WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric ozone increases

  1. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  2. Increasing surface ozone concentrations in the background atmosphere of southern China, 1994–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Chan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric ozone is of great importance with regard to air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate change. In this paper we report the first continuous record of surface ozone in the background atmosphere of South China. The data were obtained from 1994 to 2007 at a coastal site in Hong Kong, which is strongly influenced by the outflow of Asian continental air during the winter and the inflow of maritime air from the subtropics in the summer. Overall, the ozone concentration increased by an averaged rate of 0.55 ppbv/yr, with a larger increase in autumn (0.68 ppbv/yr. We also examine the trend in air masses from various source regions in Asia. Using local wind and concurrently measured carbon monoxide (CO data to filter out local emissions, the mean ozone in air masses from eastern China, using the pooled averaging method, increased by 0.64 ppbv/yr, while ozone levels in other air-mass groups showed a positive trend (0.29–0.67 ppbv/yr but with lower levels of statistical significance. An examination of the nitrogen dioxide (NO2 column concentration data obtained from GOME and SCIAMACHY reveals an increase in atmospheric NO2 in the three fastest developing coastal regions of China, whereas NO2 in other parts of Asia decreased during the same period. It is believed that the observed increase in background ozone in Hong Kong is primarily due to the increased emissions of NO2 (and possibly volatile organic compounds (VOCs as well in the upwind coastal regions of mainland China, which is supported by the observed positive CO trend (5.23 ppbv/yr at the site. The increase in background ozone contributed two thirds of the annual increase in ''total ozone'' in the downwind urban areas of Hong Kong, suggesting the need to consider distant sources when developing long-term strategies to mitigate local ozone pollution, although short-term strategies should be aimed at sources in Hong Kong and the adjacent Pearl River Delta.

  3. The effects of increasing atmospheric ozone on biogenic monoterpene profiles and the formation of secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M.; Tiiva, Päivi; Miettinen, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Kokkola, Harri; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Laaksonen, Ari; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    Monoterpenes are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) which play an important role in plant adaptation to stresses, atmospheric chemistry, plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. In this study, we determined whether ozonolysis can influence the monoterpenes in the headspace of cabbage. The monoterpenes were mixed with an air-flow enriched with 100, 200 or 400 ppbv of ozone (O 3) in a Teflon chamber. The changes in the monoterpene and O 3 concentrations, and the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were determined during ozonolysis. Furthermore, the monoterpene reactions with O 3 and OH were modelled using reaction kinetics equations. The results showed that all of the monoterpenes were unequally affected: α-thujene, sabinene and D-limonene were affected to the greatest extend, whereas the 1,8-cineole concentration did not change. In addition, plant monoterpene emissions reduced the O 3 concentration by 12-24%. The SOA formation was dependent on O 3 concentration. At 100 ppbv of O 3, virtually no new particles were formed but clear SOA formation was observed at the higher ozone concentrations. The modelled results showed rather good agreements for α-pinene and 1,8-cineole, whereas the measured concentrations were clearly lower compared to modelled values for sabinene and limonene. In summary, O 3-quenching by monoterpenes occurs beyond the boundary layer of leaves and results in a decreased O 3 concentration, altered monoterpene profiles and SOA formation.

  4. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  5. A theoretical model of atmospheric ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, S. K.; Jana, P. K.; Lahiri, T.

    1994-01-01

    A critical study on different ozone depletion and formation processes has been made and following important results are obtained: (i) From analysis it is shown that O3 concentration will decrease very minutely with time for normal atmosphere when [O], [O2] and UV-radiation remain constant. (ii) An empirical equation is established theoretically between the variation of ozone concentration and time. (iii) Special ozone depletion processes are responsible for the dramatic decrease of O3-concentration at Antarctica.

  6. Ozone in the atmosphere. Basic principles, natural and human impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, Peter [Technical Univ. Munich (Germany). Immission Research; Dameris, Martin [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen-Wessling (Germany). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensive coverage of ozone both in the upper and the lower atmosphere. Essential overview of atmospheric ozone research written by two experienced and acknowledged experts. Numerous qualified references to the scientific literature. Peter Fabian and Martin Dameris provide a concise yet comprehensive overview of established scientific knowledge about ozone in the atmosphere. They present both ozone changes and trends in the stratosphere, as well as the effects of overabundance in the troposphere including the phenomenon of photosmog. Aspects such as photochemistry, atmospheric dynamics and global ozone distribution as well as various techniques for ozone measurement are treated. The authors outline the various causes for ozone depletion, the effects of ozone pollution and the relation to climate change. The book provides a handy reference guide for researchers active in atmospheric ozone research and a useful introduction for advanced students specializing in this field. Non-specialists interested in this field will also profit from reading the book. Peter Fabian can look back on a life-long active career in ozone research, having first gained international recognition for his measurements of the global distribution of halogenated hydrocarbons. He also pioneered photosmog investigations in the metropolitan areas of Munich, Berlin, Athens and Santiago de Chile, and his KROFEX facility provided controlled ozone fumigation of adult tree canopies for biologists to investigate the effects of ozone increases on forests. Besides having published a broad range of scientific articles, he has also been the author or editor of numerous books. From 2002 to 2005 he served the European Geosciences Union (EGU) as their first and Founding President. Martin Dameris is a prominent atmospheric modeler whose interests include the impacts of all kinds of natural and man-made disturbances on the atmospheric system. His scientific work focuses on the connections between ozone and

  7. Elevated atmospheric ozone increases concentration of insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac protein in Bt Brassica napus and reduces feeding of a Bt target herbivore on the non-transgenic parent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himanen, Sari J. [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: sari.himanen@uku.fi; Nerg, Anne-Marja [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Nissinen, Anne [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); MTT Agrifood Research Finland, Plant Protection, FIN-31600 Jokioinen (Finland); Stewart, C. Neal [University of Tennessee, Department of Plant Sciences, Knoxville, TN 37996-4561 (United States); Poppy, Guy M. [University of Southampton, School of Biological Sciences, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Holopainen, Jarmo K. [University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    Sustained cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic crops requires stable transgene expression under variable abiotic conditions. We studied the interactions of Bt toxin production and chronic ozone exposure in Bt cry1Ac-transgenic oilseed rape and found that the insect resistance trait is robust under ozone elevations. Bt Cry1Ac concentrations were higher in the leaves of Bt oilseed rape grown under elevated ozone compared to control treatment, measured either per leaf fresh weight or per total soluble protein of leaves. The mean relative growth rate of a Bt target herbivore, Plutella xylostella L. larvae was negative on Bt plants in all ozone treatments. On the non-transgenic plants, larval feeding damage was reduced under elevated ozone. Our results indicate the need for monitoring fluctuations in Bt toxin concentrations to reveal the potential of ozone exposure for altering dosing of Bt proteins to target and non-target herbivores in field environments experiencing increasing ozone pollution. - Elevated atmospheric ozone can induce fluctuations in insecticidal protein concentrations in transgenic plants.

  8. Atmospheric Ozone and Methane in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar S. A. Isaksen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone and methane are chemically active climate-forcing agents affected by climate–chemistry interactions in the atmosphere. Key chemical reactions and processes affecting ozone and methane are presented. It is shown that climate-chemistry interactions have a significant impact on the two compounds. Ozone, which is a secondary compound in the atmosphere, produced and broken down mainly in the troposphere and stratosphre through chemical reactions involving atomic oxygen (O, NOx compounds (NO, NO2, CO, hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2, volatile organic compounds (VOC and chlorine (Cl, ClO and bromine (Br, BrO. Ozone is broken down through changes in the atmospheric distribution of the afore mentioned compounds. Methane is a primary compound emitted from different sources (wetlands, rice production, livestock, mining, oil and gas production and landfills.Methane is broken down by the hydroxyl radical (OH. OH is significantly affected by methane emissions, defined by the feedback factor, currently estimated to be in the range 1.3 to 1.5, and increasing with increasing methane emission. Ozone and methane changes are affected by NOx emissions. While ozone in general increase with increases in NOx emission, methane is reduced, due to increases in OH. Several processes where current and future changes have implications for climate-chemistry interactions are identified. It is also shown that climatic changes through dynamic processes could have significant impact on the atmospheric chemical distribution of ozone and methane, as we can see through the impact of Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO. Modeling studies indicate that increases in ozone could be more pronounced toward the end of this century. Thawing permafrost could lead to important positive feedbacks in the climate system. Large amounts of organic material are stored in the upper layers of the permafrost in the yedoma deposits in Siberia, where 2 to 5% of the deposits could be organic material

  9. Impacts of increasing ozone on Indian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, E; Pandey, V; Pandey, A K; Keski-Saari, S; Kontunen-Soppela, S; Sharma, C

    2013-06-01

    Increasing anthropogenic and biogenic emissions of precursor compounds have led to high tropospheric ozone concentrations in India particularly in Indo-Gangetic Plains, which is the most fertile and cultivated area of this rapidly developing country. Current ozone risk models, based on European and North American data, provide inaccurate estimations for crop losses in India. During the past decade, several ozone experiments have been conducted with the most important Indian crop species (e.g. wheat, rice, mustard, mung bean). Experimental work started in natural field conditions around Varanasi area in early 2000's, and the use of open top chambers and EDU (ethylene diurea) applications has now facilitated more advanced studies e.g. for intra-species sensitivity screening and mechanisms of tolerance. In this review, we identify and discuss the most important gaps of knowledge and future needs of action, e.g. more systematic nationwide monitoring for precursor and ozone formation over Indian region.

  10. Connection between ozone concentration and atmosphere circulation at peak Moussala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojarov, Peter; Ivanov, Peter; Kalapov, Ivo; Penev, Ilia; Drenska, Mirolujba

    2009-09-01

    Connection between ozone concentration and atmosphere circulation is investigated based on measurements at BEO station, peak Moussala (2,925 m a.s.l.), for the period 09 August 2006 to 29 January 2008. Ozone concentration data are collected with UV-analyzer “Environnement O3 42” and meteo data with weather station “Vaisala”. There are measurements of 7Be. Data from NOAA HYSPLIT model for particle trajectories are also used. Eight wind directions and three ranges of wind velocities are employed in the analysis. A comparison of ozone concentrations in upward and downward air transport according to HYSPLIT model is made. The number of cases with ozone concentration above 63 ppb has been counted. Mann-Whitney nonparametric test is employed as a basic statistical method. Correlation between atmosphere pressure and tropospheric ozone content is made. The same is done for 7Be and ozone. The main conclusion is that there is not any local or regional pollution effect detectable at peak Moussala, but most of the ozone measured is due to emissions of hydrocarbons and NO x over a larger region. There could be some regional sources of ozone building substances in southwest direction from peak Moussala. Air transported from the north quarter has higher ozone concentrations compared to the south quarter. In vertical direction, upward transport of air masses shows higher values of ozone concentration. Higher wind velocity is associated with low ozone concentrations at peak Moussala. The annual course of ozone concentration has summer maximum and winter minimum. There is right connection between air pressure and ozone concentration. The same is valid for the correlation between 7Be and ozone. Diurnal ozone course shows daytime maximum in winter and nighttime maximum in summer.

  11. Response of giant sequoia canopy foliage to elevated concentrations of atmospheric ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, N E; Miller, P R; Scioli, D

    1996-06-01

    We examined the physiological response of foliage in the upper third of the canopy of 125-year-old giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum Buchholz.) trees to a 61-day exposure to 0.25x, 1x, 2x or 3x ambient ozone concentration. Four branch exposure chambers, one per ozone treatment, were installed on 1-m long secondary branches of each tree at a height of 34 m. No visible symptoms of foliar ozone damage were apparent throughout the 61-day exposure period and none of the ozone treatments affected branch growth. Despite the similarity in ozone concentrations in the branch chambers within a treatment, the trees exhibited different physiological responses to increasing ozone uptake. Differences in diurnal and seasonal patterns of g(s) among the trees led to a 2-fold greater ozone uptake in tree No. 2 compared with trees Nos. 1 and 3. Tree No. 3 had significantly higher CER and g(s) at 0.25x ambient ozone than trees Nos. 1 and 2, and g(s) and CER of tree No. 3 declined with increasing ozone uptake. The y-intercept of the regression for dark respiration versus ozone uptake was significantly lower for tree No. 2 than for trees Nos. 1 and 3. In the 0.25x and 1x ozone treatments, the chlorophyll concentration of current-year foliage of trees Nos. 1 and 2 was significantly higher than that of current-year foliage of tree No. 3. Chlorophyll concentration of current-year foliage on tree No. 1 did not decline with increasing ozone uptake. In all trees, total needle water potential decreased with increasing ozone uptake, but turgor was constant. Although tree No. 2 had the greatest ozone uptake, g(s) was highest and foliar chlorophyll concentration was lowest in tree No. 3 in the 0.25x and 1x ambient atmospheric ozone treatments.

  12. Increase in ozone due to the use of biodiesel fuel rather than diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Phan Quang; Muto, Yusuke; Maeda, Yasuaki; Trung, Nguyen Quang; Itano, Yasuyuki; Takenaka, Norimichi

    2016-09-01

    The consumption of fuel by vehicles emits nitrogen oxides (NOx) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) into the atmosphere, which are important ozone precursors. Ozone is formed as a secondary pollutant via photochemical processes and is not emitted directly into the atmosphere. In this paper, the ozone increase resulting from the use of biodiesel and diesel fuels was investigated, and the different ozone formation trends were experimentally evaluated. Known amounts of exhaust gas from a power generator operated using biodiesel and diesel fuels were added to ambient air. The quality of the ambient air, such as the initial NMHC and NOx concentrations, and the irradiation intensity have an effect on the ozone levels. When 30 cm(3) of biodiesel fuel exhaust gas (BFEG) or diesel fuel exhausted gas (DFEG) was added to 18 dm(3) of ambient air, the highest ratios of ozone increase from BFEG compared with DFEG in Japan and Vietnam were 31.2 and 42.8%, respectively, and the maximum ozone increases resulting from DFEG and BFEG compared with the ambient air in Japan were 17.4 and 26.4 ppb, respectively. The ozone increase resulting from the use of BFEG was large and significant compared to that from DFEG under all experimental conditions. The ozone concentration increased as the amount of added exhaust gas increased. The ozone increase from the Jatropha-BFEG was slightly higher than that from waste cooking oil-BFEG.

  13. Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation: Annual report 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Svendby, Tove Marit; Edvardsen, Kåre; Hansen, Georg Heinrich; Stebel, Kerstin; Dahlback, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This is an annual report describing the activities and main results of the monitoring programme “Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation” for 2014. The ozone layer was below the long-term mean in spring 2014, but increased in April/May and was close to normal rest of the year. A clear decrease in total ozone above Norway during the period 1979-1997 stopped after 1998 and the ozone layer above Norway now seems to have stabilized.

  14. Total ozone column distribution over peninsular Malaysia from scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric cartography (SCIAMACHY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. C.; Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing of atmospheric ozone concentrations have received great attention around the whole because of its characteristic, in order to degrade air quality and brings hazard to human health and ecosystems. Ozone, one of the most pollutants source and brings a variety of adverse effects on plant life and human being. Continuous monitoring on ozone concentrations at atmosphere provide information and precautions for the high ozone level, which we need to be established. Satellite observation of ozone has been identified that it can provide the precise and accurate data globally, which sensitive to the small regional biases. We present measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) included on the European environmental satellite ENVISAT, launched on 1st of March 2002. Main objective of this study is to examine the ozone distribution over Peninsular Malaysia using SCIAMACHY level-2 of total ozone column WFMD version 1.0 with spatial resolution 1° x 1.25°. Maps of time averaged (yearly, tri-monthly) ozone was generated and analyzed over Peninsular Malaysia for the year 2003 using PCI Geomatica 10.3 image processing software. It was retrieved using the interpolation technique. The concentration changes within boundary layer at all altitude levels are equally sensitive through the SCIAMACHY nearinfrared nadir observations. Hence, we can make observation of ozone at surface source region. The results successfully identify the area with highest and lowest concentration of ozone at Peninsular Malaysia using SCIAMACHY data. Therefore, the study is suitable to examine the distribution of ozone at tropical region.

  15. Observed atmospheric total column ozone distribution from SCIAMACHY over Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, T. K.; San, L. H.; Jafri, M. Z. M.

    2014-02-01

    The increase in atmospheric ozone has received great attention because it degrades air quality and brings hazard to human health and ecosystems. The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal variations of ozone concentrations in Peninsular Malaysia from January 2003 to December 2009 using Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY). Level-2 data of total column ozone WFMD version 1.0 with spatial resolution 1° × 1.25° were acquired through SCIAMACHY. Analysis for trend of five selected sites exhibit strong seasonal variation in atmospheric ozone concentrations, where there is a significant difference between northeast monsoon and southwest monsoon. The highest ozone values occurred over industrial and congested urban zones (280.97 DU) on August at Bayan Lepas. The lowest ozone values were observed during northeast monsoon on December at Subang (233.08 DU). In addition, the local meteorological factors also bring an impact on the atmospheric ozone. During northeast monsoon, with the higher rate of precipitation, higher relative humidity, low temperature, and less sunlight hours let to the lowest ozone concentrations. Inversely, the highest ozone concentrations observed during southwest monsoon, with the low precipitation rate, lower relative humidity, higher temperature, and more sunlight hours. Back trajectories analysis is carried out, in order to trace the path of the air parcels with high ozone concentration event, suggesting cluster of trajectory (from southwest of the study area) caused by the anthropogenic sources associated with biogenic emissions from large tropical forests, which can make important contribution to regional and global pollution.

  16. Analysis of atmospheric ozone measurements over a pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A.; Fontan, J.; Minga, A.

    Vertical and horizontal profiles of ozone concentration have been measured within the atmospheric boundary layer over the pine forest located in the southwest of France (Landes Forest). Evidence for an ozone depletion in lower layers is obtained from the analysis of vertical profiles recorded at the end of the night. In terms of deposition at the upper canopy level, this corresponds to a disappearance rate ranging between 0.2 and 0.5 cm s -1. The horizontal profiles obtained at midday reveal that ozone vanishes at a rate of the order of 5 × 10 -5 ppb m -1 when air mass moving in the advection direction passes over the forested area. These results are consistent with those obtained by numeric simulation in the case of low emission rates of nitrogen oxides. On the basis of these measurements, the expression of the ozone budget within the atmospheric boundary layer is discussed and compared with the data obtained from the simulation study.

  17. A Review of Atmospheric Ozone and Current Thinking on the Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    effect. 443 V O- - Other chemical agents such as bromine# methane, fluorine and carbon dioxide have direct or indirect effects on the ozone layer...yielding HOx species which can influence the mixing ratio of ozone. Carbon dioxide increases can cause * the stratosphere to cool and, as a result, slow...depicted by the hatched areas in Fig. 1. Ozone formation begins by the photodissociation of molecular oxygen at altitudes of 40 to 100 km. Photolysis

  18. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  19. The role of open lead interactions in atmospheric ozone variability between Arctic coastal and inland sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Peterson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Boundary layer atmospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs are commonly observed across polar sea ice regions following polar sunrise. During March-April 2005 in Alaska, the coastal site of Barrow and inland site of Atqasuk experienced ODEs (O3 < 10 nmol mol-1 concurrently for 31% of the observations, consistent with large spatial scale ozone depletion. However, 7% of the time ODEs were exclusively observed inland at Atqasuk. This phenomenon also occurred during one of nine flights during the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX, when atmospheric vertical profiles at both sites showed near-surface ozone depletion only at Atqasuk on 28 March 2012. Concurrent in-flight BrO measurements made using nadir scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS showed the differences in ozone vertical profiles at these two sites could not be attributed to differences in locally occurring halogen chemistry. During both studies, backward air mass trajectories showed that the Barrow air masses observed had interacted with open sea ice leads, causing increased vertical mixing and recovery of ozone at Barrow and not Atqasuk, where the air masses only interacted with tundra and consolidated sea ice. These observations suggest that, while it is typical for coastal and inland sites to have similar ozone conditions, open leads may cause heterogeneity in the chemical composition of the springtime Arctic boundary layer over coastal and inland areas adjacent to sea ice regions.

  20. Solid State Mobile Lidar for Ozone Atmospheric Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis; Ganoe, Rene

    2014-01-01

    A tunable Ce:LiCAF laser is pumped by a CLBO crystal pumped by a doubled Nd:YLF laser running at 1 kilohertz. The UV tunable Ce:LiCAF laser produces two UV pulses between 280 to 295 nanometers. These pulses are transmitted into the atmosphere to profile the concentration of ozone as a function of altitude.

  1. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  2. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  3. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  4. Integrated Global Observation Strategy - Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Readings, C. J.; Kaye, J.; Mohnen, V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The "Long Term Continuity of Stratospheric Ozone Measurements and Atmospheric Chemistry" project was one of six established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) in response to the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) initiative. IGOS links satellite and ground based systems for global environmental observations. The strategy of this project is to develop a consensus of user requirements including the scientific (SPARC, IGAC, WCRP) and the applications community (WMO, UNEP) and to develop a long-term international plan for ozone and atmospheric chemistry measurements. The major components of the observing system include operational and research (meeting certain criteria) satellite platforms planned by the space faring nations which are integrated with a well supported and sustained ground, aircraft, and balloon measurements program for directed observations as well satellite validation. Highly integrated and continuous measurements of ozone, validation, and reanalysis efforts are essential to meet the international scientific and applications goals. In order to understand ozone trends, climate change, and air quality, it is essential to conduct long term measurements of certain other atmospheric species. These species include key source, radical, and reservoir constituents.

  5. A compact mobile ozone lidar for atmospheric ozone and aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-10-01

    A compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone air quality campaigns. This lidar is integrated into the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consists of a Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. The system has been configured to enable mobile operation from a trailer and was deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 supporting the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. Ozone curtain plots and the resulting science are presented.

  6. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sofen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971–2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8, SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452. We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  7. Lower and middle atmosphere and ozone layer responses to solar variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Ana G.

    2010-02-01

    Global warming in the troposphere and the decrease of stratospheric ozone concentration has become a major concern to the scientific community. The increase in greenhouse gases and aerosols concentration is believed to be the main cause of this global change in the lower atmosphere and in stratospheric ozone, which is corresponded by a cooling in the middle and upper atmosphere. However, there are natural sources, such as the sun and volcanic eruptions, with the same ability to produce global changes in the atmosphere. The present work will focus on solar variation and its signature in lower and middle atmosphere parameters. The Sun can influence the Earth and its climate through electromagnetic radiation variations and also through changes in the solar wind which causes geomagnetic storms. The effects of both mechanisms over the lower and middle atmosphere and ozone layer will be discussed through an overview of selected papers, which by no means cover this subject that is extremely wide and complex. A fundamental understanding of the atmosphere response to solar variations is required for understanding and interpreting the causes of atmospheric variability. This is an essential focus of climate science, which is seeking to determine the extent to which human activities are altering the planetary energy balance through the emission of greenhouse gases and pollutants.

  8. Heterogeneous reactions important in atmospheric ozone depletion: a theoretical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Hynes, James T

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the mechanisms of several heterogeneous reactions involving ClONO(2), H(2)O, HCl, HBr, and H(2)SO(4) important in atmospheric ozone depletion are described, focused primarily on reactions on aqueous aerosol surfaces. Among the insights obtained is the active chemical participation of the surface water molecules in several of these reactions. The general methodology adopted allows reduction of these complex chemical problems to meaningful model systems amenable to quantum chemical calculations.

  9. The role of ozone feedback in modulating the atmospheric response to the solar cycle forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Ewa; Maycock, Amanda; Braesicke, Peter; Telford, Paul; Abraham, Luke; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    The irradiance changes between the 11-year solar cycle maximum and minimum lead to increased stratospheric temperatures via enhanced UV absorption by ozone. This direct radiative response is strengthened by increased photochemical ozone production. While in reality these two processes are closely coupled, not all global climate models include interactive chemistry and may not therefore represent the solar-ozone feedback in an internally consistent manner. This study investigates the role of the representation of ozone for the modeled solar cycle response. We use a version of the UM-UKCA chemistry-climate model. We perform a 64-year perpetual solar minimum integration with non-interactive treatment of ozone, i.e. where ozone is externally prescribed for the radiative calculations. This is complemented with two analogous non-interactive solar maximum integrations that include an increase in solar irradiance, but which differ in their representation of the solar ozone response. We show that the representation of the solar-ozone feedback has a first-order impact on the simulated yearly mean short wave heating rates and temperature responses to the 11-year solar cycle forcing. However, despite the substantial differences in the tropical temperature changes, the Northern Hemisphere high latitude circulation responses are broadly similar in both experiments, and show strengthening of the polar vortex during winter and a weakening in March. Therefore, the representation of the prescribed solar-ozone response appears unlikely to explain the substantial spread in the solar cycle dynamical responses in different models. Lastly, we compare these results with an analogous solar maximum/minimum pair in which ozone is calculated by the photochemical scheme in a self-consistent manner. We show that the use of interactive vs non-interactive treatment of ozone does not strongly affect the yearly mean tropical temperature response. However, the results suggest potential differences

  10. Increase in Ozone hole and hence UV-B Preceding Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Before the occurrence of earthquake, the change has been observed in ozone hole as well as UV-B flux in the atmosphere of the earth. After earthquake the UV-B flux reduces, which is correlated with the fluctuation in atmospheric temperature as well as Electron flux in Sun-Earth environment. Actual measurement show a linear relationship in between Coronal Mass Ejection and increase in Solar UV- B before the earthquakes in various parts of India.

  11. Ground-based microwave measuring of middle atmosphere ozone and temperature profiles during sudden stratospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, A. M.; Shvetsov, A. A.; Krasilnikov, A. A.; Kulikov, M. Y.; Karashtin, D. A.; Mukhin, D.; Bolshakov, O. S.; Fedoseev, L. I.; Ryskin, V. G.; Belikovich, M. V.; Kukin, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    We carried out the experimental campaign aimed to study the response of middle atmosphere on a sudden stratospheric warming in winter 2011-2012 above Nizhny Novgorod, Russia (56N, 44E). We employed the ground-based microwave complex for remote sensing of middle atmosphere developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science. The complex combines two room-temperature radiometers, i.e. microwave ozonometer and the stratospheric thermometer. Ozonometer is a heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating in a range of frequencies that include the rotation transition of ozone molecules with resonance frequency 110.8 GHz. Operating frequency range of the stratospheric thermometer is 52.5-5.4 GHz and includes lower frequency edge of 5 mm molecular oxygen absorption bands and among them two relatively weak lines of O2 emission. Digital fast Fourier transform spectrometers developed by "Acqiris" are employed for signal spectral analysis. The spectrometers have frequency range 0.05-1 GHz and realizes the effective resolution about 61 KHz. For retrieval vertical profiles of ozone and temperature from radiometric data we applied novel method based on Bayesian approach to inverse problem solution, which assumed a construction of probability distribution of the characteristics of retrieved profiles with taking into account measurement noise and available a priori information about possible distributions of ozone and temperature in the middle atmosphere. Here we introduce the results of the campaign in comparison with Aura MLS data. Presented data includes one sudden stratospheric warming event which took place in January 13-14 and was accompanied by temperature increasing up to 310 K at 45 km height. During measurement period, ozone and temperature variations were (almost) anti-correlated, and total ozone abundance achieved a local maxima during the stratosphere cooling phase. In general, results of ground-based measurements are in good agreement with

  12. Stratospheric ozone depletion from future nitrous oxide increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the impact of the assumed nitrous oxide (N2O increases on stratospheric chemistry and dynamics using a series of idealized simulations with a coupled chemistry-climate model (CCM. In a future cooler stratosphere the net yield of NOy from N2O is shown to decrease in a reference run following the IPCC A1B scenario, but NOy can still be significantly increased by extra increases of N2O over 2001–2050. Over the last decade of simulations, 50% increases in N2O result in a maximal 6% reduction in ozone mixing ratios in the middle stratosphere at around 10 hPa and an average 2% decrease in the total ozone column (TCO compared with the control run. This enhanced destruction could cause an ozone decline in the first half of this century in the middle stratosphere around 10 hPa, while global TCO still shows an increase at the same time. The results from a multiple linear regression analysis and sensitivity simulations with different forcings show that the chemical effect of N2O increases dominates the N2O-induced ozone depletion in the stratosphere, while the dynamical and radiative effects of N2O increases are overall insignificant. The analysis of the results reveals that the ozone depleting potential of N2O varies with the time period and is influenced by the environmental conditions. For example, carbon dioxide (CO2 increases can strongly offset the ozone depletion effect of N2O.

  13. Will climate change increase ozone depletion from low-energy-electron precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Baumgaertner

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of a strengthened Brewer-Dobson circulation on the transport of nitric oxide (NO produced by energetic particle precipitation. During periods of high geomagnetic activity, low-energy-electron precipitation is responsible for winter time ozone loss in the polar middle atmosphere between 1 and 6 hPa. However, as climate change is expected to increase the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, the enhancements of NOx concentrations are expected to be transported to lower altitudes in extra-tropical regions, becoming even more significant in the ozone budget. We use simulations with the chemistry climate model system ECHAM5/MESSy to compare present day effects of low-energy-electron precipitation with expected effects in a climate change scenario for the year 2100. In years of strong geomagnetic activity, similar to that observed in 2003, an additional polar ozone loss of up to 0.5 μmol/mol at 5 hPa is found. However, this would be approximately compensated by an ozone enhancement originating from a stronger poleward transport of ozone from lower latitudes caused by a strengthened Brewer-Dobson circulation, as well as by slower photochemical ozone loss reactions in a stratosphere cooled by risen greenhouse gas concentrations.

  14. Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation: Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendby, T.M.; Myhre, C.L.; Stebel, K.; Edvardsen, K; Orsolini, Y.; Dahlback, A.

    2012-07-01

    This is an annual report describing the activities and main results of the monitoring programme: Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation for 2011. 2011 was a year with generally low ozone values above Norway. A clear decrease in the ozone layer above Norway during the period 1979-1997 stopped after 1998 and the ozone layer above Norway seems now to have stabilized.(Author)

  15. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  16. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  17. Ozone Diurnal Variation in the PBL at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory During Summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newchurch, M.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brewer, A.; Brown, S. S.; Carrion, W.; Delgado, R.; De Young, R.; Huang, G.; Johnson, B.; Kuang, S.; Langford, A. O.; Lundquist, J. K.; McGee, T. J.; Pliutau, D.; Senff, C. J.; Sullivan, J. T.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the diurnal variation of PBL ozone at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in July 2014 using multiple observations, including three ozone DIALs, several wind Doppler lidars, free-launched and tethered ozonesondes, and in-situ measurements on the BAO tower. Three mobile lidars from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET) provide high spatial and temporal ozone profiles from near surface to the top of the troposphere. The combination of multiple observations will provide detailed structure of the diurnal variation of ozone. This ozone information will help the satellite and modeling communities to study the character of lower tropospheric ozone for the improvements of satellite retrieval and air-quality models. In addition, a Large-Eddy Simulation model will calculate ozone in the mixed layer to explain the processes responsible for the observations.

  18. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundaru-layer tropospheric ozone - a review sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Butler, T.; Oltmans, S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone depositio

  19. Use of coupled ozone fields in a 3-D circulation model of the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reddmann

    Full Text Available With a detailed chemistry scheme for the middle atmosphere up to 70 km which has been added to the 3-D Karlsruhe simulation model of the middle atmosphere (KASIMA, the effects of coupling chemistry and dynamics through ozone are studied for the middle atmosphere. An uncoupled version using an ozone climatology for determining heating rates and a coupled version using on-line ozone are compared in a 10-month integration with meteorological analyses for the winter 1992/93 as the lower boundary condition. Both versions simulate the meteorological situation satisfactorily, but exhibit a too cold lower stratosphere. The on-line ozone differs from the climatological data between 20 and 40 km by exhibiting too high ozone values, whereas in the lower mesosphere the ozone values are too low. The coupled model version is stable and differs only above 40 km significantly from the uncoupled version. Direct heating effects are identified to cause most of the differences. The well-known negative correlation between temperature and ozone is reproduced in the model. As a result, the coupled version slightly approaches the climatological ozone field. Further feedback effects are studied by using the on-line ozone field as a basis for an artificial climatology. For non-disturbed ozone conditions realistic monthly and zonally averaged ozone data are sufficient to determine the heating rates for modelling the middle atmosphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere · composition and chemistry · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics.

  20. Lidar method of measurement of atmospheric extinction and ozone profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A description of a method of measurement of atmospheric extinction and of ozone profiles by use of the backscatter signal from a monostatic lidar is given. The central feature of the procedure involves a measurement of the ratio of the Raman backscatter returns of both the oxygen and nitrogen atmospheric content. Because the ratio of the number density of both species is known to high accuracy, the measurement itself becomes a measure of the ratio of two transmissions to altitude along with a ratio of the two system constants. The calibration measurement for determining the value of the ratio of the two system constants or electro-optical conversion constants is accomplished by a lidar measurement of identical atmospheric targets while at the same time interchanging the two optical filters in the two optical channels of the receiver. More details of the procedure are discussed. Factoring this calibrated value into the measured O2/N2 profile ratio provides a measured value of the ratio of the two transmissions. Or equivalently, it provides a measurement of the difference of the two extinction coefficients at the O2 and N2 Raman wavelengths as a function of the height.

  1. Tropospheric Ozone Changes, Radiative Forcing and Attribution to Emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D.S.; Young, P.J.; Naik, V.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Skeie, R. B.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Myhre, G.; Berntsen, T. K.; Folberth, G. A.; Rumbold, S. T.; Collins, W. J.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Doherty, R. M.; Zeng, G.; vanNoije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Plummer, D. A.; Strode, S. A.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; Szopa, S.; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Josse, B.; Cionni, I.; Righi, M.; Eyring, V.; Conley, A.; Bowman, K. W.; Wild, O.; Archibald, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs). All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750) to present-day (2010) tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m-2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (+/-1 standard deviation) in RFs of +/-17%. Three different radiation schemes were used - we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields) of +/-10 percent. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of +/-3 percent. Given additional (unquantified) uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of +/-30 percent for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44+/-12 percent), nitrogen oxides (31 +/- 9 percent), carbon monoxide (15 +/- 3 percent) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 +/- 2 percent); earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m(-2) DU(-1), a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m(-2); relative to 1750) for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5) of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030), and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100). Models show some

  2. Tropospheric ozone changes, radiative forcing and attribution to emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs. All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750 to present-day (2010 tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m−2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (±1 standard deviation in RFs of ±17%. Three different radiation schemes were used – we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields of ±10%. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of ±3%. Given additional (unquantified uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of ±30% for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44±12%, nitrogen oxides (31 ± 9%, carbon monoxide (15 ± 3% and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 ± 2%; earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m−2 DU−1, a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m−2; relative to 1750 for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030, and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100. Models show some coherent responses of ozone to climate change

  3. Use of the maximum entropy method to retrieve the vertical atmospheric ozone profile and predict atmospheric ozone content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, B. Curtis

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed for prediction of ozone levels in planetary atmospheres. This method is formulated in terms of error covariance matrices, and is associated with both direct measurements, a priori first guess profiles, and a weighting function matrix. This is described by the following linearized equation: y = A(matrix) x X + eta, where A is the weighting matrix and eta is noise. The problems to this approach are: (1) the A matrix is near singularity; (2) the number of unknowns in the profile exceeds the number of data points, therefore, the solution may not be unique; and (3) even if a unique solution exists, eta may cause the solution to be ill conditioned.

  4. Transport and deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxian

    Tropospheric ozone is an important photochemical air pollutant, which increases respiratory-related diseases, decreases crop yields, and causes other environmental problems. This research has focused on the measurement of soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide (NO), one of the precursors for ozone formation, from intensively managed soils in the Southeast US, and examined the transport and deposition of NOx (NO + NO2) and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer, and the effects of NO emissions and its chemical reactions on ozone flux and deposition to the earth's surface. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured from an intensively managed agricultural soil, in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina (near Plymouth, NC), using a dynamic chamber technique. Measurements of soil NO emissions in several crop canopies were conducted at four different sites in North Carolina during late spring and summer of 1994-1996. The turbulent fluxes of NO2 and O3 at 5 m and 10 m above the ground were measured using the eddy-correlation technique near Plymouth, NC during late spring of 1995 and summer of 1996, concurrent with measurements of soil NO emissions using the dynamic chamber system. Soil NO emission from within the corn field was high averaging approximately 35 ng N/m2/s during the measurement period of 1995. In another study, vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610 m tall tower located 15 km Southeast of Raleigh, NC during the summers of 1993-1997, as part of an effort by the State of North Carolina to develop a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. A strong correlation was observed between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations in the residual layer (CR) above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (C o max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, an empirical regression equation (Co max = 27.67*exp(0.016 CR)) was developed for predicting maximum ground level ozone

  5. [Analysis on concentration variety characteristics of atmospheric ozone under the boundary layer in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xue-Mei; Wang, Geng-Chen; Chen, Hong-Bin; Wang, Pu-Cai; Xuan, Yue-Jian

    2007-11-01

    Based on the atmospheric ozone sounding data, the average monthly and seasonal variety principles of atmospheric ozone concentration during six years are analyzed under the boundary layer in Beijing. The results show that the monthly variation of atmospheric ozone are obvious that the minimum values appear in January from less than 10 x 10(-9) on ground to less than 50 x 10(-9) on upper layer (2 km), but the maximum values appear in June from 85 x 10(-9) on ground to more than 90 x 10(-9) on upper layer. The seasonal variation is also clear that the least atmospheric ozone concentration is in winter and the most is in summer, but variety from ground to upper layer is largest in winter and least in summer. According to the type of outline, the outline of ozone concentration is composite of three types which are winter type, summer type and spring-autumn type. The monthly ozone concentration in different heights is quite different. After analyzing the relationship between ozone concentration and meteorological factors, such as temperature and humidity, we find ozone concentration on ground is linear with temperature and the correlation coefficient is more than 85 percent.

  6. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S., E-mail: shawn.goldman@nasa.gov [NASA Astrobiology Institute—Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  7. Atmospheric Hydroperoxides in West Antarctica: Links to Stratospheric Ozone and Atmospheric Oxidation Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Markus M.; Stewart, Richard W.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bales, Roger C.

    2005-01-01

    The troposphere above the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) was sampled for hydroperoxides at 21 locations during 2-month-long summer traverses from 2000 to 2002, as part of US ITASE (International Transantarctic Scientific Expedition). First time quantitative measurements using an HPLC method showed that methylhydroperoxide (MHP) is the only important organic hydroperoxide occurring in the Antarctic troposphere, and that it is found at levels ten times those previously predicted by photochemical models. During three field seasons, means and standard deviations for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were 321+/-158 pptv, 650+/-176 pptv and 330+/-147 pptv. While MHP was detected, but not quantified in December 2000, levels in summer 2001 and 2002 were 317+128 pptv and 304+/-172.2 pptv. Results from firn air experiments and diurnal variability of the two species showed that atmospheric H2O2 is significantly impacted by a physical snow pack source between 76 and 90degS, whereas MHP is not. We show strong evidence of a positive feedback between stratospheric ozone and H2O2 at the surface. Between November-27 and December-12 in 2001, when ozone column densities dropped below 220 DU (means in 2000 and 2001 were 318 DU and 334 DU, respectively), H2O2 was 1.7 times that observed in the same period in 2000 and 2002, while MHP was only 80% of the levels encountered in 2002. Photochemical box model runs suggest that NO and OH levels on WAIS are closer to coastal values, while Antarctic Plateau levels are higher, confirming that region to be a highly oxidizing environment. The modeled sensitivity of H2O2 and particularly MHP to NO offers the potential to use atmospheric hydroperoxides to constrain the NO background and thus estimate the past oxidation capacity of the remote atmosphere. Index Terms: 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere: composition and chemistry; 0322 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Constituent sources and sinks; 1610 Global Change: Atmosphere (03

  8. Will climate change increase ozone depletion from low-energy-electron precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Baumgaertner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of a strengthened stratospheric/mesospheric residual circulation on the transport of nitric oxide (NO produced by energetic particle precipitation. During periods of high geomagnetic activity, energetic electron precipitation (EEP is responsible for winter time ozone loss in the polar middle atmosphere between 1 and 6 hPa. However, as climate change is expected to increase the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation including extratropical downwelling, the enhancements of EEP NOx concentrations are expected to be transported to lower altitudes in extratropical regions, becoming more significant in the ozone budget. Changes in the mesospheric residual circulation are also considered. We use simulations with the chemistry climate model system EMAC to compare present day effects of EEP NOx with expected effects in a climate change scenario for the year 2100. In years of strong geomagnetic activity, similar to that observed in 2003, an additional polar ozone loss of up to 0.4 μmol/mol at 5 hPa is found in the Southern Hemisphere. However, this would be approximately compensated by an ozone enhancement originating from a stronger poleward transport of ozone from lower latitudes caused by a strengthened Brewer-Dobson circulation, as well as by slower photochemical ozone loss reactions in a stratosphere cooled by risen greenhouse gas concentrations. In the Northern Hemisphere the EEP NOx effect appears to lose importance due to the different nature of the climate-change induced circulation changes.

  9. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duten, X; Redolfi, M; Aggadi, N; Vega, A; Hassouni, K, E-mail: duten@lspm.cnrs.fr [LSPM-CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris Nord, 90 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  10. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  11. Germination of fungal conidia after exposure to low concentration ozone atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The germinability of conidia of Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, or Penicillium italicum was determined periodically during exposure for approximately 100 days to a humid atmosphere of air alone or air containing 150 ppb ozone ...

  12. An Autonomous Ozone Instrument for Atmospheric Measurements from Ocean Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsa, E. J.; Rawlins, W. T.; Sholkovitz, E. R.; Hosom, D. S.; Allsup, G. P.; Purcell, M. J.; Scott, D. R.; Mulhall, P.

    2002-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an oxidant, a greenhouse gas, and a pollutant. Because of its adverse health effects, there are numerous monitoring stations on land but none over the oceans. We have built an ozone instrument for deployment anywhere at sea from ocean buoys, to study ozone chemistry over the oceans, intercontinental transport of pollution, diurnal and seasonal cycles of ozone, and to make baseline and long-term time series measurements of ozone in remote locations. The instrument uses direct (Beer's Law) absorption of UV radiation in a dual-path cell, with ambient and ozone-free air alternately switched between the two paths, to measure ozone. Ozone can be measured at a rate of 1 Hz, with a precision of about 1 ppb at sea level. The air inlet and outlet have valves which close automatically under high wind conditions or rain to protect the ozone sensor. The instrument has been packaged for deployment at sea, and tested on a 3-meter discus buoy with other instruments in coastal waters in fall 2001. It can operate autonomously or be controlled via line-of-sight modem or a satellite link. We will present the details of the instrument, and laboratory and buoy test data from its first deployment, including a comparison with a nearby ozone monitoring station on land. We will also present an evaluation of the instrument's performance and describe plans for improvements. In summer 2002, the ozone measurement system will be operated at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory; in the future we anticipate deploying on the Bermuda Testbed Mooring, followed by use on the open ocean to measure long-range transport of ozone.

  13. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  14. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change.

  15. Abiotic Ozone and Oxygen in Atmospheres Similar to Prebiotic Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Claire, Mark W; Robinson, Tyler D; Meadows, Victoria S

    2014-01-01

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely-detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O_2) or ozone (O_3) simultaneous to methane (CH_4) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here, we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O_2 and O_3 production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O_2 and O_3 build up, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O_3 and CH_4 features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O_2 features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O_3 and CH_4 by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrim...

  16. The predicted impact of increased formaldehyde emissions from industrial flares on ozone concentrations in Houston, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.

    2015-12-01

    Houston features one of the largest concentrations of the petrochemical industry in all of North America and flares are widely used there as the final treatment process for unwanted volatile organic compounds. These flares have the potential to produce formaldehyde as the result of incomplete combustion. Formaldehyde emissions are an important precursor to producing hydroxyl radicals and thus can impact atmospheric chemistry and the formation of ozone. Formaldehyde emissions from flares, however, are difficult to measure in situ. Recently, alternative measurement techniques have been developed, like open path optical methods, that allow the direct measurement of flare emissions from the facility's fence line (Johansson et al., 2014; Pikelnaya, Flynn, Tsai, & Stutz, 2013). This observational data indicates that the emission rate of formaldehyde from flares is about 10-20 times greater than those found in the regulatory models developed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ). This research will use air quality models to quantify the impact that increased formaldehyde emission from flares will have on Houston ozone concentrations. This study relies on the CAMx model (version 6.1) and emission data developed by Alpine Geophysics LLC (AG) and Climate & Atmospheric Research Associates (CARA) based on the combined databases from TCEQ, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and National Emission Inventory (NEI2008). This model also used meteorology data from the results of WRF-ARW dynamics. The CAMx generated process analysis data will also be used to quantify changes in radical budgets and NOx budgets critical to ozone production.

  17. Downward transport of ozone rich air and implications for atmospheric chemistry in the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Tobias; Wei, Dandan; Chase, Randy J.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Andreoli, Rita V.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo A.; Freire, Livia S.; Jardine, Angela B.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Nascimento dos Santos, Rosa M.; von Randow, Celso; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Stoy, Paul C.; Tóta, Julio; Trowbridge, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    From April 2014 to January 2015, ozone (O3) dynamics were investigated as part of GoAmazon 2014/5 project in the central Amazon rainforest of Brazil. Just above the forest canopy, maximum hourly O3 mixing ratios averaged 20 ppbv (parts per billion on a volume basis) during the June-September dry months and 15 ppbv during the wet months. Ozone levels occasionally exceeded 75 ppbv in response to influences from biomass burning and regional air pollution. Individual convective storms transported O3-rich air parcels from the mid-troposphere to the surface and abruptly enhanced the regional atmospheric boundary layer by as much as 25 ppbv. In contrast to the individual storms, days with multiple convective systems produced successive, cumulative ground-level O3 increases. The magnitude of O3 enhancements depended on the vertical distribution of O3 within storm downdrafts and origin of downdrafts in the troposphere. Ozone mixing ratios remained enhanced for > 2 h following the passage of storms, which enhanced chemical processing of rainforest-emitted isoprene and monoterpenes. Reactions of isoprene and monoterpenes with O3 are modeled to generate maximum hydroxyl radical formation rates of 6 × 106 radicals cm-3s-1. Therefore, one key conclusion of the present study is that downdrafts of convective storms are estimated to transport enough O3 to the surface to initiate a series of reactions that reduce the lifetimes of rainforest-emitted hydrocarbons.

  18. Atmospheric Ozone Formation and Observation Effects on Waterless Rocky Exoplanets around M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Chuhong; Tian, Feng

    2015-11-01

    It is recently proposed that up to two thousand bars of O2 atmospheres could buildup on rocky planets near M dwarfs as the result of stellar luminosity evolution and runaway water loss (Luger and Barnes, 2015). Here we use a one-dimensional photochemical model to study ozone distributions in these hypothetical O2-rich atmospheres. Our study showed that ozone layers in denser O2 atmospheres locate at higher altitudes than that in the Earth’s atmospheres. A higher ozone layer should generate stronger O3 absorption feature, potentially different from that of our Earth. We also present the enhancement of transmission spectral features which could be useful to identify such dense O2-rich atmospheres by future exoplanet characterization missions and facilities such as JWST.

  19. Sensitivity of the Reaction Mechanism of the Ozone Depletion Events during the Arctic Spring on the Initial Atmospheric Composition of the Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Cao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion events (ODEs during the Arctic spring have been investigated since the 1980s. It was found that the depletion of ozone is highly associated with the release of halogens, especially bromine containing compounds. These compounds originate from various substrates such as the ice/snow-covered surfaces in Arctic. In the present study, the dependence of the mixing ratios of ozone and principal bromine species during ODEs on the initial composition of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated by using a concentration sensitivity analysis. This analysis was performed by implementing a reaction mechanism representing the ozone depletion and halogen release in the box model KINAL (KInetic aNALysis of reaction mechanics. The ratios between the relative change of the mixing ratios of particular species such as ozone and the variation in the initial concentration of each atmospheric component were calculated, which indicate the relative importance of each initial species in the chemical kinetic system. The results of the computations show that the impact of various chemical species is different for ozone and bromine containing compounds during the depletion of ozone. It was found that CH3CHO critically controls the time scale of the complete removal of ozone. However, the rate of the ozone loss and the maximum values of bromine species are only slightly influenced by the initial value of CH3CHO. In addition, according to the concentration sensitivity analysis, the reduction of initial Br2 was found to cause a significant retardant of the ODE while the initial mixing ratio of HBr exerts minor influence on both ozone and bromine species. In addition, it is also interesting to note that the increase of C2H2 would significantly raise the amount of HOBr and Br in the atmosphere while the ozone depletion is hardly changed.

  20. Plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ozone (O3) polluted atmospheres: the ecological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M; Blande, James D; Souza, Silvia R; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Holopainen, Jarmo K

    2010-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is an important secondary air pollutant formed as a result of photochemical reactions between primary pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). O3 concentrations in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) are predicted to continue increasing as a result of anthropogenic activity, which will impact strongly on wild and cultivated plants. O3 affects photosynthesis and induces the development of visible foliar injuries, which are the result of genetically controlled programmed cell death. It also activates many plant defense responses, including the emission of phytogenic VOCs. Plant emitted VOCs play a role in many eco-physiological functions. Besides protecting the plant from abiotic stresses (high temperatures and oxidative stress) and biotic stressors (competing plants, micro- and macroorganisms), they drive multitrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies e.g., predators and parasitoids as well as interactions between plants (plant-to-plant communication). In addition, VOCs have an important role in atmospheric chemistry. They are O3 precursors, but at the same time are readily oxidized by O3, thus resulting in a series of new compounds that include secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Here, we review the effects of O3 on plants and their VOC emissions. We also review the state of current knowledge on the effects of ozone on ecological interactions based on VOC signaling, and propose further research directions.

  1. The very short-lived ozone depleting substance CHBr3 (bromoform): Revised UV absorption spectrum, atmospheric lifetime and ozone depletion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; McKeen, Stuart A.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-05-01

    more pronounced as wavelength increases and temperature decreases. The source of this discrepancy is further discussed. A parameterization of the CHBr3 UV spectrum for use in atmospheric models is developed and illustrative photolysis rate calculations are presented to highlight the impact of the revised σ(Λ,T) values on its calculated local lifetimes. For instance, CHBr3 atmospheric photolysis rate in the tropical region obtained with the present spectral data was found to be 10-15% lower (longer lifetime) than that obtained using the currently recommended values. Moreover, seasonally dependent ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) for CHBr3 emitted in the Indian sub-continent were calculated using the semi-empirical relationship of Brioude et al. (Brioude et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L19804, doi: 10.1029/2010GL044856, 2010) to evaluate the impact of the present results on stratospheric ozone. In conclusion, the present study reports improved UV absorption cross section data for the short-lived ozone depleting substance CHBr3, which are a result of high quality measurements and a thorough investigation of possible sources of systematic error. The CHBr3 UV cross section data, from this study, combined with OH kinetic data enables more accurate model predictions of stratospheric bromine loading and its impact on stratospheric ozone.

  2. On the role of atmosphere-ocean interactions in the expected long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer caused by greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    It is well known that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere produce a global warming of the troposphere and a global cooling of the stratosphere. The expected stratospheric cooling essentially influences the ozone layer via increased polar stratospheric cloud formation and via temperature dependences of the gas phase reaction rates. One more mechanism of how greenhouse gases influences the ozone layer is enhanced water evaporation from the oceans into the atmosphere because of increasing temperatures of the ocean surface due to greenhouse effect. The subject of this paper is a study of the influence of anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and ozone-depleting chlorine and bromine compounds on the expected long-term changes of the ozone layer with taking into account an increase of water vapour content in the atmosphere due to greenhouse effect. The study based on 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The model allows to self-consistently calculating diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of two types. It was supposed in the model that an increase of the ocean surface temperature caused by greenhouse effect is similar to calculated increase of atmospheric surface temperature. Evaporation rate from the ocean surface was computed in dependence of latitude. The model time-dependent runs were made for the period from 1975 to 2100 using two IPCC scenarios depicting maximum and average expected increases of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The model calculations show that anthropogenic increasing of water vapour abundance in the atmosphere due to heating of the ocean surface caused by greenhouse effect gives a sensible contribution to the expected ozone

  3. Characteristics of Ozone Production by Using Atmospheric Surface Glow Barrier Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudtorlep NISOA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is a strong oxidizer that can kill bacteria and other micro-organisms very effectively. In the recent years, ozone has become very important for sterilization of water used in shrimp farming and treatment of wastewater from food industry. However, ozonisers available in the markets are very expensive and have low energy-efficiency. In this work, a highly-efficient and low-cost system that can produce high-concentrations of ozone gas and dissolved ozone in water has been developed. The system consists of a dried air unit, high-voltage rf power supply, ozoniser tubes and venturi injector. The tubes are designed and configured to convert oxygen gas to ozone gas by atmospheric surface glow barrier discharge.

