttria coated ceramic crucible induction melted titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Fernando; Puga, Hélder; Barbosa, J; Ribeiro, Carlos Silva

    2011-01-01

    When melting reactive alloys, chemical composition and alloy homogeneity strongly depend on processing conditions, especially if melting is performed in ceramic crucibles. In this case, the nature of crucible materials, the melting stock composition and the melting parameters (atmosphere, pressure, superheating time and temperature) are critical processing variables. In this work, a Ti–48Al alloy was induction melted in a ZrO2 SiO2-based crucible with Y2O3 inner layer ...

  5. Effect of O2 flow rate on the thermochromic performance of VO2 coatings grown by atmospheric pressure CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of vanadium oxide coatings using vanadyl (IV) acetylacetonate at 500 oC. The as-grown samples for 0.8 L min-1 O2 flow rate showed an (022)-oriented single vanadium dioxide monoclinic phase of low crystallinity. The narrowest hysteresis width is observed for the particular flow rate indicating a dependency on the shape of the grown crystallites. Regarding the difference in transmittance is determined by the enhanced presence of short- and long-range bond ordering of the samples. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO2 absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occulation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO2 (e.g., 2.0, 2.7, or 4.3 microns), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  7. Plasma Treatment of Industrial Landfill Leachate by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges%Plasma Treatment of Industrial Landfill Leachate by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵迪; 王达成; 严贵; 马宏; 熊小京; 罗津晶; 张先徽; 刘东平; 杨思泽

    2011-01-01

    An dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system in atmospheric pressure utilized for the treatment of industrial landfill leachate is reported. The discharge parameters, such as the operating frequency, gas flow rate, and treating duration, were found to affect significantly the removal of ammonia nitrogen (AN) in industrial landfill leachate. An increase in treating duration leads to an obvious increase in the removal efficiency of AN (up to 83%) and the leachate color changed from deep grey-black to transparent. Thus the dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure could degrade the landfill leachate effectively. Typical waveforms of both applied voltage and discharge current were also presented for analyzing the discharge processes under different discharge parameters. Optical emission spectra measurements indicate that oxidation species generated in oxygen DBD plasma play a crucial role in removing AN, oxidizing organic and inorganic substances and decolorizing the landfill leachate.

  8. Chemical Microsensor Instrument for UAV Airborne Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) proposes to develop a miniaturized Airborne Chemical Microsensor Instrument (ACMI) suitable for real-time, airborne measurements of...

  9. [Development of a chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Hua, Lei; Hou, Ke-Yong; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Wu-Duo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Wei-Guo; Di, Tian; Li, Hai-Yang

    2014-05-01

    A home-made chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) has been developed for continuous measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical. Based on the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization technique, an ionization source with orthogonal dual tube structure was adopted in the instrument, which minimized the interference between the reagent gas ionization and the titration reaction. A 63Ni radioactive source was fixed inside one of the orthogonal tubes to generate reactant ion of NO(-)(3) from HNO3 vapor. Hydroxyl radical was first titrated by excess SO2 to form equivalent concentrations of H2SO4 in the other orthogonal tube, and then reacted with NO(-)(3) ions in the chemical ionization chamber, leading to HSO(-)(4) formation. The concentration of atmospheric hydroxyl radical can be directly calculated by measuring the intensities of the HSOj product ions and the NO(-)(3) reactant ions. The analytical capability of the instrument was demonstrated by measuring hydroxyl radical in laboratory air, and the concentration of the hydroxyl radical in the investigated air was calculated to be 1.6 x 106 molecules*cm ', based on 5 seconds integration. The results have shown that the instrument is competent for in situ continuous measurements of atmospheric trace radical. PMID:25055654

  10. Three electrode atmospheric pressure plasma jet in helium flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletic, Dejan; Puac, Nevena; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    Plasma jets are widely used in various types of applications and lately more and more in the field of plasma medicine. However, it is not only their applicability that distinguishes them from other atmospheric plasma sources, but also the behavior of the plasma. It was shown that plasma plume is not continuous, but discrete set of plasma packages. Here we present iCCD images and current voltage characteristics of a three electrode plasma jet. Our plasma jet has a simple design with body made of glass tube and two transparent electrodes wrapped around it. The additional third metal tip electrode was positioned at 10 and 25 mm in front of the jet nozzle and connected to the same potential as the powered electrode. Power transmitted to the plasma was from 0.5 W to 4.0 W and the helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. For the 10 mm configuration plasma is ignited on the metal tip in the whole period of the excitation signal and in the positive half cycle plasma ``bullet'' is propagating beyond the metal tip. In contrast to that, for the 25 mm configuration at the tip electrode plasma can be seen only in the minimum and maximum of the excitation signal, and there is no plasma ``bullet'' formation. This research has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Republic of Serbia, under projects ON171037 and III41011.