  4. Comparative scenario study of tropospheric ozone climate interactions using a global model. A 1% global increase rate, the IS92a IPCC scenario and a simplified aircraft traffic increase scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalita, S. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France). Service d`Aeronomie; Le Treut, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique

    1997-12-31

    Sensitivity studies have been made to establish the relationship between different scenarios of tropospheric ozone increase and radiative forcing. Some aspects of the ozone-climate interactions for past and future scenarios are investigated. These calculations employ IMAGES tropospheric ozone concentrations for a pre-industrial, present and future atmospheres. The averaged last 10 years of the 25-year seasonal integrations were analyzed. The results of this study are preliminary. Ozone forcing is basically different from the CO{sub 2} forcing, for its regional and temporal structured nature and for its rather weak intensity. (R.P.) 14 refs.

  5. An Extended View of Ozone and Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ramsey L.; Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Lefevre, Frank; Hewagama, Tilak; Livengood, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    We present an ongoing effort to characterize chemistry in Mars' atmosphere in multiple seasons on timescales longer than spaceflight missions through coordinated efforts by GSFC's HIPWAC spectrometer and Mars Express SPICAM, archival measurements, and tests/application of photochemical models. The trace species ozone (03) is an effective probe of Mars' atmospheric chemistry because it is destroyed by odd-hydrogen species (HOx, from water vapor photolysis). Observed ozone is a critical test for specific predictions by 3-D photochemical models (spatial, diurnal, seasonal). Coordinated measurements by HIPWAC and SPICAM quantitatively linked mission data to the 23-year GSFC ozone data record and also revealed unanticipated inter-decadal variability of same-season ozone abundances, a possible indicator of changing cloud activity (heterogeneous sink for HOx). A detailed study of long-term conditions is critical to characterizing the predictability of Mars' seasonal chemical behavior, particularly in light of the implications of and the lack of explanation for reported methane behavior.

  6. Some current problems in atmospheric ozone chemistry; role of chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    A review is given on selected aspects of the reaction mechanisms of current interest in the chemistry of atmospheric ozone. Atmospheric ozone is produced and removed by a complex series of elementary gas-phase photochemical reactions involving O/sub x/, HO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, CIO/sub x/ and hydrocarbon species. At the present time there is a good knowledge of the basic processes involved in ozone chemistry in the stratosphere and the troposphere and the kinetics of most of the key reactions are well defined. There are a number of difficulties in the theoretical descriptions of observed ozone behaviour which may be due to uncertainties in the chemistry. Examples are the failure to predict present day ozone in the photochemically controlled region above 35 Km altitude and the large reductions in the ozone column in the Antartic Spring which has been observed in recent years. In the troposphere there is growing evidence that ozone and other trace gases have changed appreciably from pre-industrial concentrations, due to chemical reactions involving man-made pollutants. Quantitative investigation of the mechanisms by which these changes may occur requires a sound laboratory kinetics data base.

  7. Langley mobile ozone lidar: ozone and aerosol atmospheric profiling for air quality research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Ganoe, Rene; Pliutau, Denis; Gronoff, Guillaume; Berkoff, Timothy; Kuang, Shi

    2017-01-20

    The Langley mobile ozone lidar (LMOL) is a mobile ground-based ozone lidar system that consists of a pulsed UV laser producing two UV wavelengths of 286 and 291 nm with energy of approximately 0.2  mJ/pulse and repetition rate of 1 kHz. The 527 nm pump laser is also transmitted for aerosol measurements. The receiver consists of a 40 cm parabolic telescope, which is used for both backscattered analog and photon counting. The lidar is very compact and highly mobile. This demonstrates the utility of very small lidar systems eventually leading to space-based ozone lidars. The lidar has been validated by numerous ozonesonde launches and has provided ozone curtain profiles from ground to approximately 4 km in support of air quality field missions.

  8. Southwestern Tropical Atlantic coral growth response to atmospheric circulation changes induced by ozone depletion in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Evangelista

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes induced by stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica have been recognized as an important consequence of the recently observed Southern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. Here we present evidences that the Brazilian coast (Southwestern Atlantic may have been impacted from both winds and sea surface temperature changes derived from this process. Skeleton analysis of massive coral species living in shallow waters off Brazil are very sensitive to air–sea interactions, and seem to record this impact. Growth rates of Brazilian corals show a trend reversal that fits the ozone depletion evolution, confirming that ozone impacts are far reaching and potentially affect coastal ecosystems in tropical environments.

  9. Modeling the interaction of nitrate anions with ozone and atmospheric moisture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Y. Galashev

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics method is used to investigate the interaction between one–six nitrate anions and water clus-ters absorbing six ozone molecules. The infrared (IR) absorption and reflection spectra are reshaped significantly, and new peaks appear at Raman spectra due to the addition of ozone and nitrate anions to the disperse water system. After ozone and nitrate anions are captured, the average (in frequency) IR reflection coefficient of the water disperse system increased drastically and the absorption coefficient fell.

  10. Ozone injury increases infection of geranium leaves by Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Feder, W.A.; Perkins, I.

    1970-04-01

    Detached and attached, inoculated and noninoculated, ozone-injured and noninjured leaves from the lower, middle, and terminal regions of plants of geranium cultivars Enchantress and White Mountain were observed for infection by Botrytis cinerea. Previous exposure to ozone did not appreciably influence the susceptibility of leaves of either geranium cultivar to infection by B. cinerea, unless there was visible ozone injury. Ozone-injured, necrotic tissues on older attached and detached geranium leaves of both cultivars served as infection courts for B. cinerea. 14 references, 1 table.

  11. Significant increase of summertime ozone at Mount Tai in Central Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Xue, Likun; Wang, Tao; Gao, Jian; Ding, Aijun; Cooper, Owen R.; Lin, Meiyun; Xu, Pengju; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Xinfeng; Wen, Liang; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Tianshu; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-08-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a trace gas playing important roles in atmospheric chemistry, air quality and climate change. In contrast to North America and Europe, long-term measurements of surface O3 are very limited in China. We compile available O3 observations at Mt. Tai - the highest mountain over the North China Plain - during 2003-2015 and analyze the decadal change of O3 and its sources. A linear regression analysis shows that summertime O3 measured at Mt. Tai has increased significantly by 1.7 ppbv yr-1 for June and 2.1 ppbv yr-1 for the July-August average. The observed increase is supported by a global chemistry-climate model hindcast (GFDL-AM3) with O3 precursor emissions varying from year to year over 1980-2014. Analysis of satellite data indicates that the O3 increase was mainly due to the increased emissions of O3 precursors, in particular volatile organic compounds (VOCs). An important finding is that the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have diminished since 2011, but the increase of VOCs appears to have enhanced the ozone production efficiency and contributed to the observed O3 increase in central eastern China. We present evidence that controlling NOx alone, in the absence of VOC controls, is not sufficient to reduce regional O3 levels in North China in a short period.

  12. The role and importance of ozone for atmospheric chemistry and methods for measuring its concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dragan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. The thin layer of ozone that surrounds Earth acts as a shield protecting the planet from irradiation by UV light. When it is close to the planet's surface, ozone is a powerful photochemical oxidant that damage, icons frescos, museum exhibits, rubber, plastic and all plant and animal life. Besides the basic properties of some methods for determining the ozone concentration in working and living conditions, this paper presents a detailed description of the electrochemical method. The basic properties of the electrochemical method are used in the construction of mobile equipment for determining the sum of oxidants in the atmosphere. The equipment was used for testing the determination of the ozone concentration in working rooms, where the concentration was at a high level and caused by UV radiation or electrostatic discharge. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that this equipment for determining the ozone concentration in the atmosphere is very powerful and reproducible in measurements.

  13. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  14. Stratospheric ClO and ozone from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Manney, G. L.; Elson, L. S.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric ozone and of ClO (the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion) are reported for both the Arctic and Antarctic winters of the past 18 months. Chlorine in the lower stratosphere was almost completely converted to chemically reactive forms in both the northern and southern polar winter vortices. This occurred in the south long before the development of the Antarctic ozone hole, suggesting that ozone loss can be masked by influx of ozone-rich air.

  15. ISOTOPIC (14C) AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND FRACTIONS - PRECURSORS TO OZONE FORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are an important factor in the production of ozone near ground level [3]. Many hydrocarbons originate from auto exhaust. However, a number of VOCs, e.g., isoprene, are known to be natural in origin. To develop reliable models for un...

  16. Impacts of Ozone-vegetation Interactions and Biogeochemical Feedbacks on Atmospheric Composition and Air Quality Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeke, M.; Tai, A. P. K.; Lombardozzi, D.; Val Martin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ozone pollution is one of the major environmental concerns due to its damaging effects on human and vegetation. One of the largest uncertainties of future surface ozone prediction comes from its interaction with vegetation under a changing climate. Ozone can be modulated by vegetation through, e.g., biogenic emissions, dry deposition and transpiration. These processes are in turn affected by chronic exposure to ozone via lowered photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance. Both ozone and vegetation growth are expected to be altered by climate change. To better understand these climate-ozone-vegetation interactions and possible feedbacks on ozone itself via vegetation, we implement an online ozone-vegetation scheme [Lombardozzi et al., 2015] into the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with active atmospheric chemistry, climate and land surface components. Previous overestimation of surface ozone in eastern US, Canada and Europe is shown to be reduced by >8 ppb, reflecting improved model-observation comparison. Simulated surface ozone is lower by 3.7 ppb on average globally. Such reductions (and improvements) in simulated ozone are caused mainly by lower isoprene emission arising from reduced leaf area index in response to chronic ozone exposure. Effects via transpiration are also potentially significant but require better characterization. Such findings suggest that ozone-vegetation interaction may substantially alter future ozone simulations, especially under changing climate and ambient CO2 levels, which would further modulate ozone-vegetation interactions. Inclusion of such interactions in Earth system models is thus necessary to give more realistic estimation and prediction of surface ozone. This is crucial for better policy formulation regarding air quality, land use and climate change mitigation. Reference list: Lombardozzi, D., et al. "The Influence of Chronic Ozone Exposure on Global Carbon and Water Cycles." Journal of Climate 28.1 (2015): 292-305.

  17. Study of the superficial ozone concentrations in the atmosphere of Comunidad de Madrid using passive samplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Galán Madruga

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is a secondary atmospheric pollutant which is generated for photochemical reactions of volatil organic compounds (VOC’s and nitrogen oxides (NOx. In Spain the ozone is a big problem as a consequence of the solar radiation to reach high levels. Exposure over a period of time to elevated ozone concentrations can cause damage in the public health and alterations in the vegetation.The aim of this study is to carry out the development and validation of a measurement method to let asses the superficial ozone levels in the Comunidad de Madrid, by identifing the zones more significants, where to measure with UV photometric monitors (automatics methods this pollutant and where the health and the vegetation can be affected. To such effect, passive samplers are used, which have glass fiber filters coated with a solution of sodium nitrite, potassium carbonate, glycerol and water. The nitrite ion in the presence of ozone is oxidized to nitrato ion, which it is extrated with ultrapure water and analyzed for ion chromatography, by seen proportional to the concentration existing in the sampling point.The results of validation from field tests indicate a excellent correlation between the passive and the automatic method.The higher superficial ozone concentrations are placed in rural zones, distanced of emission focus of primary pollutants (nitrogen oxides and volatil organic compounds... principally in direction soutwest and northwest of the Comunidad of Madrid.

  18. Present-day status of investigations of anthropogenic influence on atmospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyev, K. Y.

    1984-05-01

    The present day status of research on global spatial-temporal variability of the total content of atmospheric ozone is described. There is still a probable risk of weakening of the ozone layer as a result of the discharge of fluorocarbons, although in the future attention must also be given to other halogenated compounds which may reach the stratosphere. Should the discharge of fluorocarbons continue at the present rate, this should eventually lead to a decrease in the total ozone content by approximately 10%. For the time being there are no anthropogenically caused changes in the total ozone content. Numerical modeling indicates the existence of latitudinal and seasonal variations which must be taken into account in estimates of the consequences of a decrease in ozone content for man's health and the environment. There is a need for continuing and expanding programs for investigating all the main aspects of the problem, including numerical modeling, long-term global monitoring and laboratory measurements. A priority item is the monitoring of the ozone concentration at altitudes greater than 35 km where it is most responsive to anthropogenic effects.

  19. Pre-industrial to End 21st Century Projections of Tropospheric Ozone from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Bowman, K. W.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Naik, V.; Stevenson, D. S.; Tilmes, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Wild, O.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Cionni, I.; Collins, W. J.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Doherty, R. M.; Eyring, V.; Faluvegi, G.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Plummer, D. A.; Righi, M.; Strode, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Present day tropospheric ozone and its changes between 1850 and 2100 are considered, analysing 15 global models that participated in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The ensemble mean compares well against present day observations. The seasonal cycle correlates well, except for some locations in the tropical upper troposphere. Most (75 %) of the models are encompassed with a range of global mean tropospheric ozone column estimates from satellite data, but there is a suggestion of a high bias in the Northern Hemisphere and a low bias in the Southern Hemisphere, which could indicate deficiencies with the ozone precursor emissions. Compared to the present day ensemble mean tropospheric ozone burden of 337+/-23 Tg, the ensemble mean burden for 1850 time slice is approx. 30% lower. Future changes were modelled using emissions and climate projections from four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Compared to 2000, the relative changes in the ensemble mean tropospheric ozone burden in 2030 (2100) for the different RCPs are: -4% (-16 %) for RCP2.6, 2% (-7%) for RCP4.5, 1% (-9%) for RCP6.0, and 7% (18 %) for RCP8.5. Model agreement on the magnitude of the change is greatest for larger changes. Reductions in most precursor emissions are common across the RCPs and drive ozone decreases in all but RCP8.5, where doubled methane and a 40-150% greater stratospheric influx (estimated from a subset of models) increase ozone. While models with a high ozone burden for the present day also have high ozone burdens for the other time slices, no model consistently predicts large or small ozone changes; i.e. the magnitudes of the burdens and burden changes do not appear to be related simply, and the models are sensitive to emissions and climate changes in different ways. Spatial patterns of ozone changes are well correlated across most models, but are notably different for models without time evolving stratospheric ozone concentrations

  20. Nocturnal surface ozone enhancement over Portugal during winter: Influence of different atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Sharma, Ashish; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, Rui; Silva, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Four distinct nocturnal surface ozone (NSO) enhancement events were observed, with NSO concentration exceeding 80μg/m3, at multiple ozone (O3) monitoring stations (32 sites) in January, November and December between year 2000-2010, in Portugal. The reasonable explanation for the observed bimodal pattern of surface ozone with enhanced NSO concentration during nighttime has to be transport processes, as the surface ozone production ceases at nighttime. Simultaneous measurements of O3 at multiple stations during the study period in Portugal suggest that horizontal advection alone cannot explain the observed NSO enhancement. Thus, detailed analysis of the atmospheric conditions, simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, were performed to evaluate the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for NSO enhancement in the region. Simulations revealed that each event occurred as a result of one or the combination of different atmospheric processes such as, passage of a cold front followed by a subsidence zone; passage of a moving surface trough, with associated strong horizontal wind speed and vertical shear; combination of vertical and horizontal transport at the synoptic scale; formation of a low level jet with associated vertical mixing below the jet stream. The study confirmed that large-scale flow pattern resulting in enhanced vertical mixing in the nocturnal boundary layer, plays a key role in the NSO enhancement events, which frequently occur over Portugal during winter months.

  1. Polar ozone depletion and trends as represented by the Whole Atmospheric Community Climate Model (WACCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Douglas; Solomon, Susan; Ivy, Diane; Mills, Michael; Neely, Ryan, III; Schmidt, Anja; Garcia, Rolando; Smith, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, Version 4 (WACCM4) is a comprehensive numerical model, spanning the range of altitude from the Earth's surface to the lower thermosphere [Garcia et al., JGR, 2007; Kinnison et al., JGR, 2007; Marsh et al., J. of Climate, 2013]. WACCM4 is based on the framework of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), and includes all of the physical parameterizations of CAM4 and a finite volume dynamical core for the tracer advection. This version has a detailed representation of tropospheric and middle atmosphere chemical and physical processes. Simulations completed for the SPARC Chemistry Climate Model Initiative (CCMI), REFC1, REFC2, SENSC2, and REFC1SD scenarios are examined (see Eyring et al., SPARC Newsletter, 2013). Recent improvements in model representation of orographic gravity wave processes strongly impact temperature and therefore polar ozone depletion as well as its subsequent recovery. Model representation of volcanic events will also be shown to be important for ozone loss. Evaluation of polar ozone depletion processes (e.g., dehydration, denitrification, chemical activation) with key observations will be performed and the impact on future ozone recovery will be identified.

  2. Nocturnal surface ozone enhancement over Portugal during winter: Influence of different atmospheric conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.

    2016-09-24

    Four distinct nocturnal surface ozone (NSO) enhancement events were observed, with NSO concentration exceeding 80μg/m3, at multiple ozone (O3) monitoring stations (32 sites) in January, November and December between year 2000–2010, in Portugal. The reasonable explanation for the observed bimodal pattern of surface ozone with enhanced NSO concentration during nighttime has to be transport processes, as the surface ozone production ceases at nighttime. Simultaneous measurements of O3 at multiple stations during the study period in Portugal suggest that horizontal advection alone cannot explain the observed NSO enhancement. Thus, detailed analysis of the atmospheric conditions, simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, were performed to evaluate the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for NSO enhancement in the region. Simulations revealed that each event occurred as a result of one or the combination of different atmospheric processes such as, passage of a cold front followed by a subsidence zone; passage of a moving surface trough, with associated strong horizontal wind speed and vertical shear; combination of vertical and horizontal transport at the synoptic scale; formation of a low level jet with associated vertical mixing below the jet stream. The study confirmed that large-scale flow pattern resulting in enhanced vertical mixing in the nocturnal boundary layer, plays a key role in the NSO enhancement events, which frequently occur over Portugal during winter months. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Medical ozone increases methotrexate clinical response and improves cellular redox balance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Fernández, Olga Sonia; Viebahn-Haensler, Renate; Cabreja, Gilberto López; Espinosa, Irainis Serrano; Matos, Yanet Hernández; Roche, Liván Delgado; Santos, Beatriz Tamargo; Oru, Gabriel Takon; Polo Vega, Juan Carlos

    2016-10-15

    Medical ozone reduced inflammation, IL-1β, TNF-α mRNA levels and oxidative stress in PG/PS-induced arthritis in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the medical ozone effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with methotrexate and methotrexate+ozone, and to compare between them. A randomized clinical study with 60 patients was performed, who were divided into two groups: one (n=30) treated with methotrexate (MTX), folic acid and Ibuprophen (MTX group) and the second group (n=30) received the same as the MTX group+medical ozone by rectal insufflation of the gas (MTX+ozone group). The clinical response of the patients was evaluated by comparing Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated (Anti-CCP) levels, reactants of acute phase and biochemical markers of oxidative stress before and after 20 days of treatment. MTX+ozone reduced the activity of the disease while MTX merely showed a tendency to decrease the variables. Reactants of acute phase displayed a similar picture. MTX+ozone reduced Anti-CCP levels as well as increased antioxidant system, and decreased oxidative damage whereas MTX did not change. Glutathione correlated with all clinical variables just after MTX+ozone. MTX+ozone increased the MTX clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No side effects were observed. These results suggest that ozone can increase the efficacy of MTX probably because both share common therapeutic targets. Medical ozone treatment is capable of being a complementary therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Atmospheric Volatile Organic Compounds and Ozone Creation Potential in an Urban Center of Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Gbenga Olumayede

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of individual volatile organic compounds (VOC species to photochemical ozone formation depends on their atmospheric concentrations and their oxidation mechanism. In an attempt to evaluate the ozone creation potential of ambient VOCs captured in an urban settlement of Benin City, Nigeria, the VOCs concentrations data collected in field studies at nine measurement sites of different air quality in the city and a background site were analysed. Air samples were collected at human breathing height of 1.5 meters from ground level at each site. Active sampling method using the low volume sampling pump (Acuro, Drager, Lubeck, Germany was used to drawn the air into the tube; the absorbent was Chromosorb 106. The sampling periods were between May 2010 and June 2011; the period covered both dry and wet seasons. The adsorbed gases were desorbed using solvent extraction method with carbon disulphide as solvent. The extracted solutions were analyzed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometer. The observed concentrations of individual VOCs were determined and maximum incremental reactivity (MIR coefficient along with rate constants of VOC-OH reactions were applied to assess the ozone formation potential of individual VOC in the ambient atmosphere. Sixteen VOC species were observed at various sites with mixing height in decreasing order: toluene (5.82, mp-xylene (3.58, ethylbenzene (3.46, benzene (2.29, and n-butane (0.84. The ozone formation potential study revealed that, ranking by propyl-equivalent, the alkanes included in this study account for 58% of the total propyl-equivalent concentration. The total ozone creation potential in the atmosphere of the Benin City was calculated to be 281.1 µg/m3. A comparison of total ozone formation potential (OFP in our study with results obtained from other cities of the world revealed that the total concentration of ozone production in our study is threefold lower than the values reported

  5. Middle-atmospheric Ozone and HCl anomalies during the polar stratospheric warming 2010 observed by JEM/SMILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Kreyling, D.; Sagawa, H.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.; Kasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we focused on investigating ozone and HCl variations and anomalies in the middle atmosphere due to the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) event of Arctic winter 2009-2010 using JEM/SMILES data. HCl anomalies in evolution of a SSW have been studied for the first time. SSWs are dramatic events in the winter stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere where the deceleration or reversal of the eastward winds is accompanied by an increase of temperature by several tens of degrees. The main cause of this phenomenon is known to be the interaction of zonal mean flow with upward propagating transient planetary waves from the troposphere in mid-winter leading to a vortex displacement or break down. SSWs are dynamical disturbances found to affect both dynamics and chemical compositions of the middle atmosphere still having several different atmospheric features and behaviors to be studied. The Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a highly sensitive radiometer to observe various atmospheric compositions from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Communications and Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS). From October 2009 to April 2010, SMILES has accurately measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of for example ozone and HCl with the accuracy of less than 8% and 5% in the middle atmosphere respectively. By using SMILES data the SSW event of 2010 was confirmed on 25-January categorized as a major, vortex displacement warming. After the SSW, ozone values enhanced up to 15-20% in mid-stratosphere due to the meridional transport from lower latitudes and weakening of the polar vortex. The mesospheric ozone response will also be demonstrated and discussed. For HCl, the total increase of 10% in Upper Stratosphere Lower Mesosphere (USLM) before the

  6. Seasonal variations of triple oxygen isotopic compositions of atmospheric sulfate, nitrate, and ozone at Dumont d'Urville, coastal Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Sakiko; Hattori, Shohei; Savarino, Joel; Jourdain, Bruno; Preunkert, Susanne; Legrand, Michel; Caillon, Nicolas; Barbero, Albane; Kuribayashi, Kota; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2017-03-01

    Triple oxygen isotopic compositions (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 × δ18O) of atmospheric sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-) in the atmosphere reflect the relative contribution of oxidation pathways involved in their formation processes, which potentially provides information to reveal missing reactions in atmospheric chemistry models. However, there remain many theoretical assumptions for the controlling factors of Δ17O(SO42-) and Δ17O(NO3-) values in those model estimations. To test one of those assumption that Δ17O values of ozone (O3) have a flat value and do not influence the seasonality of Δ17O(SO42-) and Δ17O(NO3-) values, we performed the first simultaneous measurement of Δ17O values of atmospheric sulfate, nitrate, and ozone collected at Dumont d'Urville (DDU) Station (66°40' S, 140°01' E) throughout 2011. Δ17O values of sulfate and nitrate exhibited seasonal variation characterized by minima in the austral summer and maxima in winter, within the ranges of 0.9-3.4 and 23.0-41.9 ‰, respectively. In contrast, Δ17O values of ozone showed no significant seasonal variation, with values of 26 ± 1 ‰ throughout the year. These contrasting seasonal trends suggest that seasonality in Δ17O(SO42-) and Δ17O(NO3-) values is not the result of changes in Δ17O(O3), but of the changes in oxidation chemistry. The trends with summer minima and winter maxima for Δ17O(SO42-) and Δ17O(NO3-) values are caused by sunlight-driven changes in the relative contribution of O3 oxidation to the oxidation by HOx, ROx, and H2O2. In addition to that general trend, by comparing Δ17O(SO42-) and Δ17O(NO3-) values to ozone mixing ratios, we found that Δ17O(SO42-) values observed in spring (September to November) were lower than in fall (March to May), while there was no significant spring and fall difference in Δ17O(NO3-) values. The relatively lower sensitivity of Δ17O(SO42-) values to the ozone mixing ratio in spring compared to fall is possibly explained by (i) the

  7. Tropospheric ozone changes, radiative forcing and attribution to emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs. We calculate a~value for the pre-industrial (1750 to present-day (2010 tropospheric ozone RF of 0.40 W m−2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (±1 standard deviation in RFs of ±17%. Three different radiation schemes were used – we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields of ±10%. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of ±3%. Given additional (unquantified uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of ±30% for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (47%, nitrogen oxides (29%, carbon monoxide (15% and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9%; earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 0.042 W m−2 DU−1, a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (W m−2; relative to 1850 – add 0.04 W m−2 to make relative to 1750 for the Representative Concentration Pathways in 2030 (2100 of: RCP2.6: 0.31 (0.16; RCP4.5: 0.38 (0.26; RCP6.0: 0.33 (0.24; and RCP8.5: 0.42 (0.56. Models show some coherent responses of ozone to climate change: decreases in the tropical lower troposphere, associated with increases in water vapour; and increases in the sub-tropical to mid-latitude upper troposphere, associated with increases in

  8. Ozone increases airway hyperreactivity and mucus hyperproduction in mice previously exposed to allergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren T; Matsubara, Shigeki; McConville, Glen

    2010-01-01

    to develop a mouse model to gain insight into the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to methacholine (MCh) in mice after exposure to both allergen and ozone. Mice were exposed for 20 min per day for 10 consecutive days to an aerosol of 1% ovalbumin (OVA) or saline followed by a single 3-h...... exposure to clean air or 100, 250, or 500 ppb ozone. Ozone induced AHR in mice previously exposed to OVA when compared to non-exposed (saline) control mice. After a 10-d exposure to OVA, a single exposure to a low (100 ppb) ozone concentration was sufficient to induce AHR. The AHR response was associated...... with goblet-cell metaplasia. Even the lowest concentration of ozone tested, 100 ppb, which may be exceeded in urban environments and in the workplace, resulted in a significant increase in AHR, most prominent 24 h after exposure in the OVA-exposed mice....

  9. Ozone Exposure Increases Circulating Stress Hormones and Lipid Metabolites in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE: Air pollution has been associated with increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. We have shown that acute ozone exposure in rats induces release of stress hormones, hyperglycemia, leptinemia, and gluoose intolerance that are assoc...

  10. Atmospheric Reactions of a Series of Hexenols with OH Radical and Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Yanbo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Qiao; Yang, Chengqiang; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-04-01

    C6 hexenols are one of the most significant groups of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Because of their antibacterial properties, C6 hexenols can be emitted by a wide number of plants in response to changes in the ambient environment. The oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere is involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), thus causing significant effects on atmospheric chemistry and the climate. The lack of corresponding kinetic parameters and product information of their oxidation reactions will result in incomplete atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. In this paper, we will overview our recent research progress on the study of the atmospheric reactions of a series of C6 hexenols with OH radicals and ozone. A series of studies were conducted using both experimental and theoretical methods. Corresponding rate constants were obtained, and reaction mechanisms were also analyzed. It could be concluded that both the nature of the substituent and its position play a fundamental role in the reactivity of the C6 hexenols toward OH radicals and O3. An activating effect of the -OH group in OH radical reactions was found, thus making the H-abstraction channel non-negligible in reactions of these unsaturated alcohols with OH radicals. The removal of these C6 hexenols by ozone also showed great importance and could be competitive with the major recognized sinks by OH radicals. These studies are of great significance for understanding the mechanism of atmospheric chemical reactions of hexenols and improving the atmospheric chemistry model. Experimental detail and corresponding results will be presented. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21307137, 41575125 and 91544228), and the Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (1508085J03).

  11. Impact of Increasing Stratospheric Water Vapor on Ozone Depletion and Temperature Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wenshou; Martyn P. CHIPPERFIELD; L(U) Daren

    2009-01-01

    Using a detailed, fully coupled chemistry climate model (CCM), the effect of increasing stratospheric H2O on ozone and temperature is investigated. Different CCM time-slice runs have been performed to investigate the chemical and radiative impacts of an assumed 2 ppmv increase in H2O. The chemical effects of this H2O increase lead to an overall decrease of the total column ozone (TCO) by ~1% in the tropics and by a maximum of 12% at southern high latitudes. At northern high latitudes, the TCO is increased by only up to 5% due to stronger transport in the Arctic. A 2-ppmv H2O increase in the model's radiation scheme causes a cooling of the tropical stratosphere of no more than 2 K, but a cooling of more than 4 K at high latitudes. Consequently, the TCO is increased by about 2%-6%. Increasing stratospheric H2O, therefore, cools the stratosphere both directly and indirectly, except in the polar regions where the temperature responds differcntly due to feedbacks between ozone and H2O changes. The combined chemical and radiative effects of increasing H2O may give rise to more cooling in the tropics and middle latitudes but less cooling in the polar stratosphere. The combined effects of H2O increases on ozone tend to offset each other, except in the Arctic stratosphere where both the radiative and chemical impacts give rise to increased ozone. The chemical and radiative effects of increasing H2O cause dynamical responses in the stratosphere with an evident hemispheric asymmetry. In terms of ozone recovery, increasing the stratospheric H2O is likely to accelerate the recovery in the northern high latitudcs and delay it in the southern high latitudes. The modeled ozone recovery is more significant between 2000-2050 than between 2050-2100, driven mainly by the larger relative change in chlorine in the earlier period.

  12. Quasi-biennial oscillation in atmospheric ozone, and its possible consequences for damaging UV-B radiation and for determination of long-term ozone trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1995-12-31

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in ozone is supposed to be related to the QBO of zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere, with an approximate period of 29 months. Generally speaking, mechanisms of QBO-related effects in the extratropical atmosphere should depend on season and region, resulting in other periodicities (e.g., a 20-month periodicity) due to nonlinear interaction between the `pure` QBO and an annual cycle. Seasonal and regional dependences of QBO-related effects in ozone not only influence the regime of ozone variability itself, but can have important consequences, for example, for interannual changes in biologically active UV-B radiation and for determination of long-term ozone trends. This work is concerned with these problems

  13. A kinetic study of the reaction of ozone with ethylene in a smog chamber under atmospheric conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongfu; JIA Long; GE Maofa; DU Lin; WANG Gengchen; WANG Dianxun

    2006-01-01

    Ozone is one of the key species in the processes of atmospheric chemistry, which can be taken as an indicator of oxidation capacity in the troposphere, The reaction of ozone with reactive gases is an important process in the troposphere. Experimental simulation equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is used to study the reaction of ozone with ethylene in real atmospheric environment with ozone concentrations of 100-200 ppb. The concentrations of ozone and ethylene were monitored during the reaction with the combination of Model 49C-O3 Analyzer and GC-FID. A rate constant of 1.01×10-18 (cm3.mol-1.s-1) was obtained at 286.5 K,under condition of which the half-life of ozone was 88 min. The results obtained from our experiments are in excellent agreement with those reported previously by other researchers under extremely Iow pressure in terms of matrix-isolation technology. This demonstrates that our equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is reliable, which can be used for further research of the processes of atmospheric reactions.

  14. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Kesic

    Full Text Available Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with increased respiratory morbidities and susceptibility to infections. Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known. The greater Mexico City area was the primary site for the spring 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, which also coincided with high levels of environmental ozone. Proteolytic cleavage of the viral membrane protein hemagglutinin (HA is essential for influenza virus infectivity. Recent studies suggest that HA cleavage might be cell-associated and facilitated by the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2, whose activities are regulated by antiproteases, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI. Based on these observations, we sought to determine how acute exposure to ozone may modulate cellular protease/antiprotease expression and function, and to define their roles in a viral infection. We utilized our in vitro model of differentiated human nasal epithelial cells (NECs to determine the effects of ozone on influenza cleavage, entry, and replication. We show that ozone exposure disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance within the airway liquid. We also determined that functional forms of HAT, TMPRSS2, and SLPI are secreted from human airway epithelium, and acute exposure to ozone inversely alters their expression levels. We also show that addition of antioxidants significantly reduces virus replication through the induction of SLPI. In addition, we determined that ozone-induced cleavage of the viral HA protein is not cell-associated and that secreted endogenous proteases are sufficient to activate HA leading to a significant increase in viral replication. Our data indicate that pre-exposure to ozone disrupts the protease/antiprotease balance found in the human airway, leading to increased influenza susceptibility.

  15. Increasing concentrations of CO and O{sub 3} - rising deforestation rates and increasing tropospheric carbon monoxide and ozone in Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchhoff, W.J.H. [Inst. Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, San Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    Increasing carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations have been observed in the lower troposphere of the Brazilian Amazon region in recent years (1989-1995). Carbon monoxide and ozone have been measured in the region continuously; from observations at a single site and many sporadic field missions, there is a clear indication that the chemical activity in the troposphere is growing, with increasing concentrations especially during the dry season. On the other hand, the most recent deforestation assessment by the Brazilian Government, performed by the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) using Landsat data, shows yearly rates rising from the 11,130 km{sup 2} year{sup -1} minimum of the 1990/91 survey, to 13,786 km{sup 2} year{sup -1} for the 1991/92 period, and 14,896 km{sup 2} year{sup -1} for the period 1992/94. It is argued that the increase in deforestation/biomass burning activities in `Amazonia` have produced larger carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations in the lower atmosphere. (orig.)

  16. a Compact Dial LIDAR for Ground-Based Ozone Atmospheric Profiling Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, R.; Carrion, W.; Pliutau, D.; Ganoe, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    A compact differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric ozone campaigns. This lidar will be integrated into the Air Quality lidar Network (AQLNet) currently made up of four other ozone lidars across the country. The lidar system consists of a UV and green laser transmitter, a telescope and an optical signal receiver box with associated Licel photon counting and analog channels. The laser transmitter consist of a Coherent Evolution 30 TEM00 1-kHz diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YLF inter-cavity doubled laser pumping a Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser with all the associated power and lidar control support units on a single system rack. A custom-designed Ce:LiCAF tunable UV laser has a wavelength range of 282 to 300-nm that is selectable between two or more wavelengths. The current wavelengths are online 286.4 nm and offline 293.1 nm. The 527-nm visible beam is transmitted into the atmosphere for aerosol measurements. The fourth harmonic 262 nm beam is split by a beamsplitter into two pump beams that pump each face of the Ce:LiCAF crystal. A short laser cavity consisting of a 60% reflective (1m radius of curvature) output mirror, a dispersive prism and a flat HR mirror is used to produce the UV wavelengths. In order to produce different wavelengths, the high-reflectivity rear mirror is mounted on a servo controlled galvanometer motor to allow rapid tuning between the on and offline ozone wavelengths. Typical laser results are 6.8-W at 527-nm, 800-mW at 262-nm and 130-mW at the UV transmitted wavelengths. The lidar receiver system consists of a receiver telescope with a 40-cm diameter parabolic mirror. A fiber optic cable transmits the received signal from the telescope to the receiver box, which houses the detectors. A separate one inch diameter telescope with PMT and filter is used to sample the very near field to allow

  17. Atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition of Al₂O₃ using trimethyl aluminum and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Moataz Bellah M; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-04-08

    High throughput spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) often uses higher reactor pressure than typical batch processes, but the specific effects of pressure on species transport and reaction rates are not fully understood. For aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ALD, water or ozone can be used as oxygen sources, but how reaction pressure influences deposition using ozone has not previously been reported. This work describes the effect of deposition pressure, between ∼2 and 760 Torr, on ALD Al2O3 using TMA and ozone. Similar to reports for pressure dependence during TMA/water ALD, surface reaction saturation studies show self-limiting growth at low and high pressure across a reasonable temperature range. Higher pressure tends to increase the growth per cycle, especially at lower gas velocities and temperatures. However, growth saturation at high pressure requires longer O3 dose times per cycle. Results are consistent with a model of ozone decomposition kinetics versus pressure and temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) results confirm the trends in growth rate and indicate that the surface reaction mechanisms for Al2O3 growth using ozone are similar under low and high total pressure, including expected trends in the reaction mechanism at different temperatures.

  18. Early physiological responses of Pinus pinea L. seedlings infected by Heterobasidion sp.pl. in an ozone-enriched atmospheric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastrini, Martina; Luchi, Nicola; Michelozzi, Marco; Gerosa, Giacomo; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Bussotti, Filippo; Capretti, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    The presence of the American root-rot disease fungus Heterobasidion irregulare Garbel. & Otrosina was detected in Italian coastal pine forests (Pinus pinea L.) in addition to the common native species Heterobasidion annosum (Fries) Brefeld. High levels of tropospheric ozone (O3) as an atmospheric pollutant are usually experienced in Mediterranean pine forests. To explore the effect of interaction between the two Heterobasidion species and ozone pollution on P. pinea, an open-top chamber (OTC) experiment was carried out. Five-year-old P. pinea seedlings were inoculated with the fungal species considered (H. irregulare, H. annosum and mock-inoculation as control), and then exposed in charcoal-filtered open-top chambers (CF-OTC) and non-filtered ozone-enriched chambers (NF+) from July to the first week of August 2010 at the experimental facilities of Curno (North Italy). Fungal inoculation effects in an ozone-enriched environment were assessed as: (i) the length of the inoculation lesion; (ii) chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) responses; and (iii) analysis of resin terpenes. Results showed no differences on lesion length between fungal and ozone treatments, whereas the short-term effects of the two stress factors on ChlF indicate an increased photosynthetic efficiency, thus suggesting the triggering of compensation/repair processes. The total amount of resin terpenes is enhanced by fungal infection of both species, but depressed by ozone to the levels observed in mock-inoculated plants. Variations in terpene profiles were also induced by stem base inoculations and ozone treatment. Ozone might negatively affect terpene defences making plants more susceptible to pathogens and insects.

  19. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Bandy, Brian; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Hopkins, James; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-02-01

    9) (particularly α-pinene and limonene) and model-generated intermediates increases the modelled OH concentrations by 41 %, and the magnitude of in situ ozone production calculated from the production of RO2 was significantly lower (60 %). This work highlights that any future ozone abatement strategies should consider the role that biogenic emissions play alongside anthropogenic emissions in influencing London's air quality.

  20. Standard method for continuous measurement of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone in the atmosphere. [Calorimetrically using Griess Reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is absorbed from the atmosphere in a modified Griess reagent which contains 0.5 percent sulfanilic acid and 50 ppM of N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylene diamine hydrochloride in 5 percent acetic acid that produces a red dye. The red dye is measured continuously in a recording colorimeter by comparison with a blank of unreacted reagent. Nitric oxide from the atmosphere passes through the absorber practically unaffected and is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide by bubbling through a dilute permanganate solution prior to determination with modified Griess reagent in a separate cell. Optionally, ozone in the air sample may be determined in a third absorber-colorimeter cell unit by adding about 0.5 to 1.0 ppM of pure nitric oxide to another sample of air and noting the increase in nitrogen dioxide level due to the rapid oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide by ozone. The overall accuracy of the results of the method is +-10 percent. (BLM)

  1. Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion and increased UVB radiation: potential impacts to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fabo, Edward C

    2005-12-01

    Contrary to popular belief, stratospheric ozone depletion, and the resultant increase in solar UV-B (280-320 nm), are unlikely to fully recover soon. Notwithstanding the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing the amount of ozone destroying chemicals into the stratosphere, the life-times of these compounds are such that even with full compliance with the Protocol by all countries, it will be decades before stratospheric ozone could return to pre-1980 levels. This raises the question, therefore, of what will happen to biological processes essential to the maintenance of life on earth which are sensitive to damage by increased UV-B radiation, particularly those involved with human health? The polar regions, because of the vagaries of climate and weather, are the bellwether for stratospheric ozone depletion and will, therefore, be the first to experience impacts due to increases in solar UV-B radiation. The impacts of these are incompletely understood and cannot be predicted with certainty. While some UV-B impacts on human health are recognized, much is unknown, unclear and uncertain. Thus, this paper attempts, as a first approximation, to point out potential impacts to the health and welfare of human inhabitants of the Arctic due to increased solar UV-B radiation associated with stratospheric ozone depletion. As will be seen, much more data is critically needed before adequate risk assessment can occur.

  2. Ozone uptake on glassy, semi-solid and liquid organic matter and the role of reactive oxygen intermediates in atmospheric aerosol chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Steimer, Sarah S; Krieger, Ulrich K; Peter, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-05-14

    Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions of ozone are important pathways for chemical ageing of atmospheric organic aerosols. To demonstrate and quantify how moisture-induced phase changes can affect the gas uptake and chemical transformation of organic matter, we apply a kinetic multi-layer model to a comprehensive experimental data set of ozone uptake by shikimic acid. The bulk diffusion coefficients were determined to be 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1) for ozone and 10(-20) cm(2) s(-1) for shikimic acid under dry conditions, increasing by several orders of magnitude with increasing relative humidity (RH) due to phase changes from amorphous solid over semisolid to liquid. Consequently, the reactive uptake of ozone progresses through different kinetic regimes characterised by specific limiting processes and parameters. At high RH, ozone uptake is driven by reaction throughout the particle bulk; at low RH it is restricted to reaction near the particle surface and kinetically limited by slow diffusion and replenishment of unreacted organic molecules. Our results suggest that the chemical reaction mechanism involves long-lived reactive oxygen intermediates, likely primary ozonides or O atoms, which may provide a pathway for self-reaction and catalytic destruction of ozone at the surface. Slow diffusion and ozone destruction can effectively shield reactive organic molecules in the particle bulk from degradation. We discuss the potential non-orthogonality of kinetic parameters, and show how this problem can be solved by using comprehensive experimental data sets to constrain the kinetic model, providing mechanistic insights into the coupling of transport, phase changes, and chemical reactions of multiple species in complex systems.

  3. Ideas and perspectives: Southwestern tropical Atlantic coral growth response to atmospheric circulation changes induced by ozone depletion in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Heitor; Wainer, Ilana; Sifeddine, Abdelfettah; Corrège, Thierry; Cordeiro, Renato C.; Lamounier, Saulo; Godiva, Daniely; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Le Cornec, Florence; Turcq, Bruno; Lazareth, Claire E.; Hu, Ching-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation, predominantly driven by stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica, has caused changes in climate across the extratropics. Here, we present evidence that the Brazilian coast (southwestern Atlantic) may have been impacted from both wind and sea-surface temperature changes derived from this process. Skeleton analysis of massive coral species living in shallow waters off Brazil are very sensitive to air-sea interactions, and seem to record this impact. Growth rates of Brazilian corals show a trend reversal that fits the ozone depletion evolution, confirming that ozone impacts are far reaching and potentially affect coastal ecosystems in tropical environments.

  4. Linear and regressive stochastic models for prediction of daily maximum ozone values at Mexico City atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, J. L [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Nava, M. M [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gay, C [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    We developed a procedure to forecast, with 2 or 3 hours, the daily maximum of surface ozone concentrations. It involves the adjustment of Autoregressive Integrated and Moving Average (ARIMA) models to daily ozone maximum concentrations at 10 monitoring atmospheric stations in Mexico City during one-year period. A one-day forecast is made and it is adjusted with the meteorological and solar radiation information acquired during the first 3 hours before the occurrence of the maximum value. The relative importance for forecasting of the history of the process and of meteorological conditions is evaluated. Finally an estimate of the daily probability of exceeding a given ozone level is made. [Spanish] Se aplica un procedimiento basado en la metodologia conocida como ARIMA, para predecir, con 2 o 3 horas de anticipacion, el valor maximo de la concentracion diaria de ozono. Esta basado en el calculo de autorregresiones y promedios moviles aplicados a los valores maximos de ozono superficial provenientes de 10 estaciones de monitoreo atmosferico en la Ciudad de Mexico y obtenidos durante un ano de muestreo. El pronostico para un dia se ajusta con la informacion meteorologica y de radiacion solar correspondiente a un periodo que antecede con al menos tres horas la ocurrencia esperada del valor maximo. Se compara la importancia relativa de la historia del proceso y de las condiciones meteorologicas previas para el pronostico. Finalmente se estima la probabilidad diaria de que un nivel normativo o preestablecido para contingencias de ozono sea rebasado.

  5. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: Implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grulke, N.E.; Miller, P.R. (USDA Forest Service, Riverside, CA (United States))

    Native stands of giant sequoia are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 y is likely to be unprecendented in the life span (ca 2,500 y) of giant sequoia. Changes in the physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current year, 12 y and 25 y) to different concentrations of ozone were determined, and age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants were assessed by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia. The CO[sub 2] exchange rate (CER) was greater in current year (12.1 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) and 2 year old seedlings (4.8 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s) than in all older trees (average of 3.0 [mu]mol CO[sub 2]/m[sup 2]s). Dark respiration was highest for current year seedlings and was increased twofold in symptotic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance was greater in current-year and 2 year old seedlings (335 and 200 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), respectively, than in all older trees (50 mmol H[sub 2]O/m[sup 2]s), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatol cavities is higher in young seedlings than in older trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. It is concluded that giant sequoia seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are ca 5 y old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa – Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Rieder

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs and extreme high (termed EHOs total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland. The results show (a an increase in ELOs and (b a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (c that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean. Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo. Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions. Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual mean values.

  7. Extreme events in total ozone over Arosa – Part 2: Fingerprints of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and effects on mean values and long-term changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Rieder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study the frequency of days with extreme low (termed ELOs and extreme high (termed EHOs total ozone values and their influence on mean values and trends are analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland. The results show (i an increase in ELOs and (ii a decrease in EHOs during the last decades and (iii that the overall trend during the 1970s and 1980s in total ozone is strongly dominated by changes in these extreme events. After removing the extremes, the time series shows a strongly reduced trend (reduction by a factor of 2.5 for trend in annual mean. Excursions in the frequency of extreme events reveal "fingerprints" of dynamical factors such as ENSO or NAO, and chemical factors, such as cold Arctic vortex ozone losses, as well as major volcanic eruptions of the 20th century (Gunung Agung, El Chichón, Mt. Pinatubo. Furthermore, atmospheric loading of ozone depleting substances leads to a continuous modification of column ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also with respect to extreme values (partly again in connection with polar vortex contributions. Application of extreme value theory allows the identification of many more such "fingerprints" than conventional time series analysis of annual and seasonal mean values. The analysis shows in particular the strong influence of dynamics, revealing that even moderate ENSO and NAO events have a discernible effect on total ozone. Overall the approach to extremal modelling provides new information on time series properties, variability, trends and the influence of dynamics and chemistry, complementing earlier analyses focusing only on monthly (or annual mean values.

  8. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001 field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by total aerosol number concentration (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations, and light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios in the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h−1.

    Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60–80% at 0.6% supersaturation, the CCN/CN ratios within

  9. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001 field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by concentrations of total aerosol number (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, and by light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios within the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h−1.

    Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60–80% at 0.6% supersaturation, the CCN/CN ratios within the

  10. Increase in markers of airway inflammation after ozone exposure can be observed also in stable treated asthmatics with minimal functional response to ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dente Federico L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discrepancy between functional and inflammatory airway response to ozone has been reported in normal subjects, but few data are available for stable asthmatics regularly treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Methods Twenty-three well controlled, regularly treated, mild-to-moderate asthmatic patients underwent two sequential randomised exposures to either filtered air or ozone (0.3 ppm for 2 hours in a challenge chamber. Pulmonary function (PF was monitored, and patients with FEV1 decrease greater than 10% from pre-challenge value were considered as responders. Immediately after each exposure, exhaled breath condensate (EBC was collected to measure malondialdehyde (MDA. Six hours after each exposure, PF and EBC collection were repeated, and sputum was induced to measure inflammatory cell counts and soluble mediators (IL-8 and neutrophil elastase. The response to ozone was also evaluated according to the presence of polymorphism in oxidative stress related NQO1 and GSTM1 genes. Results After ozone exposure, sputum neutrophils significantly increased in responders (n = 8, but not in nonresponders (n = 15. Other markers of neutrophil activation in sputum supernatant and MDA in EBC significantly increased in all patients, but only in nonresponders the increase was significant. In nonresponders, sputum eosinophils also significantly increased after ozone. There was a positive correlation between ozone-induced FEV1 fall and increase in sputum neutrophils. No difference in functional or inflammatory response to ozone was observed between subjects with or without the combination of NQO1wt- GSTM1null genotypes. Conclusions Markers of neutrophilic inflammation and oxidative stress increase also in asthmatic subjects not responding to ozone. A greater functional response to ozone is associated with greater neutrophil airway recruitment in asthmatic subjects.

  11. Forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone: sensitivity to very reactive biogenic VOC emissions and implications for in-canopy photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fate of ozone within and above forested environments is vital to assessing the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and air quality at the urban-rural interface. Observed forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone is often much faster than explicable by stomatal uptake alone, suggesting the presence of additional ozone sinks within the canopy. Using the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model in conjunction with summer noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, we explore the viability and implications of the hypothesis that ozonolysis of very reactive but yet unidentified biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can influence the forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone. Non-stomatal processes typically generate 67% of the observed ozone flux, but reactions of ozone with measured BVOC, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, can account for only 2% of this flux during the selected timeframe. By incorporating additional emissions and chemistry of a proxy for very reactive VOC (VRVOC that undergo rapid ozonolysis, we demonstrate that an in-canopy chemical ozone sink of ~2×108 molecules cm−3 s−1 can close the ozone flux budget. Even in such a case, the 65 min chemical lifetime of ozone is much longer than the canopy residence time of ~2 min, highlighting that chemistry can influence reactive trace gas exchange even when it is "slow" relative to vertical mixing. This level of VRVOC ozonolysis could enhance OH and RO2 production by as much as 1 pptv s−1 and substantially alter their respective vertical profiles depending on the actual product yields. Reaction products would also contribute significantly to the oxidized VOC budget and, by extension, secondary organic aerosol mass. Given the potentially significant ramifications of a chemical ozone flux for both in-canopy chemistry and estimates of ozone

  12. In-Line Ozonation for Sensitive Air-Monitoring of a Mustard-Gas Simulant by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive method for real-time air-monitoring of mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, HD), which is a lethal blister agent, is proposed. Humidified air containing a HD simulant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2CEES), was mixed with ozone and then analyzed by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. Mass-spectral ion peaks attributable to protonated molecules of intact, monooxygenated, and dioxygenated 2CEES (MH+, MOH+, and MO2H+, respectively) were observed. As ozone concentration was increased from zero to 30 ppm, the signal intensity of MH+ sharply decreased, that of MOH+ increased once and then decreased, and that of MO2H+ sharply increased until reaching a plateau. The signal intensity of MO2H+ at the plateau was 40 times higher than that of MH+ and 100 times higher than that of MOH+ in the case without in-line ozonation. Twenty-ppm ozone gas was adequate to give a linear calibration curve for 2CEES obtained by detecting the MO2H+ signal in the concentration range up to 60 μg/m3, which is high enough for hygiene management. In the low concentration range lower than 3 μg/m3, which is equal to the short-term exposure limit for HD, calibration plots unexpectedly fell off the linear calibration curve, but 0.6-μg/m3 vapor was actually detected with the signal-to-noise ratio of nine. Ozone was generated from instrumentation air by using a simple and inexpensive home-made generator. 2CEES was ozonated in 1-m extended sampling tube in only 1 s.

  13. Exposure to ozone modulates human airway protease/antiprotease balance contributing to increased influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to oxidant air pollution is associated with Increased respiratory morbiditses and susceptibility to Infections Ozone is a commonly encountered oxidant air pollutant, yet Its effects on influenza infections in humans are not known ‘the greater Mexico City area was the pri...

  14. Toward Improving Atmospheric Models and Ozone Projections: Laboratory UV Absorption Cross Sections and Equilibrium Constant of ClOOCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years have now passed since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, and despite comprehensive international agreements being in place to phase out CFCs and halons, polar ozone losses generally remain severe. The relevant halogen compounds have very long atmospheric lifetimes, which ensures that seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Changes in the climate system can further impact stratospheric ozone abundance through changes in the temperature and water vapor structure of the atmosphere and through the potential initiation of solar radiation management efforts. In many ways, the rate at which climate is changing must now be considered fast relative to the slow removal of halogens from the atmosphere. Photochemical models of Earth's atmosphere play a critical role in understanding and projecting ozone levels, but in order for these models to be accurate, they must be built on a foundation of accurate laboratory data. ClOOCl is the centerpiece of the catalytic cycle that accounts for more than 50% of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere every spring, and so uncertainties in the ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl are particularly important. Additionally, the equilibrium constant of the dimerization reaction of ClO merits further study, as there are important discrepancies between in situ measurements and lab-based models, and the JPL-11 recommended equilibrium constant includes high error bars at atmospherically relevant temperatures (~75% at 200 K). Here we analyze available data for the ClOOCl ultraviolet cross sections and equilibrium constant and present new laboratory spectroscopic results.

  15. Maternal Diesel Inhalation Increases Airway Hyperreactivity in Ozone Exposed Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutant exposure is linked with childhood asthma incidence and exacerbations, and maternal exposure to airborne pollutants during pregnancy increases airway hyperreactivity (ARR) in offspring. To determine if exposure to diesel exhaust during pregnancy worsened postnatal oz...

  16. The increased atmospheric greenhouse effect and regional climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenaas, S. [Bergen Univ. (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. The main information for predicting future climate changes comes from integrating coupled climate models of the atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere. Regional climate change may be studied from the global integrations, however, resolution is coarse because of insufficient computer power. Attempts are being made to get more regional details out of the global integrations by ``downscaling`` the latter. This can be done in two ways. Firstly, limited area models with high resolution are applied, driven by the global results as boundary values. Secondly, statistical relationships have been found between observed meteorological parameters, like temperature and precipitation, and analyzed large scale gridded fields. The derived relations are then used on similar data from climate runs to give local interpretations. A review is given of literature on recent observations of climate variations and on predicted regional climate change. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  18. Sources and sinks of atmospheric N2O and the possible ozone reduction due to industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. C.; Cicerone, R. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Chameides, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The terrestrial and marine nitrogen cycles are examined in an attempt to clarify how the atmospheric content of N2O is controlled. We review available data on the various reservoirs of fixed nitrogen, the transfer rates between the reservoirs, and estimate how the reservoir contents and transfer rates can change under man's influence. It is seen that sources, sinks and lifetime of atmospheric N2O are not understood well. Based on our limited knowledge of the stability of atmospheric N2O we conclude that future growth in the usage of industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers could cause a 1% to 2% global ozone reduction in the next 50 years. However, centuries from now the ozone layer could be reduced by as much as 10% if soils are the major source of atmospheric N2O.

  19. A larger pool of ozone-forming carbon compounds in urban atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, A.C.; Carslaw, N.; Marriott, P.J.; Kinghorn, R.M.; Morrison, P.; Lee, A.L.; Bartle, K.D.; Pilling, M.J.

    2000-06-15

    Volatile organic compounds play a central role in the processes that generate both urban photochemical smog and tropospheric ozone. For successful and accurate prediction of these pollution episodes, identification of the dominant reactive species within the volatile organic carbon pool is needed. At present, lack of resolution inherent in single-column chromatographic analysis limits such a detailed chemical characterization of the complex urban atmosphere. Here we present an improved method of peak deconvolution from double-column (orthogonal) gas chromatography. This has enabled us to isolate and classify more than 500 chemical species of volatile organic compounds in urban air, including over 100 multi-substituted monoaromatic and volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons. We suggest that previous assessments of reactive carbon species may therefore have underestimated the contribution made by volatile organic compounds to urban pollution, particularly for compounds with more that six carbon atoms. Incorporating these species in predictive models should greatly improve our understanding of photochemical ozone yields and the formation of harmful secondary organic aerosols. (author)

  20. Susceptibility of Diabetic Rats to Pulmonary and Systemic Effects of Inhaled Photochemically-Aged Atmosphere and Ozone (O3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susceptibility of Diabetic Rats to Pulmonary and Systemic Effects of Inhaled Photochemically-Aged Atmosphere and Ozone (O3)MC Schladweiler1, SJ Snow2, QT Krantz1, C King1, JD Krug2, N Modak2, A Henriquez3, V Bass4, DJ Miller3, JE Richards1, EH Boykin1, R Jaskot1, MI Gilmour1 and ...

  1. Reactions of cloned poplars to air pollution. Ozone-induced increase of stress ethylene and possible antisenescence strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballach, H.J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Botanisches Inst.; Niederee, C. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Botanisches Inst.; Wittig, R. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Botanisches Inst.; Woltering, E.J. [Agrotechnological Research Inst., Wageningen (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    Ozone-induced changes in ethylene production, ACC oxidase activity and the contents of ACC, MACC and free PAs were studied in Populus nigra L. cv. Loenen with high ozone sensitivity as judged by the degree of chlorophyll degradation and premature leaf abscission. Ethylene production, ACC oxidase activity, ACC content and MACC levels were induced by the one-, two-, and three-week ozone exposure (36{+-}9 ppb O{sub 3} for 11 hours a day). In addition, increases in PA levels, especially in spermidine, were measured in ozone treated plants. The role of free PAs and MACC synthesis as possible antisenescence reactions is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Combined atmospheric oxidant capacity and increased levels of exhaled nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changyuan; Li, Huichu; Chen, Renjie; Xu, Wenxi; Wang, Cuicui; Tse, Lap Ah; Zhao, Zhuohui; Kan, Haidong

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen dioxide and ozone are two interrelated oxidative pollutants in the atmosphere. Few studies have evaluated the health effects of combined oxidant capacity (O x ). We investigated the short-term effects of O x on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), a well-established biomarker for airway inflammation, in a group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Real-time concentrations of O x were obtained by calculating directly the sum of nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Linear mixed-effect models were applied to explore the acute effects of O x on FeNO levels. Short-term exposure to Ox was significantly associated with elevated FeNO. This effect was strongest in the first 24 h after exposure, and was robust to the adjustment of PM2.5. A 10 μg m-3 increase in 24 h average concentrations of O x was associated with 4.28% (95% confidence interval: 1.19%, 7.37%) increase in FeNO. The effect estimates were statistically significant only among males, elders, and those with body mass index ≥24 kg m-2, a comorbidity, higher educational attainment, or moderate airflow limitation. This analysis demonstrated an independent effect of O x on respiratory inflammation, and suggested that a single metric O x might serve as a preferable indicator of atmospheric oxidative capacity in further air pollution epidemiological studies.

  3. Vibrationally excited oxygen in the middle atmosphere. Evaluation of its potential as an additional source of ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppers, G.A.A.

    1996-11-01

    Ozone is `the` most important trace gas in the middle atmosphere. Despite the large efforts that have been made to calculate its concentration in the middle atmosphere there is long standing discrepancy between in-situ and remote sensing measurements on one hand and model results on the other. The latter tend to be about 30% too low in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. One of the photolysis products of ozone itself, O2({upsilon}) - an oxygen molecule with extra vibrational energy, has been suggested as an intermediate in a reaction sequence that possibly could represent the missing ozone source. A key point in model calculations that estimate the magnitude of the proposed extra ozone source is the fractional population distribution of O2({upsilon}) after ozone photodissociation. Recent statistical calculations supply the vibrational distribution of O2({upsilon}) as a function of the wavelength at which ozone is dissociated. Based on these results a 2D chemical model that includes O2({upsilon}) chemistry has been used to investigate the importance of this mechanism. The extra ozone production by this mechanism has been compared for several other vibrational distributions taken from literature, different collisional deactivation rates of the excited oxygen fragments, and including a reaction between high vibrational excited oxygen with ground state oxygen producing two odd oxygen molecules. Our results indicate that regardless of whether the high vibrational reaction is included, alternatively the deactivation rates are decreased or not, the vibrational excited oxygen mechanism can not simultaneously match the absolute amount of the difference between the model results and SAGE II data and the height distribution of this difference. 23 refs, 17 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Ground-Based Microwave Monitoring of Middle-Atmosphere Ozone Above Peterhof and Tomsk During Stratospheric Warming in the Winter of 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkovsky, D. A.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Kulikov, Yu. Yu.; Marichev, V. N.; Poberovsky, A. V.; Ryskin, V. G.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of studying the dynamics of middle-atmosphere ozone above Peterhof (60°N, 30°E) and Tomsk (56°N, 85°E) during stratospheric warming in the winter of 2013-2014 by the radiophysical method. In the ground-based observations we used the same microwave ozone meters (operated at 110.8 GHz) and the same techniques both for measuring the radiation spectra of ozone molecules and estimation of the vertical distribution of ozone in the middle atmosphere. These results were compared with satellite data on the total ozone content TOC (OMI/Aura), altitude profiles of ozone and temperature in the layer 20-60 km (MLS/Aura), and also with the data on ozone content in the layer 25-60 km, which were obtained using a Bruker IFS-125HR infrared Fourier spectrometer in Peterhof. Significant variations in ozone, which were caused by a stratospheric warming of the minor type, were observed in the atmosphere above Peterhof at altitudes of 40 to 60 km. The duration of dynamic perturbations above Peterhof was 2.5 months. Dynamic processes associated with the horizontal transport of air masses, which had an impact on the vertical structure of ozone in the middle atmosphere, were also detected above Tomsk, but this effect was less dependent on the background temperature variations.

  5. Trend and variability of atmospheric ozone over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: impacts of seasonality and precursor gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K; Srivastava, Prashant K; Banerjee, T; Aneja, Viney P

    2017-01-01

    Ozone dynamics in two urban background atmospheres over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) were studied in two contexts: total columnar and ground-level ozone. In terms of total columnar ozone (TCO), emphases were made to compare satellite-based retrieval with ground-based observation and existing trend in decadal and seasonal variation was also identified. Both satellite-retrieved (Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OMI-DOAS)) and ground-based observations (IMD-O3) revealed satisfying agreement with OMI-DOAS observation over predicting TCO with a positive bias of 7.24 % under all-sky conditions. Minor variation between daily daytime (r = 0.54; R (2) = 29 %; n = 275) and satellite overpass time-averaged TCO (r = 0.58; R (2) = 34 %; n = 208) was also recognized. A consistent and clear seasonal trend in columnar ozone (2005-2015) was noted with summertime (March-June) maxima (Varanasi, 290.9 ± 8.8; Lucknow, 295.6 ± 9.5 DU) and wintertime (December-February) minima (Varanasi, 257.4 ± 10.1; Lucknow, 258.8 ± 8.8 DU). Seasonal trend decomposition based on locally weighted regression smoothing technique identified marginally decreasing trend (Varanasi, 0.0084; Lucknow, 0.0096 DU year(-1)) especially due to reduction in monsoon time minima and summertime maxima. In continuation to TCO, variation in ground-level ozone in terms of seasonality and precursor gases were also analysed from September 2014 to August 2015. Both stations registered similar pattern of variation with Lucknow representing slightly higher annual mean (44.3 ± 30.6; range, 1.5-309.1 μg/m(3)) over Varanasi (38.5 ± 17.7; range, 4.9-104.2 μg/m(3)). Variation in ground-level ozone was further explained in terms water vapour, atmospheric boundary layer height and solar radiation. Ambient water vapour content was found to associate negatively (r = -0.28, n = 284) with ground-level ozone with considerable seasonal variation in

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of short-chain haloolefins: photochemical ozone creation potentials (POCPs), global warming potentials (GWPs), and ozone depletion potentials (ODPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallington, T J; Sulbaek Andersen, M P; Nielsen, O J

    2015-06-01

    Short-chain haloolefins are being introduced as replacements for saturated halocarbons. The unifying chemical feature of haloolefins is the presence of a CC double bond which causes the atmospheric lifetimes to be significantly shorter than for the analogous saturated compounds. We discuss the atmospheric lifetimes, photochemical ozone creation potentials (POCPs), global warming potentials (GWPs), and ozone depletion potentials (ODPs) of haloolefins. The commercially relevant short-chain haloolefins CF3CFCH2 (1234yf), trans-CF3CHCHF (1234ze(Z)), CF3CFCF2 (1216), cis-CF3CHCHCl (1233zd(Z)), and trans-CF3CHCHCl (1233zd(E)) have short atmospheric lifetimes (days to weeks), negligible POCPs, negligible GWPs, and ODPs which do not differ materially from zero. In the concentrations expected in the environment their atmospheric degradation products will have a negligible impact on ecosystems. CF3CFCH2 (1234yf), trans-CF3CHCHF (1234ze(Z)), CF3CFCF2 (1216), cis-CF3CHCHCl (1233zd(Z)), and trans-CF3CHCHCl (1233zd(E)) are environmentally acceptable.

  7. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  8. Atmosphere-Ocean Ozone Exchange – A Global Modeling Study of Biogeochemical, Atmospheric and Water-Side Turbulence Dependencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Helmig, D.; Fairall, C.W.; Hare, J.; Pozzer, A.

    2009-01-01

    The significance of the removal of tropospheric ozone by the oceans, covering ~2/3 of the Earth's surface, has only been addressed in a few studies involving water tank, aircraft, and tower flux measurements. On the basis of results from these few observations of the ozone dry deposition velocity (V

  9. Study of ozone "weekend effect" in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG WenYuan; ZHAO ChunSheng; GENG FuHai; PENG Li; ZHOU GuangQiang; GAO Wei; XU JianMing; TIE XueXi

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of observed ozone data in 2006 from five monitoring sites (Xujiahui, Chongming, Baoshan, Pudong, Jinshan) in Shanghai reveals that ozone (O3) concentrations in Xujiahui are higher at weekends than those on weekdays, despite the fact that emissions of ozone precursor substances, such as oxides of nitrogen (NOX), carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are lower at weekends than those on weekdays.The possible chemical cause of ozone "weekend effect" is that NO2/NO ratio increases at weekends by 25.61% compared with those on weekdays.In addition, because of an average 12.13% reduction in NOx (NO + NO2) in the early morning (05:00-09:00) at weekends compared with that on weekdays, the ozone inhibition period ends 0.5 h earlier at weekends resulting in the longer duration of ozone accumulation and the higher ozone production rate.The rate of ozone production is a function of VOCs and NOx in the atmosphere.VOCs/NOx ratio in Xujiahui is 4.55 at weekends, and 4.37 on weekdays, belonging to the "NOx-limited".The increasing VOCs/NOx ratio at weekends leads to ozone enhancement from 73 ppbv to 80 ppbv, which are consistent with ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui.Furthermore, combining with MICAPS cloud amount data, the fact that ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui weakens gradually along with the increasing of cloud amount indicates that ozone photochemical production leads to ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui of Shanghai.

  10. The impacts of summer monsoons on the ozone budget of the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xuewei; Zhu, Bin; Fei, Dongdong; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone (O3) in the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific Ocean were investigated using model simulations (2001-2007) from the Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). The simulated O3 and diagnostic precipitation are in good agreement with the observations. Model results suggest that the Asia-Pacific monsoon significantly influences the seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone. The differences of anthropogenic emissions and zonal winds in meridional directions cause a pollutants' transition zone at approximately 20°-30°N. The onset of summer monsoons with a northward migration of the rain belt leads the transition zone to drift north, eventually causing a summer minimum of ozone to the north of 30°N. In years with an early onset of summer monsoons, strong inflows of clean oceanic air lead to low ozone at polluted oceanic sites near the continent, while strong outflows from the continent exist, resulting in high levels of O3 over remote portions of the Asia-Pacific Ocean. The reverse is true in years when the summer monsoon onset is late.

  11. Sub-decadal increase of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in atmospheric total suspended particles in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, S.; Kawamura, K.; Fu, P.; Lee, M.; Tachibana, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are good tracers to evaluate the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere and are important precursors for the production of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in aqueous phase. Here we report seasonal and interannual variations of aerosol-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal over sub-decadal scale (2001-2008) in ambient aerosols collected at Gosan, Jeju Island in the East China Sea. Glyoxal concentrations ranged from 0.06 to 106 ng m-3, with a peak in January. Concentrations of methylglyoxal ranged from 0.05 to 110 ng m-3 with a peak in April. The glyoxal peak is related with carbon monoxide and levoglucosan whereas methylglyoxal peak aligns with ozone. These results suggest an elevated combustion sources of glyoxal in January and secondary sources of methylglyoxal in April. A pronounced seasonal variation was observed for methylglyoxal to glyoxal ratios with maximum in summer followed by spring, autumn and winter, suggesting methyglyoxal to glyoxal ratio is an effective proxy to evaluate the strength of biogenic versus anthropogenic sources of organic aerosol in East Asia. Overall, concentrations of glyoxal from 2001 to 2008 increased by at least 29% per year in winter and 83% per year in spring, being consistent with the increase of ozone, carbon monoxide, and biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs in East Asia. We propose that the increased glyoxal and methylglyoxal could be related to an enhanced SOA production by their reactive uptake in aqueous phase over East Asia.

  12. AN EVALUATION OF OZONE EXPOSURE METRICS FOR A SEASONALLY DROUGHT STRESSED PONDEROSA PINE ECOSYSTEM. (R826601)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone stress has become an increasingly significant factor in cases of forest decline reported throughout the world. Current metrics to estimate ozone exposure for forest trees are derived from atmospheric concentrations and assume that the forest is physiologically active at ...

  13. Quasi-16-day period oscillations observed in middle atmospheric ozone and temperature in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Demissie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nightly averaged mesospheric temperature derived from the hydroxyl nightglow at Rothera station (67°34' S, 68°08' W and nightly midnight measurements of ozone mixing ratio obtained from Troll station (72°01' S, 2°32' E in Antarctica have been used to investigate the presence and vertical profile of the quasi-16-day planetary wave in the stratosphere and mesosphere during the Antarctic winter of 2009. The variations caused by planetary waves on the ozone mixing ratio and temperature are discussed, and spectral and cross-correlation analyses are performed to extract the wave amplitudes and to examine the vertical structure of the wave from 34 to 80 km. The results show that while planetary-wave signatures with periods 3–12 days are strong below the stratopause, the oscillations associated with the 16-day wave are the strongest and present in both the mesosphere and stratosphere. The period of the wave is found to increase below 42 km due to the Doppler shifting by the strong eastward zonal wind. The 16-day oscillation in the temperature is found to be correlated and phase coherent with the corresponding oscillation observed in O3 volume mixing ratio at all levels, and the wave is found to have vertical phase fronts consistent with a normal mode structure.

  14. Quasi-16-day period oscillations observed in middle atmospheric ozone and temperature in Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demissie, T.D.; Hibbins, R.E.; Espy, P.J. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Birkeland Centre for Space Science, Bergen (Norway); Kleinknecht, N.H.; Straub, C. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-09-01

    Nightly averaged mesospheric temperature derived from the hydroxyl nightglow at Rothera station (67 34' S, 68 08' W) and nightly midnight measurements of ozone mixing ratio obtained from Troll station (72 01' S, 2 32' E) in Antarctica have been used to investigate the presence and vertical profile of the quasi-16-day planetary wave in the stratosphere and mesosphere during the Antarctic winter of 2009. The variations caused by planetary waves on the ozone mixing ratio and temperature are discussed, and spectral and cross-correlation analyses are performed to extract the wave amplitudes and to examine the vertical structure of the wave from 34 to 80 km. The results show that while planetary-wave signatures with periods 3-12 days are strong below the stratopause, the oscillations associated with the 16-day wave are the strongest and present in both the mesosphere and stratosphere. The period of the wave is found to increase below 42 km due to the Doppler shifting by the strong eastward zonal wind. The 16-day oscillation in the temperature is found to be correlated and phase coherent with the corresponding oscillation observed in O{sub 3} volume mixing ratio at all levels, and the wave is found to have vertical phase fronts consistent with a normal mode structure. (orig.)

  15. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grulke, N. E.; Miller, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Native stands of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum Bucholz) are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 years is likely to be unprecedented in the life span (about 2,500 years) of giant sequoia. We determined changes in physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current-year, 12-, and 125-year-old) to differing concentrations of ozone, and assessed age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia (current-year, 2-, 5-, 20-, 125-, and > 2,000-year-old trees). The CO(2) exchange rate (CER) was greater in current-year (12.1 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (4.8 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (3.0 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1), averaged across the four older age classes). Dark respiration was highest for current-year seedlings (-6.5 +/- 0.7 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and was increased twofold in symptomatic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was greater in current-year (355 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (200 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (50 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatal cavities is higher in young seedlings than in trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency, as indicated by C(i)/C(a), occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. We conclude that giant sequoias seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are about 5 years old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees.

  16. Range resolved measurements of atmospheric ozone and water vapour; Misure `range resolved` di ozono e vapor d`acqua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbini, R.; Colao, F.; Palucci, A.; Ribezzo, S.

    1992-12-31

    The ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) ground based lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) station, equipped with two TEA CO/sub 2/ laser transmitters, allows for range resolved measurements of minor atmospheric constituents or pollutants, using the DIAL differential absorption technique. This paper provides brief notes on the lidar station`s design characteristics and reports on the application of the instruments to obtain water vapour and ozone concentration profiles with a useful investigated range , R = 6 Km.

  17. Effect of O3 on the atmospheric temperature structure of early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Godolt, M; Grenfell, J L; Stracke, B; Rauer, H

    2015-01-01

    Ozone is an important radiative trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere. The presence of ozone can significantly influence the thermal structure of an atmosphere, and by this e.g. cloud formation. Photochemical studies suggest that ozone can form in carbon dioxide-rich atmospheres. We investigate the effect of ozone on the temperature structure of simulated early Martian atmospheres. With a 1D radiative-convective model, we calculate temperature-pressure profiles for a 1 bar carbon dioxide atmosphere. Ozone profiles are fixed, parameterized profiles. We vary the location of the ozone layer maximum and the concentration at this maximum. The maximum is placed at different pressure levels in the upper and middle atmosphere (1-10 mbar). Results suggest that the impact of ozone on surface temperatures is relatively small. However, the planetary albedo significantly decreases at large ozone concentrations. Throughout the middle and upper atmospheres, temperatures increase upon introducing ozone due to strong UV absorpt...

  18. Absolute cross sections of ozone at atmospheric temperatures for the Wulf and the Chappuis bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Z. El; Churassy, S.; Wannous, G.; Bacis, R.; Boursey, E.

    2005-06-01

    Ozone absorption constitutes a variable background against which measurement of pollution is observed from satellites by the solar occultation technique. The temperature-altitude gradient of ozone spans the range 180-340K. Laboratory measurements of ozone absorption at temperatures across this range are needed to calibrate spectroscopic remote sensing, but have yielded results in substantial disagreement with each other. This paper presents the first measurements of the variation of absorption cross-sections of ozone at temperatures from 144to300K over the 9250-18 500cm-1 spectral region.

  19. OZONE CONCENTRATION ATTRIBUTABLE PREMATURE DEATH IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Skotak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone in the lower part of the atmosphere (troposphere, strong photochemical oxidant, is not directly emitted to the atmosphere but formed through a series of complex reactions. Ozone concentrations depends on ozone precursors air contamination (mainly nitrogen dioxide and non-methane volatile organic compounds and meteorological conditions (temperature and solar radiation. The main sectors emitted ozone precursors are road transport, power and heat generation plants, household (heating, industry, and petrol storage and distribution. Ozone and some of its precursors are also transported long distances in the atmosphere and are therefore considered a transboundary problem. As a result, the ozone concentrations are often low in busy urban areas and higher in suburban and rural areas. Nowadays, instead of particulate matter, ozone is one of the most widespread global air pollution problems. In and around urban areas, relatively large gradients of ozone can be observed. Because of its high reactivity in elevated concentrations ozone causes serious health problems and damage to ecosystems, agricultural crops and materials. Main ill-health endpoints as a results of ozone concentrations can be characterised as an effect of pulmonary and cardiovascular system, time morbidity and mortality series, development of atherosclerosis and asthma and finally reduction in life expectancy. The associations with increased daily mortality due to ozone concentrations are confirmed by many researches and epidemiological studies. Estimation of the level selected ill-health endpoints (mortality in total and due to cardiovascular and respiratory causes as a result of the short-term ozone exposure in Poland was the main aim of the project. Final results have been done based on estimation method elaborated by WHO, ozone measurements from National Air Quality Monitoring System and statistical information such as mortality rate and populations. All analysis have been done in

  20. Link Winds: A visual data analysis system and its application to the atmospheric ozone depletion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Allan S.; Berkin, Andrew L.

    1995-01-01

    The Linked Windows Interactive Data System (LinkWinds) is a prototype visual data exploration system resulting from a NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) program of research into the application of graphical methods for rapidly accessing, displaying, and analyzing large multi variate multidisciplinary data sets. Running under UNIX it is an integrated multi-application executing environment using a data-linking paradigm to dynamically interconnect and control multiple windows containing a variety of displays and manipulators. This paradigm, resulting in a system similar to a graphical spreadsheet, is not only a powerful method for organizing large amounts of data for analysis, but leads to a highly intuitive, easy-to-learn user interface. It provides great flexibility in rapidly interacting with large masses of complex data to detect trends, correlations, and anomalies. The system, containing an expanding suite of non-domain-specific applications, provides for the ingestion of a variety of data base formats and hard -copy output of all displays. Remote networked workstations running LinkWinds may be interconnected, providing a multiuser science environment (MUSE) for collaborative data exploration by a distributed science team. The system is being developed in close collaboration with investigators in a variety of science disciplines using both archived and real-time data. It is currently being used to support the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) in orbit aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This paper describes the application of LinkWinds to this data to rapidly detect features, such as the ozone hole configuration, and to analyze correlations between chemical constituents of the atmosphere.

  1. Spectral analysis of atmospheric composition: application to surface ozone model-measurement comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdalo, Dene R.; Evans, Mathew J.; Sofen, Eric D.

    2016-07-01

    Models of atmospheric composition play an essential role in our scientific understanding of atmospheric processes and in providing policy strategies to deal with societally relevant problems such as climate change, air quality, and ecosystem degradation. The fidelity of these models needs to be assessed against observations to ensure that errors in model formulations are found and that model limitations are understood. A range of approaches are necessary for these comparisons. Here, we apply a spectral analysis methodology for this comparison. We use the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, a method similar to a Fourier transform, but better suited to deal with the gapped data sets typical of observational data. We apply this methodology to long-term hourly ozone observations and the equivalent model (GEOS-Chem) output. We show that the spectrally transformed observational data show a distinct power spectrum with regimes indicative of meteorological processes (weather, macroweather) and specific peaks observed at the daily and annual timescales together with corresponding harmonic peaks at one-half, one-third, etc., of these frequencies. Model output shows corresponding features. A comparison between the amplitude and phase of these peaks introduces a new comparison methodology between model and measurements. We focus on the amplitude and phase of diurnal and seasonal cycles and present observational/model comparisons and discuss model performance. We find large biases notably for the seasonal cycle in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere where the amplitudes are generally overestimated by up to 16 ppbv, and phases are too late on the order of 1-5 months. This spectral methodology can be applied to a range of model-measurement applications and is highly suitable for Multimodel Intercomparison Projects (MIPs).

  2. Modeling coupled interactions of carbon, water, and ozone exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. I: model description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Ned; Zeller, Karl F

    2003-01-01

    A new biophysical model (FORFLUX) is presented to study the simultaneous exchange of ozone, carbon dioxide, and water vapor between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The model mechanistically couples all major processes controlling ecosystem flows trace gases and water implementing recent concepts in plant eco-physiology, micrometeorology, and soil hydrology. FORFLUX consists of four interconnected modules-a leaf photosynthesis model, a canopy flux model, a soil heat-, water- and CO2- transport model, and a snow pack model. Photosynthesis, water-vapor flux and ozone uptake at the leaf level are computed by the LEAFC3 sub-model. The canopy module scales leaf responses to a stand level by numerical integration of the LEAFC3model over canopy leaf area index (LAI). The integration takes into account (1) radiative transfer inside the canopy, (2) variation of foliage photosynthetic capacity with canopy depth, (3) wind speed attenuation throughout the canopy, and (4) rainfall interception by foliage elements. The soil module uses principles of the diffusion theory to predict temperature and moisture dynamics within the soil column, evaporation, and CO2 efflux from soil. The effect of soil heterogeneity on field-scale fluxes is simulated employing the Bresler-Dagan stochastic concept. The accumulation and melt of snow on the ground is predicted using an explicit energy balance approach. Ozone deposition is modeled as a sum of three fluxes- ozone uptake via plant stomata, deposition to non-transpiring plant surfaces, and ozone flux into the ground. All biophysical interactions are computed hourly while model projections are made at either hourly or daily time step. FORFLUX represents a comprehensive approach to studying ozone deposition and its link to carbon and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems.

  3. Ozone and increased nitrogen supply effects on the yield and nutritive quality of Trifolium subterraneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, J.; Muntifering, R. B.; Bermejo, V.; Gimeno, B. S.; Elvira, S.

    The influence of ambient ozone (O 3) concentrations and nitrogen (N) fertilization, singly and in combination, on the growth and nutritive quality of Trifolium subterraneum was assessed. This is an important O 3-sensitive species of great pastoral value in Mediterranean areas. Plant material was enclosed in open-top chambers (OTCs). Three O 3 levels were established: Filtered air with O 3 concentrations below 15 ppb (CFA), non-filtered air with O 3 concentrations in the range of ambient levels (NFA), and non-filtered air supplemented with 40 ppb O 3 over ambient levels (NFA+). Similarly, three N levels were defined: 5, 15 and 30 kg ha -1. The increase in O 3 exposure induced a reduction of the clover aerial green biomass and an increase of senescent biomass. Ozone effects were more adverse in the root system, inducing an impairment of the aerial/subterranean biomass ratio. Compared with the CFA treatment, nutritive quality of aerial biomass was 10 and 20% lower for NFA and NFA+ treatments, respectively, due to increased concentrations of acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber and lignin. The latter effect appears to be related to senescence acceleration. The increment in N supplementation enhanced the increase of ADF concentrations in those plants simultaneously exposed to ambient and above-ambient O 3 concentrations, and reduced the incremental rate of foliar senescence induced by the pollutant.

  4. Reactions of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere: Ozone-alkene reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Jill Denise

    2000-08-01

    Photochemical smog cannot form without sunlight, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOC). This dissertation addresses several different aspects of VOC chemistry in the atmosphere. Aside from ambient levels of VOC outdoors, VOC are also present at moderate concentrations indoors. Many studies have measured indoor air concentrations of VOC, but only one considered the effects of human breath. The major VOC in the breath of healthy individuals are isoprene (12-580 ppb), acetone (1.2-1800 ppb), ethanol (13-1000 ppb), methanol (160-2000 ppb), and other alcohols. Human emissions of VOC are negligible on a regional (less than 4%) and global scale (less than 0.3%). However, in indoor air, under fairly crowded situations, human emissions of VOC may dominate other sources of VOC. An important class of VOC in the atmosphere is alkenes, due to their high reactivity. The ozone reaction with alkenes forms OH radicals, a powerful oxidizing agent in the troposphere. OH radical formation yields from the ozonolysis of several cycloalkenes were measured using small amounts of fast-reacting aromatics and aliphatic ethers to trace OH formation. The values are 0.62 +/- 0.15, 0.54 +/- 0.13, 0.36 +/- 0.08, and 0.91 +/- 0.20 for cyclopentene, cyclohexene, cycloheptene and 1-methylcyclohexene, respectively. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level are presented to aid in understanding the trends observed. The pressure dependence of OH radical yields may lend insight into the formation mechanism. We have made the first study of the pressure dependence of the OH radical yield for ethene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene, and 2,3-dimethyl-2- butene over the range 20-760 Torr, and trans -3-hexene, and cyclopentene over the range 200-760 Torr. The OH yields from ozonolysis of ethene and propene were pressure dependent, while the other compounds had OH yields that were independent of pressure. Ozone-alkene reactions form vibrationally excited carbonyl

  5. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  6. Atmospheric lifetimes and Ozone Depletion Potentials of trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropylene and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene in a three-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, K. O.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    2010-11-01

    The chloroalkenes trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropylene (tCFP) and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (tDCE) have been proposed as candidate replacements for other compounds in current use that cause concerns regarding potential environmental effects including destruction of stratospheric ozone. Because tCFP and tDCE contain chlorine atoms, the effects of these short-lived compounds on stratospheric ozone must be established. In this study, we derive the atmospheric lifetimes and Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs) for tCFP and for tDCE assuming emissions from land surfaces at latitudes 30° N to 60° N using the MOZART 3 three-dimensional model of atmospheric chemistry and physics. 53% of the ozone loss due to tCFP and 98% of the ozone loss due to tDCE take place in the troposphere, rather than in the stratosphere as generally expected from longer-lived chlorocarbons. The atmospheric lifetime of tCFP against chemical reaction is 40.4 days, and its ODP is quite small at 0.00034. The tDCE atmospheric lifetime is 12.7 days, and its ODP is 0.00024, which is the lowest ODP found for any chlorocarbon we have studied. Our study suggests that chlorine from tCFP and tDCE are unlikely to affect ozone at quantities likely to be emitted to the atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric lifetimes and Ozone Depletion Potentials of trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropylene and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene in a three-dimensional model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Patten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The chloroalkenes trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropylene (tCFP and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (tDCE have been proposed as candidate replacements for other compounds in current use that cause concerns regarding potential environmental effects including destruction of stratospheric ozone. Because tCFP and tDCE contain chlorine atoms, the effects of these short-lived compounds on stratospheric ozone must be established. In this study, we derive the atmospheric lifetimes and Ozone Depletion Potentials (ODPs for tCFP and for tDCE assuming emissions from land surfaces at latitudes 30° N to 60° N using the MOZART 3 three-dimensional model of atmospheric chemistry and physics. 53% of the ozone loss due to tCFP and 98% of the ozone loss due to tDCE take place in the troposphere, rather than in the stratosphere as generally expected from longer-lived chlorocarbons. The atmospheric lifetime of tCFP against chemical reaction is 40.4 days, and its ODP is quite small at 0.00034. The tDCE atmospheric lifetime is 12.7 days, and its ODP is 0.00024, which is the lowest ODP found for any chlorocarbon we have studied. Our study suggests that chlorine from tCFP and tDCE are unlikely to affect ozone at quantities likely to be emitted to the atmosphere.

  8. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  9. Improvement of the basic knowledge of the climatology of the vertical ozone layer by enhanced balloon sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attmannspacher, W.; Hartmannsgrubber, R.; Lang, P.

    1984-01-01

    Balloon sounding of the ozone in the Earth atmosphere was performed in order to determine the natural behavior of ozone and its recognizable deviations. The importance of ozone in the Earth atmosphere and the orographic situation of observatories and ozone sounding statistics since 1966 are explained. The physical processes governing the total amount of ozone, and the behavior of stratospheric ozone are described. Measurements in the upper stratosphere show a decrease of the ozone partial pressure above 26 km altitude since 1977. The behavior of tropospheric ozone is discussed. Data since 1977 show increasing ozone values in the troposphere, up to 50% to 70%. This increase is independent of the solar radiation intensity and the reinforced transport of stratospheric ozone into the troposphere. The increase in the troposphere cannot compensate the stratospheric decrease.

  10. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric interaction. We studied the interactions in the atmosphere between the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone depletion from the point of view of past and future emissions of the anthropogenic com...

  11. Compact, Rugged and Low-Cost Atmospheric Ozone DIAL Transmitter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Bridger Photonics Inc. (Bridger) proposes to develop the most compact, efficient and low-cost ultra-violet ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) transmitter...

  12. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the primary products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. Anomalies in the relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide polymers. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, a series of atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids is presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semisolids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that oxidatively processed particulate may contribute to indirect forcing of radiation. Other effects, including the potential

  13. Recent widespread tree growth decline despite increasing atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C R Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The synergetic effects of recent rising atmospheric CO(2 and temperature are expected to favor tree growth in boreal and temperate forests. However, recent dendrochronological studies have shown site-specific unprecedented growth enhancements or declines. The question of whether either of these trends is caused by changes in the atmosphere remains unanswered because dendrochronology alone has not been able to clarify the physiological basis of such trends. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we combined standard dendrochronological methods with carbon isotopic analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced water use efficiency (WUE and growth of two deciduous and two coniferous tree species along a 9 degrees latitudinal gradient across temperate and boreal forests in Ontario, Canada. Our results show that although trees have had around 53% increases in WUE over the past century, growth decline (measured as a decrease in basal area increment--BAI has been the prevalent response in recent decades irrespective of species identity and latitude. Since the 1950s, tree BAI was predominantly negatively correlated with warmer climates and/or positively correlated with precipitation, suggesting warming induced water stress. However, where growth declines were not explained by climate, WUE and BAI were linearly and positively correlated, showing that declines are not always attributable to warming induced stress and additional stressors may exist. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show an unexpected widespread tree growth decline in temperate and boreal forests due to warming induced stress but are also suggestive of additional stressors. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels during the past century resulted in consistent increases in water use efficiency, but this did not prevent growth decline. These findings challenge current predictions of increasing terrestrial carbon stocks under climate change scenarios.

  14. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jöckel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup up to 0.01 hPa was used at spectral T42 resolution to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. With the high vertical resolution the model simulates the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. In the simulations presented here a Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998–2005. This allows an efficient and direct evaluation with satellite and in-situ data. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated well, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of inter-annual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy

  15. Evaluation of the impact of atmospheric ozone and aerosols on the horizontal global/diffuse UV Index at Livorno (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Daniele; Giulietti, Danilo; Morelli, Marco

    2016-08-01

    A study was conducted at Livorno (Italy) to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols and ozone on the solar UV radiation and its diffuse component at ground in clear sky conditions. Solar UV radiation has been quantified in terms of UV Index (UVI), following the ISO 17166:1999/CIE S007/E-1998 international standard. UVI has been calculated by exploiting the libRadtran radiative transfer modelling software as a function of both the Aerosols Optical Depth (AOD) and the Total Ozone Column (TOC). In particular AOD and TOC values have been remotely sensed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the NASA's EOS (Earth Observing System) satellites constellation. An experimental confirmation was also obtained by exploiting global UVI ground-based measurements from the 26/9/14 to 12/8/15 and diffuse UVI ground-based measurements from the 17/5/15 to 12/8/15. For every considered value of Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) and atmospheric condition, estimates and measurements confirm that the diffuse component contributes for more than 50% on the global UV radiation. Therefore an exposure of human skin also to diffuse solar UV radiation can be potentially harmful for health and need to be accurately monitored, e.g. by exploiting innovative applications such as a mobile app with a satellite-based UV dosimeter that has been developed. Global and diffuse UVI variations due to the atmosphere are primarily caused by the TOC variations (typically cyclic): the maximum TOC variation detected by OMI in the area under study leads to a corresponding variation in global and diffuse UVI of about 50%. Aerosols in the area concerned, mainly of maritime nature, have instead weaker effects causing a maximum variation of the global and diffuse UVI respectively of 9% and 35% with an SZA of 20° and respectively of 13% and 10% with an SZA of 60°.

  16. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atmospheric Ozone: Its Variation and Human Influences, Aldeia das Acoteias, Algarve, Portugal, October 1-13, 1979,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    studies ( Piaget , 1971) or more directly measurements (Danielson and Mohnen, 1977) from airplanes have shown that strong intrusions predominantly occur n...Umkehr evaluation tech- nique, NCAR, Boulder, 1964. Piaget , A., Utilisation de l’ozone atmosph~rique comme traceur des 6changes entre la troposphere...due to ozone absorp- tion, J. Atmos. Sci., 30, 513-515, 1973. Louis, Jean -Francois, A two-dimensional transport model of the atmosphere, PhD thesis

  17. Plant injury induced by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A.C.; Pack, M.R.; Treshow, M.; Downs, R.J.; Transtrum, L.G.

    1961-06-01

    Phytotoxicity of ozone to 34 plant species was studied in controlled-atmosphere greenhouses. Plants were subjected at various stages of growth to 0.13-0.72 ppm ozone for 2-hour periods. Injury symptoms developed on 28 species. Some of the most sensitive species were small grains, alfalfa, spinach, and tobacco. There was a general tendency for sensitivity to increase with maturity of tissue. Palisade cells were most readily injured by ozone. On plants with adaxial palisade parenchyma, chlorotic spots and bleached necrotic areas developed on the upper leaf surface. Injury was equally apparent from either leaf surface of plants with undifferentiated mesophyll. Necrotic spots extending completely through the leaf developed on plants with either mesophyll structure when injury was severe. Ozone caused conspicuous tumors to develop on broccoli leaves. Symptoms similar to those produced by ozone fumigations have been observed on a wide range of plant species growing near several large metropolitan centers. 18 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Ozone kinetics is quite well established at atmospheric pressure, due to the importance of ozone in atmospheric chemistry and to the development of industrial ozone reactors. However, as the pressure is decreased and the dominant three-body reactions lose importance, the main mechanisms involved in the creation and destruction of ozone are still surrounded by important uncertainties. In this work we develop a self-consistent model for a pulsed discharge and its afterglow operating in a Pyrex reactor with inner radius 1 cm, at pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents of 40-120 mA. The model couples the electron Boltzmann equation with a system of equations for the time evolution of the heavy particles. The calculations are compared with time-dependent measurements of ozone and atomic oxygen. Parametric studies are performed in order to clarify the role of vibrationally excited ozone in the overall kinetics and to establish the conditions where ozone production on the surface may become important. It is shown that vibrationally excited ozone does play a significant role, by increasing the time constants of ozone formation. Moreover, an upper limit for the ozone formation at the wall in these conditions is set at 10(-4).

  19. Increased CCL24/eotaxin-2 with postnatal ozone exposure in allergen-sensitized infant monkeys is not associated with recruitment of eosinophils to airway mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Debbie L.; Gerriets, Joan E. [California National Primate Research Center, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schelegle, Edward S.; Hyde, Dallas M. [California National Primate Research Center, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Miller, Lisa A., E-mail: lmiller@ucdavis.edu [California National Primate Research Center, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Epidemiology supports a causal link between air pollutant exposure and childhood asthma, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have previously reported that ozone exposure can alter the anatomic distribution of CD25+ lymphocytes in airways of allergen-sensitized infant rhesus monkeys. Here, we hypothesized that ozone may also affect eosinophil trafficking to allergen-sensitized infant airways. To test this hypothesis, we measured blood, lavage, and airway mucosa eosinophils in 3-month old monkeys following cyclical ozone and house dust mite (HDM) aerosol exposures. We also determined if eotaxin family members (CCL11, CCL24, CCL26) are associated with eosinophil location in response to exposures. In lavage, eosinophil numbers increased in animals exposed to ozone and/or HDM. Ozone + HDM animals showed significantly increased CCL24 and CCL26 protein in lavage, but the concentration of CCL11, CCL24, and CCL26 was independent of eosinophil number for all exposure groups. In airway mucosa, eosinophils increased with exposure to HDM alone; comparatively, ozone and ozone + HDM resulted in reduced eosinophils. CCL26 mRNA and immunofluorescence staining increased in airway mucosa of HDM alone animals and correlated with eosinophil volume. In ozone + HDM animal groups, CCL24 mRNA and immunofluorescence increased along with CCR3 mRNA, but did not correlate with airway mucosa eosinophils. Cumulatively, our data indicate that ozone exposure results in a profile of airway eosinophil migration that is distinct from HDM mediated pathways. CCL24 was found to be induced only by combined ozone and HDM exposure, however expression was not associated with the presence of eosinophils within the airway mucosa. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ozone can modulate the localization of eosinophils in infant allergic airways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of eotaxins within the lung is affected by ozone and allergen exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CCL24 induction by

  20. Atmospheric processing outside clouds increases soluble iron in mineral dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G

    2015-02-03

    Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient regulating primary productivity in many parts of the global ocean. Dust deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean, but most of this Fe is biologically unavailable. Atmospheric processing and reworking of Fe in dust aerosol can increase the bioavailable Fe inputs to the ocean, yet the processes are not well understood. Here, we experimentally simulate and model the cycling of Fe-bearing dust between wet aerosol and cloud droplets. Our results show that insoluble Fe in dust particles readily dissolves under acidic conditions relevant to wet aerosols. By contrast, under the higher pH conditions generally relevant to clouds, Fe dissolution tends to stop, and dissolved Fe precipitates as poorly crystalline nanoparticles. If the dust-bearing cloud droplets evaporated again (returning to the wet aerosol stage with low pH), those neo-formed Fe nanoparticles quickly redissolve, while the refractory Fe-bearing phases continue to dissolve gradually. Overall, the duration of the acidic, wet aerosol stage ultimately increases the amount of potentially bioavailable Fe delivered to oceans, while conditions in clouds favor the formation of Fe-rich nanoparticles in the atmosphere.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MEASUREMENTS DURING THE 1996 PASO DEL NORTE OZONE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambient air VOC samples were collected at surface air quality monitoring sites, near sources of interest, and aloft on the US (El Paso) and Mexican (Ciudad Juarez) side of the border during a six-week period of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study. Samples were collected at five...

  2. The effect of aircraft emissions on atmospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck JP; Reeves CE; de Leeuw FAAM; Penkett SA

    1990-01-01

    The effect of aircraft emissions on tropospheric ozone was studied using a 2-D zonal model, of longitude versus altitude. An emission inventory for the 1987 civil aircraft fleet was constructed based on fuel usage and civil aviation statistics. For the area covered by the model (30 - 60 degrees N)

  3. Heterogeneous processing of bromine compounds by atmospheric aerosols: Relation to the ozone budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.M.; Henson, B.F.; Dubey, M.K.; Casson, J.L.; Johal, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Wilson, K.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The depletion of ozone, particularly above Antarctica, has been investigated extensively to formulate public policy on the use of halocarbons. While it has been shown that heterogeneous reactions of chlorine compounds on stratospheric particulates cause the ozone hole, little is known of the analogous bromine mechanisms, even though it has been recognized for two decades that catalytic destruction of ozone by bromine could be more efficient than chlorine. Furthermore, field measurements and modeling calculations suggest that these heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactions are not restricted to the Antarctic regions but occur globally. The authors have performed laboratory measurements of the uptake of bromine compounds and other halogens on simulated stratospheric aerosols to help elucidate their role in catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Their studies contribute to the data base required to make assessments of the effects of human activities on global change, including the Montreal Protocol.

  4. Electron attachment to molecules and clusters of atmospheric relevance: oxygen and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Cicman, P.; Skalny, J.; Stampfli, P.; Illenberger, E.; Chu, Y.; Stamatovic, A.; Märk, T. D.

    1997-05-01

    Highly monochromatized electrons are used in a crossed beams experiment to investigate electron attachment to oxygen clusters 0963-0252/6/2/007/img1 at electron energies from approximately zero up to 2 eV. At energies close to zero the attachment cross section for the reaction 0963-0252/6/2/007/img2 varies inversely with the electron energy, indicative of s-wave electron capture to 0963-0252/6/2/007/img1. Peaks in the attachment cross section present at higher energies can be ascribed to vibrational levels of the oxygen anion. The vibrational spacings observed can be quantitatively accounted for. In addition, electron attachment to ozone and mixed oxygen/ozone clusters has been studied in the energy range up to 4 eV. Absolute attachment cross sections for both fragment ions, 0963-0252/6/2/007/img4 and 0963-0252/6/2/007/img5, from ozone could be deduced. Moreover, despite the initially large excess of oxygen molecules in the neutral oxygen/ozone clusters the dominant attachment products are undissociated clusters ions 0963-0252/6/2/007/img6 including the 0963-0252/6/2/007/img7 monomer while oxygen ions 0963-0252/6/2/007/img8 appear with comparatively low intensity.

  5. A Simple Method for Measuring Ground-Level Ozone in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, John V.; Seeley, Stacy K.; Bull, Arthur W.; Fehir, Richard J., Jr.; Cornwall, Susan; Knudsen, Gabriel A.

    2005-01-01

    An iodometric assay that allows the ground-level ozone concentration to be determined with an inexpensive sampling apparatus and a homemade photometer is described. This laboratory experiment applies a variety of different fundamental concepts including oxidation-reduction chemistry, the ideal gas law, and spectroscopic analysis and also provides…

  6. Has the sensitivity of soybean cultivars to ozone pollution increased with time? An analysis of published dose-response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rising trend in concentrations of ground-level ozone (O3) – a common air pollutant and phytotoxin – currently being experienced in some world regions represents a threat to agricultural yield. Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is an O3-sensitive crop species, and is experiencing increasing globa...

  7. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-07-13

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) can affect biotic and abiotic conditions in soil, such as microbial activity and water content. In turn, these changes might be expected to alter the production and consumption of the important greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) (refs 2, 3). However, studies on fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) from soil under increased atmospheric CO(2) have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased CO(2) (ranging from 463 to 780 parts per million by volume) stimulates both N(2)O emissions from upland soils and CH(4) emissions from rice paddies and natural wetlands. Because enhanced greenhouse-gas emissions add to the radiative forcing of terrestrial ecosystems, these emissions are expected to negate at least 16.6 per cent of the climate change mitigation potential previously predicted from an increase in the terrestrial carbon sink under increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. Our results therefore suggest that the capacity of land ecosystems to slow climate warming has been overestimated.

  8. Impacts of ozone on trees and crops; Impacts de l'ozone sur les arbres et les recoltes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felzer, B.S.; Cronina, T.; Melillo, J.M. [The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Reilly, J.M.; Xiaodong, Wang [Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    In this review article, we explore how surface-level ozone affects trees and crops with special emphasis on consequences for productivity and carbon sequestration. Vegetation exposure to ozone reduces photosynthesis, growth, and other plant functions. Ozone formation in the atmosphere is a product of NO{sub x}, which are also a source of nitrogen deposition. Reduced carbon sequestration of temperate forests resulting from ozone is likely offset by increased carbon sequestration from nitrogen fertilization. However, since fertilized crop-lands are generally not nitrogen-limited, capping ozone-polluting substances in the USA, Europe, and China can reduce future crop yield loss substantially. (authors)

  9. Evidence for vertical ozone redistribution since 1967

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, R.; Döhler, W.; Kirsch, H.-J.; Plessing, P.; Görsdorf, U.

    1993-03-01

    Long-term measurements of the ozone concentration in the vicinity of the city of Berlin have been performed with ground based Dobson spectrophotometers and balloon borne systems. The respective experiments cover the past 24 years. All data have been reevaluated and corrected towards uniform calibration standards, leading to the longest European data set of total column density, altitude-dependent ozone partial pressures and the corresponding temperatures. Smoothing algorithms unravel significant long-term trends. The analysis shows an increase of ozone concentration within the middle stratosphere (below 31 km height) as well as in the troposphere over the past 24 years. On the contrary, ongoing ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere has been found. The large scale vertical redistribution of atmospheric ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere seems to be in agreement with model calculations and trend predictions that have their roots in changes of the chemical composition and the ozone photochemistry due to anthropogenically induced trace gas concentrations.

  10. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  11. Interaction of ozone and carbon dioxide with polycrystalline potassium bromide and its atmospheric implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanov, Alexander V.; Isaikina, Oksana Ya.; Maksimov, Ivan B.; Lunin, Valerii V.

    2017-03-01

    It has been discovered for the first time that gaseous ozone in the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor interacts with crystalline potassium bromide giving gaseous Br2 and solid salts KHCO3 and KBrO3. Molecular bromine and hydrocarbonate ion are the products of one and the same reaction described by the stoichiometric equation 2KBr(cr.) + O3(gas) + 2CO2(gas) + H2O(gas) → 2KHCO3(cr.) + Br2(gas) + O2(gas). The dependencies of Br2, KHCO3 and KBrO3 formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and CO2, humidity of initial gas mixture, and temperature have been investigated. A kinetic scheme has been proposed that explains the experimental regularities found in this work on the quantitative level. According to the scheme, the formation of molecular bromine and hydrocarbonate is due to the reaction between hypobromite BrO-, the primary product of bromide oxidation by ozone, with carbon dioxide and water; bromate results from consecutive oxidation of bromide ion by ozone Br- → +O3 , -O2 BrO- → +O3 , -O2 BrO2- → +O3, -O2 BrO3- .

  12. Inferring Ozone Production in an Urban Atmosphere using Measurements of Peroxynitric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, K. M.; McCabe, D. C.; Crounse, J. D.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Cantrell, C. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Mauldin, R. L.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) obtained simultaneously with those of NO and NO2 provide a sensitive measure of the ozone photochemical production rate. We illustrate this technique for constraining the ozone production rate with observations obtained from the NCAR C-130 aircraft platform during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) intensive in Mexico during the spring of 2006. Sensitive and selective measurements of HO2NO2 were made in situ using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Observations were compared to modeled HO2NO2 concentrations obtained from the NASA Langley highly-constrained photochemical time-dependent box model. The median observed-to-calculated ratio of HO2NO2 is 1.18. At NOx levels greater than 15 ppbv, the photochemical box model underpredicts observations with an observed-to-calculated ratio of HO2NO2 of 1.57. As a result, we find that at high NOx, the ozone production rate calculated using measured HO2NO2 is faster than predicted using accepted photochemistry. Inclusion of an additional HOx source from the reaction of excited state NO2 with H2O or reduction in the rate constant of the reaction of OH with NO2 improves the agreement.