  11. Characterization of Dust-Plasma Interactions In Non-Thermal Plasmas Under Low Pressure and the Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilik, Narula

    This dissertation research focuses on the experimental characterization of dust-plasma interactions at both low and atmospheric pressure. Its goal is to fill the knowledge gaps in (1) the fundamental research of low pressure dusty plasma electrons, which mainly relied on models with few experimental results; and (2) the nanoparticle synthesis process in atmospheric pressure uniform glow plasmas (APGDs), which is largely unexplored in spite of the economical advantage of APGDs in nanotechnology. The low pressure part of the dissertation research involves the development of a complete diagnostic process for an argon-siline capacitively-coupled RF plasma. The central part of the diagnostic process is the Langmuir probe measurement of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) in a dusty plasma, which has never been measured before. This is because the dust particles in the plasma cause severe probe surface contamination and consequently distort the measurement. This problem is solved by adding a solenoid-actuated shield structure to the Langmuir probe, which physically protects the Langmuir probe from the dust particle deposition to ensure reliable EEPF measurements. The dusty plasma EEPFs are characterized by lower electron density and higher electron temperature accompanied by a drop in the low energy electron population. The Langmuir probe measurement is complemented with other characterizations including the capacitive probe measurement, power measurement, and dust particle collection. The complete diagnostic process then gives a set of local plasma parameters as well as the details of the dust-electron interactions reflected in the EEPFs. This set of data serves as input for an analytical model of nanoparticle charging to yield the time evolution of nanoparticle size and charge in the dusty plasma. The atmospheric pressure part of the dissertation focuses on the design and development of an APGD for zinc oxide nanocrystal synthesis. One of the main

  12. Atmospheric pressure change associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Watada, Shingo; Kunugi, Takashi; Hirata, Kenji; Sugioka, Hiroko; Nishida, Kiwamu; Sekiguchi, Shoji; Oikawa, Jun; Tsuji, Yoshinobu; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    Clear atmospheric pressure changes associated with the 2003 Tokachi-Oki, Japan, earthquake with Mw 8.3 were recorded with the microbarographs distributed in Japan. The pressure change starts at the arrival of seismic waves and reaches its maximum amplitude at the arrival of Rayleigh waves, suggesting that the observed pressure change was driven by the ground motion of seismic waves passing by the site. We computed the seismic-to-pressure transfer function (i.e., the spectral ratio of the pres...

  13. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  14. Polymer Surface Treatment by Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Surface Discharge Plasma:Its Characteristics and Comparison with Low Pressure Oxygen Plasma Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi KUWABARA; Shin-ichi KURODA; Hitoshi KUBOTA

    2007-01-01

    The polymer treatment with a low-temperature plasma jet generated on the atmospheric pressure surface discharge (SD) plasma is performed.The change of the surface property over time,in comparison with low pressure oxygen (O2) plasma treatment,is examined.As one compares the treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma to that by the low pressure O2 plasma of PS (polystyrene) the treatment effects were almost in complete agreement.However,when the atmospheric pressure plasma was used for PP(polypropylene),it produced remarkable hydrophilic effects.

  15. Atmospheric pressure dc corona discharges: operating regimes and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating regimes and the structures of dc corona discharges in air, nitrogen, helium and hydrogen-methane mixtures are studied for a point to plate electrode configuration. The characteristics of the dc negative corona discharge are investigated. In addition to the bright glow at the cathode (pin) region, a uniform diffuse glow is observed near the anode (plate) surface for the negative corona. This diffuse glow is observed in air and hydrogen-methane discharges only and not in nitrogen discharges. The presence of a glow near the planar anode is perhaps due to the increased electric field caused by a negative ion sheath formed only in electronegative gases. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to obtain species, spatially resolved temperature measurements and electric field estimations for the corona discharges in air. For the negative corona, the presence of a weak glow indicates an active plasma region near the positive planar electrode which may be useful for processing techniques such as plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The dc negative corona discharge was observed to deposit films on the anode surface for air and methane.

  16. Self-Consistent Model for Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges in Helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show the necessity of leaving out the approximation of constant average electron energy in many fluid models. For this purpose a one-dimensional self-consistent model for He atmospheric barrier discharges is developed. With this model, the electron energy distribution function in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is obtained without introducing much difficulty, and the new model is readily implemented for investigating discharges in complicated gases. (gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  17. Emission properties of an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet excited by barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet is initiated by the barrier discharge in a capillary, through which argon was flown. The spectral composition of radiation emitted by the jet in the atmosphere and its variation in the space are analyzed in detail. The jet radiation spectrum is shown to be predominantly formed by spectral transitions of argon and oxygen atoms, by electron-vibrational transitions of the first positive system of nitrogen molecules N2, and by transitions of hydroxyl radical OH

  18. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  19. Size Resolved Mass Concentration and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols over the Eastern Mediterranean Area

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolík, Jiří; Ždímal, Vladimír; Lazaridis, M.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Havránek, Vladimír; Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Nyeki, S.; Housiadas, C.

    Kjeller: Norwegian Institute for Air Research, 2002 - (Kahnert, M.), s. 26-51. (Report.. 4) Grant ostatní: EVK2(XE) CT/1999/000052 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * Mediterranean area * chemical composition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Aging Characteristics on Epoxy Resin Surface Under Repetitive Microsecond Pulses in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Rao, Zhangquan; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Research on aging characteristics of epoxy resin (EP) under repetitive microsecond pulses is important for the design of insulating materials in high power apparatus. It is because that very fast transient overvoltage always occurs in a power system, which causes flashover and is one of the main factors causing aging effects of EP materials. Therefore, it is essential to obtain a better understanding of the aging effect on an EP surface resulting from flashover. In this work, aging effects on an EP surface were investigated by surface flashover discharge under repetitive microsecond pulses in atmospheric pressure. The investigations of parameters such as the surface micro-morphology and chemical composition of the insulation material under different degrees of aging were conducted with the aid of measurement methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with the accumulation of aging energy on the material surface, the particles formed on the material surface increased both in number and size, leading to the growth of surface roughness and a reduction in the water contact angle; the surface also became more absorbent. Furthermore, in the aging process, the molecular chains of EP on the surface were broken, resulting in oxidation and carbonisation. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. E2015502081), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51307060), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  1. Localized etching of polymer films using an atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct-write process device based on the atmospheric pressure air microplasma jet (AμPJ) has been developed for the localized etching of polymer films. The plasma was generated by the air discharge ejected out through a tip-nozzle (inner diameter of 100 μm), forming the microplasma jet. The AμPJ was capable of reacting with the polymer surface since it contains a high concentration of oxygen reactive species and thus resulted in the selective removal of polymer films. The experimental results demonstrated that the AμPJ could fabricate different microstructures on a parylene-C film without using any masks or causing any heat damage. The etch rate of parylene-C reached 5.1 μm min−1 and microstructures of different depth and width could also be realized by controlling two process parameters, namely, the etching time and the distance between the nozzle and the substrate. In addition, combining XPS analysis and oxygen-induced chemical etching principles, the potential etching mechanism of parylene-C by the AμPJ was investigated. Aside from the etching of parylene-C, micro-holes on the photoresist and polyimide film were successfully created by the AμPJ. In summary, maskless pattern etching of polymer films could be achieved using this AμPJ. (paper)

  2. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a direct current air corona discharge under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xing-Hua; He Wei; Yang Fan; Wang Hong-Yu; Liao Rui-Jin; Xiao Han-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Air corona discharge is one of the critical problems associated with high-voltage equipment.Investigating the corona mechanism plays a key role in enhancing the electrical insulation performance.An improved self-consistent multi-component two-dimensional plasma hybrid model is presented for the simulation of a direct current atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air.The model is based on plasma hydrodynamic and chemical models,and includes 12 species and 26 reactions.In addition,the photoionization effect is introduced into the model.The simulation on a bar-plate electrode configuration with an inter-electrode gap of 5.0 mm is carried out.The discharge voltage-current characteristics and the current density distribution predicted by the hybrid model agree with the experimental measurements.In addition,the dynamics of volume charged species generation,discharge current waveform,current density distribution at an electrode,charge density,electron temperature,and electric field variations are investigated in detail based on the model.The results indicate that the model can contribute valuable insights into the physics of an air plasma discharge.

  3. Stability of Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Induced Changes on Polycarbonate Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Holcomb, Edward; Trigwell, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Polycarbonate films are subjected to plasma treatment in a number of applications such as improving adhesion between polycarbonate and silicon alloy in protective and optical coatings. The changes in surface chemistry due to plasma treatment have tendency to revert back. Thus stability of the plasma induced changes on polymer surfaces over desired time period is very important. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ageing on atmospheric pressure helium-plasma treated polycarbonate (PC) sample as a function of treatment time. The ageing effects were studied over a period of 10 days. The samples were plasma treated for 0.5, 2, 5 and 10 minutes. Contact angle measurements were made to study surface energy changes. Modification of surface chemical structure was examined using, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Contact angle measurements on untreated and plasma treated surfaces were made immediately, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after treatment. Contact angle decreased from 93 deg for untreated sample to 30 deg for sample plasma treated for 10 minutes. After 10 days the contact angles for the 10 minute plasma treated sample increased to 67 deg, but it never reverted back to that of untreated surface. Similarly the O/C ratio increased from 0.136 for untreated sample to 0.321 for 10 minute plasma treated sample indication increase in surface energy.