  13. Anthropogenic emissions in Nigeria and implications for atmospheric ozone pollution: A view from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K.; Lerot, C.; Zhang, L.; Yu, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.; Sauvage, B.

    2014-12-01

    Nigeria has a high population density and large fossil fuel resources but very poorly managed energy infrastructure. Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) reveal very large sources of anthropogenic nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from the Lagos megacity and oil/gas operations in the Niger Delta. This is supported by aircraft observations over Lagos and satellite observations of methane in the Niger Delta. Satellite observations of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) show large seasonal emissions from open fires in December-February (DJF). Ventilation of central Nigeria is severely restricted at that time of year, leading to very poor ozone air quality as observed from aircraft (MOZAIC) and satellite (TES). Simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM) suggest that maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) ozone exceeds 70 ppbv over the region on a seasonal mean basis, with significant contributions from both open fires (15-20 ppbv) and fuel/industrial emissions (7-9 ppbv). The already severe ozone pollution in Nigeria could worsen in the future as a result of demographic and economic growth, although this would be offset by a decrease in open fires.

  14. Corticosteroid administration modifies ozone-induced increases in sheep airway blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, R.A.; Yousef, M.A.; Schelegle, E.S.; Cross, C.E. (Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Recently, we have shown that exposure of intubated conscious sheep to 3 to 4 ppm ozone (O3) for 3 h increases bronchial blood flow (Qbr). The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential role of corticosteroids in modulating this increase. Six nasally intubated sheep were exposed to filtered room air, 3.5 ppm O3 on two separate occasions, and 3.5 ppm O3 plus methyl-prednisone, for 3 h. Qbr was measured using a chronically implanted 20 MHz pulsed Doppler flow probe. Qbr, mean aortic pressure, cardiac output, pulmonary artery pressure, arterial blood gases, and core temperature were monitored. After 3 h of 3.5 ppm O3, Qbr increased from 3.2 +/- 0.5 (mean +/- SEM) to 8.5 +/- 1.6 KHz, whereas bronchial vascular resistance (BVR) decreased from the baseline value of 43.6 +/- 8.0 to 15.0 +/- 3 mm Hg/KHz. With corticosteroids, baseline Qbr was 3.2 +/- 0.6 and BVR was 44.2 +/- 9.7; after 3 h of 3.5 ppm O3, Qbr was 3.3 +/- 0.5 KHz and BVR was 39.0 +/- 8.0 mm Hg/KHz. The two 3.5-ppm O3 exposures without corticosteroids were impressively reproducible. Except for Qbr and BVR, no other measured cardiovascular parameters were affected by O3. The results indicate that corticosteroids are capable of interfering with mediator, neurohumoral, or inflammatory cell mechanisms responsible for vasodilation of the airway microcirculation after O3 exposure, but do not specifically address the specific processes whereby this attenuation occurs.

  15. Chronic exposure to ozone and nitric acid vapor results in increased levels of rat pulmonary putrescine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu, R.K.; Kikkawa, Yutaka [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Irvine (United States); Mautz, W.J. [Department of Community and Environmental Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing public concern for the human health effects of exposure to environmental pollutants. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is one of the most reactive components of photochemical air pollution. Despite extensive investigations by many laboratories on the functional, biochemical, and cellular effects of O{sub 3} exposure in humans, animals, and in vitro systems, questions remain concerning the potential adverse effects to human health represented by chronic near-ambient exposure to this environmental pollutant. In the present investigation, the influence of inhalation of O{sub 3} and nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) vapor on polyamine levels was examined in rat lungs. Male F344/N rats were exposed nose-only to 0.15 ppm O{sub 3} and 50 {mu}g/m{sup 3} HNO{sub 3} vapor alone and in combination for 4 hours/day, 3 days/week for a total of 40 weeks. At this time the animals were sacrificed and their lungs were examined for polyamine contents. Exposure to O{sub 3} and O{sub 3} plus HNO{sub 3} vapor caused a significant increase in the putrescine content of the lung compared to the air-exposed controls (P < 0.05). The concentrations of pulmonary spermidine and spermine were not significantly increased by exposure to either O{sub 3} or HNO{sub 3} vapor alone or in combination compared to the air-exposed controls. The role of polyamines in repair and anti-inflammatory processes has been discussed. (orig.) (orig.) With 1 fig., 1 tab., 30 refs.

  16. Assessment of atmospheric processes driving ozone variations in the subtropical North Atlantic free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cuevas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the 22-yr ozone (O3 series (1988–2009 at the subtropical high mountain Izaña~station (IZO; 2373 m a.s.l., representative of free troposphere (FT conditions, is presented. Diurnal and seasonal O3 variations as well as the O3 trend (0.19 ± 0.05 % yr−1 or 0.09 ppbv yr−1, are assessed. A climatology of O3 transport pathways using backward trajectories shows that higher O3 values are associated with air masses travelling above 4 km altitude from North America and North Atlantic Ocean, while low O3 is transported from the Saharan continental boundary layer (CBL. O3 data have been compared with PM10, 210Pb, 7Be, potential vorticity (PV and carbon monoxide (CO. A clear negative logarithmic relationship was observed between PM10 and surface O3 for all seasons. A similar relationship was found between O3 and 210Pb. The highest daily O3 values (90th percentile are observed in spring and in the first half of summer time. A positive correlation between O3 and PV, and between O3 and 7Be is found throughout the year, indicating that relatively high surface O3 values at IZO originate from the middle and upper troposphere. We find a good correlation between O3 and CO in winter, supporting the hypothesis of long-range transport of photochemically generated O3 from North America. Aged air masses, in combination with sporadic inputs from the upper troposphere, are observed in spring, summer and autumn. In summer time high O3 values seem to be the result of stratosphere-to-troposphere (STT exchange processes in regions neighbouring the Canary Islands. Since 1995–1996, the North Atlantic Oscillation has changed from a predominantly high positive phase to alternating between negative

  17. Atmospheric profiling via satellite to satellite occultations near water and ozone absorption lines for weather and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Stovern, M.; Sammler, K.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.; McCormick, C.; Griggs, E.

    2016-05-01

    Significantly reducing weather and climate prediction uncertainty requires global observations with substantially higher information content than present observations provide. While GPS occultations have provided a major advance, GPS observations of the atmosphere are limited by wavelengths chosen specifically to minimize interaction with the atmosphere. Significantly more information can be obtained via satellite to satellite occultations made at wavelengths chosen specifically to characterize the atmosphere. Here we describe such a system that will probe cm- and mmwavelength water vapor absorption lines called the Active Temperature, Ozone and Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS). Profiling both the speed and absorption of light enables ATOMMS to profile temperature, pressure and humidity simultaneously, which GPS occultations cannot do, as well as profile clouds and turbulence. We summarize the ATOMMS concept and its theoretical performance. We describe field measurements made with a prototype ATOMMS instrument and several important capabilities demonstrated with those ground based measurements including retrieving temporal variations in path-averaged water vapor to 1%, in clear, cloudy and rainy conditions, up to optical depths of 17, remotely sensing turbulence and determining rain rates. We conclude with a vision of a future ATOMMS low Earth orbiting satellite constellation designed to take advantage of synergies between observational needs for weather and climate, ATOMMS unprecedented orbital remote sensing capabilities and recent cubesat technological innovations that enable a constellation of dozens of very small spacecraft to achieve many critical, but as yet unfulfilled, monitoring and forecasting needs.

  18. Sporadic increases in lunar atmospheric helium detected by LAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason C.; Alan Stern, S.

    2014-07-01

    We report on a multi-year dataset of daily averaged observations of He in the lunar atmosphere by the LAMP UV spectrograph on NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). We examine data obtained from the start of the LRO orbital tour in September 2009 to March 2013. We find that the maximum He number density occurs about two hours after local midnight, which is consistent with earlier measurements by the Apollo ALSEP LACE mass spectrometer. However, our measured maximum He density is 2-3 times lower than that of LACE. We also observed several instances where the surface He number density rapidly increased to higher than normal values and then declined for several days. We term these events “He flares”. We examined several plausible causes of these events, and found two plausible mechanisms that could be responsible for generating them. One is that the He may be generated by strong, coincident bursts of α particles in the solar wind. To do so, we compare our observations with solar wind α particle observations by ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun). Another plausible cause we discuss is that the He in the flares may be released from the Moon itself via moonquakes. Determining which is actually the cause requires further work and new measurements.

  19. Monitoring of atmospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide over the south of Portugal by ground-based and satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoli, Daniele; Silva, Ana Maria; Costa, Maria João; Domingues, Ana Filipa; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2009-07-20

    The SPATRAM (Spectrometer for Atmospheric TRAcers Monitoring) instrument has been developed as a result of the collaboration between CGE-UE, ISAC-CNR and Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA). SPATRAM is a multi-purpose UV-Vis-scanning spectrometer (250 - 950 nm) and it is installed at the Observatory of the CGE, in Evora, since April 2004. A brief description of the instrument is given, highlighting the technological innovations with respect to the previous version of similar equipment. The need for such measurements automatically taken on a routine basis in south-western European regions, specifically in Portugal, has encouraged the development and installation of the equipment and constitutes a major driving force for the present work. The main features and some improvements introduced in the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) algorithms are discussed. The results obtained applying DOAS methodology to the SPATRAM spectrometer measurements of diffused spectral sky radiation are presented in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)). NO(2) confirms the typical seasonal cycle reaching the maximum of (6.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunset values (PM), during the summer season, and the minimum of (1.55 +/- 0.07) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunrise values (AM) in winter. O(3) presents the maximum total column of (433 +/- 5) Dobson Unit (DU) in the spring season and the minimum of (284 +/- 3) DU during the fall period. The huge daily variations of the O(3) total column during the spring season are analyzed and discussed. The ground-based results obtained for NO(2) and O(3) column contents are compared with data from satellite-borne equipment (GOME - Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment; SCIAMACHY - Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY; TOMS - Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer) and it is shown that the two data

  20. The World Already Avoided: Quantifying the Ozone Benefits Achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipperfield, Martyn; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; McKenzie, Richard; Velders, Guus; Pyle, John

    2015-04-01

    Chlorine and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic Ozone Hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2014 the Montreal Protocol has already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using an off-line 3-D atmospheric chemistry model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with benefits for surface UV and climate. A deep Arctic Ozone Hole, with column values Ozone Hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The ozone decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  1. Effects of ozone-vegetation coupling on surface ozone air quality via biogeochemical and meteorological feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Mehliyar; Tai, Amos P. K.; Lombardozzi, Danica; Martin, Maria Val

    2017-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most hazardous air pollutants as it harms both human health and plant productivity. Foliage uptake of ozone via dry deposition damages photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. These foliage changes could lead to a cascade of biogeochemical and biogeophysical effects that not only modulate the carbon cycle, regional hydrometeorology and climate, but also cause feedbacks onto surface ozone concentration itself. In this study, we implement a semi-empirical parameterization of ozone damage on vegetation in the Community Earth System Model to enable online ozone-vegetation coupling, so that for the first time ecosystem structure and ozone concentration can coevolve in fully coupled land-atmosphere simulations. With ozone-vegetation coupling, present-day surface ozone is simulated to be higher by up to 4-6 ppbv over Europe, North America and China. Reduced dry deposition velocity following ozone damage contributes to ˜ 40-100 % of those increases, constituting a significant positive biogeochemical feedback on ozone air quality. Enhanced biogenic isoprene emission is found to contribute to most of the remaining increases, and is driven mainly by higher vegetation temperature that results from lower transpiration rate. This isoprene-driven pathway represents an indirect, positive meteorological feedback. The reduction in both dry deposition and transpiration is mostly associated with reduced stomatal conductance following ozone damage, whereas the modification of photosynthesis and further changes in ecosystem productivity are found to play a smaller role in contributing to the ozone-vegetation feedbacks. Our results highlight the need to consider two-way ozone-vegetation coupling in Earth system models to derive a more complete understanding and yield more reliable future predictions of ozone air quality.

  2. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, S.; Walker, S.-E.; Knudsen, S.; Lazaridis, M.; Beine, H.J.; Semb, A

    1999-03-01

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemistry for several simultaneous point sources as well as the atmospheric mixing. the model has been used to calculate nitrogen deposition and ozone formation due to offshore emissions in the North Sea. Based on meteorological data for 1992 the calculations give a total contribution of 60-80 mg (N)/m{sub 2} at most in South Norway. Emission from British and Norwegian sector is calculated to contribute less than 5% each to the AOT40 index for ozone. (author)

  3. Effect of greenhouse gas emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velders GJM; LLO

    1997-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer is caused mainly by the increase in emissions of chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds like CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride, methyl chloroform and methyl bromide. Emissions of greenhouse gases can affect the depletion of the ozone layer through atmospheric i

  4. Observations of, and sources of the spatial and temporal variability of ozone in the middle atmosphere on climatological time scales (OZMAP) and equatorial dynamics: Seasonal variations of ozone trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entzian, G.; Grasnick, K. H.; Taubenheim, J.

    1989-01-01

    The long term trends (least square linear regression with time) of ozone content at seven European, seven North American, three Japanese and two tropical stations during 21 years (1964 to 1984) are analyzed. In all regions negative trends are observed during the 1970s, but are partly compensated by limited periods of positive trends during the late 1960s and late 1970s. Solely the North American ozone data show negative trends in all 10 year periods. When the long term ozone trends are evaluated for each month of the year separately, a seasonal variation is revealed, which in Europe and North America has largest negative trends in late winter and spring. While in Europe the negative trends in winter/spring are partly compensated by positive trends in summer, in North America the summer values reach only zero, retaining the significant negative trend in annual mean values. In contrast to the antarctic ozone hole, the spring reduction of ozone in Europe and in North America is associated with stratospheric temperatures increasing in the analyzed period and therefore is consistent with the major natural ozone production and loss processes.

  5. Eco-physiological Effects of Atmospheric Ozone and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandai, S.; Sakugawa, H. H.

    2012-12-01

    [Introduction] Tropospheric ozone is one of most concerned air pollutant, by causing damage to trees and crops. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants found in various environmental compartments. Photo-induced toxicity of PAHs can be driven from formation of intracellular single oxygen and other reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) leading to biological damages.(1) In the present study, we measured photosynthesis rate and other variables to investigate the effects of ozone and PAHs on the eco-physiological status of plants such as eggplant, common bean and strawberry. Plants treated with the single or combined air pollutants are expected to exhibit altered physiological, morphological and possibly growth changes. [Materials and Methods] We performed three exposure experiments. Exp.1. Eggplant (Solanum melongena) seedlings, were placed in the open-top chambers (n=6 plants/treatment). Treatment system was ozone (O)(120ppb), phenanthrene (P)(10μM), O+P, fluoranthene (F)(10μM), O+F, mannitol (M)(1mM) and the control (Milli-Q water)(C). P, F and M were sprayed three times weekly on the foliage part of eggplant. Average volume sprayed per seedling was 50mL. The treatment period was 30days and [AOT 40 (Accumulated exposure over a threshold of 40 ppb)]=28.8 ppmh. Exp.2, Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings were used (n=5 plants/treatment). The treatment system was the same as Exp.1. The treatment period was 40days and [AOT 40]=38.4ppmh. Exp.3. Strawberry (Fragaria L.) seedlings were used (n=5 plants/treatment). Treatment system was O (120ppb), F(10μM), O+F, F+M, O+M and C. The treatment period was 90days and [AOT 40]=86.4ppmh. Ecophysiological variables examined were photosynthesis rate measured at saturated irradiance (Amax), stomatal conductance to water vapour (gs), internal CO2 concentration (Ci), photochemical efficiency of PS2 in the dark (Fv/Fm), chlorophyll contents, visual symptom assessment and elemental composition in the

  6. Global 3-D modeling of atmospheric ozone in the free troposphere and the stratosphere with emphasis on midlatitude regions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasseur, G.; Tie, X.; Walters, S.

    1999-03-01

    The authors have used several global chemical/transport models (1) to study the contribution of various physical, chemical, and dynamical processes to the budget of mid-latitude ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere; (2) to analyze the potential mechanisms which are responsible for the observed ozone perturbations at mid-latitudes of the lower stratosphere and in the upper troposphere; (3) to calculate potential changes in atmospheric ozone response to anthropogenic changes (e.g., emission of industrially manufactured CFCs, CO, and NO{sub x}) and to natural perturbations (e.g., volcanic eruptions and biomass burning); and (4) to estimate the impact of these changes on the radiative forcing to the climate system and on the level of UV-B radiation at the surface.

  7. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  8. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere - Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Jia, W.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Rockett, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2) to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on the stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers) model. Since future growth is highly uncertain, we evaluate the impact of two world evolution scenarios, one based on an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) high-emitting scenario (A1FI) and the other on an IPCC low-emitting scenario (B1), as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the evolution growth scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall

  9. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2 to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050 H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on the stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers model. Since future growth is highly uncertain, we evaluate the impact of two world evolution scenarios, one based on an IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change high-emitting scenario (A1FI and the other on an IPCC low-emitting scenario (B1, as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the evolution growth scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two

  10. Colorado Front Range Surface Ozone Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Cothrel, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range is a unique geographical region for air quality studies, including research of surface level ozone. Not only does surface ozone play a critical role in regulating the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, but is a primary contributor to local smog and leads to public health complications and altered ecosystem functioning. The high frequency of sunny days, increasing population and pollution, and Mountain/Valley air dynamics of this region provide atmospheric conditions suitable for production and accumulation of ozone at the surface. This region of Colorado is currently in an ozone non-attainment status due to an assortment of contributing factors. Precursor emissions from pollution, wild-fires, and gas and oil production; along with stratosphere-troposphere exchange, can all result in high ozone episodes over the Colorado Front Range. To understand the dynamics of ozone accumulation in this region, Thermo-Scientific ozone monitors have been continuously sampling ozone from 4 different altitudes since the early 2000s. Analysis of ozone data in relation to Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Methane (CH4), Carbon Monoxide (CO), wind-conditions and back-trajectory air mass origins help to address local ozone precursor emissions and resulting high ozone episodes. Increased ozone episodes are scrutinized with regards to dominant wind direction to determine main precursor emission sources. Analysis of this data reveals a strong influence of precursor emissions from the North-East wind sector, with roughly 50% of ozone exceedances originating from winds prevailing from this direction. Further, correlation with methane is enhanced when prevailing winds are from the North-East; indicative of influence from natural gas processes and feedlot activity. Similar analysis is completed for the North-West wind sector exceedances, with strong correlation to carbon monoxide; likely related to emissions from biomass burning events and forest fires. In depth analysis of

  11. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3, Ca(2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3; namely, H(2O(2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  12. Impact of increasing heat waves on U.S. ozone episodes in the 2050s: Results from a multimodel analysis using extreme value theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L.; Mickley, L. J.; Gilleland, E.

    2016-04-01

    We develop a statistical model using extreme value theory to estimate the 2000-2050 changes in ozone episodes across the United States. We model the relationships between daily maximum temperature (Tmax) and maximum daily 8 h average (MDA8) ozone in May-September over 2003-2012 using a Point Process (PP) model. At ~20% of the sites, a marked decrease in the ozone-temperature slope occurs at high temperatures, defined as ozone suppression. The PP model sometimes fails to capture ozone-Tmax relationships, so we refit the ozone-Tmax slope using logistic regression and a generalized Pareto distribution model. We then apply the resulting hybrid-extreme value theory model to projections of Tmax from an ensemble of downscaled climate models. Assuming constant anthropogenic emissions at the present level, we find an average increase of 2.3 d a-1 in ozone episodes (>75 ppbv) across the United States by the 2050s, with a change of +3-9 d a-1 at many sites.

  13. Lowering of the stratopause height: is there a consequence of changes in middle atmosphere dynamics and mesospheric ozone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, E.; Rusina, V.

    Statistical analysis was applied to series of weekly temperatures measured by meteorological rockets at heights of 25-75 km over Heiss Island (80.6N), Volgograd (48.7N), Thumba (8.5N) and Molodezhnaya (67.7S) stations during 1969-1995. A linear approximation of time series for each month, with the long-period component filtered out, was used to construct vertical profiles of temperature and to estimate variations in the stratopause height during the entire period of rocket measurements. A statistically significant decrease (with a confidence of P=0.95) was established in the stratopause height over Heiss Island (0.4 km), Thumba (0.5 km) and, especially strongly (2.4 km), over Volgograd. Over Molodezhnaya station, the annual mean stratopause height did not vary. Decrease of the stratopause height from the data measured at Volgograd and Thumba was found to occur in all seasons except for the spring months. The maximum decrease in the stratopause height by 5-7 km was observed over Volgograd station in winter. The stratopause height over Heiss Island decreased only in January (2.4 km), February (4.5 km), and insignificantly in March (1.0 km). Alteration of the middle atmosphere dynamic play an important role in changes of the stratopause parameters. However, the assumption that ozone depletion in the mesosphere during the last decades of XX century is the main cause of the observed decrease in the stratopause height is discussed.

  14. 华北平原夜间对流天气对地面 O3混合比抬升效应%Increased Mixing Ratio of Surface Ozone by Nighttime Convection Process over the North China Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾诗卉; 徐晓斌; 林伟立; 王瑛; 何心河; 张华龙

    2015-01-01

    Surface ozone and other reactive gases are observed at Gucheng (39°08′57″N ,115°44′02″E)in Hebei Province of China from June to September in 2013.There are 10 cases with rapid increases of the mixing ratio of surface ozone,and sharp decreases of the mixing ratios of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide when convection processes occurs at night.The mixing ratio of surface ozone mostly increases from less than 30×10 -9 to 60×10 -9 -80×10 -9 within less than 1 hour and stays at a higher level during the night and the next morning than that on undisturbed days.Such phenomenon cannot be explained by photochemical production.The increase rate of surface ozone level is not correlated with wind speed.Therefore,the change in ozone cannot be attributed to horizontal transport of polluted airmass. To understand the phenomenon,meteorological data from Gucheng and from ECMWF reanalysis are analyzed.Surface pseudo-equivalent potential temperature (θse )for each case is calculated from the simul-taneously measured meteorological data.In all nighttime cases of convection process,the surfaceθse values decrease dramatically within a short time,coinciding with the steep increases of the ozone level and the wind speed.This suggests that the mixing ratio of surface ozone is enhanced by descending air from aloft. The convective process occurs in the warm area ahead of the front in most cases except for once near the cold front.These clearly indicate that convective downdrafts transport air with higher ozone and lowerθse from upper atmosphere to the surface layer.With the vertical profiles ofθse values calculated from ECMWF reanalysis data,levels of origins of downdrafts are estimated as from around 500-800 hPa.Vertical pro-files of ozone observed using an unmanned aircraft near the station show that ozone mixing ratio over the boundary layer at dusk is higher than 60×10 -9 ,supporting the view that the increased mixing ratio of sur-face ozone during and after the

  15. Comment on "Cosmic-ray-driven reaction and greenhouse effect of halogenated molecules: Culprits for atmospheric ozone depletion and global climate change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Rolf; Grooß, Jens-Uwe

    2014-04-01

    Lu's "cosmic-ray-driven electron-induced reaction (CRE) theory" is based on the assumption that the CRE reaction of halogenated molecules (e.g., chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), HCl, ClONO2) adsorbed or trapped in polar stratospheric clouds in the winter polar stratosphere is the key step in forming photoactive halogen species that are the cause of the springtime ozone hole. This theory has been extended to a warming theory of halogenated molecules for climate change. In this comment, we discuss the chemical and physical foundations of these theories and the conclusions derived from the theories. First, it is unclear whether the loss rates of halogenated molecules induced by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) observed in the laboratory can also be interpreted as atmospheric loss rates, but even if this were the case, the impact of DEA-induced reactions on polar chlorine activation and ozone loss in the stratosphere is limited. Second, we falsify several conclusions that are reported on the basis of the CRE theory: There is no polar ozone loss in darkness, there is no apparent 11-year periodicity in polar total ozone measurements, the age of air in the polar lower stratosphere is much older than 1-2 years, and the reported detection of a pronounced recovery (by about 20-25%) in Antarctic total ozone measurements by the year 2010 is in error. There are also conclusions about the future development of sea ice and global sea level which are fundamentally flawed because Archimedes' principle is neglected. Many elements of the CRE theory are based solely on correlations between certain datasets which are no substitute for providing physical and chemical mechanisms causing a particular behavior noticeable in observations. In summary, the CRE theory cannot be considered as an independent, alternative mechanism for polar stratospheric ozone loss and the conclusions on recent and future surface temperature and global sea level change do not have a physical basis.

  16. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S. S.; Feng, W.; McKenzie, R. L.; Velders, G. J. M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  17. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere - Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Jia, W.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M. K.; Rockett, A. A.

    2012-08-01

    The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART chemical transport model. Since future growth is highly uncertain we evaluate the impact for two world evolution scenarios, one based on a high emitting scenario (IPCC A1FI) and the other on a low emitting scenario (IPCC B1), as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario the world evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the same world evolution scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall between the above two bounding scenarios. However, the magnitude of these changes is

  18. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rockett

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050 H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheric ozone, with the MOZART chemical transport model. Since future growth is highly uncertain we evaluate the impact for two world evolution scenarios, one based on a high emitting scenario (IPCC A1FI and the other on a low emitting scenario (IPCC B1, as well as two technological options: H2 fuel cells and H2 internal combustion engines. We assume a H2 leakage rate of 2.5% and a complete market penetration of H2 vehicles in 2050. The model simulations show that a H2-based road transportation sector would reduce stratospheric ozone concentrations as a result of perturbed catalytic ozone destruction cycles. The magnitude of the impact depends on which growth scenario the world evolves and which H2 technology option is applied. For the same world evolution scenario, stratospheric ozone decreases more in the H2 fuel cell scenarios than in the H2 internal combustion engine scenarios because of the NOx emissions in the latter case. If the same technological option is applied, the impact is larger in the A1FI emission scenario. The largest impact, a 0.54% decrease in annual average global mean stratospheric column ozone, is found with a H2 fuel cell type road transportation sector in the A1FI scenario; whereas the smallest impact, a 0.04% increase in stratospheric ozone, is found with applications of H2 internal combustion engine vehicles in the B1 scenario. The impacts of the other two scenarios fall between the above two bounding scenarios. However, the magnitude of

  19. Observations of stratospheric ozone above Ny-Ålesund in the Arctic, 2010-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yuhan; SI Fuqi; LIU Wenqing; SUN Liguang; LIU Yi

    2015-01-01

    Stratosphere ozone depletion above the Arctic region has drawn increased attention recently. Here we present stratospheric ozone column densities above Ny-Ålesund in the Arctic during summer 2010 and 2011, based on a self-developed passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. By analyzing the received scattered solar spectrum, daily variations of ozone vertical column densities (VCDs) were obtained and correlated with satellite-borne ozone monitoring results and ozone sonde data. The comparisons showed good correlation, conifrming the feasibility of DOAS in high-latitude Arctic regions. The preliminary analysis also demonstrated that abnormal low-level ozone columns found in spring 2011 had negative impacts on total ozone column densities over the entire year. The loss of stratospheric ozone may be correlated with low stratospheric temperatures, where heterogeneous atmospheric reactions were active.

  20. Influence of atmospheric oxygen and ozone on ripening indices of normal (Rin) and ripening inhibited (rin) tomato cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire, Y.P.; Solberg, M.; Haard, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    Ethylene (10 ppm) dependent mediation of normal and mutant (rin) tomato fruit ripening was promoted by 100% oxygen, 3.7 pphm ozone, or their combination. All ripening indices studied (respiration, chlorophyll degradation, carotenoid accumulation, softening, and aroma development) were promoted by oxygen and/or ozone. Ozone also acted independent of ethylene in promoting chlorophyll degradation and aroma development in normal fruit, but did not appreciably affect these quality attributes in mutant fruit. Lycopene accumulation in normal and mutant fruit and aroma formation in normal fruit were promoted to a greater extent by ozone than were other ripening indices. Mutant (rin) fruit contained 27% of the lycopene that was present in normal (Rin) fruit after ripening in O/sub 2/ containing 10ppm ethylene and 3.7 pphm ozone, whereas they contained only 3% of the lycopene in normal fruit after ripening in air containing 10ppm ethylene.

  1. Ozone risk for crops and pastures in present and future climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, Jürg

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is the most important regional-scale air pollutant causing risks for vegetation and human health in many parts of the world. Ozone impacts on yield and quality of crops and pastures depend on precursor emissions, atmospheric transport and leaf uptake and on the plant’s biochemical defence capacity, all of which are influenced by changing climatic conditions, increasing atmospheric CO2 and altered emission patterns. In this article, recent findings about ozone effects under current conditions and trends in regional ozone levels and in climatic factors affecting the plant’s sensitivity to ozone are reviewed in order to assess implications of these developments for future regional ozone risks. Based on pessimistic IPCC emission scenarios for many cropland regions elevated mean ozone levels in surface air are projected for 2050 and beyond as a result of both increasing emissions and positive effects of climate change on ozone formation and higher cumulative ozone exposure during an extended growing season resulting from increasing length and frequency of ozone episodes. At the same time, crop sensitivity may decline in areas where warming is accompanied by drying, such as southern and central Europe, in contrast to areas at higher latitudes where rapid warming is projected to occur in the absence of declining air and soil moisture. In regions with rapid industrialisation and population growth and with little regulatory action, ozone risks are projected to increase most dramatically, thus causing negative impacts major staple crops such as rice and wheat and, consequently, on food security. Crop improvement may be a way to increase crop cross-tolerance to co-occurring stresses from heat, drought and ozone. However, the review reveals that besides uncertainties in climate projections, parameters in models for ozone risk assessment are also uncertain and model improvements are necessary to better define specific targets for crop improvements, to identify regions

  2. Non-methane hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Mexico City: Results of the 2012 ozone-season campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimes-Palomera, Mónica; Retama, Armando; Elias-Castro, Gabriel; Neria-Hernández, Angélica; Rivera-Hernández, Olivia; Velasco, Erik

    2016-05-01

    With the aim to strengthen the verification capabilities of the local air quality management, the air quality monitoring network of Mexico City has started the monitoring of selected non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Previous information on the NMHC characterization had been obtained through individual studies and comprehensive intensive field campaigns, in both cases restricted to sampling periods of short duration. This new initiative will address the NMHC pollution problem during longer monitoring periods and provide robust information to evaluate the effectiveness of new control measures. The article introduces the design of the monitoring network and presents results from the first campaign carried out during the first six months of 2012 covering the ozone-season (Mar-May). Using as reference data collected in 2003, results show reductions during the morning rush hour (6-9 h) in the mixing ratios of light alkanes associated with the consumption and distribution of liquefied petroleum gas and aromatic compounds related with the evaporation of fossil fuels and solvents, in contrast to olefins from vehicular traffic. The increase in mixing ratios of reactive olefins is of relevance to understand the moderate success in the ozone and fine aerosols abatement in recent years in comparison to other criteria pollutants. In the case of isoprene, the typical afternoon peak triggered by biogenic emissions was clearly observed for the first time within the city. The diurnal profiles of the monitored compounds are analyzed in terms of the energy balance throughout the day as a surrogate of the boundary layer evolution. Particular features of the diurnal profiles and correlation between individual NMHCs and carbon monoxide are used to investigate the influence of specific emission sources. The results discussed here highlight the importance of monitoring NMHCs to better understand the drivers and impacts of air pollution in large cities like Mexico City.

  3. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  4. Ozone Layer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  5. Antarctic ozone loss in 1989–2010: evidence for ozone recovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pazmiño

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed estimation of chemical ozone loss in the Antarctic polar vortex from 1989 to 2010. The analyses include ozone loss estimates for 12 Antarctic ground-based (GB stations. All GB observations show minimum ozone in the late September–early October period. Among the stations, the lowest minimum ozone values are observed at South Pole and the highest at Dumont d'Urville. The ozone loss starts by mid-June at the vortex edge and then progresses towards the vortex core with time. The loss intensifies in August–September, peaks by the end of September–early October, and recovers thereafter. The average ozone loss in the Antarctic is revealed to be about 33–50% in 1989–1992 in agreement with the increase in halogens during this period, and then stayed at around 48% due to saturation of the loss. The ozone loss in the warmer winters (e.g. 2002, and 2004 is lower (37–46% and in the colder winters (e.g. 2003, and 2006 is higher (52–55%. Because of small inter-annual variability, the correlation between ozone loss and the volume of polar stratospheric clouds yields ~0.51. The GB ozone and ozone loss values are in good agreement with those found from the space-based observations of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (TOMS/OMI, the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME, the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY, and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, where the differences are within ±5% and are mostly within the error bars of the measurements. The piece-wise linear trends computed from the September–November vortex average GB and TOMS/OMI ozone show about −4 to −5.6 DU (Dobson Unit yr−1 in 1989–1996 and about +1 DU yr−1 in 1997–2010. The trend during the former period is significant at 95% confidence intervals, but the trend in 1997–2010 is significant only at 85% confidence intervals. Our analyses suggest a period of about 9–10

  6. Molecular storage of ozone in a clathrate hydrate: an attempt at preserving ozone at high concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Nakajima

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental study of the formation of a mixed O(3+ O(2+ CO(2 hydrate and its frozen storage under atmospheric pressure, which aimed to establish a hydrate-based technology for preserving ozone (O(3, a chemically unstable substance, for various industrial, medical and consumer uses. By improving the experimental technique that we recently devised for forming an O(3+ O(2+ CO(2 hydrate, we succeeded in significantly increasing the fraction of ozone contained in the hydrate. For a hydrate formed at a system pressure of 3.0 MPa, the mass fraction of ozone was initially about 0.9%; and even after a 20-day storage at -25°C and atmospheric pressure, it was still about 0.6%. These results support the prospect of establishing an economical, safe, and easy-to-handle ozone-preservation technology of practical use.

  7. Light-trap Catch of the Common Cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha L. Depending on the Atmospheric Ozone Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOWINSZKY, László

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals the efficiency of light trapping of the Common Cockchafer (Melolonthamelolontha L. (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae in connection with the ozone concentration of air. Thedata of the Hungarian forestry light trap network were used for the years 1997 through 2006. Wecalculated relative catch values of from the number of caught insects. We assigned these to the ozonevalues of the respective days. For the classified date pairs regression equations were calculated. Weestablished that the light trapping is most effective if the ozone concentration is high. As opposed tothis, low ozone concentration reduces the success of the catch. Our results may be utilized in plantprotection and forest protection prognoses.

  8. Study of ozone “weekend effect” in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of observed ozone data in 2006 from five monitoring sites (Xujiahui, Chongming, Baoshan, Pudong, Jinshan) in Shanghai reveals that ozone (O3) concentrations in Xujiahui are higher at week-ends than those on weekdays, despite the fact that emissions of ozone precursor substances, such as oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are lower at weekends than those on weekdays. The possible chemical cause of ozone "weekend effect" is that NO2/NO ratio increases at weekends by 25.61% compared with those on weekdays. In addition, because of an average 12.13% reduction in NOx (NO + NO2) in the early morning (05:00-09:00) at weekends compared with that on weekdays, the ozone inhibition period ends 0.5 h earlier at weekends resulting in the longer duration of ozone accumulation and the higher ozone production rate. The rate of ozone production is a function of VOCs and NOx in the atmosphere. VOCs/NOx ratio in Xujiahui is 4.55 at weekends, and 4.37 on weekdays, belonging to the "NOx-limited". The increasing VOCs/NOx ratio at weekends leads to ozone enhancement from 73 ppbv to 80 ppbv, which are consistent with ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui. Furthermore, combining with MICAPS cloud amount data, the fact that ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui weakens gradually along with the increasing of cloud amount indicates that ozone photochemical production leads to ozone "weekend effect" in Xujiahui of Shanghai.

  9. Recent increase of ethane detected in the remote atmosphere of the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Bruno; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Fischer, Emily V.; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Hannigan, James W.; Nussbaumer, Eric; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) has a large impact on tropospheric composition and air quality because of its involvement in the global VOC (volatile organic compound) - HOx - NOx chemistry responsible for generating and destroying tropospheric ozone. By acting as a major sink for tropospheric OH radicals, the abundance of C2H6 influences the atmospheric content of carbon monoxide and impacts the lifetime of methane. Moreover, it is an important source of PAN, a thermally unstable reservoir for NOx radicals. On a global scale, the main sources of C2H6 are leakage from the production, transport of natural gas loss, biofuel consumption and biomass burning, mainly located in the Northern Hemisphere. Due to its relatively long lifetime of approximately two months, C2H6 is a sensitive indicator of tropospheric pollution and transport. Using an optimized retrieval strategy (see Franco et al., 2014), we present here a 20-year long-term time series of C2H6 column abundance retrieved from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) solar spectra recorded from 1994 onwards at the high-altitude station of Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 3580 m a.s.l.), part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, see http://www.ndacc.org). After a regular 1994 - 2008 decrease of the C2H6 amounts, which is very consistent with prior major studies (e.g., Aydin et al., 2011; Simpson et al., 2012) and our understanding of global C2H6 emissions, trend analysis using a bootstrap resampling tool reveals a C2H6 upturn and a statistically-significant sharp burden increase from 2009 onwards (Franco et al., 2014). We hypothesize that this observed recent increase in C2H6 could affect the whole Northern Hemisphere and may be related to the recent massive growth in the exploitation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. This hypothesis is supported by measurements derived from solar occultation observations performed since 2004 by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier

  10. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  11. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1995 "for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone" : Paul J Crutzen, Mario J Molina and F Sherwood Rowland

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    Prof. Paul J Crutzen presents "The stratospheric ozone hole : a man-caused chemical instability".The discovery of the spring time stratospheric ozone hole by scientists of the British Antarctic Survey, led by Joe Farman, was one of the greatest surprises in the history of the atmospheric sciences and global change studies. After intensive research efforts by many international scientific teams it has clearly been demonstrated that the observed rapid ozone depletions are due to catalytic reactions involving CIO radicals, more than 80571130f which are produced by the photochemical breakdown of the industrial chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases. In this lecture I will present the course of events leading to the rapid ozone depletions. International agreements have been reached to forbid the production of the CFC gases. However, despite these measures, it will take almost 50 years before the ozone hole will have disappeared. I will also show that mankind has indeed been very lucky and that things could have been far w...

  12. The Response of Lower Atmospheric Ozone to ENSO in Aura Measurements and a Chemistry-Climate Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Ziemke, J. R.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Waugh, D. W.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of tropical variability on interannual time scales. ENSO appears to extend its influence into the chemical composition of the tropical troposphere. Recent work has revealed an ENSO-induced wave-1 anomaly in observed tropical tropospheric column ozone. This results in a dipole over the western and eastern tropical Pacific, whereby differencing the two regions produces an ozone anomaly with an extremely high correlation to the Nino 3.4 Index. We have successfully reproduced this feature using the Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5) general circulation model coupled to a comprehensive stratospheric and tropospheric chemical mechanism forced with observed sea surface temperatures over the past 25 years. An examination of the modeled ozone field reveals the vertical contributions of tropospheric ozone to the column over the western and eastern Pacific region. We will show composition sensitivity in observations from NASA s Aura satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) and a simulation to provide insight into the vertical structure of these ENSO-induced ozone changes. The ozone changes due to the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the extra-polar upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in MLS measurements will also be discussed.

  13. Ozone modeling within plasmas for ozone sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Arshak, Khalil; Forde, Edward; Guiney, Ivor

    2007-01-01

    peer-reviewed Ozone (03) is potentially hazardous to human health and accurate prediction and measurement of this gas is essential in addressing its associated health risks. This paper presents theory to predict the levels of ozone concentration emittedfrom a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma for ozone sensing applications. This is done by postulating the kinetic model for ozone generation, with a DBD plasma at atmospheric pressure in air, in the form of a set of rate equations....

  14. Role of climate feedback on methane and ozone studied with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-chemistry model.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C E; D. S. Stevenson; Collins, W. J.; R. G. Derwent

    2001-01-01

    We present results from two experiments carried out with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-tropospheric chemistry model run continously over the period 1990 to 2100. In the control experiment, climate is unforced, but emissions of trace gases to the chemical model increase in line with an illustrative scenario for future trace gas emissions with medium high growth. In the climate change experiment trace gas emissions are identical to the control, but climate is also forced using greenhouse gas conce...

  15. Dissolved organic nitrogen dominates in European bogs under increasing atmospheric N deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Limpens, J.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the effects of increased atmospheric N input on N availability in ombrotrophic peatlands, the relative concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) were measured in bog waters along a natural gradient of atmospheric N deposition. Six European bog

  16. Nutritional constraints in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants under increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Kutnar, L.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Hajek, M.; Grosvernier, P.; Hansen, I.; Lacumin, P.; Gerdol, R.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of increasing levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on nutrient limitation of ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants. • Fifteen mires in 11 European countries were selected across a natural gradient of bulk atmospheric N deposition from 0.1 to 2 g/m2 year-1. Nutritional constrai

  17. Innovation of Ozone Initial Concentration and Boundary Condition for Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System Using Ozone Climatology and Its Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S.; Vukovich, F. M.; Ching, J.; Gilliland, A.

    2002-05-01

    Models-3/CMAQ system is designed to provide a comprehensive and flexible modeling tool for states and other government agencies, and for scientific studies. The current setting of initial concentrations and boundary condition (ICBC) of air species for CMAQ system represents clean ambient condition in the eastern-half of the US, and as such. The ozone ICBC differed from observational values, significantly at upper troposphere. Because of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, the upper troposphere may contain high concentrations of ozone (hundreds of ppbv). However the current ICBC artificially set ozone level as 70ppbv in upper troposphere throughout model domain. The large difference of standard ozone ICBC from realistic situation becomes considerable uncertainty source of CMAQ system. The purpose of this research is to improve ICBC setting for Models-3/CMAQ modeling system, and to assess the influence of introducing stratospheric ozone into troposphere on regional and urban air quality and on the tropospheric ozone budget. The approach taken is to perform a series of sensitivity studies on ICBC with CMAQ. The simulation covers the entire US with 108km grid resolution from July 2 to 12 of 1988. The domain divide in 34 layers vertically up to 40mbar. In addition to the base case with standard ICBC, ozone initial concentration and boundary condition are generated based on ozone climatology (Logan, 1999), which was derived from surface, satellite, and ozonesonde data across the globe. This new ICBC enables CMAQ model to study ozone cross-tropopause flux transporting to lower troposphere, and to analyze the impact of intercontinental ozone transport. The tropospheric ozone residue (TOR) data is used to compare with modeling tropospheric ozone budget for evaluation of CMAQ performance. Since ozone climatology was based on observation, the derived ozone ICBC are in better agreement with the ``real'' atmosphere than standard ICBC. CMAQ simulations with ozone climatology

  18. Kinetic measurements on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Schöne

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the aqueous atmospheric environment free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants like hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of this substance group (Tilgner und Herrmann, 2010. In this work kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV/Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and Stopped Flow technique and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acids as well as methacrolein (MACR and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK towards H2O2 and ozone. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd −1 s−1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone. Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH· ~ 109 M−1 s−1. However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated turnovers change the picture to more important H2O2 reactions especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions also mechanistic suggestions are given.

  19. Kinetic measurements of the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-05-01

    Free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds within the aqueous atmospheric environment. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of these substances (Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010). In this work, kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV / Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and stopped flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics to reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acid as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) with H2O2 and ozone at 298 K. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH • ~109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated first-order conversion rate constants change the picture towards H2O2 reactions becoming more important, especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions mechanistic suggestions are also given.

  20. Kinetic measurements on the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide and ozone towards small atmospherically relevant aldehydes, ketones and organic acids in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne, L.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-10-01

    Within the aqueous atmospheric environment free radical reactions are an important degradation process for organic compounds. Nevertheless, non-radical oxidants like hydrogen peroxide and ozone also contribute to the degradation and conversion of this substance group (Tilgner und Herrmann, 2010). In this work kinetic investigations of non-radical reactions were conducted using UV/Vis spectroscopy (dual-beam spectrophotometer and Stopped Flow technique) and a capillary electrophoresis system applying pseudo-first order kinetics of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic, pyruvic and glycolic acids as well as methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) towards H2O2 and ozone. The measurements indicate rather small rate constants at room temperature of k2nd < 3 M-1 s-1 (except for the unsaturated compounds exposed to ozone). Compared to radical reaction rate constants the values are about 10 orders of magnitude smaller (kOH· ~ 109 M-1 s-1). However, when considering the much larger non-radical oxidant concentrations compared to radical concentrations in urban cloud droplets, calculated turnovers change the picture to more important H2O2 reactions especially when compared to the nitrate radical. For some reactions also mechanistic suggestions are given.

  1. Ozone layer - climate change interactions. Influence on UV levels and UV related effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelfkens G; Bregman A; de Gruijl FR; van der Leun JC; Piquet A; van Oijen T; Gieskes WWC; van Loveren H; Velders GJM; Martens P; Slaper H; NOP; LPI; LLO

    2002-01-01

    Ozone in the atmosphere serves as a partially protective filter against the most harmful part of the solar UV-spectrum. Decreases in ozone lead to increases in ambient UV with a wide variety of adverse effects on human health, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and food chains. Human health effect

  2. The impact of synoptic weather on UK surface ozone and implications for premature mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, R. J.; Butt, E. W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Doherty, R. M.; Fenech, S.; Schmidt, A.; Arnold, S. R.; Savage, N. H.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollutants, such as ozone, have adverse impacts on human health and cause, for example, respiratory and cardiovascular problems. In the United Kingdom (UK), peak surface ozone concentrations typically occur in the spring and summer and are controlled by emission of precursor gases, tropospheric chemistry and local meteorology which can be influenced by large-scale synoptic weather regimes. In this study we composite surface and satellite observations of summer-time (April to September) ozone under different UK atmospheric circulation patterns, as defined by the Lamb weather types. Anticyclonic conditions and easterly flows are shown to significantly enhance ozone concentrations over the UK relative to summer-time average values. Anticyclonic stability and light winds aid the trapping of ozone and its precursor gases near the surface. Easterly flows (NE, E, SE) transport ozone and precursor gases from polluted regions in continental Europe (e.g. the Benelux region) to the UK. Cyclonic conditions and westerly flows, associated with unstable weather, transport ozone from the UK mainland, replacing it with clean maritime (North Atlantic) air masses. Increased cloud cover also likely decrease ozone production rates. We show that the UK Met Office regional air quality model successfully reproduces UK summer-time ozone concentrations and ozone enhancements under anticyclonic and south-easterly conditions for the summer of 2006. By using established ozone exposure-health burden metrics, anticyclonic and easterly condition enhanced surface ozone concentrations pose the greatest public health risk.

  3. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  4. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  5. Greenhouse gases and recovery of the Earth's ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyominov, I. G.; Zadorozhny, A. M.

    A numerical two-dimension zonally average interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere is used for investigation the role of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O in the recovery of the Earth's ozone layer after reduction of anthropogenic discharges in the atmosphere of chlorine and bromine compounds. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of types I and II. The scenarios of future changes of the greenhouse gases and chlorine and bromine species are taken from Climate Change 1995. The calculations show that expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by the increasing of the greenhouse gases, particularly CO2, enhances the ozone concentration in the stratosphere due to a weakness of the efficiencies of all catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction caused by temperature dependencies of photochemical reactions. The result of this effect is a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges in the atmosphere of chlorine and bromine species. On the other hand, the cooling of the stratosphere intensifies a formation of the polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere in the Polar Regions. Heterogeneous reactions on the polar stratospheric clouds, which are the key processes in the destruction of the ozone layer at the high latitudes, lead to more intensive ozone depletion here, which causes a delay of the ozone layer recovery. The calculations show that this effect is weaker than the first one so that the global ozone will recover faster under conditions of continuing anthropogenic growth of the greenhouse gases. The model predicts in this case that the annual average global ozone will reach its undisturbed level of 1980 by about 2040. If the growth of the

  6. Quantifying the contributions to stratospheric ozone changes from ozone depleting substances and greenhouse gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Plummer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art chemistry climate model coupled to a three-dimensional ocean model is used to produce three experiments, all seamlessly covering the period 1950–2100, forced by different combinations of long-lived Greenhouse Gases (GHGs and Ozone Depleting Substances (ODSs. The experiments are designed to quantify the separate effects of GHGs and ODSs on the evolution of ozone, as well as the extent to which these effects are independent of each other, by alternately holding one set of these two forcings constant in combination with a third experiment where both ODSs and GHGs vary. We estimate that up to the year 2000 the net decrease in the column amount of ozone above 20 hPa is approximately 75% of the decrease that can be attributed to ODSs due to the offsetting effects of cooling by increased CO2. Over the 21st century, as ODSs decrease, continued cooling from CO2 is projected to account for more than 50% of the projected increase in ozone above 20 hPa. Changes in ozone below 20 hPa show a redistribution of ozone from tropical to extra-tropical latitudes with an increase in the Brewer-Dobson circulation. In addition to a latitudinal redistribution of ozone, we find that the globally averaged column amount of ozone below 20 hPa decreases over the 21st century, which significantly mitigates the effect of upper stratospheric cooling on total column ozone. Analysis by linear regression shows that the recovery of ozone from the effects of ODSs generally follows the decline in reactive chlorine and bromine levels, with the exception of the lower polar stratosphere where recovery of ozone in the second half of the 21st century is slower than would be indicated by the decline in reactive chlorine and bromine concentrations. These results also reveal the degree to which GHG-related effects mute the chemical effects of N2O on ozone in the standard future scenario used for the WMO Ozone Assessment. Increases in the

  7. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 50 - Measurement Principle and Calibration Procedure for the Measurement of Ozone in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... are related by the Beer-Lambert absorption law, ER31AU93.028 where: α = absorption coefficient of O3... necessary to meet the output stability and photometer precision requirements. 3.3 Ozone generator. Device... either in tabular form or plotted on a graphical chart. As the performance and stability record of...

  8. China's air pollution reduction efforts may result in an increase in surface ozone levels in highly polluted areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anger, Annela; Dessens, Olivier; Xi, Fengming; Barker, Terry; Wu, Rui

    2016-03-01

    China, as a fast growing fossil-fuel-based economy, experiences increasing levels of air pollution. To tackle air pollution, China has taken the first steps by setting emission-reduction targets for nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) in the 11th and 12th Five Year Plans. This paper uses two models-the Energy-Environment-Economy Model at the Global level (E3MG) and the global Chemistry Transport Model pTOMCAT-to test the effects of these policies. If the policy targets are met, then the maximum values of 32 % and 45 % reductions below 'business as usual' in the monthly mean NO x and SO2 concentrations, respectively, will be achieved in 2015. However, a decrease in NO x concentrations in some highly polluted areas of East, North-East and South-East China can lead to up to a 10% increase in the monthly mean concentrations in surface ozone in 2015. Our study demonstrates an urgent need for the more detailed analysis of the impacts and designs of air pollution reduction guidelines for China.

  9. Stratospheric Ozone and Temperature Changes in the Past: The Impact of Increased Concentrations of CFCs in Simulations with a Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meul, S.; Oberländer, S.; Abalichin, J.; Kubin, A.; Langematz, U.

    2012-04-01

    Changes in stratospheric ozone between 1960 and the end of the 20th century are investigated analysing simulations with the Chemistry-Climate-Model (CCM) EMAC in FUB configuration (i.e. 39 layers with FUBRad parameterisation). In order to analyse the impact of increasing emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from 1960 to 2000 two sensitivity studies have been performed: a reference simulation with boundary conditions for the year 2000 and one analogue simulation but with CFC emissions reduced to 1960 levels. By comparing to a transient simulation (1960 to 2100) using the CCMVal SCN-B2d scenario it is possible to isolate the ozone changes that are caused by the CFC-increase only and separate the CFC-effect from other processes affecting ozone, e.g. climate change. By applying the method of Garny et al. (2011) the relative ozone changes arising from the CFC-modification can be attributed to changes in transport, chemical production and loss. Furthermore, it is analysed how the processes related to the CFC-increase contribute to the stratospheric cooling of up to 4K that is simulated by the SCN-B2d run between the 1960s and the 2000s in the upper stratosphere. The temperature change due to increased CFCs is caused by a reduced absorption of solar radiation by decreased ozone concentrations combined with the greenhouse gas (GHG) effect of the CFCs. In the upper stratosphere a cooling of up to 2.5K can be explained by the CFC-increase.

  10. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs had not been regulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling studies. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally-averaged column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increases, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  11. What would have happened to the ozone layer if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs had not been regulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Newman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the scientific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depleting substances (ODSs has been firmly established with laboratory measurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements that largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fully-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an annual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation, 17% of the globally-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed by 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower stratosphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near zero by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as currently observed in the Antarctic ozone hole. The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increases, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  12. The sensitivity of polar ozone depletion to proposed geoengineering schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, Simone; Müller, Rolf; Salawitch, Ross

    2008-05-30

    The large burden of sulfate aerosols injected into the stratosphere by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 cooled Earth and enhanced the destruction of polar ozone in the subsequent few years. The continuous injection of sulfur into the stratosphere has been suggested as a "geoengineering" scheme to counteract global warming. We use an empirical relationship between ozone depletion and chlorine activation to estimate how this approach might influence polar ozone. An injection of sulfur large enough to compensate for surface warming caused by the doubling of atmospheric CO2 would strongly increase the extent of Arctic ozone depletion during the present century for cold winters and would cause a considerable delay, between 30 and 70 years, in the expected recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  13. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations of the stratospheric ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews potential causes for reduction in the ozone abundance. The response of stratospheric ozone to solar activity is discussed. Ozone changes are simulated in relation with the potential development of a fleet of high-speed stratospheric aircraft and the release in the atmosphere of chlorofluorocarbons. The calculations are performed by a two-dimensional chemical-radiative-dynamical model. The importance of heterogeneous chemistry in polar stratospheric clouds and in the Junge layer (sulfate aerosol) is emphasized. The recently reported ozone trend over the last decade is shown to have been largely caused by the simultaneous effects of increasing concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry. The possibility for a reduction in stratospheric ozone following a large volcanic eruption such as that of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 is discussed.

  14. The increasing importance of atmospheric demand for ecosystem water and carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kimberly A.; Ficklin, Darren L.; Stoy, Paul C.; Williams, Christopher A.; Bohrer, Gil; Oishi, A. Christopher; Papuga, Shirley A.; Blanken, Peter D.; Noormets, Asko; Sulman, Benjamin N.; Scott, Russell L.; Wang, Lixin; Phillips, Richard P.

    2016-11-01

    Soil moisture supply and atmospheric demand for water independently limit--and profoundly affect--vegetation productivity and water use during periods of hydrologic stress. Disentangling the impact of these two drivers on ecosystem carbon and water cycling is difficult because they are often correlated, and experimental tools for manipulating atmospheric demand in the field are lacking. Consequently, the role of atmospheric demand is often not adequately factored into experiments or represented in models. Here we show that atmospheric demand limits surface conductance and evapotranspiration to a greater extent than soil moisture in many biomes, including mesic forests that are of particular importance to the terrestrial carbon sink. Further, using projections from ten general circulation models, we show that climate change will increase the importance of atmospheric constraints to carbon and water fluxes in all ecosystems. Consequently, atmospheric demand will become increasingly important for vegetation function, accounting for >70% of growing season limitation to surface conductance in mesic temperate forests. Our results suggest that failure to consider the limiting role of atmospheric demand in experimental designs, simulation models and land management strategies will lead to incorrect projections of ecosystem responses to future climate conditions.

  15. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  16. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  17. Spatio-temporal observations of tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at altitude ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time obtaining spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  18. Estonian total ozone climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Eerme

    Full Text Available The climatological characteristics of total ozone over Estonia based on the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS data are discussed. The mean annual cycle during 1979–2000 for the site at 58.3° N and 26.5° E is compiled. The available ground-level data interpolated before TOMS, have been used for trend detection. During the last two decades, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO corrected systematic decrease of total ozone from February–April was 3 ± 2.6% per decade. Before 1980, a spring decrease was not detectable. No decreasing trend was found in either the late autumn ozone minimum or in the summer total ozone. The QBO related signal in the spring total ozone has an amplitude of ± 20 DU and phase lag of 20 months. Between 1987–1992, the lagged covariance between the Singapore wind and the studied total ozone was weak. The spring (April–May and summer (June–August total ozone have the best correlation (coefficient 0.7 in the yearly cycle. The correlation between the May and August total ozone is higher than the one between the other summer months. Seasonal power spectra of the total ozone variance show preferred periods with an over 95% significance level. Since 1986, during the winter/spring, the contribution period of 32 days prevails instead of the earlier dominating 26 days. The spectral densities of the periods from 4 days to 2 weeks exhibit high interannual variability.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry; volcanic effects – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology

  19. Relationship between acceleration of hydroxyl radical initiation and increase of multiple-ultrasonic field amount in the process of ultrasound catalytic ozonation for degradation of nitrobenzene in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Ma, Weichao; Ma, Jun; Wen, Gang; Liu, Qianliang

    2015-01-01

    The synergetic effect between ozone and ultrasound can enhance the degradation of nitrobenzene and removal efficiency of TOC in aqueous solution, and the degradation of nitrobenzene follows the mechanism of hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation. Under the same total ultrasonic power input condition, the degradation rate of nitrobenzene (kNB), the volumetric mass transfer coefficient of ozone (kLa), and the initiation rate of OH (kOH) increases with introduction of additional ultrasonic field (1-4) in the process of ozone/ultrasound. The increasing amount of ultrasonic fields accelerates the decomposition of ozone, leading to the rapid appearance of the maximum equilibrium value and the decrease in the accumulation concentration of ozone in aqueous solution with the increasing reaction time. The increase in mass transfer of gaseous ozone dissolved into aqueous solution and the acceleration in the decomposition of ozone in aqueous solution synchronously contribute to the increase of kLa. The investigation of mechanism confirms that the increasing amount of ultrasonic fields yields the increase in cavitation activity that improves the mass transfer and decomposition of ozone, resulting in acceleration of OH initiation, which determines the degradation of nitrobenzene in aqueous solution.

  20. Climate warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2 - Simulations with a multilayer coupled atmosphere-ocean seasonal energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Chou, Ming-Dah; Arking, Albert

    1987-01-01

    The transient response of the climate to increasing CO2 is studied using a modified version of the multilayer energy balance model of Peng et al. (1982). The main characteristics of the model are described. Latitudinal and seasonal distributions of planetary albedo, latitude-time distributions of zonal mean temperatures, and latitudinal distributions of evaporation, water vapor transport, and snow cover generated from the model and derived from actual observations are analyzed and compared. It is observed that in response to an atmospheric doubling of CO2, the model reaches within 1/e of the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature in 9-35 years for the probable range of vertical heat diffusivity in the ocean. For CO2 increases projected by the National Research Council (1983), the model's transient response in annually and globally averaged surface temperatures is 60-75 percent of the corresponding equilibrium response, and the disequilibrium increases with increasing heat diffusivity of the ocean.

  1. Past changes, current state and future evolution of the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin-Beekmann, S.

    2013-05-01

    The ozone layer has been under scrutiny since the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in the mid-eighties (Farman et al., 1985). The rapid disclosure of the main processes involved in polar ozone destruction lead to the signature of the Montreal Protocol that regulates the emission of ozone depleting substances (ODS). The objective of this presentation is to review the current understanding of past changes and current state of the ozone layer, the evolution of ODS concentration in the atmosphere and assess the projections of ozone recovery. Satellite measurements revealed a peak of ODS concentration in the mid and end of the nineties and ODS concentrations have started to decrease, albeit at a slower pace than during the increase period due to the atmospheric lifetimes of these compounds. The total ozone content has stabilized at global scale since the beginning of the 21st century. In 2009, integrated ozone content was about 3.5 % smaller in the 60°S-60°N region compared to values prior to 1980 (WMO, 2011). Climate change will influence the recovery of stratospheric. Both ozone depletion and increase of carbon dioxide induce a cooling of the stratosphere. In the winter polar stratosphere, this cooling enhances the formation of polar stratospheric clouds involved in the formation of the ozone hole. In the high stratosphere, it slows the chemical reactions destroying ozone and accelerates its reformation (WMO, 2011). Besides, most chemistry-climate models predict an acceleration of the stratospheric meridional circulation, which would speed up the ozone recovery (Eyring et al., 2010). This recovery is forecasted in periods ranging between 2015 and 2030 and between 2030 and 2040 in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. The Antarctic ozone hole will not disappear before 2050. Because of the acceleration of the meridional circulation, models simulate a super-recovery of ozone in the high latitude regions and an under recovery in the tropics. At

  2. Global Health Benefits from Reductions in Background Tropospheric Ozone due to Methane Emission Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2005-05-01

    Increases in background ozone throughout the troposphere are partially attributed to rising anthropogenic methane concentrations, which are projected to continue to increase in the future. Because methane is long-lived and affects background ozone, controls on methane emissions would reduce surface ozone concentrations fairly uniformly around the globe. Epidemiological research indicates that exposure to ozone increases incidence of respiratory ailments and premature mortality. In addition, exposure to ozone reduces agricultural yields and damages natural ecosystems. We use the MOZART-2 global atmospheric chemistry and transport model to estimate the effects on global surface ozone of perturbations in methane emissions. We consider a baseline scenario for 2000 and the 2030 A2 scenario (emissions from the IPCC AR-4 2030 atmospheric chemistry experiments), and examine the impact on ozone of decreasing anthropogenic methane emissions relative to this baseline by 20%. Using the simulated spatially-distributed decreases in surface ozone concentrations resulting from these reductions in methane emissions, we estimate the global benefits to human health in the methane emission reduction scenario. We focus on human mortality, and consider the sensitivity of our estimates to different assumptions of health effect thresholds at low ozone concentrations.

  3. Study of total column atmospheric aerosol optical depth, ozone and precipitable water content over Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Dani; R S Maheskumar; P C S Devara

    2003-06-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in aerosols and precursor gases over oceanic regions have special importance in the estimation of radiative forcing parameters and thereby in the refinement of general circulation models. Extensive observations of the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD), total column ozone (TCO) and precipitable water content (PWC) have been carried out using the on-line, multi-band solar radiometers onboard ORV Sagar Kanya (Cruise#SK 147B) over Bay of Bengal during 11th-28th August 1999. Aerosol optical and physical properties (optical depth and angstrom parameter) have been estimated at six wavelengths covering from UV to NIR (380-1020 nm) while TCO and PWC have been determined using the UV band around 300nm and NIR band around 940 nm, respectively. Added, concurrent meteorological and satellite observations during this field phase of BOBMEX-99 have been utilized to investigate spectral-temporal variations of AOD, TCO and PWC in marine environment. The results indicate lower AODs (around 0.4 at characteristic wavelength of 500 nm) and size distributions with abundance of coarse-mode particles as compared to those aerosols of typical land origin. An interesting result that is found in the present study is the significant reduction in AOD at all wavelengths from initial to later part of observation period due to cloud-scavenging and rain-washout effects as well as signature of coastal aerosol loading. The clear-sky daytime diurnal variation of TCO shows gradual increase during post-sunrise hours, broad maximum during afternoon hours and gradual decrease during pre-sunset hours, which is considered to be due to photochemical reactions. The diurnal variation curve of PWC showed maximum (∼4cm) during morning hours and gradual decrease (∼3.5cm) towards evening hours, which are found to be greater as compared to typical values over land. Another interesting feature observed is that although the PWC values are very high, there was no proportionate

  4. What Would Have Happened to the Ozone Layer if Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been Regulated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the sci entific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depl eting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory m easurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements t hat largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fu lly-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an ann ual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation 1.7 % of the globa lly-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed b y 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observ ed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower strat osphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near ze ro by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as curren tly observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increa ses, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  5. A statistical inference approach for the retrieval of the atmospheric ozone profile from simulated satellite measurements of solar backscattered ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Gordon, C. L.; Inguva, R.; Serafino, G. N.; Barnes, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) will address important interdisciplinary and environmental issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, deforestation, acid rain, and the like with its long term satellite observations of the Earth and with its comprehensive Data and Information System. Extensive sets of satellite observations supporting MTPE will be provided by the Earth Observing System (EOS), while more specific process related observations will be provided by smaller Earth Probes. MTPE will use data from ground and airborne scientific investigations to supplement and validate the global observations obtained from satellite imagery, while the EOS satellites will support interdisciplinary research and model development. This is important for understanding the processes that control the global environment and for improving the prediction of events. In this paper we illustrate the potential for powerful artificial intelligence (AI) techniques when used in the analysis of the formidable problems that exist in the NASA Earth Science programs and of those to be encountered in the future MTPE and EOS programs. These techniques, based on the logical and probabilistic reasoning aspects of plausible inference, strongly emphasize the synergetic relation between data and information. As such, they are ideally suited for the analysis of the massive data streams to be provided by both MTPE and EOS. To demonstrate this, we address both the satellite imagery and model enhancement issues for the problem of ozone profile retrieval through a method based on plausible scientific inferencing. Since in the retrieval problem, the atmospheric ozone profile that is consistent with a given set of measured radiances may not be unique, an optimum statistical method is used to estimate a 'best' profile solution from the radiances and from additional a priori information.

  6. Analysis of the Impact of Wildfire on Surface Ozone Record in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Oltmans, S. J.; Pierce, R. B.; Sullivan, J. T.; Reddy, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone plays an important role on the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, and at ground-level has negative impacts on human health and ecosystem processes. In order to understand the dynamics and variability of surface ozone, it is imperative to analyze individual sources, interactions between sources, transport, and chemical processes of ozone production and accumulation. Biomass burning and wildfires have been known to emit a suite of particulate matter and gaseous compounds into the atmosphere. These compounds, such as, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides are precursor species which aid in the photochemical production and destruction of ozone. The Colorado Front Range (CFR) is a region of complex interactions between pollutant sources and meteorological conditions which result in the accumulation of ozone. High ozone events in the CFR associated with fires are analyzed for 2003-2014 to develop understanding of the large scale influence and variability of ozone and wildfire relationships. This study provides analysis of the frequency of enhanced ozone episodes that can be confirmed to be transported within and affected by the fires and smoke plumes. Long-term records of surface ozone data from the CFR provide information on the impact of wildfire pollutants on seasonal and diurnal ozone behavior. Years with increased local fire activity, as well as years with increased long-range transport of smoke plumes, are evaluated for the effect on the long-term record and high ozone frequency of each location. Meteorological data, MODIS Fire detection images, NOAA HYSPLIT Back Trajectory analysis, NOAA Smoke verification model, Fire Tracer Data (K+), RAQMS Model, Carbon Monoxide data, and Aerosol optical depth retrievals are used with NOAA Global Monitoring Division surface ozone data from three sites in Colorado. This allows for investigation of the interactions between pollutants and meteorology which result in high surface ozone levels.

  7. Land-atmosphere feedbacks amplify aridity increase over land under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Findell, Kirsten; Lintner, Benjamin; Giannini, Alessandra; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; van den Hurk, Bart; Lorenz, Ruth; Pitman, Andy; Hagemann, Stefan; Meier, Arndt; Cheruy, Frédérique; Ducharne, Agnès; Malyshev, Sergey; Milly, P. C. D.

    2016-09-01

    The response of the terrestrial water cycle to global warming is central to issues including water resources, agriculture and ecosystem health. Recent studies indicate that aridity, defined in terms of atmospheric supply (precipitation, P) and demand (potential evapotranspiration, Ep) of water at the land surface, will increase globally in a warmer world. Recently proposed mechanisms for this response emphasize the driving role of oceanic warming and associated atmospheric processes. Here we show that the aridity response is substantially amplified by land-atmosphere feedbacks associated with the land surface's response to climate and CO2 change. Using simulations from the Global Land Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE)-CMIP5 experiment, we show that global aridity is enhanced by the feedbacks of projected soil moisture decrease on land surface temperature, relative humidity and precipitation. The physiological impact of increasing atmospheric CO2 on vegetation exerts a qualitatively similar control on aridity. We reconcile these findings with previously proposed mechanisms by showing that the moist enthalpy change over land is unaffected by the land hydrological response. Thus, although oceanic warming constrains the combined moisture and temperature changes over land, land hydrology modulates the partitioning of this enthalpy increase towards increased aridity.

  8. In vitro ozone exposure increases release of arachidonic acid products from a human bronchial epithelial cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, K.P.; Madden, M.C.; Noah, T.L.; Devlin, R.B. (TRC Environmental Corporation, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Eicosanoids released after ozone exposure of a human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-S6, were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of supernatants from exposed cells prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. BEAS cells released thromboxane B2 (TxB2), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene C4 (LTC4), LTD4, LTE4, and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) after exposure to ozone at concentrations of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm. The eicosanoids were identified by coelution with authentic standards. The largest product from ozone-exposed BEAS cells was the most polar peak, designated Peak 1. Release of cyclooxygenase products such as TxB2, PGE2, and HHT was inhibited by acetylsalicylic acid. Peaks that migrated with authentic standards for LTB4, LTC4, and LTD4 were inhibited by the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The leukotrienes LTB4 and LTC4/D4 could also be detected by immunoassay of concentrated peak fractions. Thus BEAS cells released eicosanoids from cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism following exposure to ozone. Airway epithelial cells may be an important source of eicosanoids following ozone stimulation in humans.

  9. Changes in tropospheric composition and air quality due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Keith R; Tang, Xiaoyan; Wilson, Stephen R; Zanis, Prodromos; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2003-01-01

    Increased UV-B through stratospheric ozone depletion leads to an increased chemical activity in the lower atmosphere (the troposphere). The effect of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone is small (though significant) compared to the ozone generated anthropogenically in areas already experiencing air pollution. Modeling and experimental studies suggest that the impacts of stratospheric ozone depletion on tropospheric ozone are different at different altitudes and for different chemical regimes. As a result the increase in ozone due to stratospheric ozone depletion may be greater in polluted regions. Attributable effects on concentrations are expected only in regions where local emissions make minor contributions. The vertical distribution of NOx (NO + NO2), the emission of volatile organic compounds and the abundance of water vapor, are important influencing factors. The long-term nature of stratospheric ozone depletion means that even a small increase in tropospheric ozone concentration can have a significant impact on human health and the environment. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA) are produced by the atmospheric degradation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). TFA has been measured in rain, rivers, lakes, and oceans, the ultimate sink for these and related compounds. Significant anthropogenic sources of TFA other than degradation HCFCs and HFCs have been identified. Toxicity tests under field conditions indicate that the concentrations of TFA and CDFA currently produced by the atmospheric degradation of HFCs and HCFCs do not present a risk to human health and the environment. The impact of the interaction between ozone depletion and future climate change is complex and a significant area of current research. For air quality and tropospheric composition, a range of physical parameters such as temperature, cloudiness and atmospheric transport will modify the impact of UV-B. Changes in the

  10. Effect of some climatic parameters on tropospheric and total ozone column over Alipore (22.52°N, 88.33°E), India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Jana; S Bhattacharyya; A Banerjee

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents the nature of variations of tropospheric and total ozone column retrieved from the Convective Cloud Differential (CCD) technique, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data, National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA), USA, respectively; surface temperature, relative humidity, total rainfall, ozone precursors (non-methane hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide) that are collected from India Meteorological Department (IMD), Alipore, Kolkata; solar insolation obtained from Solar Geophysical Data Book and El-ñ index collected from National Climatic Data Center, US Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA. The effect of these climatic parameters and ozone precursors on ozone variations is critically analyzed and explained on the basis of linear regression and correlation. It has been observed that the maximum, minimum and mean temperature, relative humidity, solar insolation, tropospheric, and total ozone column (TOC) showed slight increasing tendencies from October 2004 to December 2011, while total rainfall and El-ñ index showed little decreasing tendencies for the same period. Amongst selected climatic parameters and ozone precursors, the solar insolation and the average temperature had a significant influence on both, the tropospheric ozone and total ozone column formation. The solar insolation had contributed more in tropospheric ozone than in total ozone column; while El-ñ index had played a more significant role in total ozone column build up than in tropospheric ozone. Negative correlation was observed between almost all ozone precursors with the tropospheric and total ozone. The tropospheric ozone and total ozone column were also significantly correlated. The level of significance and contribution of different climatic parameters are determined from correlation technique and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) method. The

  11. Increasing Access to Atmospheric Science Research at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Bethea, K. L.; LaPan, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Directorate (SD) at NASA's Langley Research Center conducts cutting edge research in fundamental atmospheric science topics including radiation and climate, air quality, active remote sensing, and upper atmospheric composition. These topics matter to the public, as they improve our understanding of our home planet. Thus, we have had ongoing efforts to improve public access to the results of our research. These efforts have accelerated with the release of the February OSTP memo. Our efforts can be grouped in two main categories: 1. Visual presentation techniques to improve science understanding: For fundamental concepts such as the Earth's energy budget, we have worked to display information in a more "digestible" way for lay audiences with more pictures and fewer words. These audiences are iPad-lovers and TV-watchers with shorter attention spans than audiences of the past. They are also educators and students who need a basic understanding of a concept delivered briefly to fit into busy classroom schedules. We seek to reach them with a quick, visual message packed with important information. This presentation will share several examples of visual techniques, such as infographics (e.g., a history of lidar at Langley and a timeline of atmospheric research, ozone garden diagrams (http://science-edu.larc.nasa.gov/ozonegarden/ozone-cycle.php); history of lidar at LaRC; DISCOVER-AQ maps. It will also share examples of animations and interactive graphics (DISCOVER-AQ); and customized presentations (e.g., to explain the energy budget or to give a general overview of research). One of the challenges we face is a required culture shift between the way scientists traditionally share knowledge with each other and the way these public audiences ingest knowledge. A cross-disciplinary communications team in SD is crucial to bridge that gap. 2. Lay research summaries to make research more accessible: Peer-reviewed publications are a primary product of the SD, with more

  12. Possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone by a radiosonde equipped with two temperature sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, T.; Sumi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitiveness of white coated thermistor sensors and non-sensitiveness of the gold coated over white thermistor sensors (which have been manufactured by a vacuum evaporation process) to long wave radiation were ascertained by some simple experiments in-room and also by analyses of some results of experimental soundings. From results of analyses on the temperature discrepancies caused by long wave radiation, the possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone partial pressure by a radiosonde equipped with two kinds of sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation was suggested, and the test results of the newly developed software for the deduction of ozone partial pressure in upper layers was also shown. However, it was found that the following is the necessary condition to realize the purpose. The sounding should be made by a radiosonde equipped with three sensors, instead of two, one being non-sensitive to the long wave radiation perfectly, and the other two also non-sensitive partially to the downward one, with two different angles of exposure upward. It is essential for the realization of the purpose to get two different values of temperature discrepancies simultaneously observed by the three sensors mentioned above and to avoid the troublesome effects of the upward long wave radiation.

  13. Increased greenhouse-gas intensity of rice production under future atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; van Kessel, Chris; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2013-03-01

    Increased atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are expected to affect rice yields and greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest human-induced sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. The need for meeting a growing global food demand argues for assessing GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, such that efforts to reduce GHG emissions take into consideration the consequences for food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Increased atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely owing to a decrease in yield. This analysis suggests that rising CO2 and warming will approximately double the GHG intensity of rice production by the end of the twenty-first century, stressing the need for management practices that optimize rice production while reducing its GHG intensity as the climate continues to change.

  14. Oxygen isotope dynamics of atmospheric nitrate over the Antarctic plateau: First combined measurements of ozone and nitrate 17O-excess (Δ17O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicars, William; Savarino, Joël; Erbland, Joseph; Preunkert, Susanne; Jourdain, Bruno; Frey, Markus; Gil, Jaime; Legrand, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Variations in the isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate (NO3-) provide novel indicators for important processes in boundary layer chemistry, often acting as source markers for reactive nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) and providing both qualitative and quantitative constraints on the pathways that determine its fate. Stable isotope ratios of nitrate (δ15N, δ17O, δ18O) offer direct insight into the nature and magnitude of the fluxes associated with different processes, thus providing unique information regarding phenomena that are often difficult to quantify from concentration measurements alone. The unique and distinctive 17O-excess (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 × δ18O ) of ozone (O3), which is transferred to NOx via oxidation reactions in the atmosphere, has been found to be a particularly useful isotopic fingerprint in studies of NOx transformations. Constraining the propagation of 17O-excess within the NOx cycle is critical in polar areas where there exists the possibility of extending atmospheric interpretations to the glacial/interglacial time scale using deep ice core records of nitrate. Here we present measurements of the comprehensive isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate collected at Dome C, Antarctica during December 2011 to January 2012. Sampling was conducted within the framework of the OPALE (Oxidant Production over Antarctic Land and its Export) project, thus providing an opportunity to combine our isotopic observations with a wealth of meteorological and chemical data, including in-situ concentration measurements of the gas-phase precursors involved in nitrate production (NOx, O3, OH, HO2, etc.). Furthermore, nitrate isotope analysis has been combined in this study for the first time with parallel observations of the transferrable Δ17O of surface ozone, which was measured concurrently at Dome C using our recently developed analytical approach. This unique dataset has allowed for a direct comparison of observed Δ17O(NO3-) values to those that are

  15. Effect of ozone on respiration of adult Sitophilus oryzae (L.), Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Baoqian; Ren, Yonglin; Du, Yu-zhou; Fu, Yueguan; Gu, Jie

    2009-10-01

    The effect of ozone on the respiration of three species of adult stored-product Coleoptera was tested in an air-tight flask. Sitophilus oryzae (L.), Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) and Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) adults were exposed to atmosphere containing 0.1, 0.2 or 0.4microg/ml initial ozone at 23-25 degrees C and 50% r.h. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) production reflected the respiration rates of insects and was determined with a gas chromatograph (GC). The experiments showed that the effects of ozone on respiration had two distinct phases. Phase 1 involved a lower respiration rate of the adult stored-product Coleoptera under ozone atmosphere and reflected the need for insects to reduce ozone toxicity. After 1h, CO(2) production of S. oryzae was 3.19, 2.63, 2.27 and 1.99microl/mg for the ozone concentration of 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4microg/ml, respectively. The results also showed that there were decreases in the rate of respiration in R. dominica and T. castaneum with an increase in ozone concentration. During phase 2, respiration of S. oryzae, R. dominica, and T. castaneum adults treated with ozone increased as the ozone degraded to oxygen. After 7h, the effect of ozone on CO(2) production, relative to the control, changed from a decrease to an increase. The findings in relation to control strategies were discussed.

  16. Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cazorla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new ambient air monitor, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS, measures directly the rate of ozone production in the atmosphere. The sensor consists of two 11.3 L environmental chambers made of UV-transmitting Teflon film, a unit to convert NO2 to O3, and a modified ozone monitor. In the sample chamber, flowing ambient air is exposed to the sunlight so that ozone is produced just as it is in the atmosphere. In the second chamber, called the reference chamber, a UV-blocking film over the Teflon film prevents ozone formation but allows other processes to occur as they do in the sample chamber. The air flows that exit the two chambers are sampled by an ozone monitor operating in differential mode so that the difference between the two ozone signals, divided by the exposure time in the chambers, gives the ozone production rate. High-efficiency conversion of NO2 to O3 prior to detection in the ozone monitor accounts for differences in the NOx photostationary state that can occur in the two chambers. The MOPS measures the ozone production rate, but with the addition of NO to the sampled air flow, the MOPS can be used to study the sensitivity of ozone production to NO. Preliminary studies with the MOPS on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University show the potential of this new technique.

  17. Impact of biogenic very short-lived bromine on the Antarctic ozone hole during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rafael P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2017-02-01

    Active bromine released from the photochemical decomposition of biogenic very short-lived bromocarbons (VSLBr) enhances stratospheric ozone depletion. Based on a dual set of 1960-2100 coupled chemistry-climate simulations (i.e. with and without VSLBr), we show that the maximum Antarctic ozone hole depletion increases by up to 14 % when natural VSLBr are considered, which is in better agreement with ozone observations. The impact of the additional 5 pptv VSLBr on Antarctic ozone is most evident in the periphery of the ozone hole, producing an expansion of the ozone hole area of ˜ 5 million km2, which is equivalent in magnitude to the recently estimated Antarctic ozone healing due to the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. We find that the inclusion of VSLBr in CAM-Chem (Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry, version 4.0) does not introduce a significant delay of the modelled ozone return date to 1980 October levels, but instead affects the depth and duration of the simulated ozone hole. Our analysis further shows that total bromine-catalysed ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere surpasses that of chlorine by the year 2070 and indicates that natural VSLBr chemistry would dominate Antarctic ozone seasonality before the end of the 21st century. This work suggests a large influence of biogenic bromine on the future Antarctic ozone layer.

  18. Ozone pollution in China: A review of concentrations, meteorological influences, chemical precursors, and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xue, Likun; Brimblecombe, Peter; Lam, Yun Fat; Li, Li; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    High concentrations of ozone in urban and industrial regions worldwide have long been a major air quality issue. With the rapid increase in fossil fuel consumption in China over the past three decades, the emission of chemical precursors to ozone-nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds-has increased sharply, surpassing that of North America and Europe and raising concerns about worsening ozone pollution in China. Historically, research and control have prioritized acid rain, particulate matter, and more recently fine particulate matter (PM2.5). In contrast, less is known about ozone pollution, partly due to a lack of monitoring of atmospheric ozone and its precursors until recently. This review summarizes the main findings from published papers on the characteristics and sources and processes of ozone and ozone precursors in the boundary layer of urban and rural areas of China, including concentration levels, seasonal variation, meteorology conducive to photochemistry and pollution transport, key production and loss processes, ozone dependence on nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, and the effects of ozone on crops and human health. Ozone concentrations exceeding the ambient air quality standard by 100-200% have been observed in China's major urban centers such as Jing-Jin-Ji, the Yangtze River delta, and the Pearl River delta, and limited studies suggest harmful effect of ozone on human health and agricultural corps; key chemical precursors and meteorological conditions conductive to ozone pollution have been investigated, and inter-city/region transport of ozone is significant. Several recommendations are given for future research and policy development on ground-level ozone.

  19. Man's effect on stratospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellsaesser, H.W.

    1979-08-01

    Since McDonald, at the beginning of this decade, first proposed that water vapor from SST exhaust would lead to increases in skin cancer, about a dozen man-induced mechanisms have been suggested as threatening to modify our stratospheric ozone uv-shield. Possible thinning of the ozone layer has been attributed to one or more of the catalytic ozone destroyers, water vapor (HO/sub x/), oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/), chlorine (ClX); or bromine (BrX). The original catalyst, HO/sub x/, rather quickly lost its role to NO/sub x/. In an almost unique evolution, computed sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to NO/sub x/ progressively declined until a reversal of effect occurred. Models now compute a thickening of the ozone layer for any but high level or very massive injections of NO/sub x/. Meanwhile, computed sensitivity to ClX has fluctuated widely and in 1978 models increased to the point where comparisons with observations were becoming an embarrassment. The potential role of BrX has also increased but awaits a credible source of stratospheric bromine to bring it center stage. More recently the atmospheric build-up of carbon dioxide, by cooling the stratosphere and increasing the chemical equilibrium level of ozone, has also been recognized as a potential modifier of the ozone layer.

  20. Increasing Mississippi river discharge throughout the twenty-first century influenced by changes in climate, land use and atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, B.; Tian, H.; Ren, W.; Yang, J.; Yang, Q.; He, R.; Cai, W. J.; Lohrenz, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in temperature and precipitation (hereafter climate change) would influence river discharge, but the relative importance of climate change, land use, and elevated atmospheric CO2 have not yet been fully investigated. Here we examined how river discharge in the Mississippi River basin in the 21st century might be influenced by these factors using the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model driven by atmospheric CO2, downscaled GCMs climate and land use scenarios. Our results suggest that river discharge would be substantially enhanced (10.7-59.8%) by the 2090s compared to the recent decade (2000s), though large discrepancies exist among different climate, atmospheric CO2, and land use change scenarios. Our factorial analyses further indicate that the combined effects of land use change and human-induced atmospheric CO2 elevation on river discharge would outweigh climate change effect under the high emission scenario (A2) of Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change. Our study offers the first attempt to project potential changes in river discharge in response to multiple future environmental changes. It demonstrates the importance of land use change and atmospheric CO2 concentrations in projecting future changes in hydrologic processes. The projected increase river discharge implies that riverine fluxes of carbon, nutrients and pesticide from the MRB to the coastal regions would increase in the future, and thus may influence the states of ocean acidification and hypoxia and deteriorate ocean water quality. Further efforts will also be needed to account for additional environmental factors (such as nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, dam construction, etc.) in projecting changes in the hydrological cycle.

  1. Evaluation of Atmospheric Electric Field as Increasing Seismic Activity Indicator on the example of Caucasus Region

    CERN Document Server

    Kachakhidze, M K; Kachakhidze, N K

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with reliability of a gradient of atmospheric electric field potential as an indicator of seismic activity increase. With this in view, records of atmospheric electric field potential gradients of Caucasus region for 1953-1992 with respect to periods before average and large earthquakes, which took place in the same time interval, were considered. It is worth to pay attention to the fact that the avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation based on theoretical model of self-generated seismo-electromagnetic oscillations of LAI system explains convincingly spectral succession of electromagnetic emission frequency of the periods preceding earthquakes.

  2. Model of risk of cortical cataract in the US population with exposure to increased ultraviolet radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Sheila K; Longstreth, Janice D; Munoz, Beatriz E; Pitcher, Hugh M; Duncan, Donald D

    2005-12-01

    The authors modeled the possible consequences for US cataract incidence of increases in ultraviolet B radiation due to ozone depletion. Data on the dose-response relation between ocular exposure to ultraviolet B radiation and cortical cataract were derived from a population-based study (the Salisbury Eye Evaluation Project, Salisbury, Maryland) in which extensive data on cataract and ultraviolet radiation were collected in persons aged 65-84 years. Exposure estimates for the US population were derived using estimated ultraviolet radiation fluxes as a function of wavelength. US Census data were used to obtain the age, ethnicity, and sex distribution of the population. Predicted probabilities of cataract were derived from the age-, sex-, and ethnicity-specific ocular ultraviolet exposure data and were modeled under conditions of 5-20% ozone depletion. The analysis indicated that by 2050, the prevalence of cortical cataract will increase above expected levels by 1.3-6.9%. The authors estimate that with 5-20% ozone depletion, there will be 167,000-830,000 additional cases of cortical cataract by 2050. Because of the high prevalence of cataract in older persons, at a 2003 cost of 3,370 dollars per cataract operation, this increase could represent an excess cost of 563 million dollars to 2.8 billion dollars.

  3. Atmospheric Ozone And Its Biosphere - Atmosphere Exchange In A Mangrove Forest Ecosystem A Case Study From Sundarbans NE Coast Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Kumar Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporal variation of atmospheric O3 and its biosphere atmosphere exchange were monitored in the Sundarbans mangrove forest from January 2011 to December 2011 on bimonthly basis. O3 mixing ratios at 10 m and 20 m heights over the forest atmosphere ranged between 14.66 1.88 to 37.90 0.91 and 19.32 6.27 to 39.80 10.13 ppbv respectively having maximal premonsoon and minimal monsoon periods. Average daytime O3 mixing ratio was 1.69 times higher than nighttime indicates significant photo chemical production of O3 in forest atmosphere. Annual averaged O3 mixing ratio in 10 m height was 13.2 lower than 20 m height induces exchange of O3 across mangrove biosphere atmosphere interface depending upon micrometeorological conditions of the forest ecosystem. Annual average biosphere atmosphere O3 exchange flux in this mangrove forest environment was 0.441 g m-2 s-1. Extrapolating the value for entire forest surface area the mangrove ecosystem acts as a sink of 58.4GgO3 annually indicating significant contribution of Sundarbans mangroves towards regional atmospheric O3 budget as well as climate change.

  4. Ozone studies in the Paso del Norte region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Davila, Fernando

    obtained from this photolysis study demonstrate that the local ground level ozone formation is not only influenced by the strong solar radiation and changing aerosol makeup, but also by other heterogeneous factors and reactions. In addition, this research provided good evidence that the ground level ozone precursor regime in El Paso during the ozone episode of June 2006 was mostly VOC-limited. Much of this estimation was derived from measurements of local ambient VOC/NOx ratios. This finding shows that at least during June 2006, the non-linear surface ozone production increased during weekends compared to workdays in a habitually VOC-limited regime. The seasonal variations of columnar ozone as measured by a Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband instrument installed at the UTEP campus are analyzed for the first time for this region and results are presented. This investigation has addressed the problem of ground-level ozone formation in the Paso del Norte region. Urban ozone is a complex problem with many aspects that are not fully understood. In this investigation, a range of techniques has been used to address the study of local surface ozone episodes with the purpose of acquiring new insights and knowledge that will help understand and remediate the diverse atmospheric pollution events that affect this bi-national region recurrently. Innovative techniques were developed and used, ranging from the use of local ambient atmospheric pollution data to the utilization of complex modeling techniques to achieve the best possible computer results. Finally, the influence of ground level ozone concentrations in admissions to hospitals for this region due to respiratory diseases is analyzed. The comprehensive results obtained in this work will help to better understand ozone formation in the Paso del Norte Region for future policy regulation implementations.

  5. Future atmospheric conditions increase the greenhouse gas intensity of rice production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Van Kessel, C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 and rising temperatures are both expected to alter rice yields and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from rice paddies. This is important, because rice cultivation is one of the largest anthropogenic sources of the potent GHG methane (CH4) and rice is the world's second-most produced staple crop. Because global food demand is growing, it makes sense to assess GHG emissions from croplands on the basis of yield rather than land area, so that efforts to reduce GHG emissions occur with taking into consideration the effects on food production. However, it is unclear whether or how the GHG intensity (that is, yield-scaled GHG emissions) of cropping systems will be affected by future atmospheric conditions. Using meta-analysis, we show that elevated atmospheric CO2 (ranging from 550 to 743 ppmV) and warming (ranging from +0.8°C to +6°C) both increase the GHG intensity of rice cultivation. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increased GHG intensity by 31.4%, because CH4 emissions are stimulated more than rice yields. Warming increased GHG intensity by 11.8% per 1°C, largely due to a decrease in yield. Our findings underscore the need for mitigation and adaptation efforts to secure global food supply while at the same time keeping GHG emissions in check.

  6. Implications of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Tropospheric Ozone for Water Use in Stands of Trembling Aspen and Paper Birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Lee Kirk

    Projected increases in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 and tropospheric O3 over the next 50 years are of concern due in part to their potential to affect forest water budgets. I conducted a series of studies at the Aspen Free Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment experiment near Rhinelander, WI to determine the effect of projected concentrations of these gases for the year 2050 on the water budget in stands of trembling aspen and paper birch. In order to determine the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO 2) and O3 (eO3) on rainfall partitioning between interception, through fall, and stem flow I performed a computerized analysis of photographed canopy branches and compared the results to hydrologic measurements. Elevated O3 significantly decreased total aspen and birch branch length, resulting in net decreases for 2002 whorls of -18 % and 2006 whorls of -16 %. Some of these changes had measurable effects on rainfall partitioning. The biomass of fine roots has been observed to change in response to eCO2 and eO3 at shallow depths, but little work has been done to assess deeper roots. I characterized fine root responses to eCO 2 and eO3 to a depth of one meter. Fumigation with O 3 increased small root biomass in shallow soil 30 % in all aspen plots and decreased root biomass in shallow soil 46 % in aspen-birch plots. Increases in root length up to 131 % and specific root length up to 77 % occurred under eO3 in middle and deep soil layers, indicating more extensive soil exploration at depth. Small root biomass in shallow soils increased 20 % to 24 % under eCO2, indicative of more intensive soil exploration near the surface. Previous studies of sapwood from Aspen-FACE indicated that anatomical structures related to hydraulic conductance (K) differed between aspen clones and that they responded to the treatments differently. I constructed embolism curves for stem wood samples collected below the base of the live crowns. There were no significant treatment effects on K at full water

  7. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the ozonosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the role of the greenhouse gases CO2 , CH4 , and N2 O in the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular in its recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abundance of the greenhouse gases on the dynamics of recovery of the Earth's ozone layer, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2 , essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weakness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification begins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard the expected recovery of the

  8. Two mechanisms of stratospheric ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere, studied using data assimilation of Odin/SMR atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Kazutoshi; Pérot, Kristell; Murtagh, Donal; Orsolini, Yvan

    2017-02-01

    Observations from the Odin/Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) instrument have been assimilated into the DIAMOND model (Dynamic Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data), in order to estimate the chemical ozone (O3) loss in the stratosphere. This data assimilation technique is described in Sagi and Murtagh (2016), in which it was used to study the inter-annual variability in ozone depletion during the entire Odin operational time and in both hemispheres. Our study focuses on the Arctic region, where two O3 destruction mechanisms play an important role, involving halogen and nitrogen chemical families (i.e. NOx = NO and NO2), respectively. The temporal evolution and geographical distribution of O3 loss in the low and middle stratosphere have been investigated between 2002 and 2013. For the first time, this has been done based on the study of a series of winter-spring seasons over more than a decade, spanning very different dynamical conditions. The chemical mechanisms involved in O3 depletion are very sensitive to thermal conditions and dynamical activity, which are extremely variable in the Arctic stratosphere. We have focused our analysis on particularly cold and warm winters, in order to study the influence this has on ozone loss. The winter 2010/11 is considered as an example for cold conditions. This case, which has been the subject of many studies, was characterised by a very stable vortex associated with particularly low temperatures, which led to an important halogen-induced O3 loss occurring inside the vortex in the lower stratosphere. We found a loss of 2.1 ppmv at an altitude of 450 K in the end of March 2011, which corresponds to the largest ozone depletion in the Northern Hemisphere observed during the last decade. This result is consistent with other studies. A similar situation was observed during the winters 2004/05 and 2007/08, although the amplitude of the O3 destruction was lower. To study the opposite situation, corresponding to a warm and

  9. Middle Stratospheric Polar Vortex Ozone Budget during the Warming Arctic Winter, 2002-2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; LIU Chuanxi; Xuexi TIE; GAO Shouting

    2011-01-01

    The ozone budget inside the middle stratospheric polar vortex (24-36 km) during the 2002 2003 Arctic winter is studied by analyzing Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite data.A comprehensive global chemical transport model (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers,MOZART-3) is used to analyze the observed variation in polar vortex ozone during the stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) events.Both MIPAS measurement and MOZART-3 calculation show that a pronounced increase (26-28 DU) in the polar vortex ozone due to the SSW events.Due to the weakening of the polar vortex,the exchange of ozone mass across the edge of the polar vortex increases substantially and amounts to about 3.0 × 107 kg according to MOZART-3 calculation.The enhanced downward transport offsets about 80% of polar vortex ozone mass increase by horizontal transport.A “passive ozone” experiment shows that only ~55% of the vertical ozone mass flux in February and March can be attributed to the variation in vertical transport.It is also shown that the enhanced downward ozone above ~32 km should be attributed to the springtime photochemical ozone production.Due to the increase of air temperature,the NOx reaction rate increases by 40%-80% during the SSW events.As a rcsult,NOx catalytic cycle causes another 44% decrease in polar vortex ozone compared to the net ozone changes due to dynamical transport.It is also shown that the largest change in polar vortex ozone is due to horizontal advection by planetary waves in January 2003.

  10. Stratospheric ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Peer Johannes; Abraham, Nathan Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term solar radiation management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks for this experiment. While the SRM scheme considered here could offset greenhouse gas induced global mean surface warming, it leads to important changes in atmospheric composition. We find large stratospheric ozone increases that induce significant reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, which would have implications for vitamin D production. In addition, the higher stratospheric ozone levels lead to decreased ozone photolysis in the troposphere. In combination with lower atmospheric specific humidity under SRM, this results in overall surface ozone concentration increases in the idealized G1 experiment. Both UV-B and surface ozone changes are important for human health. We therefore highlight that both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone changes must be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  11. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  12. Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV total ozone and profile algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhartia

    2013-10-01

    column ozone by integrating the SBUV profiles, rather than from a separate set of wavelengths, as was done in previous algorithm versions. This allows us to extend the total ozone retrieval to 88° solar zenith angle (SZA. Since the quality of total column data is affected by reduced sensitivity to ozone in the lower atmosphere by cloud and Rayleigh attenuation, which gets worse with increasing SZA, we provide our best estimate of these errors, as well as the kernels that can be used to test the sensitivity of the derived columns to long-term changes in ozone in the lower atmosphere.

  13. Delivery of Forecasted Atmospheric Ozone and Dust for the New Mexico Environmental Public Health Tracking System - An Open Source Geospatial Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, W. B.; Sanchez-Silva, R.; Cavner, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    New Mexico's Environmental Public Health Tracking System (EPHTS), funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN), aims to improve health awareness and services by linking health effects data with levels and frequency of environmental exposure. As a public health decision-support system, EPHTS systems include: state-of-the-art statistical analysis tools; geospatial visualization tools; data discovery, extraction, and delivery tools; and environmental/public health linkage information. As part of its mandate, EPHTS issues public health advisories and forecasts of environmental conditions that have consequences for human health. Through a NASA-funded partnership between the University of New Mexico and the University of Arizona, NASA Earth Science results are fused into two existing models (the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model) in order to improve forecasts of atmospheric dust, ozone, and aerosols. The results and products derived from the outputs of these models are made available to an Open Source mapping component of the New Mexico EPHTS. In particular, these products are integrated into a Django content management system using GeoDjango, GeoAlchemy, and other OGC-compliant geospatial libraries written in the Python and C++ programming languages. Capabilities of the resultant mapping system include indicator-based thematic mapping, data delivery, and analytical capabilities. DREAM and CMAQ outputs can be inspected, via REST calls, through temporal and spatial subsetting of the atmospheric concentration data across analytical units employed by the public health community. This paper describes details of the architecture and integration of NASA Earth Science into the EPHTS decision-support system.

  14. Ozone formation in pulsed SDBD in a wide pressure range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Nudnova, Maryia; mipt Team

    2011-10-01

    Ozone concentration in surface anode-directed DBD for wide pressure range (150 - 1300 torr) was experimentally measured. Voltage and pressure effect were investigated. Reduced electric field was measured for anode-directed and cathode-directed SDBD. E/n values in cathode-directed SDBD is higher than in cathode-directed on 50 percent at atmospheric pressure. E/n value increase leads to decrease the rate of oxygen dissociation and Ozone formation at lower pressures. Radiating region thickness of sliding discharge was measured. Typical thickness of radiating zone is 0.4-1.0 mm within pressure range 220-740 torr. It was shown that high-voltage pulsed nanosecond discharge due to high E/n value produces less Ozone with compare to other discharges. Kinetic model was proposed to describe Ozone formation in the pulsed nanosecond SDBD.

  15. Evildoer or Do-Gooder: Getting the Goods on Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diane K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the differences of good ozone and bad ozone. Good ozone, which is found in the stratosphere, protects people and other living things from the bad things UV can do, such skin cancer, cataracts, and other problems. However, lower in the atmosphere, at the top of the troposphere (around 12 miles up), ozone acts like a…

  16. A Negative Feedback Between Anthropogenic Ozone Pollution and Enhanced Ocean Emissions of Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Prados-Roman, C.; Cuevas, C.; Fernandez, R.; Lamarque, J. F.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally emitted from the oceans, iodine compounds efficiently destroy atmospheric ozone and reduce its positive radiative forcing effects in the troposphere. Emissions of inorganic iodine have been experimentally shown to depend on the deposition to the oceans of tropospheric ozone, whose concentrations have significantly increased since 1850 as a result of human activities. A chemistry-climate model is used to quantify the current ocean emissions of inorganic iodine and assess the impact that the anthropogenic increase of tropospheric ozone has had on the natural cycle of iodine in the marine environment since pre-industrial times. Results included in this communication indicate that the human-driven enhancement of tropospheric ozone has doubled the oceanic inorganic iodine emissions following the reaction of ozone with iodide at the sea surface. The consequent build-up of atmospheric iodine, with maximum enhancements of up to 70% with respect to preindustrial times in continental pollution outflow regions, has in turn accelerated the ozone chemical loss over the oceans with strong spatial patterns. We suggest that this ocean-atmosphere interaction represents a negative geochemical feedback loop by which current ocean emissions of iodine act as a natural buffer for ozone pollution and its radiative forcing in the global marine environment.

  17. Stratospheric ozone: History and concepts and interactions with climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekki S.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Although in relatively low concentration of a few molecules per million of e e air molecules, atmospheric ozone (trioxygen O3 is essential to sustaining life on the surface of the Earth. Indeed, by absorbing solar radiation between 240 and 320 nm, it shields living organisms including humans from the very harmful ultraviolet radiation UV-B. About 90% of the ozone resides in the stratosphere, a region that extends from the tropopause, whose altitude ranges from 7 km at the poles to 17 km in the tropics, to the stratopause located at about 50 km altitude. Stratospheric ozone is communally referred as the « ozone layer ». Unlike the atmosphere surrounding it, the stratosphere is vertically stratified and stable because the temperature increases with height within it. This particularity originates from heating produced by the absorption of UV radiation by stratospheric ozone. The present chapter describes the main mechanisms that govern the natural balance of ozone in the stratosphere, and its disruption under the influence of human activities.

  18. The atmospheric chemistry general circultation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: Consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Brülh, Ch.; Buchholz, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Hoor, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Lawrence, M.G.; Sander, R.; Steil, B.; Stiller, G.; Tanarhte, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; Aardenne, van J.A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-01-01

    The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup

  19. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: Ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, U.; Ganzeveld, L.N.

    2010-01-01

    As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001) field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry sea

  20. Averaging kernel prediction from atmospheric and surface state parameters based on multiple regression for nadir-viewing satellite measurements of carbon monoxide and ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Worden

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A current obstacle to the observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs used to quantify the potential performance of future atmospheric composition remote sensing systems is a computationally efficient method to define the scene-dependent vertical sensitivity of measurements as expressed by the retrieval averaging kernels (AKs. We present a method for the efficient prediction of AKs for multispectral retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO and ozone (O3 based on actual retrievals from MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere on the Earth Observing System (EOS-Terra satellite and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument on EOS-Aura, respectively. This employs a multiple regression approach for deriving scene-dependent AKs using predictors based on state parameters such as the thermal contrast between the surface and lower atmospheric layers, trace gas volume mixing ratios (VMRs, solar zenith angle, water vapor amount, etc. We first compute the singular value decomposition (SVD for individual cloud-free AKs and retain the first three ranked singular vectors in order to fit the most significant orthogonal components of the AK in the subsequent multiple regression on a training set of retrieval cases. The resulting fit coefficients are applied to the predictors from a different test set of test retrievals cased to reconstruct predicted AKs, which can then be evaluated against the true retrieval AKs from the test set. By comparing the VMR profile adjustment resulting from the use of the predicted vs. true AKs, we quantify the CO and O3 VMR profile errors associated with the use of the predicted AKs compared to the true AKs that might be obtained from a computationally expensive full retrieval calculation as part of an OSSE. Similarly, we estimate the errors in CO and O3 VMRs from using a single regional average AK to represent all retrievals, which has been a common approximation in chemical OSSEs

  1. Advances on the Responses of Root Dynamics to Increased Atmospheric CO2 and Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots dynamics responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperature and changed precipitation can be a key link between plant growth and long-term changes in soil organic matter and ecosystem carbon balance. This paper reviews some experiments and hypotheses developed in this area, which mainly include plant fine roots growth, root turnover, root respiration and other root dynamics responses to elevated CO2 and global climate change. Some recent new methods of studying root systems were also discussed and summarized. It holds herein that the assemblage of information about root turnover patterns, root respiration and other dynamic responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 and global climatic change can help to better understand and explore some new research areas. In this paper, some research challenges in the plant root responses to the elevated CO2 and other environmental factors during global climate change were also demonstrated.

  2. Tropospheric ozone reduces carbon assimilation in trees: estimates from analysis of continuous flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Silvano; Vargas, Rodrigo; Detto, Matteo; Goldstein, Allen H; Karlik, John; Paoletti, Elena; Vitale, Marcello

    2013-08-01

    High ground-level ozone concentrations are typical of Mediterranean climates. Plant exposure to this oxidant is known to reduce carbon assimilation. Ozone damage has been traditionally measured through manipulative experiments that do not consider long-term exposure and propagate large uncertainty by up-scaling leaf-level observations to ecosystem-level interpretations. We analyzed long-term continuous measurements (>9 site-years at 30 min resolution) of environmental and eco-physiological parameters at three Mediterranean ecosystems: (i) forest site dominated by Pinus ponderosa in the Sierra Mountains in California, USA; (ii) forest site composed of a mixture of Quercus spp. and P. pinea in the Tyrrhenian sea coast near Rome, Italy; and (iii) orchard site of Citrus sinensis cultivated in the California Central Valley, USA. We hypothesized that higher levels of ozone concentration in the atmosphere result in a decrease in carbon assimilation by trees under field conditions. This hypothesis was tested using time series analysis such as wavelet coherence and spectral Granger causality, and complemented with multivariate linear and nonlinear statistical analyses. We found that reduction in carbon assimilation was more related to stomatal ozone deposition than to ozone concentration. The negative effects of ozone occurred within a day of exposure/uptake. Decoupling between carbon assimilation and stomatal aperture increased with the amount of ozone pollution. Up to 12-19% of the carbon assimilation reduction in P. ponderosa and in the Citrus plantation was explained by higher stomatal ozone deposition. In contrast, the Italian site did not show reductions in gross primary productivity either by ozone concentration or stomatal ozone deposition, mainly due to the lower ozone concentrations in the periurban site over the shorter period of investigation. These results highlight the importance of plant adaptation/sensitivity under field conditions, and the importance of

  3. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases water use efficiency in Florida scrub oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, B. G.; Hayek, L. C.; Johnson, D. P.; Li, J.; Powell, T. L.