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of antimicrobial coatings on non-woven textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Anton Yu.; Deng, Xiaolong; Onyshchenko, Iuliia; Vujosevic, Danijela; Vuksanovic, Vineta; Cvelbar, Uros; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino; Leys, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    A simple method for preparation of nanoparticle incorporated non-woven fabric with high antibacterial efficiency has been proposed based on atmospheric pressure plasma process. In this work direct current plasma jet stabilized by fast nitrogen flow was used as a plasma deposition source. Three different types of the nanoparticles (silver, copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles) were employed as antimicrobial agents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have shown a positive chemical shift observed for Ag 3d 5/2 (at 368.1 eV) suggests that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are partly oxidized during the deposition. The surface chemistry and the antibacterial activity of the samples against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were investigated and analyzed. It is shown that the samples loaded with nanoparticles of Ag and Cu and having the barrier layer of 10 nm characterized by almost 97% of bacterial reduction whereas the samples with ZnO nanoparticles provide 86% reduction of Staphylococcus aureus. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  5. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  6. An atmospheric-pressure plasma process for C2F6 removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M B; Yu, S J

    2001-04-15

    Perfluorocompounds (PFCs) are widely used in the semiconductor industry for plasma etching and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). They are relatively inert gases that intensely absorb infrared radiation and, therefore, aggravate the greenhouse effect. A bench-scale experimental system was designed and constructed to evaluate the effectiveness of C2F6 conversion by using dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) with atmospheric-pressure plasma processing. Experimental results indicated that the removal efficiency of C2F6 increased with applications of higher voltage and frequency. Combined plasma catalysis (CPC) is an innovative way for abatement of PFCs, and experimental results revealed that combining plasma generation with catalysts could effectively enhance C2F6 removal efficiency achieved with DBD. The major products of C2F6 with DBD processing include CO2, COF2, and CO, when O2 was included in the discharge process. Experimental results indicated that as high as 94.5% of C2F6 were removed via CPC at applied voltage of 15 kV, frequency of 240 Hz in the gas stream of N2:Ar:O2:C2F6 = 50:40:10:0.03. PMID:11329706

  7. Remote atmospheric-pressure plasma activation of the surfaces of polyethylene terephthalate and polyethylene naphthalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, E; Barankin, M D; Guschl, P C; Hicks, R F

    2008-11-01

    The surfaces of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) were treated with an atmospheric-pressure oxygen and helium plasma. Changes in the energy, adhesion, and chemical composition of the surfaces were determined by contact angle measurements, mechanical pull tests, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface-energy calculations revealed that after plasma treatment the polarity of PET and PEN increased 6 and 10 times, respectively. In addition, adhesive bond strengths were enhanced by up to 7 times. For PET and PEN, XPS revealed an 18-29% decrease in the area of the C 1s peak at 285 eV, which is attributable to the aromatic carbon atoms. The C 1s peak area due to ester carbon atoms increased by 11 and 24% for PET and PEN, respectively, while the C 1s peak area resulting from C-O species increased by about 5% for both polymers. These results indicate that oxygen atoms generated in the plasma rapidly oxidize the aromatic rings on the polymer chains. The Langmuir adsorption rate constants for oxidizing the polymer surfaces were 15.6 and 4.6 s(-1) for PET and PEN, respectively. PMID:18834154

  8. Effects of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma treatments on aflatoxigenic fungi and its host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo-Chen

    2015-09-01

    This experiment tests the ability of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma treatments in the prevention of fungi infection. There are charged particles, electric field, radicals and UV light inside plasmas and these elements might trigger different physical or chemical effects during non-thermal plasma treatments. In this experiment, the experimental samples received indirect plasma treatments with different time duration and gas compositions which mean only the remote effects caused by plasma treatments could be seen. In this work, plasmas were produced by dielectric barrier discharge method. The operation gases were air and a mixed gas of 97% He and 3%O2. After plasma treatments, fungi growth rate was observed by taking pictures and the existence of aflatoxin was qualitatively detected by black light method. The final results show that the radicals in both He/O2 and air plasma might facilitate fungi growth rate which means peanuts received indirect plasma treatments grew fungi faster than control group. The outcomes of aflatoxin detection also shows that the fungi grown on all the sample are aflatoxigenic fungi.

  9. Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) and Its Effect on Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Ek; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source was constructed and then characterized by monitoring a deflected current on a high voltage electrode and a potential difference between two electrodes. The deflected current was also monitored for the APPJ source with varied electrical and fed gas composition e.g. admixtures of He and water vapor. The deflected power per cycle for gas admixtures was decreased with the increase in fraction of water vapor. In addition, this APPJ source was used to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of supercoiled, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks in DNA were quantified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. The number of DNA strand breaks increased as a function of plasma irradiation time and decrease as a distance between APPJ and DNA sample increased. The APPJ with the gas admixture, in which the fraction of water vapor was varied, was also used to induce damage to aqueous DNA samples. The damage level decreased with the increase in a fraction of water vapor under specific experimental conditions. The change in numbers of DNA strand breaks irradiated by a pure He plasma and a plasma with a gas admixture is predicted by different physical and chemical process in the APPJ. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  10. Ag recovery from copper anode slime by acid leaching at atmospheric pressure to synthesize silver nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atefeh Khaleghi; Sattar Ghader; Dariush Afzali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, recovery of silver from anode slime of Sarcheshmeh copper complex in Iran and subsequent synthesis of silver nanoparticles from leaching solution is investigated. Sarcheshmeh anode slime is mainly consisted of Cu, Ag, Pb and Se. Amount of Ag in the considered anode slime was 5.4%(by weight). The goal was to recover as much as possible Ag from anode slime at atmospheric pressure to synthesize Ag nanoparticles. Therefore, acid leaching was used for this purpose. The anode slime was leached with sulfuric and nitric acid from room to 90 ?C at different acid concentrations and the run which yielded the most recovery of Ag was selected for Ag nanoparticles synthesis. At this condition, Cu, Pb and Se are lea-ched as well as Ag. To separate Ag from leach solution HCl was added and silver was precipitated as AgCl which were then dissolved by ammonia solution. The Ag nanoparticles are synthesized from this solution by chemical reduction method by aid of sodium borohydride in the presence of PVP and PEG as stabiliz-ers. The synthesized Ag nanoparticles showed a peak of 394 nm in UV-vis spectrum and TEM images showed a rather uniform Ag nanoparticles of 12 nm.