    2009-12-01

    Plants are expected to have higher rates of photosynthesis and reduced transpiration as atmospheric CO2 (Ca) continues to rise. But will higher Ca reduce water loss, and increase water use efficiency and soil water in native ecosystems? We tested this question using large (3.0m by 2.8m) open top chambers to expose Florida scrub oak on Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, Kennedy Space Center, FL, from May 1996 to June 2007 to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2, (Ce = Ca + 350ppm) compared to ambient Ca. Although Ce stimulated total shoot biomass 68% by the end of the study, the effect of Ce on annual growth declined each year (Seiler et al. 2009, Global Change Biology15, 356-367). Compared with the effects of Ca, Ce increased net ecosystem CO2 exchange approximately 70% on average for the entire study, increased leaf area index (LAI) seasonally, reduced evapotranspiration except during mid-summer of some years, and, depending on the relative effect of Ce on LAI, increased volumetric soil water content.. These results are consistent with the observation that continental river discharge has increased as Ca has risen throughout the past 50 years (Gedney et al., Nature, Vol. 439, 16 February 2006).

  4. Biogeochemical aspects of atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    Cicerone, RJ; Oremland, RS

    1988-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant organic chemical in Earth's atmosphere, and its concentration is increasing with time, as a variety of independent measurements have shown. Photochemical reactions oxidize methane in the atmosphere; through these reactions, methane exerts strong influence over the chemistry of the troposphere and the stratosphere and many species including ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and carbon monoxide. Also, through its infrared absorption spectrum, methane is an important greenho...

  5. A statistical model to predict total column ozone in Peninsular Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.C.TAN; H.S.LIM; M.Z.MAT JAFRI

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to predict monthly columnar ozone in Peninsular Malaysia based on concentrations of several atmospheric gases.Data pertaining to five atmospheric gases (CO2,O3,CH4,NO2,and H2O vapor) were retrieved by satellite scanning imaging absorption spectrometry for atmospheric chartography from 2003 to 2008 and used to develop a model to predict columnar ozone in Peninsular Malaysia.Analyses of the northeast monsoon (NEM) and the southwest monsoon (SWM) seasons were conducted separately.Based on the Pearson correlation matrices,columnar ozone was negatively correlated with H2O vapor but positively correlated with CO2 and NO2 during both the NEM and SWM seasons from 2003 to 2008.This result was expected because NO2 is a precursor of ozone.Therefore,an increase in columnar ozone concentration is associated with an increase in NO2 but a decrease in H2O vapor.In the NEM season,columnar ozone was negatively correlated with H2O (-0.847),NO2 (0.754),and CO2 (0.477);columnar ozone was also negatively but weakly correlated with CH4 (-0.035).In the SWM season,columnar ozone was highly positively correlated with NO2 (0.855),CO2 (0.572),and CH4 (0.321) and also highly negatively correlated with H2O (-0.832).Both multiple regression and principal component analyses were used to predict the columnar ozone value in Peninsular Malaysia.We obtained the best-fitting regression equations for the columnar ozone data using four independent variables.Our results show approximately the same R value (≈ 0.83) for both the NEM and SWM seasons.

  6. Increasing synoptic scale variability in atmospheric CO2 at Hateruma Island associated with increasing East-Asian emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hashimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 at Hateruma Island (24.05° N, 123.80° E, 47 m a.s.l, Japan shows large synoptic scale variations during a 6-month period from November to April, when the sampled air is predominantly of continental origin due to the Asian winter monsoon. Synoptic scale variations are extracted from the daily averaged values for the years between 1996 and 2007, along with the annual standard deviations (σCO2 and σCH4 for CO2 and CH4, respectively for the relevant 6-month period. During this 6-month period the absolute mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 at Hateruma are also elevated compared to those at two sites in the central North Pacific Ocean. The temporal change in σCO2 shows a systematic increase over the 12-year period, with elevated excursions in 1998 and 2003; there is no clear increase in σCH4. We also find that the σCO2/σCH4 ratio increases gradually from 1996 to 2002 and rapidly after 2002 without any extreme deviations that characterised σCO2. The σCO2/σCH4 ratio correlates closely with the recent rapid increase in fossil carbon emissions from China, as indicated in the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC database. This methodology can be applied to multiple chemical tracers of sufficient lifetime, for tracking overall changes in regional emissions.

  7. Transpacific transport of ozone pollution and the effect of recent Asian emission increases on air quality in North America: an integrated analysis using satellite, aircraft, ozonesonde, and surface observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We use an ensemble of aircraft, satellite, sonde, and surface observations for April–May 2006 (NASA/INTEX-B aircraft campaign to better understand the mechanisms for transpacific ozone pollution and its implications for North American air quality. The observations are interpreted with a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem. OMI NO2 satellite observations constrain Asian anthropogenic NOx emissions and indicate a factor of 2 increase from 2000 to 2006 in China. Satellite observations of CO from AIRS and TES indicate two major events of Asian transpacific pollution during INTEX-B. Correlation between TES CO and ozone observations shows evidence for transpacific ozone pollution. The semi-permanent Pacific High and Aleutian Low cause splitting of transpacific pollution plumes over the Northeast Pacific. The northern branch circulates around the Aleutian Low and has little impact on North America. The southern branch circulates around the Pacific High and some of that air impacts western North America. Both aircraft measurements and model results show sustained ozone production driven by peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN decomposition in the southern branch, roughly doubling the transpacific influence from ozone produced in the Asian boundary layer. Model simulation of ozone observations at Mt. Bachelor Observatory in Oregon (2.7 km altitude indicates a mean Asian ozone pollution contribution of 9±3 ppbv to the mean observed concentration of 54 ppbv, reflecting mostly an enhancement in background ozone rather than episodic Asian plumes. Asian pollution enhanced surface ozone concentrations by 5–7 ppbv over western North America in spring 2006. The 2000–2006 rise in Asian anthropogenic emissions increased this influence by 1–2 ppbv.

  8. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 Affects Ectomycorrhizal Species Abundance and Increases Sporocarp Production under Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L. Godbold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic activities during the last century have increased levels of atmospheric CO2. Forest net primary productivity increases in response to elevated CO2, altering the quantity and quality of carbon supplied to the rhizosphere. Ectomycorrhizal fungi form obligate symbiotic associations with the fine roots of trees that mediate improved scavenging for nutrients in exchange for a carbohydrate supply. Understanding how the community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi is altered by climate change is important to further our understanding of ecosystem function. Betula pendula and Fagus sylvatica were grown in an elevated CO2 atmosphere delivered using free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE under field conditions in the U.K., and Picea abies was grown under elevated CO2 in glass domes in the Czech Republic. We used morphotyping and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the fungal ribosomal operon to study ectomycorrhizal community structure. Under FACE, un-colonised roots tips increased in abundance for Fagus sylvatica, and during 2006, sporocarp biomass of Peziza badia significantly increased. In domes, ectomycorrhizal community composition shifted from short-distance and smooth medium-distance to contact exploration types. Supply and competition for carbon belowground can influence ectomycorrhizal community structure with the potential to alter ecosystem function.

  9. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumyeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Our results clearly showed that the functional characteristics of the soil microbial community (i.e. specific growth rates and enzymes activity) rather than total microbial biomass

  10. Stratospheric ozone response to a solar irradiance reduction in a quadrupled CO2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2014-07-01

    We used the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) global two-dimensional (2D) atmospheric model to investigate the stratospheric ozone response to a proposed geoengineering activity wherein a reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) solar irradiance is imposed to help counteract a quadrupled CO2 atmosphere. This study is similar to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Experiment G1. Three primary simulations were completed with the GSFC 2D model to examine this possibility: (A) a pre-industrial atmosphere with a boundary condition of 285 ppmv CO2 (piControl); (B) a base future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 (abrupt4xCO2); and (C) a perturbed future atmosphere with 1140 ppmv CO2 and a 4% reduction in the TOA total solar irradiance (G1). We found huge ozone enhancements throughout most of the stratosphere (up to 40%) as a result of a large computed temperature decrease (up to 18 K) when CO2 was quadrupled (compare simulation abrupt4xCO2 to piControl). Further, we found that ozone will additionally increase (up to 5%) throughout most of the stratosphere with total ozone increases of 1-2.5% as a result of a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance (compare simulation G1 to abrupt4xCO2). Decreases of atomic oxygen and temperature are the main drivers of this computed ozone enhancement from a reduction in TOA total solar irradiance.

  11. Ozonated Olive Oils and Troubles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Uysal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 49-50

  12. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  13. Springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone, gaseous elemental mercury and non-methane hydrocarbons in the European Arctic, and its relation to atmospheric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneroth, Kristina; Holmén, Kim; Berg, Torunn; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Solberg, Sverre

    Using a trajectory climatology for the period 1992-2001 we have examined how seasonal changes in transport cause changes in the concentrations of tropospheric ozone (O 3), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) observed at the Mt. Zeppelin station, Ny-Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E). During April-June O 3 depletion events were frequently observed in connection with air transport across the Arctic Basin. The O 3 loss was most pronounced in air masses advected close to the surface. This result supports the idea that the O 3 depletion reactions take place in the lowermost part of the atmosphere in the central Arctic Basin. A strong positive correlation between springtime O 3 depletion events and the oxidation of GEM to divalent mercury was found. During air mass advection from Siberia, the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea the strongest correlation was observed during April-May, whereas air masses originating from the Canadian Arctic and the central Arctic areas showed the highest O 3-GEM correlation in May-June. We suggest that this 1-month lag could either be due to the position of the marginal ice zone or temperature differences between the northwestern and northeastern air masses. In connection with springtime O 3 depletion events low concentrations of some NMHCs, especially ethane and ethyne, were observed, indicating that both bromine (ethyne oxidant) and chlorine radicals (ethane oxidant) are present in the Arctic atmosphere during spring. In winter, negative correlations between O 3 and NMHCs were found in connection with air transport from Europe and Siberia, which we interpret as O 3 destruction taking place in industrially contaminated plumes.

  14. Agricultural green revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-20

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 256N and 606N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 506N and 706 N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 ± 0.027 percent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001–2010 than in 1961–1970

  15. Regional-Scale Ozone Deposition to North-East Atlantic Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model is used to evaluate dry deposition of ozone over the North East Atlantic. Results are presented for a deposition scheme accounting for turbulent and chemical enhancement of oceanic ozone deposition and a second non-chemical, parameterised gaseous dry deposition scheme. The first deposition scheme was constrained to account for sea-surface ozone-iodide reactions and the sensitivity of modelled ozone concentrations to oceanic iodide concentration was investigated. Simulations were also performed using nominal reaction rate derived from in-situ ozone deposition measurements and using a preliminary representation of organic chemistry. Results show insensitivity of ambient ozone concentrations modelled by the chemical-enhanced scheme to oceanic iodide concentrations, and iodide reactions alone cannot account for observed deposition velocities. Consequently, we suggest a missing chemical sink due to reactions of ozone with organic matter at the air-sea interface. Ozone loss rates are estimated to be in the range of 0.5–6 ppb per day. A potentially significant ozone-driven flux of iodine to the atmosphere is estimated to be in the range of 2.5–500 M molec cm−2  s−1, leading to a mixing-layer enhancement of organo-iodine concentrations of 0.1–22.0 ppt, with an average increase in the N.E. Atlantic of around 4 ppt per day.

  16. Examination of the atmospheric conditions associated with high and low summer ozone levels in the lower troposphere over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Kalabokas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the observed high rural ozone levels in the Eastern Mediterranean area during summertime, vertical profiles of ozone measured in the period 1994–2008 in the framework of the MOZAIC project (Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus in Service Aircraft over the Eastern Mediterranean basin (Cairo, Tel-Aviv, Heraklion, Rhodes, Antalya were analysed, focusing in the lower troposphere (1.5–5 km. At first, vertical profiles collected during extreme days with very high or very low tropospheric ozone mixing ratios have been examined together with the corresponding back-trajectories. Also, the average profiles of ozone, relative humidity, carbon monoxide, temperature gradient and wind speed corresponding to the 7% highest and the 7% lowest ozone mixing ratios for the 1500–5000 m height layer for Cairo and Tel-Aviv have been examined and the corresponding composite maps of geopotential heights at 850 hPa have been plotted. Based on the above analysis, it turns out that the lower-tropospheric ozone variability over the Eastern Mediterranean area is controlled mainly by the synoptic meteorological conditions, combined with local topographical and meteorological features. In particular, the highest ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere and subsequently in the boundary layer are associated with large scale subsidence of ozone rich air masses from the upper troposphere under anticyclonic conditions while the lowest ozone concentrations are associated with low pressure conditions inducing uplifting of boundary layer air, poor in ozone and rich in relative humidity, to the lower troposphere.

  17. Subalpine grassland carbon balance during 7 years of increased atmospheric N deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Enderle, Jan; Bassin, Seraina

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution agents interact when affecting biological sinks for atmospheric CO2, e.g., the soil organic carbon (SOC) content of grassland ecosystems. Factors favoring plant productivity, like atmospheric N deposition, are usually considered to favor SOC storage. In a 7-year experiment in subalpine grassland under N- and O3-deposition treatment, we examined C fluxes and pools. Total N deposition was 4, 9, 14, 29 and 54 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (N4, N9, etc.); annual mean phytotoxic O3 dose was 49, 65 and 89 mmol m-2 projected leaf area. We hypothesized that between years SOC of this mature ecosystem would not change in control treatments and that effects of air pollutants are similar for plant yield, net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and SOC content, leading to SOC content increasing with N deposition. Cumulative plant yield showed a significant N and N × N effect (+38 % in N54) but no O3 effect. In the control treatment SOC increased significantly by 9 % in 7 years. Cumulative NEP did show a strong, hump-shaped response pattern to N deposition with a +62 % increase in N14 and only +39 % increase in N54 (N effect statistically not significant, N × N interaction not testable). SOC had a similar but not significant response to N, with highest C gains at intermediate N deposition rates, suggesting a unimodal response with a marginal (P = 0.09) N × N interaction. We assume the strong, pollutant-independent soil C sink developed as a consequence of the management change from grazing to cutting. The non-parallel response of SOC and NEP compared to plant yield under N deposition is likely the result of increased respiratory SOC losses, following mitigated microbial N-limitation or priming effects, and a shift in plant C allocation leading to smaller C input from roots.

  18. Modelling the impacts of climate change on tropospheric ozone over three centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Hedegaard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The ozone chemistry over three centuries has been simulated based on climate prediction from a global climate model and constant anthropogenic emissions in order to separate out the effects on air pollution from climate change. Four decades in different centuries has been simulated using the chemistry version of the atmospheric long-range transport model; the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM forced with meteorology predicted by the ECHAM5/MPI-OM coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model. The largest changes in both meteorology, ozone and its precursors is found in the 21st century, however, also significant changes are found in the 22nd century. At surface level the ozone concentration is predicted to increase due to climate change in the areas where substantial amounts of ozone precursors are emitted. Elsewhere a significant decrease is predicted at the surface. In the free troposphere a general increase is found in the entire Northern Hemisphere except in the tropics, where the ozone concentration is decreasing. In the Arctic the ozone concentration will increase in the entire air column, which most likely is due to changes in transport. The change in temperature, humidity and the naturally emitted Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs are governing with respect to changes in ozone both in the past, present and future century.

  19. A negative feedback between anthropogenic ozone pollution and enhanced ocean emissions of iodine

    OpenAIRE

    Prados-Roman, C; Cuevas, C.A.; R. P. Fernandez; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J-F.; A. Saiz-Lopez

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Author(s). CC Attribution 3.0 License. Naturally emitted from the oceans, iodine compounds efficiently destroy atmospheric ozone and reduce its positive radiative forcing effects in the troposphere. Emissions of inorganic iodine have been experimentally shown to depend on the deposition to the oceans of tropospheric ozone, whose concentrations have significantly increased since 1850 as a result of human activities. A chemistry-climate model is used herein to quantify the current ocean ...

  20. Model studies of the influence of O2 photodissociation parameterizations in the Schumann-Runge bands on ozone related photolysis in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs A. A. Koppers

    Full Text Available A new parameterization for atmospheric transmission and O2 photodissociation in the Schumann-Runge band region has been developed and tested with a 1D radiative-photochemical model. The parameterization is based on the O2-column along the line of sight to the Sun and the local temperature. Line-by-line calculations have served as a benchmark for testing this method and several other, commonly used, parameterizations. The comparisons suggest that differences between the line-by-line calculations and currently accepted parameterizations can be reduced significantly by using the new method, particularly at large solar zenith angles. The production rate of O-atoms computed with this method shows less than 6% deviation compared to the line-by-line calculations at any altitude, all solar zenith angles and in all seasons. The largest errors are found toward the shorter wavelengths in the Schumann-Runge region at low altitudes. Transmittance is approximated to better than 4% at any altitude and/or solar zenith angle. The total O-production rate above 20 km is approximated to better than 2%. The new parameterization is easily implemented in existing photochemical models and in many cases it may simply replace the existing algorithm. The computational effort exceeds that of other parameterizations but in view of the total computation time needed for the actual calculation of the parameterized Schumann-Runge bands this should not lead to significant performance degeneration. The first 14 coefficients of the parameterization are included in this study. Both the complete sets of coefficients and a simple algorithm can be obtained by contacting the authors. A photochemical model study shows the largest effect of the parameterization method is on odd hydrogen concentrations. Subsequent interaction with an odd oxygen family causes differences in the ozone concentrations between the different parameterizations of more than 10% at selected

  1. Effect of a chronic and moderate ozone pollution on the phenolic pattern of bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Nerina): relations with visible injury and biomass production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoun, M; Goulas, M J.P.; Biolley, J -P.

    2001-05-01

    From sowing, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Nerina) plants were exposed to three chronic doses of ozone for 7h.day(-1): non-filtered air (NF), non-filtered air supplied with 40nl.l(-1) ozone (NF+40) and non-filtered air supplied with 60nll(-1) ozone (NF+60). Four harvests were carried out 6, 13, 20 and 27 days after emergence. Either primary leaves, or first trifoliate leaves, or both were sampled as far as possible. For each sampled leaf, visible ozone injuries were registered, the free polyphenolic pool was analysed using HPLC and the dry matter was weighed. Visible damage on leaves was related to both exposure time and ozone concentration added. There were no adverse effects of added ozone on the biomass of primary leaves while a significant reduction of first trifoliates dry matter could be observed (NF+60 atmosphere, third and fourth harvest). Among the normally occurring phenolics, we detected a significant decrease in the accumulation of a hydroxycinnamic acid derivative as the ozone concentration increased. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that this ozone-induced modification could be sometimes distinguishable with difficulties from changes expected to be of development relevance. Beside this phenolic disbalance, we detected a de novo biosynthesis of compounds that closely depended on the level of visible ozone injury. Since their accumulation increased with leaf damage, these ozone-induced phenolics could be used to detect phytotoxic ambient levels of tropospheric ozone.

  2. A brief history of stratospheric ozone research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Müller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is one of the most important trace species in the atmosphere. Therefore, the history of research on ozone has also received a good deal of attention. Here a short overview of ozone research (with a focus on the stratosphere is given, starting from the first atmospheric measurements and ending with current developments. It is valuable to study the history of ozone research, because much can be learned for current research from an understanding of how previous discoveries were made. Moreover, since the 1970s, the history of ozone research has also encompassed also the history of the human impact on the ozone layer and thus the history of policy measures taken to protect the ozone layer, notably the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments. The history of this development is particularly important because it may serve as a prototype for the development of policy measures for the protection of the Earth's climate.

  3. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    A numerical 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the atmosphere including aerosol physics is used to examine the impact of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O on the future long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer, in particular on its expected recovery after reduction of anthropogenic discharges of chlorine and bromine compounds into the atmosphere. The model allows calculating self-consistently diabatic circu-lation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the North to South Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar strato-spheric clouds (PSCs) of types I and II. The scenarios of expected changes of the anthropogenic pollutants for the period from 1980 through 2050 are taken from Climate Change 2001. The processes, which determine the influence of anthropogenic growth of atmospheric abun-dance of the greenhouse gases on the long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions, have been studied in details. Expected cooling of the stratosphere caused by increases of greenhouse gases, most importantly CO2, essentially influences the ozone layer by two ways: through temperature dependencies of the gas phase reaction rates and through enhancement of polar ozone depletion via increased PSC formation. The model calculations show that a weak-ness in efficiencies of all gas phase catalytic cycles of the ozone destruction due to cooling of the stratosphere is a dominant mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer in Antarctic as well as at the lower latitudes. This mechanism leads to a significant acceleration of the ozone layer recovery here because of the greenhouse gases growth. On the contrary, the mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone through PSC modification be-gins to be more effective in Arctic in comparison with the gas phase mechanism in springs after about 2020, which leads to retard

  4. Interactive Ozone and Methane Chemistry in GISS-E2 Historical and Future Climate Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, D. T.; Pechony, O.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Nazarenko. L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Bowman, K.; Milly, G.; Kovari, B.; Ruedy, R.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The new generation GISS climate model includes fully interactive chemistry related to ozone in historical and future simulations, and interactive methane in future simulations. Evaluation of ozone, its tropospheric precursors, and methane shows that the model captures much of the largescale spatial structure seen in recent observations. While the model is much improved compared with the previous chemistry-climate model, especially for ozone seasonality in the stratosphere, there is still slightly too rapid stratospheric circulation, too little stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux in the Southern Hemisphere and an Antarctic ozone hole that is too large and persists too long. Quantitative metrics of spatial and temporal correlations with satellite datasets as well as spatial autocorrelation to examine transport and mixing are presented to document improvements in model skill and provide a benchmark for future evaluations. The difference in radiative forcing (RF) calculated using modeled tropospheric ozone versus tropospheric ozone observed by TES is only 0.016W/sq. m. Historical 20th Century simulations show a steady increase in whole atmosphere ozone RF through 1970 after which there is a decrease through 2000 due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Ozone forcing increases throughout the 21st century under RCP8.5 owing to a projected recovery of stratospheric ozone depletion and increases in methane, but decreases under RCP4.5 and 2.6 due to reductions in emissions of other ozone precursors. RF from methane is 0.05 to 0.18W/ sq. m higher in our model calculations than in the RCP RF estimates. The surface temperature response to ozone through 1970 follows the increase in forcing due to tropospheric ozone. After that time, surface temperatures decrease as ozone RF declines due to stratospheric depletion. The stratospheric ozone depletion also induces substantial changes in surface winds and the Southern Ocean circulation, which may play a role in a slightly stronger

  5. Interactive ozone and methane chemistry in GISS-E2 historical and future climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The new generation GISS climate model includes fully interactive chemistry related to ozone in historical and future simulations, and interactive methane in future simulations. Evaluation of ozone, its tropospheric precursors, and methane shows that the model captures much of the large-scale spatial structure seen in recent observations. While the model is much improved compared with the previous chemistry-climate model, especially for ozone seasonality in the stratosphere, there is still slightly too rapid stratospheric circulation too little stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux in the Southern Hemisphere and an Antarctic ozone hole that is too large and persists too long quantitative metrics of spatial and temporal correlations with satellite datasets as well as spatial autocorrelation to examine transport and mixing are presented to document improvements in model skill and provide a benchmark for future evaluations. The difference in radiative forcing (RF calculated using modeled tropospheric ozone versus tropospheric ozone observed by TES is only 0.016 W m−2. Historical 20th Century simulations show a steady increase in whole atmosphere ozone RF through 1970 after which there is a decrease through 2000 due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Ozone forcing increases in the future under RCP8.5 owing to a projected recovery of stratospheric ozone depletion and increases in methane, but decreases under other RCPs due to reductions in emissions of other ozone precursors. RF from methane is 0.05 to 0.18 W m−2 higher in our model calculations than in the RCP RF estimates. The surface temperature response to ozone through 1970 follows the increase in forcing due to tropospheric ozone. After that time, surface temperatures decrease as ozone RF declines due to stratospheric depletion. The stratospheric ozone depletion also induces substantial changes in surface winds and the Southern Ocean circulation, which may play a role

  6. Interactive ozone and methane chemistry in GISS-E2 historical and future climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The new generation GISS climate model includes fully interactive chemistry related to ozone in historical and future simulations, and interactive methane in future simulations. Evaluation of ozone, its tropospheric precursors, and methane shows that the model captures much of the large-scale spatial structure seen in recent observations. While the model is much improved compared with the previous chemistry-climate model, especially for ozone seasonality in the stratosphere, there is still slightly too rapid stratospheric circulation, too little stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux in the Southern Hemisphere and an Antarctic ozone hole that is too large and persists too long. Quantitative metrics of spatial and temporal correlations with satellite datasets as well as spatial autocorrelation to examine transport and mixing are presented to document improvements in model skill and provide a benchmark for future evaluations. The difference in radiative forcing (RF calculated using modeled tropospheric ozone versus tropospheric ozone observed by TES is only 0.016 W m−2. Historical 20th Century simulations show a steady increase in whole atmosphere ozone RF through 1970 after which there is a decrease through 2000 due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Ozone forcing increases throughout the 21st century under RCP8.5 owing to a projected recovery of stratospheric ozone depletion and increases in methane, but decreases under RCP4.5 and 2.6 due to reductions in emissions of other ozone precursors. RF from methane is 0.05 to 0.18 W m−2 higher in our model calculations than in the RCP RF estimates. The surface temperature response to ozone through 1970 follows the increase in forcing due to tropospheric ozone. After that time, surface temperatures decrease as ozone RF declines due to stratospheric depletion. The stratospheric ozone depletion also induces substantial changes in surface winds and the Southern Ocean circulation, which may play a role in

  7. Forecasts and assimilation experiments of the Antarctic ozone hole 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, J.; Inness, A.; Jones, L.; Eskes, H. J.; Huijnen, V.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.; Cariolle, D.; Kinnison, D.; Brasseur, G.

    2011-03-01

    The 2008 Antarctic ozone hole was one of the largest and most long-lived in recent years. Predictions of the ozone hole were made in near-real time (NRT) and hindcast mode with the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The forecasts were carried out both with and without assimilation of satellite observations from multiple instruments to provide more realistic initial conditions. Three different chemistry schemes were applied for the description of stratospheric ozone chemistry: (i) a linearization of the ozone chemistry, (ii) the stratospheric chemical mechanism of the Model of Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 3, (MOZART-3) and (iii) the relaxation to climatology as implemented in the Transport Model, version 5, (TM5). The IFS uses the latter two schemes by means of a two-way coupled system. Without assimilation, the forecasts showed model-specific shortcomings in predicting start time, extent and duration of the ozone hole. The assimilation of satellite observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Solar Backscattering Ultraviolet radiometer (SBUV-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) led to a significant improvement of the forecasts when compared with total columns and vertical profiles from ozone sondes. The combined assimilation of observations from multiple instruments helped to overcome limitations of the ultraviolet (UV) sensors at low solar elevation over Antarctica. The assimilation of data from MLS was crucial to obtain a good agreement with the observed ozone profiles both in the polar stratosphere and troposphere. The ozone analyses by the three model configurations were very similar despite the different underlying chemistry schemes. Using ozone analyses as initial conditions had a very beneficial but variable effect on the predictability of the ozone hole over 15 days. The

  8. Atmosphere-ocean ozone fluxes during the TexAQS 2006, STRATUS 2006, GOMECC 2007, GasEx 2008, and AMMA 2008 cruises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Lang, E.K.; Bariteau, L.; Boylan, P.; Fairall, C.W.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Hare, J.E.; Hueber, J.; Pallandt, M.

    2012-01-01

    A ship-based eddy covariance ozone flux system was deployed to investigate the magnitude and variability of ozone surface fluxes over the open ocean. The flux experiments were conducted on five cruises on board the NOAA research vessel Ronald Brown during 2006-2008. The cruises covered the Gulf of M

  9. The influence of temperature on ozone production under varying NOx conditions - a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jane; Mar, Kathleen A.; Ojha, Narendra; Butler, Tim M.

    2016-09-01

    Surface ozone is a secondary air pollutant produced during the atmospheric photochemical degradation of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sunlight and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Temperature directly influences ozone production through speeding up the rates of chemical reactions and increasing the emissions of VOCs, such as isoprene, from vegetation. In this study, we used an idealised box model with different chemical mechanisms (Master Chemical Mechanism, MCMv3.2; Common Representative Intermediates, CRIv2; Model for OZone and Related Chemical Tracers, MOZART-4; Regional Acid Deposition Model, RADM2; Carbon Bond Mechanism, CB05) to examine the non-linear relationship between ozone, NOx and temperature, and we compared this to previous observational studies. Under high-NOx conditions, an increase in ozone from 20 to 40 °C of up to 20 ppbv was due to faster reaction rates, while increased isoprene emissions added up to a further 11 ppbv of ozone. The largest inter-mechanism differences were obtained at high temperatures and high-NOx emissions. CB05 and RADM2 simulated more NOx-sensitive chemistry than MCMv3.2, CRIv2 and MOZART-4, which could lead to different mitigation strategies being proposed depending on the chemical mechanism. The increased oxidation rate of emitted VOC with temperature controlled the rate of Ox production; the net influence of peroxy nitrates increased net Ox production per molecule of emitted VOC oxidised. The rate of increase in ozone mixing ratios with temperature from our box model simulations was about half the rate of increase in ozone with temperature observed over central Europe or simulated by a regional chemistry transport model. Modifying the box model set-up to approximate stagnant meteorological conditions increased the rate of increase of ozone with temperature as the accumulation of oxidants enhanced ozone production through the increased production of peroxy radicals from the secondary degradation of

  10. Modeling the reactivities of hydroxyl radical and ozone towards atmospheric organic chemicals using quantitative structure-reactivity relationship approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Basant, Nikita; Mohan, Dinesh; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-07-01

    The persistence and the removal of organic chemicals from the atmosphere are largely determined by their reactions with the OH radical and O3. Experimental determinations of the kinetic rate constants of OH and O3 with a large number of chemicals are tedious and resource intensive and development of computational approaches has widely been advocated. Recently, ensemble machine learning (EML) methods have emerged as unbiased tools to establish relationship between independent and dependent variables having a nonlinear dependence. In this study, EML-based, temperature-dependent quantitative structure-reactivity relationship (QSRR) models have been developed for predicting the kinetic rate constants for OH (kOH) and O3 (kO3) reactions with diverse chemicals. Structural diversity of chemicals was evaluated using a Tanimoto similarity index. The generalization and prediction abilities of the constructed models were established through rigorous internal and external validation performed employing statistical checks. In test data, the EML QSRR models yielded correlation (R (2)) of ≥0.91 between the measured and the predicted reactivities. The applicability domains of the constructed models were determined using methods based on descriptors range, Euclidean distance, leverage, and standardization approaches. The prediction accuracies for the higher reactivity compounds were relatively better than those of the low reactivity compounds. Proposed EML QSRR models performed well and outperformed the previous reports. The proposed QSRR models can make predictions of rate constants at different temperatures. The proposed models can be useful tools in predicting the reactivities of chemicals towards OH radical and O3 in the atmosphere.

  11. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  12. Oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by ozone and nitrogen dioxide: reaction mechanisms and biological and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhiya, L; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-04-01

    The nitration of tyrosine by atmospheric oxidants, O3 and NO2, is an important cause for the spread of allergenic diseases. In the present study, the mechanism and pathways for the reaction of tyrosine with the atmospheric oxidants O3 and NO2 are studied using DFT-M06-2X, B3LYP, and B3LYP-D methods with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The energy barrier for the initial oxidation reactions is also calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The reaction is studied in gas, aqueous, and lipid media. The initial oxidation of tyrosine by O3 proceeds by H atom abstraction and addition reactions and leads to the formation of six different intermediates. The subsequent nitration reaction is studied for all the intermediates, and the results show that the nitration affects both the side chain and the aromatic ring of tyrosine. The rate constant of the favorable oxidation and nitration reaction is calculated using variational transition state theory over the temperature range of 278-350 K. The spectral properties of the oxidation and nitration products are calculated at the TD-M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The fate of the tyrosine radical intermediate is studied by its reaction with glutathione antioxidant. This study provides an enhanced understanding of the oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by O3 and NO2 in the context of improving the air quality and reducing the allergic diseases.

  13. Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – Part 1: Measurement techniques, uncertainties and availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hassler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Peak stratospheric chlorofluorocarbon (CFC and other ozone depleting substance (ODS concentrations were reached in the mid- to late 1990s. Detection and attribution of the expected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer in an atmosphere with reduced ODSs as well as efforts to understand the evolution of stratospheric ozone in the presence of increasing greenhouse gases are key current research topics. These require a critical examination of the ozone changes with an accurate knowledge of the spatial (geographical and vertical and temporal ozone response. For such an examination, it is vital that the quality of the measurements used be as high as possible and measurement uncertainties well quantified. In preparation for the 2014 United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP/World Meteorological Organization (WMO Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, the SPARC/IO3C/IGACO-O3/NDACC (SI2N Initiative was designed to study and document changes in the global ozone profile distribution. This requires assessing long-term ozone profile data sets in regards to measurement stability and uncertainty characteristics. The ultimate goal is to establish suitability for estimating long-term ozone trends to contribute to ozone recovery studies. Some of the data sets have been improved as part of this initiative with updated versions now available. This summary presents an overview of stratospheric ozone profile measurement data sets (ground and satellite based available for ozone recovery studies. Here we document measurement techniques, spatial and temporal coverage, vertical resolution, native units and measurement uncertainties. In addition, the latest data versions are briefly described (including data version updates as well as detailing multiple retrievals when available for a given satellite instrument. Archive location information for each data set is also given.

  14. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  15. Climate Prediction Center (CPC)Stratospheric Monitoring Ozone Blended Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 3-D global ozone mixing ratio (ppm) and total column ozone (DU) dataset analyzed from daily Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Instrument(SBUV/2) and TIROS Operational...

  16. Effect of cultivar x ozone treatment interaction on the total polyphenols content and antioxidant activity of globe artichoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lombardo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Two globe artichoke cultivars (Violet de Provence and Apollo were harvested at an experimental field in Sicily, immediately washed with ozonised water and stored in: i normal atmosphere; ii ozone-enriched atmosphere for 3 days and for the last 4 days in normal atmosphere; iii ozone-enriched atmosphere for 7 days. A control (samples unwashed and stored at room temperature was also investigated. The effect of cultivar x ozone treatment interaction on water content losses, total polyphenols content and antioxidant activity was evaluated after 0, 3 and 7 days of storage. Washing with ozonised water and storage under O3- enriched atmosphere allowed higher water retention compared with the control, especially for Violet de Provence. After 3 days of storage in ozone-enriched atmosphere, on average of cultivars, the total polyphenols content and antioxidant activity increased by 11.7% and 5.5%, respectively. By contrast, after further 4 days of storage in ozonised atmosphere, Apollo and Violet de Provence displayed a significant reduction in their level of total polyphenols and aantioxidant activity. The exposure of globe artichoke heads to an ozone-enriched atmosphere should not exceed 3 days aimed at preserving their high nutritional value, with special emphasis on total polyphenols content.

  17. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles p. 967-973. [2] Smith, D. and A. Chughtai, Reaction kinetics of ozone at low concentrations with n-hexane soot. Journal of geophysical research, 1996. 101(D14): p. 19607-19,620. [3] Kamm, S., et al., The heterogeneous reaction of ozone with soot aerosol. Atmospheric Environment, 1999. 33(28): p. 4651-4661. [4] Stephens, S., M.J. Rossi, and D.M. Golden, The heterogeneous reaction of ozone on carbonaceous surfaces. International journal of chemical kinetics, 1986. 18(10): p. 1133-1149. [5] Pöschl, U., et al., Interaction of ozone and water vapor with spark discharge soot aerosol particles coated with benzo [a] pyrene: O3 and H2O adsorption, benzo [a] pyrene degradation, and atmospheric implications. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2001. 105(16): p. 4029-4041.

  18. Degradation of Acenaphthene by Ozone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the oxidation of acenaphthene (Ace), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with a saturated C-C bond by ozone and to characterize the intermediate products of ozonation. Methods Ozone was generated from filtered dry oxygen by an ozone generator and continually bubbled into a reactor containing 1g/L Ace dissolved in an acetonitrile/water solvent mixture (90/10, v/v) at a rate of 0.5 mg/s. HPLC was used to analyze the Ace concentration. Total organic carbon (TOC) was used to measure the amount of water soluble organic compounds. GC-MS was used to identify the ozonized products. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of activated sludge was used to characterize the biodegradability of ozonized products. Results During the ozonation process, Ace was degraded, new organic compounds were produced and these intermediate products were difficult mineralize by ozone, with increasing TOC of soluble organics. The ozonized products were degraded by activated sludge more easily than Ace. Conclusion Ozonation decomposes the Ace and improves its biodegradability. The ozonation combined with biological treatment is probably an efficient and economical way to mineralize acenaphthene in wastewater.

  19. Chemistry and Dynamics of the Unusual 2015 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch of the World Meteorological Organization includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the unusually large ozone hole of 2015 will be compared to ozone holes from 2003 to 2014 and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2012, 2013 and 2014 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The South Polar vortex of 2015 was unusually stable and long-lived, so ozone depletion lasted longer than seen in recent years. The ozone hole area, i.e. the area where total ozone is less that 220 DU, averaged over the worst 60 consecutive days was larger in 2015 than in any other year since the beginning of the ozone hole era in the early 1980s.

  20. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma on polyethylene for increased prosthesis adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vrekhem, S., E-mail: stijn.vanvrekhem@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cools, P. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Declercq, H. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Tongel, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185 13K12, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vercruysse, C.; Cornelissen, M. [Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Geyter, N.; Morent, R. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    Biopolymers are often subjected to surface modification in order to improve their surface characteristics. The goal of this study is to show the use of plasma technology to enhance the adhesion of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) shoulder prostheses. Two different plasma techniques (low pressure plasma activation and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization) are performed on UHMWPE to increase the adhesion between (1) the polymer and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and (2) the polymer and osteoblast cells. Both techniques are performed using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A previous paper showed that low pressure plasma activation of UHMWPE results in the incorporation of oxygen-containing functional groups, which leads to an increased surface wettability. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on UHMWPE results in a PMMA-like coating, which could be deposited with a high degree of control of chemical composition and layer thickness. The thin film also proved to be relatively stable upon incubation in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). This paper discusses the next stage of the study, which includes testing the adhesion of the plasma-activated and plasma-polymerized samples to bone cement through pull-out tests and testing the cell adhesion and proliferation on the samples. In order to perform the pull-out tests, all samples were cut to standard dimensions and fixed in bone cement in a reproducible way with a sample holder specially designed for this purpose. The cell adhesion and proliferation were tested by means of an MTS assay and live/dead staining after culturing MC3T3 osteoblast cells on UHMWPE samples. The results show that both plasma activation and plasma polymerization significantly improve the adhesion to bone cement and enhance cell adhesion and proliferation. In conclusion, it can be stated that the use of plasma technology can lead to an implant with improved quality and a subsequent

  1. Over-expression of ascorbate oxidase in the apoplast of transgenic tobacco results in altered ascorbate and glutathione redox states and increased sensitivity to ozone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanmartin, Maite; Drogoudi, Pavlina D.; Lyons, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) plants expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (EC.1.10.3.3) were used to examine the role of extracellular ascorbic acid in mediating tolerance to the ubiquitous air pollutant, ozone (O3). Three homozygous transgenic lines, chosen on the basis...... of a preliminary screen of AO activity in the leaves of 29 lines, revealed up to a 380-fold increase in AO activity, with expression predominantly associated with leaf cell walls. Overexpression of AO resulted in no change in the total ascorbate content recovered in apoplast washing fluid, but the redox state...... of ascorbate was reduced from 30% in wild-type leaves to below the threshold for detection in transgenic plants. Levels of ascorbic acid and glutathione in the symplast were not affected by AO overexpression, but the redox state of ascorbate was reduced, while that of glutathione was increased. AO...

  2. Instrumentation on commercial aircraft for monitoring the atmospheric composition on a global scale: the IAGOS system, technical overview of ozone and carbon monoxide measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillipe Nédélec

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the In-service Aircraft of a Global Observing System (IAGOS developed for operations on commercial long-range Airbus aircraft (A330/A340 for monitoring the atmospheric composition. IAGOS is the continuation of the former Measurement of OZone and water vapour on Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC programme (1994–2014 with five aircraft operated by European airlines over 20 yr. MOZAIC has provided unique scientific database used worldwide by the scientific community. In continuation of MOZAIC, IAGOS aims to equip a fleet up to 20 aircraft around the world and for operations over decades. IAGOS started in July 2011 with the first instruments installed aboard a Lufthansa A340-300, and a total of six aircraft are already in operation. We present the technical aircraft system concept, with basic instruments for O3, CO, water vapour and clouds; and optional instruments for measuring either NOy, NOx, aerosols or CO2/CH4. In this article, we focus on the O3 and CO instrumentation while other measurements are or will be described in specific papers. O3 and CO are measured by optimised but well-known methods such as UV absorption and IR correlation, respectively. We describe the data processing/validation and the data quality control for O3 and CO. Using the first two overlapping years of MOZAIC/IAGOS, we conclude that IAGOS can be considered as the continuation of MOZAIC with the same data quality of O3 and CO measurements.

  3. Stratospheric impact on tropospheric ozone variability and trends: 1990–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Hess

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stratospheric ozone on the interannual variability and trends in tropospheric ozone is evaluated between 30 and 90° N from 1990–2009 using ozone measurements and a global chemical transport model, the Community Atmospheric Model with chemistry (CAM-chem. Long-term measurements from ozonesondes, at 150 and 500 hPa, and the Measurements of OZone and water vapour by in-service Airbus aircraft programme (MOZAIC, at 500 hPa, are analyzed over Japan, Canada, the Eastern US and Northern and Central Europe. The measurements generally emphasize northern latitudes, although the simulation suggests that measurements over the Canadian, Northern and Central European regions are representative of the large-scale interannual ozone variability from 30 to 90° N at 500 hPa. CAM-chem is run with input meteorology from the National Center for Environmental Prediction; a tagging methodology is used to identify the stratospheric contribution to tropospheric ozone concentrations. A variant of the synthetic ozone tracer (synoz is used to represent stratospheric ozone. Both the model and measurements indicate that on large spatial scales stratospheric interannual ozone variability drives significant tropospheric variability at 500 hPa and the surface. In particular, the simulation and the measurements suggest large stratospheric influence at the surface sites of Mace Head (Ireland and Jungfraujoch (Switzerland as well as many 500 hPa measurement locations. Both the measurements and simulation suggest the stratosphere has contributed to tropospheric ozone trends. In many locations between 30–90° N 500 hPa ozone significantly increased from 1990–2000, but has leveled off since (from 2000–2009. The simulated global ozone budget suggests global stratosphere-troposphere exchange increased in 1998–1999 in association with a global ozone anomaly. Discrepancies between the simulated and measured ozone budget include a large underestimation of

  4. Multiple scattering calculation of the middle ultraviolet reaching the ground. [SST effects on ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shettle, E. P.; Green, A. E. S.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding the increase in the UV radiation as a function of wavelength due to changes in the amounts of ozone and various other parameters affecting the radiation in the atmosphere. Attention is given to the methods that can be used to solve the problem of the transfer of radiation through an absorbing and scattering atmosphere which includes aerosols. The multiple channel solution reported by Mudgett and Richards' (1971) is extended to vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres.

  5. Ozone absorption cross section measurements in the Wulf bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Hupalo, Peter; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-08-01

    A tandem dual-beam spectrometer has been developed to determine ozone absorption cross sections for 13 selected wavelengths between 750 and 975 nm at room temperature. The increasingly pronounced structure in this region may interfere with atmospheric trace gas transitions that are useful for remote sensing and complicate the measurement of aerosols. Ozone concentrations were determined by absorption at the common HeNe laser transition near 632.8 nm using the absolute cross section reported previously. The overall accuracy of these room temperature measurements is generally better than 2 percent. A synoptic near-IR spectrum scaled to these measurements is employed for comparison with results of previous studies.

  6. Increased Growth Factors Play a Role in Wound Healing Promoted by Noninvasive Oxygen-Ozone Therapy in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang; Meiping Guan; Cuihua Xie; Xiangrong Luo; Qian Zhang; Yaoming Xue

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxy...

  7. The role of midlatitude mixing barriers in creating the annual variation of total ozone in high northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, John; Karol, Svetlana; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Yudin, Valery

    2014-08-01

    Data from the HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) are used to investigate the annual variation of total column ozone in high northern latitudes. Downward transport of ozone-rich air by the residual mean circulation during autumn and winter bends ozone isopleths down and increases the high-latitude ozone amounts, leading to an ozone maximum at the end of the winter. During the summer months eddy mixing acts to restore pre-fall distributions of ozone. In this study the large-scale mixing in the lower stratosphere is analyzed using Nakamura's (1996) equivalent length formulation with observed and simulated ozone. The analysis of ozone mixing is performed in the tracer equivalent latitude-potential temperature coordinate system. Steep latitudinal gradients of ozone isopleths below about 500 K occur during the winter, where there are minima in the equivalent length, indicating barriers to mixing at 30°N-40°N. This transport barrier allows large ozone maxima to develop poleward of it. The barrier disappears over the summer, permitting latitudinal mixing of the high ozone air. Above 500 K mixing is more effective during the winter, so a large winter maximum does not occur. In both midlatitude and high latitude the lower stratospheric layer from 330 to 500 K doubles its ozone content from autumn to spring, compared with much smaller changes in the layer from 500 to 650 K. Our results confirm that the presence of the winter transport barrier in the lower stratosphere controls the seasonal variation of total ozone.

  8. Response of the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation to Increased Atmospheric CO2 in a Coupled Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Aixue; Meehl, Gerald A.; Washington, Warren M.; Dai, Aiguo

    2004-11-01

    Changes in the thermohaline circulation (THC) due to increased CO2 are important in future climate regimes. Using a coupled climate model, the Parallel Climate Model (PCM), regional responses of the THC in the North Atlantic to increased CO2 and the underlying physical processes are studied here. The Atlantic THC shows a 20-yr cycle in the control run, qualitatively agreeing with other modeling results. Compared with the control run, the simulated maximum of the Atlantic THC weakens by about 5 Sv (1 Sv 106 m3 s-1) or 14% in an ensemble of transient experiments with a 1% CO2 increase per year at the time of CO2 doubling. The weakening of the THC is accompanied by reduced poleward heat transport in the midlatitude North Atlantic. Analyses show that oceanic deep convective activity strengthens significantly in the Greenland Iceland Norway (GIN) Seas owing to a saltier (denser) upper ocean, but weakens in the Labrador Sea due to a fresher (lighter) upper ocean and in the south of the Denmark Strait region (SDSR) because of surface warming. The saltiness of the GIN Seas are mainly caused by an increased salty North Atlantic inflow, and reduced sea ice volume fluxes from the Arctic into this region. The warmer SDSR is induced by a reduced heat loss to the atmosphere, and a reduced sea ice flux into this region, resulting in less heat being used to melt ice. Thus, sea ice related salinity effects appear to be more important in the GIN Seas, but sea ice melt-related thermal effects seem to be more important in the SDSR region. On the other hand, the fresher Labrador Sea is mainly attributed to increased precipitation. These regional changes produce the overall weakening of the THC in the Labrador Sea and SDSR, and more vigorous ocean overturning in the GIN Seas. The northward heat transport south of 60°N is reduced with increased CO2, but increased north of 60°N due to the increased flow of North Atlantic water across this latitude.

  9. Increased cloud activation potential of secondary organic aerosol for atmospheric mass loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. King

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic particle mass loading from 1 to ≥100 μg m−3 on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN properties of mixed organic-sulfate particles was investigated in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. Mixed particles were produced by the condensation of organic molecules onto ammonium sulfate particles during the dark ozonolysis of α-pinene. A continuous-flow mode of the chamber provided stable conditions over long time periods, allowing for signal integration and hence increased measurement precision at low organic mass loadings representative of atmospheric conditions. CCN activity was measured at eight mass loadings for 80- and 100-nm particles grown on 50-nm sulfate seeds. A two-component (organic/sulfate Köhler model, which included the particle heterogeneity arising from DMA size selection and from organic volume fraction for the selected 80- and 100-nm particles, was used to predict CCN activity. For organic mass loadings of 2.9 μg m−3 and greater, the observed activation curves were well predicted using a single set of physicochemical parameters for the organic component. For mass loadings of 1.74 μg m−3 and less, the observed CCN activity increased beyond predicted values using the same parameters, implying changed physicochemical properties of the organic component. A sensitivity analysis suggests that a drop in surface tension must be invoked to explain quantitatively the CCN observations at low SOA particle mass loadings. Other factors, such as decreased molecular weight, increased density, or increased van't Hoff factor, can contribute to the explanation but are quantitatively insufficient as the full explanation.

  10. Low level of stratospheric ozone near the Jharia coal field in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nandita D Ganguly

    2008-02-01

    The Indian reserve of coking coal is mainly located in the Jharia coal field in Jharkhand. Although air pollution due to oxides and dioxides of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur is reported to have increased in this area due to large-scale opencast mining and coal fires, no significant study on the possible impact of coal fires on the stratospheric ozone concentration has been reported so far. The possible impact of coal fires, which have been burning for more than 90 years on the current stratospheric ozone concentration has been investigated using satellite based data obtained from Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS MLS), Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in this paper. The stratospheric ozone values for the years 1992–2007, in the 28–36 km altitude range near Jharia and places to its north are found to be consistently lower than those of places lying to its south (up to a radius of 1000 km around Jharia) by 4.0–20%. This low stratospheric ozone level around Jharia is being observed and reported for the first time. However, due to lack of systematic ground-based measurements of tropospheric ozone and vertical ozone profiles at Jharia and other far off places in different directions, it is difficult to conclude strongly on the existence of a relationship between pollution from coal fires and stratospheric ozone depletion.

  11. Seasonal prediction of US summertime ozone using statistical analysis of large scale climate patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a statistical model to predict June–July–August (JJA) daily maximum 8-h average (MDA8) ozone concentrations in the eastern United States based on large-scale climate patterns during the previous spring. We find that anomalously high JJA ozone in the East is correlated with these springtime patterns: warm tropical Atlantic and cold northeast Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs), as well as positive sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies over Hawaii and negative SLP anomalies over the Atlantic and North America. We then develop a linear regression model to predict JJA MDA8 ozone from 1980 to 2013, using the identified SST and SLP patterns from the previous spring. The model explains ∼45% of the variability in JJA MDA8 ozone concentrations and ∼30% variability in the number of JJA ozone episodes (>70 ppbv) when averaged over the eastern United States. This seasonal predictability results from large-scale ocean–atmosphere interactions. Warm tropical Atlantic SSTs can trigger diabatic heating in the atmosphere and influence the extratropical climate through stationary wave propagation, leading to greater subsidence, less precipitation, and higher temperatures in the East, which increases surface ozone concentrations there. Cooler SSTs in the northeast Pacific are also associated with more summertime heatwaves and high ozone in the East. On average, models participating in the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project fail to capture the influence of this ocean–atmosphere interaction on temperatures in the eastern United States, implying that such models would have difficulty simulating the interannual variability of surface ozone in this region. PMID:28223483

  12. Comparison of atmospheric microplasma and plasma jet irradiation for increasing of skin permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.; Tran, N. A.; Hayashida, K.; Blajan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric plasma is attracting interest for medical applications such as sterilization, treatment of cancer cells and blood coagulation. Application of atmospheric plasma in dermatology has potential as a novel tool for wound healing, skin rejuvenation and treatment of wrinkles. In this study, we investigated the enhancement of percutaneous absorption of dye as alternative agents of transdermal drugs. Hypodermic needles are often the only way to deliver large-molecule drugs into the dermis, although a safe transdermal drug delivery method that does not require needles would be desirable. We therefore explored the feasibility of using atmospheric microplasma irradiation to enhance percutaneous absorption of drugs, as an alternative delivery method to conventional hypodermic needles. Pig skin was used as a biological sample, exposed to atmospheric microplasma, and analyzed by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A tape stripping test, a representative method for evaluating skin barrier performance, was also conducted for comparison. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured and compared with and without atmospheric microplasma irradiation, to quantify water evaporation from the inner body through the skin barrier. The results show that the stratum corneum, the outermost skin layer, could be chemically and physically modified by atmospheric microplasma irradiation. Physical damage to the skin by microplasma irradiation and an atmospheric plasma jet was also assessed by observing the skin surface. The results suggest that atmospheric microplasma has the potential to enhance percutaneous absorption.