  11. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a direct current air corona discharge under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air corona discharge is one of the critical problems associated with high-voltage equipment. Investigating the corona mechanism plays a key role in enhancing the electrical insulation performance. An improved self-consistent multi-component two-dimensional plasma hybrid model is presented for the simulation of a direct current atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air. The model is based on plasma hydrodynamic and chemical models, and includes 12 species and 26 reactions. In addition, the photoionization effect is introduced into the model. The simulation on a bar-plate electrode configuration with an inter-electrode gap of 5.0 mm is carried out. The discharge voltage—current characteristics and the current density distribution predicted by the hybrid model agree with the experimental measurements. In addition, the dynamics of volume charged species generation, discharge current waveform, current density distribution at an electrode, charge density, electron temperature, and electric field variations are investigated in detail based on the model. The results indicate that the model can contribute valuable insights into the physics of an air plasma discharge. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  12. Investigating effects of atmospheric-pressure plasma on the process of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Shahram; Shokri, Asana; Khani, Mohammad Reza; Bigdeli, Mohammadreza; Shokri, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJ) have excellent applications in biomedicine. Advantages of APPJ include lack of need for vacuum systems, capability of operation for a long time, and safe to be directly touched by living tissues such as a human body. In this study, an APPJ was generated by a dielectric barrier and applied for the treatment of chemical wounds. This APPJ worked with argon and was driven by high-voltage pulses. This paper compares the spontaneous healing of wounds and a stimulated healing using daily APPJ treatment. Biological data, such as hematological, biochemical, and histological parameters, were remarked. The mortality and morbidity of the untreated samples were reported after 20 days in comparison with the plasma-treated samples, which were alive after these days. Experimental results demonstrated that an increase in the oxidative stress could result in the decreased destruction of lesions by controlling the infection growth. These results were related to the presence of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the plasma volume, which were detected by optical emission spectroscopy. PMID:25758659

  13. A computational modeling study on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Mu-Yang; Yang, Cong-Ying; Liu, San-Qiu; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Lv, Yan; Wang, De-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    A two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is employed to investigate the streamer dynamics in a helium plasma needle at atmospheric pressure. A parametric study of the streamer propagation as a function of needle tip curvature radius and helium gas flow rate is presented. The key chemical reactions at the He/air mixing layer which drive the streamer propagation are the direct ionization via collision with electrons, the Penning effect being not so crucial. With increasing the gas flow rate from 0.2 standard liter per minute (SLM) to 0.8 SLM, however, the emissions resulting from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species change from a solid circle to a hollow profile and the average streamer propagation velocity decreases. Air impurities (backdiffusion from ambient air) in the helium jet result in a significant increase in the streamer propagation velocity. Besides, with decreasing the tip curvature radiusfrom 200 μm to 100 μm, the electron avalanche process around the near-tip region is more pronounced. However, the spatially resolved plasma parameters distributions (electron, helium metastables, ground state atomic oxygen, etc.) remain almost the same, except that around the near-tip region where their peak values are more than doubled. Project supported partly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11465013), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20151BAB212012), and in part by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2015DFA61800).

  14. Measurement of hydroxyl radical density generated from the atmospheric pressure bioplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure bioplasmas are being used in a variety of bio-medical and material processing applications, surface modifications of polymers. This plasma can generate the various kinds of radicals when it contacs with the water. Especially, hydroxyl radical species have very important role in the biological and chemical decontamination of media in this situation. It is very important to investigate the hydroxyl radical density in needle-typed plasma jet since it plays a crucial role in interaction between the living body and plasma. We have generated the needle-typed plasma jet bombarding the water surface by using an Ar gas flow and investigated the emission lines by OES (optical emission spectroscopy). It is noted that the electron temperature and plasma density are measured to be about 1.7 eV and 3.4 × 1012 cm−3, respectively, under Ar gas flow ranged from 80 to 300 sccm (standard cubic centimeter per minute) in this experiment. The hydroxyl radical density has also been investigated and measured to be maximum value of 2.6 × 1015 cm−3 for the gas flow rate of 150 sccm in the needle-typed plasma jet by the ultraviolet optical absorption spectroscopy.

  15. Deposition of hard thin films from HMDSO in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trunec, D; Zajickova, L; BursIkova, V; Studnicka, F; Stahel, P; Prysiazhnyi, V; Navratil, Z; Franta, D [Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Perina, V [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Houdkova, J, E-mail: trunec@physics.muni.c [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-09

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge burning in nitrogen with a small admixture of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used for the deposition of thin organosilicon films. The thin films were deposited on glass, silicon and polycarbonate substrates, and the substrate temperature during the deposition process was increased up to values within the range 25-150 {sup 0}C in order to obtain hard SiO{sub x}-like thin films. The properties of the discharge were studied by means of optical emission spectroscopy and electrical measurements. The deposited films were characterized by the Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection methods, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy measurements, ellipsometry and the depth sensing indentation technique. It was found that the films' properties depend significantly on the substrate temperature at deposition. An increase in substrate temperature from 25 to 150 {sup 0}C led to an increase in film hardness from 0.4 to 7 GPa and the film chemical composition changed from CH{sub x}Si{sub y}O{sub z} to SiO{sub x}H{sub y}. The films were transparent in the visible range.

  16. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Riris, H.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.; Stephen, M.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are needed for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS will measure atmospheric CO2 dry mixing ratios on a global scale. Remote atmospheric pressure measurements are necessary to normalize ASCENDS CO2 measurements. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses erbium doped fiber optic amplifiers and non-linear optics technology to tune laser radiation over the Oxygen A-band between 764.5 nm and 765 nm. Surface reflections are fiber-coupled from a receiver telescope to photon counting detectors. Our pulsed, time gated approach resolves ground reflections from cloud returns. This system successfully recorded O2 absorption spectra during two airborne campaigns aboard a NASA DC-8. Airborne data has been analyzed and fitted to HITRAN reference spectra based upon aircraft meteorological data. Our algorithm linearly scales the HITRAN reference until measurement errors are minimized. Atmospheric pressure changes are estimated by comparing the differential optical depth of the optimum scaled HITRAN spectra to the differential optical depth of the nominal HITRAN spectra. On flights over gradually sloping terrain, these results compare favorably with ground-based observations and predictions from computer models. Measurement uncertainty is commensurate with photon counting noise. We plan to reduce measurement uncertainty in future campaigns by improving transmitter pulse energy and increasing wavelength sweep frequency.

  17. Decontamination of a rotating cutting tool during operation by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Hansen, F.;

    2010-01-01

    The decontamination of a rotating cutting tool used for slicing in the meat industry by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua......, is used for the experiments. A rotating knife was inoculated with L. innocua. The surface of the rotating knife was partly exposed to an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge operated in air, where the knife itself served as a ground electrode. The rotation of the knife ensures a...

  18. Relation among Summer Rainfall in South Shandong and High Pressure in South Asia and Atmospheric Circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relation among summer rainfall in south Shandong and high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation.[Method] Taking the precipitation in south Shandong along the Yellow River and Huaihe River,using the NCEP/NCAR data and summer rainfall data in south Shandong in summer from 1961 to 2005,the characteristics of high pressure in South Asia and atmospheric circulation in drought year and flood year in summer in south Shandong Province were expounded.The mechanism of...

  19. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Chima C. Ngumah; Jude N. Ogbulie; Justina C. Orji; Ekperechi S. Amadi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD) of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD...

  20. Spectral measurement of atmospheric pressure plasma by means of digital camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A digital camera measuring system has been used successfully to measure the space fluctuation behaviors of Induced Dielectric Barrier Discharge (IDBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure. The experimental results showed that: (1) The uniformity of electron temperature in space depends on discharge condition and structure of web electrode. For a certain web electrode the higher the discharge voltage is, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be. For a certain discharge the finer and denser the holes on web electrode are, the more uniform distribution of electron temperature in space will be. (2) Digital camera is an available equipment to measure some behaviors of the plasma working at atmospheric pressure

  1. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  2. Generations and applications of atmospheric pressure glow discharge by integration of microplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, O; Tachibana, K [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Integration of microplasmas enables us to obtain atmospheric pressure discharges with good macroscopic uniformity and various functions. We demonstrate two specific electrodes of microplasmas for generations of dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure, and integrated microplasmas on large two-dimensional area are sustained with electron density more than 10{sup 12}cm{sup -3}. Especially 'fabric' type electrode has a promising structure to provide various flexible discharge space and plasma processing on winding surface. Integrated microplasmas in array structure will serve as electromagnetic-wave control devices as well as processing tools, and two aspects are discussed in terms of equivalent dielectrics and metals.

  3. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Li, Zhongshan; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational and...... vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  4. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  5. Scaling laws for gas breakdown for nanoscale to microscale gaps at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Amanda M.; Garner, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Electronics miniaturization motivates gas breakdown predictions for microscale and smaller gaps, since traditional breakdown theory fails when gap size, d, is smaller than ˜15 μm at atmospheric pressure, patm. We perform a matched asymptotic analysis to derive analytic expressions for breakdown voltage, Vb, at patm for 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 35 μm. We obtain excellent agreement between numerical, analytic, and particle-in-cell simulations for argon, and show Vb decreasing as d → 0, instead of increasing as predicted by Paschen's law. This work provides an analytic framework for determining Vb at atmospheric pressure for various gap distances that may be extended to other gases.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A. H.; McLinden, M. O.; Tew, W. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO2 concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained several equations with incorrect/missing characters resulting from processes used to create the PDF file. The article has been replaced and the equations now display correctly.

  7. Using Dimers to Measure Biosignatures and Atmospheric Pressure for Terrestrial Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Amit; Claire, Mark; Crisp, Dave

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to probe atmospheric pressure on Earthlike planets using (O2-O2) dimers in the near-infrared. We also show that dimer features could be the most readily detectable biosignatures for Earthlike atmospheres, and may even be detectable in transit transmission with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The absorption by dimers changes more rapidly with pressure and density than that of monomers, and can therefore provide additional information about atmospheric pressures. By comparing the absorption strengths of rotational and vibrational features to the absorption strengths of dimer features, we show that in some cases it may be possible to estimate the pressure at the reflecting surface of a planet. This method is demonstrated by using the O2 A band and the 1.06 $\\mu$m dimer feature, either in transmission or reflected spectra. It works best for planets around M dwarfs with atmospheric pressures between 0.1 and 10 bars, and for O2 volume mixing ratios above 50% of Earth's present day lev...

  8. The puzzling chemical composition of GJ 436b's atmosphere: influence of tidal heating on the chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, Marcelino; Venot, Olivia; Selsis, Franck; Iro, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The dissipation of the tidal energy deposited on eccentric planets may induce a heating of the planet that affects its atmospheric thermal structure. Here we study the influence of tidal heating on the atmospheric composition of the eccentric (e = 0.16) "hot Neptune" GJ 436b, for which inconclusive chemical abundances are retrieved from multiwavelength photometric observations carried out during primary transit and secondary eclipse. We build up a one-dimensional model of GJ 436b's atmosphere...

  9. Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Rosat, Séverine; Rogister, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

  10. Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure at Ground Level using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angshuman Ray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of Atmospheric Pressure is one important and challenging task that needs lot of attention and study for analyzing atmospheric conditions. Advent of digital computers and development of data driven artificial intelligence approaches like Artificial Neural Networks (ANN have helped in numerical prediction of pressure. However, very few works have been done till now in this area. The present study developed an ANN model based on the past observations of several meteorological parameters like temperature, humidity, air pressure and vapour pressure as an input for training the model. The novel architecture of the proposed model contains several multilayer perceptron network (MLP to realize better performance. The model is enriched by analysis of alternative hybrid model of k-means clustering and MLP. The improvement of the performance in the prediction accuracy has been demonstrated by the automatic selection of the appropriate cluster

  11. Time Invariant Surface Roughness Evolution during Atmospheric Pressure Thin Film Depositions

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Merkh; Robert Spivey; Toh Ming Lu

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of thin film morphology during atmospheric pressure deposition has been studied utilizing Monte Carlo methods. Time invariant root-mean-squared roughness and local roughness morphology were both observed when employing a novel simulation parameter, modeling the effect of the experimental high pressure condition. This growth regime, where the surface roughness remains invariant after reaching a critical value, has not been classified by any existing universality class. An anti-sh...

  12. Melt-vapor phase transition in the lead-selenium system at atmospheric and low pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Trebukhov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The boiling temperature and the corresponding vapor phase composition in the existence domain of liquid solutions were calculated from the partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components and lead selenide over liquid melts in the lead-selenium system. The phase diagram was complemented with the liquid-vapor phase transition at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum of 100 Pa, which allowed us to judge the behavior of the components during the distillation separation.

  13. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  14. Carbon compounds in the atmosphere and their chemical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Martišová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The essay dissert on compounds of carbon in the atmosphere and its reaction. The most important are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane. Included among important compounds of carbon are volatile organic substances, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and dioxin. Carbon dioxide and methane representing greenhouse gases have also indispensable meaning. As they, together with water vapour, nitrogen monoxide and other gases are causing the major part of greenhouse effect. Primarily because of...

  15. Characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma treated pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles: Treatment in air/water vapor mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.zanini@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Grimoldi, Elisa [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Citterio, Attilio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica “G. Natta”, Via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy); Riccardi, Claudia, E-mail: riccardi@mib.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, p.za della Scienza, 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We treated cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with atmospheric pressure plasma. • Wettability of the fabrics was increased. • The increment in wettability derived from a surface oxidation of the fibers. • Only minor etching effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: We performed atmospheric pressure plasma treatments of pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in humid air (air/water vapor mixtures). Treatment parameters have been optimized in order to enhance the wettability of the fabrics without changing their bulk properties as well as their touch. A deep characterization has been performed to study the wettability, the surface morphologies, the chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plasma treated textiles. The chemical properties of the plasma treated samples were investigated with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). The analyses reveal a surface oxidation of the treated fabrics, which enhances their surface wettability. Morphological characterization of the treated fibers with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals minor etching effects, an essential feature for the maintenance of the textile softness.

  16. Characterization of atmospheric pressure plasma treated pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles: Treatment in air/water vapor mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We treated cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with atmospheric pressure plasma. • Wettability of the fabrics was increased. • The increment in wettability derived from a surface oxidation of the fibers. • Only minor etching effects were observed with scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: We performed atmospheric pressure plasma treatments of pure cashmere and wool/cashmere textiles with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in humid air (air/water vapor mixtures). Treatment parameters have been optimized in order to enhance the wettability of the fabrics without changing their bulk properties as well as their touch. A deep characterization has been performed to study the wettability, the surface morphologies, the chemical composition and the mechanical properties of the plasma treated textiles. The chemical properties of the plasma treated samples were investigated with attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). The analyses reveal a surface oxidation of the treated fabrics, which enhances their surface wettability. Morphological characterization of the treated fibers with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals minor etching effects, an essential feature for the maintenance of the textile softness

  17. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care. PMID:27136117

  18. Paleosols and the chemical evolution of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, H. D.; Zbinden, E. A.; Pinto, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The chemistry and mineralogy of soils reflects the chemistry of the atmosphere below which they develop. Today the presence of a cover of land plants can obscure the signature of a highly oxidizing atmosphere. Prior to the advent of higher land plants ca. 400 m.y. ago the obscuring effect of a biological interface should have been minor. It can be shown that under such conditions the behavior of ferrous iron during weathering depends on the relationship between the ratio of the net concentration of oxidants to the concentration of acids in rainwater, and on the ratio of the oxygen demand to the acid demand for complete weathering of the parent rock. An analysis of the behavior of iron in some 15 paleosols between 1.0 and 2.9 b.y. in age showed some time ago that iron was retained, or largely retained, in paleosols developed on rocks with a low ratio of oxidant demand to acid demand (R value) and was lost from paleosols with a high R value. The results indicate that between 1.1 and 2.9 b.y.b.p. the ratio of the net concentration of oxidants to CO2 in rainwater was less than ca. 1/600 of the present-day value. Work during the past year has sought to extend the data base for paleosols and to define more precisely the relationships between the composition of paleosols and the chemistry of the atmosphere below which they developed.

  19. A flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow as an ion source coupled to a differential mobility analyzer for volatile organic compound detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, Marcos; Orejas, Jaime; López-Vidal, Silvia; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-05-23

    Atmospheric pressure glow discharges have been widely used in the last decade as ion sources in ambient mass spectrometry analyses. Here, an in-house flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) has been developed as an alternative ion source for differential mobility analysis (DMA). The discharge source parameters (inter-electrode distance, current and helium flow rate) determining the atmospheric plasma characteristics have been optimized in terms of DMA spectral simplicity with the highest achievable sensitivity while keeping an adequate plasma stability and so the FAPA working conditions finally selected were: 35 mA, 1 L min(-1) of He and an inter-electrode distance of 8 mm. Room temperature in the DMA proved to be adequate for the coupling and chemical analysis with the FAPA source. Positive and negative ions for different volatile organic compounds were tested and analysed by FAPA-DMA using a Faraday cup as a detector and proper operation in both modes was possible (without changes in FAPA operational parameters). The FAPA ionization source showed simpler ion mobility spectra with narrower peaks and a better, or similar, sensitivity than conventional UV-photoionization for DMA analysis in positive mode. Particularly, the negative mode proved to be a promising field of further research for the FAPA ion source coupled to ion mobility, clearly competitive with other more conventional plasmas such as corona discharge. PMID:27141552

  20. Thin film deposition at atmospheric pressure using dielectric barrier discharges: Advances on three-dimensional porous substrates and functional coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Fiorenza; Bosso, Piera; Mastrangelo, Anna Maria; Fracassi, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Surface processing of materials by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) has experienced significant growth in recent years. Considerable research efforts have been directed for instance to develop a large variety of processes which exploit different DBD electrode geometries for the direct and remote deposition of thin films from precursors in gas, vapor and aerosol form. This article briefly reviews our recent progress in thin film deposition by DBDs with particular focus on process optimization. The following examples are provided: (i) the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin films on an open-cell foam accomplished by igniting the DBD throughout the entire three-dimensional (3D) porous structure of the substrate, (ii) the preparation of hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposite coatings using an aerosol-assisted process, (iii) the DBD jet deposition of coatings containing carboxylic acid groups and the improvement of their chemical and morphological stability upon immersion in water.