  13. Convective forcing of mercury and ozone in the Arctic boundary layer induced by leads in sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher W; Obrist, Daniel; Steffen, Alexandra; Staebler, Ralf M; Douglas, Thomas A; Richter, Andreas; Nghiem, Son V

    2014-02-06

    The ongoing regime shift of Arctic sea ice from perennial to seasonal ice is associated with more dynamic patterns of opening and closing sea-ice leads (large transient channels of open water in the ice), which may affect atmospheric and biogeochemical cycles in the Arctic. Mercury and ozone are rapidly removed from the atmospheric boundary layer during depletion events in the Arctic, caused by destruction of ozone along with oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to oxidized mercury (Hg(II)) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to snow and ice. Ozone depletion events can change the oxidative capacity of the air by affecting atmospheric hydroxyl radical chemistry, whereas atmospheric mercury depletion events can increase the deposition of mercury to the Arctic, some of which can enter ecosystems during snowmelt. Here we present near-surface measurements of atmospheric mercury and ozone from two Arctic field campaigns near Barrow, Alaska. We find that coastal depletion events are directly linked to sea-ice dynamics. A consolidated ice cover facilitates the depletion of Hg(0) and ozone, but these immediately recover to near-background concentrations in the upwind presence of open sea-ice leads. We attribute the rapid recoveries of Hg(0) and ozone to lead-initiated shallow convection in the stable Arctic boundary layer, which mixes Hg(0) and ozone from undepleted air masses aloft. This convective forcing provides additional Hg(0) to the surface layer at a time of active depletion chemistry, where it is subject to renewed oxidation. Future work will need to establish the degree to which large-scale changes in sea-ice dynamics across the Arctic alter ozone chemistry and mercury deposition in fragile Arctic ecosystems.

  14. Increased growth factors play a role in wound healing promoted by noninvasive oxygen-ozone therapy in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Luo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change) to grade 3 (wound healing). The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P ozone group than in control group (P ozone group than in control group. Ozone therapy promotes the wound healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415).

  15. Assessing the Influence of Indoor Exposure to "Outdoor Ozone" on the Relationship between Ozone and Short-term Mortality in US Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Weschler, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: City-to-city differences have been reported for the increase in short-term mortality associated with a given increase in ozone concentration (ozone mortality coefficient). Although ozone concentrations are monitored at central outdoor locations, a large fraction of total ozone exposur......: Differences in ozone mortality coefficients among cities appear to partially reflect differences in total ozone exposure resulting from differences in the amount of outdoor ozone that is transported indoors....

  16. Experimental studies on ozonation of ethylenethiourea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinyu Dong; Junwang Meng; Bo Yang; Yang Zhang; Jie Gan; Xi Shu; Jinian Shu

    2011-01-01

    The experimental study on ozonation of ethylenethiourea (ETU) is conducted. The reaction of gas-phase ETU with 0.63 × l06 mol/L ozone is carried out in a 200-L reaction chamber. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) resulted from the ozonation of gas-phase ETU is observed with a scanning mobility particle size (SMPS). The rapid exponential growth of SOA reveals that the atmospheric lifetime of ETU vapor towards ozone reaction is less than four days. The ozonation of dry ETU particles, ETU-contained water droplets and ETU aqueous solution is investigated with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUVATOFMS). The formation of 2-imidazoline is observed in the ozonation of dry ETU particles and ETU-contained water droplets. The formation of 2-imidazoline and ethylenerea is observed in the ozonation of ETU aqueous solution.

  17. Sensitivity of model assessments of high-speed civil transport effects on stratospheric ozone resulting from uncertainties in the NO x production from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, Sergei P.; Geller, Marvin A.; Yudin, Valery A.

    1999-11-01

    Lightning NOx production is one of the most important and most uncertain sources of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. To examine the role of NOx lightning production uncertainties in supersonic aircraft assessment studies, we have done a number of numerical calculations with the State University of New York at Stony Brook-Russian State Hydrometeorological Institute of Saint-Petersburg two-dimensional model. The amount of nitrogen oxides produced by lightning discharges was varied within its quoted uncertainty from 2 to 12 Tg N/yr. Different latitudinal, altitudinal, and seasonal distributions of lightning NOx production were considered. Results of these model calculations show that the assessment of supersonic aircraft impacts on the ozone layer is very sensitive to the strength of NOx production from lightning. The high-speed civil transport produced NOx leads to positive column ozone changes for lightning NOx production less than 4 Tg N/yr, and to total ozone decrease for lightning NOx production more than 5 Tg N/yr for the same NOx emission scenario. For large lightning production the ozone response is mostly decreasing with increasing emission index, while for low lightning production the ozone response is mostly increasing with increasing emission index. Uncertainties in the global lightning NOx production strength may lead to uncertainties in column ozone up to 4%. The uncertainties due to neglecting the seasonal variations of the lightning NOx production and its simplified latitude distribution are about 2 times less (1.5-2%). The type of altitude distribution for the lightning NOx production does not significally impact the column ozone, but is very important for the assessment studies of aircraft perturbations of atmospheric ozone. Increased global lightning NOx production causes increased total ozone, but for assessment of the column ozone response to supersonic aircraft emissions, the increase of lightning NOx production leads to column ozone

  18. Applications of ozone therapy in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shiva Gupta; D Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen, which is effectively used in the treatment of different diseases for more than 100 years. In the present era of increasing antibiotic resistance, ozone therapy is an alternative medical treatment that rationales to increase the amount of oxygen to the body through institution of ozone into the body. Owing to its beneficial biological properties including antimicrobial and immune-stimulating effects, ozone therapy has opened new vistas in treatment modali...

  19. Sensitivity analysis of surface ozone to emission controls in Beijing and its neighboring area during the 2008 Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen

    2012-01-01

    The regional air quality modeling system RAMS (regional atmospheric modeling system)-CMAQ (community multi-scale air quality modeling system) is applied to analyze temporal and spatial variations in surface ozone concentration over Beijing and its surrounding region from July to October 2008. Comparison of simulated and observed meteorological elements and concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone at one urban site and three rural sites during Olympic Games show that model can generally reproduce the main observed feature of wind, temperature and ozone, but NOx concentration is overestimated. Although ozone concentration decreased during Olympics, high ozone episodes occurred on 24 July and 24 August with concentration of 360 and 245 microg/m3 at Aoyuncun site, respectively. The analysis of sensitive test, with and without emission controls, shows that emission controls could reduce ozone concentration in the afternoon when ozone concentration was highest but increase it at night and in the morning. The evolution of the weather system during the ozone episodes (24 July and 24 August) indicates that hot and dry air and a stable weak pressure field intensified the production of ozone and allowed it to accumulate. Process analysis at the urban site and rural site shows that under favorable weather condition on 24 August, horizontal transport was the main contributor of the rural place and the pollution from the higher layer would be transported to the surface layer. On 24 July, as the wind velocity was smaller, the impact of transport on the rural place was not obvious.

  20. Ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term Solar Radiation Management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks such as ozone changes under this scenario. Including the composition changes, we find large reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, with implications for vitamin D production, and increases in surface ozone concentrations, both of which could be important for human health. We highlight that both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes should be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  1. Modeling of Regional Climate Change Effects on Ground-Level Ozone and Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Perry E.; Knowlton, Kim; Carr, Jessie L.; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse respiratory effects of ground-level ozone are well-established. Ozone is the air pollutant most consistently projected to increase under future climate change. Purpose To project future pediatric asthma emergency department visits associated with ground-level ozone changes, comparing 1990s to 2020s. Methods This study assessed future numbers of asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years using (1) baseline New York City metropolitan area emergency department rates, (2) a dose–response relationship between ozone levels and pediatric asthma emergency department visits, and (3) projected daily 8-hour maximum ozone concentrations for the 2020s as simulated by a global-to-regional climate change and atmospheric chemistry model. Sensitivity analyses included population projections and ozone precursor changes. This analysis occurred in 2010. Results In this model, climate change could cause an increase in regional summer ozone-related asthma emergency department visits for children aged 0–17 years of 7.3% across the New York City metropolitan region by the 2020s. This effect diminished with inclusion of ozone precursor changes. When population growth is included, the projections of morbidity related to ozone are even larger. Conclusions The results of this analysis demonstrate that the use of regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models make possible the projection of local climate change health effects for specific age groups and specific disease outcomes – such as emergency department visits for asthma. Efforts should be made to improve on this type of modeling to inform local and wider-scale climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. PMID:21855738

  2. 1,2-Dichlorohexafluoro-Cyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) a Potent Ozone Depleting Substance and Greenhouse Gas: Atmospheric Loss Processes, Lifetimes, and Ozone Depletion and Global Warming Potentials for the (E) and (Z) stereoisomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Smith, Shona C.; Jubb, Aaron M.; Portmann, Robert W.; Hall, Bradley D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric processing of (E)- and (Z)-1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) was examined in this work as the ozone depleting (ODP) and global warming (GWP) potentials of this proposed replacement compound are presently unknown. The predominant atmospheric loss processes and infrared absorption spectra of the R-316c isomers were measured to provide a basis to evaluate their atmospheric lifetimes and, thus, ODPs and GWPs. UV absorption spectra were measured between 184.95 to 230 nm at temperatures between 214 and 296 K and a parametrization for use in atmospheric modeling is presented. The Cl atom quantum yield in the 193 nm photolysis of R- 316c was measured to be 1.90 +/- 0.27. Hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) was determined to be a photolysis co-product with molar yields of 0.7 and 1.0 (+/-10%) for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c, respectively. The 296 K total rate coefficient for the O(1D) + R-316c reaction, i.e., O(1D) loss, was measured to be (1.56 +/- 0.11) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/ molecule/s and the reactive rate coefficient, i.e., R-316c loss, was measured to be (1.36 +/- 0.20) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/molecule/s corresponding to a approx. 88% reactive yield. Rate coefficient upper-limits for the OH and O3 reaction with R-316c were determined to be global annually averaged lifetimes for the (E)- and (Z)-R-316c isomers were calculated using a 2-D atmospheric model to be 74.6 +/- 3 and 114.1 +/-10 years, respectively, where the estimated uncertainties are due solely to the uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra. Stratospheric photolysis is the predominant atmospheric loss process for both isomers with the O(1D) reaction making a minor, approx. 2% for the (E) isomer and 7% for the (Z) isomer, contribution to the total atmospheric loss. Ozone depletion potentials for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c were calculated using the 2-D model to be 0.46 and 0.54, respectively. Infrared absorption spectra for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c were measured at 296 K and used to estimate their

  3. Experimental drought in a tropical rain forest increases soil carbon dioxide losses to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Cory C.; Wieder, William R.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    to the atmosphere both via increased soil O2 availability and through responses to elevated DOM concentrations.

  4. Ozone Monitoring Instrument Observations of Interannual Increases in SO2 Emissions from Indian Coal-fired Power Plants During 2005-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David D.; de Foy, Benjamin; Krotkov, Nickolay A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid growth of electricity demand and the absence of regulations, sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from coal-fired power plants in India have increased notably in the past decade. In this study, we present the first interannual comparison of SO2 emissions and the satellite SO2 observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for Indian coal-fired power plants during the OMI era of 2005-2012. A detailed unit-based inventory is developed for the Indian coal-fired power sector, and results show that its SO2 emissions increased dramatically by 71 percent during 2005-2012. Using the oversampling technique, yearly high-resolution OMI maps for the whole domain of India are created, and they reveal a continuous increase in SO2 columns over India. Power plant regions with annual SO2 emissions greater than 50 Gg year-1 produce statistically significant OMI signals, and a high correlation (R equals 0.93) is found between SO2 emissions and OMI-observed SO2 burdens. Contrary to the decreasing trend of national mean SO2 concentrations reported by the Indian Government, both the total OMI-observed SO2 and average SO2 concentrations in coal-fired power plant regions increased by greater than 60 percent during 2005-2012, implying the air quality monitoring network needs to be optimized to reflect the true SO2 situation in India.

  5. Polar stratospheric ozone: interactions with climate change, results from the EU project RECONCILE, and the 2010/11 Arctic ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    One of the most profound and well known examples of human impacts on atmospheric chemistry is the so called ozone hole. During the second half of the 20th century, anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) led to a significant increase in stratospheric chlorine levels and hence the rate of ozone removal by catalytic cycles involving chlorine. While CFCs were essentially banned by the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments, and stratospheric chlorine levels have recently started to decline again, another anthropogenic influence may at least delay the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer: climate change, with little doubt a result of human emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, has led to changes in stratospheric temperature and circulation. The large ozone losses that typically occur in polar regions in spring are particularly affected by these changes. Here, we give an overview of the ozone-climate interactions affecting polar stratospheric ozone loss, and present latest results from the international research project RECONCILE funded by the European Commission. Remaining open questions will be discussed including the possible impacts of recently suggested geoengineering concepts to artificially enhance the stratospheric aerosol loading. A special focus will also be put on the 2010/11 Arctic winter that saw the first Arctic Ozone hole, including an impact study on surface UV radiation in the densely populated northern mid-latitudes.

  6. Budget of tropospheric ozone during TOPSE from two chemical transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, L. K.; Hess, P.; Klonecki, A.; Tie, X.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Kinnison, D.; Brasseur, G.; Atlas, E.; Browell, E.; Cantrell, C.; Eisele, F.; Mauldin, R. L.; Merrill, J.; Ridley, B.; Shetter, R.

    2003-04-01

    The tropospheric ozone budget during the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) campaign has been studied using two chemical transport models (CTMs): HANK and the Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2). The two models have similar chemical schemes but use different meteorological fields, with HANK using MM5 (Pennsylvania State University, National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Modeling System) and MOZART-2 driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) fields. Both models simulate ozone in good agreement with the observations but underestimate NOx. The models indicate that in the troposphere, averaged over the northern middle and high latitudes, chemical production of ozone drives the increase of ozone seen in the spring. Both ozone gross chemical production and loss increase greatly over the spring months. The in situ production is much larger than the net stratospheric input, and the deposition and horizontal fluxes are relatively small in comparison to chemical destruction. The net production depends sensitively on the concentrations of H2O, HO2 and NO, which differ slightly in the two models. Both models underestimate the chemical production calculated in a steady state model using TOPSE measurements, but the chemical loss rates agree well. Measures of the stratospheric influence on tropospheric ozone in relation to in situ ozone production are discussed. Two different estimates of the stratospheric fraction of O3 in the Northern Hemisphere troposphere indicate it decreases from 30-50% in February to 15-30% in June. A sensitivity study of the effect of a perturbation in the vertical flux on tropospheric ozone indicates the contribution from the stratosphere is approximately 15%.

  7. A chemistry-transport model simulation of middle atmospheric ozone from 1980 to 2019 using coupled chemistry GCM winds and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damski, J.; Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kaurola, J.; Taalas, P.; Austin, J.; Butchart, N.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-05-01

    A global 40-year simulation from 1980 to 2019 was performed with the FinROSE chemistry-transport model based on the use of coupled chemistry GCM-data. The main focus of our analysis is on climatological-scale processes in high latitudes. The resulting trend estimates for the past period (1980-1999) agree well with observation-based trend estimates. The results for the future period (2000-2019) suggest that the extent of seasonal ozone depletion over both northern and southern high-latitudes has likely reached its maximum. Furthermore, while climate change is expected to cool the stratosphere, this cooling is unlikely to accelerate significantly high latitude ozone depletion. However, the recovery of seasonal high latitude ozone losses will not take place during the next 15 years.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation in the Arctic - The impact of potential ozone depletions and cloud effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Stamnes, Knut

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of ozone depletions/redistributions and particulate clouds on atmospheric cheating/photolysis rates and UV radiation reaching the biosphere are investigated by means of an atmospheric radiation model. Consideration is given to four types of particulate clouds prevalent in the summertime Arctic: stratospheric aerosols, tropospheric aerosols (Arctic haze), cirrus clouds, and stratus clouds. The effects of ozone depletion and vertical redistributions of ozone are also examined. Stratus clouds are found to provide significant protection from UV radiation exposure, but while stratospheric aerosols imply increased UVB exposure, Arctic haze results in a decrease. A redistribution of ozone from the stratosphere to the troposphere tends to decrease UV exposure, but for low solar elevations an increase may occur. A 20-percent ozone depletion leads to about 0.4 K/d cooling in the lower stratosphere, while redistribution of ozone from the stratosphere to the troposphere implies a warming of about 0.015 K/d in the upper troposphere.

  9. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  10. Airborne Dial Remote Sensing of the Arctic Ozone Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Martin; Renger, Wolfgang; Ehret, Gerhard

    1992-01-01

    A combined ozone and aerosol LIDAR was developed at the Institute of Physics of the Atmosphere at the DLR in Oberpfaffenhofen. It is an airborne version, that, based on the DIAL-principle, permits the recording of two-dimensional ozone profiles. This presentation will focus on the ozone-part; the aerosol subsection will be treated later.

  11. Ozone Minihole Found over Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Through a comprehensive analysis, researchers from the CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) discovered an ozone minihole, a large area with the lowest total ozone column (TOC, see figure), over the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau from Dec. 14 to 17, 2003.

  12. Atmospheric Chemistry in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, William H.

    The world is changing,and the atmosphere's composition is changing with it. Human activity is responsible for much of this. Global population growth and migration to urban centers, extensive biomass burning, the spread of fertilizer-intensive agribusiness, globalization of business and industry, rising standards of living in the developing world, and increased energy use fuels atmospheric change. If current practices continue, atmospheric increases are likely for the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide; and for the chemically active gases nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide,and ammonia. Increases in global tropospheric ozone and aerosols are a distinct possibility.

  13. Co-exposure to ultrafine particulate matter and ozone causes electrocardiogram changes indicative of increased arrhythmia risk in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies have shown a relationship between acute air pollution exposure and increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Due to the inherent complexity of air pollution, recent studies have focused on co-exposures to better understand potential interactions....

  14. Increasing external effects negate local efforts to control ozone air pollution: a case study of Hong Kong and implications for other Chinese cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Likun; Wang, Tao; Louie, Peter K K; Luk, Connie W Y; Blake, Donald R; Xu, Zheng

    2014-09-16

    It is challenging to reduce ground-level ozone (O3) pollution at a given locale, due in part to the contributions of both local and distant sources. We present direct evidence that the increasing regional effects have negated local control efforts for O3 pollution in Hong Kong over the past decade, by analyzing the daily maximum 8 h average O3 and Ox (=O3+NO2) concentrations observed during the high O3 season (September-November) at Air Quality Monitoring Stations. The locally produced Ox showed a statistically significant decreasing trend over 2002-2013 in Hong Kong. Analysis by an observation-based model confirms this decline in in situ Ox production, which is attributable to a reduction in aromatic hydrocarbons. However, the regional background Ox transported into Hong Kong has increased more significantly during the same period, reflecting contributions from southern/eastern China. The combined result is a rise in O3 and a nondecrease in Ox. This study highlights the urgent need for close cross-boundary cooperation to mitigate the O3 problem in Hong Kong. China's air pollution control policy applies primarily to its large cities, with little attention to developing areas elsewhere. The experience of Hong Kong suggests that this control policy does not effectively address secondary pollution, and that a coordinated multiregional program is required.

  15. Increased Growth Factors Play a Role in Wound Healing Promoted by Noninvasive Oxygen-Ozone Therapy in Diabetic Patients with Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change to grade 3 (wound healing. The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P<0.05. The wound size reduction was significantly more in ozone group than in control group (P<0.001. After treatment, the expressions of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF proteins at day 11 were significantly higher in ozone group than in control group. Ozone therapy promotes the wound healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415.

  16. An isotopomer strategy to detect plant acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusti, A.; Betson, T. R.; Schleucher, J.

    2009-04-01

    , but individual D isotopomer abundances are ultimately set by enzyme isotope effects. In tree-ring cellulose, abundance differences between exchanging and non-exchanging isotopomers reflect evaporative enrichment and may be exploited to reconstruct humidity. Finally, we have shown that abundance ratios of non-exchanging D isotopomers are wholly determined by biochemical isotope fractionations, independent of source water. Consequently, isotopomer ratios represent signals of leaf-level metabolic regulation, which are deposited in tree rings. For example, one isotopomer ratio responds to the CO2 concentration during photosynthesis. This effect reflects CO2-induced changes of the metabolic flux ratio of photosynthesis versus photorespiration. Photorespiration reduces the efficiency of photosynthesis, therefore this isotopomer ratio may reveal plant acclimation on time scales of decades, and associated trends in plant productivity. Combining signals reflecting metabolic regulation with climate signals opens the possibility to study acclimation of plants to increasing atmospheric CO2 and concomitant climatic changes, on time scales of decades and centuries.

  17. Fast increasing of surface ozone concentrations in Pearl River Delta characterized by a regional air quality monitoring network during 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinfeng; Lu, Keding; Lv, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhong, Liuju; Ou, Yubo; Chen, Duohong; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2014-01-01

    Based on the observation by a Regional Air Quality Monitoring Network including 16 monitoring stations, temporal and spatial variations of ozone (O3), NO2 and total oxidant (O(x)) were analyzed by both linear regression and cluster analysis. A fast increase of regional O3 concentrations of 0.86 ppbV/yr was found for the annual averaged values from 2006 to 2011 in Guangdong, China. Such fast O3 increase is accompanied by a correspondingly fast NO(x) reduction as indicated by a fast NO2 reduction rate of 0.61 ppbV/yr. Based on a cluster analysis, the monitoring stations were classified into two major categories--rural stations (non-urban) and suburban/urban stations. The O3 concentrations at rural stations were relatively conserved while those at suburban/urban stations showed a fast increase rate of 2.0 ppbV/yr accompanied by a NO2 reduction rate of 1.2 ppbV/yr. Moreover, a rapid increase of the averaged O3 concentrations in springtime (13%/yr referred to 2006 level) was observed, which may result from the increase of solar duration, reduction of precipitation in Guangdong and transport from Eastern Central China. Application of smog production algorithm showed that the photochemical O3 production is mainly volatile organic compounds (VOC)-controlled. However, the photochemical O3 production is sensitive to both NO(x) and VOC for O3 pollution episode. Accordingly, it is expected that a combined NO(x) and VOC reduction will be helpful for the reduction of the O3 pollution episodes in Pearl River Delta while stringent VOC emission control is in general required for the regional O3 pollution control.

  18. Ozone Layer Research and Technical Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on research and technical resources related to ozone layer science. This page provides links to research efforts led by organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the United Nations Environment Program, an

  19. Fast Flow Cavity Enhanced Ozone Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Naturally occurring in the stratosphere, ozone plays a significant role in many atmospheric reactions, cloud formation, and is the key player in shielding harmful UV...

  20. Sensitivities of NOx transformation and the effects on surface ozone and nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As precursors for tropospheric ozone and nitrate aerosols, Nitrogen oxides (NOx in present atmosphere and its transformation in responding to emission and climate perturbations are studied by CAM-Chem model and air quality measurements including National Emission Inventory (NEI, Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET and Environmental Protection Agency Air Quality System (EPA AQS. It is found that not only the surface ozone formation but also the nitrate formation is associated with the relative emissions of NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC. Due to the availability of VOC and associated NOx titration, ozone productions in industrial regions increase in warmer conditions and slightly decrease against NOx emission increase, which is converse to the response in farming region. The decrease or small increase in ozone concentrations over industrial regions result in the responded nitrate increasing rate staying above the increasing rate of NOx emissions. It is indicated that ozone concentration change is more directly affected by changes in climate and precursor emissions, while nitrate concentration change is also affected by local ozone production types and their seasonal transfer. The sensitivity to temperature perturbations shows that warmer climate accelerates the decomposition of odd nitrogen (NOy during the night. As a result, the transformation rate of NOx to nitrate decreases. Examinations on the historical emission and air quality records on typical pollution areas further confirm the conclusion drawn from modeling experiments.

  1. Photochemical Process Modeling and Analysis of Ozone Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 邱彤; 陈丙珍

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution in modern city and industrial zones has become a serious public concern in recent years in China. Significance of air quality assessment and emission control strategy design is increasing. Most studies in China focus on particulate matter (PM), especially PM2.5, while few account for photochemical secondary air pol-lutions represented by ozone (O3). In this paper, a procedure for air quality simulation with comprehensive air quality model with extensions (CAMx) is demonstrated for studying the photochemical process and ozone generation in the troposphere. As a case study, the CAMx photochemical grid model is used to model ozone over southern part of Beijing city in winter, 2011. The input parameters to CAMx include emission sources, meteorology field data, terrain definition, photolysis status, initial and boundary conditions. The simulation results are verified by theoretical analysis of the ozone generation tendency. The simulated variation tendency of domain-wide average value of hourly ozone concentration coincides reasonably well with the theoretical analysis on the atmospheric photochemical process, demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. An integrated model system that cooperates with CAMx will be established in our future work.

  2. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  3. Applications of ozone therapy in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen, which is effectively used in the treatment of different diseases for more than 100 years. In the present era of increasing antibiotic resistance, ozone therapy is an alternative medical treatment that rationales to increase the amount of oxygen to the body through institution of ozone into the body. Owing to its beneficial biological properties including antimicrobial and immune-stimulating effects, ozone therapy has opened new vistas in treatment modalities of dental pathologies for patients of all ages. The objective of this article is to review the literature available on applications of ozone in dentistry.

  4. Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone From Assimilation of Aura Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bowman, K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone is an atmospheric trace gas with multiple impacts on the environment. Global ozone fields are needed for air quality predictions, estimation of the ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface, climate-radiation studies, and ozone may also have an impact on longer-term weather predictions. We estimate global ozone fields in the stratosphere and troposphere by combining the data from the EOS Aura satellite with an ozone model using data assimilation. Ozone exhibits a large temporal variability in the lower stratosphere. Our previous work showed that assimilation of satellite data from limb-sounding geometry helps constrain ozone profiles in that region. We assimilated ozone data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) into the ozone system at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). Ozone is transported within a general circulation model (GCM) which includes parameterizations for stratospheric photochemistry, tropospheric chemistry, and a simple scheme for heterogeneous ozone loss. The focus of this study is on the representation of ozone in the lower stratosphere and tropospheric ozone columns. We plan to extend studies of tropospheric ozone distribution through assimilation of ozone data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Comparisons with ozone sondes and occultation data show that assimilation of Aura data provides a good representation of ozone gradients and variability in the lower stratosphere. We proceed by separating the contributions to temporal changes in the ozone field into those that are due to the model and those that are due to the assimilation of Aura data. We discuss the impacts of Aura data and their role in the representation of ozone variability in the lower stratosphere and troposphere.

  5. The Primary Study on the Regularity of Atmospheric Photochemical Process for Surface Ozone%地面臭氧光化学过程规律的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白建辉; 王明星

    2001-01-01

    给出了1996年夏季在广东肇庆鼎湖山对光化辐射、地面O3、NO、NO2浓度的观测结果,对影响地面O3、NO、NO2的主要因子进行了分析。晴天,地面O3、NO、NO2浓度有明显的日变化;阴天,它们的日变化比较复杂。晴天和阴天,在lnQUVB/m和lnQvis/m(其中QUVB为紫外B辐射,Qvis为可见光辐射,m为大气质量)与地面O3、NO,NO2浓度、整层大气水汽含量(q1、q2、q3、q4)之间存在着很好的相关关系。利用得到的关系式计算了地面O3浓度,在紫外和可见光波段,计算值与观测值符合得都比较好。%The observational results of surface ozone, NO, NO2 concentrations and solar actinic radiation during the summer of 1996 in Dinghushan biosphere reserve, Zhaoqing City, Guangdong Province are given. Good results were got from the analysis of key factors affecting the surface ozone, NO,NO2 concentrations. In the clear sky condition, surface ozone, NO, NO2 show a clear diurnal variation, and in cloudy sky condition, their diurnal variation is complicated. Both in clear sky and in cloudy sky conditions, there are good correlations between solar actinic radiation factors (lnQuvB/m and lnQvis/m, QuvB is the ultraviolet B radiation, Qvis is the visible radiation, m is the air mass) and the concentrations of the surface ozone, NO, NO2 and the water vapor content in whole atmospheric column (q1, q2, q3, q4 ). At last, the surface ozone concentration was calculated by using the formula we got, results show that calculated values are close to the observed both in UVB band and in visible band.

  6. The role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin B.; Pedersen, J. O. P.; Bondo, T.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol nucleation has been studied experimentally in purified, atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of water vapor, ozone, and sulfur dioxide. The results are compared with model calculations. It is found that an increase in ionization by a factor of 10 increases the production rate of stable...

  7. Recent Biomass Burning in the Tropics and Related Changes in Tropospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke; Chandra, J. R. S.; Duncan, B. N.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Torres, O.; Damon, M. R.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of chemical precursors of tropospheric ozone. In the tropics, biomass burning produces ozone enhancements over broad regions of Indonesia, Africa, and South America including Brazil. Fires are intentionally set in these regions during the dry season each year to clear cropland and to clear land for human/industrial expansion. In Indonesia enhanced burning occurs during dry El Nino conditions such as in 1997 and 2006. These burning activities cause enhancement in atmospheric particulates and trace gases which are harmful to human health. Measurements from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) from October 2004-November 2008 are used to evaluate the effects of biomass burning on tropical tropospheric ozone. These measurements show sizeable decreases approx.15-20% in ozone in Brazil during 2008 compared to 2007 which we attribute to the reduction in biomass burning. Three broad biomass burning regions in the tropics (South America including Brazil, western Africa, and Indonesia) were analyzed in the context of OMI/MLS measurements and the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model developed at Goddard Space Flight Center. The results indicate that the impact of biomass burning on ozone is significant within and near the burning regions with increases of approx.10-25% in tropospheric column ozone relative to average background concentrations. The model suggests that about half of the increases in ozone from these burning events come from altitudes below 3 km. Globally the model indicates increases of approx.4-5% in ozone, approx.7-9% in NO, (NO+NO2), and approx.30-40% in CO.

  8. Unusual discrepancy between TOMS and ground-based measurements of the total ozone in 2002-2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Jianchun; CHEN Hongbin; ZHANG Zhongbo; ZHAO Yanliang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Monitoring the atmospheric ozone is one of the key projects in the atmospheric and environmental sciences, and the decrease of ozone in stratosphere has aroused the interests of governments and public in the world[1-4].

  9. Increased reliability of passive mode-locking a multi-atmosphere TE CO2 laser by injection mode-locking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goor, van F.A.

    1986-01-01

    By injection of manosecond pulses from an AM mode-locked TEA CO2 laser in a passive mode-locked multi-atmosphere TE CO2 laser the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the generated subnanosecond pulses was increased to almost 100%.

  10. Change is in the air: impacts of the historical and predicted increase in atmospheric CO2 on pasture and prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas in the atmosphere has increased by almost 40% since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and is predicted to reach double the pre-Industrial concentration within 50 years. By stimulating leaf photosynthesis and reducing stomatal conductance to wat...

  11. A proposed potential role for increasing atmospheric CO2 as a promoter of weight gain and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Astrup, A

    2012-01-01

    , which in turn spills over to cerebrospinal fluids. Nerve cells in the hypothalamus that regulate appetite and wakefulness have been shown to be extremely sensitive to pH, doubling their activity if pH decreases by 0.1 units. We hypothesize that an increased acidic load from atmospheric CO2 may...

  12. Environmental effects of ozone depletion and its interactions with climate change: progress report, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This year the Montreal Protocol celebrates its 20th Anniversary. In September 1987, 24 countries signed the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. Today 191 countries have signed and have met strict commitments on phasing out of ozone depleting substances with the result that a 95% reduction of these substances has been achieved. The Montreal Protocol has also contributed to slowing the rate of global climate change, since most of the ozone depleting substances are also effective greenhouse gases. Even though much has been achieved, the future of the stratospheric ozone layer relies on full compliance of the Montreal Protocol by all countries for the remaining substances, including methyl bromide, as well as strict monitoring of potential risks from the production of substitute chemicals. Also the ozone depleting substances existing in banks and equipment need special attention to prevent their release to the stratosphere. Since many of the ozone depleting substances already in the atmosphere are long-lived, recovery cannot be immediate and present projections estimate a return to pre-1980 levels by 2050 to 2075. It has also been predicted that the interactions of the effects of the ozone layer and that of other climate change factors will become increasingly important.

  13. Diverse policy implications for future ozone and surface UV in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A. H.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Young, P. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the success of the Montreal Protocol in limiting emissions of ozone-depleting substances, concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane will control the evolution of total column and stratospheric ozone by the latter half of the 21st century. As the world proceeds down the path of reducing climate forcing set forth by the 2015 Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 21), a broad range of ozone changes are possible depending on future policies enacted. While decreases in tropical stratospheric ozone will likely persist regardless of the future emissions scenario, extratropical ozone could either remain weakly depleted or even increase well above historical levels, with diverse implication for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The ozone layer’s dependence on future emissions of these gases creates a complex policy decision space for protecting humans and ecosystems, which includes unexpected options such as accepting nitrous oxide emissions in order to maintain historical column ozone and surface UV levels.

  14. Stratospheric ozone, ultraviolet radiation and climate change; Ozone stratospherique, rayonnement ultraviolet et changement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, O. [Met Office Hadley Centre (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    It is well known that an overexposure to ultraviolet radiation is associated with a number of health risks such as an increased risk of cataracts and skin cancers. At a time when climate change is often blamed for all our environmental problems, what is the latest news about the stratospheric ozone layer and other factors controlling ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the Earth? Will the expected changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere and changes in our climate increase or decrease the risk for skin cancer? This article investigates the role of the various factors influencing ultraviolet radiation and presents the latest knowledge on the subject. (author)

  15. Latest tendency in the Antarctic ozone longitudinal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Grytsai, Asen; Klekociuk, Andrew; Evtushevsky, Olexander

    2014-05-01

    Significant ozone depletion was observed within the southern polar vortex during spring in the 1980s - early 1990s. Later, a stabilization in total ozone levels and ozone hole area has been observed. Atmosphere models predict a consequent recovery of the Antarctic ozone. Nevertheless, identification of the long-term processes is complicated by high interannual variability hiding their general regularities. In particular, a large stratosphere warming in 2002 resulted in significant increase in total ozone levels. The Antarctic ozone hole is formed inside polar stratospheric vortex, which is under influence of large-scale planetary waves. The components of the quasi-stationary wave (QSW) in the spring Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere is mainly contributed by zonal wave number 1 which in turn determines the location of the total ozone extremes in spring: QSW minimum (maximum) is located in the South Atlantic (Australian) sector. In our work the satellite data of TOMS/Nimbus-7, TOMS/Earth Probe and OMI/Aura (http://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/) have been used to investigate longitudinal distribution of the total ozone in Antarctic region. The gap in these satellite observations (1993-1995) was filled by the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis data (http://www.temis.nl/). Ozone distribution in the SH high and mid latitudes 80-50S were analyzed for southern spring season including months from September to November. The zonal distribution is considered along seven latitude circles from 80S to 50S with step of five degrees. To distinguish long-term processes and to obtain a quasi-stationary pattern, daily September - November ozone was averaged. Our previous study demonstrated a systematic eastward shift of the QSW minimum region. In this study, we extended the analysis to 2013 and obtained new results that exhibited a probable cessation in that eastward shift. Polynomial fit for all chosen latitudes is even evidence of a change in the tendency to opposite. It more time needs to

  16. Future Arctic ozone recovery: the importance of chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Ewa M.; Maycock, Amanda C.; Abraham, N. Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Dessens, Olivier; Pyle, John A.

    2016-09-01

    Future trends in Arctic springtime total column ozone, and its chemical and dynamical drivers, are assessed using a seven-member ensemble from the Met Office Unified Model with United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UM-UKCA) simulating the period 1960-2100. The Arctic mean March total column ozone increases throughout the 21st century at a rate of ˜ 11.5 DU decade-1, and is projected to return to the 1980 level in the late 2030s. However, the integrations show that even past 2060 springtime Arctic ozone can episodically drop by ˜ 50-100 DU below the corresponding long-term ensemble mean for that period, reaching values characteristic of the near-present-day average level. Consistent with the global decline in inorganic chlorine (Cly) over the century, the estimated mean halogen-induced chemical ozone loss in the Arctic lower atmosphere in spring decreases by around a factor of 2 between the periods 2001-2020 and 2061-2080. However, in the presence of a cold and strong polar vortex, elevated halogen-induced ozone losses well above the corresponding long-term mean continue to occur in the simulations into the second part of the century. The ensemble shows a significant cooling trend in the Arctic winter mid- and upper stratosphere, but there is less confidence in the projected temperature trends in the lower stratosphere (100-50 hPa). This is partly due to an increase in downwelling over the Arctic polar cap in winter, which increases transport of ozone into the polar region as well as drives adiabatic warming that partly offsets the radiatively driven stratospheric cooling. However, individual winters characterised by significantly suppressed downwelling, reduced transport and anomalously low temperatures continue to occur in the future. We conclude that, despite the projected long-term recovery of Arctic ozone, the large interannual dynamical variability is expected to continue in the future, thereby facilitating episodic reductions in springtime ozone columns

  17. Increased subaerial volcanism and the rise of atmospheric oxygen 2.5 billion years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, Lee R; Barley, Mark E

    2007-08-30

    The hypothesis that the establishment of a permanently oxygenated atmosphere at the Archaean-Proterozoic transition (approximately 2.5 billion years ago) occurred when oxygen-producing cyanobacteria evolved is contradicted by biomarker evidence for their presence in rocks 200 million years older. To sustain vanishingly low oxygen levels despite near-modern rates of oxygen production from approximately 2.7-2.5 billion years ago thus requires that oxygen sinks must have been much larger than they are now. Here we propose that the rise of atmospheric oxygen occurred because the predominant sink for oxygen in the Archaean era-enhanced submarine volcanism-was abruptly and permanently diminished during the Archaean-Proterozoic transition. Observations are consistent with the corollary that subaerial volcanism only became widespread after a major tectonic episode of continental stabilization at the beginning of the Proterozoic. Submarine volcanoes are more reducing than subaerial volcanoes, so a shift from predominantly submarine to a mix of subaerial and submarine volcanism more similar to that observed today would have reduced the overall sink for oxygen and led to the rise of atmospheric oxygen.

  18. Stratospheric Temperature Changes and Ozone Recovery in the 21st Century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yongyun; XIA Yan; GAO Mei; LU Daren

    2009-01-01

    Increasing greenhouse gases and likely ozone recovery will be the two most important factors influencing changes in stratospheric temperatures in the 21st century. The radiative effect of increasing greenhouse gases will cause cooling in the stratosphere, while ozone recovery will lead to stratospheric warming. To investigate how stratospheric temperatures change under the two opposite forcings in the 21st century, we use observed ozone and reanalysis data as well as simulation results from four coupled oceanic and atmospheric general circulation models (GISS-ER, GFDL-CM20, NCAR-CCSM3, and UKMO-HadCM3) used in the IPCC (Intergovernment Panel for Climate Change) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Observational analysis shows that total column ozone and lower stratospheric temperatures all show increasing in the past 10 years, while middle stratospheric temperatures demonstrate cooling. IPCC AR4 simulations show that greenhouse forcing alone will lead to stratospheric cooling. However, with forcing of both increasing greenhouse gases and ozone recovery, the middle stratosphere will be cooled, while the lower stratosphere will be warmed. Warming magnitudes vary from one model to another. UKMO-HadCM3 generates relatively strong warming for all three greenhouse scenarios, and warming extends to 40 hPa. GFDL-CM20 and NCAR-CCSM3 produce weak warming, and warming mainly exists at lower levels, below about 60 hPa. In addition, we also discuss the effect of temperature changes on ozone recovery.

  19. The recent increase of atmospheric methane from 10 years of ground-based NDACC FTIR observations since 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Conway, Stephanie; Strong, Kimberly; Smale, Dan; Turner, Alexander J.; Blumenstock, Thomas; Boone, Chris; Collaud Coen, Martine; Coulon, Ancelin; Garcia, Omaira; Griffith, David W. T.; Hase, Frank; Hausmann, Petra; Jones, Nicholas; Krummel, Paul; Murata, Isao; Morino, Isamu; Nakajima, Hideaki; O'Doherty, Simon; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Robinson, John; Sandrin, Rodrigue; Schneider, Matthias; Servais, Christian; Sussmann, Ralf; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    Changes of atmospheric methane total columns (CH4) since 2005 have been evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar observations carried out at 10 ground-based sites, affiliated to the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). From this, we find an increase of atmospheric methane total columns of 0.31 ± 0.03 % year-1 (2σ level of uncertainty) for the 2005-2014 period. Comparisons with in situ methane measurements at both local and global scales show good agreement. We used the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model tagged simulation, which accounts for the contribution of each emission source and one sink in the total methane, simulated over 2005-2012. After regridding according to NDACC vertical layering using a conservative regridding scheme and smoothing by convolving with respective FTIR seasonal averaging kernels, the GEOS-Chem simulation shows an increase of atmospheric methane total columns of 0.35 ± 0.03 % year-1 between 2005 and 2012, which is in agreement with NDACC measurements over the same time period (0.30 ± 0.04 % year-1, averaged over 10 stations). Analysis of the GEOS-Chem-tagged simulation allows us to quantify the contribution of each tracer to the global methane change since 2005. We find that natural sources such as wetlands and biomass burning contribute to the interannual variability of methane. However, anthropogenic emissions, such as coal mining, and gas and oil transport and exploration, which are mainly emitted in the Northern Hemisphere and act as secondary contributors to the global budget of methane, have played a major role in the increase of atmospheric methane observed since 2005. Based on the GEOS-Chem-tagged simulation, we discuss possible cause(s) for the increase of methane since 2005, which is still unexplained.

  20. Observations of ozone transport from the free troposphere to the Los Angeles basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Aikin, K. C.; Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J.; Brown, S. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dube, W. P.; Flynn, J. H.; Graus, M.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B. L.; Nedelec, P.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Smit, H.; Thouret, V.; Wagner, N. L.

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of in situ airborne measurements from the CalNex 2010 field experiment (Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) show that ozone in the boundary layer over Southern California was increased by downward mixing of air from the free troposphere (FT). The chemical composition, origin, and transport of air upwind and over Los Angeles, California, were studied using measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, reactive nitrogen species, and meteorological parameters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft on 18 research flights in California in May and June 2010. On six flights, multiple vertical profiles from 0.2-3.5 km above ground level were conducted throughout the Los Angeles (LA) basin and over the Pacific Ocean. Gas phase compounds measured in 32 vertical profiles are used to characterize air masses in the FT over the LA basin, with the aim of determining the source of increased ozone observed above the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Four primary air mass influences were observed regularly in the FT between approximately 1 and 3.5 km altitude: upper tropospheric air, long-range transport of emissions, aged regional emissions, and marine air. The first three air mass types accounted for 89% of the FT observations. Ozone averaged 71 ppbv in air influenced by the upper troposphere, 69 ppbv in air containing emissions transported long distances, and 65 ppbv in air with aged regional emissions. Correlations between ozone and CO, and ozone and nitric acid, demonstrate entrainment of ozone from the FT into the LA PBL. Downward transport of ozone-rich air from the FT into the PBL contributes to the ozone burden at the surface in this region and makes compliance with air quality standards challenging.

  1. The impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rockett; Dubey, M.K.; Wuebbles, D. J.; S. C. Olsen; W. Jia; Wang, D.

    2012-01-01

    The prospective future adoption of hydrogen to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question whether the adoption would have adverse effects on stratospheric ozone. The possibility of these undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and chemistry, especially on stratospheri...

  2. Impact of a future H2-based road transportation sector on the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere – Part 2: Stratospheric ozone

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, D.; W. Jia; S. C. Olsen; Wuebbles, D. J.; Dubey, M.K.; A. A. Rockett

    2013-01-01

    The prospective future adoption of molecular hydrogen (H2) to power the road transportation sector could greatly improve tropospheric air quality but also raises the question of whether the adoption would have adverse effects on the stratospheric ozone. The possibility of undesirable impacts must be fully evaluated to guide future policy decisions. Here we evaluate the possible impact of a future (2050) H2-based road transportation sector on stratospheric composition and che...

  3. Response of lightning NOx emissions and ozone production to climate change: Insights from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, D. L.; Doherty, R. M.; Wild, O.; Young, P. J.; Butler, A.

    2016-05-01

    Results from an ensemble of models are used to investigate the response of lightning nitrogen oxide emissions to climate change and the consequent impacts on ozone production. Most models generate lightning using a parameterization based on cloud top height. With this approach and a present-day global emission of 5 TgN, we estimate a linear response with respect to changes in global surface temperature of +0.44 ± 0.05 TgN K-1. However, two models using alternative approaches give +0.14 and -0.55 TgN K-1 suggesting that the simulated response is highly dependent on lightning parameterization. Lightning NOx is found to have an ozone production efficiency of 6.5 ± 4.7 times that of surface NOx sources. This wide range of efficiencies across models is partly due to the assumed vertical distribution of the lightning source and partly to the treatment of nonmethane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) chemistry. Careful consideration of the vertical distribution of emissions is needed, given its large influence on ozone production.

  4. Ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Nowack

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term Solar Radiation Management (SRM. Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere–ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks such as ozone changes under this scenario. Including the composition changes, we find large reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, with implications for vitamin D production, and increases in surface ozone concentrations, both of which could be important for human health. We highlight that both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes should be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  5. Relationship between ozone and the air pollutants in Peninsular Malaysia for 2003 retrieved from SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. C.; Lim, H. S.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.

    2013-05-01

    Since few decades ago, air pollution has become a hot topic of environmental and atmospheric research due to the impact of air pollution on human health. Ozone is one of the important chemical constituent of the atmosphere, which plays a key role in atmospheric energy budget and chemistry, air quality and global change. Results from the analysis of the retrieved monthly data from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) were utilized, in order to analyze the impact of air pollutants (CO2, CH4, H2O, and NO2) on the ozone in Peninsular Malaysia for 2003 using multiple regression analysis. SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT as part of the atmospheric chemistry payload of the third European Space Agency (ESA) Earth observation, is the first satellite instrument whose measurements is enough precise and sensitive for all the greenhouse gases to make observation at all atmospheric altitude levels down to the Earth's surface. Among the four pollutants, ozone was most affected by water vapor (H2O vapor), indicated by a strong beta coefficient (-0.769 - 0.997), depends on the seasonal variety. In addition, CO2 also shows a strong Beta coefficient (-0.654 - 0.717) and also affected by the seasonal variation. The variation of pollutants on the average explains change 50.1% of the ozone. This means that about 50.1% of the ozone is attributed to these pollutant gases. The SCIAMACHY data and the satellite measurements successfully identify the increase of the atmospheric air pollutants over the study area.

  6. Heterogeneous Catalytic Ozonization of Sulfosalicylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of heterogeneous catalytic ozonization of sulfo-salicylic acid (SSal). It was found that catalytic ozonization in the presence of Mn-Zr-O (a modified manganese dioxide supported on silica gel) had significantly enhanced the removal rate (72%) of total organic carbon (TOC) compared with that of ozonization alone (19%). The efficient removal rate of TOC was probably due to increasing the adsorption ability of catalyst and accelerating decomposition of ozone to produce more powerful oxidants than ozone.

  7. Long-term trends of surface ozone and its influencing factors at the Mt Waliguan GAW station, China - Part 1: Overall trends and characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wanyun; Lin, Weili; Xu, Xiaobin; Tang, Jie; Huang, Jianqing; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Xiaochun

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important atmospheric oxidant, greenhouse gas and atmospheric pollutant at the same time. The oxidation capacity of the atmosphere, climate, human and vegetation health can be impacted by the increase of the ozone level. Therefore, long-term determination of trends of baseline ozone is highly needed information for environmental and climate change assessment. So far, studies on the long-term trends of ozone at representative sites are mainly available for European and North American sites. Similar studies are lacking for China and many other developing countries. Measurements of surface ozone were carried out at a baseline Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) station in the north-eastern Tibetan Plateau region (Mt Waliguan, 36°17' N, 100°54' E, 3816 m a.s.l.) for the period of 1994 to 2013. To uncover the variation characteristics, long-term trends and influencing factors of surface ozone at this remote site in western China, a two-part study has been carried out, with this part focusing on the overall characteristics of diurnal, seasonal and long-term variations and the trends of surface ozone. To obtain reliable ozone trends, we performed the Mann-Kendall trend test and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) analysis on the ozone data. Our results confirm that the mountain-valley breeze plays an important role in the diurnal cycle of surface ozone at Waliguan, resulting in higher ozone values during the night and lower ones during the day, as was previously reported. Systematic diurnal and seasonal variations were found in mountain-valley breezes at the site, which were used in defining season-dependent daytime and nighttime periods for trend calculations. Significant positive trends in surface ozone were detected for both daytime (0.24 ± 0.16 ppbv year-1) and nighttime (0.28 ± 0.17 ppbv year-1). The largest nighttime increasing rate occurred in autumn (0.29 ± 0.11 ppbv year-1), followed by spring (0.24 ± 0.12 ppbv year-1), summer (0.22 ± 0

  8. Evolution of microwave limb sounder ozone and the polar vortex during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of polar ozone observed by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is described for the northern hemisphere (NH) winters of 1991/1992, 1992/1993, and 1993/1994 and the southern hemisphere (SH) winters of 1992 and 1993. Imterannual and interhemispheric variability in polar ozone evolution are closely related to differences in the polar vortex and to the frequency, duration and strength of stratospheric sudden warmings. Ozone in the midstratospheric vortices increases during the winter, with largest increases associated with stratospheric warmings and a much larger increase in the NH than in the SH. A smaller NH increase was observed in 1993/1994, when the middle stratospheric vortex was stronger. During strong stratospheric warmings in the NH, the upper stratospheric vortex may be so much eroded that it presents little barrier to poleward transport; in contrast, the SH vortex remains strong throughout the stratosphere during wintertime warmings, and ozone increases only below the mixing ratio peak, due to enhanced diabatic descent. Ozone mixing ratios decrease rapidly in the lower stratosphere in both SH late winters, as expected from chemical destruction due to enhanced reactive chlorine. The interplay between dynamics and chemistry is more complex in the NH lower stratosphere and interannual variability is greater. Evidence has previously been shown for chemical ozone destruction in the 1991/1992 and 1992/1993 winters. We show here evidence suggesting some chemical destruction in late February and early March 1994. In the NH late winter lower stratosphere the pattern of high-ozone values (typical of the vortex) seen in mid-latitudes is related to the strength of the lower-stratospheric vortex, with the largest areal extent of high ozone outside the vortex in 1994, when the lower stratospheric vortex is relatively weak, and the least extent in 1993 when the lower stratospheric vortex is strongest.

  9. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  10. Tracer-tracer relations as a tool for research on polar ozone loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rolf

    2010-07-01

    The report includes the following chapters: (1) Introduction: ozone in the atmosphere, anthropogenic influence on the ozone layer, polar stratospheric ozone loss; (2) Tracer-tracer relations in the stratosphere: tracer-tracer relations as a tool in atmospheric research; impact of cosmic-ray-induced heterogeneous chemistry on polar ozone; (3) quantifying polar ozone loss from ozone-tracer relations: principles of tracer-tracer correlation techniques; reference ozone-tracer relations in the early polar vortex; impact of mixing on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex; impact of mesospheric intrusions on ozone-tracer relations in the stratospheric polar vortex calculation of chemical ozone loss in the arctic in March 2003 based on ILAS-II measurements; (4) epilogue.

  11. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Kaifel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology.

    The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile. The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III measurements over the years 1995–2007. In total, four different combinations (modes for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile are available.

    The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian

  12. Representing ozone extremes in European megacities: the importance of resolution in a global chemistry climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Stock

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuing growth of the world's urban population has led to an increasing number of cities with more than 10 million inhabitants. The higher emissions of pollutants, coupled to higher population density, makes predictions of air quality in these megacities of particular importance from both a science and a policy perspective. Global climate models are typically run at coarse resolution to enable both the efficient running of long time integrations, and the ability to run multiple future climate scenarios. However, when considering surface ozone concentrations at the local scale, coarse resolution can lead to inaccuracies arising from the highly non-linear ozone chemistry and the sensitivity of ozone to the distribution of its precursors on smaller scales. In this study, we use UM-UKCA, a global atmospheric chemistry model, coupled to the UK Met Office Unified Model, to investigate the impact of model resolution on tropospheric ozone, ranging from global to local scales. We focus on the model's ability to represent the probability of high ozone concentrations in the summer and low ozone concentrations, associated with polluted megacity environments, in the winter, and how this varies with horizontal resolution. We perform time-slice integrations with two model configurations at typical climate resolution (CR, ~150 km and at a higher resolution (HR, ~40 km. The CR configuration leads to overestimation of ozone concentrations on both regional and local scales, while it gives broadly similar results to the HR configuration on the global scale. The HR configuration is found to produce a more realistic diurnal cycle of ozone concentrations and to give a better representation of the probability density function of ozone values in urban areas such as the megacities of London and Paris. We discuss the possible causes for the observed difference in model behaviour between CR and HR configurations and estimate the relative contribution of chemical and

  13. The search for signs of recovery of the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C; Andersen, Signe Bech

    2006-05-04

    Evidence of mid-latitude ozone depletion and proof that the Antarctic ozone hole was caused by humans spurred policy makers from the late 1980s onwards to ratify the Montreal Protocol and subsequent treaties, legislating for reduced production of ozone-depleting substances. The case of anthropogenic ozone loss has often been cited since as a success story of international agreements in the regulation of environmental pollution. Although recent data suggest that total column ozone abundances have at least not decreased over the past eight years for most of the world, it is still uncertain whether this improvement is actually attributable to the observed decline in the amount of ozone-depleting substances in the Earth's atmosphere. The high natural variability in ozone abundances, due in part to the solar cycle as well as changes in transport and temperature, could override the relatively small changes expected from the recent decrease in ozone-depleting substances. Whatever the benefits of the Montreal agreement, recovery of ozone is likely to occur in a different atmospheric environment, with changes expected in atmospheric transport, temperature and important trace gases. It is therefore unlikely that ozone will stabilize at levels observed before 1980, when a decline in ozone concentrations was first observed.

  14. Characterising the three-dimensional ozone distribution of a tidally locked Earth-like planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proedrou, Elisavet; Hocke, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the 3D ozone distribution of a tidally locked Earth-like exoplanet using the high-resolution, 3D chemistry-climate model CESM1(WACCM) and study how the ozone layer of a tidally locked Earth (TLE) (Ω _{TLE}= 1/365 days) differs from that of our present-day Earth (PDE) (Ω _{PDE}= 1/1 day). The middle atmosphere reaches a steady state asymptotically within the first 80 days of the simulation. An upwelling, centred on the subsolar point, is present on the day side while a downwelling, centred on the antisolar point, is present on the night side. In the mesosphere, we find similar global ozone distributions for the TLE and the PDE, with decreased ozone on the day side and enhanced ozone on the night side. In the lower mesosphere, a jet stream transitions into a large-scale vortex around a low-pressure system, located at low latitudes of the TLE night side. In the middle stratosphere, the concentration of odd oxygen is approximately equal to that of the ozone [({O}x) ≈ ({O}3)]. At these altitudes, the lifetime of odd oxygen is ˜16 h and the transport processes significantly contribute to the global distribution of stratospheric ozone. Compared to the PDE, where the strong Coriolis force acts as a mixing barrier between low and high latitudes, the transport processes of the TLE are governed by jet streams variable in the zonal and meridional directions. In the middle stratosphere of the TLE, we find high ozone values on the day side, due to the increased production of atomic oxygen on the day side, where it immediately recombines with molecular oxygen to form ozone. In contrast, the ozone is depleted on the night side, due to changes in the solar radiation distribution and the presence of a downwelling. As a result of the reduced Coriolis force, the tropical and extratropical air masses are well mixed and the global temperature distribution of the TLE stratosphere has smaller horizontal gradients than the PDE. Compared to the PDE, the total ozone column

  15. A model intercomparison of changes in the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory, J; Dixon, K; Stouffer, R.; Weaver, A.; E. Driesschaert; Eby, M.; Fichefet, T.; Hasumi, H.; Hu, A.; J. Jungclaus; Kamenkovich, I.; A. Levermann; Montoya, M.; Murakami, S.; Nawrath , S.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, integrations with a common design have been undertaken with eleven different climate models to compare the response of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation ( THC) to time-dependent climate change caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. Over 140 years, during which the CO2 concentration quadruples, the circulation strength declines gradually in all models, by between 10 and 50%. No model shows a rapid or complete collapse, desp...

  16. Modelling of Current Density Redistribution in Hollow Needle to Plate Electrical Discharge Designed for Ozone Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriha, Vitezslav

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasma of atmospheric pressure electrical discharges in flowing air can be used to generation of ozone. We have been observed two modes of discharge burning in a hollow needle to plane electrodes configuration studied in the ozone generation experiments: A low current diffuse mode is characterized by increasing of the ozone production with the discharge current; a high current filamentary mode is disadvantageous for the ozone generation(the ozone production decreases when the discharge current increases). A possible interpretation of this effect is following: The filamentary mode discharge current density is redistributed and high current densities in filaments cores lead to degradation of the ozone generation. Local fields in the discharge can be modified by charged metallic and/or dielectric components (passive modulators) in the discharge space. An interactive numerical model has been developed for this purpose. This model is based on Ferguson's polynomial objects for both the discharge chamber scene modelling and the discharge fields analyzing. This approach allows intuitive modifications of modulators shapes and positions in 3D scene followed by quantitative comparison of the current density distribution with previous configurations.

  17. Stratospheric Water and OzOne Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Stratospheric Water and Ozone Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set is a merged record of stratospheric ozone and water vapor measurements taken by a number of...

  18. Ozone and UV research at Finnish Meteorological Inst.: review of selected results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P.; Koskela, T.; Damski, J.; Supperi, A. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E. [Finnish Meteorologican Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory; Ginzburg, M. [Servicio Meteorologico Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dijkhuis, J.L. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). EUMETSAT

    1995-12-31

    Ozone and UV radiation research have become an important part of atmospheric research at Finnish Meteorological Institute after the discovery of chlorine based ozone loss in the Antarctic stratosphere

  19. Short-lived halocarbons efficient at influencing climate through ozone loss in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn; Montzka, Steven; Rap, Alex; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu

    2015-04-01

    Halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) of both natural and anthropogenic origin are a significant source of atmospheric bromine, chlorine and iodine. Due to relatively short atmospheric lifetimes (typically disproportionately large climate impact compared to other altitudes. Here we present chemical transport model simulations that quantify VSLS-driven ozone loss in the UTLS and infer the climate relevance of these ozone perturbations using a radiative transfer model. Our results indicate that through their impact on UTLS ozone, VSLS are efficient at influencing climate. We calculate a whole atmosphere global mean radiative effect (RE) of -0.20 (-0.16 to -0.23) Wm-2 from natural and anthropogenic VSLS-driven ozone loss, including a tropospheric contribution of -0.12 Wm-2. In the stratosphere, the RE due to ozone loss from natural bromine-containing VSLS (e.g. CHBr3, CH2Br2) is almost half of that from long-lived anthropogenic compounds (e.g. CFCs) and normalized by equivalent chlorine is ~4 times larger. We show that the anthropogenic chlorine-containing VSLS, not regulated by the Montreal Protocol, also contribute to ozone loss in the UTLS and that the atmospheric concentration of dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), the most abundant of these, is increasing rapidly. Finally, we present evidence that VSLS have made a small yet previously unrecognized contribution to the ozone-driven radiative forcing of climate since pre-industrial times of -0.02 (-0.01 to -0.03) Wm-2. Given the climate leverage that VSLS possess, future increases to their emissions, either through continued industrial or altered natural processes, may be important for future climate forcing.

  20. Response of lightning NOx emissions and ozone production to climate change:Insights from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Results from an ensemble of models are used to investigate the response of lightning nitrogen oxide emissions to climate change and the consequent impacts on ozone production. Most models generate lightning using a parameterization based on cloud top height. With this approach and a present-day global emission of 5 TgN, we estimate a linear response with respect to changes in global surface temperature of +0.44 ± 0.05 TgN K−1. However, two models using alternative approaches give +0.14 and −0...

  1. Study of the superficial ozone concentrations in the atmosphere of Comunidad de Madrid using passive samplers Estudio de las concentraciones de ozono superficial en la atmósfera de la Comunidad de Madrid usando muestreadores pasivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Díaz Ramiro

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is a secondary atmospheric pollutant which is generated for photochemical reactions of volatil organic compounds (VOC’s and nitrogen oxides (NOx. In Spain the ozone is a big problem as a consequence of the solar radiation to reach high levels. Exposure over a period of time to elevated ozone concentrations can cause damage in the public health and alterations in the vegetation.The aim of this study is to carry out the development and validation of a measurement method to let asses the superficial ozone levels in the Comunidad de Madrid, by identifing the zones more significants, where to measure with UV photometric monitors (automatics methods this pollutant and where the health and the vegetation can be affected. To such effect, passive samplers are used, which have glass fiber filters coated with a solution of sodium nitrite, potassium carbonate, glycerol and water. The nitrite ion in the presence of ozone is oxidized to nitrato ion, which it is extrated with ultrapure water and analyzed for ion chromatography, by seen proportional to the concentration existing in the sampling point.The results of validation from field tests indicate a excellent correlation between the passive and the automatic method.The higher superficial ozone concentrations are placed in rural zones, distanced of emission focus of primary pollutants (nitrogen oxides and volatil organic compounds... principally in direction soutwest and northwest of the Comunidad of Madrid.El ozono es un contaminante atmosférico secundario formado por reacciones fotoquímicas de compuestos orgánicos volátiles (COV y óxidos de nitrógeno (NOx. En España, el ozono es un gran problema como consecuencia de los altos niveles alcanzados por la radiación solar. Exposiciones periódicas a concentraciones elevadas de ozono, pueden causar daños en la salud pública y alteraciones en la vegetación.El objetivo del presente estudio es desarrollar y validar un método de medida que

  2. Future local and remote influences on Mediterranean ozone air quality and climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steve; Martin, Maria Val; Emmons, Louisa; Rap, Alex; Heald, Colette; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is expected to display large increases in population over the coming decades, and to exhibit strong sensitivity to projected climate change, with increasing frequency of extreme summer temperatures and decreases in precipitation. Understanding of how these changes will affect atmospheric composition in the region is limited. The eastern Mediterranean basin has been shown to exhibit a pronounced summertime local maximum in tropospheric ozone, which impacts both local air quality and the atmospheric radiation balance. In summer, the region is subject to import of pollution from Northern Europe in the boundary layer and lower troposphere, from North American sources in the large-scale westerly flow of the free mid and upper-troposphere, as well as import of pollution lofted in the Asian monsoon and carried west to the eastern Mediterranean in anticyclonic flow in the upper troposphere over north Africa. In addition, interactions with the land-surface through biogenic emission sources and dry deposition play important roles in the Mediterranean ozone budget. Here we use the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) to investigate how tropospheric ozone in the Mediterranean region responds to climate, land surface and global emissions changes between present day and 2050. We simulate climate and atmospheric composition for the year 2050, based on greenhouse gas abundances, trace gas and aerosol emissions and land cover and use from two representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP4.5 & RCP8.5), designed for use by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5(CMIP5) experiments in support of the IPCC. By comparing these simulations with a present-day scenario, we investigate the effects of predicted changes in climate and emissions on air quality and climate forcing over the Mediterranean region. The simulations suggest decreases in boundary layer ozone and sulfate aerosol throughout the tropospheric column over the Mediterranean

  3. Extrapolating future Arctic ozone losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Knudsen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Future increases in the concentration of greenhouse gases and water vapour are likely to cool the stratosphere further and to increase the amount of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs. Future Arctic PSC areas have been extrapolated using the highly significant trends in the temperature record from 1958–2001. Using a tight correlation between PSC area and the total vortex ozone depletion and taking the decreasing amounts of ozone depleting substances into account we make empirical estimates of future ozone. The result is that Arctic ozone losses increase until 2010–2020 and only decrease slightly up to 2030. This approach is an alternative method of prediction to that based on the complex coupled chemistry-climate models (CCMs.

  4. Springtime daily variations in lower-tropospheric ozone over east Asia: the role of cyclonic activity and pollution as observed from space with IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Cuesta, J.; Doche, C.; Foret, G.; Beekmann, M.; Cheiney, A.; Wang, Y.; Cai, Z.; Liu, Y.; Takigawa, M.; Kanaya, Y.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2015-09-01

    We use satellite observations from IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) on board the MetOp-A satellite to evaluate the springtime daily variations in lower-tropospheric ozone over east Asia. The availability of semi-independent columns of ozone from the surface up to 12 km simultaneously with CO columns provides a powerful observational data set to diagnose the processes controlling tropospheric ozone enhancement on synoptic scales. By combining IASI observations with meteorological reanalyses from ERA-Interim, we develop an analysis method based only on IASI ozone and CO observations to identify the respective roles of the stratospheric source and the photochemical source in ozone distribution and variations over east Asia. The succession of low- and high-pressure systems drives the day-to-day variations in lower-tropospheric ozone. A case study analysis of one frontal system and one cut-off low system in May 2008 shows that reversible subsiding and ascending ozone transfers in the upper-troposphere-lower-stratosphere (UTLS) region, due to the tropopause perturbations occurring in the vicinity of low-pressure systems, impact free and lower-tropospheric ozone over large regions, especially north of 40° N, and largely explain the ozone enhancement observed with IASI for these latitudes. Irreversible stratosphere-troposphere exchanges of ozone-rich air masses occur more locally in the southern and southeastern flanks of the trough. The contribution to the lower-tropospheric ozone column is difficult to dissociate from the tropopause perturbations generated by weather systems. For regions south of 40° N, a significant correlation has been found between lower-tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide (CO) observations from IASI, especially over the North China Plain (NCP). Considering carbon monoxide observations as a pollutant tracer, the O3-CO correlation indicates that the photochemical production of ozone from primary pollutants emitted over such

  5. Unraveling the sources of ground level ozone in the Intermountain Western United States using Pb isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, John N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Weiss-Penzias, Peter [University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Fine, Rebekka [University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); McDade, Charles E.; Trzepla, Krystyna [University of California at Davis, Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, Davis, CA (United States); Brown, Shaun T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gustin, Mae Sexauer [University of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Ozone as an atmospheric pollutant is largely produced by anthropogenic precursors and can significantly impact human and ecosystem health, and climate. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recently proposed lowering the ozone standard from 75 ppbv (MDA8 = Maximum Daily 8-Hour Average) to between 65 and 70 ppbv. This will result in remote areas of the Intermountain West that includes many U.S. National Parks being out of compliance, despite a lack of significant local sources. We used Pb isotope fingerprinting and back-trajectory analysis to distinguish sources of imported ozone to Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada. During discrete Chinese Pb events (> 1.1 ng/m{sup 3} & > 80% Asian Pb) trans-Pacific transported ozone was 5 ± 5.5 ppbv above 19 year averages for those dates. In contrast, concentrations during regional transport from the Los Angeles and Las Vegas areas were 15 ± 2 ppbv above the long-term averages, and those characterized by high-altitude transport 3 days prior to sampling were 19 ± 4 ppbv above. However, over the study period the contribution of trans-Pacific transported ozone increased at a rate of 0.8 ± 0.3 ppbv/year, suggesting that Asian inputs will exceed regional and high altitude sources by 2015–2020. All of these sources will impact regulatory compliance with a new ozone standard, given increasing global background. - Highlights: • Ozone can significantly impact human and ecosystem health and climate. • Pb isotopes and back-trajectory analysis were used to distinguish sources of O{sub 3}. • Baseline concentrations in the Western US are ~ 54 ppbv. • During discrete Asia events O{sub 3} increased by 5 ± 5.5 ppbv and during S CA events by 15 ± 2 ppbv. • Data indicate that Asian ozone inputs will exceed other sources by 2015–2020.

  6. Ozone measurements 2010. [EMEP Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjellbrekke, Anne-Gunn; Solberg, Sverre; Fjaeraa, Ann Mari

    2012-07-01

    From the Introduction: Ozone is a natural constituent of the atmosphere and plays a vital role in many atmospheric processes. However, man-made emissions of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides have increased the photochemical formation of ozone in the troposphere. Until the end of the 1960s the problem was basically believed to be one of the big cities and their immediate surroundings. In the 1970s, however, it was found that the problem of photochemical oxidant formation is much more widespread. The ongoing monitoring of ozone at rural sites throughout Europe shows that episodes of high concentrations of ground-level ozone occur over most parts of the continent every summer. During these episodes the ozone concentrations can reach values above ambient air quality standards over large regions and lead to adverse effects for human health and vegetation. Historical records of ozone measurements in Europe and North America indicate that in the last part of the nineteenth century the values were only about half of the average surface ozone concentrations measured in the same regions during the last 10-15 years (Bojkov, 1986; Volz and Kley, 1988).The formation of ozone is due to a large number of photochemical reactions taking place in the atmosphere and depends on the temperature, humidity and solar radiation as well as the primary emissions of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds. Together with the non-linear relationships between the primary emissions and the ozone formation, these effects complicates the abatement strategies for ground-level ozone and makes photochemical models crucial in addition to the monitoring data. The 1999 Gothenburg Protocol is designed for a joint abatement of acidification, eutrophication and ground-level ozone. It has been estimated that once the Protocol is implemented, the number of days with excessive ozone levels will be halved and that the exposure of vegetation to excessive ozone levels will be 44% down on 1990

  7. A possible mechanism of the Scandinavian ozone loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹捍; 周立波; 季崇萍; 王维; 蹇泳啸; 吴瑞欢

    2001-01-01

    Satellite data analysis shows an important Arctic ozone loss over the Scandinavia, with - 50 DU in winter, equivalent to 15% of the total ozone over this region. The study shows a possible mechanism causing the ozone loss. The North Atlantic current carries the heat energy northwards, and causes a relatively high surface temperature along the Scandinavia. The high temperature over the east of North Atlantic heats the atmosphere, induces an upward mass lifting, and therefore causes an ozone divergence near 330°K isoentropic surface, which leads to a decline in the total ozone.

  8. Optical remote measurement of ozone in cirrus clouds; Optische Fernmessung von Ozon in Zirruswolken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    1998-12-31

    The subject of this thesis is theoretical and experimental investigations into the simultaneous optical remote measurement of atmospheric ozone concentration and particle properties. A lidar system was developed that combines the Raman-lidar and the polarization-lidar with the Raman-DIAL technique. An error analysis is given for ozone measurements in clouds. It turns out that the wavelength dependencies of photon multiple scattering and of the particle extinction coefficient necessitate a correction of the measured ozone concentration. To quantify the cloud influence, model calculations based on particle size distributions of spheres are carried out. The most important experimental result of this thesis is the measured evidence of pronounced minima in the ozone distribution in a humid upper troposphere shortly before and during cirrus observation. Good correlation between ozone-depleted altitude ranges and ice clouds is found. This finding is in contrast to ozone profiles measured in a dry and cloud-free troposphere. (orig.) 151 refs.

  9. The Effect of Climate Change on Ozone Depletion through Changes in Stratospheric Water Vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk-Davidoff, Daniel B.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Anderson, James G.; Keith, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have predicted substantial increases in Arctic ozone depletion due to the stratospheric cooling induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. But climate change may additionally influence Arctic ozone depletion through changes in the water vapor cycle. Here we investigate this possibility by combining predictions of tropical tropopause temperatures from a general circulation model with results from a one-dimensional radiative convective model, recent progress in understanding the stratospheric water vapor budget, modelling of heterogeneous reaction rates and the results of a general circulation model on the radiative effect of increased water vapor. Whereas most of the stratosphere will cool as greenhouse-gas concentrations increase, the tropical tropopause may become warmer, resulting in an increase of the mean saturation mixing ratio of water vapor and hence an increased transport of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere. Stratospheric water vapor concentration in the polar regions determines both the critical temperature below which heterogeneous reactions on cold aerosols become important (the mechanism driving enhanced ozone depletion) and the temperature of the Arctic vortex itself. Our results indicate that ozone loss in the later winter and spring Arctic vortex depends critically on water vapor variations which are forced by sea surface temperature changes in the tropics. This potentially important effect has not been taken into account in previous scenarios of Arctic ozone loss under climate change conditions.

  10. Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1957−2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Balis

    injected. In fact, the overall amount of ozone is not depleted, but redistributed on the hemispheric scale. Review of low ozone events, defined as days with negative deviations from the pre-1976 averages greater than 25% show, in general, similar origin. The seasonally averaged area with ELO3 and the associated O3MD, as well as for the cases with deviations > –25%, has increased during the 1990s, which could be an indication of stronger and/or more frequent subtropical air intrusions. Their occurrences could contribute noticeably to the ozone deficiency of the middle latitude ozone during the days of ELO3 appearances; however, their contribution to the long-term trend of the ozone seasonal decline is of the order of ~10%.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere - composition and chemistry Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  11. Protecting the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  12. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Elson, L.S.; Fishbein, E.F.; Zurek, R.W. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (United States)); Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A. (Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents initial data analysis of ozone distributions in the southern polar vortex region during the winter of 1992. The data comes from the microwave limb sounder on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The data provides never before available coverage of the polar stratosphere, and reveals the development of an ozone hole from column ozone data, changes in ozone mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere consistent with ozone destruction processes in the stratosphere, and evidence to support the transport of ozone toward the pole by tidal wave activity in the stratosphere. The ozone measurements are compared with the development of the polar vortex derived from national meteorological center data.

  13. Ozonation of Common Textile Auxiliaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskender, Gulen; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Koyunluoglu, Sebnem; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Germirli Babuna, Fatos

    2016-10-01

    The treatability of four different commonly applied textile auxiliary chemicals, namely two tannin formulations (Tannin 1: a condensation product of aryl sulphonate; Tannin 2: natural tannic acid) and two biocidal finishing agents (Biocide 1: 2,4,4’-trichloro-2’- hydroxydiphenyl ether; Biocide 2: a nonionic diphenyl alkane derivative) with ozone was investigated. Increasing the ozone dose yielded higher COD removals for the natural tannin. Optimum ozone doses of 485 and 662 mg/h were obtained at a pH of 3.5 for natural and synthetic tannin carrying textile bath discharges, respectively. When the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0, a slight decrease in COD removal was observed for the natural tannin due to ozone selectivity towards its polyaromatic structure. The same increase in ozonation pH enhanced COD removals for the synthetic tannin as a result of enhanced ozone decomposition rendering free radical chain reactions dominant. Optimum ozone doses of 499 and 563 mg/h were established for Biocide 1 and 2, respectively. With the increase of ozonation, pH exhibited a positive influence on COD removals for both textile tannins. A substantial improvement in terms of TOC removals was observed as the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0 for the synthetic tannin, and from 7 to 12 for both textile biocides. Higher AOX removals were evident at pH 7 than at pH 12 for Biocide 1 as a result of the higher selectivity of the dehalogenation reaction at neutral pH.

  14. Simulation des changements climatiques au cours du XXIe siècle incluant l'ozone stratosphériqueSimulation of climate changes during the 21st century including stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Jean-François; Cariolle, Daniel; Chauvin, Fabrice; Déqué, Michel; Douville, Hervé; Hu, Rong-Ming; Planton, Serge; Rascol, Annie; Ricard, Jean-Louis; Salas Y Melia, David; Sevault, Florence; Simon, Pascal; Somot, Samuel; Tyteca, Sophie; Terray, Laurent; Valcke, Sophie

    Two climate simulations of 150 years, performed with a coupled ocean/sea-ice/atmosphere model including stratospheric ozone, respectively with and without heterogeneous chemistry, simulate the tropospheric warming associated with an increase of the greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide and other trace gases since 1950 and their impact on sea-ice extent, as well as the stratospheric cooling and its impact on ozone concentration. The scenario with heterogeneous chemistry reproduces the formation of the ozone hole over the South Pole from the 1970s and its deepening until the present time, and shows that the ozone hole should progressively fill during the coming decades. To cite this article: J.-F. Royer et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 147-154.

  15. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    the gap in our ability to measure global surface ozone. An additional 20 surface ozone monitoring sites (a 20 % increase in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO GAW) ozone sites or a 1 % increase in the total background network) located on 10 islands and in 10 continental regions would almost double the area observed. The cost of this addition to the network is small compared to other expenditure on atmospheric composition research infrastructure and would provide a significant long-term benefit to our understanding of the composition of the atmosphere, information which will also be available for consideration by air quality control managers and policy makers.

  16. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  17. Climate sensitivity due to increased CO2: experiments with a coupled atmosphere and ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Warren M.; Meehl, Gerald A.

    1989-06-01

    A version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model — a global, spectral (R15) general circulation model — is coupled to a coarse-grid (5° latitude-] longitude, four-layer) ocean general circulation model to study the response of the climate system to increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Three simulations are run: one with an instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 (from 330 to 660 ppm), another with the CO2 concentration starting at 330 ppm and increasing linearly at a rate of 1% per year, and a third with CO2 held constant at 330 pm. Results at the end of 30 years of simulation indicate a globally averaged surface air temperature increase of 1.6° C for the instantaneous doubling case and 0.7°C for the transient forcing case. Inherent characteristics of the coarse-grid ocean model flow sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropics and higher-than-observed SSTs and reduced sea-ice extent at higher latitudes] produce lower sensitivity in this model after 30 years than in earlier simulations with the same atmosphere coupled to a 50-m, slab-ocean mixed layer. Within the limitations of the simulated meridional overturning, the thermohaline circulation weakens in the coupled model with doubled CO2 as the high-latitude ocean-surface layer warms and freshens and westerly wind stress is decreased. In the transient forcing case with slowly increasing CO2 (30% increase after 30 years), the zonal mean warming of the ocean is most evident in the surface layer near 30° 50° S. Geographical plots of surface air temperature change in the transient case show patterns of regional climate anomalies that differ from those in the instantaneous CO2 doubling case, particularly in the North Atlantic and northern European regions. This suggests that differences in CO2 forcing in the climate system are important in CO2 response in regard to time-dependent climate anomaly regimes. This confirms earlier studies with simple climate models

  18. Screen level temperature increase due to higher atmospheric carbon dioxide in calm and windy nights revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; McNider, R.T.; Pielke sr., R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term surface observations over land have shown temperature increases during the last century, especially during nighttime. Observations analyzed by Parker [2004] show similar long-term trends for calm and windy conditions at night, and on basis of this it was suggested that the possible effect

  19. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  20. Effects of ozone and relative humidity on fluorescence spectra of octapeptide bioaerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Coleman, Mark; Bare, Christopher; Kinahan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ozone and relative humidity (RH) at common atmospheric levels on the properties of single octapeptide bioaerosol particles were studied using an improved rotating reaction chamber, an aerosol generator, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS), an improved single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS), and equipments to generate, monitor and control the ozone and RH. Aerosol particles (mean diameter 2 μm) were generated from a slurry of octapeptide in phosphate buffered saline, injected into the rotating chamber, and kept airborne for hours. Bioaerosols were sampled from the chamber hourly for the measurements of particle-size distribution, concentration, total fluorescence excited at 355-nm, and single particle fluorescence spectra excited at 266-nm and 351-nm under different controlled RH (20%, 50%, or 80%) and ozone concentration (0 or 150 ppb). The results show that: (1) Particle size, concentration, and the 263-nm-excited fluorescence intensity decrease at different rates under different combinations of the RH and ozone concentrations used. (2) The 263-nm-excited UV fluorescence (280-400 nm) decreased more rapidly than the 263-nm-excited visible fluorescence (400-560 nm), and decreased most rapidly when ozone is present and RH is high. (3) The UV fluorescence peak near 340 nm slightly shifts to the shorter wavelength (blue-shift), consistent with a more rapid oxidation of tryptophan than tyrosine. (4) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence (430-580 nm/380-700 nm) increases when ozone is present, especially when the RH is high. (5) The 351/355-nm-excited fluorescence increase that occurs as the tryptophan emission in the UV decreases, and the observation that these changes occur more rapidly at higher RH with the present of ozone, are consistent with the oxidation of tryptophan by ozone and the conversion of the resulting ozonides to N-formyl kynurenine and kynurenine.

  1. Ozone transport from the free troposphere to the Los Angeles Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, J.; Trainer, M.; Aikin, K.; Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J.; Brown, S. S.; De Gouw, J. A.; Dube, B.; Graus, M.; Flynn, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B. L.; Nedelec, P.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Smit, H. M.; Thouret, V.; Wagner, N.

    2011-12-01

    Downward transport of ozone-rich air from the free troposphere (FT) into the planetary boundary layer (PBL) contributes to the ozone burden at the surface in Southern California and makes compliance with air quality standards challenging. Gas phase compounds measured in 32 vertical profiles are used to characterize air masses in the FT over the Los Angeles, California (LA) basin, with the aim of determining the source of increased ozone observed above the PBL. The chemical composition, origin, and transport of air upwind and over LA are studied using in-situ airborne measurements from the CalNex 2010 field experiment (Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change). Carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, reactive nitrogen species, and meteorological parameters were measured from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft on 18 research flights in California in May and June 2010. On six flights, multiple vertical profiles from 0.2-3.5 km above ground level were conducted throughout the LA basin and over the Pacific Ocean. Four primary air mass influences were regularly observed in the FT between approximately 1-3.5 km altitude: upper tropospheric air, emissions from long range transport, aged regional emissions, and marine air. Ozone in the FT was increased in three air mass types, averaging 71 ppbv in air influenced by the upper troposphere, 69 ppbv in air containing emissions transported long distances, and 65 ppbv in air with aged regional emissions. Correlations between ozone and CO, and ozone and nitric acid, demonstrate entrainment of ozone from the FT into the LA PBL.

  2. Information content of ozone retrieval algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Chu, W. P.; Curran, R.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mateer, C.; Rusch, D.; Thomas, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The algorithms are characterized that were used for production processing by the major suppliers of ozone data to show quantitatively: how the retrieved profile is related to the actual profile (This characterizes the altitude range and vertical resolution of the data); the nature of systematic errors in the retrieved profiles, including their vertical structure and relation to uncertain instrumental parameters; how trends in the real ozone are reflected in trends in the retrieved ozone profile; and how trends in other quantities (both instrumental and atmospheric) might appear as trends in the ozone profile. No serious deficiencies were found in the algorithms used in generating the major available ozone data sets. As the measurements are all indirect in someway, and the retrieved profiles have different characteristics, data from different instruments are not directly comparable.

  3. Ozone Gardens for the Citizen Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Margaret; Reilly, Gay; Rodjom, Abbey; Malick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    NASA Langley partnered with the Virginia Living Museum and two schools to create ozone bio-indicator gardens for citizen scientists of all ages. The garden at the Marshall Learning Center is part of a community vegetable garden designed to teach young children where food comes from and pollution in their area, since most of the children have asthma. The Mt. Carmel garden is located at a K-8 school. Different ozone sensitive and ozone tolerant species are growing and being monitored for leaf injury. In addition, CairClip ozone monitors were placed in the gardens and data are compared to ozone levels at the NASA Langley Chemistry and Physics Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (CAPABLE) site in Hampton, VA. Leaf observations and plant measurements are made two to three times a week throughout the growing season.

  4. Tropospheric ozone columns and ozone profiles for Kiev in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Shavrina, A V; Sheminova, V A; Synyavski, I I; Romanyuk, Ya O; Eremenko, N A; Ivanov, Yu S; Monsar, O A; Kroon, M

    2010-01-01

    We report on ground-based FTIR observations being performed within the framework of the ESA-NIVR-KNMI project 2907 entitled "OMI validation by ground based remote sensing: ozone columns and atmospheric profiles" for the purpose of OMI data validation. FTIR observations were performed during the time frames August-October 2005, June-October 2006 and March-October 2007, mostly under cloud free and clear sky conditions and in some days from early morning to sunset covering the full range of solar zenith angles possible. Ozone column and ozone profile data were obtained for the year 2005 using spectral modeling of the ozone spectral band profile near 9.6 microns with the MODTRAN3 band model based on the HITRAN-96 molecular absorption database. The total ozone column values retrieved from FTIR observations are biased low with respect to OMI-DOAS data by 8-10 DU on average, where they have a relatively small standard error of about 2%. FTIR observations for the year 2006 were simulated by MODTRAN4 modeling. For the...

  5. A joint data record of tropospheric ozone from Aura-TES and MetOp-IASI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Hilke; Payne, Vivienne H.; Neu, Jessica L.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Edwards, David P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Worden, Helen M.; Worden, John R.

    2016-08-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Aura and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp-A together provide a time series of 10 years of free-tropospheric ozone with an overlap of 3 years. We characterise the differences between TES and IASI ozone measurements and find that IASI's coarser vertical sensitivity leads to a small (< 5 ppb) low bias relative to TES for the free troposphere. The TES-IASI differences are not dependent on season or any other factor and hence the measurements from the two instruments can be merged, after correcting for the offset, in order to study decadal-scale changes in tropospheric ozone. We calculate time series of regional monthly mean ozone in the free troposphere over eastern Asia, the western United States (US), and Europe, carefully accounting for differences in spatial sampling between the instruments. We show that free-tropospheric ozone over Europe and the western US has remained relatively constant over the past decade but that, contrary to expectations, ozone over Asia in recent years does not continue the rapid rate of increase observed from 2004 to 2010.

  6. Aspects of stratospheric long-term changes induced by ozone depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagnazzo, Chiara [Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace (IPSL), Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique du CNRS, Palaiseau Cedex (France); INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia), Bologna (Italy); Claud, Chantal [Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace (IPSL), Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique du CNRS, Palaiseau Cedex (France); Hare, Sylvia [University of Reading, Department of Meteorology, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading (United Kingdom); Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The effect of the stratospheric ozone depletion on the thermal and dynamical structure of the middle atmosphere is assessed using two 5-member ensembles of transient GCM simulations; one including linear trends in ozone, the other not, for the 1980-1999 period. Simulated temperatures and observations are in good agreement in terms of mean values, autocorrelations and cross correlations. Annual-mean and seasonal temperature trends have been calculated using the same statistical analysis. Simulations show that ozone trends are responsible for reduced wave activity in the Arctic lower stratosphere in February and March, confirming both the role of dynamics in controlling March temperatures and a recently proposed mechanism whereby Arctic ozone depletion causes the reduction in wave activity entering the lower stratosphere. Changes in wave activity are consistent with an intensification of the polar vortex at the time of ozone depletion and with a weakened Brewer-Dobson circulation: A decrease of the dynamical warming/cooling associated with the descending/ascending branch of the wintertime mean residual circulation at high/low latitudes has been obtained through the analysis of temperature observations (1980-1999). Ozone is responsible of about one third of the decrease of this dynamical cooling at high latitudes. An increase in the residual mean circulation is seen in the observations for the 1965-1980 period. (orig.)

  7. Sampling Ozone Exposure of Canadian Forests at Different Scales: Some Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Cox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive samplers in extensive monitoring, such as that used in national forest health monitoring plots, indicates that these devices are able to determine both spatial and temporal differences in ozone exposure of the plots. This allows for categorisation of the plots and the potential for cause-effect analysis of certain forest health responses. Forest exposure along a gradient of air pollution deposition demonstrates large variation in accumulated exposures. The efficacy of using passive samplers for in situ monitoring of forest canopy exposure was also demonstrated. The sampler data produced weak relationships with ozone values from the nearest �continuous� monitor, even though data from colocated samplers showed strong relationships. This spatial variation and the apparent effect of elevation on ozone exposure demonstrate the importance of topography and tree canopy characteristics in plant exposure on a regional scale. In addition, passive sampling may identify the effects of local pollutant gases, such as NO, which may scavenge ozone locally only to increase the production of this secondary pollutant downwind, as atmospheric reactions redress the equilibrium between concentrations of this precursor and those of the generated ozone. The use of passive samplers at the stand level is able to resolve vertical profiles within the stand and edge effects that are important in exposure of understorey and ground flora. Recent case studies using passive samplers to determine forest exposure to ozone indicate a great potential for the development of spatial models on a regional, landscape, and stand level scale.

  8. Atmospheric test of the J(BrONO2)/kBrO+NO2 ratio: implications for total stratospheric Bry and bromine-mediated ozone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreycy, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dorf, M.; Feng, W.; Hossaini, R.; Kritten, L.; Werner, B.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2013-07-01

    We report on time-dependent O3, NO2 and BrO profiles measured by limb observations of scattered skylight in the stratosphere over Kiruna (67.9° N, 22.1° E) on 7 and 8 September 2009 during the autumn circulation turn-over. The observations are complemented by simultaneous direct solar occultation measurements around sunset and sunrise performed aboard the same stratospheric balloon payload. Supporting radiative transfer and photochemical modelling indicate that the measurements can be used to constrain the ratio J(BrONO2)/kBrO+NO2, for which at T = 220 ± 5 K an overall 1.7 (+0.4 -0.2) larger ratio is found than recommended by the most recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) compilation (Sander et al., 2011). Sensitivity studies reveal the major reasons are likely to be (1) a larger BrONO2 absorption cross-section σBrONO2, primarily for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, and (2) a smaller kBrO+NO2 at 220 K than given by Sander et al. (2011). Other factors, e.g. the actinic flux and quantum yield for the dissociation of BrONO2, can be ruled out. The observations also have consequences for total inorganic stratospheric bromine (Bry) estimated from stratospheric BrO measurements at high NOx loadings, since the ratio J(BrONO2)/kBrO+NO2 largely determines the stratospheric BrO/Bry ratio during daylight. Using the revised J(BrONO2)/kBrO+NO2 ratio, total stratospheric Bry is likely to be 1.4 ppt smaller than previously estimated from BrO profile measurements at high NOx loadings. This would bring estimates of Bry inferred from organic source gas measurements (e.g. CH3Br, the halons, CH2Br2, CHBr3, etc.) into closer agreement with estimates based on BrO observations (inorganic method). The consequences for stratospheric ozone due to the revised J(BrONO2)/kBrO+NO2 ratio are small (maximum -0.8%), since at high NOx (for which most Bry assessments are made) the enhanced ozone loss by overestimating Bry is compensated for by the suppressed ozone loss due to the underestimation

  9. Satellite to measure equatorial ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer E (Explorer 55) Satellite is described. The satellite will gather information on the earth's upper atmosphere, particularly regarding the condition of the protective ozone layer. The satellite will also provide information concerning the earth's heat balance, and heat flow characteristics, and energy conversion mechanisms.

  10. Evaluation of ozone column amount from the solar backscattering spectra measured with the Airborne-OPUS and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, T.; Kita, K.; Suzuki, M.; Shiomi, K.; Okumura, S.; Ogawa, T.

    Satellite observation is one of the best methods to monitor the increase of atmospheric pollutants including tropospheric ozone especially due to industrial activities in Asia It is significant to investigate the satellite sensor and data processing algorithm for developing next generation monitoring system The Airborne Ozone and Pollution measuring Ultraviolet Spectrometer Airborne-OPUS sensor was developed by JAXA EORC to study the solar ultraviolet backscattering measurement of ozone nitrogen dioxide sulfur dioxide and some other species from a satellite In this study we deduced slant column amounts of ozone from the Airborne-OPUS data during an aircraft observation and estimated analytical errors The Airborne-OPUS which consists of a compact spectrometer Jobin-Yvon CP-200 thermoelectric-cooled CCD SpectraVideo SV11C and optics measures backward-scattered ultraviolet spectra between 300 and 455 nm with a spectral resolution of 0 9 nm FWHM from an aircraft In this study the spectra between 315 and 325 nm obtained during Pacific Exploration and Asia and Continental Emission phase-A campaign Parrish et al 2004 in January 2002 were analyzed to evaluate the ozone column amount In this analysis the absorption by ozone the scattering by atmospheric molecules and the Ring effect were estimated from the ratios between the target spectra derived when the solar zenith angle SZA exceeded about 60o and the reference spectra when SZA was minimum at the same day The scattering by aerosols surface albedo and artificial continuous

  11. Ozone budget in the West African lower troposphere during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saunois

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A bi-dimensional latitudinal-vertical meterological model coupled with O3-NOx-VOC chemistry is used to reproduce the distribution of ozone and precursors in the boundary layer over West Africa during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA campaign as observed on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe 146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft. The model reproduces the increase of ozone mixing ratios in the boundary layer observed between the forested region south of 13° N and the Sahelian area northward. Sensitivity and budget analysis reveals that the intertropical convergence zone is a moderate source of O3 rich-air in the boundary layer due to convective downdrafts. Dry deposition drives the ozone minimum over the vegetated area. The combination of high NOx emissions from soil north of 13° N and northward advection by the monsoon flux of VOC-enriched air masses contributes to the ozone maximum simulated at higher latitudes. Simulated OH exhibit a well marked latitudinal gradient with minimum concentrations over the vegetated region where the reactions with biogenic compounds predominate. The model underestimates the observed OH mixing ratios, however this model discrepancy has slight effect on ozone budget and does not alter the conclusions.

  12. A record of ozone variability in South Pole Antarctic snow: Role of nitrate oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Justin R.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Savarino, Joel

    2007-06-01

    The information contained in polar nitrate has been an unresolved issue for over a decade. Here we demonstrate that atmospheric nitrate's oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O-NO3) reflects stratospheric chemistry in winter and tropospheric chemistry in summer. Surface snow isotope mass balance indicates that nitrate oxygen isotopic composition is the result of a mixture of 25% stratospheric and 75% tropospheric origin. Analysis of trends in Δ17O-NO3 in a 6 m snow pit that provides a 26-year record reveals a strong 2.70-year cycle that anticorrelates (R = -0.77) with October-November-December column ozone. The potential mechanisms linking the records are either denitrification or increased boundary layer photochemical ozone production. We suggest that the latter is dominating the observed trend and find that surface ozone and Δ17O-NO3 correlate well before 1991 (R = 0.93). After 1991, however, the records show no significant relationship, indicating an altered oxidative environment consistent with current understanding of a highly oxidizing atmosphere at the South Pole. The disappearance of seasonal Δ17O-NO3 trends in the surface layer at depth remain unresolved and demand further investigation of how postdepositional processes affect nitrate's oxygen isotope composition. Overall, the findings of this study present a new paleoclimate technique to investigate Antarctic nitrate records that appear to reflect trends in stratospheric ozone depletion by recording tropospheric surface ozone variability.

  13. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro-and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmos-pheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to util-ize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photo-synthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physi-ology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  14. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU HongYan; ZOU DingHui; GAO KunShan

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  15. On the variability of tropospheric ozone in the Tropical Eastern Pacific and its impact on the oxidizing capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Gomez Martin, J.; Hay, T.; Mahajan, A.; Ordoñez, C.; Parrondo Sempere, M.; Gil, M. J.; Agama Reyes, M.; Paredes Mora, J.; Voemel, H.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of surface ozone, NOx and meteorological variables were made during two ground based field campaigns in the Eastern Pacific marine boundary layer (MBL). The first study was PIQUERO (Primera Investigación de la Química, Evolución y Reparto de Ozono), running from September 2000 to July 2001 in parallel to the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) in the Galápagos Islands. The second study is the Climate and HAlogen Reactivity tropicaL EXperiment (CHARLEX), running from September 2010 to present. These long-term, high frequency, measurements enable a detailed description of the daily, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of ozone and help to constrain the MBL and lower free troposphere (FT) ozone budget. In the Equatorial Eastern Pacific "cold season" (August - October), net ozone photochemical destruction of ~ 2 ppb day-1 occurs in the MBL (~30% due to halogens, and the rest to HOx). Ozone recovers by entrainment from aloft at night. The monthly baseline is set by the tropical instability waves (TIW), which also impact the ozone concentration in the lower FT. In the cold phase of the TIWs the MBL is stratified and, apart from higher surface ozone, it may also contain an upper drier layer with higher ozone between ~ 500 m and the main inversion at ~1 km. In the warm phase the buoyant MBL expands upwards (as much as 500 m) and poor ozone air reaches the FT. As the system shifts to the warm season (February- April), the TIWs stop and the sea becomes warmer, increasing evaporation and reducing ozone. The inversion is pushed upwards and finally disappears or becomes very weak. Surface ozone is so low that even at the low background NOx levels observed ozone production balances photochemical destruction, so the daily profile is flat (observed local effects in the populated areas of Galapagos are discussed). In February Galapagos is almost in the doldrums because the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) shifts south. In this

  16. Modified Atmosphere Packaging Combined with Ozonated Water-Ethanol Coalition Treatment for Keeping Chilled Fresh Pork Quality%臭氧水-乙醇联合预处理结合MAP保鲜冷鲜猪肉研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李益恩; 刘翔; 游敬刚; 陈功; 潘红梅; 郭洪祥; 柏红梅

    2014-01-01

    Effects of modified atmosphere packaging (80% CO2+20% O2)combined with ozonated water-ethanol treatment on keeping chilled fresh pork quality were studied. Chilled fresh pork were treated by ozonated water in 5,8,12,15,20ppm separately,and disinfected by ethanol (75%). After being treated by ozonated water-ethanol, it was showed that original bacteria count in chilled fresh pork was evidently reduced. TVB-N value was slowed pro-moting and sensory quality was well controlled. Based on the evaluation of effect of ozonated water-ethanol treat-ment potency on sensory quality, total bacteria count, TVB-N value, peroxide number and water holding capacity of the chilled fresh pork during MAP storage, it could be concluded that 12ppm ozonated water-ethanol(75%) coalition treatment was the best one for keeping the chilled fresh pork quality. Shelf life of the chilled fresh pork could be extended 7 to 13 days, compared with the untreated group(CK group).%本文研究了臭氧水-乙醇(75%)联合预处理结合气调包装(MAP,80% O2+20% CO2)[1]用于冷鲜猪肉的保鲜效果。通过以未经过臭氧水-乙醇(75%)预处理的MAP做对照组,试验研究了臭氧水-乙醇(75%)联合预处理:浓度分别为5ppm,8ppm,12ppm,15ppm,20ppm的臭氧水进行关键工序冲洗,联合乙醇(75%)进行入库前表面喷洒的不同组合方式对冷鲜猪肉气调保鲜期的影响。结果表明:臭氧水-乙醇(75%)预处理能有效减少冷鲜猪肉原始的带菌数,减缓贮藏期间细菌增殖速率和TVB-N值的增加速度,以及减缓MAP冷鲜猪肉感官品质的下降。综合分析臭氧水-乙醇(75%)联合预处理对冷鲜猪肉贮藏期间感官品质、肌肉持水力、菌落总数、TVB-N 值的影响,确定以12ppm臭氧水-乙醇(75%)联合预处理这一组合效果最好,与同条件单一乙醇(75%)预处理对照组比较,贮藏货架期延长7-13d。

  17. Experimental Research on Atmospheric Electric Field and Extensive Air Shower Particle Increasing During Thunderstorms with ARGO-YBJ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bin; ZHANG Ying; JIA Huan-Yu

    2008-01-01

    From April lst to August 14th, 2006, thunderstorms had been recorded at Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory by ARGO-YBJ experiment. This paper analyzed the correlation between atmospheric electric field (AEF) and "scaler mode" counting rate during thunderstorm. Counting rates of multiplicities n = 1,2 were found to have a large increase ( from 1.02% to 9.03% ), while there was few or no changes in those of multiplicities n =3 and n≥4 during the thunderstorms. The counts of different multiplicities had different feedbacks on the violent change of AEF, which showed that their energy and most components were distinguishing.

  18. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, M. [Univ. de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Lopez, M.; Banon, M. [Agenica Estatal de Meteorologia (AEMET), Madrid (Spain); Costa, M.J.; Silva, A.M. [Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Evora Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Physics; Serrano, A. [Univ. de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Bortoli, D. [Evora Univ. (PT). Goephysics Centre of Evora (CGE); Vilaplana, J.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Huelva (Spain). Estacion de Sondeos Atmosferico ' ' El Arenosillo' '

    2009-07-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75 . In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85 . These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7{+-}1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80 . Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes. (orig.)

  19. Influence of the ozone profile above Madrid (Spain) on Brewer estimation of ozone air mass factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, M.; López, M.; Costa, M. J.; Serrano, A.; Bortoli, D.; Bañón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.; Silva, A. M.

    2009-08-01

    The methodology used by Brewer spectroradiometers to estimate the ozone column is based on differential absorption spectroscopy. This methodology employs the ozone air mass factor (AMF) to derive the total ozone column from the slant path ozone amount. For the calculating the ozone AMF, the Brewer algorithm assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height of 22 km. However, for a real specific site the ozone presents a certain profile, which varies spatially and temporally depending on the latitude, altitude and dynamical conditions of the atmosphere above the site of measurements. In this sense, this work address the reliability of the mentioned assumption and analyses the influence of the ozone profiles measured above Madrid (Spain) in the ozone AMF calculations. The approximated ozone AMF used by the Brewer algorithm is compared with simulations obtained using the libRadtran radiative transfer model code. The results show an excellent agreement between the simulated and the approximated AMF values for solar zenith angle lower than 75°. In addition, the relative differences remain lower than 2% at 85°. These good results are mainly due to the fact that the altitude of the ozone layer assumed constant by the Brewer algorithm for all latitudes notably can be considered representative of the real profile of ozone above Madrid (average value of 21.7±1.8 km). The operational ozone AMF calculations for Brewer instruments are limited, in general, to SZA below 80°. Extending the usable SZA range is especially relevant for Brewer instruments located at high mid-latitudes.

  20. Asymmetric correlations in the ozone concentration dynamics of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz, M.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Echeverria, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    Mexico City is a megalopolis with severe pollution problems caused by vehicles and industrial activity. This condition imposes important risks to human health and economic activity. Based on hourly-sampled data during the last decade, in a recent work (Meraz et al., 2015) we showed that the pollutant dynamics in Mexico City exhibits long-term and scale-dependent persistence effects resulting from the combination of pollutants generation by vehicles and removal by advection mechanisms. In this work, we analyzed the dynamics of ozone, a key component reflecting the degree of atmospheric contamination, to determine if its long-term correlations are asymmetric in relation to the actual concentration trend (increasing or decreasing). The analysis is conducted with detrended fluctuation analysis. The results showed that the average ozone dynamics is uncorrelated when the concentration is increasing. In contrast, the ozone dynamics shows long-term anti-persistence effects when the concentration is decreasing.

  1. Effect of Nearby Forest Fires on Ground Level Ozone Concentrations in Santiago, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Rubio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On 4 and 8 January 2014, at the height of the austral summer, intense wildfires in forests and dry pastures occurred in the Melipilla sector, located about 70 km to the southwest of Santiago, the Chilean capital, affecting more than 6 million inhabitants. Low level winds transported the forest fire plume towards Santiago causing a striking decrease in visibility and a marked increase in the concentration of both primary (PM10 and CO and secondary (Ozone pollutants in the urban atmosphere. In particular, ozone maximum concentrations in the Santiago basin reached hourly averages well above 80 ppb, the national air quality standard. This ozone increase took place at the three sampling sites considered in the present study. These large values can be explained in terms of high NOx concentrations and NO2/NO ratios in biomass burning emissions.

  2. Atmospheric changes caused by galactic cosmic rays over the period 1960-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2016-05-01

    The Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM) and the Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (GSFC 2-D) models are used to investigate the effect of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) on the atmosphere over the 1960-2010 time period. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) computation of the GCR-caused ionization rates are used in these simulations. GCR-caused maximum NOx increases of 4-15 % are computed in the Southern polar troposphere with associated ozone increases of 1-2 %. NOx increases of ˜ 1-6 % are calculated for the lower stratosphere with associated ozone decreases of 0.2-1 %. The primary impact of GCRs on ozone was due to their production of NOx. The impact of GCRs varies with the atmospheric chlorine loading, sulfate aerosol loading, and solar cycle variation. Because of the interference between the NOx and ClOx ozone loss cycles (e.g., the ClO + NO2+ M → ClONO2+ M reaction) and the change in the importance of ClOx in the ozone budget, GCRs cause larger atmospheric impacts with less chlorine loading. GCRs also cause larger atmospheric impacts with less sulfate aerosol loading and for years closer to solar minimum. GCR-caused decreases of annual average global total ozone (AAGTO) were computed to be 0.2 % or less with GCR-caused column ozone increases between 1000 and 100 hPa of 0.08 % or less and GCR-caused column ozone decreases between 100 and 1 hPa of 0.23 % or less. Although these computed ozone impacts are small, GCRs provide a natural influence on ozone and need to be quantified over long time periods. This result serves as a lower limit because of the use of the ionization model NAIRAS/HZETRN which underestimates the ion production by neglecting electromagnetic and muon branches of the cosmic ray induced cascade. This will be corrected in future works.

  3. Gamma-ray bursts and terrestrial planetary atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, B C; Thomas, Brian C.; Melott, Adrian L.

    2006-01-01

    We describe results of modeling the effects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within a few kiloparsecs of an Earth-like planet. A primary effect is generation of nitrogen oxide compounds which deplete ozone. Ozone depletion leads to an increase in solar UVB radiation at the surface, enhancing DNA damage, particularly in marine microorganisms such as phytoplankton. In addition, we expect increased atmospheric opacity due to buildup of nitrogen dioxide produced by the burst and enhanced precipitation of nitric acid. We review here previous work on this subject and discuss recent developments.

  4. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvar