WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence

  1. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 227-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N{sub 2} discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N{sub 2} discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N{sub 2} discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge, two-step process of N{sub 2} dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  2. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B; Fraga, M; Matthews, J; Sakaki, N; Tameda, Y; Tsunesada, Y; Ulrich, A

    2012-01-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of \\emph{Air Fluorescence Workshops} commenced in 2002. At the 8$^{\\rm{th}}$ Air Fluoresc...

  3. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunesada Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  4. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bohacova, M.; Fraga, M.; Matthews, J.; Sakaki, N.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ulrich, A.

    2013-06-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  5. Can mushrooms fix atmospheric nitrogen?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayasinghearachchi; Gamini Seneviratne

    2004-09-01

    It is generally reported that fungi like Pleurotus spp. can fix nitrogen (N2). The way they do it is still not clear. The present study hypothesized that only associations of fungi and diazotrophs can fix N2. This was tested in vitro. Pleurotus ostreatus was inoculated with a bradyrhizobial strain nodulating soybean and P. ostreatus with no inoculation was maintained as a control. At maximum mycelial colonization by the bradyrhizobial strain and biofilm formation, the cultures were subjected to acetylene reduction assay (ARA). Another set of the cultures was evaluated for growth and nitrogen accumulation. Nitrogenase activity was present in the biofilm, but not when the fungus or the bradyrhizobial strain was alone. A significant reduction in mycelial dry weight and a significant increase in nitrogen concentration were observed in the inoculated cultures compared to the controls. The mycelial weight reduction could be attributed to C transfer from the fungus to the bradyrhizobial strain, because of high C cost of biological N2 fixation. This needs further investigations using 14C isotopic tracers. It is clear from the present study that mushrooms alone cannot fix atmospheric N2. But when they are in association with diazotrophs, nitrogenase activity is detected because of the diazotrophic N2 fixation. It is not the fungus that fixes N2 as reported earlier. Effective N2 fixing systems, such as the present one, may be used to increase protein content of mushrooms. Our study has implications for future identification of as yet unidentified N2 systems occurring in the environment.

  6. Atmospheric Nitrogen input to the Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asman, W.A.H.; Hertel, O.; Berkowicz, R.;

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the processes involved in the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. These processes are incorporated in an atmospheric transport model that is used to calculate the nitrogen input to the Kattegat, the sea area between Denmark and Sweden. The model results show...... that the total atmospheric nitrogen input to the Kattegat is approximately 960 kg N km(-2) yr(-1). The nitrogen input to the Kattegat is dominated by the wet depositions of NHx (42%) and NOy (30%). The contribution from the dry deposition of NHx is 17% and that of the dry deposition of NOy is 11......%. The contribution of the atmospheric input of nitrogen to the Kattegat is about 30% of the total input including the net transport from other sea areas, runoff etc....

  7. Atmospheric nitrogen evolution on Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen is the most common element in Earth's atmosphere and also appears to be present in significant amounts in the mantle. However, its long-term cycling between these two reservoirs remains poorly understood. Here a range of biotic and abiotic mechanisms are evaluated that could have caused nitrogen exchange between Earth's surface and interior over time. In the Archean, biological nitrogen fixation was likely strongly limited by nutrient and/or electron acceptor constraints. Abiotic fixation of dinitrogen becomes efficient in strongly reducing atmospheres, but only once temperatures exceed around 1000 K. Hence if atmospheric N2 levels really were as low as they are today 3.0-3.5 Ga, the bulk of Earth's mantle nitrogen must have been emplaced in the Hadean, most likely at a time when the surface was molten. The elevated atmospheric N content on Venus compared to Earth can be explained abiotically by a water loss redox pump mechanism, where oxygen liberated from H2O photolysis and subsequent H loss to space oxidises the mantle, causing enhanced outgassing of nitrogen. This mechanism has implications for understanding the partitioning of other Venusian volatiles and atmospheric evolution on exoplanets.

  8. Atmospheric nitrogen evolution on Earth and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, R D

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is the most common element in Earth's atmosphere and also appears to be present in significant amounts in the mantle. However, its long-term cycling between these two reservoirs remains poorly understood. Here a range of biotic and abiotic mechanisms are evaluated that could have caused nitrogen exchange between Earth's surface and interior over time. In the Archean, biological nitrogen fixation was likely strongly limited by nutrient and/or electron acceptor constraints. Abiotic fixation of dinitrogen becomes efficient in strongly reducing atmospheres, but only once temperatures exceed around 1000 K. Hence if atmospheric N2 levels really were as low as they are today 3.0 - 3.5 Ga, the bulk of Earth's mantle nitrogen must have been emplaced in the Hadean, most likely at a time when the surface was molten. The elevated atmospheric N content on Venus compared to Earth can be explained abiotically by a water loss redox pump mechanism, where oxygen liberated from H2O photolysis and subsequent H loss to s...

  9. The Atmospheric Fate of Organic Nitrogen Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine

    Organic nitrogen compounds are present in our atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and have impacts on air quality and climate. Due to recent advances in instrumentation, these compounds are being detected in the gas and particle phases, raising questions as to their source, processing and sinks in the environment. With their recently identified role as contributors to aerosol formation and growth, their novel large scale use as solvents in carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and their emissions from cigarette smoke, it is now important to address the gaps in our understanding of the fate of organic nitrogen. Experimentally and theoretically, I studied the chemical atmospheric fate of specific organic nitrogen compounds in the amine, amide and isocyanate families, yielding information that can be used in chemical transport models to assess the fate of this emerging class of atmospheric molecules. I performed kinetic laboratory studies in a smog chamber to measure the room temperature rate coefficient for reaction with the hydroxyl radical of monoethanolamine, nicotine, and five different amides. I employed online-mass spectrometry techniques to quantify the oxidation products. I found that amines react quickly with OH radicals with lifetimes of a few hours under sunlit conditions, producing amides as oxidation products. My studies on amides revealed that they have much longer lifetimes in the atmosphere, ranging from a few hours to a week. Photo-oxidation of amides produces isocyanates and I investigated these mechanisms in detail using ab initio calculations. Furthermore, I experimentally measured isocyanic acid's Henry's Law constant as well as its hydrolysis rate constants to better understand its sinks in the atmosphere. Finally, I re-examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of organic nitrogen molecules for improved model parameterizations.

  10. Ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-yan; Lv Yan-na; LIU Xue-yan Liu; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    The continuing increase in human activities is causing global changes such as increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.There is considerable interest in understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,specifically in terms of global nitrogen cycling and its potential future contribution to global climate change.This paper summarizes the ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,including size-effects,stage-effects,site-effects,and the effects of different levels and forms of atmospheric nitrogen deposition.We discuss needs for further research on the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil enzymes.

  11. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  12. Raman Scattering from Atmospheric Nitrogen in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M. J.; Kent, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Mark II laser radar system at Kingston, Jamaica, has been used to make observations on the Raman shifted line from atmospheric nitrogen at 828.5 nm. The size of the system makes it possible to detect signals from heights of up to 40 kilometres. The effects of aerosol scattering observed using a single wavelength are almost eliminated, and a profile of nitrogen density may be obtained. Assuming a constant mixing ratio, this may be interpreted as a profile of atmospheric density whose accuracy is comparable to that obtained from routine meteorological soundings. In order to obtain an accurate profile several interfering effects have had to be examined and, where necessary, eliminated. These include: 1) Fluorescence in optical components 2) Leakage of signal at 694.3 nm. 3) Overload effects and non-linearities in the receiving and counting electronics. Most of these effects have been carefully examined and comparisons are being made between the observed atmospheric density profiles and local meteorological radio-sonde measurements. Good agreement has been obtained over the region of overlap (15 - 30 KID), discrepancies being of the same order as the experimental accuracy (1-10%), depending on height and length of period of observation.

  13. Spectral resolved Measurement of the Nitrogen Fluorescence Emissions in Air induced by Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Waldenmaier, Tilo; Klages, Hans

    2007-01-01

    For the calorimetric determination of the primary energy of extensive air showers, measured by fluorescence telescopes, a precise knowledge of the conversion factor (fluorescence yield) between the deposited energy in the atmosphere and the number of emitted fluorescence photons is essential. The fluorescence yield depends on the pressure and the temperature of the air as well as on the water vapor concentration. Within the scope of this work the fluorescence yield for the eight strongest nitrogen emission bands between 300 nm and 400 nm has been measured using electrons from a Sr-90 source with energies between 250 keV and 2000 keV. Measurements have been performed in dry air, pure nitrogen, and a nitrogen-oxygen mixture at pressures ranging from 2 hPa to 990 hPa. Furthermore the influence of water vapor has been studied. A new approach for the parametrization of the fluorescence yield was used to analyze the data, leading to a consistent description of the fluorescence yield with a minimal set of parameters...

  14. Atmospheric nitrogen budget in Sahelian dry savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric nitrogen budget depends on emission and deposition fluxes both as reduced and oxidized nitrogen compounds. In this study, a first attempt at estimating the Sahel nitrogen budget for the year 2006 is made, through measurements and simulations at three stations from the IDAF network situated in dry savanna ecosystems. Dry deposition fluxes are estimated from measurements of NO2, HNO3 and NH3 gaseous concentrations, and wet deposition fluxes are calculated from NH4+ and NO3 concentrations in samples of rain. Emission fluxes are estimated including biogenic emission of NO from soils (an Artificial Neural Network module has been inserted into the ISBA-SURFEX surface model, emission of NOx and NH3 from domestic fires and biomass burning, and volatilization of NH3 from animal excreta.

    This study uses original and unique data from remote and hardly-ever-explored regions. The monthly evolution of oxidized N compounds shows that deposition increases at the beginning of the rainy season because of large emissions of biogenic NO (pulse events. Emission of oxidized compounds is dominated by biogenic emission from soils (domestic fires and biomass burning account for 27% at the most, depending on the station, whereas emission of NH3 is dominated by the process of volatilization. Deposition fluxes are dominated by gaseous dry deposition processes (58% of the total, for both oxidized and reduced compounds. The average deposition flux in dry savanna ecosystems ranges from 8.6 to 10.9 kgN ha−1 yr−1, with 30% attributed to oxidized compounds, and the other 70% attributed to NHx. The average emission flux ranges from 7.8 to 9.7 kgN ha−1 yr−1, dominated by NH3 volatilization (67% and biogenic emission from soils (24%. The annual budget is then

  15. Atmospheric nitrogen budget in Sahelian dry savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric nitrogen budget depends on emission and deposition fluxes both as reduced and oxidized nitrogen compounds. In this study, a first attempt at estimating the Sahel nitrogen budget for the year 2006 is made, through measurements and simulations at three stations from the IDAF network situated in dry savanna ecosystems. Dry deposition fluxes are estimated from measurements of NO2, HNO3 and NH3 gaseous concentrations and from simulated dry deposition velocities, and wet deposition fluxes are calculated from NH4+ and NO3 concentrations in samples of rain. Emission fluxes are estimated including biogenic emission of NO from soils (an Artificial Neural Network module has been inserted into the ISBA-SURFEX surface model, emission of NOx and NH3 from domestic fires and biomass burning, and volatilization of NH3 from animal excreta. Uncertainties are calculated for each contribution of the budget.

    This study uses original and unique data from remote and hardly-ever-explored regions.The monthly evolution of oxidized N compounds shows that emission and deposition increase at the beginning of the rainy season because of large emissions of biogenic NO (pulse events. Emission of oxidized compounds is dominated by biogenic emission from soils (domestic fires and biomass burning of oxidized compounds account for 0 to 13% at the most at the annual scale, depending on the station, whereas emission of NH3 is dominated by the process of volatilization from soils. At the annual scale, the average gaseous dry deposition accounts for 47% of the total estimated deposition flux, for both oxidized and reduced compounds. The average estimated wet plus dry deposition flux in dry savanna ecosystems is 7.5±1.8 kgN ha−1 yr−1, with approximately 30% attributed to oxidized compounds, and the rest attributed

  16. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  17. Nitrogen and Carbon Dynamics Across Trophic Levels Along an Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, B. D.; Bell, M. D.; Newingham, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has altered soil biogeochemical processes and plant communities across the United States. Prior investigations have demonstrated these alterations; however, little is known about the effects of elevated nitrogen on higher trophic levels. Building upon previous research that revealed an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient from the San Bernardino Mountains through Joshua Tree National Park in California, we investigated atmospheric nitrogen and its effects on soils, plants, and harvester ants. We measured nitrogen and carbon concentrations, along with carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, across trophic levels at eighteen urban and unpopulated sites along the deposition gradient. Carbon and nitrogen attributes were determined in atmospheric nitric acid, soil, Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa leaves, seeds from selected plant species, and ants. We predicted carbon and nitrogen ratios and isotopes to change in areas with higher nitrogen deposition and vary along the deposition gradient. Nitrogen (p=0.02) and carbon (p=0.05) concentrations, as well as C:N ratios (p=<0.001), significantly differed in Messor pergandei individuals among sites; however, no correlation was found between these carbon and nitrogen attributes and the nitrogen deposition gradient (%N r2=0.02, %C r2=0.007, C:N r2=0.02). The δ15N and δ13C values of the ants, leaf tissues, and seeds measured across the gradient follow similar patterns with r2 values all below 0.20. Our results suggest the current and previous rates of nitrogen deposition in this area are not enough to modify nitrogen and carbon concentrations and isotope values. Compensatory nitrogen cycling processes in the soil may reduce the effects of increased nitrogen on plants and thus higher trophic levels. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics across trophic levels might change after longer ecosystem exposure to elevated nitrogen; however, other abiotic and biotic factors are likely driving current

  18. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the European atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Ole; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Reis, S.;

    2012-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N-r) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in the governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. N-r compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+))...

  19. Atmospheric nitrogen compounds: Occurrence, composition and deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Pilegaard, K.; Egeløv, A.H.;

    1996-01-01

    Traffic in cities and on highways is an important contributor to NOy atmospheric pollution in open areas. In this situation both the concentration and composition of NOy compounds show a wide variation and are dependent on meteorological and atmospheric chemical conditions. The proportion of NOz...

  20. Energy transfer in Anabaena variabilis filaments adapted to nitrogen-depleted and nitrogen-enriched conditions studied by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Aya; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-16

    Nitrogen is among the most important nutritious elements for photosynthetic organisms such as plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Therefore, nitrogen depletion severely compromises the growth, development, and photosynthesis of these organisms. To preserve their integrity under nitrogen-depleted conditions, filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, and self-adapt by regulating their light-harvesting and excitation energy-transfer processes. To investigate the changes in the primary processes of photosynthesis, we measured the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRFS) of whole filaments of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis at 77 K. The filaments were grown in standard and nitrogen-free media for 6 months. The TRFS were measured with a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting system. Despite the phycobilisome degradation, the energy-transfer paths within phycobilisome and from phycobilisome to both photosystems were maintained. However, the energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I was suppressed and a specific red chlorophyll band appeared under the nitrogen-depleted condition.

  1. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmens, H., E-mail: hh@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A., E-mail: danor@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cooper, D.M., E-mail: cooper@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Mills, G., E-mail: gmi@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Steinnes, E., E-mail: Eiliv.Steinnes@chem.ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kubin, E., E-mail: Eero.Kubin@metla.fi [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kirkkosaarentie 7, 91500 Muhos (Finland); Thoeni, L., E-mail: lotti.thoeni@fub-ag.ch [FUB-Research Group for Environmental Monitoring, Alte Jonastrasse 83, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alber, R., E-mail: Renate.Alber@provinz.bz.it [Environmental Agency of Bolzano, 39055 Laives (Italy); Carballeira, A., E-mail: alejo.carballeira@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Coskun, M., E-mail: coskunafm@yahoo.com [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey); De Temmerman, L., E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.be [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Tervuren (Belgium); Frolova, M., E-mail: marina.frolova@lvgma.gov.lv [Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Agency, Riga (Latvia); Gonzalez-Miqueo, L., E-mail: lgonzale2@alumni.unav.es [Univ. of Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations ({>=}1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km x 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r{sup 2} = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. - Highlights: > Nitrogen concentrations in mosses were determined at ca. 3000 sites across Europe. > Moss concentrations were compared with EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition. > The asymptotic relationship for Europe showed saturation at ca. 15 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. > Linear relationships were found with measured nitrogen deposition in some countries. > Moss concentrations complement deposition measurements at high spatial resolution. - Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

  2. Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jickells, Tim D.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs to the Ocean and their Impact T Jickells (1), K. Altieri (2), D. Capone (3), E. Buitenhuis (1), R. Duce (4), F. Dentener (5), K. Fennel (6), J. Galloway (7), M. Kanakidou (8), J. LaRoche (9), K. Lee (10), P. Liss (1), J. Middleburg (11), K. Moore (12), S. Nickovic (13), G. Okin (14), A. Oschilies (15), J. Prospero (16), M. Sarin (17), S. Seitzinger (18), J. Scharples (19), P. Suntharalingram (1), M. Uematsu (20), L. Zamora (21) Atmospheric nitrogen inputs to the ocean have been identified as an important source of nitrogen to the oceans which has increased greatly as a result of human activity. The significance of atmospheric inputs for ocean biogeochemistry were evaluated in a seminal paper by Duce et al., 2008 (Science 320, 893-7). In this presentation we will update the Duce et al 2008 study estimating the impact of atmospheric deposition on the oceans. We will summarise the latest model estimates of total atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the ocean, their chemical form (nitrate, ammonium and organic nitrogen) and spatial distribution from the TM4 model. The model estimates are somewhat smaller than the Duce et al estimate, but with similar spatial distributions. We will compare these flux estimates with a new estimate of the impact of fluvial nitrogen inputs on the open ocean (Sharples submitted) which estimates some transfer of fluvial nitrogen to the open ocean, particularly at low latitudes, compared to the complete trapping of fluvial inputs on the continental shelf assumed by Duce et al. We will then estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on ocean primary productivity and N2O emissions from the oceans using the PlankTOM10 model. The impacts of atmospheric deposition we estimate on ocean productivity here are smaller than those predicted by Duce et al impacts, consistent with the smaller atmospheric deposition estimates. However, the atmospheric input is still larger than the estimated fluvial inputs to the open ocean

  3. Measurement of air and nitrogen fluorescence light yields induced by electron beam for UHECR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, P; Grebenyuk, V; Naumov, D; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Y; Onofre, A; Porokhovoi, S; Sabirov, B; Tkatchev, L G

    2006-01-01

    Most of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, EUSO, TUS,...) use air fluorescence to detect and measure extensive air showers (EAS). The precise knowledge of the Fluorescence Light Yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the reconstruction of UHECR. The MACFLY - Measurement of Air Cherenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield - experiment has been designed to perform such FLY measurements. In this paper we will present the results of FLY in the 290-440 nm wavelength range for dry air and pure nitrogen, both excited by electrons with energy of 1.5 MeV, 20 GeV and 50 GeV. The experiment uses a 90Sr radioactive source for low energy measurement and a CERN SPS electron beam for high energy. We find that the FLY is proportional to the deposited energy (E_d) in the gas and we show that the air fluorescence properties remain constant independently of the electron energy. At the reference point: atmospheric dry air at 1013 hPa and 23C, the ratio FLY/E_d=17.6 photon/MeV with ...

  4. Spatial variation in atmospheric nitrogen deposition on low canopy vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhagen, Rene [Community and Conservation Ecology Group, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 14, 9750 AA Haren (Netherlands); Diggelen, Rudy van [Community and Conservation Ecology Group, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 14, 9750 AA Haren (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.van.diggelen@rug.nl

    2006-12-15

    Current knowledge about the spatial variation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on a local scale is limited, especially for vegetation with a low canopy. We measured nitrogen deposition on artificial vegetation at variable distances of local nitrogen emitting sources in three nature reserves in the Netherlands, differing in the intensity of agricultural practices in the surroundings. In the nature reserve located in the most intensive agricultural region nitrogen deposition decreased with increasing distance to the local farms, until at a distance of 1500 m from the local nitrogen emitting sources the background level of 15 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} was reached. No such trend was observed in the other two reserves. Interception was considerably lower than in woodlands and hence affected areas were larger. The results are discussed in relation to the prospects for the conservation or restoration of endangered vegetation types of nutrient-poor soil conditions. - Areas with low canopy vegetation are affected over much larger distances by nitrogen deposition than woodlands.

  5. An Overview of Modeling Middle Atmospheric Odd Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Odd nitrogen (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, and BrONO2) constituents are important components in the control of middle atmospheric ozone. Several processes lead to the production of odd nitrogen (NO(sub y)) in the middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) including the oxidation of nitrous oxide (N2O), lightning, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles (e.g., galactic cosmic rays, solar proton events, and energetic electron precipitation). The dominant production mechanism of NO(sub y) in the stratosphere is N2O oxidation, although other processes contribute. Mesospheric NO(sub y) is influenced by N2O oxidation, downflux from the thermosphere, and energetic charged particles. NO(sub y) is destroyed in the middle atmosphere primarily via two processes: 1) dissociation of NO to form N and O followed by N + NO yielding N2 + O to reform even nitrogen; and 2) transport to the troposphere where HNO3 can be rapidly scavenged in water droplets and rained out of the atmosphere. There are fairly significant differences among global models that predict NO(sub y). NO(sub y) has a fairly long lifetime in the stratosphere (months to years), thus disparate transport in the models probably contributes to many of these differences. Satellite and aircraft measurement provide modeling tests of the various components of NO(sub y). Although some recent reaction rate measurements have led to improvements in model/measurement agreement, significant differences do remain. This presentation will provide an overview of several proposed sources and sinks of NO(sub y) and their regions of importance. Multi-dimensional modeling results for NO(sub y) and its components with comparisons to observations will also be presented.

  6. Combustion synthesis of silicon carbide in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, O. (College of General Education, Osaka Industrial Univ., Daito, Osaka 574 (JP)); Hirao, K. (Narumi Technical Lab., Midoriku, Nagoya 458 (JP)); Koizumi, M. (Institute for Science and Technology, Ryukoku Univ., Fushimiku, Kyoto 612 (JP)); Miyamoto, Y. (Institute for Science and Industrial Research, Osaka Univ., Ibariki, Osaka 567 (JP))

    1989-09-01

    This paper reports on fine SiC powders synthesized by burning the mixed reactants Si and C in a nitrogen atmosphere of 3 to 10 MPa. The exothermic synthesis reaction propagated spontaneously after igniting the reactants at room temperature. The SiC powders obtained had a uniform size distribution of about 0.2 {mu}m. The combustion velocity was 0.8 to 1.5 mm/s. The maximum temperature measured at the reaction was 2500 K, which was higher than the adiabatic combustion temperature of SiC, but slightly lower than the decomposition temperature of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} under nitrogen pressure.

  7. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the European atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hertel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen (Nr compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in the governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3 and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+, oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO + nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and their reaction products as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N. Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account the differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2 emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions generally have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3 before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3. In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3 contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human

  8. Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen Compounds in Humid Tropical Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Cuesta-Santos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid deposition, a direct effect of gaseous air pollutants, is causing widespread damage to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Further, these pollutants are responsible for the corrosion of building materials and cultural objects, as well as having an impact on human health. In Cuba, main atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds varies from approximately 12.0 to 65.0 kg N ha�1 year�1 in rural areas. Ammonia and ammonium are the most important elements in Cuba�s tropical conditions.

  9. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, M.A.; Nemitz, E.; Erisman, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended...... progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N2O, NO and bi-directional NH3 exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes...

  10. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols – fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pöhlker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS.

    In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient

  11. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, C.; Huffman, J. A.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-01-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP) by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS). In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM) exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient supermicron particle

  12. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols – fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pöhlker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS.

    In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient

  13. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qianlai; Chen, Min; Xu, Kai; Tang, Jinyun; Saikawa, Eri; Lu, Yanyu; Melillo, Jerry M.; Prinn, Ronald G.; McGuire, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a process-based biogeochemistry model to quantify soil consumption during the 20th and 21st centuries. We estimated that global soils consumed 32–36 Tg CH4 yr−1 during the 1990s. Natural ecosystems accounted for 84% of the total consumption, and agricultural ecosystems only consumed 5 Tg CH4 yr−1 in our estimations. During the twentieth century, the consumption rates increased at 0.03–0.20 Tg CH4 yr−2 with seasonal amplitudes increasing from 1.44 to 3.13 Tg CH4 month−1. Deserts, shrublands, and xeric woodlands were the largest sinks. Atmospheric CH4 concentrations and soil moisture exerted significant effects on the soil consumption while nitrogen deposition had a moderate effect. During the 21st century, the consumption is predicted to increase at 0.05-1.0 Tg CH4 yr−2, and total consumption will reach 45–140 Tg CH4 yr−1 at the end of the 2090s, varying under different future climate scenarios. Dry areas will persist as sinks, boreal ecosystems will become stronger sinks, mainly due to increasing soil temperatures. Nitrogen deposition will modestly reduce the future sink strength at the global scale. When we incorporated the estimated global soil consumption into our chemical transport model simulations, we found that nitrogen deposition suppressed the total methane sink by 26 Tg during the period 1998–2004, resulting in 6.6 ppb higher atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios compared to without considering nitrogen deposition effects. On average, a cumulative increase of every 1 Tg soil CH4 consumption decreased atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios by 0.26 ppb during the period 1998–2004.

  14. Atmospheric Deposition of Soluble Organic Nitrogen due to Biomass Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.; Lin, G.; Penner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) species from large fires may contribute to enrichment of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. Here we use an atmospheric chemistry transport model to investigate the supply of soluble organic nitrogen (ON) from open biomass burning to the ocean. The model results show that the annual deposition rate of soluble ON to the oceans is increased globally by 13% with the increase being particularly notable over the coastal water downwind from the source regions. The estimated deposition of soluble ON due to haze events from the secondary formation is more than half of that from the primary sources. We examine the secondary formation of particulate C-N compounds (e.g., imidazole) from the reactions of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with atmospheric ammonium in wet aerosols and upon cloud evaporation. These ON sources result in a significant contribution to the open ocean, suggesting that atmospheric processing in aqueous phase may have a large effect. We compare the soluble ON concentration in aerosols with and without open biomass burning as a case study in Singapore. The model results demonstrate that the soluble ON concentration in aerosols is episodically enriched during the fire events, compared to the without smoke simulations. However, the model results show that the daily soluble ON concentration can be also enhanced in the without smoke simulations during the same period, compared to the monthly averages. This indicates that care should be taken when using in-situ observations to constrain the soluble ON source strength from biomass burning. More accurate quantification of the soluble ON burdens with no smoke sources is therefore needed to assess the effect of biomass burning on bioavailable ON input to the oceans.

  15. Atmospheric emission of reactive nitrogen during biofuel ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Cristine M D; Cardoso, Arnaldo A; Allen, Andrew G

    2008-01-15

    This paper evaluates emissions to the atmosphere of biologically available nitrogen compounds in a region characterized by intensive sugar cane biofuel ethanol production. Large emissions of NH3 and NOx, as well as particulate nitrate and ammonium, occur at the harvest when the crop is burned, with the amount of nitrogen released equivalent to approximately 35% of annual fertilizer-N application. Nitrogen oxides concentrations show a positive association with fire frequency, indicating that biomass burning is a major emission source, with mean concentrations of NOx doubling in the dry season relative to the wetseason. During the dry season biomass burning is a source of NH3, with other sources (wastes, soil, biogenic) predominant during the wet season. Estimated NO2-N, NH3-N, NO3- -N and NH4+ -N emission fluxes from sugar cane burning in a planted area of ca. 2.2 x 10(6) ha are 11.0, 1.1, 0.2, and 1.2 Gg N yr(-1), respectively.

  16. Fluorescence action spectra of algae and bean leaves at room and at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra were determined, both at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature, with various blue-green, red and green algae, and greening bean leaves. The action spectra of algae were established with samples of low light absorption as well as dense samples. Fluorescence

  17. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  18. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  19. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Guo, Jun [Testing and Analysis Center, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  20. Can the foliar nitrogen concentration of upland vegetation be used for predicting atmospheric nitrogen deposition? Evidence from field surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, W K; Leith, I D; Woodin, S J; Fowler, D

    2000-03-01

    The deposition of atmospheric nitrogen can be enhanced at high altitude sites as a consequence of cloud droplet deposition and orographic enhancement of wet deposition on hills. The degree to which the increased deposition of nitrogen influences foliar nitrogen concentration in a range of upland plant species was studied in a series of field surveys in northern Britain. A range of upland plant species sampled along altitudinal transects at sites of known atmospheric nitrogen deposition showed marked increases in foliar nitrogen concentration with increasing nitrogen deposition and altitude (and hence with decreasing temperature). For Nardus stricta L., Deschampsia flexuosa (L.) Trin., Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull, Erica cinerea L. and Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Br. Eur. on an unpolluted hill, foliar nitrogen increased by 0.07, 0.12, 0.15, 0.08 and 0.04% dry weight respectively for each 1 kg ha(-1) year(-1) increase in nitrogen deposition. Most species showed an approximately linear relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and altitude but no trend with altitude for foliar phosphorus concentration. This provided evidence that the tissue nutrient status of upland plants reflects nutrient availability rather than the direct effects of climate on growth. However, differences in the relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and atmospheric nitrogen deposition for N. stricta sampled on hills in contrasting pollution climates show that the possibility of temperature-mediated growth effects on foliar nitrogen concentration should not be ignored. Thus, there is potential to use upland plant species as biomonitors of nitrogen deposition, but the response of different species to nitrogen addition, in combination with climatic effects on growth, must be well characterised.

  1. Colorimetric microdetermination of nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltzman, B.E.

    1954-12-01

    The determination of nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere has heretofore been hampered by difficulties in sample absorption and lack of specificity. A new specific reagent has been developed and demonstrated to absorb efficiently in a midget fritted bubbler at levels below 1 ppM. The reagent is a mixture of sulfanilic acid, N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine dihydrochloride, and acetic acid. A stable direct color is produced with a sensitivity of a few parts per billion for a 10-minute sample at 0.4 liter per minute. Ozone in five-fold excess and other gases in tenfold excess produce only slight interfering effects; these may be reduced further by means which are described. 25 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  2. Regional atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen over the British isles assessed using a multi-layer atmospheric transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournier, N.; Tang, Y.S.; Dragosits, U.; Kluizenaar, Y.de; Sutton, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric budgets of reduced nitrogen for the major political regions of the British Isles are investigated with a multi-layer atmospheric transport model. The model is validated against measurements of NH3 concentration and is developed to provide atmospheric budgets for defined subdomains of the

  3. Ultrafast laser-collision-induced fluorescence in atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat, E. V.; Fierro, A.

    2017-04-01

    The implementation and demonstration of laser-collision-induced fluorescence (LCIF) generated in atmospheric pressure helium environments is presented in this communication. As collision times are observed to be fast (~10 ns), ultrashort pulse laser excitation (<100 fs) of the 23S to 33P (388.9 nm) is utilized to initiate the LCIF process. Both neutral-induced and electron-induced components of the LCIF are observed in the helium afterglow plasma as the reduced electric field (E/N) is tuned from  <0.1 Td to over 5 Td. Under the discharge conditions presented in this study (640 Torr He), the lower limit of electron density detection is ~1012 e cm‑3. The spatial profiles of the 23S helium metastable and electrons are presented as functions of E/N to demonstrate the spatial resolving capabilities of the LCIF method.

  4. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ms@ceh.ac.uk; Nemitz, E. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Erisman, J.W. [ECN, Clean Fossil Fuels, PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Beier, C. [Riso National Laboratory, PO Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bahl, K. Butterbach [Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmos. Environ. Research (IMK-IFU), Research Centre Karlsruhe GmbH, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, 82467 Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany); Cellier, P. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Vries, W. de [Alterra, Green World Research, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Cotrufo, F. [Dip. Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Skiba, U.; Di Marco, C.; Jones, S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Laville, P.; Soussana, J.F.; Loubet, B. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Twigg, M.; Famulari, D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Whitehead, J.; Gallagher, M.W. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Neftel, A.; Flechard, C.R. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, PO Box, CH 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended on improved methodologies, while ongoing challenges include gas-aerosol interactions, organic nitrogen and N{sub 2} fluxes. The NEU strategy applies a 3-tier Flux Network together with a Manipulation Network of global-change experiments, linked by common protocols to facilitate model application. Substantial progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N{sub 2}O, NO and bi-directional NH{sub 3} exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes is highly uncertain and a key priority is for better data on agricultural practices. Finally, attention is needed to develop N flux verification procedures to assess compliance with international protocols. - Current N research is separated by form; the challenge is to link N components, scales and issues.

  5. Electron beam dispersion measurements in nitrogen using two-dimensional imaging of N2(+) fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, L. H.; Twiss, R. G.; Cattolica, R. J.

    Experimental results are presented related to the radial spread of fluorescence excited by 10 and 20 KeV electron beams passing through nonflowing rarefied nitrogen at 293 K. An imaging technique for obtaining species distributions from measured beam-excited fluorescence is described, based on a signal inversion scheme mathematically equivalent to the inversion of the Abel integral equation. From fluorescence image data, measurements of beam radius, integrated signal intensity, and spatially resolved distributions of N2(+) first-negative-band fluorescence-emitting species have been made. Data are compared with earlier measurements and with an heuristic beam spread model.

  6. Effect of reaction temperature on structure and fluorescence properties of nitrogen-doped carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yaling; Feng, Xiaoting; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of reaction temperature and nitrogen doping on the structure and fluorescence properties of carbon dots (CDs), six kinds of nitrogen-doped CDs (NCDs) were synthesized at reaction temperatures of 120, 140, 160, 180, 200 and 220 °C, separately, by using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source. Nitrogen-free CDs (N-free CDs-180) was also prepared at 180 °C by using citric acid as the only carbon source for comparison. Results show that reaction temperature has obvious effect on carbonization degree, quantum yield (QY), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra but less effect on functional groups, nitrogen doping degree and fluorescence lifetime of NCDs. Compared with N-free CDs-180, NCDs-180 possesses enchanced QY and longer fluorescence lifetime. Doping nitrogen has obvious effect on UV-vis absorption and PL spectra but less effect on particles sizes and carbonization degree. The formation mechanism of NCDs is explored: QY of NCDs depends largely on the number of fluorescent polymer chains (FPC), the competition between FPC formation on the surface of NCDs and carbon core growth leads to the change in number of FPC, and consequently to the NCDs with highest QY at appropriate hydrothermal temperature.

  7. Reactive nitrogen in atmospheric emission inventories – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Excess reactive Nitrogen (Nr has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current inventories cover emissions of Nr to the atmosphere in Europe, the United States of America, and The People's Republic of China. The focus is on anthropogenic sources, assessing the state-of-the-art of quantifying emissions of Ammonia (NH3, Nitrogen Oxides (NOx and Nitrous Oxide (N2O, the different purposes for which inventories are compiled, and to which extent current inventories meet the needs of atmospheric dispersion modelling. The paper concludes with a discussion of uncertainties involved and a brief outlook on emerging trends in the three regions investigated is conducted.

    Key issues are substantial differences in the overall magnitude, but as well in the relative sectoral contribution of emissions in the inventories that have been assessed. While these can be explained by the use of different methodologies and underlying data (e.g. emission factors or activity rates, they may lead to quite different results when using the emission datasets to model ambient air quality or the deposition with atmospheric dispersion models. Hence, differences and uncertainties in emission inventories are not merely of academic interest, but can have direct policy implications when the development of policy actions is based on these model results.

    The robustness of emission estimates varies greatly between substances, regions and emission source sectors. This has implications for the direction of future research needs and indicates how existing gaps between modelled and measured concentration or deposition rates could be most efficiently addressed.

    The observed current trends in emissions display decreasing NO

  8. Mechanisms controlling soil carbon sequestration under atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Sinsabaugh; D.R. Zak; D.L. Moorhead

    2008-02-19

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can alter the processing and storage of organic carbon in soils. In 2000, we began studying the effects of simulated atmospheric N deposition on soil carbon dynamics in three types of northern temperate forest that occur across a wide geographic range in the Upper Great Lakes region. These ecosystems range from 100% oak in the overstory (black oak-white oak ecosystem; BOWO) to 0% overstory oak (sugar maple-basswood; SMBW) and include the sugar maple-red oak ecosystem (SMRO) that has intermediate oak abundance. The leaf litter biochemistry of these ecosystems range from highly lignified litter (BOWO) to litter of low lignin content (SMBW). We selected three replicate stands of each ecosystem type and established three plots in each stand. Each plot was randomly assigned one of three levels of N deposition (0, 30 & 80 kg N ha-1 y-1) imposed by adding NaNO3 in six equal increments applied over the growing season. Through experiments ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scales, we produced a conceptual framework that describes the biogeochemistry of soil carbon storage in N-saturated ecosystems as the product of interactions between the composition of plant litter, the composition of the soil microbial community and the expression of extracellular enzyme activities. A key finding is that atmospheric N deposition can increase or decrease the soil C storage by modifying the expression of extracellular enzymes by soil microbial communities. The critical interactions within this conceptual framework have been incorporated into a new class of simulations called guild decomposition models.

  9. Dissolved organic nitrogen dominates in European bogs under increasing atmospheric N deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Limpens, J.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the effects of increased atmospheric N input on N availability in ombrotrophic peatlands, the relative concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) were measured in bog waters along a natural gradient of atmospheric N deposition. Six European bog

  10. CAN Canopy Addition of Nitrogen Better Illustrate the Effect of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Forest Ecosystem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Weijun; Zhu, Shidan; Wan, Shiqiang; Luo, Yiqi; Yan, Junhua; Wang, Keya; Liu, Lei; Dai, Huitang; Li, Peixue; Dai, Keyuan; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Zhanfeng; Wang, Faming; Kuang, Yuanwen; Li, Zhian; Lin, Yongbiao; Rao, Xingquan; Li, Jiong; Zou, Bi; Cai, Xian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhao, Ping; Ye, Qing; Huang, Jianguo; Fu, Shenglei

    2015-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition could profoundly impact community structure and ecosystem functions in forests. However, conventional experiments with understory addition of N (UAN) largely neglect canopy-associated biota and processes and therefore may not realistically simulate atmospheric N deposition to generate reliable impacts on forest ecosystems. Here we, for the first time, designed a novel experiment with canopy addition of N (CAN) vs. UAN and reviewed the merits and pitfalls of the two approaches. The following hypotheses will be tested: i) UAN overestimates the N addition effects on understory and soil processes but underestimates those on canopy-associated biota and processes, ii) with low-level N addition, CAN favors canopy tree species and canopy-dwelling biota and promotes the detritus food web, and iii) with high-level N addition, CAN suppresses canopy tree species and other biota and favors rhizosphere food web. As a long-term comprehensive program, this experiment will provide opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations, including biogeochemistry, microbiology, zoology, and plant science to examine forest ecosystem responses to atmospheric N deposition.

  11. Implications of the Nitrogen Isotope Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere for the Nitrogen Ratio in Ammonia in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2013-12-01

    The D/H ratio of water measured in solar system bodies has been established as a tool for determining the conditions under which bodies such as comets or icy moons formed. This ratio varies significantly and indicates complex thermal and chemical evolution of the solar nebula during solar system and planetary formation. Nitrogen isotope ratios also vary significantly, and in some but not all cases correlate to D/H ratios, but are poorly understood. Nitrogen in the solar nebula was primarily in the form of atomic and molecular nitrogen. The isotope ratio (14N/15N) of this reservoir is expected to be ~435 based on the ratio measured in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the atmosphere of Jupiter is made up of gas captured from the solar nebula (Owen et al., 2001). The terrestrial atmospheric ratio is 272, which is close to the ratio measured in the Earth's mantle. This may be the primordial ratio for nitrogen delivered to Earth depending on the amount of exchange between the atmosphere and the mantle and any atmospheric fractionation processes that may have influenced the ratio over time. Comets are a possible source of nitrogen in the Earth's atmosphere (Hutsmekers et al., 2009), although chondrites have also been suggested as a source (Marty, 2012). In the case of comets, nitrogen would have been essentially retained in the form of ammonia (Mousis et al., 2012), which is the most abundant form of nitrogen in comets. The nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere is expected to have originated as ammonia hydrates and converted to N2 early in Titan's history (Atreya et al., 1978). The nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere is ~170, which is significantly enriched in the heavy isotope compared to the terrestrial value. We will discuss the evolution of the nitrogen ratio in Titan's atmosphere (Mandt et al., 2009), the limits of the primordial ratio in ammonia, and the implications for this ratio for the isotope ratio in ammonia in comets that should be measured by the ROSINA instrument

  12. High Quantum Efficiency Phototubes for Atmospheric Fluorescence Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kruppke-Hansen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The detection of atmospheric fluorescence light from extensive air showers has become a powerful tool for accurate measurements of the energy and mass of ultra-high energy cosmic ray particles. Employing large area imaging telescopes with mirror areas of 10m2 or more, showers out to distances of 30km and more can be observed. Matrices of low-noise photomultipliers are used to detect the faint light of the air showers against the ambient night-sky background noise. The signal-to-noise ratio of such a system is found to be proportional to the square root of the mirror area times the quantum efficiency of the phototube. Thus, higher quantum efficiencies could potentially improve the quality of the measurement and/or lead to the construction of more compact telescopes. In this paper, we shall discuss such improvements to be expected from high quantum efficiency phototubes that became available on the market only very recently. A series of simulations has been performed with data of different types of commercially...

  13. [Effects of nitrogen application and elevated atmospheric CO2 on electron transport and energy partitioning in flag leaf photosynthesis of wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-cheng; Yu, Xian-feng; Ma, Yi-fan

    2011-03-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants were pot-cultured in open top chambers at the nitrogen application rate of 0 and 200 mg x kg(-1) soil and the atmospheric CO2 concentration of 400 and 760 micromol x mol(-1). Through the determination of flag leaf nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, photosynthetic rate (Pn)-intercellar CO2 concentration (Ci) response curve, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters at heading stage, the photosynthetic electron transport rate and others were calculated, aimed to investigate the effects of nitrogen application and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on the photosynthetic energy partitioning in wheat flag leaves. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased the leaf nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, compared with the ambient one, and the chlorophyll a/b ratio increased at the nitrogen application rate of 200 mg x kg(-1). With the application of nitrogen, no evident variations were observed in the maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), maximal quantum yield under irradiance (Fv'/Fm') of PS II reaction center, photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient (q(p)), and actual PS II efficiency under irradiance (phi(PS II) at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, and the total photosynthetic electron transport rate (J(F)) of PS II reaction center had no evident increase, though the non-photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient (NPQ) decreased significantly. With no nitrogen application, the Fv'/Fm', psi(PS II), and NPQ at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased significantly, and the J(F) had a significant decrease though the Fv/Fm and q(p) did not vary remarkably. Nitrogen application increased the J(F) and photochemical electron transport rate (Jc); while elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased the photorespiration electron transport rate (J0), Rubisco oxidation rate (V0), ratio of photorespiration to photochemical electron transport rate (J0/Jc) , and Rubisco oxidation/carboxylation rate (Vo/Vc), but

  14. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Nitrogen fixation routes in early atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, an icy world surrounded by auburn organic haze, is considered as one of the best targets for studying abiotic planetary organic chemistry. In spite of a great many efforts being made, the chemistry in Titan’s atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of Titan aerosols analogs (tholin) by NMR and identified hexamethylenetetramine as a dominant small molecule in Titan tholin. Here we report a more complete and definitive structural investigation of the small molecule inventory in Titan tholin. We identified several nitrogenous organic molecules including cyanamide, guanidine, 2-cyanoguanidine, melamine, N‧-cyanoformamidine and 1,2,4-triazole in Titan tholin by using NMR and GC-MS and standard sample comparison. The structural characteristics of these molecules suggest a possible formation pathway from the reaction of HCN and NH3, both of which are known to exist in appreciable density in the atmosphere and were tentatively detected by the Huygens probe.

  15. A reevaluation of the magnitude and impacts of anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen inputs on the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jickells, T. D.; Buitenhuis, E.; Altieri, K.; Baker, A. R.; Capone, D.; Duce, R. A.; Dentener, F.; Fennel, K.; Kanakidou, M.; LaRoche, J.; Lee, K.; Liss, P.; Middelburg, J. J.; Moore, J. K.; Okin, G.; Oschlies, A.; Sarin, M.; Seitzinger, S.; Sharples, J.; Singh, A.; Suntharalingam, P.; Uematsu, M.; Zamora, L. M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new synthesis of best estimates of the inputs of fixed nitrogen to the world ocean via atmospheric deposition and compare this to fluvial inputs and dinitrogen fixation. We evaluate the scale of human perturbation of these fluxes. Fluvial inputs dominate inputs to the continental shelf, and we estimate that about 75% of this fluvial nitrogen escapes from the shelf to the open ocean. Biological dinitrogen fixation is the main external source of nitrogen to the open ocean, i.e., beyond the continental shelf. Atmospheric deposition is the primary mechanism by which land-based nitrogen inputs, and hence human perturbations of the nitrogen cycle, reach the open ocean. We estimate that anthropogenic inputs are currently leading to an increase in overall ocean carbon sequestration of 0.4% (equivalent to an uptake of 0.15 Pg C yr-1 and less than the Duce et al. (2008) estimate). The resulting reduction in climate change forcing from this ocean CO2 uptake is offset to a small extent by an increase in ocean N2O emissions. We identify four important feedbacks in the ocean atmosphere nitrogen system that need to be better quantified to improve our understanding of the perturbation of ocean biogeochemistry by atmospheric nitrogen inputs. These feedbacks are recycling of (1) ammonia and (2) organic nitrogen from the ocean to the atmosphere and back, (3) the suppression of nitrogen fixation by increased nitrogen concentrations in surface waters from atmospheric deposition, and (4) increased loss of nitrogen from the ocean by denitrification due to increased productivity stimulated by atmospheric inputs.

  16. Atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition to a typical red soil forestland in southeastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Ling; Hu, Zheng-Yi; Wang, Ti-Jian; Zhou, Jing; Wu, Cong-Yang-Hui; Xia, Xu

    2009-12-01

    A 2-year monitoring study was conducted to estimate nitrogen deposition to a typical red soil forestland in southeastern China. The dry deposition velocities (V(d)) were estimated using big leaf resistance analogy model. Atmospheric nitrogen dry deposition was estimated by combing V(d) and nitrogen compounds concentrations, and the wet deposition was calculated via rainfall and nitrogen concentrations in rainwater. The total inorganic nitrogen deposition was 83.7 kg ha(-1) a(-1) in 2004 and 81.3 kg ha(-1) a(-1) in 2005, respectively. The dry deposition contributed 78.6% to total nitrogen deposition, in which ammonia was the predominant contributor that accounted for 86.1%. Reduced nitrogen compounds were the predominant contributors, accounting for 78.3% of total nitrogen deposition. The results suggested that atmospheric inorganic nitrogen could be attributed to intensive agricultural practices such as excessive nitrogen fertilization and livestock production. Therefore, impacts of atmospheric nitrogen originated from agriculture practices on nearby forest ecosystems should be evaluated.

  17. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  18. Absolute measurement of the nitrogen fluorescence yield in air between 300 and 430 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Lefeuvre, G; Gorodetzky, P; Patzak, T; Salin, P

    2007-01-01

    The nitrogen fluorescence induced in air is used to detect ultra-high energy cosmic rays and to measure their energy. The precise knowledge of the absolute fluorescence yield is the key quantity to improve the accuracy on the cosmic ray energy. The total yield has been measured in dry air using a 90Sr source and a [300-430 nm] filter. The fluorescence yield in air is 4.23 $\\pm$ 0.20 photons per meter when normalized to 760 mmHg, 15 degrees C and with an electron energy of 0.85 MeV. This result is consistent with previous experiments made at various energies, but with an accuracy improved by a factor of about 3. For the first time, the absolute continuous spectrum of nitrogen excited by 90Sr electrons has also been measured with a spectrometer. Details of this experiment are given in one of the author's PhD thesis [32].

  19. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition at a Conifer Forest: Canopy Nitrogen Uptake and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, T.; Sievering, H.

    2006-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is known to impact forests in a variety of ways ranging from increased growth and photosynthesis to needle necrosis. More than half of the growing-season N deposition flux at the Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research site's subalpine forest (Niwot Forest) is of anthropogenic origin. N fertilization studies investigating forest responses to increased N deposition have primarily dealt with deposition loading to the soil. However, some studies indicate that forest canopies (especially conifer forest canopies) retain a substantial portion of atmospherically-deposited N before this N reaches the soil in throughfall solutions. In the present study, canopy N uptake (CNU) and the influence of CNU on photosynthesis are investigated. At the Niwot Forest, growing-season throughfall fluxes of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) are markedly lower (~70% lower) than fluxes in wet plus dry deposition flux, indicating the forest canopy is taking up atmospherically-deposited N. This uptake was found to be driven by diffusion of NH4+ and NO3- into canopy tissues. Although the canopy is taking up atmospherically-deposited N, spruce foliar N content is still relatively low at the Niwot Forest. This low foliar N content contributes to low rates of light-saturated photosynthesis and maximum carboxylation (initial rate of CO2 reduction by RUBISCO). Further, a strong linear dependence of maximum carboxylation on needle N content was found and N solutions that had been directly applied to foliage at Niwot Forest spruce branches induced a 12% greater photosynthetic efficiency (i.e., proportion of absorbed light utilized by photosynthesis). The low foliar N content and dependence of photosynthetic parameters on foliar N content show that the Niwot Forest has yet to reach a state of N saturation. Noting the Niwot Forest has one of the largest N deposition fluxes in the Rockies, our CNU and photosynthetic parameter results characterizing pre

  20. An advanced technique for speciation of organic nitrogen in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, S.; Robinson, J.; Hays, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical composition of organic nitrogen (ON) in the environment is a research topic of broad significance. The topic intersects the branches of atmospheric, aquatic, and ecological science; thus, a variety of instrumentation, analytical methods, and data interpretation tools have evolved for determination of ON. Recent studies that focus on atmospheric particulate nitrogen (N) suggest a significant fraction (20-80%) of total N is bound in organic compounds. The sources, bioavailability and transport mechanisms of these N-containing compounds can differ, producing a variety of environmental consequences. Amino acids (AA) are a key class of atmospheric ON compounds that can contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and potentially influence water cycles, air pollutant scavenging, and the radiation balance. AA are water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) that can significantly alter the acid-base chemistry of aerosols, and may explain the buffering capacity that impacts heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. The chemical transformations that N-containing organic compounds (including AA) undergo can increase the light-absorbing capacity of atmospheric carbon via formation of 'brown carbon'. Suggested sources of atmospheric AA include: marine surface layer transport from bursting sea bubbles, the suspension of bacteria, fungi, algae, pollen, spores, or biomass burning. Methodology for detection of native (underivatized) amino acids (AA) in atmospheric aerosols has been developed and validated (Samy et al., 2011). This presentation describes the use of LC-MS (Q-TOF) and microwave-assisted gas phase hydrolysis for detection of free and combined amino acids in aerosols collected in a Southeastern U.S. forest environment. Accurate mass detection and the addition of isotopically labeled surrogates prior to sample preparation allows for sensitive quantitation of target AA in a complex aerosol matrix. A total of 16 native AA were detected above the reporting

  1. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  2. Effects of N2O and O2 addition to nitrogen Townsend dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure on the absolute ground-state atomic nitrogen density

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2012-11-27

    Absolute ground-state density of nitrogen atoms N (2p3 4S3/2) in non-equilibrium Townsend dielectric barrier discharges (TDBDs) at atmospheric pressure sustained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 gas mixtures has been measured using Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy. The quantitative measurements have been obtained by TALIF calibration using krypton as a reference gas. We previously reported that the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) atom density is around 3 × 1014 cm-3 in pure nitrogen TDBD, and that this maximum depends strongly on the mean energy dissipated in the gas. In the two gas mixtures studied here, results show that the absolute N (2p3 4S3/2) density is strongly affected by the N2O and O2 addition. Indeed, the density still increases exponentially with the energy dissipated in the gas but an increase in N2O and O2 amounts (a few hundreds of ppm) leads to a decrease in nitrogen atom density. No discrepancy in the order of magnitude of N (2p3 4S3/2) density is observed when comparing results obtained in N2/N2O and N2/O2 mixtures. Compared with pure nitrogen, for an energy of ∼90 mJ cm-3, the maximum of N (2p3 4S3/2) density drops by a factor of 3 when 100 ppm of N2O and O2 are added and it reduces by a factor of 5 for 200 ppm, to reach values close to our TALIF detection sensitivity for 400 ppm (1 × 1013 cm -3 at atmospheric pressure). © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Analyzing the performance of fluorescence parameters in the monitoring of leaf nitrogen content of paddy rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Gong, Wei; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing

    2016-06-01

    Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) is a significant factor which can be utilized to monitor the status of paddy rice and it requires a reliable approach for fast and precise quantification. This investigation aims to quantitatively analyze the correlation between fluorescence parameters and LNC based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. The fluorescence parameters exhibited a consistent positive linear correlation with LNC in different growing years (2014 and 2015) and different rice cultivars. The R2 of the models varied from 0.6978 to 0.9045. Support vector machine (SVM) was then utilized to verify the feasibility of the fluorescence parameters for monitoring LNC. Comparison of the fluorescence parameters indicated that F740 is the most sensitive (the R2 of linear regression analysis of the between predicted and measured values changed from 0.8475 to 0.9226, and REs ranged from 3.52% to 4.83%) to the changes in LNC among all fluorescence parameters. Experimental results demonstrated that fluorescence parameters based on LIF technology combined with SVM is a potential method for realizing real-time, non-destructive monitoring of paddy rice LNC, which can provide guidance for the decision-making of farmers in their N fertilization strategies.

  4. Total Nitrogen Deposition (wet+dry) from the Atmosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Oxides of Nitrogen are emitted primarily as by-products of combustion. Sources include power plants, industrial boilers, and automobiles. In addition, agricultural...

  5. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm band in atmospheric gases

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Curry, E; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Li, S; Monasor, M; Nozka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; D'Orfeuil, B Rouille; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Smida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of the 337 nm nitrogen band, relevant to ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) detectors, is reported. Two independent calibrations of the fluorescence emission induced by a 120 GeV proton beam were employed: Cherenkov light from the beam particle and calibrated light from a nitrogen laser. The fluorescence yield in air at a pressure of 1013 hPa and temperature of 293 K was found to be $Y_{337} = 5.61\\pm 0.06_{stat} \\pm 0.21_{syst}$ photons/MeV. When compared to the fluorescence yield currently used by UHECR experiments, this measurement improves the uncertainty by a factor of three, and has a significant impact on the determination of the energy scale of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  6. Biogeochemical context impacts seawater pH changes resulting from atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, M.; Hunter, K.A.; Liss, P.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater acidification can be induced both by absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and by atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Their relative significance, interplay, and dependency on water column biogeochemistry are not well understood. Using a simple biogeoc

  7. Nutritional constraints in ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants under increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragazza, L.; Tahvanainen, T.; Kutnar, L.; Rydin, H.; Limpens, J.; Hajek, M.; Grosvernier, P.; Hansen, I.; Lacumin, P.; Gerdol, R.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of increasing levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on nutrient limitation of ombrotrophic Sphagnum plants. • Fifteen mires in 11 European countries were selected across a natural gradient of bulk atmospheric N deposition from 0.1 to 2 g/m2 year-1. Nutritional constrai

  8. On extreme atmospheric and marine nitrogen fluxes and chlorophyll-a levels in the Kattegat Strait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, C.B.; Carstensen, J.; Ellermann, T.

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is carried out to investigate the importance of the vertical fluxes of nitrogen to the marine sea surface layer in which high chlorophyll a levels may cause blooms of harmful algae and subsequent turn over and oxygen depletion at the bottom of the sea. Typically nitrogen...... are calculated by the periodic maximum method and the results are successfully compared to a map of chlorophyll return periods based on in-situ observations. The one-year return of extreme atmospheric wet deposition is around 60 mg N m(-2) day(-1) and 30 mg N m(-2) day(-1) for deep-water entrainment. Atmospheric......-water entrainment forced by high winds greatly exceeds the atmospheric pool of nitrogen washed out by precipitation. At the frontal zone of the Kattegat Strait and Skagerrak, the nitrogen deep-water entrainment is very high and this explains the high 10-year return chlorophyll level at 8 mg m(-3) in the Kattegat...

  9. Titan's past and future: 3D modeling of a pure nitrogen atmosphere and geological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Tobie, Gabriel; Sotin, Christophe; Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Several clues indicate that Titan's atmosphere has been depleted in methane during some period of its history, possibly as recently as 0.5-1 billion years ago. It could also happen in the future. Under these conditions, the atmosphere becomes only composed of nitrogen with a range of temperature and pressure allowing liquid or solid nitrogen to condense. Here, we explore these exotic climates throughout Titan's history with a 3D Global Climate Model (GCM) including the nitrogen cycle and the radiative effect of nitrogen clouds. We show that for the last billion years, only small polar nitrogen lakes should have formed. Yet, before 1 Ga, a significant part of the atmosphere could have condensed, forming deep nitrogen polar seas, which could have flowed and flooded the equatorial regions. Alternatively, nitrogen could be frozen on the surface like on Triton, but this would require an initial surface albedo higher than 0.65 at 4 Ga. Such a state could be stable even today if nitrogen ice albedo is higher than th...

  10. Relationship between atmospheric ammonia concentration and nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Erik; Andersen, Helle Vibeke; Strandberg, Morten Tune

    2014-01-01

    From April 2006 to April 2007, the geographical and seasonal variation in nitrogen content in terricolous lichen (Cladonia portentosa) and atmospheric ammonia concentrations were measured at five heathland sites. The seasonal variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was small, even though...... there was a large seasonal variation in the air concentration of ammonia. A sizable local variation in the nitrogen content of the lichen was found even at the scale of a few kilometres. The nitrogen content in the lichen showed a high correlation to the yearly mean value of the measured ammonia concentration...

  11. Isotopic constraints on the source of Pluto's nitrogen and the history of atmospheric escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mousis, Olivier; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn

    2016-10-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in solar system bodies is an important question for understanding processes that took place during the formation of the planets and solar system bodies. Pluto has an atmosphere that is 99% molecular nitrogen, but it is unclear if this nitrogen is primordial or derived from ammonia in the protosolar nebula. The nitrogen isotope ratio is an important tracer of the origin of nitrogen on solar system bodies, and can be used at Pluto to determine the origin of its nitrogen. After evaluating the potential impact of escape and photochemistry on Pluto's nitrogen isotope ratio (14N/15N), we find that if Pluto's nitrogen originated as N2 the current ratio in Pluto's atmosphere would be greater than 324 while it would be less than 157 if the source of Pluto's nitrogen were NH3. The New Horizons spacecraft successfully visited the Pluto system in July 2015 providing a potential opportunity to measure 14N/15N in N2.

  12. Responses of two summer annuals to interactions of atmospheric carbon dioxide and soil nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The competitive relationship between Chenopodium album L. (C{sub 3}) and Amaranthus hybridus L. (C{sub 4}) was investigated in two atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels and tow soil nitrogen levels. Biomass and leaf surface area of Amaranthus plants did not respond to CO{sub 2} enrichment. Only in high nitrogen did Chenopodium plants respond to increased CO{sub 2} with greater biomass and leaf surface area. Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) was higher in Amaranthus than in Chenopodium in all treatments except for the high-nitrogen high-CO{sub 2} treatment. Under conditions of high nitrogen and low CO{sub 2}, Chenopodium was a poor competitor, but competition favored Chenopodium in high nitrogen and high CO{sub 2}. In low nitrogen and high CO{sub 2}, competition favored Chenopodium on a dry weight basis, but favored Amaranthus on a seed weight basis, reflecting early senescence of Chenopodium. In low nitrogen and high CO{sub 2}, competition favored Amaranthus on a dry weight basis, but favored Chenopodium on a seed weight basis. Physiological aspects of the growth of Chenopodium and Amaranthus were studied. Acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} occurred at the enzyme level in Chenopodium. Under conditions of high nitrogen and no competition, individual Chenopodium plants responded to elevated CO{sub 2} with greater biomass, leaf surface area, and maximum net photosynthetic rates. In high nitrogen, leaf nitrogen, soluble protein, and RuBP carboxylase activity of Chenopodium decreased and NUE increased when grown in elevated CO{sub 2}. In low nitrogen without competition, Chenopodium showed no significant response to CO{sub 2} enrichment. Amarantus grown in high and low nitrogen without competition showed no significant changes in leaf nitrogen, soluble protein, carboxylase activity, chlorophyll, or NUE of in response to CO{sub 2} enrichment.

  13. Manufacture of high-nitrogen corrosion-resistant steel by an aluminothermic method in a high-pressure nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeev, G. A.; Karev, V. A.; Kuzminykh, E. V.; Lad'yanov, V. I.; Lubnin, A. N.; Vaulin, A. S.; Mokrushina, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    The conditions of aluminothermic synthesis of high-nitrogen Cr-N and Cr-Mn-N steels in a high-pressure nitrogen atmosphere are studied by thermodynamic simulation and metallurgical experiments. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the aluminothermic reduction reactions are incomplete. The most important synthesis parameter is the ratio of the aluminum to the oxygen content in a charge, and its optimum value ensures a compromise between the degree of oxide reduction, the aluminum and oxygen contents in steel (degree of deoxidation), and steel contamination by aluminum nitride. An analysis of experimental heats demonstrates good agreement between the experimental results and the data calculated by a thermodynamic model. As-cast ingots have the structure of nitrogen pearlite, and quenched ingots have an austenitic structure.

  14. Improved speciation of dissolved organic nitrogen in natural waters: amide hydrolysis with fluorescence derivatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan L.Firnmen; Tamara D.Trouts; Daniel D.Richter Jr.; Dharni Vasudevan

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to improve primary-amine nitrogen (1°-N) quantification in dissolved organic matter (DOM)originating from natural waters where inorganic forms of N, which may cause analytical interference, are commonly encountered.Efforts were targeted at elucidating organic-N structural criteria influencing the response of organic amines to known colorimetric andfluorescent reagents and exploring the use of divalent metal-assisted amide hydrolysis in combination with fluorescence analyses.We found that reaction of o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) with primary amines is significantly influenced by steric factors, whereasfluorescamine (FLU) lacks sensitivity to steric factors and allows for the detection of a larger suite of organic amines, includingdi- and tri-peptides and sterically hindered 1°-N. Due to the near quantitative recovery of dissolved peptides with the FLU reagent andlack of analytical response to inorganic nitrogen, we proposed that FLU be utilized for the quantification of primary amine nitrogen.In exploring the application of divalent metal promoted peptide hydrolysis to the analysis of organic forms of nitrogen in DOM, wefound that Zn(Ⅱ) reaction increased the total fraction of organic-N detectable by both OPA and FLU reagents. Zn-hydrolysis improvedrecovery of organic-N in natural waters from<5% to 35%. The above method, coupled with standard inorganic-N analyses, allows forenhanced resolution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) speciation in natural waters.

  15. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  16. The effects of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien Ming eEaslon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial higher plants are composed of roots and shoots, distinct organs that conduct complementary functions in dissimilar environments. For example, roots are responsible for acquiring water and nutrients such as inorganic nitrogen from the soil, yet shoots consume the majority of these resources. The success of such a relationship depends on excellent root-shoot communications. Increased net photosynthesis and decreased shoot nitrogen and water use at elevated CO2 fundamentally alter these source-sink relations. Lower than predicted productivity gains at elevated CO2 under nitrogen or water stress may indicate shoot-root signaling lacks plasticity to respond to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The following presents recent research results on shoot-root nitrogen and water signaling, emphasizing the influence that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are having on these source-sink interactions.

  17. Raman Scattering by Molecular Hydrogen and Nitrogen in Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    An important source of opacity in the atmospheres of exoplanets at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process -- Raman scattering. In this paper, we analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide valuable information about planetary atmospheres. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in two main ways. Firstly, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Secondly, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of the scattering molecule, thus providing constrains on the presence of clouds and hazes in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically iden...

  18. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Plants Under Nitrogen Stress Determined with Active and Passive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation productivity is driven by nitrogen (N) availability in soils. Both excessive and low soil N induce physiological changes in plant foliage. In 2001, we examined the use of spectral fluorescence and reflectance measurements to discriminate among plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight daily). Three types of steady state laser-induced fluorescence measurements were made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broad irradiance excitation; 2) emission spectra (5 nm resolution) produced by excitation at single wavelengths (280,380 or 360, and 532 nm); and 3) excitation spectra (2 nm resolution), with emission wavelengths fixed at wavelengths centered on selected solar Fraunhofer lines (532,607,677 and 745 nm). Two complementary sets of high resolution (less than 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces: 1) optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance; and 2) reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a short pass filter at 665 nm to determine the fluorescence contribution to apparent reflectance in the 650-750 spectrum, especially at the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChIF) peaks. The strongest relationships between foliar chemistry and optical properties were demonstrated for C/N content and two optical parameters associated with the red edge inflection point. Select optical properties and ChIF parameters were highly correlated for both species. A significant contribution of ChIF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2 - 6% at 740 nm over all N treatments. Discrimination of N treatment

  19. Hydrogen-nitrogen greenhouse warming in Earth's early atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2013-01-04

    Understanding how Earth has sustained surface liquid water throughout its history remains a key challenge, given that the Sun's luminosity was much lower in the past. Here we show that with an atmospheric composition consistent with the most recent constraints, the early Earth would have been significantly warmed by H(2)-N(2) collision-induced absorption. With two to three times the present-day atmospheric mass of N(2) and a H(2) mixing ratio of 0.1, H(2)-N(2) warming would be sufficient to raise global mean surface temperatures above 0°C under 75% of present-day solar flux, with CO(2) levels only 2 to 25 times the present-day values. Depending on their time of emergence and diversification, early methanogens may have caused global cooling via the conversion of H(2) and CO(2) to CH(4), with potentially observable consequences in the geological record.

  20. Optical and fluorescence properties of corn leaves from different nitrogen regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Entcheva Campbell, Petya K.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, Emmett W.

    2003-03-01

    The important role of nitrogen (N) in limiting or enhancing vegetation productivity is relatively well understood, although the interaction of N with other environmental variables in natural and agricultural ecosystems needs more study. In 2001, a suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves of corn (Zea Mays L.) from field plots provided four N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. Two complementary sets of high-resolution (foliar chemistry were obtained for a "red-edge" optical parameter versus C/N and chlorophyll b. Select optical indices and ChlF parameters were correlated. A significant contribution of steady-state ChlF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2-6% at 740 nm over the range of N treatments. From all measurements assessing fluorescence, higher ChlF was measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces.

  1. Oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere and its impact on the evolution of nitrogen-based metabolisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papineau, D.; Mojzsis, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The evolution of metabolic pathways is closely linked to the evolution of the redox state of the terrestrial atmosphere. Nitrogen has been an essential biological element since the emergence of life when reduced nitrogen compounds (e.g. ammonia) were utilized in the prebiotic synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. The nitrogen isotopic composition of sediments has been used to trace the origin of sedimentary organic matter in the rock record. Nitrogen is therefore suitable as a biosignature to trace the emergence of life on Earth or other planetary bodies as well as to follow the subsequent evolution of the biosphere in response to global redox changes. Evidence is strong that biological nitrogen fixation evolved very early in the history of life. The Last Common Ancestor (LCA) on Earth was most likely capable of nitrogen fixation as seen from the phylogenetic distribution of nitrogen-fixing organisms in both the domains of Bacteria and Archaea. Phylogenetic trees plotted with nitrogen-fixing gene (Nif) sequences from lineages of Bacteria and Archaea suggest that the Nif genes originated in a common ancestor of the two domains. Other phylogenetic analyses have also demonstrated that the paralogous duplication of the nifDK and nifEN operons, central to nitrogen fixation, predated the divergence of Archaea from Bacteria and therefore occurred prior to the emergence of the LCA. Although the same may be true for denitrification, this metabolic pathway probably did not become dominant until atmospheric pO2 increased between ~2.4 to 1.9 Ga during the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE). Recent work has shown a general depletion in 15N content of Archean (pre-2.5 Ga) relative to Phanerozoic (<540 Ma) kerogens. Studies have shown that the distribution of the δ15N values in kerogens shift from negative values in the Early Archean (from -6 to +6‰ with an average near 0‰ ) to approximately contemporary positive values (from +2 to +10‰ with an average at +6‰ ) by the

  2. Box-modeling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralization on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Su

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations of the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP to nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphate regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. In the model, atmospheric nitrogen deposition based on estimates for the years 2000–2009 is offset by half by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Both model- and data-based benthic denitrification are found to trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3− loss. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, enhanced sedimentary phosphate regeneration under suboxic conditions stimulates primary production and subsequent export production and NO3− loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization indicates dominant stabilizing feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory, i.e., nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3− loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly removed by the stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3− source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might become a NO3− sink.

  3. Nitrogen atmosphere and natural antioxidants effect on muesli oxidation during long-time storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Klensporf-Pawlik

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of natural antioxidants from raspberry and black currant seeds and modified atmosphere packaging on muesli oxidative stability measured by monitoring volatile lipid oxidation products were evaluated. The effectiveness toward lipid oxidation was investigated during 10 months storage at ambient temperature. Both ethanolic extracts as well as nitrogen atmosphere influenced lipid oxidation rate in muesli measured by volatile compounds content. The most abundant lipid derived volatile compounds was hexanal. After storage, its concentration changed from 802 µg/kg to 9.8 mg/kg in muesli stored in air atmosphere, whereas in muesli stored in nitrogen atmosphere with raspberry seed extract addition it raised to 3.1 mg/kg. Although, both natural antioxidants rich in phenolic compounds, were effective towards lipid oxidation, the strongest inhibiting effect had modified atmosphere packaging. The addition of ethanolic extracts did not fortify its positive effect. Total concentration of volatile compounds in muesli after 10 months of storage was 19.6 mg/kg when stored in air and 13.7 and 11.8 mg/kg when stored with raspberry and black currant seeds extract addition respectively, while 9.8 mg/kg when stored in nitrogen atmosphere without antioxidants, and 9.7 and 9.9 mg/kg when stored with antioxidants mentioned above.

  4. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests: refinement of estimation of dry deposition for unmeasured nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunova, Iva; Stoklasova, Petra; Kurfurst, Pavel; Vlcek, Ondrej; Schovankova, Jana

    2014-05-01

    The accurate quantification of atmospheric deposition is very important for assessment of ambient air pollution impacts on ecosystems. Our contribution presents an advanced approach to improved quantification of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests, merging available measured data and model results. The ambient air quality monitoring in the Czech Republic is paid an appreciable attention (Hůnová, 2001) due to the fact, that in the recent past its territory belonged to the most polluted parts of Europe (Moldan and Schnoor, 1992). The time trends and spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition were published (Hůnová et al. 2004, Hůnová et al. 2014). Nevertheless, it appears that the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, particularly the dry deposition, is likely to be underestimated due to unavailability of data of certain nitrogen species as HNO3(g) and NH3. It is known that HNO3(g) may contribute significantly to the dry deposition of nitrogen even in regions with relatively low concentrations (Flechard et al., 2011). We attempted to substitute unmeasured nitrogen species using an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Preliminary results for 2008 indicate that dry deposition of nitrogen, so far based on detailed monitoring of ambient NOx levels, is underestimated substantially. The dry deposition of N/NOx in 2008 reported by Ostatnická (2009) was about 0.5 g.m-2.year-1 over 99.5 % of the nation-wide area, while the contribution of unmeasured nitrogen species estimated by CAMx model were much higher. To be specific, the dry deposition of N/HNO3(g) accounted for 1.0 g.m-2.year-1, and N/NH3 for 1.6 g.m-2.year-1. In contrast, the deposition of N/HONO (g) with 0.001 g.m-2.year-1, N/PAN with 0.007 g.m-2.year-1, particulate N/NO3- with 0.002 g.m-2.year-1, and particulate N/NH4

  5. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to the Baltic Sea in the period 1995–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bartnicki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The EMEP/MSC-W model has been used to compute atmospheric nitrogen deposition into the Baltic Sea basin for the period of 12 yr: 1995–2006. The level of annual total nitrogen deposition into the Baltic Sea basin has changed from 230 Gg N in 1995 to 199 Gg N in 2006, decreasing 13 %. This value corresponds well with the total nitrogen emission reduction (11 % in the HELCOM Contracting Parties. However, inter-annual variability of nitrogen deposition to the Baltic Sea basin is relatively large, ranging from −13 % to +17 % of the averaged value. It is mainly caused by the changing meteorological conditions and especially precipitation in the considered period. The calculated monthly deposition pattern is similar for most of the years showing maxima in the autumn months October and November. The source allocation budget for atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the Baltic Sea basin was calculated for each year of the period 1997–2006. The main emission sources contributing to total nitrogen deposition are: Germany 18–22 %, Poland 11–13 % and Denmark 8–11 %. There is also a significant contribution from distant sources like the United Kingdom 6–9 %, as well as from the international ship traffic on the Baltic Sea 4–5 %.

  6. Source receptor relations for the calculation of atmospheric deposition to the North Sea: Nitrogen and Cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld JA; de Leeuw FAAM

    1993-01-01

    In this report a simplified atmospheric transport model for estimating the deposition of nitrogen (both NOx and NHx) and cadmium to the North Sea is presented. In this so-called meta-model a linear relationship between the emissions from a source area and the resulting deposition at receptor points

  7. The Effects of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition on Terrestrial and Freshwater Biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, J.S.; Barber, M.; Adams, M.; Dobben, van H.F.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports the findings of a Working Group on how atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition affects both terrestrial and freshwater biodiversity. Regional and global scale impacts on biodiversity are addressed, together with potential indicators. Key conclusions are that: the rates of loss in bi

  8. Optical Reflectance and Fluorescence for Detecting Nitrogen Needs in Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, J. E.; Middleton, E. M.; Corp. L. A.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Butcher, L. M.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) status in field grown corn (Zea mays L.) was assessed using spectral techniques. Passive reflectance remote sensing and, both passive and active fluorescence sensing methods were investigated. Reflectance and fluorescence methods are reported to detect changes in the primary plant pigments (chlorophylls a and b; carotenoids) in higher plant species. As a general rule, foliar chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b) usually exist in approx.3:l ratio. In plants under stress, Chl b content is affected before Chl a reductions occur. For reflectance, a version of the chlorophyll absorption in reflectance index (CARI) method was tested with narrow bands from the Airborne Imaging Spectroradiometer for Applications (ASIA). CARI minimizes the effects of soil background on the signal from green canopies. A modified CARI (MCARI) was used to track total Chl a levels in the red dip of the spectrum from the corn canopy. A second MCARI was used to track the auxiliary plant pigments (Chl b and the carotenoids) in the yellow/orange/red edge part of the reflectance spectrum. The difference between these two MCARI indices detected variations in N levels across the field plot canopies using ASIA data. At the leaf level, ratios of fluorescence emissions in the blue, green, red and far-red wavelengths sensed responses that were associated with the plant pigments, and were indicative of energy transfer in the photosynthetic process. N stressed corn stands could be distinguish from those with optimally applied N with fluorescence emission spectra obtained from individual corn leaves. Both reflectance and fluorescence methods are sensitive in detecting corn N needs and may be especially powerful in monitoring crop conditions if both types of information can be combined.

  9. Nitrogen isotopes in ice core nitrate linked to anthropogenic atmospheric acidity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lei; Alexander, Becky; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Steig, Eric J.; Savarino, Joël; Sofen, Eric D.; Schauer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in Greenland snow nitrate and in North American remote lake sediments has decreased gradually beginning as early as ∼1850 Christian Era. This decrease was attributed to increasing atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic nitrate, reflecting an anthropogenic impact on the global nitrogen cycle, and the impact was thought to be amplified ∼1970. However, our subannually resolved ice core records of δ15N and major ions (e.g., , ) over the last ∼200 y show that the decrease in δ15N is not always associated with increasing concentrations, and the decreasing trend actually leveled off ∼1970. Correlation of δ15N with H+, , and HNO3 concentrations, combined with nitrogen isotope fractionation models, suggests that the δ15N decrease from ∼1850–1970 was mainly caused by an anthropogenic-driven increase in atmospheric acidity through alteration of the gas−particle partitioning of atmospheric nitrate. The concentrations of and also leveled off ∼1970, reflecting the effect of air pollution mitigation strategies in North America on anthropogenic NOx and SO2 emissions. The consequent atmospheric acidity change, as reflected in the ice core record of H+ concentrations, is likely responsible for the leveling off of δ15N ∼1970, which, together with the leveling off of concentrations, suggests a regional mitigation of anthropogenic impact on the nitrogen cycle. Our results highlight the importance of atmospheric processes in controlling δ15N of nitrate and should be considered when using δ15N as a source indicator to study atmospheric flux of nitrate to land surface/ecosystems. PMID:24711383

  10. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A.; Peterka, Darcy S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Owen, Jonathan S.; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV- state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  11. Modulation of nitrogen vacancy charge state and fluorescence in nanodiamonds using electrochemical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaveli, Sinan; Gaathon, Ophir; Wolcott, Abraham; Sakakibara, Reyu; Shemesh, Or A; Peterka, Darcy S; Boyden, Edward S; Owen, Jonathan S; Yuste, Rafael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-04-12

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV(-)) center in diamond has attracted strong interest for a wide range of sensing and quantum information processing applications. To this end, recent work has focused on controlling the NV charge state, whose stability strongly depends on its electrostatic environment. Here, we demonstrate that the charge state and fluorescence dynamics of single NV centers in nanodiamonds with different surface terminations can be controlled by an externally applied potential difference in an electrochemical cell. The voltage dependence of the NV charge state can be used to stabilize the NV(-) state for spin-based sensing protocols and provides a method of charge state-dependent fluorescence sensing of electrochemical potentials. We detect clear NV fluorescence modulation for voltage changes down to 100 mV, with a single NV and down to 20 mV with multiple NV centers in a wide-field imaging mode. These results suggest that NV centers in nanodiamonds could enable parallel optical detection of biologically relevant electrochemical potentials.

  12. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific: seasonal variation and source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Yuepeng; Wang, Yuesi; Paulot, Fabien; Henze, Daven

    2016-04-01

    Rapid Asian industrialization has lead to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition downwind threatening the marine environment. We present an analysis of the sources and processes controlling atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific, using the GEOS-Chem global chemistry model and its adjoint model at 1/2°× 2/3° horizontal resolution over the East Asia and its adjacent oceans. We focus our analyses on the marginal seas: the Yellow Sea and the South China Sea. Asian nitrogen emissions in the model are 28.6 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 15.7 Tg N a-1 as NOx. China has the largest sources with 12.8 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 7.9 Tg N a-1 as NOx; the much higher NH3 emissions reflect its intensive agricultural activities. We improve the seasonality of Asian NH3 emissions; emissions are a factor of 3 higher in summer than winter. The model simulation for 2008-2010 is evaluated with NH3 and NO2 column observations from satellite instruments, and wet deposition flux measurements from surface monitoring sites. Simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific ranges 0.8-20 kg N ha-1 a-1, decreasing rapidly downwind the Asian continent. Deposition fluxes average 11.9 kg N ha-1 a-1 (5.0 as reduced nitrogen NHx and 6.9 as oxidized nitrogen NOy) to the Yellow Sea, and 5.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 (2.5 as NHx and 3.1 as NOy) to the South China Sea. Nitrogen sources over the ocean (ship NOx and oceanic NH3) have little contribution to deposition over the Yellow Sea, about 7% over the South China Sea, and become important (greater than 30%) further downwind. We find that the seasonality of nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific is determined by variations in meteorology largely controlled by the East Asian Monsoon and in nitrogen emissions. The model adjoint further points out that nitrogen deposition to the Yellow Sea originates from sources over China (92% contribution) and the Korean peninsula (7%), and by sectors from fertilizer use (24%), power plants

  13. Nickel(II) dithiocarbamate complexes containing sulforhodamine B as fluorescent probes for selective detection of nitrogen dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Krishnakumar, Saarangan; Yu, Huan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Deng, Lih-Wen; Wang, Suhua; Huang, Leaf; Huang, Dejian

    2013-04-10

    We synthesized complexes of Ni(II) with dithiocarbamate ligands derived from the ortho and para isomers of sulforhodamine B fluorophores and demonstrated they are highly selective in reactions with nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Compared with the para isomer, the ortho isomer showed a much greater fluorescence increase upon reaction with NO2, which led to oxidation and decomplexation of the dithiocarbamate ligand from Ni(II). We applied this probe for visual detection of 1 ppm NO2 in the gas phase and fluorescence imaging of NO2 in macrophage cells treated with a nitrogen dioxide donor.

  14. Nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore: the relative importance of atmospheric deposition and catchment sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele TARTARI

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological and chemical data of 1996 and 1997 are used to evaluate the relative contributions of atmospheric deposition and urban/industrial wastewaters to the nitrogen budget of Lago Maggiore. The atmospheric load of nitrogen was about 80% of the total input to the lake, with negligible variations in dry (1997 and wet (1996 years. A comparison of the two study years with the yearly N budgets evaluated from 1978 to 1998, showed that the N load was higher with increasing amounts of precipitation/water inflow. Soils and vegetation act as N sinks; the % retention varies between 40-60% for the forested catchments with low population density in the central-northern part of the basin, to values close to zero or even negative in the south, indicating a net leaching from the soils. The Traaen & Stoddard (1995 approach revealed that all the catchments of the major inflowing rivers were oversaturated with nitrogen. The long-term trend of nitrogen concentrations in Lago Maggiore (1955-99 is analogous to the trend for atmospheric deposition (1975-99, which is related to emissions of nitrogen oxides and ammonia in the atmosphere. The relationships between the present N load and in-lake concentrations are discussed using a budget model, which is also used to infer the pristine load of N. The close relationships between N trends in lakes Maggiore, Como and Iseo, and the geographical and anthropogenic features common to their catchments, suggest that the results obtained for Lago Maggiore can be extended to a wider area.

  15. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Corn and Soybean Plants Under Nitrogen Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    We are investigating the use of spectral indices derived from actively induced fluorescence spectra and passive optical spectra. We examined the influence of photosynthetic pigment, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content on the spectral fluorescence and passive optical property characteristics of mature, upper leaves from plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of recommended N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight. Steady state laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra (5 nm resolution) were obtained from adaxial and abaxial surfaces resulting from excitation at single wavelengths (280, 380 or 360, and 532 nm). For emission spectra produced by each of these excitation wavelengths, ratios of emission peaks were calculated, including the red far-red chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) ratio (F685/F740) and the far-red/green (F740/F525) ratio. High resolution (< 3 nm) optical spectra (350-2500 nm) of reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance were also acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. Species differences were demonstrated for several optical parameters. A 'red edge' derivative ratio determined from transmittance spectra [as the maximum first deivative, between 650-750 nm, normalized to the value at 744 nm, or Dmax/D744], was strongly associated with the C/N ratio (r(exp 2) = 0.90, P +/- 0.001). This ratio, calculated from reflectance spectra, was inversely related to chlorophyll b content (r(exp 2) = 0.91, P +/- 0.001) as was the ChlF (F685/F740) ratio obtained with 532 nm excitation (r(exp 2) = 0.76, P +/- 0.01). Discrimination of N treatment groups was possible with specific fluorescence band ratios (e.g., F740/F525 obtained with 380 nm excitation). Higher ChlF and blue-green emissions were measured from the abaxial leaf surfaces

  16. Contribution of Atmospheric Nitrogen Compounds to N Deposition in a Broadleaf Forest of Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zheng-Yi; XU Cheng-Kai; ZHOU Li-Na; SUN Ben-Hua; HE Yuan-Qiu; ZHOU Jing; CAO Zhi-Hong

    2007-01-01

    A one-year study in a typical red soil region of southern China was conducted to determine atmospheric nitrogen (N) fluxes of typical N compounds (NH3, NH4-N, NO3-N, and NO2) and contribution of three sources (gas, rainwater, and particles) to N deposition. From July 2003 to June 2004, the total atmospheric N deposition was 70.7 kg N ha-1, with dry deposition accounting for 75% of the total deposition. Dry NH3 deposition accounted for 73% of the dry deposition and 55% of the total deposition. Moreover, NO2 contributed 11% of the dry deposition and 8% of the total deposition. Reduced N compounds (NH+4 and NH3) were the predominate contributors, accounting for 66% of the total deposition. Therefore, atmospheric N deposition should be considered when soil acidification and critical loads of atmospheric deposition on soils are estimated.

  17. Nitrogen fertilization has a stronger effect on soil nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities than elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthrong, Sean T; Yeager, Chris M; Gallegos-Graves, Laverne; Steven, Blaire; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Jackson, Robert B; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is the primary supply of N to most ecosystems, yet there is considerable uncertainty about how N-fixing bacteria will respond to global change factors such as increasing atmospheric CO2 and N deposition. Using the nifH gene as a molecular marker, we studied how the community structure of N-fixing soil bacteria from temperate pine, aspen, and sweet gum stands and a brackish tidal marsh responded to multiyear elevated CO2 conditions. We also examined how N availability, specifically, N fertilization, interacted with elevated CO2 to affect these communities in the temperate pine forest. Based on data from Sanger sequencing and quantitative PCR, the soil nifH composition in the three forest systems was dominated by species in the Geobacteraceae and, to a lesser extent, Alphaproteobacteria. The N-fixing-bacterial-community structure was subtly altered after 10 or more years of elevated atmospheric CO2, and the observed shifts differed in each biome. In the pine forest, N fertilization had a stronger effect on nifH community structure than elevated CO2 and suppressed the diversity and abundance of N-fixing bacteria under elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions. These results indicate that N-fixing bacteria have complex, interacting responses that will be important for understanding ecosystem productivity in a changing climate.

  18. Torrefaction and low temperature carbonization of oil palm fiber and Eucalyptus in nitrogen and air atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ke-Miao; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Lin, Ta-Chang

    2012-11-01

    Torrefaction is a pretreatment method for upgrading biomass as solid fuels. To provide flexible operations for effectively upgrading biomass at lower costs, the aim of this study was to investigate the properties of oil palm fiber and eucalyptus pretreated in nitrogen and air atmospheres at temperatures of 250-350°C for 1h. Based on energy and solid yield and introducing an energy-mass co-benefit index (EMCI), oil palm fiber pretreatment under nitrogen at 300°C provided the solid fuel with higher energy density and less volume compared to other temperatures. Pretreatment of oil palm fiber in air resulted in the fuel with low solid and energy yields and is therefore not recommended. For eucalyptus, nitrogen and air can be employed to upgrade the biomass, and the suggested temperatures are 325 and 275°C, respectively.

  19. Rotational and Vibrational Temperatures of Atmospheric Double Arc Argon-Nitrogen Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jian-Hua; TU Xin; MA Zeng-Yi; CEN Ke-Fa; B.G.Chéron

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique is employed to study the emission of atmospheric argon-nitrogen plasma jet generated by an original dc double anode plasma torch. The molecular bands of the N(+2) first negative system are observed at the torch exit and chosen to evaluate the rotational and vibrational temperatures in comparison with the simulated spectra. The excitation temperature (Texc≈9600 K) is determined from the Boltzmann plot method. The results show that the rotational, vibrational, electron and kinetic temperatures are in good agreement with one another, which indicates that the core region of atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet at the torch exit is close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium state under our experimental conditions.

  20. Inorganic nitrogenous air pollutants, atmospheric nitrogen deposition and their potential ecological impacts in remote areas of western North America (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M. E.; Fraczek, W.; Johnson, R.; Allen, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous inorganic nitrogenous (N) air pollutants plays an important role in total atmospheric N deposition and its ecological effects in the arid and semi-arid ecosystems. Passive samplers and denuder/ filter pack systems have been used for determining ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and nitric acid vapor (HNO3) in the topographically complex remote areas of the western United States and Canada. Concentrations of the measured pollutants varied significantly between the monitoring areas. Highest NH3, NO2 and HNO3 levels occurred in southern California areas downwind of the Los Angeles Basin and in the western Sierra Nevada impacted by emissions from the California Central Valley and the San Francisco Bay area. Strong spatial gradients of N pollutants were also present in southeastern Alaska due to cruise ship emissions and in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region in Canada affected by oil exploitation. Distribution of these pollutants has been depicted by maps generated by several geostatistical methodologies within the ArcGIS Geostatistical Analyst (ESRI, USA). Such maps help to understand spatial and temporal changes of air pollutants caused by various anthropogenic activities and locally-generated vs. long range-transported air pollutants. Pollution distribution maps for individual N species and gaseous inorganic reactive nitrogen (Nr) have been developed for the southern portion of the Sierra Nevada, Lake Tahoe Basin, San Bernardino Mountains, Joshua Tree National Park and the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The N air pollution data have been utilized for estimates of dry and total N deposition by a GIS-based inferential method specifically developed for understanding potential ecological impacts in arid and semi-arid areas. The method is based on spatial and temporal distribution of concentrations of major drivers of N dry deposition, their surface deposition velocities and stomatal conductance values

  1. Nitrogen- Doped Graphene Quantum Dots: "Turn-off" Fluorescent Probe for Detection of Ag(+) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaraki, Reza; Nateghi, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) were prepared from glucose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The N-GQDs showed a strong emission at 458 nm with excitation at 360 nm. The N-GQDs exhibited analytical potential as sensing probes for silver ions determination. Factors affecting the fluorescence sensing of Ag(+) ions such as pH, N-GQDs concentration and incubation time were studied using Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimum conditions were determined as pH 7, N-GQDs concentration 1 mg/mL and time 60 min. It suggested that N-GQDs exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity toward Ag(+). The linear range of N-GQDs and the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.2-40 μM and 168 nM, respectively. The N-GQDs-based Ag(+) ions sensor was successfully applied to the determination of Ag(+) in tap water and real river water samples.

  2. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  3. Comparison of Measurements and FluorMOD Simulations for Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Reflectance of a Corn Crop under Nitrogen Treatments [SIF and Reflectance for Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Campbell, Petya K. E.

    2007-01-01

    The FLuorescence Explorer (FLEX) satellite concept is one of six semifinalist mission proposals selected in 2006 for pre-Phase studies by the European Space Agency (ESA). The FLEX concept proposes to measure passive solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) of terrestrial ecosystems. A new spectral vegetation Fluorescence Model (FluorMOD) was developed to include the effects of steady state SIF on canopy reflectance. We used our laboratory and field measurements previously acquired from foliage and canopies of corn (Zea mays L.) under controlled nitrogen (N) fertilization to parameterize and evaluate FluorMOD. Our data included biophysical properties, fluorescence (F) and reflectance spectra for leaves; reflectance spectra of canopies and soil; solar irradiance; plot-level leaf area index; and canopy SIF emissions determined using the Fraunhofer Line Depth principal for the atmospheric telluric oxygen absorption features at 688 nm (O2-beta) and 760 nm (O2-alpha). FluorMOD simulations implemented in the default "look-up-table" mode did not reproduce the observed magnitudes of leaf F, canopy SIF, or canopy reflectance. However, simulations for all of these parameters agreed with observations when the default FluorMOD information was replaced with measurements, although N treatment responses were underestimated. Recommendations were provided to enhance FluorMOD's potential utility in support of SIF field experiments and studies of agriculture and ecosystems.

  4. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, X.; Chéron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-01

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  5. Box-modelling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralisation on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bei; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) among nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphorus regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition ( ≈ 1.5 Tg N yr-1 for the years 2000-2009) is offset by half in the model by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Model- and data-based benthic denitrification in our model domain are responsible for losses of 0.19 and 1.0 Tg Tg N yr-1, respectively, and both trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3- loss. Model- and data-based estimates of enhanced phosphate release via sedimentary phosphorus regeneration under suboxic conditions are 0.062 and 0.11 Tg N yr-1, respectively. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, even very small additional phosphate inputs stimulate primary production and subsequent export production and NO3- loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation indicates dominant stabilising feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory; i.e. nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3- loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated for by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly counteracted by stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3- source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might be a NO3- sink.

  6. Mass flows of nitrogen-containing pollutants between atmosphere and forest ecosystem. Massenfluesse stickstoffhaltiger Schadstoffe zwischen Atmosphere und Waldoekosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, W.; Grieser, J.; Herrmann, U.; Kessel, M.; Kosiol, W.; Nietzsche, I.; Sattler, T. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung)

    1992-01-01

    In the discussion about the possible causes of novel forest decline, nitrogen-containing components in the atmosphere have received increased interest in recent years. At the Centre for Environmental Research of the University of Frankfurt, a new approach to this problem was tried within the framework of the coordinated research project Frankfurter Stadtwald. A whole number of concentrations and flows of different pollutants were used to make up a balance for the area of investigation. Where possible, all relevant concentrations and flows were to be measured or at least realistically estimated. Therefore several measuring set-ups were realized. From the compiled data, a budget of nitrogen-containing components for the area of investigation was made up. This novel approach gives an idea of the concentrations and flows of a multitude of nitrogen compounds in an ecosystem like the Frankfurter Stadtwald. These constitute a necessary basis for impact investigations by botanists to explain novel forest decline. (orig./KW) With 90 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Carbon dioxide level and form of soil nitrogen regulate assimilation of atmospheric ammonia in young trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Salamanca-Jimenez, Alveiro; Doane, Timothy A; Horwath, William R

    2015-08-21

    The influence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and soil fertility on the physiological performance of plants has been extensively studied, but their combined effect is notoriously difficult to predict. Using Coffea arabica as a model tree species, we observed an additive effect on growth, by which aboveground productivity was highest under elevated CO2 and ammonium fertilization, while nitrate fertilization favored greater belowground biomass allocation regardless of CO2 concentration. A pulse of labelled gases ((13)CO2 and (15)NH3) was administered to these trees as a means to determine the legacy effect of CO2 level and soil nitrogen form on foliar gas uptake and translocation. Surprisingly, trees with the largest aboveground biomass assimilated significantly less NH3 than the smaller trees. This was partly explained by declines in stomatal conductance in plants grown under elevated CO2. However, unlike the (13)CO2 pulse, assimilation and transport of the (15)NH3 pulse to shoots and roots varied as a function of interactions between stomatal conductance and direct plant response to the form of soil nitrogen, observed as differences in tissue nitrogen content and biomass allocation. Nitrogen form is therefore an intrinsic component of physiological responses to atmospheric change, including assimilation of gaseous nitrogen as influenced by plant growth history.

  8. Thresholds for protecting Pacific Northwest ecosystems from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: state of knowledge report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Tonnie; Blett, Tamara; Porter, Ellen; Geiser, Linda; Graw, Rick; McMurray, Jill; Perakis, Steven S.; Rochefort, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service manage areas in the states of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington – collectively referred to in this report as the Pacific Northwest - that contain significant natural resources and provide many recreational opportunities. The agencies are mandated to protect the air quality and air pollution-sensitive resources on these federal lands. Human activity has greatly increased the amount of nitrogen emitted to the atmosphere, resulting in elevated amounts of nitrogen being deposited in park and forest ecosystems. There is limited information in the Pacific Northwest about the levels of nitrogen that negatively affect natural systems, i.e., the critical loads. The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service, with scientific input from the U.S. Geological Survey, have developed an approach for accumulating additional nitrogen critical loads information in the Pacific Northwest and using the data in planning and regulatory arenas. As a first step in that process, this report summarizes the current state of knowledge about nitrogen deposition, effects, and critical loads in the region. It also describes ongoing research efforts and identifies and prioritizes additional data needs.

  9. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wolff

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (reactive nitrogen: Nr from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen compounds (∑Nr in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of all Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced Nr compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised Nr compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate Nr is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher nitrogen oxides or those generated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3−, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in ∑Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all individual Nr compounds measured by the different single techniques. The TRANC features a specific design with very short distance between the sample air inlet and the place where the thermal

  10. Amino Nitrogen Quantum Dots-Based Nanoprobe for Fluorescence Detection and Imaging of Cysteine in Biological Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhijiao; Lin, Zhenhua; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2017-03-20

    Fluorescent amino nitrogen quantum dots (aN-dots) were synthesized by microwave-assisted method using 2-azidoimidazole and aqueous ammonia. The aN-dots have a nitrogen component up to 40%, which exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield, good photostability, and excellent biocompatibility. We further explored the use of the aN-dots combined with AuNPs as a nanoprobe for detecting fluorescently and imaging of cysteine (Cys) in complex biological samples. In this sensing system, the fluorescence of aN-dots was quenched significantly by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), while the addition of Cys can lead to the fluorescence signal recovery. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that this strategy can offer a rapid and selective detection of Cys with a good linear relationship in the range of 0.3-3.0 μmol/L. As expected, this assay was successfully applied to the detection of Cys in human serum and plasma samples with recoveries ranging from 90.0% to 106.7%. Especially, the nanoprobe exhibits good cell membrane permeability and excellent biocompatibility by CCK-8 assay, which is favorable for bioimaging applications. Therefore, this fluorescent probe ensemble was further used for imaging of Cys in living cells, which suggests our proposed method has strong potential for clinical diagnosis. As a novel member of the quantum-dot family, the aN-dots hold great promise to broaden applications in biological systems.

  11. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002 summarized for NHDPlus v2 catchments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Pacific Northwest region of...

  12. Imbalanced atmospheric nitrogen and phosphorus depositions in China: Implications for nutrient limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxing; Wang, Qiufeng; He, Nianpeng; Smith, Melinda D.; Elser, James J.; Du, Jiaqiang; Yuan, Guofu; Yu, Guirui; Yu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric wet nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) depositions are important sources of bioavailable N and P, and the input of N and P and their ratios significantly influences nutrient availability and balance in terrestrial as well as aquatic ecosystems. Here we monitored atmospheric P depositions by measuring monthly dissolved P concentration in rainfall at 41 field stations in China. Average deposition fluxes of N and P were 13.69 ± 8.69 kg N ha-1 a-1 (our previous study) and 0.21 ± 0.17 kg P ha-1 a-1, respectively. Central and southern China had higher N and P deposition rates than northwest China, northeast China, Inner Mongolia, or Qinghai-Tibet. Atmospheric N and P depositions showed strong seasonal patterns and were dependent upon seasonal precipitation. Fertilizer and energy consumption were significantly correlated with N deposition but less correlated with P deposition. The N:P ratios of atmospheric wet deposition (with the average of 77 ± 40, by mass) were negatively correlated with current soil N:P ratios in different ecological regions, suggesting that the imbalanced atmospheric N and P deposition will alter nutrient availability and strengthen P limitation, which may further influence the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. The findings provide the assessments of both wet N and P deposition and their N:P ratio across China and indicate potential for strong impacts of atmospheric deposition on broad range of terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Critical load of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in French forests: modelling soil and vegetation response in a context of climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzetto, Simon; Gaudio, Noémie; Belyazid, Salim; Gégout, Jean-Claude; Alard, Didier; Corcket, Emmanuel; Sverdrup, Harald; Probst, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities highly contributed to increased nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric emissions since 1880. Nitrogen deposition is known to severely impact ecosystem functioning by infl uencing soil biogeochemistry, nutrient balance, and consequently tree growth, forest health, and biodiversity. Since the 1980s, within the Geneva Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, European countries have joined their efforts to abate atmospheric pollution. The concept of N critical loads...

  14. Effect of fluorescence characteristics and different algorithms on the estimation of leaf nitrogen content based on laser-induced fluorescence lidar in paddy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Jia; Du, Lin; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Paddy rice is one of the most significant food sources and an important part of the ecosystem. Thus, accurate monitoring of paddy rice growth is highly necessary. Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) serves as a crucial indicator of growth status of paddy rice and determines the dose of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to be used. This study aims to compare the predictive ability of the fluorescence spectra excited by different excitation wavelengths (EWs) combined with traditional multivariate analysis algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and support vector machine (SVM), for estimating paddy rice LNC from the leaf level with three different fluorescence characteristics as input variables. Then, six estimation models were proposed. Compared with the five other models, PCA-BPNN was the most suitable model for the estimation of LNC by improving R2 and reducing RMSE and RE. For 355, 460 and 556 nm EWs, R2 was 0.89, 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the fluorescence spectra excited by 355 and 556 nm EWs were superior to those excited by 460 nm for the estimation of LNC with different models. BPNN algorithm combined with PCA may provide a helpful exploratory and predictive tool for fluorescence spectra excited by appropriate EW based on practical application requirements for monitoring the N status of crops.

  15. ADVANTAGE OF VACUUM VERSUS NITROGEN TO ACHIEVE INERT ATMOSPHERE DURING SOFTWOOD THERMAL MODIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin CANDELIER

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood heat treatment is an attractive alternative to improve decay resistance of wood species with low natural durability. Durability and mechanical properties are strongly correlated to thermal degradation of wood cells wall components. Mass loss resulting from this degradation is a good indicator of treatment intensity and final treated wood properties. Several types of convective heating processes exist currently differing mainly by the nature of the inert atmosphere used during treatment: nitrogen, steam or oil. Conductive heat treatment using vacuum as inert atmosphere is an attractive new alternative to previous classical methods. Heat transfer by conduction has been reported to provide better treatment homogeneity than heat transfer using convection. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of vacuum comparatively to nitrogen on the thermal degradation pathways and on the conferred properties to the material. It appears that utilization of vacuum permit a better control of thermal degradation reactions limiting the mass loss resulting from degradation of wood cell wall polymers. Chemical analysis indicates that wood heat treated under nitrogen present higher Klason lignin and carbon contents, lower hemicelluloses and neutral monosaccharides contents comparatively to wood heat treated under vacuum. At the same time, mechanical properties are less affected under vacuum, which constitute another advantage of this technology.

  16. Atmospheric pressure microwave sample preparation procedure for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and kjeldahl nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, L W; Chalk, S J; Kingston, H M

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave digestion method has been developed for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and Kjeldahl nitrogen in complex matrices. In comparison to the digestion steps in EPA Methods 365.4 (total phosphorus) and 351.x (Kjeldahl nitrogen), this method requires less time, eliminates the need for a catalyst, and reduces the toxicity of the waste significantly. It employs a microwave-assisted digestion step, using refluxing borosilicate glass vessels at atmospheric pressure. Traditionally, this method has a time-consuming sample preparation step and generates toxic waste through the use of heavy metal catalysts. These advantages are gained by the combination of a high boiling point acid (sulfuric acid) and the application of focused microwave irradiation, which enhances the digestion process by direct energy coupling. NIST standard reference materials 1572 (citrus leaves), 1577a (bovine liver), and 1566 (oyster tissue) and tryptophan were analyzed to validate the method. Phosphorus concentrations were determined by the colorimetric ascorbic acid method outlined in EPA Method 365.3. Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were determined using EPA Method 351.1. The results of the analyses showed good precision and are in excellent agreement with the NIST published values for both elements.

  17. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-10-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  18. Exchange of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, C.; Meixner, F. X.; Thielmann, A.; Kuhn, U.; Dindorf, T.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), often denoted as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3) are considered as most important compounds in atmospheric chemistry. In remote areas NOx concentration is related to biological activities of soils and vegetation. The emitted NOx will not entirely be subject of long range transport through the atmosphere. Aside oxidation of NO2 by the OH radical (forming HNO3), a considerable part of it is removed from the atmosphere through the uptake of NO2 by plants. The exchange depends on stomatal activity and on NO2 concentrations in ambient air. It is known that NO2 uptake by plants represents a large NO2 sink, but the magnitude and the NO2 compensation point concentration are still under discussion. Our dynamic chamber system allows exchange measurements of NO2 under field conditions (uncontrolled) as well as studies under controlled laboratory conditions including fumigation experiments. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter (photolytic converter) with subsequent chemiluminescence analysis of the generated NO. Furthermore, as the exchange of NO2 is a complex interaction of transport, chemistry and plant physiology, in our field experiments we determined fluxes of NO, NO2, O3, CO2 and H2O. For a better knowledge of compensation point values for the bi-directional NO2 exchange we investigated a primary representative of conifers, Picea abies, under field and laboratory conditions, and re-analyzed older field data of the deciduous tree Quercus robur.

  19. Process-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. A.; Doskey, P. V.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2013-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate exchange of NOx with snowpack, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we collected 2 years of meteorological and chemical data in and above the snowpack at Summit, Greenland. The comprehensive dataset indicates NOx emissions are episodic, with NOx enhancements in snowpack in early spring during high wind speed events (10-20 mph), which elevate NOx levels to ~500 pptv at depths of 2.5 m. Analysis of the observations will be based upon application of a 1-D process-scale model of atmosphere-snowpack exchange of NOx. The model will include representations of the snowpack chemistry in gas and aqueous phases, mass transfer of chemical species between phases, and physical transport by diffusion and wind pumping. The model will calculate the chemical and physical tendencies in three dimensions: depth, time, and intensity. Analysis of the tendencies will allow us to perform model sensitivity tests of pertinent snowpack physical and chemical processes. The end-goal of the project is to simplify the major tendencies into a parameterized model add-on for use in global models to determine the importance of properly representing snowpack in global model simulations.

  20. Responses of chlorophyll fluorescence and nitrogen level of Leymus chinensis Seedling to changes of soil moisture and temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhen-zhu; ZHOU Guang-sheng; LI Hui

    2004-01-01

    Controlled experiment of Leymus chinensis seedlings grown in the environmental growth chambers at 3 soilmoisture levels and 3 temperature levels was conducted in order to improve the understanding how leafphotosynthetic parameters will respond to climatic change. The results indicated that soil drought and hightemperature decreased the photochemical efficiency of photosystem (Fv/Fm ), the overall photochemical quantumyield of PSIl(yield), the coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching(qp), but increased the coefficient ofnon-photochemical fluorescence quenching(qN). Severe soil drought would decrease Fv/Fm and yield by 3.12% and 37.04% under 26℃ condition, respectively, and 6.60% and 73.33% under 32℃ condition, respectively, suggesting that higher temperature may enhance the negative effects of soil drought. All the soil drought treatments resulted in the decline in leaf nitrogen content. There was no significant effect of temperature on leaf nitrogen level, but higher temperature significantly reduced the root nitrogen content and the ratio of root nitrogen to leaf nitrogen, indicating the different strategies of adaptation to soil drought and temperature. It was also implied that higher temperature would enhance the effect of soil drought on leaf photosynthetic capacity, decrease the adaptability of Leymus chinensis to drought.

  1. Synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus doped carbon dots for the detection of Fe(3+) ions in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Ray Chowdhuri, Angshuman; Karmakar, Parimal; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen and phosphorus-doped carbon dots with a quantum yield 59% have been successfully synthesized from citric acid and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate by single step hydrothermal method. The synthesized carbon dots have high solubility as well as stability in aqueous medium. The as-obtained carbon dots are well monodispersed with particle sizes 1.5-4 nm. Owing to a good tunable fluorescence property and biocompatibility, the carbon dots were applied for intercellular sensing of Fe(3+) ions as well as cancer cell imaging.

  2. Quantifying atmospheric nitrogen deposition through a nationwide monitoring network across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Xu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global reactive nitrogen (Nr deposition to terrestrial ecosystems has increased dramatically since the industrial revolution. This is especially true in recent decades in China due to continuous economic growth. However, there are no comprehensive reports of both measured dry and wet Nr deposition across China. We therefore conducted a multiple-year study during the period mainly from 2010 to 2014 to monitor atmospheric concentrations of five major Nr species of gaseous NH3, NO2 and HNO3, and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3− in both particles and precipitation, based on a Nationwide Nitrogen Deposition Monitoring Network (NNDMN, covering 43 sites in China. Wet deposition fluxes of Nr species were measured directly; dry deposition fluxes were estimated using airborne concentration measurements and inferential models. Our observations reveal large spatial variations of atmospheric Nr concentrations and dry and wet Nr deposition. The annual average concentrations (1.3–47.0 μg N m−3 and dry plus wet deposition fluxes (2.9–75.2 kg N ha−1 yr−1 of inorganic Nr species ranked by region as North China > Southeast China > Southwest China > Northeast China > Northwest China > the Tibetan Plateau or by land use as urban > rural > background sites, reflecting the impact of anthropogenic Nr emission. Average dry and wet N deposition fluxes were 18.5 and 19.3 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively, across China, with reduced N deposition dominating both dry and wet deposition. Our results suggest atmospheric dry N deposition is equally important to wet N deposition at the national scale and both deposition forms should be included when considering the impacts of N deposition on environment and ecosystem health.

  3. Impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on phytoplankton productivity in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Lee, Kitack; Duce, Robert; Liss, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition on the marine N cycle are only now being revealed, but the magnitudes of those impacts are largely unknown in time and space. The South China Sea (SCS) is particularly subject to high anthropogenic N deposition, because the adjacent countries are highly populated and have rapidly growing economies. Analysis of data sets for atmospheric N deposition, satellite chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), and air mass back trajectories reveals that the transport of N originating from the populated east coasts of China and Indonesia, and its deposition to the ocean, has been responsible for the enhancements of Chl-a in the SCS. We found that atmospheric N deposition contributed approximately 20% of the annual biological new production in the SCS. The airborne contribution of N to new production in the SCS is expected to grow considerably in the coming decades.

  4. Atmospheric air pollutants: CO in Nitrogen, 5 μmol/mol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Pankratov, V. V.; Pankov, A. A.; Ivahnenko, B. V.; Efremova, O. V.; Bakovec, N. V.; Mironchik, A. M.; Aleksandrov, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the report on the COOMET supplementary comparison "Atmospheric air pollutants: CO in Nitrogen, 5 μmol/mol". Carbon monoxide (CO) is present in atmosphere due to different natural and anthropogenic sources. CO is a toxic gas and in concentrations higher than (3-5) μmol/mol it is hazardous to human health. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. The effect of atmosphere composition in plasma nitrogenation of Sm2Fe17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson, J. D.; Araujo, R. C.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Persiano, A. I. C.; Gama, S.

    2004-05-01

    The change on the structural and magnetic properties of the Sm2Fe17 compound as the ratio of H2/N2 forming the mixture of the atmosphere in a plasma chamber used to nitride this compound varied, was investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the increase of the hydrogen concentration in the mixed H2/N2 atmosphere reduces the formation of the nitrogen-rich phases, Sm2Fe17N8 and Sm2Fe17N11 and increases the formation of the Sm2Fe17N3 phase, whose maximum values are obtained for 70% H2 in the gas mixture.

  6. Development of Nitrogen-Hydrocarbon Atmospheric Carburizing and Process Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolan; Zurecki, Zbigniew; Sisson, Richard D.

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure carburizing and neutral carbon potential annealing in nitrogen containing small additions of hydrocarbon gases can offer cost and steel surface quality alternatives to the comparable, endothermic atmosphere, or vacuum operations. An experimental program was conducted for refining real-time process control methods in carburizing of AISI 8620 steel under N2-CH4, N2-C3H8 blends containing <5 vol.% of hydrocarbon gas at 900 and 930 °C. Multiple types of gas analyzers were used to monitor residual concentrations of H2, CO, CO2, H2O, O2, CH4, C3H8, and other hydrocarbons inside furnace. A modified shim stock technique was additionally evaluated for correlation with gas analysis and diffusional modeling using measured carbon mass flux values (g/cm2/s). Results of this evaluation work are presented.

  7. Shifts in lake N: P stoichiometry and nutrient limitation driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, J.J.; Andersen, T.; Baron, J.S.; Bergstrom, A.-K.; Jansson, M.; Kyle, M.; Nydick, K.R.; Steger, L.; Hessen, D.O.

    2009-01-01

    Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen (N) circulating in the biosphere. One major pathway of this anthropogenic N input into ecosystems has been increased regional deposition from the atmosphere. Here we show that atmospheric N deposition increased the stoichiometric ratio of N and phosphorus (P) in lakes in Norway, Sweden, and Colorado, United States, and, as a result, patterns of ecological nutrient limitation were shifted. Under low N deposition, phytoplankton growth is generally N-limited; however, in high-N deposition lakes, phytoplankton growth is consistently P-limited. Continued anthropogenic amplification of the global N cycle will further alter ecological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, trophic dynamics, and biological diversity, in the world's lakes, even in lakes far from direct human disturbance.

  8. Sources and sinks of atmospheric N2O and the possible ozone reduction due to industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. C.; Cicerone, R. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Chameides, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The terrestrial and marine nitrogen cycles are examined in an attempt to clarify how the atmospheric content of N2O is controlled. We review available data on the various reservoirs of fixed nitrogen, the transfer rates between the reservoirs, and estimate how the reservoir contents and transfer rates can change under man's influence. It is seen that sources, sinks and lifetime of atmospheric N2O are not understood well. Based on our limited knowledge of the stability of atmospheric N2O we conclude that future growth in the usage of industrial fixed nitrogen fertilizers could cause a 1% to 2% global ozone reduction in the next 50 years. However, centuries from now the ozone layer could be reduced by as much as 10% if soils are the major source of atmospheric N2O.

  9. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilization on Leaf Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Field-Grown Winter Wheat Under Rainfed Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANGGUAN Zhou-ping; ZHENG Shu-xia; ZHANG Lei-ming; XUE Qing-wu

    2005-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen fertilization on leaf chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in field-grown winter wheat during grain filling under rainfed conditions in Loess Plateau. Results showed that the actual photochemical efficiency of PS Ⅱ reaction center (Ф PS Ⅱ) decreased significantly as leaf water stress progressed, however, the Ф PS was increased by nitrogen fertilization. The Ф PS Ⅱ of 0, 90 and 180 kg ha-1 nitrogen treatments at noon were 0.197, 0.279 and 0.283, respectively, which decreased by 57.7, 56.4 and 40.2% as compared was even higher than that in the moming. Application of nitrogen fertilizer significantly increased maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (qNP). These results indicated that application of nitrogen fertilizer could increase the light energy conversion efficiency, the potential activity of photosynthetic reaction center, and the non-photochemical dissipation of excess light energy, which can prevent leaf photosynthetic apparatus from damage of treatments, indicating that the excess nitrogen was unfavorable to photosynthesis.

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfur and Nitrogen in the Remote Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Charlson, Robert; Andreae, Meinrat; Rodhe, Henning

    1985-01-01

    Viewed from space, the Earth appears as a globe without a beginning or an end. Encompassing the globe is the atmosphere with its three phases-­ gaseous, liquid, and solid--moving in directions influenced by sunlight, gravity, and rotation. The chemical compositions of these phases are determined by biogeochemical cycles. Over the past hundred years, the processes governing the rates and reactions in the atmospheric biogeochemical cycles have typically been studied in regions where scientists lived. Hence, as time has gone by, the advances in our knowledge of atmospheric chemical cycles in remote areas have lagged substantially behind those for more populated areas. Not only are the data less abundant, they are also scattered. Therefore, we felt a workshop would be an excellent mechanism to assess the state­ of-knowledge of the atmospheric cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in remote areas and to make recommendations for future research. Thus, a NATO Advanced Research Workshop '~he Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfu...

  11. Isotopes of nitrogen on Mars: Atmospheric measurements by Curiosity's mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael H; Atreya, Sushil K; Mahaffy, Paul N; Franz, Heather B; Malespin, Charles; Trainer, Melissa G; Stern, Jennifer C; Conrad, Pamela G; Manning, Heidi L K; Pepin, Robert O; Becker, Richard H; McKay, Christopher P; Owen, Tobias C; Navarro-González, Rafael; Jones, John H; Jakosky, Bruce M; Steele, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) measured a Mars atmospheric14N/15N ratio of 173 ± 11 on sol 341 of the mission, agreeing with Viking's measurement of 168 ± 17. The MSL/SAM value was based on Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer measurements of an enriched atmospheric sample, with CO2 and H2O removed. Doubly ionized nitrogen data at m/z 14 and 14.5 had the highest signal/background ratio, with results confirmed by m/z 28 and 29 data. Gases in SNC meteorite glasses have been interpreted as mixtures containing a Martian atmospheric component, based partly on distinctive14N/15N and40Ar/14N ratios. Recent MSL/SAM measurements of the40Ar/14N ratio (0.51 ± 0.01) are incompatible with the Viking ratio (0.35 ± 0.08). The meteorite mixing line is more consistent with the atmospheric composition measured by Viking than by MSL. PMID:26074632

  12. Spatial Variability Analysis of Within-Field Winter Wheat Nitrogen and Grain Quality Using Canopy Fluorescence Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheat grain protein content (GPC is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inherent variability of soil properties and position in the landscape. The objectives of this field study were: (i to assess the spatial and temporal variability of wheat nitrogen (N attributes related to the grain quality of winter wheat production through canopy fluorescence sensor measurements; and (ii to examine the influence of spatial variability of soil N and moisture across different growth stages on the wheat grain quality. A geostatistical approach was used to analyze data collected from 110 georeferenced locations. In particular, Ordinary Kriging Analysis (OKA was used to produce maps of wheat GPC, GPC yield, and wheat canopy fluorescence parameters, including simple florescence ratio and Nitrogen Balance Indices (NBI. Soil Nitrate-Nitrogen (NO3-N content and soil Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR value in the study field were also interpolated through the OKA method. The fluorescence parameter maps, soil NO3-N and soil TDR maps obtained from the OKA output were compared with the wheat GPC and GPC yield maps in order to assess their relationships. The results of this study indicate that the NBI spatial variability map in the late stage of wheat growth can be used to distinguish areas that produce higher GPC.

  13. High-resolution measurements from the airborne Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen Dioxide is both a primary pollutant with direct health effects and a key precursor of the secondary pollutant ozone. This paper reports on the development, characterisation and test flight of the Atmospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Imager (ANDI remote sensing system. The ANDI system includes an imaging (UV-vis grating spectrometer able to capture scattered sunlight spectra for the determination of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations by way of DOAS slant column density and vertical column density measurements. Results are shown for an ANDI test flight over Leicester City in the UK. Retrieved NO2 columns at a surface resolution of 80 m x 20 m revealed hot spots in a series of locations around Leicester City, including road junctions, the train station, major car parks, areas of heavy industry, a nearby airport (East Midlands and a power station (Ratcliffe-on-Soar. In the city centre the dominant source of NO2 emissions was identified as road traffic, contributing to a background concentration as well as producing localised hot spots. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant urban increment over the city centre which increased throughout the flight.

  14. Meteorological and Back Trajectory Modeling for the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi A. Gebhart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS II study with field operations during November 2008 through November 2009 was designed to evaluate the composition and sources of reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. As part of RoMANS II, a mesoscale meteorological model was utilized to provide input for back trajectory and chemical transport models. Evaluation of the model's ability to capture important transport patterns in this region of complex terrain is discussed. Previous source-receptor studies of nitrogen in this region are also reviewed. Finally, results of several back trajectory analyses for RoMANS II are presented. The trajectory mass balance (TrMB model, a receptor-based linear regression technique, was used to estimate mean source attributions of airborne ammonia concentrations during RoMANS II. Though ammonia concentrations are usually higher when there is transport from the east, the TrMB model estimates that, on average, areas to the west contribute a larger mean fraction of the ammonia. Possible reasons for this are discussed and include the greater frequency of westerly versus easterly winds, the possibility that ammonia is transported long distances as ammonium nitrate, and the difficulty of correctly modeling the transport winds in this area.

  15. Ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia, nitrogen dioxide and nitric acid in an intensive agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbieranowski, Antoni L.; Aherne, Julian

    2013-05-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of ambient atmospheric gaseous reactive nitrogen (Nr) species concentrations (ammonia [NH3], nitrogen dioxide [NO2] and nitric acid [HNO3]) were measured at the field scale in an intensive agricultural region in southern Ontario, Canada. Atmospheric concentrations were measured with the Willems badge diffusive passive sampler (18 sites for NH3, 9 sites for NO2 and HNO3) for one year (April 2010-March 2011; under a two week measurement frequency) within a 15 km × 15 km area. Dry deposition was calculated using the inferential method and estimated across the entire study area. The spatial distribution of emission sources associated with agricultural activity resulted in high spatial variability in annual average ambient NH3 concentrations (8 μg m-3 within a 2 km distance, coefficient of variation ˜50%) and estimated dry deposition (4-13 kg N ha-1 yr-1) between sample sites. In contrast, ambient concentrations and deposition of both NO2 (˜5.2->6.5 μg m-3; 1.0-1.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and HNO3 (0.6-0.7 μg m-3; 0.5-1 kg N ha-1 yr-1) had low variability (coefficient of variation mycorrhiza and ground vegetation within adjacent semi-natural ecosystems (estimated at ˜10% of the study area).

  16. Earth's early atmosphere as seen from carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of Archean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Carr, L. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the Earth's early atmosphere has long been a topic of great interest but determination of actual compositions over geologic time is a difficult problem. However, recent systematic studies of stromatolite deposits (Precambrian Paleobiology Research Group) has extended our knowledge of Archean ecosystems. It has been shown that many stromatolite deposits have undergone negligible alteration since their time of formation. The discovery of primary fluid inclusions within unaltered 3.5 b.y. old Archiean sediments and the observation that the 3.3 b.y. old Barberton cherts have remained closed to argon loss and have not been subjected to thermal metamorphism suggests that an opportunity exists for the direct measurement of the volatile constituents present at their time of formation. Of primary interest to this study was the possibility that the stromatolites and other Archean sediments might retain a vestige of the atmosphere and thus afford an indication of the variations in carbon dioxide and nitrogen isotopic compositions with time. A suite of essentially unaltered Archean stromatolites and the cherts of different ages and geologic sites have been analyzed for their trapped carbon dioxide and nitrogen compositions by the stepped combustion extraction tech nique utilizing static mass spectrometers for the isotope measurements.

  17. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  18. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  19. Resolving the influence of nitrogen abundances on sediment organic matter in macrophyte-dominated lakes, using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Yao; Shengrui Wang; Lixin Jiao; Caihong Yan; Xiangcan Jin

    2015-01-01

    A controlled experiment was designed to resolve the influence of nitrogen abundance on sediment organic matters in macrophyte-dominated lakes using fluorescence analysis.Macrophyte biomass showed coincident growth trends with time,but different variation rates with nitrogen treatment.All plant growth indexes with nitrogen addition (N,NH4Cl 100,200,400 mg/kg,respectively) were lower than those of the control group.Four humiclike components,two autochthonous tryptophan-like components,and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component were identified using the parallel factor analysis model.The results suggested that the relative component changes of fluorescence in the colonized sediments were in direct relation to the change of root biomass with time.In the experiment,the root formation parameters of the plants studied were significantly affected by adding N in sediments,which may be related to the reason that the root growth was affected by N addition.Adding a low concentration of N to sediments can play a part in supplying nutrients to the plants.However,the intensive uptake of NH~ may result in an increase in the intracellular concentration of ammonia,which is highly toxic to the plant cells.Hence,our experiment results manifested that organic matter cycling in the macrophyte-dominated sediment was influenced by nitrogen enrichment through influencing vegetation and relevant microbial activity.

  20. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizer Level on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Characteristics in Flag Leaf of Super Hybrid Rice at Late Growth Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Ji-rui; MA Guo-hui; WAN Yi-zheng; SONG Chun-fang; SUN Jian; QIN Rui-jun

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effects of slow-release nitrogen fertilizer at six different levels on the flag leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of super hybrid rice,a field fertilization experiment was conducted with super hybrid rice Y Liangyou 1 as a test material.The photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR),effective quantum yield (EQY),photochemical quenching coefficient (qp),and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) of flag leaves were measured at the initial heading,full heading,10 d after full heading and 20 d after full heading stages.Results showed that the values of ETR,EQY and qp increased with rice development from initial heading to 20 d after full heading,whereas the NPQ decreased.During the measured stages,ETR,EQY and qp increased initially and then decreased as nitrogen application amount increased,but they peaked at different nitrogen fertilizer levels.The maximum ETR and EQY values appeared at the treatment of 135 kg/hm2 N.In conclusion,the optimum nitrogen amount for chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of super hybrid rice was 135-180 kg/hm2.

  1. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast.

  2. Efficient synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for cell imaging using unripe fruit extract of Prunus mume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atchudan, Raji; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of); Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan, E-mail: mgsethu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural Institute-Deemed University, Gandhigram 624 302, Tamilnadu (India); Lee, Yong Rok, E-mail: yrlee@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 38541 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs was achieved using the extract of unripe P. mume fruit as a carbon precursor by a one-pot simple hydrothermal-carbonization method. The resulting N-CDs were used as a staining agent for the fluorescence imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The green synthesis of highly fluorescent N-CDs using the extract of unripe P. mume. • The N-CDs were synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal-carbonization method. • This method of synthesis is a simple, cost effective and eco-friendly route. • N-CDs will be a good alternative for fluorescent dyes and SQDs for bio-applications. - Abstract: Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized using the extract of unripe Prunus mume (P. mume) fruit by a simple one step hydrothermal-carbonization method. The N-CDs were synthesized at different pH ranges, 2.3, 5, 7, and 9. The pH of the P. mume extract was adjusted using an aqueous ammonia solution (25%). The optical properties of N-CDs were examined by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 emitted high fluorescence intensity compared to other obtained N-CDs. The N-CDs synthesized at pH 9 was further characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. HR-TEM showed that the average size of the synthesized N-CDs was approximately 9 nm and the interlayer distance was 0.21 nm, which was validated by XRD. The graphitic nature of the synthesized N-CDs were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. XPS and FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed the doping of the nitrogen moiety over the synthesized CDs. The synthesized nitrogen doped CDs (N-CDs) were low toxicity and were used as a staining probe for fluorescence cell imaging.

  3. Detection of temporal trends in atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen and sulphate to forests in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, Peter; Marchetto, Aldo; Thimonier, Anne; Schmitt, Maria; Rogora, Michela; Granke, Oliver; Mues, Volker; Hansen, Karin; Pihl Karlsson, Gunilla; Žlindra, Daniel; Clarke, Nicholas; Verstraeten, Arne; Lazdins, Andis; Schimming, Claus; Iacoban, Carmen; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Vanguelova, Elena; Benham, Sue; Meesenburg, Henning; Nicolas, Manuel; Kowalska, Anna; Apuhtin, Vladislav; Napa, Ulle; Lachmanová, Zora; Kristoefel, Ferdinand; Bleeker, Albert; Ingerslev, Morten; Vesterdal, Lars; Molina, Juan; Fischer, Uwe; Seidling, Walter; Jonard, Mathieu; O'Dea, Philip; Johnson, James; Fischer, Richard; Lorenz, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric deposition to forests has been monitored within the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) with sampling and analyses of bulk precipitation and throughfall at several hundred forested plots for more than 15 years. The current deposition of inorganic nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) and sulphate is highest in central Europe as well as in some southern regions. We compared linear regression and Mann-Kendall trend analysis techniques often used to detect temporal trends in atmospheric deposition. The choice of method influenced the number of significant trends. Detection of trends was more powerful using monthly data compared to annual data. The slope of a trend needed to exceed a certain minimum in order to be detected despite the short-term variability of deposition. This variability could to a large extent be explained by meteorological processes, and the minimum slope of detectable trends was thus similar across sites and many ions. The overall decreasing trends for inorganic nitrogen and sulphate in the decade to 2010 were about 2% and 6%, respectively. Time series of about 10 and 6 years were required to detect significant trends in inorganic nitrogen and sulphate on a single plot. The strongest decreasing trends were observed in western central Europe in regions with relatively high deposition fluxes, whereas stable or slightly increasing deposition during the last 5 years was found east of the Alpine region as well as in northern Europe. Past reductions in anthropogenic emissions of both acidifying and eutrophying compounds can be confirmed due to the availability of long-term data series but further reductions are required to reduce deposition to European forests to levels below which significant harmful effects do not occur according to present knowledge.

  4. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  5. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a semi-open-top artificial climate chamber was used to study the effect of CO2 enrichment (360 and 540 µmol · mol(-1)) and nitrogen addition (0, 150, 300 and 450 kg · hm(-2)) on cotton dry matter accumulation and distribution, nitrogen absorption and soil urease activity. The results showed that the dry matter accumulation of bud, stem, leaf and the whole plant increased significantly in the higher CO2 concentration treatment irrespective of nitrogen level. The dry matter of all the detected parts of plant with 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen addition was significantly higher than those with the other nitrogen levels irrespective of CO2 concentration, indicating reasonable nitrogen fertilization could significantly improve cotton dry matter accumulation. Elevated CO2 concentration had significant impact on the nitrogen absorption contents of cotton bud and stem. Compared to those under CO2 concentration of 360 µmol · mol(-1), the nitrogen contents of bud and stem both increased significantly under CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content of cotton bud in the treatment of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was the highest among the four nitrogen fertilizer treatments. While the nitrogen contents of cotton stem in the treatments of 150 kg · hm(-2) and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels were higher than those in the treatment of 0 kg · hm(-2) and 450 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels. The nitrogen content of cotton leaf was significantly influenced by the in- teraction of CO2 elevation and N addition as the nitrogen content of leaf increased in the treatments of 0, 150 and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels under the CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content in cotton root was significantly increased with the increase of nitrogen fertilizer level under elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. Overall, the cotton nitrogen absorption content under the elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment was higher than that

  6. The anthropogenic perturbation of the marine nitrogen cycle by atmospheric deposition: Nitrogen cycle feedbacks and the 15N Haber-Bosch effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Simon; Gruber, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 100 years, anthropogenic emissions have led to a strong increase of atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the ocean, yet the resulting impacts and feedbacks are neither well understood nor quantified. To this end, we run a suite of simulations with the ocean component of the Community Earth System Model v1.2 forced with five scenarios of nitrogen deposition over the period from 1850 through 2100, while keeping all other forcings unchanged. Even though global oceanic net primary production increases little in response to this fertilization, the higher export and the resulting expansion of the oxygen minimum zones cause an increase in pelagic and benthic denitrification and burial by about 5%. In addition, the enhanced availability of fixed nitrogen in the surface ocean reduces global ocean N2 fixation by more than 10%. Despite the compensating effects through these negative feedbacks that eliminate by the year 2000 about 60% of the deposited nitrogen, the anthropogenic nitrogen input forced the upper ocean N budget into an imbalance of between 9 and 22 Tg N yr-1 depending on the deposition scenario. The excess nitrogen accumulates to highly detectable levels and causes in most areas a distinct negative trend in the δ15N of the oceanic fixed nitrogen pools—a trend we refer to as the 15N Haber-Bosch effect. Changes in surface nitrate utilization and the nitrogen feedbacks induce further changes in the δ15N of NO3-, making it a good but complex recorder of the overall impact of the changes in atmospheric deposition.

  7. Marine biogenic source of atmospheric organic nitrogen in the subtropical North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Katye E; Fawcett, Sarah E; Peters, Andrew J; Sigman, Daniel M; Hastings, Meredith G

    2016-01-26

    Global models estimate that the anthropogenic component of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition to the ocean accounts for up to a third of the ocean's external N supply and 10% of anthropogenic CO2 uptake. However, there are few observational constraints from the marine atmospheric environment to validate these findings. Due to the paucity of atmospheric organic N data, the largest uncertainties related to atmospheric N deposition are the sources and cycling of organic N, which is 20-80% of total N deposition. We studied the concentration and chemical composition of rainwater and aerosol organic N collected on the island of Bermuda in the western North Atlantic Ocean over 18 mo. Here, we show that the water-soluble organic N concentration ([WSON]) in marine aerosol is strongly correlated with surface ocean primary productivity and wind speed, suggesting a marine biogenic source for aerosol WSON. The chemical composition of high-[WSON] aerosols also indicates a primary marine source. We find that the WSON in marine rain is compositionally different from that in concurrently collected aerosols, suggesting that in-cloud scavenging (as opposed to below-cloud "washout") is the main contributor to rain WSON. We conclude that anthropogenic activity is not a significant source of organic N to the marine atmosphere over the North Atlantic, despite downwind transport from large pollution sources in North America. This, in conjunction with previous work on ammonium and nitrate, leads to the conclusion that only 27% of total N deposition to the global ocean is anthropogenic, in contrast to the 80% estimated previously.

  8. Atmospheric deposition and watershed nitrogen export along an elevational gradient in the Catskill Mountains, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Baevsky, Y.H.

    2000-01-01

    Cumulative effects of atmospheric N deposition may increase N export from watersheds and contribute to the acidification of surface waters, but natural factors (such as forest productivity and soil drainage) that affect forest N cycling can also control watershed N export. To identify factors that are related to stream-water export of N, elevational gradients in atmospheric deposition and natural processes were evaluated in a steep, first-order watershed in the Catskill Mountains of New York, from 1991 to 1994. Atmospheric deposition of SO4/2-, and probably N, increased with increasing elevation within this watershed. Stream-water concentrations of SO4/2- increased with increasing elevation throughout the year, whereas stream-water concentrations of NO3/- decreased with increasing elevation during the winter and spring snowmelt period, and showed no relation with elevation during the growing season or the fall. Annual export of N in stream water for the overall watershed equaled 12% to 17% of the total atmospheric input on the basis of two methods of estimation. This percentage decreased with increasing elevation, from about 25% in the lowest subwatershed to 7% in the highest subwatershed; a probable result of an upslope increase in the thickness of the surface organic horizon, attributable to an elevational gradient in temperature that slows decomposition rates at upper elevations. Balsam fir stands, more prevalent at upper elevations than lower elevations, may also affect the gradient of subwatershed N export by altering nitrification rates in the soil. Variations in climate and vegetation must be considered to determine how future trends in atmospheric deposition will effect watershed export of nitrogen.

  9. Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at Dome C, East Antarctica, during the OPALE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Roscoe, H. K.; Kukui, A.; Savarino, J.; France, J. L.; King, M. D.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.

    2015-07-01

    Mixing ratios of the atmospheric nitrogen oxides NO and NO2 were measured as part of the OPALE (Oxidant Production in Antarctic Lands & Export) campaign at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m), during December 2011 to January 2012. Profiles of NOx mixing ratios of the lower 100 m of the atmosphere confirm that, in contrast to the South Pole, air chemistry at Dome C is strongly influenced by large diurnal cycles in solar irradiance and a sudden collapse of the atmospheric boundary layer in the early evening. Depth profiles of mixing ratios in firn air suggest that the upper snowpack at Dome C holds a significant reservoir of photolytically produced NO2 and is a sink of gas-phase ozone (O3). First-time observations of bromine oxide (BrO) at Dome C show that mixing ratios of BrO near the ground are low, certainly less than 5 pptv, with higher levels in the free troposphere. Assuming steady state, observed mixing ratios of BrO and RO2 radicals are too low to explain the large NO2 : NO ratios found in ambient air, possibly indicating the existence of an unknown process contributing to the atmospheric chemistry of reactive nitrogen above the Antarctic Plateau. During 2011-2012, NOx mixing ratios and flux were larger than in 2009-2010, consistent with also larger surface O3 mixing ratios resulting from increased net O3 production. Large NOx mixing ratios at Dome C arise from a combination of continuous sunlight, shallow mixing height and significant NOx emissions by surface snow (FNOx). During 23 December 2011-12 January 2012, median FNOx was twice that during the same period in 2009-2010 due to significantly larger atmospheric turbulence and a slightly stronger snowpack source. A tripling of FNOx in December 2011 was largely due to changes in snowpack source strength caused primarily by changes in NO3- concentrations in the snow skin layer, and only to a secondary order by decrease of total column O3 and associated increase in NO3- photolysis rates. A

  10. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle modulated turn-on fluorescent probes for histidine detection and its imaging in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Tingbi; Nie, Zhou; Miao, Zhuang; Liu, Yang; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which presented great potential in the bio-labeling assay and clinical diagnostic applications.In this work, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle (N-CNP) modulated turn-on fluorescent probes were developed for rapid and selective detection of histidine. The as synthesized N-CNPs exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and excellent biocompatibility. The fluorescence of N-CNPs can be quenched selectively by Cu(ii) ions with high efficiency, and restored by the addition of histidine owing to the competitive binding of Cu(ii) ions and histidine that removes Cu(ii) ions from the surface of the N-CNPs. Under the optimal conditions, a linear relationship between the increased fluorescence intensity of N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion conjugates and the concentration of histidine was established in the range from 0.5 to 60 μM. The detection limit was as low as 150 nM (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). In addition, the as-prepared N-CNP/Cu(ii) ion nanoprobes showed excellent biocompatibility and were applied for a histidine imaging assay in living cells, which

  11. Oxidation Behaviour of Si3N4 Materials in Air and Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGQitu; LINGZhida

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 powder and hot-pressed Si3N4 ceramics added with Al2O3 are used for investigate their oxidation behvior in air and nitrogen atmosphere(with oxygen partial pressure PO2=1-10Pa),The oxidation products of Si3N4 are examined by chemical analysi,X-ray diffraction (XRD) and XPS method,Also, thermodynamic calculation is made to analyze oxidation behavior of Si3N4.The results show that only passive oxidation will occur when Si3N4 is oxidized in air at high temperature,whereas in N2 at high temperature,the active oxidation is dominant in spite of the existence of a little passive oxidation.

  12. Nitrate formation from atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen photocatalysed by nano-sized titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Jie; Chen, Jie-Jie; Lin, Zhi-Qi; Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of nitrate in aquatic systems is rising with the development of modern industry and agriculture, causing a cascade of environmental problems. Here we describe a previously unreported nitrate formation process. Both indoor and outdoor experiments are conducted to demonstrate that nitrate may be formed from abundant atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen on nano-sized titanium dioxide surfaces under UV or sunlight irradiation. We suggest that nitric oxide is an intermediate product in this process, and elucidate its formation mechanisms using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Given the expanding use of titanium dioxide worldwide, such a titanium dioxide-mediated photocatalysis process may reveal a potentially underestimated source of nitrate in the environment, which on one hand may lead to an increasing environmental pollution concern, and on the other hand may provide an alternative, gentle and cost-effective method for nitrate production.

  13. Measuring the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of total reactive nitrogen by eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, C.; Wolff, V.; Marx, O.; Brümmer, C.; Neftel, A.

    2012-11-01

    The (net) exchange of reactive nitrogen (Nr) with the atmosphere is an important driver for ecosystem productivity and greenhouse gas exchange. The exchange of airborne Nr includes various trace compounds that usually require different specific measurement techniques, and up to now fast response instruments suitable for eddy covariance measurements are only available for few of these compounds. Here we present eddy covariance flux measurements with a recently introduced converter (TRANC) for the sum of all Nr compounds (∑Nr). Measurements were performed over a managed grassland field with phases of net emission and net deposition of ∑Nr and alternating dominance of oxidized (NOX) and reduced species (NH3). Spectral analysis of the eddy covariance data exhibited the existence of covariance function peaks at a reasonable time lag related to the sampling tube residence time under stationary conditions. Using ogive analysis, the high-frequency damping was quantified to 19%-26% for a low measurement height of 1.2 m and to about 10% for 4.8 m measurement height. ∑Nr concentrations and fluxes were compared to parallel NO and NO2 measurements by dynamic chambers and NH3 measurements by the aerodynamic gradient technique. The average concentration results indicate that the main compounds NO2 and NH3 were converted by the TRANC system with an efficiency of near 100%. With an optimised sample inlet also the fluxes of these compounds were recovered reasonably well including net deposition and net emission phases. The study shows that the TRANC system is suitable for fast response measurements of oxidized and reduced nitrogen compounds and can be used for continuous eddy covariance flux measurements of total reactive nitrogen.

  14. Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at ambient levels stimulates growth and development of horticultural plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, S.E.H.; Shigeto, J. [Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical and Life Sciences; Sakamoto, A.; Takahashi, M.; Morikawa, H. [Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Dept. of Mathematical and Life Sciences, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology

    2008-02-15

    Studies have demonstrated that ambient levels of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) can cause Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to double its biomass as well as its cell contents. This paper examined the influence of NO{sub 2} on lettuce, sunflower, cucumber, and pumpkin plants. Plants were grown in environments supplemented with stable isotope-labelled NO{sub 2} for approximately 6 weeks and irrigated with nitrates. Measured growth parameters included leaf number, internode number, stem length, number of flower buds, and root length. Results of the study demonstrated that the addition of NO{sub 2} doubled the aboveground and belowground biomass of sunflowers, while only the aboveground biomass of pumpkin, cucumbers, and lettuces was doubled. Levels of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) were also doubled in the lettuce samples. A mass spectrometry analysis showed that only a small percentage of total plant N was derived from NO{sub 2}. It was concluded that exogenous NO{sub 2} additions function as a signal rather than as a significant nutrient source in horticultural plants. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Increased forest carbon storage with increased atmospheric CO2 despite nitrogen limitation: a game-theoretic allocation model for trees in competition for nitrogen and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybzinski, Ray; Farrior, Caroline E; Pacala, Stephen W

    2015-03-01

    Changes in resource availability often cause competitively driven changes in tree allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots, either via plastic changes within individuals or through turnover of individuals with differing strategies. Here, we investigate how optimally competitive tree allocation should change in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 along a gradient of nitrogen and light availability, together with how those changes should affect carbon storage in living biomass. We present a physiologically-based forest model that includes the primary functions of wood and nitrogen. From a tree's perspective, wood is an offensive and defensive weapon used against neighbors in competition for light. From a biogeochemical perspective, wood is the primary living reservoir of stored carbon. Nitrogen constitutes a tree's photosynthetic machinery and the support systems for that machinery, and its limited availability thus reduces a tree's ability to fix carbon. This model has been previously successful in predicting allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots along natural productivity gradients. Using game theory, we solve the model for competitively optimal foliage, wood, and fine root allocation strategies for trees in competition for nitrogen and light as a function of CO2 and nitrogen mineralization rate. Instead of down-regulating under nitrogen limitation, carbon storage under elevated CO2 relative to carbon storage at ambient CO2 is approximately independent of the nitrogen mineralization rate. This surprising prediction is a consequence of both increased competition for nitrogen driving increased fine root biomass and increased competition for light driving increased allocation to wood under elevated CO2 .

  16. [Quantitative input of atmospheric nitrogen to an agro-ecosystem in a typical red soil region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Hao; Liang, Jia-ni; Liu, Xiao-li

    2009-08-15

    The atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition flux and dry deposition N velocities (Vd) were estimated using big leaf resistance analogy model by observations of onflow and factors of farmland microclimate, analysis of nitrides from the atmosphere and rain in an agro-ecosystem, a typical red soil region on Experiment Station of Red Earth Ecology, Chinese Academy (Yingtan, Jiangxi) of Sciences in 2005. The results showed that the dry deposition N was 82.63 kg x hm(-2), accounting for 67.94% of the total N, which was 132.6 kg x hm(-2) in the whole year (2005). In N dry deposition progress, NH3-N and NO3- -N were the main settlement for gas and particle, respectively. NH3-N was made up 43.02% to 89.89% (mean value, 71.05%) of the gaseous N deposition while NO3- -N was accounted for 33.67% to 94.54% (mean value, 61.01%) of the particle N deposition. The N wet deposition fluxes were 0.50-8.45 kg x hm(-2) per month and reached the higher value in July and November.

  17. Lichen-based critical loads for atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Western Oregon and Washington Forests, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, Linda H., E-mail: lgeiser@fs.fed.u [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Jovan, Sarah E. [US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 620 SW Main St, Suite 400, Portland, OR 97205 (United States); Glavich, Doug A. [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Porter, Matthew K. [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Critical loads (CLs) define maximum atmospheric deposition levels apparently preventative of ecosystem harm. We present first nitrogen CLs for northwestern North America's maritime forests. Using multiple linear regression, we related epiphytic-macrolichen community composition to: 1) wet deposition from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, 2) wet, dry, and total N deposition from the Communities Multi-Scale Air Quality model, and 3) ambient particulate N from Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE). Sensitive species declines of 20-40% were associated with CLs of 1-4 and 3-9 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in wet and total deposition. CLs increased with precipitation across the landscape, presumably from dilution or leaching of depositional N. Tight linear correlation between lichen and IMPROVE data suggests a simple screening tool for CL exceedance in US Class I areas. The total N model replicated several US and European lichen CLs and may therefore be helpful in estimating other temperate-forest lichen CLs. - Lichen-based critical loads for N deposition in western Oregon and Washington forests ranged from 3 to 9 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}, increasing with mean annual precipitation.

  18. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, P.; Theobald, M. R.; Dias, T.; Tang, Y. S.; Cruz, C.; Martins-Loução, M. A.; Máguas, C.; Sutton, M.; Branquinho, C.

    2011-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds have been established, such as critical loads (deposition fluxes) and levels (concentrations). For Mediterranean ecosystems, few studies have been carried out to assess these parameters. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. For that we have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, which have been shown to be one of the most sensitive to excessive N. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done under Mediterranean climate, in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, by sampling lichen functional diversity and annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations and modelling N deposition downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn). By modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition, the critical load was estimated to be below 26 kg (N) ha-1 yr-1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. By modelling the highly significant relationship of lichen functional groups with annual atmospheric ammonia concentration, the critical level was estimated to be below 1.9 μg m-3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should be taken into account in policies that aim at protecting Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  19. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds have been established, such as critical loads (deposition fluxes and levels (concentrations. For Mediterranean ecosystems, few studies have been carried out to assess these parameters. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. For that we have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, which have been shown to be one of the most sensitive to excessive N. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done under Mediterranean climate, in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, by sampling lichen functional diversity and annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations and modelling N deposition downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn. By modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition, the critical load was estimated to be below 26 kg (N ha−1 yr−1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. By modelling the highly significant relationship of lichen functional groups with annual atmospheric ammonia concentration, the critical level was estimated to be below 1.9 μg m−3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should be taken into account in policies that aim at protecting Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  20. Wet and dry deposition of atmospheric nitrogen at ten sites in Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of reactive nitrogen (N species can affect surrounding ecosystems via atmospheric deposition. However, few long-term and multi-site measurements have focused on both the wet and the dry deposition of individual N species in large areas of Northern China. Thus, the magnitude of atmospheric deposition of various N species in Northern China remains uncertain. In this study, the wet and dry atmospheric deposition of different N species was investigated during a three-year observation campaign at ten selected sites in Northern China. The results indicate that N deposition levels in Northern China were high with a ten-site, three-year average of 60.6 kg N ha−1 yr−1. The deposition levels showed spatial and temporal variation in the range of 28.5–100.4 kg N ha−1 yr−1. Of the annual total deposition, 40% was deposited via precipitation, and the remaining 60% was comprised of dry-deposited forms. Compared with gaseous N species, particulate N species were not the major contributor of dry-deposited N; they contributed approximately 10% to the total flux. On an annual basis, oxidized species accounted for 21% of total N deposition, thereby implying that other forms of gaseous N, such as NH3, comprised a dominant portion of the total flux. The contribution of NO3 to N deposition was enhanced in certain urban and industrial areas. As expected, the total N deposition in Northern China was significantly larger than the values reported by national scale monitoring networks in Europe, North America and East Asia because of high rates of wet deposition and gaseous NH3 dry deposition. The results have three important implications. First, atmospheric N deposition in Northern China falls within the range of critical loads for temperate forests and grasslands, a threshold above which harmful ecological effects to specified parts of temperate ecosystems often

  1. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gomez, Héctor; Izquieta-Rojano, Sheila; Aguillaume, Laura; González-Fernández, Ignacio; Valiño, Fernando; Elustondo, David; Santamaría, Jesús M; Àvila, Anna; Fenn, Mark E; Alonso, Rocío

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work, bulk and throughfall deposition of inorganic nitrogen were monitored in three different holm oak forests in Spain during two years. The results obtained with IECs were contrasted with a conventional technique using bottle collectors and with a literature review of similar studies. The performance of IECs in comparison with the conventional method was good for measuring bulk deposition of nitrate and acceptable for ammonium and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Mean annual bulk deposition of inorganic nitrogen ranged 3.09-5.43 kg N ha(-1) according to IEC methodology, and 2.42-6.83 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) using the conventional method. Intra-annual variability of the net throughfall deposition of nitrogen measured with the conventional method revealed the existence of input pulses of nitrogen into the forest soil after dry periods, presumably originated from the washing of dry deposition accumulated in the canopy. Important methodological recommendations on the IEC method and discussed, compiled and summarized.

  2. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition in world biodiversity hotspots: the need for a greater global perspective in assessing N deposition impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phoenix, G.K.; Hicks, W.K.; Cinderby, S.; Kuylenstierna, J.C.I.; Stock, W.D.; Dentener, F.J.; Giller, K.E.; Austin, A.T.; Lefroy, R.D.B.; Gimeno, B.S.; Ashmore, M.R.; Ineson, P.

    2006-01-01

    Increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is known to reduce plant diversity in natural and semi-natural ecosystems, yet our understanding of these impacts comes almost entirely from studies in northern Europe and North America. Currently, we lack an understanding of the threat of N deposition t

  3. Influence of the atmospheric species water, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.; Kniknie, B.; Barreau, N.; Berkum, J. van; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N 2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical,

  4. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- and a decrease in NO3- concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is underestimated by the model at most

  5. TRANC – a novel fast-response converter to measure total reactive atmospheric nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marx

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The input and loss of plant available nitrogen (N from/to the atmosphere can be an important factor for the productivity of ecosystems and thus for its carbon and greenhouse gas exchange. We present a novel converter for the measurement of total reactive nitrogen (TRANC: Total Reactive Atmospheric Nitrogen Converter, which offers the opportunity to quantify the sum of all airborne reactive nitrogen (Nr compounds in high time resolution. The basic concept of the TRANC is the full conversion of total Nr to nitrogen monoxide (NO within two reaction steps. Initially, reduced N compounds are being oxidised, and oxidised N compounds are thermally converted to lower oxidation states. Particulate N is being sublimated and oxidised or reduced afterwards. In a second step, remaining higher N oxides or those originated in the first step are catalytically converted to NO with carbon monoxide used as reduction gas. The converter is combined with a fast response chemiluminescence detector (CLD for NO analysis and its performance was tested for the most relevant gaseous and particulate Nr species under both laboratory and field conditions. Recovery rates during laboratory tests for NH3 and NO2 were found to be 95 and 99%, respectively, and 97% when the two gases were combined. In-field longterm stability over an 11-month period was approved by a value of 91% for NO2. Effective conversion was also found for ammonium and nitrate containing particles. The recovery rate of total ambient Nr was tested against the sum of individual measurements of NH3, HNO3, HONO, NH4+, NO3, and NOx using a combination of different well-established devices. The results show that the TRANC-CLD system precisely captures fluctuations in Nr concentrations and also matches the sum of all

  6. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  7. Field investigations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 exchange between plants and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kesselmeier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen dioxide (NO2 exchange between the atmosphere and needles of Picea abies L. (Norway Spruce was studied under uncontrolled field conditions using a dynamic chamber system. This system allows measurements of the flux density of the reactive NO-NO2-O3 triad and additionally of the non-reactive trace gases CO2 and H2O. For the NO2 detection a highly NO2 specific blue light converter was used, which was coupled to chemiluminescence detection of the photolysis product NO. This NO2 converter excludes known interferences with other nitrogen compounds, which occur by using more unspecific NO2 converters. Photo-chemical reactions of NO, NO2, and O3 inside the dynamic chamber were considered for the determination of NO2 flux densities, NO2 deposition velocities, as well as NO2 compensation point concentrations. The calculations are based on a bi-variate weighted linear regression analysis (y- and x-errors considered. The NO2 deposition velocities for spruce, based on projected needle area, ranged between 0.07 and 0.42 mm s−1. The calculated NO2 compensation point concentrations ranged from 2.4 ± 9.63 to 29.0 ± 16.30 nmol m−3 (0.05–0.65 ppb but the compensation point concentrations were all not significant in terms of compensation point concentration is unequal to zero. These data challenge the existence of a NO2 compensation point concentration for spruce. Our study resulted in lower values of NO2 gas exchange flux densities, NO2 deposition velocities and NO2 compensation point concentrations in comparison to most previous studies. It is essential to use a more specific NO2 analyzer than used in previous studies and to consider photo-chemical reactions between NO, NO2, and O3 inside the chamber.

  8. Chemical-meteorological aspects of some atmospheric nitrogen compounds in the tropics (CUBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta Santos, O.A.; Ortiz Bulto, P.L.; Hurtado, M.S.; Gonzalez, M.L. [Meteorological Institute of Cuban Ministry of Science, Havana City (Cuba)

    1996-12-31

    The transboundary problems of global and regional atmospheric pollution are at current time, a concern of scientific community and environmentalist, so our region is not considered as an exception on this matter. In our monitoring stations, some studies confirming the presence of nitrogen compounds connected with long range transport have been undertaken. For such reason, the interesting tropospheric chemistry reactions shall be verified. The above mentioned studies include the analysis of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}), NH{sub 3}, nitrate and ammonium concentrations in aerosols and rainfall in some monitoring stations its connection with the Kinds of Synoptic Situations (KSS) and the research on back tracks, so all this allows to know its possible sources of origin. As a result of interest it has been found that the total deposition of these compounds oscillates between 0,706 an d3,317 g.m{sup -2} year{sup -1}. The wet deposition exhibits approximately 60%, while the dry one is of 40%. The weight of both depositions depends on our tropical rainy climate`s features. On the other hand, the oxidized nitrogen forms only give 40%, while the reduced ones 60% of total. This coincides more with the power of natural sources in accordance with our climate. The nitrate`s concentrations in aerosols and rainfall connected with Continental Migratory Anticyclone have the higher values than with remaining kinds of synoptic situations influencing on our territory, so it can be concluded that there is transport of these pollutants from continent.

  9. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to the Oceans: Observation- and Model-Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (Nr) burden of the atmosphere has been increased by a factor of 3-4 by anthropogenic activity since the Industrial Revolution. This has led to large increases in the deposition of nitrate and ammonium to the surface waters of the open ocean, particularly downwind of major human population centres, such as those in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. In oligotrophic waters, this deposition has the potential to significantly impact marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce effective models of reactive nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition (including deposition to the land surface). Over land, N deposition models can be assessed using comparisons to regional monitoring networks of precipitation chemistry (notably those located in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia). No similar datasets exist which would allow observation - model comparisons of wet deposition for the open oceans, because long-term wet deposition records are available for only a handful of remote island sites and rain collection over the open ocean itself is logistically very difficult. In this work we attempt instead to use ~2800 observations of aerosol nitrate and ammonium concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995 - 2012, to assess the performance of modelled N deposition fields over the remote ocean. This database is non-uniformly distributed in time and space. We selected three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific) where we considered the density and distribution of observational data is sufficient to provide effective comparison to the model ensemble. Our presentation will focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic region, which has the best data coverage of the three. We will compare dry deposition fluxes calculated from the observed nitrate

  10. Aptamer induced assembly of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots on gold nanoparticles for sensitive detection of AFB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Yanfen; Wu, Yuanya; Weng, Bo; Liu, Yingshuai; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Chang Ming; Yu, Cong

    2016-04-15

    Novel fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N,C-dots) were synthesized and assembled on aptamer modified gold nanoparticles (Aptamer/AuNPs) for the super sensitive detection of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Positively charged N,C-dots were synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of pancreatin. The prepared N,C-dots were assembled on aptamer/AuNPs by electrostatic interactions. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots was efficiently quenched. When AFB1 was added to the assay solution, specific interactions between AFB1 and the aptamer caused release of the N,C-dots. The fluorescence of the N,C-dots recovered and the intensity increase could be used to calculate the amount of AFB1 added. The assay exhibits super-high sensitivity with a detection limit of 5 pg/mL (16 pM) and a wide range of linear response of 5 pg/mL to 2.00 ng/mL. A novel aptasensor is thus successfully constructed, it provides an efficient way for sensitive AFB1 sensing as well as a new technique for aptamer based novel sensor construction.

  11. Precise measurement of the absolute fluorescence yield of nitrogen in air. Consequences on the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Mesure precise du rendement absolu de la fluorescence de l'azote dans l'air. Consequences sur la detection des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefeuvre, G

    2006-07-15

    The study of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 20} eV) requires to determine the energy with much more precision than what is currently achieved. The shower of particles created in the atmosphere can be detected either by sampling particle on the ground, or by detecting the fluorescence induced by the excitation of nitrogen by shower electrons. At present, the measurement of the fluorescence is the simplest and the most reliable method, since it does not call upon hadronic physics laws at extreme energies, a field still inaccessible to accelerators. The precise knowledge of the conversion factor between deposited energy and the number of fluorescence photons produced (the yield) is thus essential. Up to now, it has been determined with an accuracy of 15 % only. This main goal of this work is to measure this yield to better than 5 per cent. To do this, 1 MeV electrons from a radioactive source excite nitrogen of the air. The accuracy has been reached thanks to the implementation of a new method for the absolute calibration of the photomultipliers detecting the photons, to better than 2 per cent. The fluorescence yield, measured and normalized to 0.85 MeV, 760 mmHg and 15 Celsius degrees, is (4.23 {+-} 0.20) photons per meter, or (20.46 {+-} 0.98) photons per deposited MeV. In addition, and for the first time, the absolute fluorescence spectrum of nitrogen excited by a source has been measured with an optical grating spectrometer. (author)

  12. Interpretation of biomass gasification yields regarding temperature intervals under nitrogen-steam atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Gasification of some agricultural waste biomass samples (sunflower shell, pine cone, cotton refuse, and olive refuse) and colza seed was performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer at temperatures up to 1273 K with a constant heating rate of 20 K/min under a dynamic nitrogen-steam atmosphere. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis profiles of the samples were derived from the non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis data. Gasification yields of the biomass samples at temperature intervals of 473-553 K, 553-653 K, 653-773 K, 773-973 K, and 973-1173 K were investigated considering the successive stages of ''evolution of carbon oxides'', ''start of hydrocarbon evolution'', ''evolution of hydrocarbons'', ''dissociation'', and ''evolution of hydrogen'', respectively. Although, there were some interactions between these stages, some evident relations were observed between the gasification yields in a given stage and the chemical properties of the parent biomass materials. (author)

  13. Seasonal trends of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide over North Santa Clara, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Daniellys; Morales, Mayra C; de la Torre, Jorge B; Grau, Ricardo; Bencs, László; Van Grieken, René; Van Espen, Piet; Sosa, Dismey; Nuñez, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) levels were monitored simultaneously by means of Radiello passive samplers at six sites of Santa Clara city, Cuba, in the cold and the warm seasons in 2010. The dissolved ionic forms of NO2 and SO2 as nitrate and sulfite plus sulfate, respectively, were determined by means of ion chromatography. Analysis of NO2 as nitrite was also performed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. For NO2, significant t tests show good agreement between the results of IC and UV-Vis methods. The NO2 and SO2 concentrations peaked in the cold season, while their minimum levels were experienced in the warm season. The pollutant levels do not exceed the maximum allowable limit of the Cuban Standard 39:1999, i.e., 40 μg/m(3) and 50 μg/m(3) for NO2 and SO2, respectively. The lowest pollutant concentrations obtained in the warm season can be attributed to an increase in their removal via precipitation (scavenging) while to the decreased traffic density and industrial emission during the summer holidays (e.g., July and August).

  14. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Torbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L. Willd (Huisache. Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient, 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 increased both C and N inputs from plant growth which would result in higher soil C from litter fall, root turnover, and excretions. Results from the incubation indicated an initial (20 days decrease in N mineralization which resulted in no change in C mineralization. However, after 40 and 60 days, an increase in both C and N mineralization was observed. These increases would indicate that increases in soil C storage may not occur in grass ecosystems that are invaded with Acacia over the long term.

  15. Melting and spheroidization of hexagonal boron nitride in a microwave-powered, atmospheric pressure nitrogen plasma `

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleiman, S. S. (Seth S.); Phillips, J. (Jonathan)

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a method for producing spherically-shaped, hexagonal phase boron nitride (hBN) particles of controlled diameter in the 10-100 micron size range. Specifically, platelet-shaped hBN particles are passed as an aerosol through a microwave-generated, atmospheric pressure, nitrogen plasma. In the plasma, agglomerates formed by collisions between input hBN particles, melt and forms spheres. We postulate that this unprecedented process takes place in the unique environment of a plasma containing a high N-atom concentration, because in such an environment the decomposition temperature can be raised above the melting temperature. Indeed, given the following relationship [1]: BN{sub (condensed)} {leftrightarrow} B{sub (gas)} + N{sub (gas)}. Standard equilibrium thermodynamics indicate that the decomposition temperature of hBN is increased in the presence of high concentrations of N atoms. We postulate that in our plasma system the N atom concentration is high enough to raise the decomposition temperature above the (undetermined) melting temperature. Keywords Microwave plasma, boron nitride, melting, spherical, thermodynamics, integrated circuit package.

  16. Diamond Radio Receiver: Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers as Fluorescent Transducers of Microwave Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Linbo; Zhang, Mian; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M.; Lončar, Marko

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a robust frequency-modulated radio receiver using electron-spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The carrier frequency of the frequency-modulated signal is in the 2.8-GHz range, determined by the zero-field splitting in the nitrogen-vacancy electronic ground state. The radio can be tuned over 300 MHz by applying an external dc magnetic field. We show the transmission of high-fidelity audio signals over a bandwidth of 91 kHz using the diamond radio. We demonstrate operating temperature of the radio as high as 350 ° C .

  17. Summertime distribution of PAN and other reactive nitrogen species in the northern high-latitude atmosphere of eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Herlth, D.; O'Hara, D.; Zahnle, K.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Talbot, R.; Gregory, G. L.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of key reactive nitrogen species (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN, PPN, NO3(-), NO(y)), C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, acetone, O3, chemical tracers (C2Cl4, CO), and important meteorological parameters were performed over eastern Canada during July to August 1990 at altitudes between 0 and 6 km as part of an Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE3B). In the free troposphere, PAN was found to be the single most abundant reactive nitrogen species constituting a major fraction of NO(y) and was significantly more abundant than NO(x) and HNO3. PAN and O3 were well correlated both in their fine and gross structures. Compared to data previously collected in the Arctic/subarctic atmosphere over Alaska (ABLE3A), the lower troposphere (0-4 km) over eastern Canada was found to contain larger reactive nitrogen and anthropogenic tracer concentrations. At higher altitudes (4-6 km) the atmospheric composition was in many ways similar to what was seen over Alaska and supports the view that a large-scale reservoir of PAN (and NO(y)) is present in the upper troposphere over the entire Arctic/subarctic region. The reactive nitrogen budget based on missions conducted from the North Bay site (missions 2-10) showed a small shortfall, whereas the budget for data collected from the Goose Bay operation (missions 11-19) showed essential balance. It is calculated that 15-20 ppt of the observed NO(x) may find its source from the available PAN reservoir. Meteorological considerations as well as relationships between reactive nitrogen and tracer species suggest that the atmosphere over eastern Canada during summer is greatly influenced by forest fires and transported industrial pollution.

  18. A Remote Raman and Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectrometer and its Application for Lidar Remote Sensing of Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Angel, S. M.; Lucey, P. G.; McKay, C. P.; Misra, A. K.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Newsom, H.; Scott, E. R.; Singh, U. N.; Taylor, J. G.; Porter, J. N.

    2005-05-01

    A combined remote Raman and Laser Induced Fluorescence (RLIF) spectrometer was proposed as a mast-mounted instrument for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This remote RLIF system is capable of conducting reconnaissance of fluorescence materials and minerals with high sensitivity (e.g., carbonates, sulfates, phosphates, quartz, etc.) that can be recorded with a single 532 nm (35 mJ) laser pulse of 8 ns half-width. The RLIF system is also capable of identification of mineral, organic, and biogenic materials and is sitable for atmospheric studies of Mars. This instrument design is based on a prototypes that was developed with partial support from NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) at the University of Hawaii. This prototype instrument has been modified to operate in the lidar mode to obtain Mie-Rayleigh scattering profiles in the atmosphere for studying meteorological processes in the marine atmosphere. Application of RLIF to obtain range-resolved atmospheric backscattering profiles using the AOTF technique are capable of providing atmospheric backscatter profiles. Data from RLIF can be used to retrieve optical properties of dust aerosols and clouds, including the profiling of scattering intensity, location of cloud base and thickness, atmospheric extinction, and de-polarization. These measurements can be made at high vertical resolution up to altitudes >5 km. Simultaneous measurements can be made of atmospheric CO2 and its variations; surface CO2-ice and water-ice; and surface and subsurface hydrated methane on Mars. Capability of RLIF and examples of atmospheric measurements applicable to RLIF will be presented in this paper.

  19. Remote monitoring of 129I and 127I isotopes in the atmosphere using the laser-induced fluorescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Suganeev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and calculation research of the development of the remote laser-induced fluorescence method for the detection of 129I and 127I molecular iodine isotopologues in atmospheric air in real time. As an excitation source we used a frequency-doubled neodymium laser (~532 nm). We estimated the sensitivity of 127I129I and 129I2 detection in the atmosphere. Detection sensitivity of molecular iodine is 4 · 1013 cm-3 for a sensing distance of 6 km.

  20. Atmospherically-promoted photosynthetic activity in a well-mixed ecosystem: Significance of wet deposition events of nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Wet atmospheric deposition of dissolved N, P and Si species is studied in well-mixed coastal ecosystem to evaluate its potential to stimulate photosynthetic activities in nutrient-depleted conditions. Our results show that, during spring, seawater is greatly depleted in major nutrients: Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN), Dissolved Inorganic Phosphorus (DIP) and Silicic acid (Si), in parallel with an increase of phytoplanktonic biomass. In spring (March-May) and summer (June-September), wet a...

  1. Enhanced Removal of Biogenic Hydrocarbons in Power Plant Plumes Constrains the Dependence of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Concentrations on Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S. W.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Wolfe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere provide one of the main chemical mechanisms for the removal of trace gases. OH plays a central role in determining the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing of greenhouse gases like methane. OH also plays a major role in the oxidation of organic trace gases, which can lead to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. Due to its very short atmospheric lifetime of seconds or less, OH concentrations are extremely variable in space and time, which makes measurements and their interpretation very challenging. Several recent measurements have yielded higher than expected OH concentrations. To explain these would require the existence of unidentified, radical recycling processes, but issues with the measurements themselves are also still being discussed. During the NOAA airborne SENEX study in the Southeast U.S., the biogenic hydrocarbons isoprene and monoterpenes were consistently found to have lower mixing ratios in air masses with enhanced nitrogen oxides from power plants. We attribute this to faster oxidation rates of biogenic hydrocarbons due to increased concentrations of OH in the power plant plumes. Measurements at different downwind distances from the Scherer and Harllee Branch coal-fired power plants near Atlanta are used to constrain the dependence of OH on nitrogen oxides. It is found that OH concentrations were highest at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 1-2 ppbv and decreased at higher and at lower concentrations. These findings agree with the expected dependence of OH on nitrogen oxide concentrations, but do not appear to be consistent with the reports in the literature that have shown high OH concentrations in regions of the atmosphere with high biogenic emissions and low NOx concentrations that would require unidentified radical recycling processes to be explained.

  2. Standard method for continuous measurement of nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone in the atmosphere. [Calorimetrically using Griess Reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is absorbed from the atmosphere in a modified Griess reagent which contains 0.5 percent sulfanilic acid and 50 ppM of N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylene diamine hydrochloride in 5 percent acetic acid that produces a red dye. The red dye is measured continuously in a recording colorimeter by comparison with a blank of unreacted reagent. Nitric oxide from the atmosphere passes through the absorber practically unaffected and is oxidized to nitrogen dioxide by bubbling through a dilute permanganate solution prior to determination with modified Griess reagent in a separate cell. Optionally, ozone in the air sample may be determined in a third absorber-colorimeter cell unit by adding about 0.5 to 1.0 ppM of pure nitric oxide to another sample of air and noting the increase in nitrogen dioxide level due to the rapid oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide by ozone. The overall accuracy of the results of the method is +-10 percent. (BLM)

  3. Dielectric barrier discharges with steep voltage rise: mapping of atomic nitrogen in single filaments measured by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, C.; Spaan, M.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Thomson, M.; Wegst, R.; Döbele, H. F.; Neiger, M.

    2001-08-01

    Space and time resolved relative atomic density distributions of nitrogen have been measured for the first time at a single filament within a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with submillimetre radial dimensions. Two-photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) spectroscopy of atomic nitrogen using radiation at λ = 206.7 nm is applied to a DBD with fast rising voltage amplitudes. The decay time of the atomic nitrogen density depends strongly on the position within the discharge and the distance from the dielectric where the lifetime is maximum. Admixed oxygen leads to an increase of the N density decay by an order of magnitude even at small fractions.

  4. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sonal; Blaud, Aimeric; Osborn, A Mark; Press, Malcolm C; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem (15)N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g Nm(-2)yr(-1), applied as (15)NH4(15)NO3 in Svalbard (79(°)N), during the summer. Separate applications of (15)NO3(-) and (15)NH4(+) were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total (15)N applied was recovered after one growing season (~90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants>vascular plants>organic soil>litter>mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of (15)N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater (15)NO3(-) than (15)NH4(+), suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events may represent a major source of eutrophication.

  5. Atmospheric wet deposition of sulfur and nitrogen in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Xiao, Weiyang; Jaffe, Daniel; Kota, Sri Harsha; Ying, Qi; Tang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable ecological changes have been observed in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR). Some of these changes might be related to excessive deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N), but the relationship has not been quantified due to lack of monitoring data, particularly S and N deposition data. In this study, we investigated the concentrations, fluxes, and sources of S and N wet deposition in JNNR from April 2010 to May 2011. The results show that SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the wet deposition were 39.4-170.5, 6.2-34.8, and 0.2-61.2 μeq L(-1), with annual Volume-Weighted Mean (VWM) concentrations of 70.5, 12.7, and 13.4 μeq L(-1), respectively. Annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ were 8.06, 1.29, and 1.39 kg S(N)ha(-1), respectively, accounting for about 90% of annual atmospheric inputs of these species at the monitoring site. The results of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis show that fossil fuel combustion, agriculture, and aged sea salt contributed to 99% and 83% of annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3-, respectively. Agriculture alone contributed to 89% of annual wet deposition flux of NH4+. Although wet deposition in JNNR was polluted by anthropogenic acids, the acidity was largely neutralized by the Ca2+ from crust and 81% of wet deposition samples had a pH higher than 6.00. However, acid rain mainly caused by SO4(2-) continued to occur in the wet season, when ambient alkaline dust concentration was lower. Since anthropogenic emissions have elevated S and N deposition and caused acid rain in JNNR, further studies are needed to better quantify the regional sources and ecological effects of S and N deposition for JNNR.

  6. Langmuir probe diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. R. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ingenieria Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ingenieria Electromecanica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651, (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina) and Instituto de Fisica del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales UBA Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current (dc) plasma jet are reported. Sweeping probes were used. The experiment was carried out using a dc non-transferred arc torch with a rod-type cathode and an anode of 5 mm diameter. The torch was operated at a nominal power level of 15 kW with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 Nl min{sup -1}. A flat ion saturation region was found in the current-voltage curve of the probe. The ion saturation current to a cylindrical probe in a high-pressure non local thermal equilibrium (LTE) plasma was modeled. Thermal effects and ionization/recombination processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Averaged radial profiles of the electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. An electron temperature around 11 000 K, a heavy particle temperature around 9500 K and an electron density of about 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found throughout the plasma jet. The electron and heavy particle temperature profiles showed good agreement with those reported in the literature by using spectroscopic techniques. It was also found that the temperature radial profile based on LTE was very close to that of the electrons. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma jets characterized by electron temperatures in the range 9000-14 000 K.

  7. Conditional vulnerability of plant diversity to atmospheric nitrogen deposition across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Samuel M.; Allen, Edith B.; Bowman, William D.; Clark, Christopher M.; Belnap, Jayne; Brooks, Matthew L.; Cade, Brian S.; Collins, Scott L.; Geiser, Linda H.; Gilliam, Frank S.; Jovan, Sarah E.; Pardo, Linda H.; Schulz, Bethany K.; Stevens, Carly J.; Suding, Katharine N.; Throop, Heather L.; Waller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has been shown to decrease plant species richness along regional deposition gradients in Europe and in experimental manipulations. However, the general response of species richness to N deposition across different vegetation types, soil conditions, and climates remains largely unknown even though responses may be contingent on these environmental factors. We assessed the effect of N deposition on herbaceous richness for 15,136 forest, woodland, shrubland, and grassland sites across the continental United States, to address how edaphic and climatic conditions altered vulnerability to this stressor. In our dataset, with N deposition ranging from 1 to 19 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1, we found a unimodal relationship; richness increased at low deposition levels and decreased above 8.7 and 13.4 kg N⋅ha−1⋅y−1 in open and closed-canopy vegetation, respectively. N deposition exceeded critical loads for loss of plant species richness in 24% of 15,136 sites examined nationwide. There were negative relationships between species richness and N deposition in 36% of 44 community gradients. Vulnerability to N deposition was consistently higher in more acidic soils whereas the moderating roles of temperature and precipitation varied across scales. We demonstrate here that negative relationships between N deposition and species richness are common, albeit not universal, and that fine-scale processes can moderate vegetation responses to N deposition. Our results highlight the importance of contingent factors when estimating ecosystem vulnerability to N deposition and suggest that N deposition is affecting species richness in forested and nonforested systems across much of the continental United States.

  8. Effects of nitrogen form on growth, CO₂ assimilation, chlorophyll fluorescence, and photosynthetic electron allocation in cucumber and rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-hong; Zhang, Yi-li; Wang, Xue-min; Cui, Jin-xia; Xia, Xiao-jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-quan

    2011-02-01

    Cucumber and rice plants with varying ammonium (NH(4)(+)) sensitivities were used to examine the effects of different nitrogen (N) sources on gas exchange, chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence quenching, and photosynthetic electron allocation. Compared to nitrate (NO(3)(-))-grown plants, cucumber plants grown under NH(4)(+)-nutrition showed decreased plant growth, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular carbon dioxide (CO(2)) level, transpiration rate, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, and O(2)-independent alternative electron flux, and increased O(2)-dependent alternative electron flux. However, the N source had little effect on gas exchange, Chl a fluorescence parameters, and photosynthetic electron allocation in rice plants, except that NH(4)(+)-grown plants had a higher O(2)-independent alternative electron flux than NO(3)(-)-grown plants. NO(3)(-) reduction activity was rarely detected in leaves of NH(4)(+)-grown cucumber plants, but was high in NH(4)(+)-grown rice plants. These results demonstrate that significant amounts of photosynthetic electron transport were coupled to NO(3)(-) assimilation, an effect more significant in NO(3)(-)-grown plants than in NH(4)(+)-grown plants. Meanwhile, NH(4)(+)-tolerant plants exhibited a higher demand for the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for NO(3)(-) reduction, regardless of the N form supplied, while NH(4)(+)-sensitive plants had a high water-water cycle activity when NH(4)(+) was supplied as the sole N source.

  9. Carbon dynamics in subtropical forest soil. Effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment and nitrogen addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juxiu X.; Zhou, Guoyi Y.; Zhang, Deqiang Q.; Duan, Honglang L.; Deng, Qi; Zhao, Liang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Xu, Zhihong H. [Griffith Univ., Nathan, Queensland (Australia). Environmental Futures Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences

    2010-06-15

    The levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]) are rapidly increasing. Understanding carbon (C) dynamics in soil is important for assessing the soil C sequestration potential under elevated [CO{sub 2}]. Nitrogen (N) is often regarded as a limiting factor in the soil C sequestration under future CO{sub 2} enrichment environment. However, few studies have been carried out to examine what would happen in the subtropical or tropical areas where the ambient N deposition is high. In this study, we used open-top chambers to study the effect of elevated atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] alone and together with N addition on the soil C dynamics in the first 4 years of the treatments applied in southern China. Materials and methods Above- and below-ground C input (tree biomass) into soil, soil respiration, soil organic C, and total N as well as dissolved organic C (DOC) were measured periodically in each of the open-top chambers. Soil samples were collected randomly in each chamber from each of the soil layers (0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm) using a standard soil sampling tube (2.5-cm inside diameter). Soil leachates were collected at the bottom of the chamber below-ground walls in stainless steel boxes. Results and discussion The highest above- and below-ground C input into soil was found in the high CO{sub 2} and high N treatment (CN), followed by the only high N treatment (N+), the only high CO{sub 2} treatment (C+), and then the control (CK) without any CO{sub 2} enrichment or N addition. DOC in the leachates was small for all the treatments. Export of DOC played a minor role in C cycling in our experiment. Generally, soil respiration rate in the chambers followed the order: CN treatment > C + treatment > N + treatment > the control. Except for the C+ treatment, there were no significant differences in soil total N among the CN treatment, N + treatment, and the control. Overall, soil organic C (SOC) was significantly affected by the treatments (p < 0.0001). SOC

  10. Fluorescent probes for "off-on" highly sensitive detection of Hg²⁺ and L-cysteine based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Cui, Peipei; Zhang, Feng; Feng, Xiaoting; Wang, Yaling; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2016-05-15

    Fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were synthesized by a facile, and low-cost one-step hydrothermal strategy using citric acid as carbon source and ammonia solution as nitrogen source for the first time. The obtained NCDs show stable blue fluorescence with a high quantum yield of 35.4%, along with the fluorescence lifetime of ca. 6.75 ns. Most importantly, Hg(2+) can completely quench the fluorescence of NCDs as a result of the formation of a non-fluorescent stable NCDs-Hg(2+) complex. Static fluorescence quenching towards Hg(2+) is proved by the Stern-Volmer equation, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, temperature dependent quenching and fluorescence lifetime measurements. Subsequently, the fluorescence of the NCDs-Hg(2+) system is completely recovered with the addition L-cysteine (L-Cys) owing to the dissociation of NCDs-Hg(2+) complex to form a more stable Hg(2+)-L-Cys complex by Hg(2+)-S bonding. Therefore, such NCDs can be used as an effective fluorescent "turn-off" probe for rapid, rather highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg(2+), with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 1.48 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM. Interestingly, NCDs-Hg(2+) system can be conveniently employed as a fluorescent "turn-on" sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of L-Cys with a low LOD of 0.79 nM and a wide linear detection range of 0-50 μM. Further, the sensitivity of NCDs to Hg(2+) is preserved in tap water with a LOD of 1.65 nM and a linear detection range of 0-10 μM.

  11. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition.

  12. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment, Applied Nitrogen and Soil Moisture on Dry Matter Accumulation and Nitrogen Uptake in Spring Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Dingxi No. 8654) was treated with two concentrations of atmospheric COz (350 and 700 μmol mol-1), two levels of soil moisture (well-watered and drought) and five rates of nitrogen fertilizer (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mg kg-1 soil) to study the atmospheric CO2 concentration effect on dry matter accumulation and N uptake of spring wheat. The effects of CO2 enrichment on the shoot and total mass depended largely on soil nitrogen level, and the shoot and total mass increased significantly in the moderate to high N treatments but did not increase significantly in the low N treatment. Enriched CO2concentration did not increase more shoot and total mass in the drought treatment than in the well-watered treatment. Thus, elevated CO2 did not ameliorate the depressive effects of drought and nitrogen stress. In addition, root mass decreased slightly and root/shoot ratio decreased significantly due to CO2 enrichment in no N treatment under well-watered condition. Enriched CO2 decreased shoot N content and shoot and total N uptake; but it reduced root N content and uptake slightly. Shoot critical N concentration was lower for spring wheat grown at 700 μmol mol-1 CO2 than at 350 μmol mol-1 CO2 in both well-watered and drought treatments. The critical N concentrations were 16 and 19 g kg-1 for the well-watered treatment and drought treatment at elevated CO2 and 21 and 26 g kg-1 at ambient CO2, respectively. The reductions in the movement of nutrients to the plant roots through mass flow due to the enhancement in WUE (water use efficiency) and the increase in N use efficiency at elevated CO2 could elucidate the reduction of shoot and root N concentrations.

  13. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Normalized Atmospheric Deposition for 2002, Total Inorganic Nitrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the average normalized atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms, of Total Inorganic Nitrogen for the year 2002 compiled for every...

  14. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Average Atmospheric (Wet) Deposition of Inorganic Nitrogen, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the average atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer, of inorganic nitrogen for the year 2002 compiled for every...

  15. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Average Atmospheric (Wet) Deposition of Inorganic Nitrogen, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This tabular data set represents the average atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer, of inorganic nitrogen for the year 2002 compiled for...

  16. Fluorescence spectra of atmospheric aerosol at Adelphi, Maryland, USA: measurement and classification of single particles containing organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.

    We measured laser-induced fluorescence spectra from individual supermicron-sized atmospheric particles drawn into our laboratory at Adelphi, MD, an urban site in the Washington, DC metroplex. A virtural impactor concentrator is used along with an aerodynamic-focusing-nozzle which forms, within an optical chamber, a focused aerosol jet where single aerosol particles can be interrogated on-the-fly with a pulsed 266-nm-wavelength laser. Sample rates are a few liter per minute, and are size dependent. Crossed-diode laser beams indicate when a particle is traversing the sample region and are used to trigger the UV laser to fire and the gated intensified CCD to record the fluorescence spectrum. Our breadboard fluorescence particle spectrometer measures particles in the 3-10 μm diameter size range. Typical trigger rates are a few per second. The usable spectral range is from about 295 to 605 nm. The majority of the particles have very weak fluorescence (on average 8 percent of particles have fluorescence signals above noise). The spectra were grouped using a heirarchical cluster analysis, with parameters chosen so that spectra typically cluster into 4-12 main categories. From the set of all cluster spectra we chose 8 template spectra for reanalyzing all the data. On average, 92 percent (81-94 percent) of the spectra were similar to these templates (using the same thresholds used for the cluster analysis). The major emission bands of the most commonly occurring spectra have peaks: near 460 nm (28 percent of fluorescent particles on average), a very broad hump, and may be humic acids or humic like substances; near 317 nm (on average 24 percent of fluorescent particles); near 321 and 460 nm (a double hump, 12 percent of fluorescent particles); and near 341 nm (8 percent of fluorescent particles). Some of the fluorescence in spectra peaking in the 317-341 nm range is probably from dicyclic aromatics and heterocyclics, including the amino acid tryptophan in biological

  17. Elevated atmospheric CO2 and increased nitrogen deposition : effects on C and N metabolism and growth of the peat moss Sphagnum recurvum P. Beauv. var. mucronatum (Russ.) Warnst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heijden, E; Verbeek, SK; Kuiper, PJC

    2000-01-01

    Sphagnum bogs play an important role when considering the impacts of global change on global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Sphagnum recurvum P. Beauv. var. mucronatum (Russ.) was grown at 360 (ambient) and 700 mu L L-1 (elevated) atmospheric [CO2] in combination with different nitrogen deposition rate

  18. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere in relation to ecosystem, climatic and human health impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hertel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive nitrogen (Nr compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3 and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+, oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO + nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and their reaction products as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N. Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account these differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2 emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3 before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3. In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3 contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with a diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and

  19. Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions and a Nitrogen Mass Balance for a Dairy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumburg, B. P.; Mount, G. H.; Filipy, J. M.; Lamb, B.; Yonge, D.; Wetherelt, S.

    2003-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) emissions have many impacts on the environment and human health. Environmental NH3 impacts include terrestrial and aquatic eutrophication, soil acidification, and aerosol formation. Aerosols affect global radiative transfer and have been linked to human health effects. The global emissions of NH3 are estimated to be 45 Tg N yr-1 (Dentener and Crutzen, 1994) with most of the emissions coming from domestic animals. The largest per animal emission come from dairy cows at 33 kg N animal{-1} year{-1} versus 10 kg N animal{-1} {-1} for cattle. On a global scale the emissions uncertainty is about 25%, but local emissions are highly uncertain (Bouwman et al., 1997). Local emissions determination is required for proper treatment in air pollution models. The main sources of emission from dairies are the cow stalls where urea and manure react to form NH3, the storage lagoons where NH3 is the end product of microbial degradation and the disposal of the waste. There have been numerous studies of NH3 emissions in Europe but farming practices are quite different in Europe than in the U.S.. The impact of these differences on emissions is unknown. We have been studying the NH3 emissions from the Washington State University dairy for three years to develop a detailed emission model for use in a regional air pollution model. NH3 is measured using a short-path spectroscopic absorption near 200 nm with a sensitivity of a few ppbv and a time resolution of a few seconds. The open air short-path method is advantageous because it is self calibrating and avoids inlet wall adherence which is a major problem for most NH3 measurement techniques. A SF6 tracer technique has been used to measure fluxes from the three main emission sources: the cow stalls, anaerobic lagoon and the waste application to grass fields using a sprinkler system. Estimated yearly emissions from each source will be compared to a nitrogen mass balance model for the dairy.

  20. Effects of elevated atmospherical CO2 concentration and nitrogen fertilisation on priming effects in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, H.; Marschner, B.

    2009-04-01

    It is expected that the biomass production and thus the input of organic carbon to the soil will increase in response to elevated CO¬2 concentrations in the atmosphere. It remains unclear whether this will lead to a long term increased carbon pool, because only little is known about the stability of the additional carbon inputs. The soil samples were taken on an agricultural field at the experimental farm of the Federal Agricultural Research Centre (FAL) in Braunschweig, Germany. A Free-Air Carbon-dioxide Enrichment (FACE) system was installed here in May 2000. It consists of rings with 20 m diameter. Two rings were operated with CO2 enriched air (550 ppm), another two rings received ambient air (370 ppm). One half of each ring received the full amount of nitrogen fertiliser, the remainder received only half of this N-amount. The soil samples were taken after 6 years of operation and were incubated with 14C-labeled fructose and alanine for 21 days. Furthermore, combined additions with the respective substrate and ammonium nitrate or ammonium nitrate alone were conducted. The microbial biomass was determined after 2 and 21 days. In the untreated controls the SOC mineralisation amounted to 0.59 to 0.68%. The addition of fructose, fructose+NH4NO3, alanine and alanine+NH4NO3 to the different soil samples increased SOC mineralization and thus caused priming effects of different extents. For NH4NO3 no priming effects occurred. The addition of fructose induced positive priming effects in all samples. The lowest priming effect was observed in the sample ambient CO2+50% N (+50%), either with fructose alone or in combination with NH4NO3. The addition of alanine caused similar priming effects in the ambient CO2+100% N and the elevated CO2+100% N samples (+92.4 and +95.6%, respectively). Again, the lowest priming effect was observed in the sample ambient CO2+50% N. The microbial biomass showed a clear increase in the substrate treated samples compared to the controls. The

  1. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sonal, E-mail: S.Choudhary@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Management School, University of Sheffield, Conduit Road, Sheffield S10 1FL (United Kingdom); Blaud, Aimeric [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Osborn, A. Mark [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Press, Malcolm C. [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15 6BH (United Kingdom); Phoenix, Gareth K. [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem {sup 15}N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g N m{sup −2} yr{sup −1}, applied as {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup 15}NO{sub 3} in Svalbard (79{sup °}N), during the summer. Separate applications of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total {sup 15}N applied was recovered after one growing season (~ 90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants > vascular plants > organic soil > litter > mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of {sup 15}N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} than {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events

  2. Spatiotemporal patterns of correlation between atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and aerosols over South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ul-Haq, Zia; Tariq, Salman; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    An accurate knowledge is needed on the complex relation between atmospheric trace gasses and aerosol variability and their sources to explain trace gases-aerosols-climate interaction and next-generation modeling of climate change and air quality. In this regard, we have used tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Angstrom Exponent (AE) obtained from satellite-based Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)/Aura and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua over South Asia. NO2-AOD correlation with coefficient r = 0.49 is determined over the landmass of South Asia during 2005-2015. Yearly mean NO2-AOD correlation over South Asia shows large variations ranging from r = 0.32 to 0.86 in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The highest correlation (r = 0.66) is seen over eastern regions of Bangladesh and India, as well as adjoining areas of western Myanmar mostly linked to anthropogenic activities. A significant correlation (r = 0.59) associated with natural causes is found over some parts of Sistan region, located at the borders of Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan, and adjoining territory. We find significant positive correlations for monsoon and post-monsoon seasons with r = 0.50 and r = 0.61, respectively. A linear regression on the annual correlation coefficients data suggests that NO2-AOD correlation is strengthening with an increase of 12.9% over South Asia during the study period. The spatial distribution of data slopes reveals positive trends in NO2-AOD correlation over megacities Lahore, Dhaka, Mumbai and Kolkata linked to growing anthropogenic activities. Singrauli city (India) has the highest correlation (r = 0.62) and 35% increase in correlation coefficient value per year. A negative correlation is observed for megacity Karachi (r = -0.37) suggesting the non-commonality of NO2 and aerosols emission sources. AE has also been used to discuss its correlation with NO2 over the areas with dominance of fine-mode aerosols.

  3. Downsizing of Georgia Tech's Airborne Fluorescence Spectrometer (AFS) for the Measurement of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholm, Scott

    1998-01-01

    This report addresses the Tropospheric Trace Gas and Airborne Measurements (TTGAMG) endeavors to further downsize and stabilize the Georgia Institute of Technology's Airborne Laser Induced Fluorescence Experiment (GITALIFE). It will mainly address the TTGAMG successes and failures as participants in the summer 1998 Wallops Island test flights on board the P3-B. Due to the restructuring and reorganization of the TTGAMG since the original funding of this grant, some of the objectives and time lines of the deliverables have been changed. Most of these changes have been covered in the preceding annual report. We are anticipating getting back on track with the original proposal's downsizing effort this summer, culminating in the GITALIFE no longer occupying a high bay rack and the loss of several hundred pounds.

  4. Nitrogen fluorescence induced by the femtosecond intense laser pulses in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Li; Suyu Li; Shuchang Li; Dunli Liu; Dan Tian; Anmin Chen; Ying Wang; Xiaowei Wang; Yunfeng Zhang; Mingxing Jin

    2016-01-01

    Our experiments show that external focusing and initial laser energy strongly influences filament generated by the femtosecond Ti–sapphire laser in air. The experimental measurements show the filament length can be extended both by increasing the laser energy and focal length of focusing lens. On the other hand, the plasma fluorescence emission can be enhanced by increasing the laser energy with fixed focal length or decreasing the focal length. In addition, the collapse distance measured experimentally are larger than the calculated ones owing to the group-velocity-dispersion effect. In addition, we find that the line widths of the spectral lines from N2 is independent of filament positions, laser energies and external focusing.

  5. The effect of nitrogen additions on oak foliage and herbivore communities at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eatough Jones, Michele [Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: michele.eatough@ucr.edu; Paine, Timothy D. [Department of Entomology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Fenn, Mark E. [USDA, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive. Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    To evaluate plant and herbivore responses to nitrogen we conducted a fertilization study at a low and high pollution site in the mixed conifer forests surrounding Los Angeles, California. Contrary to expectations, discriminant function analysis of oak herbivore communities showed significant response to N fertilization when atmospheric deposition was high, but not when atmospheric deposition was low. We hypothesize that longer-term fertilization treatments are needed at the low pollution site before foliar N nutrition increases sufficiently to affect herbivore communities. At the high pollution site, fertilization was also associated with increased catkin production and higher densities of a byturid beetle that feeds on the catkins of oak. Leaf nitrogen and nitrate were significantly higher at the high pollution site compared to the low pollution site. Foliar nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with abundance of sucking insects, leafrollers and plutellids in all three years of the study. - Nitrogen additions at sites impacted by air pollution were associated with altered foliar herbivore communities and increased densities of a catkin-feeding beetle on Quercus kellogii.

  6. Watershed-scale changes in terrestrial nitrogen cycling during a period of decreased atmospheric nitrate and sulfur deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Robert D.; Scanga, Sara E.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Nelson, David M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Zabala, Gabriel A.; Alinea, Alexandria A.; Schirmer, Charles D.

    2016-12-01

    Recent reports suggest that decreases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition throughout Europe and North America may have resulted in declining nitrate export in surface waters in recent decades, yet it is unknown if and how terrestrial N cycling was affected. During a period of decreased atmospheric N deposition, we assessed changes in forest N cycling by evaluating trends in tree-ring δ15N values (between 1980 and 2010; n = 20 trees per watershed), stream nitrate yields (between 2000 and 2011), and retention of atmospherically-deposited N (between 2000 and 2011) in the North and South Tributaries (North and South, respectively) of Buck Creek in the Adirondack Mountains, USA. We hypothesized that tree-ring δ15N values would decline following decreases in atmospheric N deposition (after approximately 1995), and that trends in stream nitrate export and retention of atmospherically deposited N would mirror changes in tree-ring δ15N values. Three of the six sampled tree species and the majority of individual trees showed declining linear trends in δ15N for the period 1980-2010; only two individual trees showed increasing trends in δ15N values. From 1980 to 2010, trees in the watersheds of both tributaries displayed long-term declines in tree-ring δ15N values at the watershed scale (R = -0.35 and p = 0.001 in the North and R = -0.37 and p declining stream nitrate concentrations (-0.009 mg N L-1 yr-1, p = 0.02), but no change in the retention of atmospherically deposited N was observed. In contrast, nitrate yields in the South did not exhibit a trend, and the watershed became less retentive of atmospherically deposited N (-7.3% yr-1, p declines in terrestrial N availability inferred from tree-ring δ15N values do not always correspond with decreased stream nitrate export or increased retention of atmospherically deposited N.

  7. Impact of Urban, Agricultural and Industrial Emissions on the Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen in the Columbia River Gorge Scenic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainord, J.; George, L. A.; Orlando, P.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) formation is not fully characterized due to inadequate knowledge of pre-cursor emissions (ammonia, NH3, and nitrogen oxides, NOx) and from incomplete understanding of reactions in model predictions involving the precursors and the chemical products such as nitric acid (HNO3). The Columbia River Gorge (CRG), located between Oregon and Washington states, has unique sources of reactive nitrogen located at both ends and experiences bimodal winds: winter easterlies and summer westerlies. Because of the unique winds, this project will utilize the CRG as an environmental flow tube as we monitor for atmospheric reactive nitrogen species at two locations within the CRG: one located on the western side and one on the east. Measurements will include total oxidized nitrogen, NOx, NH3 and HNO3 using annular denuders, and a novel method using ion exchange resins for particulate ammonium, nitrate, and sulfates. In addition, an ozone gas analyzer and meteorological conditions of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction will be measured. Our December 2012- June 2014 NOx measurements located near the eastern end of the CRG show significantly different (pwind conditions. This suggests an eastern NOx source - potentially the 550 megawatt Boardman Coal Power Plant 100 km to the east. These measurements in the near-source environment will provide insight into uncertainties in HNO3 formation, regional ammonia levels, and the best strategy for managers to reduce NOx or NH3 emissions to minimize SIA formation.

  8. Total atmospheric deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the Pacific...

  9. Total atmospheric deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the...

  10. Total atmospheric deposition of reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of reduced nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States (2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes annual nitrogen and sulfur deposition within each 12-digit HUC subwatershed for the year 2002. Values are provided for total...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States (2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes annual nitrogen and sulfur deposition within each 12-digit HUC subwatershed for the year 2006. Values are provided for total...

  13. Interactive effects of changing climate, increasing atmospheric CO2, nitrogen deposition and disturbance on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in Oregon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, T. W.; Law, B. E.; Thornton, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbance and climate are two of the most important factors governing forest carbon storage and uptake. Disturbances by fire, insects, and diseases that can reduce forest carbon storage have significantly increased in recent years, and this trend is projected to continue. We examined forest carbon dynamics in response to climate, increased atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen deposition in Oregon for the period 2010-2100, assuming current harvest rates would continue. We used the NCAR CLM4 model combined with a regional atmospheric forcing dataset and account for future environmental change using the IPCC RCP 4.5 (moderate GHG reductions) and RCP 8.5 (high emissions) scenarios. For the RCP 4.5 moderate GHG reductions scenario, regional relative humidity remains constant overtime, predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations rise to 550 ppm and nitrogen deposition varies from 2.2 kg N ha-1 yr-1 in the mesic ecoregions to 3.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1 in the semi-arid ecoregions. This is a change of 5.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1). At the end of the 21st century, predicted regional net ecosystem production (NEP) is 13.7 Tg C yr-1 (107 g C m-2 yr-1) for business-as-usual (BAU) conditions compared with the current NEP of 13.2 ± 1.6 Tg C yr-1 (103 g C m-2 yr-1). There is no significant influence on NEP by changing climate, nitrogen deposition, and increasing CO2 concentrations in the long term for the moderate RCP 4.5 scenario. Increases in BAU net primary production (NPP) are accompanied by increases in heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from a warmer climate, resulting in no change in NEP. Predicted soil mineral nitrogen is maintained for the first 40-50 years and then declines. In Pacific Northwest forests, our results support the hypothesis that increases in NPP and Rh due to climate warming are enhanced by CO2 fertilization and warming until nitrogen limitation occurs and carbon uptake declines following a peak in 2030 and then drops below its current value. We applied clearcut management scenarios

  14. Particle-fluorescence spectrometer for real-time single-particle measurements of atmospheric organic carbon and biological aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ronald G; Hill, Steven C; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-15

    A particle-fluorescence spectrometer (PFS) for real-time measurements of single-particle UV-laser-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) excited with a pulsed (263-nm) laser is reported. The dispersed UV-LIF spectra are measured by a 32-anode PMT detector with spectral coverage from 280-600 nm. The PFS represents a significant improvement over our previous apparatus [Pinnick et al., Atmos. Environ. 2004, 38, 1657] and can (1) measure fluorescence spectra of bacterial particles having light-scattering sizes as small as 1 microm (previously limited to about 3 microm) and so can measure particles with size in the range of 1-10 microm, (2) measure each particle's elastic scattering which can be used to estimate particle size (not available previously), (3) measure single-particle fluorescence spectra with a laser and detector that can record spectra as fast as 90,000/s, although the highest rates we have found experimentally in atmospheric measurements is only several hundred per second (previously limited by detectors to only 25/s), and (4) provide a time stamp for a data block of spectra with time resolution from 10 ms to 10 min. In addition, the PFS has been modified to be more robust, transportable, and smaller. The use of an aerodynamic-focusing sheath inlet nozzle assembly has improved the sample rate. The PFS has been employed to measure UV-LIF spectra from individual atmospheric particles during October-December 2006 and January-May 2008 in New Haven, CT, and during January-May 2007 in Las Cruces, NM.

  15. The effect of atmosphere composition in plasma nitrogenation of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardisson, J.D. E-mail: jdr@cdtn.br; Araujo, R.C.; Macedo, W.A.A.; Persiano, A.I.C.; Gama, S

    2004-05-01

    The change on the structural and magnetic properties of the Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} compound as the ratio of H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} forming the mixture of the atmosphere in a plasma chamber used to nitride this compound varied, was investigated by Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the increase of the hydrogen concentration in the mixed H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} atmosphere reduces the formation of the nitrogen-rich phases, Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 8} and Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 11} and increases the formation of the Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}N{sub 3} phase, whose maximum values are obtained for 70% H{sub 2} in the gas mixture.

  16. Evaluation of a catalytic reduction technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D. W.; Eubank, C. S.; Hubler, C. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of a technique for the measurement of total reactive odd-nitrogen NOy-containing species in the atmosphere has been examined. In the technique, an NOy component species, which may include NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and particulate nitrate, are catalytically reduced by CO to form NO molecules on the surface of a metal converter tube, and the NO product is detected by chemiluminescence produced in reaction with O3. Among the catalysts tested in the temperature range of 25-500 C, Au was the preferred catalyst. The results of laboratory tests investigating the effects of pressure, O3, and H2O on NOy conversion, and the possible sources of interference, have shown that the technique is suitable for atmospheric analyses. The results of a test in ambient air at a remote ground-based field site are included.

  17. Abrupt recent trend changes in atmospheric nitrogen dioxide over the Middle East

    KAUST Repository

    Lelieveld, J.

    2015-08-21

    Nitrogen oxides, released from fossil fuel use and other combustion processes, affect air quality and climate. From the mid-1990s onward, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has been monitored from space, and since 2004 with relatively high spatial resolution by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. Strong upward NO2 trends have been observed over South and East Asia and the Middle East, in particular over major cities. We show, however, that a combination of air quality control and political factors, including economical crisis and armed conflict, has drastically altered the emission landscape of nitrogen oxides in the Middle East. Large changes, including trend reversals, have occurred since about 2010 that could not have been predicted and therefore are at odds with emission scenarios used in projections of air pollution and climate change in the early 21st century.

  18. The Effect of Surface Ice and Topography on the Atmospheric Circulation and Distribution of Nitrogen Ice on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Soto, Alejandro; Michaels, Timothy I.

    2016-10-01

    A newly developed general circulation model (GCM) for Pluto is used to investigate the impact of a heterogeneous distribution of nitrogen surface ice and large scale topography on Pluto's atmospheric circulation. The GCM is based on the GFDL Flexible Modeling System (FSM). Physics include a gray model radiative-conductive scheme, subsurface conduction, and a nitrogen volatile cycle. The radiative-conductive model takes into account the 2.3, 3.3 and 7.8 μm bands of CH4 and CO, including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. The nitrogen volatile cycle is based on a vapor pressure equilibrium assumption between the atmosphere and surface. Prior to the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft, the expectation was that the volatile ice distribution on the surface of Pluto would be strongly controlled by the latitudinal temperature gradient. If this were the case, then Pluto would have broad latitudinal bands of both ice covered surface and ice free surface, as dictated by the season. Further, the circulation, and the thus the transport of volatiles, was thought to be driven almost exclusively by sublimation and deposition flows associated with the volatile cycle. In contrast to expectations, images from New Horizon showed an extremely complex, heterogeneous distribution of surface ices draped over substantial and variable topography. To produce such an ice distribution, the atmospheric circulation and volatile transport must be more complex than previously envisioned. Simulations where topography, surface ice distributions, and volatile cycle physics are added individually and in various combinations are used to individually quantify the importance of the general circulation, topography, surface ice distributions, and condensation flows. It is shown that even regional patches of ice or large craters can have global impacts on the atmospheric circulation, the volatile cycle, and hence, the distribution of

  19. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  20. Microorganisms in dry polar snow are involved in the exchanges of reactive nitrogen species with the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, A; Domine, F; Esposito, G; Morin, S; Savarino, J; Nardino, M; Montagnoli, M; Bonneville, J-M; Clement, J-C; Ianniello, A; Beine, H J

    2010-01-15

    The snowpack is a complex photochemical reactor that emits a wide variety of reactive molecules to the atmosphere. In particular, the photolysis of nitrate ions, NO(3)(-), produces NO, NO(2), and HONO, which affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. We report measurements in the European High Arctic where we observed for the first time emissions of NO, NO(2), and HONO by the seasonal snowpack in winter, in the complete or near-complete absence of sunlight and in the absence of melting. We also detected unusually high concentrations of nitrite ions, NO(2)(-), in the snow. These results suggest that microbial activity in the snowpack is responsible for the observed emissions. Isotopic analysis of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) in the snow confirm that these ions, at least in part, do not have an atmospheric origin and are most likely produced by the microbial oxidation of NH(4)(+) coming from clay minerals into NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). These metabolic pathways also produce NO. Subsequent dark abiotic reactions lead to NO(2) and HONO production. The snow cover is therefore not only an active photochemical reactor but also a biogeochemical reactor active in the cycling of nitrogen and it can affect atmospheric composition all year round.

  1. Synergistic Effects of Nitrogen Amendments and Ethylene on Atmospheric Methane Uptake under a Temperate Old-growth Forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xingkai; HAN Lin; LUO Xianbao; HAN Shijie

    2011-01-01

    An increase in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition can promote soil acidification, which may increase the release of ethylene (C2H4) under forest floors. Unfortunately, knowledge of whether increasing N deposition and C2H4 releases have synergistic effects on soil methane (CH4) uptake is limited and certainly deserves to be examined. We conducted some field measurements and laboratory experiments to examine this issue. The addition of (NH4)2SO4 or NH4C1 at a rate of 45 kg N ha-1 yr 1 reduced the soil CH4 uptake under a temperate old-growth forest in northeast China, and there were synergistic effects of N amnendments in the presence of C2H4 concentrations equal to atmospheric CH4 concentration on the soil CH4 uptake, particularly in the NH4Cl-treated plots. Effective concentrations of added C2H4 on the soil CH4 uptake were smaller in NH4+-treated plots than in KNO3-treated plots. The concentration of ca 0.3 μ1 C2H4 L-1 in the headspace gases reduced by 20% soil atmospheric CH4 uptake in the NH4Cl-treated plots, and this concentration was easily produced in temperate forest topsoils under short-term anoxic conditions. Together with short-term stimulating effects of N amendments and soil acidification on C2H4 production from forest soils, our observations suggest that knowledge of synergistic effects of NH4+, rather than NO3-, amendments and C2H4 on the in situ soil CH4 uptake is critical for understanding the role of atmospheric N deposition and cycling of C2H4 under forest floors in reducing global atmospheric CH4 uptake by forests. Synergistic functions of NH4+-N deposition and C2H4 release due to soil acidification in reducing atmospheric CH4 uptake by forests are discussed.

  2. Measurement of bonding energy in an anhydrous nitrogen atmosphere and its application to silicon direct bonding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournel, F.; Continni, L.; Morales, C.; Da Fonseca, J.; Moriceau, H.; Rieutord, F.; Barthelemy, A.; Radu, I.

    2012-05-01

    Bonding energy represents an important parameter for direct bonding applications as well as for the elaboration of physical mechanisms at bonding interfaces. Measurement of bonding energy using double cantilever beam (DCB) under prescribed displacement is the most used technique thanks to its simplicity. The measurements are typically done in standard atmosphere with relative humidity above 30%. Therefore, the obtained bonding energies are strongly impacted by the water stress corrosion at the bonding interfaces. This paper presents measurements of bonding energies of directly bonded silicon wafers under anhydrous nitrogen conditions in order to prevent the water stress corrosion effect. It is shown that the measurements under anhydrous nitrogen conditions (less than 0.2 ppm of water in nitrogen) lead to high stable debonding lengths under static load and to higher bonding energies compared to the values measured under standard ambient conditions. Moreover, the bonding energies of Si/SiO2 or SiO2/SiO2 bonding interfaces are measured overall the classical post bond annealing temperature range. These new results allow to revisit the reported bonding mechanisms and to highlight physical and chemical phenomena in the absence of stress corrosion effect.

  3. Preparation of nitrogen doped silicon oxides thin films by plasma polymerization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Meng-Jiy

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification techniques have been applied in various applications including self-cleaning surface, antibacterial filter, and biomaterials. In this study we employed the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) deposition, a dry process for surface modification, to deposit 3-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane (APTES) on stainless steel (SS) on the purposes of simultaneously incorporating SiOx and nitrogen containing functionalities for the modulation of biofunctionality. The APPJ deposition allowed to form a thin layer of APTES with linear growth rate by controlling the deposition time. In addition, the surface chemical and physical properties, such as surface chemical composition, wettability, film thickness, and interactions with mammalian cells were evaluated by using different analytical methods. The results showed that the surface wettability was improved significantly due to the APTES deposition along with the increase of the incorporated nitrogen content. Moreover, the viability of L-929 fibroblasts was clearly promoted on the APTES deposited SS, which is most probably due to the thicker deposited films and higher density of nitrogen-containing functional groups. The outcomes of this research showed great potential to apply on metallic substrates in real time for biomedical related applications.

  4. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the lowermost stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003 an extended aerosol layer at 13km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal that we detected with a water vapour Raman channel, but that was not produced by Raman scattering. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering from a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. We interpret the unexpected properties of these aerosols as fluorescence induced by the laser beam at organic components of the aerosol particles. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar systems. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates, inelastic backscatter signals that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  5. Fluorescence from atmospheric aerosol detected by a lidar indicates biogenic particles in the stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Immler

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available With a lidar system that was installed in Lindenberg/Germany, we observed in June 2003, an extended aerosol layer at 13 km altitude in the lowermost stratosphere. This layer created an inelastic backscatter signal which we interpret as laser induced fluorescence from aerosol particles. Also, we find evidence for inelastic scattering in a smoke plume from a forest fire that we observed in the troposphere. Fluorescence from ambient aerosol had not yet been considered detectable by lidar. However, organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sticking to the aerosol particles, or bioaerosol such as bacteria, spores or pollen fluoresce when excited with UV-radiation in a way that is detectable by our lidar system. Therefore, we conclude that fluorescence from organic material released by biomass burning creates the inelastic backscatter signal that we measured with our instrument and thus demonstrate a new and powerful way to characterize aerosols by a remote sensing technique. The stratospheric aerosol layer that we have observed in Lindenberg for three consecutive days is likely to be a remnant from Siberian forest fire plumes lifted across the tropopause and transported around the globe.

  6. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  7. Laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique (LP-RF) applied to the study of reactions of atmospheric interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, J.; Cuevas, C. A.; Notario, A.; Martínez, E.

    Atomic chlorine is highly reactive with a variety of organic and inorganic compounds so that relatively small concentrations can compete with the tropospheric oxidants (OH, O3 and NO3) in determining the tropospheric fate of such compounds [1]. Besides, there is a lot of evidence that bromine compounds play significant role in the ozone chemistry both in the troposphere and in the stratosphere [2]. In this work we show the laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique (LP-RF) applied to the study of gas phase reactions of halogen atoms with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of interest in atmospheric chemistry [3]. By means of this technique is possible to measure the rate constants of theses reactions, and subsequently obtain the Arrhenius parameters. Halogens atoms are produced in a excess of the VOC and He, by photolyzing Cl2 at 308 nm to obtain Cl atoms, or CF2Br2 at 248 nm for Br atoms, both cases using a pulsed excimer laser. The radiation (135 nm) from a microwave-driven lamp, through which He containing a low concentrations of Cl2 or Br2 was flowed, was used to excite the resonance fluorescence from the corresponding halogen atom in the jacketed Pyrex reaction cell. Signal were obtained using photon-counting techniques in conjunction with multichannel scaling. The fluorescence signal from the PMT was processed by a preamplifier and sent to an multichannel scaler to collect the time-resolved signal. The multichannel scaler was coupled to a microcomputer for further kinetics analysis.

  8. Nitrogen distribution and cycling through water flows in a subtropical bamboo forest under high level of atmospheric deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-hua Tu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hydrological cycle is an important way of transportation and reallocation of reactive nitrogen (N in forest ecosystems. However, under a high level of atmospheric N deposition, the N distribution and cycling through water flows in forest ecosystems especially in bamboo ecosystems are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate N fluxes through water flows in a Pleioblastus amarus bamboo forest, event rainfall/snowfall (precipitation, PP, throughfall (TF, stemflow (SF, surface runoff (SR, forest floor leachate (FFL, soil water at the depth of 40 cm (SW1 and 100 cm (SW2 were collected and measured through the whole year of 2009. Nitrogen distribution in different pools in this ecosystem was also measured. Mean N pools in vegetation and soil (0-1 m were 351.7 and 7752.8 kg ha(-1. Open field nitrogen deposition at the study site was 113.8 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1, which was one of the highest in the world. N-NH4(+, N-NO3(- and dissolved organic N (DON accounted for 54%, 22% and 24% of total wet N deposition. Net canopy accumulated of N occurred with N-NO3(- and DON but not N-NH4(+. The flux of total dissolved N (TDN to the forest floor was greater than that in open field precipitation by 17.7 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1, due to capture of dry and cloudwater deposition net of canopy uptake. There were significant negative exponential relationships between monthly water flow depths and monthly mean TDN concentrations in PP, TF, SR, FFL and SW1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The open field nitrogen deposition through precipitation is very high over the world, which is the main way of reactive N input in this bamboo ecosystem. The water exchange and N consume mainly occurred in the litter floor layer and topsoil layer, where most of fine roots of bamboo distributed.

  9. Atmospheric organic and inorganic nitrogen inputs to coastal urban and montane Atlantic Forest sites in southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Patricia A.; Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; de Mello, William Z.; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Santos, Isimar A.

    2015-06-01

    Tropical regions are currently experiencing changes in the quantity and form of nitrogen (N) deposition as a result of urban and industrial emissions. We quantified atmospheric N inputs to two coastal urban and two montane (400 m and 1000 m) Atlantic Forest sites downwind of the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro (MRRJ), Brazil, from August 2008 to August 2009. Concentrations of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and urea were measured in bulk precipitation at all sites, as well as in canopy throughfall in the lower montane forest. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was calculated as the difference between TDN and DIN (NH4+ + NO3- + NO2-). Annual volume-weighted mean bulk concentrations of all N species were higher at the coastal urban than montane forest sites, with DON accounting for 32-56% and 26-32%, respectively, of the TDN concentration in bulk precipitation. Bulk deposition of TDN ranged 12.1-17.2 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 and tended to decrease with increasing distance from the coastal urban region. In the lower montane forest, throughfall TDN flux, 34.3 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1, was over 2-fold higher than bulk TDN deposition, and DON comprised 57% of the total N deposited by throughfall to the forest soil. Urea comprised 27% of DON in throughfall compared to up to 100% in bulk precipitation. Our findings show that DON is an important, yet understudied, component of TDN deposition in tropical forest regions, comprising one-third to greater than one-half of the N deposited in rainfall and throughfall. Further, in this lower montane Atlantic Forest site, throughfall DIN flux was 1.5-3 fold higher than the suggested empirical critical load for humid tropical forests, highlighting the potential for increasing N pollution emitted from the MRRJ to impact N cycling in adjacent ecosystems.

  10. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Daumiller, K; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Luis, P Facal San; Gonzales, D; Hojvat, C; Hörandel, J R; Hrabovský, M; Iarlori, M; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuehn, F; Monasor, M; Nožka, L; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Ridky, J; Rizi, V; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Salamida, F; Schovánek, P; Šmida, R; Spinka, H; Ulrich, A; Verzi, V; Williams, C

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  11. Precise measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons in atmospheric gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ave, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IK, Postfach 6980, D - 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bohacova, M. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Daumiller, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IK, Postfach 6980, D - 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Di Carlo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita de l' Aquila and INFN, Via Vetoio, I-67010 Coppito, Aquila (Italy); Di Giulio, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Roma Tor Vergata and Sezione INFN, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Facal San Luis, Pedro, E-mail: facal@kicp.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gonzales, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IEKP, Postfach 3640, D - 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hojvat, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hoerandel, J.R. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hrabovsky, M. [Palacky University, RCATM, Olomuc (Czech Republic); Iarlori, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita de l' Aquila and INFN, Via Vetoio, I-67010 Coppito, Aquila (Italy); Keilhauer, B.; Klages, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IK, Postfach 6980, D - 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kleifges, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IPE, Postfach 3640, D - 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kuehn, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Monasor, M. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Nozka, L.; Palatka, M. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-15

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  12. Long-term atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfate in a large oligotrophic lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Bonnie K; Craft, James A; Stanford, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    We documented significantly increasing trends in atmospheric loading of ammonium (NH4) and nitrate/nitrite (NO2/3) and decreasing trends in total phosphorus (P) and sulfate (SO4) to Flathead Lake, Montana, from 1985 to 2004. Atmospheric loading of NO2/3 and NH4 increased by 48 and 198% and total P and SO4 decreased by 135 and 39%. The molar ratio of TN:TP also increased significantly. Severe air inversions occurred periodically year-round and increased the potential for substantial nutrient loading from even small local sources. Correlations between our loading data and various measures of air quality in the basin (e.g., particulate matter dust and smoke are important sources. Ammonium was the primary form of N in atmospheric deposition, whereas NO3 was the primary N form in tributary inputs. Atmospheric loading of NH4 to Flathead Lake averaged 44% of the total load and on some years exceeded tributary loading. Primary productivity in the lake is colimited by both N and P most of the year; and in years of high atmospheric loading of inorganic N, deposition may account for up to 6.9% of carbon converted to biomass.

  13. Low atmospheric nitrogen loads lead to grass encroachment in coastal dunes, but only on acid soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remke, E.; Brouwer, E.; Kooijman, A.; Blindow, I.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric N-deposition on succession from open sand to dry, lichen-rich, short grassland, and tall grass vegetation dominated by Carex arenaria was surveyed in 19 coastal dune sites along the Baltic Sea. Coastal dunes with acid or slightly calcareous sand reacted differently to atmos

  14. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, P.; Theobald, M. R.; Dias, T.; Tang, Y. S.; Cruz, C.; Martins-Loução, M. A.; Máguas, C.; Sutton, M.; Branquinho, C.

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds such as critical loads (deposition fluxes) and levels (concentrations) can be established. Few studies have assessed these thresholds for semi-natural Mediterranean ecosystems. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. We have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, one of the most sensitive comunity indicators of excessive N in the atmosphere. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done for a Mediterranean climate in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, based on the relation between lichen functional diversity and modelled N deposition for critical loads and measured annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations for critical levels, evaluated downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn). Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and annual atmospheric ammonia concentration showed the critical level to be below 1.9 μg m-3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition showed that the critical load was lower than 26 kg (N) ha-1 yr-1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should aid development of policies to protect Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  15. Contribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition to diffuse pollution in a typical hilly red soil catchment in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianlin; Liu, Jieyun; Li, Yong; Li, Yuyuan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Xuejun; Wu, Jinshui

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is currently high and meanwhile diffuse N pollution is also serious in China. The correlation between N deposition and riverine N export and the contribution of N deposition to riverine N export were investigated in a typical hilly red soil catchment in southern China over a two-year period. N deposition was as high as 26.1 to 55.8kgN/(ha·yr) across different land uses in the studied catchment, while the riverine N exports ranged from 7.2 to 9.6kgN/(ha·yr) in the forest sub-catchment and 27.4 to 30.3kgN/(ha·yr) in the agricultural sub-catchment. The correlations between both wet N deposition and riverine N export and precipitation were highly positive, and so were the correlations between NH4(+)-N or NO3(-)-N wet deposition and riverine NH4(+)-N or NO3(-)-N exports except for NH4(+)-N in the agricultural sub-catchment, indicating that N deposition contributed to riverine N export. The monthly export coefficients of atmospheric deposited N from land to river in the forest sub-catchment (with a mean of 14%) presented a significant positive correlation with precipitation, while the monthly contributions of atmospheric deposition to riverine N export (with a mean of 18.7% in the agricultural sub-catchment and a mean of 21.0% in the whole catchment) were significantly and negatively correlated with precipitation. The relatively high contribution of N deposition to diffuse N pollution in the catchment suggests that efforts should be done to control anthropogenic reactive N emissions to the atmosphere in hilly red soil regions in southern China.

  16. Carbon-Water-Nitrogen relationships between lichens and the atmosphere: Tools to understand metabolism and ecosystem change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Máguas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the close linking between the biosphere and atmosphere, there are clear impacts of changes in climate, atmospheric deposition of nutrients/pollutants and land use (Global Changes on the terrestrial biosphere. Lichens, with a direct dependence on atmospheric conditions, are much more affected by their immediate microclimate than by the ecosystem’s prevailing macroclimate. In contrast to higher plants, poikilohydric organisms have different mechanisms of water and CO2 exchange. The application of stable isotopes to the understanding of the mechanisms that are fundamental to lichen gas exchange and water uptake is a promising tool for the evaluation of lichen response to environmental changes. Indeed, lichens have been shown to be influenced by a large number of natural and anthropogenic environmental factors, serving as ecological indicators. Thus, we may use these organisms to model the impact of key global change drivers, such as nitrogen deposition and biodiversity changes, at local scale. Particularly useful is the application of the Lichen Diversity Value (LDV in order to evaluate the impact of global drivers. Moreover, it has been shown that these indices, associated with main photobiont types, green-algae (LDVch or cyanobacteria (LDVcyh, and/or nitrophilous versus oligotrophic species, were good candidates as ecological indicators. Besides mapping with high spatial resolution the effects of climate alterations, lichen functional groups could also be used as an early-warning system in order to detect the first effects of climate change in ecosystems before sudden shifts occur on other components that may be less sensitive. Clearly, lichens possess the adequate traits to be used as powerful indicators of complex interactions between atmosphere and biosphere, and thus can generate potentially interesting models for global change drivers.

  17. Critical loads of nitrogen deposition and critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N has emerged in recent years as a key factor associated with global changes, with impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems functioning and human health. In order to ameliorate the effects of excessive N, safety thresholds such as critical loads (deposition fluxes and levels (concentrations can be established. Few studies have assessed these thresholds for semi-natural Mediterranean ecosystems. Our objective was therefore to determine the critical loads of N deposition and long-term critical levels of atmospheric ammonia for semi-natural Mediterranean evergreen woodlands. We have considered changes in epiphytic lichen communities, one of the most sensitive comunity indicators of excessive N in the atmosphere. Based on a classification of lichen species according to their tolerance to N we grouped species into response functional groups, which we used as a tool to determine the critical loads and levels. This was done for a Mediterranean climate in evergreen cork-oak woodlands, based on the relation between lichen functional diversity and modelled N deposition for critical loads and measured annual atmospheric ammonia concentrations for critical levels, evaluated downwind from a reduced N source (a cattle barn. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and annual atmospheric ammonia concentration showed the critical level to be below 1.9 μg m−3, in agreement with recent studies for other ecosystems. Modelling the highly significant relationship between lichen functional groups and N deposition showed that the critical load was lower than 26 kg (N ha−1 yr−1, which is within the upper range established for other semi-natural ecosystems. Taking into account the high sensitivity of lichen communities to excessive N, these values should aid development of policies to protect Mediterranean woodlands from the initial effects of excessive N.

  18. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Alexandre A. [Institute for Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories, all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per unit electrode length. These results are important to establish the validity of this simulation tool for the future study and development of this effect for practical purposes.

  19. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Alexandre A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per u...

  20. Foliar Uptake of Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen Pollution Along an Urban-Rural Gradient in New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallano, D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation is an important sink for atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) pollution in terrestrial ecosystems, and when soil N is limiting, foliar N uptake can be a source of plant-available N. A proxy for pollution derived N, and in particular foliar assimilated N, would be useful to quantify the impact of the foliar uptake pathway on plant metabolism. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios (15N/14N) are practical for this purpose because forms of plant-available N often have varying isotopic compositions. However, the mechanisms driving differences in foliar N isotopic composition (δ15N) are still unresolved. Current understanding of foliar δ 15N suggests these values primarily represent the integration of the soil water solution δ15N, direct foliar uptake of atmospheric reactive N, within-plant fractionations, and fractionation due to the fungus to root transfer in mycorrhizae. In this study, we investigated the influence of direct foliar uptake, soil solution δ 15N, and mycorrhizae on foliar δ15N in seedlings of two dominant Northeastern tree species, red maple (Acer rubrum) and red oak (Quercus rubra), along an N deposition gradient in New York State. Using a potted plant mesocosm system, we compared foliar δ15N values directly to soil solution δ15N values while controlling for mycorrhizal associations. Both species showed higher foliar δ15N when exposed to fractionation by mycorrhizal associations. Overall, A. rubrum showed higher foliar δ15N than Q. rubra across all sites. In both species, patterns of foliar δ15N values were coupled with soil solution δ15N values across the N deposition gradient. Additionally, increasing atmospheric N deposition was correlated with higher foliar δ15N values in Q. rubra, but not in A. rubrum. Using a mixing model, we estimated that Q. rubra seedlings incorporated up to 7% of their assimilated N via direct foliar uptake of atmospheric N pollution. However, foliar uptake was not detectable in A. rubrum seedlings. Results

  1. Disequilibrium Carbon, Oxygen, and Nitrogen Chemistry in the Atmospheres of HD 189733b and HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, Julianne I; Fortney, Jonathan J; Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K; Griffith, Caitlin A; Shabram, Megan; Friedson, A James; Marley, Mark S; Freedman, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    We have developed 1-D photochemical and thermochemical kinetics and diffusion models for the transiting exoplanets HD 189733b and HD 209458b to study the effects of disequilibrium chemistry on the atmospheric composition of "hot Jupiters." Here we investigate the coupled chemistry of neutral carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen species, and we compare the model results with existing transit and eclipse observations. We find that the vertical profiles of molecular constituents are significantly affected by transport-induced quenching and photochemistry, particularly on cooler HD 189733b; however, the warmer stratospheric temperatures on HD 209458b can help maintain thermochemical equilibrium and reduce the effects of disequilibrium chemistry. For both planets, the methane and ammonia mole fractions are found to be enhanced over their equilibrium values at pressures of a few bar to less than a mbar due to transport-induced quenching, but CH$_4$ and NH$_3$ are photochemically removed at higher altitudes. Atomi...

  2. Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Seo

    Full Text Available The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ, elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air, to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in

  3. Development of a low-cost atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet and its characteristics in air and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Tarek M.; Ahmed, Kamal M.; Abouelatta, Mohamed A.; Ward, Sayed A.; Lashin, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Hanaa M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the development of a low-cost atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet (ANPJ) which was designed and operated previously in our laboratory. The purpose of the developed design with a small size less than 4% of the previous volume is to obtain a more portable device which holds promise for various fields of applications. The discharge is operated separately with compressed air and nitrogen gas with flow rates varied within the range of 3-18 L/min. The plasma plume length and thickness are measured as a function of the gas flow rate and input voltage Vinput within the range of 3-18 L/min and 2-6 kV respectively. The results showed that for nitrogen gas, the maximum values of the plume length and thickness are 20 mm and 1.3 mm respectively at a flow rate of 12 L/min and Vinput = 6 kV. Results of electrical characterization at Vinput = 6 kV such as discharge voltage, discharge current, the mean consumed power and energy showed that the maximum values of these parameters are obtained at a flow rate of 12 L/min. The developed design is found to be saving up to 65.47% and 68.54% of the consumed power compared to the previous design in the case of air and N2 respectively. The new proposed configuration for the developed ANPJ offers more suitable characteristics than the earlier designs, especially for nitrogen gas.

  4. A Comparison of Process-Scale Modeling and Measurements of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. A.; Helmig, D.; Kramer, L. J.; Doskey, P. V.; Van Dam, B. A.; Seok, B.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate NOx surface exchange, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we use a 1-D process-scale model to evaluate measurements of NOxin and above the snowpack during March-May 2009 at Summit, Greenland. The model is based upon the processes previously presented in the snowpack chemistry and physics model, MISTRA-SNOW, which represents snow grains as spheres with surfaces uniformly coated by an aqueous phase. Modeled profiles of NO, NO2, and O3 up to ~ 2 meters deep into the snowpack for March-May 2009 have been compared to measured profiles and will be presented. During the March-May time period at Summit, low irradiances are observed during March, diurnal irradiance profiles are observed during April, and the sun never sets in May. The model results suggest a key chemical pathway for the formation of NO2 during "nighttime" that was previously unexplained. In addition, modeled 24-hour NOx fluxes are compared to measured NOx fluxes from a MET tower at Summit. Modeled fluxes of NOx in April 2009 are the same order of magnitude as the measurements; however, modeled fluxes of NOx deviate up to one order of magnitude from measurements in May 2009. A detailed analysis of the modeled/measured flux comparison will be presented.

  5. Feasibility of VHE gamma ray detection by an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes using the fluorescence technique

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, J L; Arqueros, F; López, M; Barrio, J A; Nievas, M

    2015-01-01

    The last 20 years have seen the development of new techniques in Astroparticle Physics providing access to the highest end of the electromagnetic spectrum. It has been shown that some sources emit photons up to energies close to 100 TeV. Yet the fluxes of these photons are incredibly low and new detection techniques are needed to go higher in energy. A new technique that would use the new generation of Cherenkov Telescopes, i.e., the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), is proposed to push further the energy frontier. It is based on the detection of the fluorescence radiation emitted in extensive air showers, a successful method used in ultra-high-energy cosmic ray experiments, like the Pierre Auger Observatory. It would complement the standard imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique with only minor modifications of the hardware currently being developed for the CTA and would not imply significant extra costs during its planned operation.

  6. Investigation of potential interferences in the detection of atmospheric ROx radicals by laser-induced fluorescence under dark conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Tan, Zhaofeng; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Broch, Sebastian; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Holland, Frank; Künstler, Christopher; Gomm, Sebastian; Rohrer, Franz; Schrade, Stephanie; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Direct detection of highly reactive, atmospheric hydroxyl radicals (OH) is widely accomplished by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instruments. The technique is also suitable for the indirect measurement of HO2 and RO2 peroxy radicals by chemical conversion to OH. It requires sampling of ambient air into a low-pressure cell, where OH fluorescence is detected after excitation by 308 nm laser radiation. Although the residence time of air inside the fluorescence cell is typically only on the order of milliseconds, there is potential that additional OH is internally produced, which would artificially increase the measured OH concentration. Here, we present experimental studies investigating potential interferences in the detection of OH and peroxy radicals for the LIF instruments of Forschungszentrum Jülich for nighttime conditions. For laboratory experiments, the inlet of the instrument was over flowed by excess synthetic air containing one or more reactants. In order to distinguish between OH produced by reactions upstream of the inlet and artificial signals produced inside the instrument, a chemical titration for OH was applied. Additional experiments were performed in the simulation chamber SAPHIR where simultaneous measurements by an open-path differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) served as reference for OH to quantify potential artifacts in the LIF instrument. Experiments included the investigation of potential interferences related to the nitrate radical (NO3, N2O5), related to the ozonolysis of alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene, 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, α-pinene, limonene, isoprene), and the laser photolysis of acetone. Experiments studying the laser photolysis of acetone yield OH signals in the fluorescence cell, which are equivalent to 0.05 × 106 cm-3 OH for a mixing ratio of 5 ppbv acetone. Under most atmospheric conditions, this interference is negligible. No significant interferences were found for atmospheric concentrations of reactants

  7. Temperature dependence of evaporation coeffcient of water in air and nitrogen under atmospheric pressure; study in water droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Zientara, M; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2008-01-01

    The evaporation coefficients of water in air and nitrogen were found as a function of temperature, by studying the evaporation of pure water droplet. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a climatic chamber maintaining atmospheric pressure. Droplet radius evolution and evaporation dynamics were studied with high precision by analyzing the angle-resolved light scattering Mie interference patterns. A model of quasi-stationary droplet evolution, accounting for the kinetic effects near the droplet surface was applied. In particular, the effect of thermal effusion (a short range analogue of thermal diffusion) was discussed and accounted for. The evaporation coefficient \\alpha in air and in nitrogen were found equal. \\alpha was found to decrease from ~ 0.18 to ~ 0.13 for the temperature range from 273.1 K to 293.1 K and follow the trend given by Arrhenius formula. The agreement with condensation coefficient values obtained with essentially different method by Li et al.[1] was found excellent...

  8. Kinetics of organic molecules in pulsed plasmas of nitrogen or N2/O2 mixtures at near atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, S.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Magne, L.

    2013-12-01

    In plasmas of atmospheric gases, the kinetics of some aliphatic organic molecules belonging to the hydrocarbons (propene, propane), aldehydes (acetaldehyde) and ketones (acetone) families were studied using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma). It was shown that quenchings of N2 metastable states, A\\,^{3}\\Sigma_{u}^{+} and the group of singlets a'\\,^{1}\\Sigma_{u}^{-} , a 1Πg and w 1Δu, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. It plays a fundamental role in the nitrogen plasma, but it is also present in air. At low temperature, the oxidation reactions by the oxygen atom or by the hydroxyl radical are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the nitrogen/organic mixture. For most cases, quenching processes appear purely dissociative. However, recent results obtained for propene lead to the conclusion that a non-dissociative exit route could exist. The quenching of the singlet states induces a break of the double bound C = O for the acetaldehyde and acetone molecules. Some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas, which could be very useful to get a comprehensive understanding of the physico-chemical processes in dielectric barriers or corona discharges used for various applications.

  9. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs.

  10. [Effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application level on absorption and transportation of nutrient elements in oilseed rape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-ming; Zhang, Zhen-hua; Song, Hai-xing; Liu, Qiang; Rong, Xiang-min; Guan, Chun-yun; Zeng, Jing; Yuan, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Effect of elevated atmospheric-CO2 (780 µmol . mol-1) on the absorption and transportation of secondary nutrient elements (calcium, magnesium, sulphur) and micronutrient elements (iron, manganese, zinc, molybdenum and boron) in oilseed rape at the stem elongation stage were studied by greenhouse simulated method. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the content of Zn in stem was increased and the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with no nitrogen (N) application; the contents of Ca, S, B and Zn were increased, and the contents of Mg, Mn, Mo and Fe were decreased under the elevated atmospheric CO2 with N application (0.2 g N . kg-1 soil); except the content of Mo in leaf was increased, the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with two levels of N application. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the amounts of Ca and S relative to the total amount of secondary nutrient elements in stem and the amounts of B and Zn relative to the total amount of micronutrient elements in stem were increased under the elevated-CO2 treatment with both levels of N application, and the corresponding values of Mg, Fe, Mn and Mo were decreased; no-N application treatment increased the proportion of Ca distributed into the leaves, and the proportion of Mg distributed into leaves was increased by the normal-N application level; the proportions of Mn, Zn and Mo distributed into the leaves were increased at both N application levels. Without N application, the elevation of atmospheric CO2 increased the transport coefficients of SFe, Mo and SS,B, but decreased the transport coefficients of SMg,Fe, SMg, Mn and SS,Fe, indicating the proportions of Mo, S transported into the upper part of plant tissues was higher than that of Fe, and the corresponding value of B was higher than that observed for S, the corresponding value of Mg was higher than that of Fe and Mn. Under normal-N application

  11. An improved reagent for determination of aliphatic amines with fluorescence and online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You Jinmao, E-mail: Jmyou6304@163.com [Northwest Plateau Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810001 (China) and Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, College of Chemistry Science, Qufu Normal University, Qufu Shandong, 273165 (China); Song Cuihua; Yan Tao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis, College of Chemistry Science, Qufu Normal University, Qufu Shandong, 273165 (China); Sun Zhiwei [Northwest Plateau Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810001 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li Yulin; Suo Yourui [Northwest Plateau Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xining, 810001 (China)

    2010-01-18

    An improved reagent named 2-[2-(dibenzocarbazole)-ethoxy] ethyl chloroformate (DBCEC-Cl) for the determination of aliphatic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and post-column online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) identification has been developed. DBCEC-Cl could easily and quickly label aliphatic amines. Derivatives were stable enough to be efficiently analyzed by HPLC and showed an intense protonated molecular ion corresponding m/z [M+H]{sup +} under APCI-MS in positive-ion mode. The ratios for fluorescence responses were I{sub DBCEC-amine}/I{sub BCEC-amine} = 1.02-1.60; I{sub DBCEC-amine}/I{sub BCEOC-amine} = 1.30-2.57; and I{sub DBCEC-amine}/I{sub FMOC-amine} = 2.20-4.12 (here, I was relative fluorescence intensity). The ratios for MS responses were IC{sub DBCEC-amine}/IC{sub BCEC-amine} = 4.16-29.31 and IC{sub DBCEC-amine}/IC{sub BCEOC-amine} = 1.23-2.47 (Here, IC: APCI-MS ion current intensity). Detection limits calculated from 0.0244 pmol injection, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, were 0.3-3.0 fmol. The relative standard deviations for within-day determination (n = 6) were 0.045-0.081% for retention time and 0.86-1.03% for peak area for the tested aliphatic amines. The mean intra- and inter-assay precision for all amine levels were <3.64% and 4.67%, respectively. The mean recoveries ranged from 96.9% to 104.7% with their standard deviations in the range of 1.80-2.70 (RSDs%). Excellent linear responses were observed with coefficients of >0.9991.

  12. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel, E-mail: aperez@icmab.es; Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); György, Enikö [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P. O. Box MG 36, 76900 Bucharest V (Romania); Ballesteros, Belén [ICN2—Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-07

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  13. Ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez del Pino, Ángel; György, Enikö; Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Laser irradiation of randomly oriented multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) networks has been carried out using a pulsed Nd:YAG UV laser in nitrogen gas environment. The evolution of the MWCNT morphology and structure as a function of laser fluence and number of accumulated laser pulses has been studied using electron microscopies and Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes are discussed and correlated with thermal simulations. The obtained results indicate that laser irradiation induces very fast, high temperature thermal cycles in MWCNTs which produce the formation of different nanocarbon forms, such as nanodiamonds. Premelting processes have been observed in localized sites by irradiation at low number of laser pulses and low fluence values. The accumulation of laser pulses and the increase in the fluence cause the full melting and amorphization of MWCNTs. The observed structural changes differ from that of conventional high temperature annealing treatments of MWCNTs.

  14. The photosynthesis - leaf nitrogen relationship at ambient and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew G. Peterson; J. Timothy Ball; Yiqi Luo; Christopher B. Field; Peter B. Reich; Peter S. Curtis; Kevin L. Griffin; Carla S Gunderson; Richard J. Norby; David T. Tissue; Manfred Forstreuter; Ana Rey; Christoph S. Vogel; CMEAL collaboration

    1998-09-25

    Estimation of leaf photosynthetic rate (A) from leaf nitrogen content (N) is both conceptually and numerically important in models of plant, ecosystem and biosphere responses to global change. The relationship between A and N has been studied extensively at ambient CO{sub 2} but much less at elevated CO{sub 2}. This study was designed to (1) assess whether the A-N relationship was more similar for species within than between community and vegetation types, and (2) examine how growth at elevated CO{sub 2} affects the A-N relationship. Data were obtained for 39 C{sub 3} species grown at ambient CO{sub 2} and 10 C{sub 3} species grown at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2}. A regression model was applied to each species as well as to species pooled within different community and vegetation types. Cluster analysis of the regression coefficients indicated that species measured at ambient CO{sub 2} did not separate into distinct groups matching community or vegetation type. Instead, most community and vegetation types shared the same general parameter space for regression coefficients. Growth at elevated CO{sub 2} increased photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency for pines and deciduous trees. When species were pooled by vegetation type, the A-N relationship for deciduous trees expressed on a leaf-mass bask was not altered by elevated CO{sub 2}, while the intercept increased for pines. When regression coefficients were averaged to give mean responses for different vegetation types, elevated CO{sub 2} increased the intercept and the slope for deciduous trees but increased only the intercept for pines. There were no statistical differences between the pines and deciduous trees for the effect of CO{sub 2}. Generalizations about the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on the A-N relationship, and differences between pines and deciduous trees will be enhanced as more data become available.

  15. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  16. Spatial variation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and critical loads for aquatic ecosystems in the Greater Yellowstone Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanus, L; McMurray, J A; Clow, D W; Saros, J E; Blett, T; Gurdak, J J

    2017-04-01

    Current and historic atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has impacted aquatic ecosystems in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA). Understanding the spatial variation in total atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) of N is needed to estimate air pollution deposition critical loads for sensitive aquatic ecosystems. This is particularly important for areas that have an increasing contribution of ammonia dry deposition to total N (TN), such as the GYA. High resolution geostatistical models and maps of TN deposition (wet + dry) were developed using a variety of techniques including ordinary kriging in a geographic information system, to evaluate spatial variability and identify areas of elevated loading of pollutants for the GYA. TN deposition estimates in the GYA range from <1.4 to 7.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and show greater variability than wet inorganic N deposition. Critical loads of TN deposition (CLTNdep) for nutrient enrichment in aquatic ecosystems range from less than 1.5 ± 1.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) to over 4.0 ± 1.0 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) and variability is controlled by differences in basin characteristics. The lowest CLTNdep estimates occurred in high elevation basins within GYA Wilderness boundaries. TN deposition maps were used to identify critical load exceedances for aquatic ecosystems. Estimated CLTNdep exceedances for the GYA range from 17% to 48% depending on the surface water nitrate (NO3(-)) threshold. Based on a NO3(-) threshold of 1.0 μmol L(-1), TN deposition exceeds CLTNdep in approximately 30% of the GYA. These predictive models and maps can be used to help identify and protect sensitive ecosystems that may be impacted by excess atmospheric N deposition.

  17. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased nitrogen deposition on growth and chemical composition of ombrotrophic Sphagnum balticum and oligo-mesotrophic Sphagnum papillosum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heijden, E; Jauhiainen, J; Silvola, J; Vasander, H; Kuiper, PJC

    2000-01-01

    The ombrotrophic Sphagnum balticum (Russ.) C. Jens. and the oligo-mesotrophic Sphagnum papillosum Lindb. were grown at ambient (360 mu l l(-1)) and at elevated (720 mu l l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentrations and at different nitrogen deposition rates, varying between 0 and 30kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), The

  18. Formation of Biphasic State in Vacuum-Arc Coatings Obtained by Evaporation of Ti-Al-Zr-Nb-Y Alloy in the Atmosphere of Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Beresnev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By means of X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and indentation methods, the effect of nitrogen atmosphere pressure on composition, structure and hardness of vacuum-arc (Ti-Al-Zr-Nb-YN coatings during the deposition process has been studied. The two-phase state of the coating with solid-solution metal component (bcc lattice and nitride phase (fcc lattice have been formed. Increasing the pressure of nitrogen atmosphere leads to the increase of nitrogen component in the coating as well as to increase of the ordering regions size, allowing to achieve the hardness of H = 49 GPa at a pressure of P = 0.5 Pa.

  19. The quenching effect of hydrogen on the nitrogen in metastable state in atmospheric-pressure N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} microwave plasma torch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shou-Zhe, E-mail: lisz@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Jialiang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Yong-Xing [College of Electrical Engineering, Dalian 116024 (China); Xia, Guang-Qing [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-07-15

    The atmospheric-pressure microwave N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma torch is generated and diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that a large amount of N atoms and NH radicals are generated in the plasma torch and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band is the strongest over the spectra. The mixture of hydrogen in nitrogen plasma torch causes the morphology of the plasma discharge to change with appearance that the afterglow shrinks greatly and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band decreases with more hydrogen mixed into nitrogen plasma. In atmospheric-pressure microwave-induced plasma torch, the hydrogen imposes a great influence on the characteristics of nitrogen plasma through the quenching effect of the hydrogen on the metastable state of N{sub 2}.

  20. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  1. The catalytic removal of ammonia and nitrogen oxides from spacecabin atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, A. J.; Graham, R. R.; Halligan, J. E.; Bentsen, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations were made on methods for the removal of ammonia and to a lesser extent nitrogen oxides in low concentrations from air. The catalytic oxidation of ammonia was studied over a temperature range of 250 F to 600 F and a concentration range 20 ppm to 500 ppm. Of the catalysts studied, 0.5 percent ruthenium supported on alumina was found to be superior. This material is active at temperatures as low as 250 F and was found to produce much less nitrous oxide than the other two active catalysts, platinum on alumina and Hopcalite. A quantitative design model was developed which will permit the performance of an oxidizer to be calculated. The ruthenium was found to be relatively insensitive to low concentrations of water and to oxygen concentration between 21 percent and 100 percent. Hydrogen sulfide was found to be a poison when injected in relatively large quantities. The adsorption of ammonia by copper sulfate treated silica gel was investigated at temperatures of 72 F and 100 F. A quantitative model was developed for predicting adsorption bed behavior.

  2. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  3. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of pollen as an indicator for atmospheric pollution*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepponi, G.; Lazzeri, P.; Coghe, N.; Bersani, M.; Gottardini, E.; Cristofolini, F.; Clauser, G.; Torboli, A.

    2004-08-01

    The viability of pollen is affected by environmental pollution and its use as a bio-indicator is proposed. Such effects can be observed and quantified by biological tests. However, a more accurate identification of the agents affecting the viability is required in order to validate the biological assay for environmental monitoring. The chemical analysis of pollen is meant to ascertain the existence of a correlation between its reduced biological functions and the presence of pollutants. Moreover, such biological systems act as accumulators and allow the detection and quantification of species present in the environment at low concentrations. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) has been chosen for the investigation due to its high sensitivity, multielement capability and wide dynamic range. Corylus avellana L. (hazel) pollen has been collected in areas with different anthropic impact in the province of Trento, Italy. For the TXRF measurements, a liquid sample is needed, especially if a quantitative analysis is required. In the present work, the analysis after a microwave digestion has been compared with the analysis of a suspension of the pollen samples. In both cases, an internal standard has been used for the quantification. The concentrations of 17 elements ranging from Al to Pb have been determined in 13 samples. Analysis of the suspensions showed to be comparable to that of digested samples in terms of spectral quality, but the latter preparation method gave better reproducibility. Sub-ppm lowest limits of detection were obtained for iron and heavier elements detected.

  4. Assessing atmospheric nitrogen deposition to natural and semi-natural ecosystems – experience from Danish studies using the DAMOS system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Ole; Geels, Camilla; Frohn, Lise

    2013-01-01

    and ammonium (reaction products of nitrogen oxides and ammonia), but also dry deposition of other reactive nitrogen compounds (mainly nitrogen oxides in the form of gas phase nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide). In Denmark's environmental management of the sensitive terrestrial ecosystems modelling tools...

  5. One-pot synthesis of highly greenish-yellow fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots for pyrophosphate sensing via competitive coordination with Eu(3+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Zhao, Tingting; Jiang, Yaqi; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) with greenish-yellow emission and quantum yield of 13.2% have been synthesized via a one-pot hydrothermal method. The obtained N-GQDs displayed excellent optical properties, high photostability and resistance to strong ion strength. Based on the higher affinity of pyrophosphate (PPi) than carboxyl and amido groups on the surface of the N-GQDs to Eu(3+), a Eu(3+)-modulated N-GQD off-on fluorescent probe for PPi detection was constructed with a detection limit of 0.074 μM. The detection process was simple in design, easy to operate, and showed a highly selective response to PPi in the presence of co-existing anions. This work widens the applications of N-GQDs with versatile functionality and reactivity in clinical diagnostics and as biosensors.

  6. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Martino, J. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2010-01-01

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perforin calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by Cosmic rays of above 10(18) eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group O

  7. Dynamics of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in a temperate calcareous forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morier, Isabelle; Guenat, Claire; Siegwolf, Rolf; Védy, Jean-Claude; Schleppi, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In temperate forest ecosystems, soil acts as a major sink for atmospheric N deposition. A (15)N labeling experiment in a hardwood forest on calcareous fluvisol was performed to study the processes involved. Low amounts of ammonium ((15)NH(4)(+)) or nitrate ((15)NO(3)(-)) were added to small plots. Soil samples were taken after periods ranging from 1 h to 1 yr. After 1 d, the litter layer retained approximately 28% of the (15)NH(4)(+) tracer and 19% of (15)NO(3)(-). The major fraction of deposited N went through the litter layer to reach the soil within the first hours following the tracer application. During the first day, a decrease in extractable (15)N in the soil was observed ((15)NH(4)(+): 50 to 5%; (15)NO(3)(-): 60 to 12%). During the same time, the amount of microbial (15)N remained almost constant and the (15)N immobilized in the soil (i.e., total (15)N recovered in the bulk soil minus extractable (15)N minus microbial (15)N) also decreased. Such results can therefore be understood as a net loss of (15)N from the soil. Such N loss is probably explained by NO(3)(-) leaching, which is enhanced by the well-developed soil structure. We presume that the N immobilization mainly occurs as an incorporation of deposited N into the soil organic matter. One year after the (15)N addition, recovery rates were similar and approximately three-quarters of the deposited N was recovered in the soil. We conclude that the processes relevant for the fate of atmospherically deposited N take place rapidly and that N recycling within the microbes-plants-soil organic matter (SOM) system prevents further losses in the long term.

  8. Solid-phase synthesis of highly fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for sensitive and selective probing ferric ions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijuan; Chen, Yonglei; Liang, Meijuan; Xu, Laifang; Qi, Shengda; Chen, Hongli; Chen, Xingguo

    2014-10-07

    Carbon quantum dots (C-Dots) have drawn extensive attention in recent years due to their stable physicochemical and photochemical properties. However, the development of nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-doped C-Dots) is still on its early stage. In this paper, a facile and high-output solid-phase synthesis approach was proposed for the fabrication of N-doped, highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots. The obtained N-doped C-Dots exhibited a strong blue emission with an absolute quantum yield (QY) of up to 31%, owing to fluorescence enhancement effect of introduced N atoms into carbon dots. The strong coordination of oxygen-rich groups on N-doped C-Dots to Fe(3+) caused fluorescence quenching via nonradiative electron-transfer, leading to the quantitative detection of Fe(3+). The probe exhibited a wide linear response concentration range (0.01-500 μM) to Fe(3+) with a detection limit of 2.5 nM. Significantly, the N-doped C-Dots possess negligible cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility, and high photostability. All these features are favorable for label-free monitoring of Fe(3+) in complex biological samples. It was then successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of intracellular Fe(3+). As an efficient chemosensor, the N-doped C-Dots hold great promise to broaden applications in biological systems.

  9. Changes in susceptibility of beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings towards Phytophthora citricola under the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, F; Raidl, S; Osswald, W F

    2010-04-01

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts changes in susceptibility of plants against herbivores with changing resource availability. In the presented study we tested the validity of the GDBH for trees infected with a root pathogen. For this purpose Fagus sylvatica seedlings grown under different atmospheric CO(2)- and soil nitrogen regimes were infected with the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola. High nitrogen supply increased total biomass of beech regardless of the CO(2)-treatment, whereas elevated CO(2) enhanced biomass only in the high nitrogen treatment. The responses of beech under the different growing regimes to the Phytophthora root infection were not in line with the predictions of the GDBH. Enhanced susceptibility of beech against P. citricola was found in seedlings grown under elevated CO(2) and low nitrogen supply. Fifteen months after inoculation these plants were characterized by enhanced water use efficiency, by altered root-shoot ratios, and by enhanced specific root tip densities.

  10. Catchment-mediated atmospheric nitrogen deposition drives ecological change in two alpine lakes in SE Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhujun; Anderson, Nicholas John; Yang, Xiangdong; McGowan, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    The south-east margin of Tibet is highly sensitive to global environmental change pressures, in particular, high contemporary reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition rates (ca. 40 kg ha(-1)  yr(-1) ), but the extent and timescale of recent ecological change is not well prescribed. Multiproxy analyses (diatoms, pigments and geochemistry) of (210) Pb-dated sediment cores from two alpine lakes in Sichuan were used to assess whether they have undergone ecological change comparable to those in Europe and North America over the last two centuries. The study lakes have contrasting catchment-to-lake ratios and vegetation cover: Shade Co has a relatively larger catchment and denser alpine shrub than Moon Lake. Both lakes exhibited unambiguous increasing production since the late 19th to early 20th. Principle component analysis was used to summarize the trends of diatom and pigment data after the little ice age (LIA). There was strong linear change in biological proxies at both lakes, which were not consistent with regional temperature, suggesting that climate is not the primary driver of ecological change. The multiproxy analysis indicated an indirect ecological response to Nr deposition at Shade Co mediated through catchment processes since ca. 1930, while ecological change at Moon Lake started earlier (ca. 1880) and was more directly related to Nr deposition (depleted δ(15) N). The only pronounced climate effect was evidenced by changes during the LIA when photoautotrophic groups shifted dramatically at Shade Co (a 4-fold increase in lutein concentration) and planktonic diatom abundance declined at both sites because of longer ice cover. The substantial increases in aquatic production over the last ca. 100 years required a substantial nutrient subsidy and the geochemical data point to a major role for Nr deposition although dust cannot be excluded. The study also highlights the importance of lake and catchment morphology for determining the response of alpine lakes to

  11. Bulk deposition of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen in mountainous heathland ecosystems in North-Western Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Fernández, Javier; Marcos, Elena; Calvo, Leonor

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has been identified as one of the main traits of terrestrial ecosystems, affecting their structure and functioning. However, few studies have been developed under natural field conditions to evaluate the amount of N deposition in low nutrient status heathland ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment was carried out to investigate the bulk inorganic N inputs in mountainous heathlands of North-Western Spain. Two study sites (La Majúa and San Isidro) were selected on the south side of the Cantabrian Mountains, as a representative monitoring of N-sensitive ecosystems. Three replicated bulk collectors and one rain gauge were installed at each study site to collect monthly bulk deposition samples over three-year period (2011-2014). Bulk inorganic N deposition was different between the study sites (2.81 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 in La Majúa and 4.56 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 in San Isidro), but showed the same seasonal dynamic, with higher N deposition rate in the wet period (October to April) compared to the dry period (May to September). Annual bulk NO3- deposition was comparable to annual bulk NH4+ deposition in La Majúa (1.42 vs. 1.39 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1), and higher in San Isidro (2.89 vs. 1.67 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1). San Isidro displayed a characteristic bulk NH4+/NO3- deposition ratio below 1 of industrialized areas (0.58), while La Majúa displayed a bulk NH4+/NO3- deposition ratio close to 1 (0.98), distinctive of an intermediate situation between industrialized and agricultural areas. Total bulk inorganic N depositions observed in the present field study are consistent with the modelled estimation of N depositions for North-Western Spain, but only San Isidro was consistent with the estimated dominance of oxidized N over reduced N.

  12. Sustained effects of atmospheric [CO2] and nitrogen availability on forest soil CO2 efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, A Christopher; Palmroth, Sari; Johnsen, Kurt H; McCarthy, Heather R; Oren, Ram

    2014-04-01

    Soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil ) is the largest source of carbon from forests and reflects primary productivity as well as how carbon is allocated within forest ecosystems. Through early stages of stand development, both elevated [CO2] and availability of soil nitrogen (N; sum of mineralization, deposition, and fixation) have been shown to increase gross primary productivity, but the long-term effects of these factors on Fsoil are less clear. Expanding on previous studies at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, we quantified the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil using daily measurements from automated chambers over 10 years. Consistent with previous results, compared to ambient unfertilized plots, annual Fsoil increased under elevated [CO2] (ca. 17%) and decreased with N (ca. 21%). N fertilization under elevated [CO2] reduced Fsoil to values similar to untreated plots. Over the study period, base respiration rates increased with leaf productivity, but declined after productivity saturated. Despite treatment-induced differences in aboveground biomass, soil temperature and water content were similar among treatments. Interannually, low soil water content decreased annual Fsoil from potential values - estimated based on temperature alone assuming nonlimiting soil water content - by ca. 0.7% per 1.0% reduction in relative extractable water. This effect was only slightly ameliorated by elevated [CO2]. Variability in soil N availability among plots accounted for the spatial variability in Fsoil , showing a decrease of ca. 114 g C m(-2) yr(-1) per 1 g m(-2) increase in soil N availability, with consistently higher Fsoil in elevated [CO2] plots ca. 127 g C per 100 ppm [CO2] over the +200 ppm enrichment. Altogether, reflecting increased belowground carbon partitioning in response to greater plant nutritional needs, the effects of elevated [CO2] and N fertilization on Fsoil in this stand are sustained beyond the early stages of stand development and

  13. Measurement and Modeling of Site-specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global mixing ratios of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, have increased nearly linearly from the beginning of the modern industrial period to today, with the current global average in excess of 325 ppb. This increase can be largely attributed to anthropogenic activity above the level of N2O emissions from natural biotic sources. The effect of N2O on Earth's climate is twofold: in the troposphere, N2O is radiatively active and chemically inert, while it serves as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. The marked altitudinal divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on Earth's climate. However, the understanding of the total impact of N2O is incomplete, as there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. Due to unique isotopic substitutions (15N and 18O) made by different N2O sources and stratospheric chemical reactions, the measurement of N2O isotopic ratios in ambient air can help identify the distribution and magnitude of distinct source types. We present the first year of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the MIT Stheno-tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) instrument at Mace Head, Ireland. Aided by the Stheno preconcentration system, Stheno-TILDAS can achieve measurement precisions of 0.10‰ or greater for all isotopic ratios (δ15N and δ18O) in ambient N2O. We further compare these data to the results from Model for Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) simulations, including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and MERRA/GEOS-5 reanalysis meteorological fields. These results will form the basis of future Bayesian inverse modeling simulations that will constrain global N2O source, circulation, and sink dynamics better.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma CVD of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) Films Using Triethylsilane and Nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan Guruvenket; Steven Andrie; Mark Simon; Kyle W. Johnson; Robert A. Sailer

    2011-10-04

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor (AP-PECVD) deposition using the Surfx Atomflow{trademark} 250D APPJ source with triethylsilane (HSiEt{sub 3}, TES) and nitrogen as the precursor and the reactive gases, respectively. The effect of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the growth characteristics and the properties of a-SiCN:H films was evaluated. The properties of the films were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphological analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chemical and compositional analyses; spectroscopic ellipsometry for optical properties and thickness determination and nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the a-SiCN:H films. Films deposited at low T{sub s} depict organic like features, while the films deposited at high T{sub s} depict ceramic like features. FTIR and XPS studies reveal that an increases in T{sub s} helps in the elimination of organic moieties and incorporation of nitrogen in the film. Films deposited at T{sub s} of 425 C have an index of refraction (n) of 1.84 and hardness (H) of 14.8 GPa. A decrease in the deposition rate between T{sub s} of 25 and 250 C and increase in deposition rate between T{sub s} of 250 and 425 C indicate that the growth of a-SiCN:H films at lower T{sub s} are surface reaction controlled, while at high temperatures film growth is mass-transport controlled. Based on the experimental results, a potential route for film growth is proposed.

  15. Dual stable isotopic analysis of nitrogen and oxygen to evaluate sources and sinks of atmospheric anthropogenic nitrate in the Colorado Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Allen, E. B.; Sickman, J. O.

    2010-12-01

    Industrial, automotive, and agricultural emissions release nitrogen into the atmosphere which is subsequently deposited to the surrounding terrestrial ecosystem. The Colorado Desert is impacted by nitrogen deposition from the west due to inputs from the Los Angeles air basin as well as nearby sources from agriculture in the Coachella Valley (CV). Current research within the Colorado Desert has demonstrated that anthropogenic N deposition contributes to the increased biomass of exotic invasive grasses, which compete with native species and can create enough biomass to carry fire in areas of high deposition. To measure the anthropogenic nitrogen within the CV, an array of passive air samplers was erected spanning the valley from west to east. Each sampler contained filters to passively collect both nitric acid and ammonia ions. To evaluate the degree to which the local ecosystem is supplemented by atmospheric N and determine how nitrogen pools are transformed, surface soil and leaf tissue of the dominant shrub, Larrea tridentata, were collected at each site. Only nitrate data from the samplers has currently been analyzed. δ15N, δ17O, and δ18O were obtained from atmospheric and 1M KCl soil extracts using dual isotopic analysis of NO3-. δ15N of vegetation was obtained through combustion of dried leaf tissue. The highest concentrations of atmospheric nitrate are located on the western edge of the desert in the direction toward Los Angeles, and there is also high nitrate near the Salton Sea. The isoscape produced by the isotopic analysis provides a map further describing how NO3- molecules are moving through the desert. This map shows which sources are influencing deposition sinks across the valley. Soil concentrations of nitrogen increase along the same gradient and have an inverse relationship with δ15N. Plant tissue is also less enriched in δ15N at high deposition sites, which correlates with soil values and may be caused by increased fractionation of nitrogen

  16. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of antifungal effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itooka, Koki; Takahashi, Kazuo; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-11-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) has potential to be utilized as an alternative method for sterilization in food industries without thermal damage or toxic residues. In contrast to the bactericidal effects of CAP, information regarding the efficacy of CAP against eukaryotic microorganisms is very limited. Therefore, herein we investigated the effects of CAP on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a focus on the cellular response to CAP. The CAP treatment caused oxidative stress responses including the nuclear accumulation of the oxidative stress responsive transcription factor Yap1, mitochondrial fragmentation, and enhanced intracellular oxidation. Yeast cells also induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes and formation of Hsp104 aggregates when treated with CAP, suggesting that CAP denatures proteins. As phenomena unique to eukaryotic cells, the formation of cytoplasmic mRNP granules such as processing bodies and stress granules and changes in the intracellular localization of Ire1 were caused by the treatment with CAP, indicating that translational repression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were induced by the CAP treatment. These results suggest that the fungicidal effects of CAP are attributed to the multiple severe stresses.

  17. Response of stable carbon isotope in epilithic mosses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xueyan, E-mail: liuxueyan@vip.skleg.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Xiao Huayun; Liu Congqiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Li Youyi; Xiao Hongwei; Wang Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550002 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquanlu, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Epilithic mosses are characterized by insulation from substratum N and hence meet their N demand only by deposited N. This study investigated tissue C, total Chl and delta{sup 13}C of epilithic mosses along 2 transects across Guiyang urban (SW China), aiming at testing their responses to N deposition. Tissue C and total Chl decreased from the urban to rural, but delta{sup 13}C{sub moss} became less negative. With measurements of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and delta{sup 13}CO{sub 2}, elevated N deposition was inferred as a primary factor for changes in moss C and isotopic signatures. Correlations between total Chl, tissue C and N signals indicated a nutritional effect on C fixation of epilithic mosses, but the response of delta{sup 13}C{sub moss} to N deposition could not be clearly differentiated from effects of other factors. Collective evidences suggest that C signals of epilithic mosses are useful proxies for N deposition but further works on physiological mechanisms are still needed. - Photosynthetic {sup 13}C discrimination of bryophytes might increase with elevated N deposition.

  18. Modelling the effects of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen deposition on selected lakes and streams of the Central Alps (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic model MAGIC was calibrated and applied to selected sites in north-western Italy (3 rivers, 10 alpine lakes to predict the future response of surface water to different scenarios of atmospheric deposition of S and N compounds. Results at the study sites suggest that several factors other than atmospheric deposition may influence the long-term changes in surface water chemistry. At present the lumped approach of dynamic models such as MAGIC cannot represent all the processes occurring at the catchment scale. Climate warming in particular and its effects on surface water chemistry proved to be important in the study area. Furthermore the river catchments considered here showed clear signs of N saturation. This condition and the increasing concentrations of NO3 in river water were simulated using N dynamics recently included in MAGIC. The modelling performed in this study represents the first application of MAGIC to Italian sites. The results show that inclusion of other factors specific to the Mediterranean area, such as dust deposition and climate change, may improve the fit to observed data and the reliability of the model forecast. Despite these limitations, the model captured well the main trends in chemical data in both rivers and lakes. The outputs clearly demonstrate the benefits of achieving the emission reductions in both S and N compounds as agreed under the Gothenburg Protocol rather than making no further emission reductions. It was also clear that, besides the substantial reduction of SO4 deposition from the peak levels of the 1980s, N deposition must also be reduced in the near future to protect freshwaters from further acidification. Keywords: MAGIC, northern Italy, acidification, recovery, nitrogen saturation

  19. Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of carbon dioxide, ozone, and nitrogen oxides at a hardwood forest site in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Seok

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Snowpack-atmosphere gas exchanges of CO2, O3, and NOx (NO + NO2 were investigated at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS, a mid-latitude, low elevation hardwood forest site, during the 2007–2008 winter season. An automated trace gas sampling system was used to determine trace gas concentrations in the snowpack at multiple depths continuously throughout the snow-covered period from two adjacent plots. One natural plot and one with the soil covered by a Tedlar sheet were setup for investigating whether the primary source of measured trace gases was biogenic (i.e., from the soil or non-biogenic (i.e., from the snowpack. The results were compared with the “White on Green” study conducted at the Niwot Ridge (NWT Long Term Ecological Research site in Colorado. The average winter CO2 flux ± s.e. from the soil at UMBS was 0.54 ± 0.037 µmol m-2 s-1 using the gradient diffusion method and 0.71 ± 0.012 µmol m-2 s-1 using the eddy covariance method, and in a similar range as found for NWT. Observed snowpack-O3 exchange was also similar to NWT. However, nitrogen oxides (NOx fluxes from snow at UMBS were 10 times smaller than those at NWT, and fluxes were bi-directional with the direction of the flux dependent on NOx concentrations in ambient air. The compensation point for the change in the direction of NOx flux was estimated to be 0.92 nmol mol-1. NOx in snow also showed diurnal dependency on incident radiation. These NOx dynamics in the snow at UMBS were notably different compared to NWT, and primarily determined by snow-atmosphere interactions rather than by soil NOx emissions.

  20. Changes in fungal community composition in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization varies with soil horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F Weber

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 and rates of nitrogen (N-deposition to forest ecosystems are predicted to alter the structure and function of soil fungal communities, but the spatially heterogeneous distribution of soil fungi has hampered investigations aimed at understanding such impacts. We hypothesized that soil physical and chemical properties and fungal community composition would be differentially impacted by elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2 and N-fertilization in spatially separated field samples, in the forest floor, 0-2 cm, 2-5 cm and 5-10 cm depth intervals in a loblolly pine Free-Air-Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE experiment. In all soils, quantitative PCR-based estimates of fungal biomass were highest in the forest floor. Fungal richness, based on pyrosequencing of the fungal ribosomal large subunit gene, increased in response to N-fertilization in 0-2 cm and forest floor intervals. Composition shifted in forest floor, 0-2 cm and 2-5 cm intervals in response to N-fertilization, but the shift was most distinct in the 0-2 cm interval, in which the largest number of statistically significant changes in soil chemical parameters (i.e phosphorus, organic matter, calcium, pH was also observed. In the 0-2 cm interval, increased recovery of sequences from the Thelephoraceae, Tricholomataceae, Hypocreaceae, Clavicipitaceae, and Herpotrichiellaceae families and decreased recovery of sequences from the Amanitaceae correlated with N-fertilization. In this same depth interval, Amanitaceae, Tricholomataceae and Herpotriciellaceae sequences were recovered less frequently from soils exposed to eCO2 relative to ambient conditions. These results demonstrated that vertical stratification should be taken into consideration in future efforts to elucidate environmental impacts on fungal communities and their feedbacks on ecosystem processes.

  1. Prediction of BOD, COD, and Total Nitrogen Concentrations in a Typical Urban River Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix with PARAFAC and UV Absorption Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a real-time monitoring tool for the estimation of water quality is essential for efficient management of river pollution in urban areas. The Gap River in Korea is a typical urban river, which is affected by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP and various anthropogenic activities. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC and UV absorption values at 220 nm and 254 nm were applied to evaluate the estimation capabilities for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD, and total nitrogen (TN concentrations of the river samples. Three components were successfully identified by the PARAFAC modeling from the fluorescence EEM data, in which each fluorophore group represents microbial humic-like (C1, terrestrial humic-like organic substances (C2, and protein-like organic substances (C3, and UV absorption indices (UV220 and UV254, and the score values of the three PARAFAC components were selected as the estimation parameters for the nitrogen and the organic pollution of the river samples. Among the selected indices, UV220, C3 and C1 exhibited the highest correlation coefficients with BOD, COD, and TN concentrations, respectively. Multiple regression analysis using UV220 and C3 demonstrated the enhancement of the prediction capability for TN.

  2. Prediction of BOD, COD, and total nitrogen concentrations in a typical urban river using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix with PARAFAC and UV absorption indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jin; Cho, Jinwoo

    2012-01-01

    The development of a real-time monitoring tool for the estimation of water quality is essential for efficient management of river pollution in urban areas. The Gap River in Korea is a typical urban river, which is affected by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and various anthropogenic activities. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM) with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and UV absorption values at 220 nm and 254 nm were applied to evaluate the estimation capabilities for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations of the river samples. Three components were successfully identified by the PARAFAC modeling from the fluorescence EEM data, in which each fluorophore group represents microbial humic-like (C1), terrestrial humic-like organic substances (C2), and protein-like organic substances (C3), and UV absorption indices (UV(220) and UV(254)), and the score values of the three PARAFAC components were selected as the estimation parameters for the nitrogen and the organic pollution of the river samples. Among the selected indices, UV(220), C3 and C1 exhibited the highest correlation coefficients with BOD, COD, and TN concentrations, respectively. Multiple regression analysis using UV(220) and C3 demonstrated the enhancement of the prediction capability for TN.

  3. Transport and deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxian

    Tropospheric ozone is an important photochemical air pollutant, which increases respiratory-related diseases, decreases crop yields, and causes other environmental problems. This research has focused on the measurement of soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide (NO), one of the precursors for ozone formation, from intensively managed soils in the Southeast US, and examined the transport and deposition of NOx (NO + NO2) and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer, and the effects of NO emissions and its chemical reactions on ozone flux and deposition to the earth's surface. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured from an intensively managed agricultural soil, in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina (near Plymouth, NC), using a dynamic chamber technique. Measurements of soil NO emissions in several crop canopies were conducted at four different sites in North Carolina during late spring and summer of 1994-1996. The turbulent fluxes of NO2 and O3 at 5 m and 10 m above the ground were measured using the eddy-correlation technique near Plymouth, NC during late spring of 1995 and summer of 1996, concurrent with measurements of soil NO emissions using the dynamic chamber system. Soil NO emission from within the corn field was high averaging approximately 35 ng N/m2/s during the measurement period of 1995. In another study, vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610 m tall tower located 15 km Southeast of Raleigh, NC during the summers of 1993-1997, as part of an effort by the State of North Carolina to develop a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. A strong correlation was observed between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations in the residual layer (CR) above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (C o max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, an empirical regression equation (Co max = 27.67*exp(0.016 CR)) was developed for predicting maximum ground level ozone

  4. Modeled subalpine plant community response to climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, T C; Belyazid, S; Sullivan, T J; Sverdrup, H; Bowman, W D; Porter, E M

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate potential long-term effects of climate change and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on subalpine ecosystems, the coupled biogeochemical and vegetation community competition model ForSAFE-Veg was applied to a site at the Loch Vale watershed of Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Changes in climate and N deposition since 1900 resulted in pronounced changes in simulated plant species cover as compared with ambient and estimated future community composition. The estimated critical load (CL) of N deposition to protect against an average future (2010-2100) change in biodiversity of 10% was between 1.9 and 3.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1). Results suggest that the CL has been exceeded and vegetation at the study site has already undergone a change of more than 10% as a result of N deposition. Future increases in air temperature are forecast to cause further changes in plant community composition, exacerbating changes in response to N deposition alone.

  5. Monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy using two different light paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Yasuaki; Yoshii, Yotsumi; Takahashi, Kenshi; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of the local distribution of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) by long-path pulsed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-PDOAS) in Tokyo during August 2008 are presented. Two LP-PDOAS systems simultaneously measured average NO(2) temporal mixing ratios along two different paths from a single observation point. Two flashing aviation obstruction lights, located 7.0 km north and 6.3 km east from the observation point, were used as light sources, allowing spatiotemporal variations of NO(2) in Tokyo to be inferred. The LP-PDOAS data were compared with ground-based data measured using chemiluminescence. Surface wind data indicated that large inhomogeneities were present in the spatial NO(2) distributions under southerly wind conditions, while northerly wind conditions displayed greater homogeneity between the two systems. The higher correlation in the NO(2) mixing ratio between the two LP-PDOAS systems was observed under northerly wind conditions with a correlation factor R(2) = 0.88. We demonstrated that the combined deployment of two LP-PDOAS systems oriented in different directions provides detailed information on the spatial distribution of NO(2).

  6. Rich soil carbon and nitrogen but low atmospheric greenhouse gas fluxes from North Sulawesi mangrove swamps in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang C; Ulumuddin, Yaya I; Pramudji, Sastro; Chen, Shun Y; Chen, Bin; Ye, Yong; Ou, Dan Y; Ma, Zhi Y; Huang, Hao; Wang, Jing K

    2014-07-15

    The soil to atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases N2O, CH4 and CO2 and their relationships with soil characteristics were investigated in three tropical oceanic mangrove swamps (Teremaal, Likupang and Kema) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Mangrove soils in North Sulawesi were rich in organic carbon and nitrogen, but the greenhouse gas fluxes were low in these mangroves. The fluxes ranged -6.05-13.14 μmol m(-2)h(-1), -0.35-0.61 μmol m(-2)h(-1) and -1.34-3.88 mmol m(-2)h(-1) for N2O, CH4 and CO2, respectively. The differences in both N2O and CH4 fluxes among different mangrove swamps and among tidal positions in each mangrove swamp were insignificant. CO2 flux was influenced only by mangrove swamps and the value was higher in Kema mangrove. None of the measured soil parameters could explain the variation of CH4 fluxes among the sampling plots. N2O flux was negatively related to porewater salinity, while CO2 flux was negatively correlated with water content and organic carbon. This study suggested that the low gas emissions due to slow metabolisms would lead to the accumulations of organic matters in North Sulawesi mangrove swamps.

  7. Seasonal variability of atmospheric nitrogen oxides and non-methane hydrocarbons at the GEOSummit station, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Kramer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric NOx (NOx = NO + NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN, NOy and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC were taken at the GEOSummit Station, Greenland (72.34° N, 38.29° W, 3212 m.a.s.l from July 2008 to July 2010. The data set represents the first year-round concurrent record of these compounds sampled at a high latitude Arctic site in the free troposphere. Here, the study focused on the seasonal variability of these important ozone (O3 precursors in the Arctic free troposphere and the impact from transported anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions. Our analysis shows that PAN is the dominant NOy species in all seasons at Summit, varying from 49% to 78%, however, we find that odd NOy species (odd NOy = NOy − PAN-NOx contribute a large amount to the total NOy speciation with monthly means of up to 95 pmol mol−1 in the winter and ∼40 pmol mol−1 in the summer, and that the level of odd NOy species at Summit during summer is greater than that of NOx. We hypothesize that the source of this odd NOy is most likely alkyl nitrates from transported pollution, and photochemically produced species such as HNO3 and HONO. FLEXPART retroplume analysis and tracers for anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, were used to identify periods when the site was impacted by polluted air masses. Europe contributed the largest source of anthropogenic emissions during the winter and spring months, with up to 82% of the simulated anthropogenic black carbon originating from this region between December 2009 and March 2010, whereas, North America was the primary source of biomass burning emissions. Polluted air masses were typically aged, with median transport times to the site from the source region of 11 days for anthropogenic events in winter, and 14 days for BB plumes. Overall we find that the transport of polluted air masses to the high altitude Arctic typically resulted in high variability in levels of O3 and O3 precursors. During winter

  8. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  9. Leaf Gas Exchange and Fluorescence of Two Winter Wheat Varieties in Response to Drought Stress and Nitrogen Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiubo; Wang, Lifang; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Water and nitrogen supply are the two primary factors limiting productivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In our study, two winter wheat varieties, Xinong 979 and large-spike wheat, were evaluated for their physiological responses to different levels of nitrogen and water status during their seedling stage grown in a phytotron. Our results indicated that drought stress greatly reduced the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), transpiration rate (E), and stomatal conductance (Gs), but with a greater increase in instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE). At the meantime, the nitrogen (N) supply improved photosynthetic efficiency under water deficit. Parameters inferred from chlorophyll a measurements, i.e., photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), the maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), the quantum yield of photosystemII(ΦPSII), and the apparent photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) decreased under water stress at all nitrogen levels and declined in N-deficient plants. The root–shoot ratio (R/S) increased slightly with water stress at a low N level; the smallest root–shoot ratio was found at a high N level and moderate drought stress treatment. These results suggest that an appropriate nitrogen supply may be necessary to enhance drought resistance in wheat by improving photosynthetic efficiency and relieving photoinhibition under drought stress. However, an excessive N supply had no effect on drought resistance, which even showed an adverse effect on plant growth. Comparing the two cultivars, Xinong 979 has a stronger drought resistance compared with large-spike wheat under N deficiency. PMID:27802318

  10. The camera of the Pierre Auger Observatory Fluorescence Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Bracci, F; Facal, P; Fonte, R; Gallo, G; Kemp, E; Matthiae, Giorgio; Nicotra, D; Privitera, P; Raia, G; Tusi, E; Vitali, G

    2002-01-01

    The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a set of telescopes which measure the fluorescence light emitted by atmospheric nitrogen stimulated by the cosmic-ray showers. The Camera is an array of photomultipliers positioned on the telescope focal surface. We describe the main features of the camera: the hexagonal pixels geometry on the spherical focal surface; the light collectors which complement the photomultipliers; the photomultipliers test.

  11. Properties of nitrogen fertilization are decisive in determining the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the activity of nitrate reductase in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Du, Shaoting

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 is predicted to double by the end of this century. The response of higher plants to an increase in atmospheric CO2 often includes a change in nitrate reductase (NR) activity. In a recent study, we showed that, under elevated CO2 levels, NR induction in low-nitrate plants and NR inhibition in high-nitrate plants are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) generated via nitric oxide synthases. This finding provides an explanation for the diverse responses of plants to elevated CO2 levels, and suggests that the use of nitrogen fertilizers on soil will have a major influence on the nitrogen assimilation capacity of plants in response to CO2 elevation.

  12. Microbial ecology of á-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers along a concentration gradient of dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the San Bernadino Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, F. L.; Fenn, M. E.; Stein, L. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The fate of atmospherically-deposited nitrogen from industrial pollution is of major concern in the montane ecosystems bordering the South Coast California Air Basin. Nitrogen deposition rates in the more exposed regions of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM) are among the highest in North America often exceeding 40 kg ha-1 year-1 in throughfall deposition of nitrate and ammonium (Fenn and Poth, 1999). Forest ecosystems with elevated N deposition generally exhibit elevated accumulation of soil nitrate, leaching and runoff, elevated emissions of nitrogenous gases, increased nitrification, and decreased litter decomposition rates. The role of nitrifying microbial populations, especially those taxonomically associated with the beta-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOB), will provide insight into nitrogen-cycling in these extremely N-saturated environments. Using 16S ribosomal DNA-based molecular techniques (16S rDNA clone library construction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), we are comparing AOB community diversity at 3 different locations along a natural atmospheric N-deposition concentration gradient in the SBM: from high at Camp Paviaka (CP), medium at Strawberry Peak (SP) to low at Dogwood (DW). As observed for wet N-deposition systems on the east coast, we hypothesized a negative correlation between AOB community diversity, abundance and function with nitrogen loading in the dry N deposition system of SBM. Nitrification potentials determined for the 3 sites along the N-deposition gradient were in the order of CP less than SP less than DW. Preliminary results indicate no correlation between diversity of AOB and increased nitrogen loading. Shannon-Weiner diversity indices calculated for ammonia-oxidizer RFLP group units were 2.22, 2.66 and 1.80 for CP, SP and DW, respectively.

  13. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation historical and projected changes

    OpenAIRE

    J.-F. Lamarque; Dentener, F.; Mcconnell, J.; C.-U. Ro; M. Shaw; Vet, R.; D. Bergmann; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; B. Josse; Lee, Y. H.; I. A. MacKenzie; Plummer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice...

  14. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; Mcconnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; M. Shaw; Vet, R.; D. Bergmann; Cameron-Smith, P.; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; B. Josse; Lee, Y. H.; I. A. MacKenzie

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000...

  15. Modification of surface layers of copper under the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepov, M. A.; Akhmadeev, Yu. Kh.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Kolubaeva, Yu. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.

    2011-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam on the surface of copper specimens are presented. The volumetric (diffuse) discharge in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure was initiated by applying high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration to a tubular foil cathode. It has been found that the treatment of a copper surface by this type of discharge increases the hardness of the surface layer due to oxidation.

  16. A new Open Top Chamber designed to test in situ effects of climatic and atmospheric changes on nitrogen fixation in boreal forest floor mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuier, Charline; Bradley, Robert; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Hubert; Lindo, Zoë

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by cyanobacteria dwelling in forest floor moss layers is an important determinant of boreal black spruce forest productivity. Recent studies have suggested that these BNF rates may increase with increasing atmospheric CO2 and increasing temperature, as predicted by current weather models. This potential increase in BNF may be offset, however, by increasing atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, or by increasing demands for phosphorus (i.e. driving nodular ATP content) and for micronutrients such as Mo, Va and Fe (i.e. co-factors of nitrogenase enzyme). In order to study the relative and interactive effects of these factors controlling in situ BNF rates in boreal forest floor moss layers, a new Open Top Chamber (OTC) was developed in summer of 2013. The chambers measure 1.60 cm dia. × 60 cm height, and are equipped with an automated CO2 delivery system designed to maintain atmospheric daytime CO2 concentrations at 800 ppm, as well as buried heating coils that increase soil temperature by 4 ° C for 3 weeks in springtime. These 2 experimental factors are crossed in a full factorial (2 × 2) design that is replicated in 4 complete blocks. Each of the 16 OTCs is divided into 4 compartments, each of which are assigned 1 of 4 sub-plot factors. These include chronic additions of either atmospheric nitrogen, phosphorus, micronutrients or a non-amended control. Staring in summer 2014, a series of measurements will be made to assess the effects of treatments on BNF rates, cyanobacterial colonization and soil nitrogen cycling. Our poster will describe in detail the design and operation of the OTCs, as well as their construction and maintenance costs.

  17. Post effect of repetitive exposures to pressure nitrogen-induced narcosis on the dopaminergic activity at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, C; Weiss, M; Sainty, J M; Risso, J J; Rostain, J C

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen at pressure produces a neurological syndrome called nitrogen narcosis. Neurochemical experiments indicated that a single exposure to 3 MPa of nitrogen reduced the concentration of dopamine by 20% in the striatum, a structure involved in the control of extrapyramidal motor activity. This effect of nitrogen was explained by enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission through GABAA receptors and, to a lesser extent, by a decreased glutamatergic input to DA cells through NMDA receptors. The aim of this study was to study, under normobaric conditions, possible alterations of NMDA receptor activity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) induced by repetitive exposures to nitrogen pressure. Under general anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes and in the SNc with guide cannulae for drug injections. After recovery from surgery, the striatal dopamine level was recorded by voltammetry in freely-moving rats, in normobaric conditions, before and after 5 repetitive exposures to 1MPa of nitrogen (threshold of nitrogen narcosis occurrence in rat). The effect of NMDA receptor activity on DA concentration was investigated using agonist (NMDA) and specific antagonist (AP7) SNc administration. Following repetitive nitrogen exposures, the ability of NMDA to elevate DA concentrations was enhanced. In contrast, after nitrogen exposure AP7 produced a paradoxical increase in DA concentration compared to its inhibitory effect before any exposure. Similar responses were obtained after a single exposure to 3MPa nitrogen. Thus, repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis produced a sensitization of postsynaptic NMDA receptors on DA cells, related to a decreased glutamatergic input in SNc. Consequently, successive nitrogen narcosis exposures disrupted ion-channel receptor activity revealing a persistent nitrogen-induced neurochemical change underlying the pathologic process.

  18. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Hoffman, A. S.

    2016-07-26

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  19. Monitoring of atmospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide over the south of Portugal by ground-based and satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoli, Daniele; Silva, Ana Maria; Costa, Maria João; Domingues, Ana Filipa; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2009-07-20

    The SPATRAM (Spectrometer for Atmospheric TRAcers Monitoring) instrument has been developed as a result of the collaboration between CGE-UE, ISAC-CNR and Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA). SPATRAM is a multi-purpose UV-Vis-scanning spectrometer (250 - 950 nm) and it is installed at the Observatory of the CGE, in Evora, since April 2004. A brief description of the instrument is given, highlighting the technological innovations with respect to the previous version of similar equipment. The need for such measurements automatically taken on a routine basis in south-western European regions, specifically in Portugal, has encouraged the development and installation of the equipment and constitutes a major driving force for the present work. The main features and some improvements introduced in the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) algorithms are discussed. The results obtained applying DOAS methodology to the SPATRAM spectrometer measurements of diffused spectral sky radiation are presented in terms of diurnal and seasonal variations of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)). NO(2) confirms the typical seasonal cycle reaching the maximum of (6.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunset values (PM), during the summer season, and the minimum of (1.55 +/- 0.07) x 10(+15) molecules cm(-2) for the sunrise values (AM) in winter. O(3) presents the maximum total column of (433 +/- 5) Dobson Unit (DU) in the spring season and the minimum of (284 +/- 3) DU during the fall period. The huge daily variations of the O(3) total column during the spring season are analyzed and discussed. The ground-based results obtained for NO(2) and O(3) column contents are compared with data from satellite-borne equipment (GOME - Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment; SCIAMACHY - Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY; TOMS - Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer) and it is shown that the two data

  20. Atmospheric reactive nitrogen concentrations at ten sites with contrasting land use in an arid region of Central Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric concentrations of reactive nitrogen species (Nr from 2009 to 2011 are reported for ten sites in Xinjiang, an arid region in Northwest China. Concentrations of NH3, NO2, particulate ammonium and nitrate (pNH4+ and pNO3 showed large spatial and seasonal variation and averaged 7.71, 9.68, 1.81 and 1.13 μg N m−3, and PM10 concentrations averaged 249.2 μg m−3 across all sites. Lower NH3 concentrations and higher NO2, pNH4+ and pNO3 concentrations were found in winter, reflecting serious air pollution due to domestic heating in winter and other anthropogenic sources such as increased emissions from motor traffic and industry. The order of increasing total concentrations of Nr species was alpine grassland < desert, desert-oasis ecotone < desert in an oasis < farmland < suburban and urban ecosystems. Lower ratios of secondary particles (NH4+ and NO3 were found in the desert and desert-oasis ecotone, while urban and suburban areas had higher ratios, which implies that anthropogenic activities have greatly influenced local air quality and must be controlled.

  1. Evolution on the structural and optical properties of SiO{sub x} films annealed in nitrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyopol, A., E-mail: acoyopol@gmail.com; Díaz-Becerril, T.; García-Salgado, G.; Juárez-Santisteban, H.; López, R.; Rosendo-Andrés, E.

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, thermal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures from 900 to 1100 °C was done on the SiO{sub x} films to follow the changes in their optical and structural properties. Micro-Raman measurements revealed the existence of a nanocrystalline phase and it become dominant as the annealing temperature increased from 900 to 1100 °C. The last might be an indicative of presence of silicon clusters with high crystallization grade embedded in the SiO{sub x} matrix. X-ray diffractograms from samples annealed at 1100 °C showed reflections at 2θ=28.4, 47.3, and 56.1° ascribed to (1 1 1), (2 2 0), and (3 1 1) planes of the silicon respectively. HRTEM measurements confirmed the existence of silicon nanocrystals (Si-ncs) in the SiO{sub x} films and both the average size and number of the Si-ncs were modified by the annealing process. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement displayed a broad emission from 400 to 1100 nm. This emission was related to the number of nanocrystals and to the creation of interface defects in SiO{sub x} films. -- Highlights: • Si-ncs are synthesized from interaction between a silicon solid-source and hydrogen atoms. • The size modulation of Si-ncs by effect of the annealing temperature is studied. • Silicon clusters consist of a crystalline core surrounded by an amorphous silicon shell. • The average size and number of the Si-ncs are modified by the annealing effect. • The increase in the number of Si-ncs with annealing process causes radiative centers.

  2. Spatial Variability Analysis of Within-Field Winter Wheat Nitrogen and Grain Quality Using Canopy Fluorescence Sensor Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyu Song; Guijun Yang; Chenghai Yang; Jihua Wang; Bei Cui

    2017-01-01

    Wheat grain protein content (GPC) is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inherent variability of soil properties and position in the landscape. The objectives of this field study were: (i) to assess the spatial and temporal variability of wheat nitrogen (N) attributes rela...

  3. Source apportionment of atmospheric ammonia before, during, and after the 2014 APEC summit in Beijing using stable nitrogen isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunhua; Liu, Xuejun; Deng, Congrui; Dore, Anthony J.; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N) offers new opportunities to address the long-standing and ongoing controversy regarding the origins of ambient ammonia (NH3), a vital precursor of PM2.5 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter equal or less than 2.5 µm) inorganic components, in the urban atmosphere. In this study, the δ15N values of NH3 samples collected from various sources were constrained using a novel and robust chemical method coupled with standard elemental analysis procedures. Independent of the wide variation in mass concentrations (ranging from 33 (vehicle) to over 6000 (human excreta) µg m-3), different NH3 sources have generally different δ15N values (ranging from -52.0 to -9.6 ‰). Significantly high δ15N values are seen as a characteristic feature of all vehicle-derived NH3 samples (-14.2 ± 2.8 ‰), which can be distinguished from other sources emitted at environmental temperature (-29.1 ± 1.7, -37.8 ± 3.6, and -50.0 ± 1.8 ‰ for livestock, waste, and fertilizer, respectively). The isotope δ15N signatures for a range of NH3 emission sources were used to evaluate the contributions of the different sources within measured ambient NH3 in Beijing, using an isotope mixing model (IsoSource). The method was used to quantify the sources of ambient NH3 before, during and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, when a set of stringent air quality control measures were implemented. Results show that the average NH3 concentrations (the overall contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer) during the three periods were 9.1 (20.3, 28.3, 23.6, and 27.7 %), 7.3 (8.8, 24.9, 14.3, and 52.0 %), and 12.7 (29.4, 23.6, 31.7, and 15.4 %) µg m-3, respectively, representing a 20.0 % decrease first and then a 74.5 % increase in overall NH3 mass concentrations. During (after) the summit, the contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer decreased (increased) by 56.7 (234.2), 12.0 (-5.0), 39.4 (120

  4. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (CALOR2010 Proceedings)

    CERN Document Server

    Necesal, Petr

    2010-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a facility designed for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The Observatory combines two different types of detectors: a surface array of 1600 water Cherenkov stations placed on a 1.5 km triangular grid covering over 3000 km$^2$; and a fluorescence detector of 24 telescopes located in 4 buildings at the perimeter of the surface array. The fluorescence telescopes, each consisting of 440 photomultipliers, collect the ultraviolet light produced when the charged secondary particles in an air shower excite nitrogen molecules in the atmosphere. Because the intensity of the nitrogen fluorescence is proportional to the energy deposited in the atmosphere during the air shower, the air fluorescence measurements can be used to make a calorimetric measurement of the cosmic ray primary energy. Showers observed independently by the surface array and fluorescence telescopes, called hybrid events, are critical to the function of the Observatory, as they allow for a model-independent ca...

  5. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-04-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  6. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  7. Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere of the former Soviet Union in 1985 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryaboshapko, A.G.; Brukhanov, P.A.; Gromov, S.A.; Proshina, Yu.V; Afinogenova, O.G. [Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen over the former Soviet Union for 1985 and 1990 were calculated on the basis of a combination of `bottom-up` and `top-down` approaches. Sulfur dioxide emissions from combustion of hard coal, brown coal, oil products, natural gas, shale oil, peat, wood as well as from metallurgy, sulfuric acid production, and cement production were estimated. Nitrogen oxides emissions were considered separately for large power plants, small power plants, industrial boilers, residential combustion units, and for transport. The sulfur and nitrogen emissions were spatially distributed over the former Soviet Union with 1 x 1 degree resolution. Data on 721 point sources of sulfur dioxide emissions and on the 242 largest power stations as nitrogen oxides sources were used. The area sources of both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were distributed according to the population density separately for about 150 administrative units of the former Soviet Union. 63 refs., 19 tabs.

  8. On-line enrichment and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in atmospheric particulates using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence as detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric particulates were determinated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector using direction injection and an on-line enrichment trap column. The method simplified the sample pretreatment, saved time and increased the efficiency. With the on-line trap column, PAHs were separated availably even underground injecting 1.0 ml sample with relatively high column efficiency. The recoveries of the seven PAHs were from 85% to 120% for spiked atmospheric particulate sample. The limit of detection was 15.3-39.6 ng/L (S/N=3.3). There were good linear correlations between the peak areas and concentrations of the seven kinds of PAHs in the range of 1-50 ng/ml with the correlation coefficients over 0.9970. Furthermore, it also indicated that the method is available to determine PAHs in atmospheric particulates well.

  9. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds in Titan's Atmosphere, the Interstellar Medium and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landera, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Several different mechanisms leading to the formation of (substituted) naphthalene and azanaphthalenes were examined using theoretical quantum chemical calculations. As a result, a series of novel synthetic routes to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Nitrogen Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (N-PACs) have been proposed. On Earth, these aromatic compounds originate from incomplete combustion and are released into our environment, where they are known to be major pollutants, often with carcinogenic properties. In the atmosphere of a Saturn's moon Titan, these PAH and N-PACs are believed to play a critical role in organic haze formation, as well as acting as chemical precursors to biologically relevant molecules. The theoretical calculations were performed by employing the ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** method to effectively probe the Potential Energy Surfaces (PES) relevant to the PAH and N-PAC formation. Following the construction of the PES, Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Markus (RRKM) theory was used to evaluate all unimolecular rate constants as a function of collision energy under single-collision conditions. Branching ratios were then evaluated by solving phenomenological rate expressions for the various product concentrations. The most viable pathways to PAH and N-PAC formation were found to be those where the initial attack by the ethynyl (C2H) or cyano (CN) radical toward a unsaturated hydrocarbon molecule led to the formation of an intermediate which could not effectively lose a hydrogen atom. It is not until ring cyclization has occurred, that hydrogen elimination leads to a closed shell product. By quenching the possibility of the initial hydrogen atom elimination, one of the most competitive processes preventing the PAH or N-PAC formation was avoided, and the PAH or N-PAC formation was allowed to proceed. It is concluded that these considerations should be taken into account when attempting to explore any other potential routes towards

  10. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  11. Changes in susceptibility of beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings towards Phytophthora citricola under the influence of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, F., E-mail: fleischmann@wzw.tum.d [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Raidl, S. [Department Biology I and GeoBioCenterLMU, Systematic Mycology, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Menzinger Strasse 67, 80638 Muenchen (Germany); Osswald, W.F. [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts changes in susceptibility of plants against herbivores with changing resource availability. In the presented study we tested the validity of the GDBH for trees infected with a root pathogen. For this purpose Fagus sylvatica seedlings grown under different atmospheric CO{sub 2}- and soil nitrogen regimes were infected with the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola. High nitrogen supply increased total biomass of beech regardless of the CO{sub 2}-treatment, whereas elevated CO{sub 2} enhanced biomass only in the high nitrogen treatment. The responses of beech under the different growing regimes to the Phytophthora root infection were not in line with the predictions of the GDBH. Enhanced susceptibility of beech against P. citricola was found in seedlings grown under elevated CO{sub 2} and low nitrogen supply. Fifteen months after inoculation these plants were characterized by enhanced water use efficiency, by altered root-shoot ratios, and by enhanced specific root tip densities. - Susceptibility of Fagus sylvatica to the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola increased under elevated CO{sub 2}

  12. EnviroAtlas - Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes annual nitrogen and sulfur deposition within each 12-digit HUC subwatershed for the year 2011. Values are provided for total...

  13. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation Historical and Projected Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, D.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching 1300 mg(N) m2 yr1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, 3050 larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  14. The contribution to nitrogen deposition and ozone formation in South Norway from atmospheric emissions related to the petroleum activity in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, S.; Walker, S.-E.; Knudsen, S.; Lazaridis, M.; Beine, H.J.; Semb, A

    1999-03-01

    A photochemical plume model has been developed and refined. The model is designed to simulate the advection and photochemistry for several simultaneous point sources as well as the atmospheric mixing. the model has been used to calculate nitrogen deposition and ozone formation due to offshore emissions in the North Sea. Based on meteorological data for 1992 the calculations give a total contribution of 60-80 mg (N)/m{sub 2} at most in South Norway. Emission from British and Norwegian sector is calculated to contribute less than 5% each to the AOT40 index for ozone. (author)

  15. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Fraqueza, Maria João Ramos; Ferreira, Marilia Catarina; Barreto, António Salvador

    2008-01-01

    Abstract 1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (light (PSE-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. Breasts were selected according to Luminance (L*) and pH24: L ? 51 and pH < 5.8 for light colour, 43 < L < 51 f...

  16. Nitrogen metastable (N2(A3 Σu + )) in a cold argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet: Shielding and gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseni, Sylvain; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) metastable species are detected and measured in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet by laser induced fluorescence. A shielding device is used to change the ambient conditions additionally to the feeding gas composition. Varying the amount of N2 and air admixed to the feeding gas as well as changing the shielding gas from N2 to air reveals that the highest N 2 ( A 3 Σu + ) is achieved in the case of air admixtures in spite of the enhanced collisional quenching due to the presence of O2. The reasons for these observations are discussed in detail.

  17. Effects of nitrogen form on growth,CO2 assimilation,chlorophyll fluorescence,and photosynthetic electron allocation in cucumber and rice plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-hong ZHOU; Yi-li ZHANG; Xue-min WANG; Jin-xia CUI; Xiao-jian XIA; Kai SHI; Jing-quan YU

    2011-01-01

    Cucumber and rice plants with varying ammonium(NH4+)sensitivities were used to examine the effects of different nitrogen(N)sources on gas exchange,chlorophyll(ChI)fluorescence quenching,and photosynthetic electron allocation.Compared to nitrate(NO3-)-grown plants,cucumber plants grown under NH4+-nutdtion showed decreased plant growth,net photosynthetic rate,stomatal conductance,intercellular carbon dioxide(CO2)level,transpiration rate,maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ,and O2-independent alternative electron flux,and increased O2-dependent alternative electron flux.However,the N source had little effect on gas exchange,ChI a fluorescence parameters,and photosynthetic electron allocation in rice plants,except that NH4+-grown plants had a higher O2-independent alternative electron flux than NO3--grown plants.NO3-reduction activity was rarely detected in leaves of NH4+-grown cucumber plants,but was high in NH4+-grown rice plants.These results demonstrate that significant amounts of photosynthetic electron transport were coupled to NO3-assimilation,an effect more significant in NO3--grown plants than in NH4+-grown plants.Meanwhile,NH4+-tolerant plants exhibited a higher demand for the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate(NADPH)for NO3-reduction,regardless of the N form supplied,while NH4+-sensitive plants had a high water-water cycle activity when NH4+was supplied as the sole N source.

  18. The effect of nitrogen in sintered atmosphere of the ferritic stainless steels AISI 430L P/M; Efecto del nitrogeno en la atmosfera de sinterizacion del acero inoxiable ferritico AISI 430L P/M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpas, F. A.; Ruiz-Roman, J. M.; Codina, S.; Iglesias, F. J.

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we have studied the nitrogen effects different sintering atmospheres (nitrogen-hydrogen, and dissociate ammonia) on ferritic stainless steels (430L), fabricated by powder metallurgy process. We have carried out a study of the physical (density, porosity and dimensional variation) and mechanical properties (hardness, tensile strength, and lengthening) of the ferritic stainless steels sintered in the afore-mentioned atmospheres, as well as of their behaviour in pitting corrosion. We have studied, also the microstructure of the steels, which depends on the atmosphere used for sintering. (Author) 13 refs.

  19. Effects of high atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on root hydraulic conductivity of conifers depend on species identity and inorganic nitrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, Tobias [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biological Sciences, 840 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); BassiriRad, Hormoz, E-mail: hormoz@uic.edu [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biological Sciences, 840 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We examined root hydraulic conductivity (L{sub p}) responses of one-year-old seedlings of four conifers to the combined effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and inorganic nitrogen (N) sources. We found marked interspecific differences in L{sub p} responses to high CO{sub 2} ranging from a 37% increase in P. abies to a 27% decrease in P. menziesii, but these effects depended on N source. The results indicate that CO{sub 2} effects on root water transport may be coupled to leaf area responses under nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), but not ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) dominated soils. To our knowledge, this is the first study that highlights the role of inorganic N source and species identity as critical factors that determine plant hydraulic responses to rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. The results have important implications for understanding root biology in a changing climate and for models designed to predict feedbacks between rising atmospheric CO{sub 2}, N deposition, and ecohydrology. - Highlights: > Root hydraulic conductivity (L{sub p}) in conifers is affected by increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. > This response depends on inorganic N source and species identity. > This is the first report of L{sub p} responses to elevated CO{sub 2} and N source in multiple species. - Root water transport responses to rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration depends on species identity and inorganic N sources.

  20. δ13C and δ15N of moss Haplocladium microphyllum (Hedw.) Broth. for indicating growing environment variation and canopy retention on atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Yan; Xiao, Hua-Yun; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Li, You-Yi

    Mosses have been recognized as a useful tool for biomonitoring atmospheric deposition and assessing regional environment. This study was carried on whether the same moss growing in areas with identical regional atmospheric deposition while under different growing environments would have the same indicating signals. Similar variations in mean δ13C and δ15N signatures were found between mosses collected from five habitats, with an increasing sequence from mosses under canopies to epilithic mosses, indicating that habitats were potentially regulating δ13C and δ15N values of mosses. Dryer habitats (lower water availability) and input of more aerosol N were the main reasons for higher δ13C and δ15N values of mosses at open sites (especially for epilithic species), while more negative values of mosses under canopies were attributed to their wetter habitats and less uptake of aerosol N. Additionally, δ15N values not δ13C varied linearly with canopy thickness from -7.84‰ (1 m) to -4.71±0.7‰ (4 m), suggesting δ15N was more sensitive for indicating canopy retention. Consequently, isotopic data of mosses under different environments could not be compared for atmospheric deposition research with each other even collected at the same site. Moss δ13C and δ15N were affected not only by regional atmospheric N sources but also by their growing environments. δ15N of epilithic Haplocladium microphyllum at open sites can be taken as confident bio-indicator of atmospheric N deposition, which would deepen the application of stable nitrogen isotope of bryophytes in atmosphere-plant system study.

  1. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perform calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by cosmic rays of above 1018eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group of monitoring instruments to record atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3000 km 2. The atmospheric data are used extensively in the reconstruction of air showers, and are particularly important for the correct determination of shower energies and the depths of shower maxima. This paper contains a summary of the molecular and aerosol conditions measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory since the start of regular operations in 2004, and includes a discussion of the impact of these measurements on air shower reconstructions. Between 1018 and 1020eV, the systematic uncertainties due to all atmospheric effects increase from 4% to 8% in measurements of shower energy, and 4gcm to 8gcm in measurements of the shower maximum.

  2. NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN LOADING SOURCES FOR THREE COASTAL LAGOONS FROM ATMOSPHERIC AND WATERSHED SOURCES, ADJACENT COASTAL MARSHES, TIDAL EXCHANGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract and Oral Presentation Gulf Estuarine Research Society.Standing stocks and inputs of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) to three coastal lagoons, hereafter referred to as Kee's Bayou, Gongora, and State Park, with varying adjacent land-use, geomorphology, and water re...

  3. Fast incorporation of primary amine group into polylactide surface for improving C₂C₁₂ cell proliferation using nitrogen-based atmospheric-pressure plasma jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Wei; Wu, Jane-Yii; Liu, Chih-Tung; Liao, Guo-Chun; Huang, Hsuan-Yu; Hsu, Ray-Quen; Chiang, Ming-Hung; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the development of the fast incorporation of primary amine functional groups into a polylactide (PLA) surface using the post-discharge jet region of an atmospheric-pressure nitrogen-based dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Plasma treatments were carried out in two sequential steps: (1) nitrogen with 0.1% oxygen addition, and (2) nitrogen with 5% ammonia addition. The analyses show that the concentration of N/C ratio, surface energy, contact angle, and surface roughness of the treated PLA surface can reach 19.1%, 70.5 mJ/m(2), 38° and 73.22 nm, respectively. In addition, the proposed two-step plasma treatment procedure can produce a PLA surface exhibiting almost the same C2C12 cell attachment and proliferation performance as that of the conventional gelatin coating method. Most importantly, the processing/preparation time is reduced from 13-15 h (gelatin coating method) to 5-15 min (two-step plasma treatment), which is very useful in practical applications.

  4. Charge-state and element-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were mainly thermalised. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen an...

  5. The Seasonal Cycle of Satellite Chlorophyll Fluorescence Observations and its Relationship to Vegetation Phenology and Ecosystem Atmosphere Carbon Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Yoshida, Y.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Schaefer, K.; Jung, M.; Guanter, L.; Zhang, Y; Garrity, S.; Middleton, E. M.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Gu, L.; Marchesini, L. Belelli

    2014-01-01

    Mapping of terrestrial chlorophyll uorescence from space has shown potentialfor providing global measurements related to gross primary productivity(GPP). In particular, space-based fluorescence may provide information onthe length of the carbon uptake period that can be of use for global carboncycle modeling. Here, we examine the seasonal cycle of photosynthesis asestimated from satellite fluorescence retrievals at wavelengths surroundingthe 740nm emission feature. These retrievals are from the Global OzoneMonitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) flying on the MetOp A satellite. Wecompare the fluorescence seasonal cycle with that of GPP as estimated froma diverse set of North American tower gas exchange measurements. Because the GOME-2 has a large ground footprint (40 x 80km2) as compared with that of the flux towers and requires averaging to reduce random errors, we additionally compare with seasonal cycles of upscaled GPP in the satellite averaging area surrounding the tower locations estimated from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry (MPI-BGC) machine learning algorithm. We also examine the seasonality of absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation(APAR) derived with reflectances from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Finally, we examine seasonal cycles of GPP as produced from an ensemble of vegetation models. Several of the data-driven models rely on satellite reflectance-based vegetation parameters to derive estimates of APAR that are used to compute GPP. For forested sites(particularly deciduous broadleaf and mixed forests), the GOME-2 fluorescence captures the spring onset and autumn shutoff of photosynthesis as delineated by the tower-based GPP estimates. In contrast, the reflectance-based indicators and many of the models tend to overestimate the length of the photosynthetically-active period for these and other biomes as has been noted previously in the literature. Satellite fluorescence measurements therefore show potential for

  6. Methodology to assess and map the potential development of forest ecosystems exposed to climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition: A pilot study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Winfried; Nickel, Stefan; Jenssen, Martin; Riediger, Jan

    2015-07-15

    A methodology for mapping ecosystems and their potential development under climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition was developed using examples from Germany. The methodology integrated data on vegetation, soil, climate change and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. These data were used to classify ecosystem types regarding six ecological functions and interrelated structures. Respective data covering 1961-1990 were used for reference. The assessment of functional and structural integrity relies on comparing a current or future state with an ecosystem type-specific reference. While current functions and structures of ecosystems were quantified by measurements, potential future developments were projected by geochemical soil modelling and data from a regional climate change model. The ecosystem types referenced the potential natural vegetation and were mapped using data on current tree species coverage and land use. In this manner, current ecosystem types were derived, which were related to data on elevation, soil texture, and climate for the years 1961-1990. These relations were quantified by Classification and Regression Trees, which were used to map the spatial patterns of ecosystem type clusters for 1961-1990. The climate data for these years were subsequently replaced by the results of a regional climate model for 1991-2010, 2011-2040, and 2041-2070. For each of these periods, one map of ecosystem type clusters was produced and evaluated with regard to the development of areal coverage of ecosystem type clusters over time. This evaluation of the structural aspects of ecological integrity at the national level was added by projecting potential future values of indicators for ecological functions at the site level by using the Very Simple Dynamic soil modelling technique based on climate data and two scenarios of nitrogen deposition as input. The results were compared to the reference and enabled an evaluation of site-specific ecosystem changes over time

  7. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  8. Uncertainty and perspectives in studies of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China: A response to Liu et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nianpeng; Zhu, Jianxing; Wang, Qiufeng

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we have formally responded to the speculation in "Liu et al. suspect that Zhu et al. (2015) may have underestimated dissolved organic N but overestimated total particulate N in wet deposition in China" by Liu et al. (2015). Here, we first discussed the uncertainty and plausible reasons of atmospheric deposition in China, which have been reported in different studies. We disagree with their interpretation on some points. Firstly, the difficulties in quality control from sampling to analyzing are common to all studies regarding atmospheric deposition, including the studies cited by Liu et al. (2015). More importantly, their discussion did not fully consider the apparent influence of different scaling-up methods (from an observation site scale to a national scale) on estimations of atmospheric N deposition in China. Furthermore, we provided the optimal approaches to resolve these challenges discussed in order to promote the related studies of atmospheric N deposition in China in the future.

  9. FAMOUS. The fluorescence telescope prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Bretz, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Lauscher, Markus; Middendorf, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Peters, Christine; Sommer, Dominik; Stephan, Maurice [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Auffenberg, Jan; Schaufel, Merlin [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    One of the most successful techniques for the detection of air showers produced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are fluorescence telescopes. The light produced by de-exciting nitrogen in the atmosphere is typically detected by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This technique has been successfully used by the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina for many years. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) promise higher photon detection efficiencies than PMTs. This and other advantages motivate the construction of the fluorescence telescope prototype FAMOUS (First Auger Multi-pixel photon counter camera for the Observation of Ultra-high-energy air Showers) which makes use of SiPMs. In this talk we discuss the FAMOUS telescope with a new 64-pixel camera including power supply and DAQ.

  10. Spectrophotometry near the atmospheric cutoff of the strongest Bowen resonance fluorescence lines of O III in two planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Opal, Chet B.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometric results are presented for the stronger, well-resolved Bowen O III resonance fluorescence emission lines in the planetary nebulae 7027 and NGC 7662 down to and including the intrinsically strong line at 3133 A. These data are combined with results from the IUE atlas of spectra and similar results for the longer wavelength lines by Likkel and Aller (1986) to give the first full coverage of the Bowen lines. Good agreement is found with fluorescence theory for the primary cascade lines, except for the Likkel and Aller results. The efficiency of conversion of the exciting He II Ly-alpha into O III lines is determined, and values comparable to other planetary nebulae are found.

  11. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols using Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence and Fe K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, U.E.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de; Meirer, F. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: fmeirer@ati.ac.at; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: streli@ati.ac.at; Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: wobi@ati.ac.at; Thiele, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: Julian.Thiele@gmx.de; Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: falkenbe@mail.desy.de; Pepponi, G. [ITC-irst, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy)], E-mail: pepponi@itc.it

    2008-12-15

    In this study a new procedure using Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) to characterize elemental amounts in atmospheric aerosols down to particle sizes of 0.015 um is presented. The procedure was thoroughly evaluated regarding bounce off effects and blank values. Additionally the potential of total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure (SR-TXRF-XANES) for speciation of FeII/III down to amounts of 34 pg in aerosols which were collected for 1 h is shown. The aerosols were collected in the city of Hamburg with a low pressure Berner impactor on Si carriers covered with silicone over time periods of 60 and 20 min each. The particles were collected in four and ten size fractions of 10.0-8.0 {mu}m, 8.0-2.0 {mu}m, 2.0-0.13 {mu}m 0.13-0.015 {mu}m (aerodynamic particle size) and 15-30 nm, 30-60 nm, 60-130 nm, 130-250 nm, 250-500 nm, 0.5-1 {mu}m, 1-2 {mu}m, 2-4 {mu}m, 4-8 {mu}m, 8-16 {mu}m. Prior to the sampling 'bounce off' effects on Silicone and Vaseline coated Si carriers were studied with total reflection X-ray fluorescence. According to the results silicone coated carriers were chosen for the analysis. Additionally, blank levels originating from the sampling device and the calibration procedure were studied. Blank levels of Fe corresponded to 1-10% of Fe in the aerosol samples. Blank levels stemming from the internal standard were found to be negligible. The results from the Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of the aerosols showed that 20 min of sampling time gave still enough sample material for elemental determination of most elements. For the determination of the oxidation state of Fe in the aerosols different Fe salts were prepared as a reference from suspensions in isopropanol. The results from the Fe K-edge Synchroton radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near-edge structure analysis of the aerosol samples showed that mainly Fe(III) was present in

  12. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000 ACCMIP time slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of approximately 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards a potential misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores, but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double their 2000 counterpart in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental-scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~ 30–50% larger than the values in any region currently (circa 2000. However, sulfur deposition rates in 2100 are in all regions lower than in 2000 in

  13. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation historical and projected changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30–50 % larger than the values in any region currently (2000. The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of

  14. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@SiO2 Nanoparticles as Electrochemiluminescence and Fluorescence Signal Indicators for Magnetically Controlled Aptasensor with Dual Detection Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Hua, Mengjuan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; You, Tianyan; Huang, Xingyi

    2015-12-09

    We proposed a facile method to prepare the nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) doped silica (NGQDs@SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). The NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were further explored as a versatile signal indicator for ochratoxin A (OTA) aptasensing by combination with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and fluorescence (FL) detection. In this strategy, the core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic beads (MBs) acted as a nanocarrier to immobilize the thiolated aptamer specific for OTA, and the amino modified capture DNA (cDNA) was efficiently tagged with NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The multifunctional aptasensor was thus fabricated by assembly of the NGQDs@SiO2 NPs onto the surface of Fe3O4@Au MBs through the high specific DNA hybridization between aptamer and cDNA. Upon OTA incubation, the aptamer linked with Fe3O4@Au MBs preferred to form an aptamer-OTA complex, which resulted in the partial release of the preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The more OTA molecules in the detection system, the more NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were released into the bulk solution and the less preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were accumulated on the magnetic electrode surface. This provided a dual channel for OTA detection by combination with the enriched solid-state ECL and homogeneous FL detection. The FL assay exhibits a wide dynamic range and is more reproducible due to the homogeneous detection while the ECL assay possesses a lower detection limit and is preferable by using a cheaper instrument. One can obtain a preliminary screen from FL assay and a more accurate result from ECL assay. Integrating the virtues of dual analytical modality, this aptasensing strategy well-balanced the rapidity, sensitivity, and dynamic range, making it promising to other targets with aptamer sequences.

  15. Electron density change of atmospheric-pressure plasmas in helium flow depending on the oxygen/nitrogen ratio of the surrounding atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Kentaro; Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Sato, Yuta; Hassaballa, Safwat; Bolouki, Nima; Yoneda, Munehiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Uchino, Kiichiro

    2016-06-01

    Laser Thomson scattering was applied to an atmospheric-pressure plasma produced in a helium (He) gas flow for measuring the spatial profiles of electron density (n e) and electron temperature (T e). Aside from the He core flow, the shielding gas flow of N2 or synthesized air (\\text{N}2:\\text{O}2 = 4:1) surrounding the He flow was introduced to evaluate the effect of ambient gas components on the plasma parameters, eliminating the effect of ambient humidity. The n e at the discharge center was 2.7 × 1021 m-3 for plasma generated with N2/O2 shielding gas, 50% higher than that generated with N2 shielding.

  16. Reactive spark plasma sintering of MgB2 in nitrogen atmosphere for the enhancement of the high-field critical current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badica, P.; Burdusel, M.; Popa, S.; Pasuk, I.; Ivan, I.; Borodianska, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Kuncser, A.; Ionescu, A. M.; Miu, L.; Aldica, G.

    2016-10-01

    High density bulks (97%-99%) of MgB2 were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) in nitrogen (N2) atmosphere for different heating rates (10, 20 and 100 °C min-1) and compared with reference samples processed in vacuum and Ar. N2 reacts with MgB2 and forms MgB9N along the MgB2 grain boundaries. The high-field critical current density is enhanced for the sample processed in N2 with a heating rate of 100 °C min-1. At 2-35 K, this sample shows the strongest contribution of the grain boundary pinning (GBP). All samples are in the point pinning (PP) limit and by increasing temperature the GBP contribution decreases.

  17. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition for protection of acid sensitive aquatic resources in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Cosby, B.J.; Driscoll, C.T.; McDonnell, T.C.; Herlihy, A.T.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic watershed acid-base chemistry model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC) was used to calculate target loads (TLs) of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition expected to be protective of aquatic health in lakes in the Adirondack ecoregion of New York. The TLs were calculated for two future dates (2050 and 2100) and three levels of protection against lake acidification (acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 0, 20, and 50 eq L -1). Regional sulfur and nitrogen deposition estimates were combined with TLs to calculate exceedances. Target load results, and associated exceedances, were extrapolated to the regional population of Adirondack lakes. About 30% of Adirondack lakes had simulated TL of sulfur deposition less than 50 meq m -2 yr to protect lake ANC to 50 eq L -1. About 600 Adirondack lakes receive ambient sulfur deposition that is above this TL, in some cases by more than a factor of 2. Some critical criteria threshold values were simulated to be unobtainable in some lakes even if sulfur deposition was to be decreased to zero and held at zero until the specified endpoint year. We also summarize important lessons for the use of target loads in the management of acid-impacted aquatic ecosystems, such as those in North America, Europe, and Asia. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Extreme isotopic depletion of nitrogen in New Zealand lithophytes and epiphytes; the result of diffusive uptake of atmospheric ammonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, W C; Hackell, D; Miers, D B; Silvester, W B

    2005-08-01

    Several lichens and the terrestrial alga Trentepohlia were found to have extremely depleted 15N signatures at two sites near the Rotorua geothermal area, New Zealand. Values, typically -20 per thousand, with several extreme cases of -24 per thousand, are more isotopically depleted than any previously quoted delta15N signature for vegetation growing in natural environments. For Trentepohlia, distance from a geothermal source did not affect isotopic signature. A 100-km transect showed that the phenomenon is widespread and the discrimination is not related to substrate N, or to elevation. Rainfall NHx and atmospheric gaseous NH3 (NH3(g)) were shown to be isotopically depleted in the range -1 per thousand to -8 per thousand and could not, of themselves, be responsible for the plant values obtained. A simulation of Trentepohlia thallus was created using an acidified fiberglass mat and was allowed to absorb NH3(g) from the atmosphere. Mats exposed at the geothermal sites and on farm-land showed a significant further depletion of 15N to -17 per thousand. We hypothesize that the extreme isotopic depletion is due to dual fractionation: firstly by the volatilization of NH3(g) from aqueous sources into the atmosphere; secondly by the diffusive assimilation of that NH3(g) into vegetation. We further hypothesize that lithophytes, epiphytes, and higher plants, growing on strongly N-limited substrates, will show this phenomenon more or less, depending on the proportion of diffusively assimilated NH3(g) utilized as a N source. Many of the isotopically depleted delta15N signatures in vegetation, previously reported in the literature, especially epiphytes, may be due to this form of uptake depending on the concentration of atmospheric NH3(g), and the degree of reliance on that form of N.

  19. Effects of nitrogen application and elevated atmospheric CO2 on electron transport and energy partitioning in flag leaf photosynthesis of wheat%施氮和大气CO2浓度升高对小麦旗叶光合电子传递和分配的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绪成; 于显枫; 马一凡

    2011-01-01

    Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) plants were pot-cultured in open top chambers at the nitrogen application rate of 0 and 200 mg · kg-1 soil and the atmospheric CO2 concentration of 400 and 760 μmol · mol-1. Through the determination of flag leaf nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, photosynthetic rate (Pn)-intercellar CO2 concentration (Ci) response curve, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters at heading stage, the photosynthetic electron transport rate and others were calculated,aimed to investigate the effects of nitrogen application and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on the photosynthetic energy partitioning in wheat flag leaves. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased the leaf nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, compared with the ambient one, and the chlorophyll a/b ratio increased at the nitrogen application rate of 200 mg · kg-1. With the application of nitrogen, no evident variations were observed in the maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) , maximal quantum yield under irradiance (Fv'/Fm') of PS Ⅱ reaction center, photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient (qp), and actual PS Ⅱ efficiency under irradiance (ΦPSⅡ) at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, and the total photosynthetic electron transport rate ( JF ) of PS Ⅱ reaction center had no evident increase, though the non-photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient (NPQ ) decreased significantly. With no nitrogen application, the Fv'/ Fm', ΦPSⅡ , and NPQ) at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased significantly, and the JF had a significant decrease though the Fv/Fm and qp did not vary remarkably. Nitrogen application increased the JF and photochemical electron transport rate (JC); while elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration decreased the photorespiration electron transport rate (J0) , Rubisco oxidation rate ( V0 ), ratio of photorespiration to photochemical electron transport rate ( J0/JC ), and Rubisco oxidation/carboxylation rate ( V0/VC ), but

  20. Joint analysis of deposition fluxes and atmospheric concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and sulphur compounds predicted by six chemistry transport models in the frame of the EURODELTAIII project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, M. G.; Bessagnet, B.; Cuvelier, C.; Theobald, M. R.; Tsyro, S.; Pirovano, G.; Aulinger, A.; Bieser, J.; Calori, G.; Ciarelli, G.; Manders, A.; Mircea, M.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Briganti, G.; Cappelletti, A.; Colette, A.; Couvidat, F.; D'Isidoro, M.; Kranenburg, R.; Meleux, F.; Menut, L.; Pay, M. T.; Rouïl, L.; Silibello, C.; Thunis, P.; Ung, A.

    2017-02-01

    all the campaigns, except for the 2006 campaign. This points to a low efficiency in the wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen for these models, especially with regards to the scavenging of nitric acid, which is the main driver of oxidized N deposition for all the models. CHIMERE, LOTOS-EUROS and EMEP agree better with the observations for both wet deposition and air concentration of oxidized nitrogen, although CHIMERE seems to overestimate wet deposition in the summer period. This requires further investigation, as the gas-particle equilibrium seems to be biased towards the gas phase (nitric acid) for this model. In the case of MINNI, the frequent underestimation of wet deposition combined with an overestimation of atmospheric concentrations for the three pollutants indicates a low efficiency of the wet deposition processes. This can be due to several reasons, such as an underestimation of scavenging ratios, large vertical concentration gradients (resulting in small concentrations at cloud height) or a poor parameterization of clouds. Large differences between models were also found for the estimates of dry deposition. However, the lack of suitable measurements makes it impossible to assess model performance for this process. These uncertainties should be addressed in future research, since dry deposition contributes significantly to the total deposition for the three deposited species, with values in the same range as wet deposition for most of the models, and with even higher values for some of them, especially for reduced nitrogen.

  1. Atmospheric carbon dioxide, irrigation, and fertilization effects on phenolic and nitrogen concentrations in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, F L; Maier, C A

    2001-06-01

    Concentrations of total soluble phenolics, catechin, proanthocyanidins (PA), lignin and nitrogen (N) were measured in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) needles exposed to either ambient CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]), ambient plus 175 or ambient plus 350 micromol CO(2) mol(-1) in branch chambers for 2 years. The CO(2) treatments were superimposed on a 2 x 2 factorial combination of irrigation and fertilization treatments. In addition, we compared the effects of branch chambers and open-top chambers on needle chemistry. Proanthocyanidin and N concentrations were measured in needles from branch chambers and from trees in open-top chambers exposed concurrently for two years to either ambient [CO(2)] or ambient plus 200 micromol CO(2) mol(-1) in combination with a fertilization treatment. In the branch chambers, concentrations of total soluble phenolics in needles generally increased with needle age. Concentrations of total soluble phenolics, catechin and PA in needle extracts increased about 11% in response to the elevated [CO(2)] treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on foliar lignin concentrations. Nitrogen concentrations were about 10% lower in needles from the elevated [CO(2)] treatments than in needles from the ambient [CO(2)] treatments. Soluble phenolic and PA concentrations were higher in the control and irrigated soil treatments in about half of the comparisons; otherwise, differences were not statistically significant. Needle N concentrations increased 23% in response to fertilization. Treatment effects on PA and N concentrations were similar between branch and open-top chambers, although in this part of the study N concentrations were not significantly affected by the CO(2) treatments in either the branch or open-top chambers. We conclude that elevated [CO(2)] and low N availability affected foliar chemical composition, which could in turn affect plant-pathogen interactions, decomposition rates and mineral nutrient cycling.

  2. Discussion of "Atmospheric deposition as an important nitrogen load to a typical agro-ecosystem in the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain" by Huang et al. (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Xu, Wen; Wentworth, Gregory R.; Tian, Shili

    2017-03-01

    In a recent publication of Atmospheric Environment, Huang et al. (2016) reported nitrogen (N) deposition estimates using the water surrogate surface method. This method may be suitable to evaluate the atmospheric N input to a body of water, wetland or paddy fields rather than dry crop land without sustained waterlogged conditions. Such a method may also result in the potential underestimation of both dry and wet N deposition due to the release of ammonia (NH3) from water evaporation and/or N loss from biological activities, and hence bias the relative contribution of dry deposition to total deposition. Besides the uncertainties regarding the magnitude and pathways of N deposition, the statement by Huang et al. (2016) that "nitrate was the dominant species in N deposition even in cropland" is also questionable. We suggest that reduced species dominate the N deposition in Huang-Huai-Hai Plain (i.e., North China Plain) even in urban and industrial regions due to the abundance of NH3.

  3. WHEAT STORAGE BY CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE WITH NITROGEN IN PLAIN WAREHOUSE%简易仓氮气气调储存小麦试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖; 覃新锋; 李明革

    2012-01-01

    对简易仓堆放的小麦进行2次充氮气调试验,与相邻货位的采用传统磷化铝(PH3)杀虫方式储存的小麦进行对比.试验结果表明:通过对粮堆密闭处理,进行充氮杀虫,采用边充边排等工艺方式,杀虫效果明显,粮情稳定,成本较低.%Compared with pest control by phosphine fumigation traditionally in the adjacent location, the wheat stored in a plain warehouse has been tested twice by controlled atmosphere with N2. The results showed that the technology of controlled atmosphere had an obvious effect of pest control, grain condition kept in stabilization with lower cost by such technologies as sealing grain bulks, insect control by fulfilling nitrogen while exhausting and so on.

  4. Total N content and δ15N signatures in moss tissue for indicating varying atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Guizhou Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Linglu; Xiao, Huayun; Guan, Hui; Zhang, Zhongyi; Xu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Unsurprisingly, the amount of reactive nitrogen circulating annually on land has been doubled because of increasing anthropogenic activities. Exceedingly large amounts of reactive nitrogen (Nr) are likely to disrupt N dynamics and negatively impact the environment and human health. Guizhou Province, a major energy-producing province in southwest China, is suffering from serious long-term acid deposition. However, little work has been done to quantify the levels of atmospheric N deposition in this province, in which some ecologically vulnerable areas have resulted from rocky desertification. In this study, tissue N contents and δ15N signatures in 109 epilithic mosses were analyzed by the ordinary kriging (OK) interpolation technique to determine atmospheric N deposition. Moss N content (1.36-2.65%) showed a significant decrease from west to east, indicating that the spatial variance of TN deposition was the same as that of moss N content, with an average of 27.74 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Moss δ15N ranged from -5.89‰ to -0.72‰ and showed an opposite spatial variance compared with moss N contents. Negative δ15N indicated that the main sources for N deposition were urban sewage and agricultural NH3. According to Moss δ15N values, it could be concluded that NH4+-N and NO3--N were the main components of wet deposition, accounting for 52% and 44% of TN, respectively. The deposition fluxes were 14.49 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 12.16 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Although the emission flux of NO3--N far exceeded that of NH4+-N, the amount of NH4+-N deposited on land was larger than that of NO3--N. N deposition in 99.6% of the province exceeded the critical load for terrestrial ecosystems. High N deposition is the main environmental problem facing Guizhou Province, and recommendations regarding regulatory strategies for mitigating atmospheric N pollution are urgently needed.

  5. Impact of atmospheric CO2 on growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eloísa; Ruano, David; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación

    2006-07-01

    Expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) were analysed in relation to the rate of CO(2) assimilation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves. Intact plants were exposed to different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations (100, 400 and 1200microLL(-1)) for 14 days. A correlation between the in vivo rates of net CO(2) assimilation and the atmospheric CO(2) concentrations was observed. Transpiration rate and stomatal conductance remained unaffected by CO(2) levels. The exposure of the cucumber plants to rising CO(2) concentrations led to a concomitant increase in the contents of starch and soluble sugars, and a decrease in the nitrate content in leaves. At very low CO(2), NR and GS expression decreased, in spite of high nitrate contents, whereas at normal and elevated CO(2) expression and activity were high although the nitrate content was very low. Thus, in cucumber, NR and GS expression appear to be dominated by sugar levels, rather than by nitrate contents.

  6. Influence of atmospheric [CO2] on growth, carbon allocation and cost of plant tissues on leaf nitrogen concentration maintenance in nodulated Medicago sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Plant carbon (C) allocation and plant metabolic processes (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) can be affected by changes in C availability, for example from changing atmospheric [CO2]. In nodulated plants, C availability may also influence nitrogen (N) fixation by bacteriods. But C allocation and N fixation are often studied independently and hence do not allow elucidating interactive effects. We investigated how different atmospheric [CO2] (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence plant growth, allocation to nodules, and the ratio of photosynthesis-to-respiration (R:A) as an indicator of C cost in Medicago sativa inoculated with Ensifer meliloti. M. sativa grew c. 38% more nodules at 400 ppm and 700 ppm than at 170 ppm. However, ratios of above- and belowground plant biomass to nodule biomass were constant over time and independent of atmospheric [CO2]. Total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were not significantly different between plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, but were four to five-fold higher than in 170 ppm plants. Leaf level N concentration was similar across treatments, but N-based photosynthetic rates were 82% and 93% higher in leaves of plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, respectively, than plants grown at 170 ppm. In addition, leaf R:A was greater (48% or 55%) in plants grown at 170 ppm than plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm. Similarly, the greatest proportion of assimilated CO2 released by root respiration occurred in rhizobial plants growing at 170 ppm. Our results suggest that C limitation in nodulated Medicago sativa plants did not influence C allocation to nodule biomass but caused a proportionally greater allocation of C to belowground respiration, most likely to bacteriods. This suggests that N tissue concentration was maintained at low [CO2] by revving up bacteriod metabolism and at the expense of non-structural carbohydrate reserves.

  7. Development and Study of Hard-Facing Materials on the Base of Heat-Resisting High-Hardness Steels for Plasma-Jet Hard- Facing in Shielding-Doping Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malushin, N. N.; Kovalev, A. P.; Valuev, D. V.; Shats, E. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    The authors develop hard-facing materials on the base of heat-resisting highhardness steels for plasma-jet hard-facing in nitrogen atmosphere for manufacturing parts of mining and metallurgic equipment which significantly simplify the production process and effect a saving when producing bimetallic parts and tools.

  8. Observations of atmosphere-biosphere exchange of total and speciated peroxynitrates: nitrogen fluxes and biogenic sources of peroxynitrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-E. Min

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxynitrates are responsible for global scale transport of reactive nitrogen. Recent laboratory observations suggest that they may also play an important role in delivery of nutrients to plant canopies. We measured eddy covariance fluxes of total peroxynitrates (ΣPNs and three individual peroxynitrates (APNs ≡ PAN + PPN + MPAN over a ponderosa pine forest during the Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment 2009 (BEARPEX 2009. Concentrations of these species were also measured at multiple heights above and within the canopy. While the above-canopy daytime concentrations are nearly identical for ΣPNs and APNs, we observed the downward flux of ΣPNs to be 30–60% slower than the flux of APNs. The vertical concentration gradients of ΣPNs and APNs vary with time of day and exhibit different temperature dependencies. These differences can be explained by the production of peroxynitrates other than PAN, PPN, and MPAN within the canopy (presumably as a consequence of biogenic VOC emissions and upward fluxes of these PN species. The impact of this implied peroxynitrate flux on the interpretation of NOx fluxes and ecosystem N exchange is discussed.

  9. Observations of atmosphere-biosphere exchange of total and speciated peroxynitrates: nitrogen fluxes and biogenic sources of peroxynitrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-E. Min

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxynitrates are responsible for global scale transport of reactive nitrogen. Recent laboratory observations suggest that they may also play an important role in delivery of nutrients to plant canopies. We measured eddy covariance fluxes of total peroxynitrates (ΣPNs and three individual peroxynitrates (APNs ≡ PAN + PPN + MPAN over a ponderosa pine forest during the Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment 2009 (BEARPEX 2009. Concentrations of these species were also measured at multiple heights above and within the canopy. While the above-canopy daytime concentrations are nearly identical for ΣPNs and APNs, we observed the downward flux of ΣPNs to be 30–60% slower than the flux of APNs. The vertical concentration gradients of ΣPNs and APNs vary with time of day and exhibit different temperature dependencies. These differences can be explained by the production of peroxynitrates other than PAN, PPN, and MPAN within the canopy (presumably as a consequence of biogenic VOC emissions and upward fluxes of these PN species. The impact of this implied peroxynitrate flux on the interpretation of NOx fluxes and ecosystem N exchange is discussed.

  10. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  11. Comparison of atmospheric concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen compounds, chloride and base cations at Ahtari and Hyytiala, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruoho-Airola, T. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    Seven-year (2003-2009) time series of atmospheric SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}-, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Cl{sup -} concentrations as well as four-year time series of atmospheric Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} concentrations from Ahtari and Hyytiala background stations in southern Finland, located within 85 km of each other were compared. At Ahtari the air sampler was located in a clearing within a young forest, while at Hyytiala it was within dense forest stands. Pearson's correlations between the time series were very strong (r{sub P} {>=} 0.9) for SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup -} and Ca{sup 2+}, strong (r{sub P} > 0.8) for Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} and week (r{sub P} = 0.65) for K{sup +}. The concentrations recorded at Hyytiala were on average 0.8-1.0 times those at Ahtari, although for K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} the ratios were higher. The GLS-ARMA method used takes into account the seasonal behaviour and serial correlation in the air quality time series, which revealed similar seasonal and temporal behaviour for S and N compounds and Cl- at both stations. As a result of the dense seasonalization of the time series, the part of the data heavily influenced by local agricultural sources could be identified. This enables elimination of the minimal part of the data affected and the use of the remaining data for further studies on a more regional level. (orig.)

  12. Effects of long-term nitrogen fertilization on the uptake kinetics of atmospheric methane in temperate forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Jay; Hrywna, Yarek; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Steudler, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    To determine whether repeated, long-term NH(4) (+) fertilization alters the enzymatic function of the atmospheric CH(4) oxidizer community in soil, we examined CH(4) uptake kinetics in temperate pine and hardwood forest soils amended with 150 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) as NH(4)NO(3) for more than a decade. The highest rates of atmospheric CH(4) consumption occurred in the upper 5 cm mineral soil of the control plots. In contrast to the results of several previous studies, surface organic soils in the control plots also exhibited high consumption rates. Fertilization decreased in situ CH(4) consumption in the pine and hardwood sites relative to the control plots by 86% and 49%, respectively. Fertilization increased net N mineralization and relative nitrification rates and decreased CH(4) uptake most dramatically in the organic horizon, which contributed substantially to the overall decrease in field flux rates. In all cases, CH(4) oxidation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with apparent K(m) (K(m(app))) values typical of high-affinity soil CH(4) oxidizers. Both K(m(app)) and V(max(app)) were significantly lower in fertilized soils than in unfertilized soils. The physiology of the methane consumer community in the fertilized soils was distinct from short-term responses to NH(4) (+) addition. Whereas the immediate response to NH(4) (+) was an increase in K(m(app)), resulting from apparent enzymatic substrate competition, the long-term response to fertilization was a community-level shift to a lower K(m(app)), a possible adaptation to diminish the competitiveness of NH(4) (+) for enzyme active sites.

  13. Oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by ozone and nitrogen dioxide: reaction mechanisms and biological and atmospheric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhiya, L; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-04-01

    The nitration of tyrosine by atmospheric oxidants, O3 and NO2, is an important cause for the spread of allergenic diseases. In the present study, the mechanism and pathways for the reaction of tyrosine with the atmospheric oxidants O3 and NO2 are studied using DFT-M06-2X, B3LYP, and B3LYP-D methods with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The energy barrier for the initial oxidation reactions is also calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The reaction is studied in gas, aqueous, and lipid media. The initial oxidation of tyrosine by O3 proceeds by H atom abstraction and addition reactions and leads to the formation of six different intermediates. The subsequent nitration reaction is studied for all the intermediates, and the results show that the nitration affects both the side chain and the aromatic ring of tyrosine. The rate constant of the favorable oxidation and nitration reaction is calculated using variational transition state theory over the temperature range of 278-350 K. The spectral properties of the oxidation and nitration products are calculated at the TD-M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The fate of the tyrosine radical intermediate is studied by its reaction with glutathione antioxidant. This study provides an enhanced understanding of the oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by O3 and NO2 in the context of improving the air quality and reducing the allergic diseases.

  14. Photolysis imprint in the nitrate stable isotope signal in snow and atmosphere of East Antarctica and implications for reactive nitrogen cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. F. Martins

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen15N and triple oxygen (δ17O and δ18O isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3 was measured year-round in the atmosphere and snow pits at Dome C, Antarctica (DC, 75.1° S, 123.3° E, and in surface snow on a transect between DC and the coast. Comparison to the isotopic signal in atmospheric NO3 shows that snow NO3 is significantly enriched in δ15N by >200‰ and depleted in δ18O by <40‰. Post-depositional fractionation in Δ17O(NO3 is small, potentially allowing reconstruction of past shifts in tropospheric oxidation pathways from ice cores. Assuming a Rayleigh-type process we find fractionation constants ε of −60±15‰, 8±2‰ and 1±1‰, for δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O, respectively. A photolysis model yields an upper limit for the photolytic fractionation constant 15ε of δ15N, consistent with lab and field measurements, and demonstrates a high sensitivity of 15ε to the incident actinic flux spectrum. The photolytic 15ε is process-specific and therefore applies to any snow covered location. Previously published 15ε values are not representative for conditions at the Earth surface, but apply only to the UV lamp used in the reported experiment (Blunier et al., 2005; Jacobi et al., 2006. Depletion of oxygen stable isotopes is attributed to photolysis followed by isotopic exchange with water and hydroxyl radicals. Conversely, 15N enrichment of the NO3 fraction in the snow implies 15N depletion of emissions. Indeed, δ15N in atmospheric NO3 shows a strong decrease from background levels (4±7‰ to −35‰ in spring followed by recovery during summer, consistent with significant snowpack

  15. Synthesis of recent advances in critical loads research on impacts from atmospheric nitrogen deposition on terrestrial plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C.; Horn, K. J.; Thomas, R. Q.; Simkin, S.; Pardo, L. H.; Blett, T.; Lawrence, G. B.; Belyazid, S.; Phelan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is one of the primary threats to plant biodiversity world-wide after habitat destruction and climate change. As a primary limiting nutrient and contributor to soil acidification, N inputs have the capacity to alter ecosystems through several mechanisms. Up until now, there was very little detailed information on the impacts from this stressor at the species level, or how climate and edaphic factors could alter ecosystem sensitivity. Here we summarize and synthesize four major efforts, funded by EPA, USGS, USFS, and the NPS, which greatly advance our understanding of this stressor. These include (1) a national analysis of sensitivity to N deposition for 114 tree species, (2) a national analysis of impacts from N deposition on herbaceous species and how climate and soil factors modify that sensitivity, (3) a regional dynamic modeling study of impacts and recovery from N and S deposition for a dominant northeastern forest type under a range of future climate and deposition scenarios, and (4) a large assessment of impacts to streams, soils, and vegetation along the 2000+ mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail. Here we show many responses to this stressor for all taxonomic groups, with some species decreasing, some increasing, and some unaffected by N deposition. However, dozens of tree and herb species are negatively affected and are of particular concern for conservation purposes, with vulnerability being greatly affected by regional climate and local edaphic factors. Dynamic modeling suggests that, at least in some northeastern forests, recovery across a broad range of climate change and management scenarios is unlikely by 2100. The study along the Appalachian Trail, a beloved national recreation trail, echoes these findings, with stream, soils, and vegetation impacted across large percentages of sites, and only moderate capacity for recovery by 2100. In total, this work highlights several recent advances in the area of critical loads research

  16. The fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Mendoza, (UTN-FRM), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Aguirre, C. [Universidad Catolica de Bolivia, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Argiro, S. [Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arneodo, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi , L' Aquila (Italy); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-21

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It combines a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level together with a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The fluorescence detector comprises 24 large telescopes specialized for measuring the nitrogen fluorescence caused by charged particles of cosmic ray air showers. In this paper we describe the components of the fluorescence detector including its optical system, the design of the camera, the electronics, and the systems for relative and absolute calibration. We also discuss the operation and the monitoring of the detector. Finally, we evaluate the detector performance and precision of shower reconstructions.

  17. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bacher, A; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barbosa, H J M; Barenthien, N; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Bollmann, E; Bolz, H; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Bracci, F; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, D CaminL; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Castro, J; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordero, A; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J W; Cuautle, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daudo, F; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Gibbs, K; Giller, M; Gitto, J; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gomez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grashorn, E; Grassi, V; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Grygar, J; Guardincerri, Y; Guardone, N; Guerard, C; Guarino, F; Gumbsheimer, R; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hofman, G; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovský, M; Hucker, H; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kern, H; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kopmann, A; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Malek, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Marchetto, F; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Martineau, O; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mucchi, M; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nerling, F; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nicotra, D; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Oßwald, B; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Pouryamout, J; Prado, L; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, G Raia J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Reis, H C; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Roberts, M D; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; b, H Salazar; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, G Schleif A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Sequieros, G; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Smiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Trapani, P; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tuci, V; Tueros, M; Tusi, E; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vitali, G; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wild, N; Wiebusch, C; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wörner, G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; b, A Zepeda; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It combines a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level together with a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The fluorescence detector comprises 24 large telescopes specialized for measuring the nitrogen fluorescence caused by charged particles of cosmic ray air showers. In this paper we describe the components of the fluorescence detector including its optical system, the design of the camera, the electronics, and the systems for relative and absolute calibration. We also discuss the operation and the monitoring of the detector. Finally, we evaluate the detector performance and precision of shower reconstructions.

  18. Effects of nitrogen on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon-based cold atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Yunoki, Tatsuya; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is known as a source of biologically active agents, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In the present study, we examined the effects of nitrogen (N2) on the apoptosis of and changes in gene expression in human lymphoma U937 cells exposed to argon (Ar)-CAP. Enormous amounts of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals in aqueous solution were produced using Ar‑CAP generated using a 20 kHz low frequency at 18 kV with a flow rate of 2 l/min. The increase in the levels of ·OH radicals was significantly attenuated by the addition of N2 to Ar gas. On the other hand, the level of total nitrate/nitrite in the supernatant was significantly elevated in the Ar + N2-CAP‑exposed U937 cells. When the cells were exposed to Ar‑CAP, a significant increase in apoptosis was observed, whereas apoptosis was markedly decreased in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP. Microarray and pathway analyses revealed that a newly identified gene network containing a number of heat shock proteins (HSPs), anti-apoptotic genes, was mainly associated with the biological function of the prevention of apoptosis. Quantitative PCR revealed that the expression levels of HSPs were significantly elevated in the cells exposed to Ar + N2-CAP than those exposed to Ar‑CAP. These results indicate that N2 gas in Ar‑CAP modifies the ratio of ROS to RNS, and suppresses the apoptosis induced by Ar‑CAP. The modulation of gaseous conditions in CAP may thus prove to be useful for future clinical applications, such as for switching from a sterilizing mode to cytocidal effect for cancer cells.

  19. Letter to the editor: Critical assessments of the current state of scientific knowledge, terminology, and research needs concerning the ecological effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuepeng; Liu, Yongwen; Wentworth, Gregory R.; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Yuanhong; Li, Yi; Liu, Xuejun; Du, Enzai; Fang, Yunting; Xiao, Hongwei; Ma, Hongyuan; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-03-01

    In a publication in Atmospheric Environment (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2015.10.081), Gu et al. (2015) estimated that "the total nitrogen (N) deposition in 2010 was 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1" in China. This value is comparable with previous estimations based on a synthesized dataset of wet/bulk inorganic N deposition observations, which underestimates the total N deposition since their algorithm (equations (2) and (3) in their paper) does not account for dry deposition of NH3, HNO3, NOx and wet/dry deposition of HONO and organic nitrogen (e.g. amines, amides, PAN). Indeed, Gu et al. (2015) mixed the terminology of wet/bulk deposition and total deposition. Another flawed assumption by Gu et al. (2015) is that all inorganic N in precipitation estimated by their algorithm originates from fertilizer and coal combustion. This is incorrect and almost certainly causes biases in the spatial and temporal distribution of estimated wet/bulk inorganic N deposition (Fig. 5 in their paper), further considering the fact that they neglected important N sources like livestock and they did not consider the nonlinearity between various sources and deposition. Besides the input data on N deposition, the model validation (Sect. 2.3.2) described in their paper also requires clarification because the detailed validation information about the time series of observational dataset versus modeling results was not given. As a result of these combined uncertainties in their estimation of N deposition and the lack of detail for model-measurement comparison, their estimates of the impacts of N deposition on carbon storage in Chinese forests may need further improvement. We suggest the clarification of the terminology regarding N deposition, especially for wet deposition, bulk deposition, gaseous and particulate dry deposition or total deposition since the accurate distinction between these terms is crucial to investigating and estimating the effects of N deposition on ecosystems.

  20. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006–September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25–50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3−) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3− from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p < 0.001), indicating a seasonal shift in the relative importance of regional NOxsources, such as coal combustion and vehicular sources of atmospheric NO3−. There were no significant differences in δ15N of NO3− between east and west sides of the park during summer or winter (p = 0.83), indicating that the two areas may have similar sources of atmospheric NO3−. Results from this study indicate that a combination of IER collectors and snowpack

  1. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands.

  2. Distribution of atmospheric reactive nitrogen at two sites of different socio- economic characteristics in IndoGangetic Plain(IGP) region, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Sharma, A.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    In India, most of the human population lives in rural areas. People depends on agriculture products to meet the demand of food supply. In order to get higher yield of agriculture and food product, increased practice of fertilizer application has added extra burden of nutrients especially, the reactive nitrogen (Nr) species viz NH3 and NOx. Growing energy demands has resulted in increased emissions of NOx from coal combustion in thermal power plant and the petroleum combustion in transport sector. In addition, biomass burning in traditional cooking and heating has become significant source of NH3 and NOx in Indian region. Significance of the study lies in the fact that increasing Nr emissions have adverse impact on human health, plant, soil and water bodies directly and to see the effect, knowledge of emission and deposition for Nr at different sites. Hence, the selection of the sites for present study was done very carefully. Delhi city and Mai village were selected to represent typical characteristics of high and low socioeconomic region respectively. Delhi is the capital of India, known for higher income group urban cluster where rural site having agricultural dominance has its importance in Indian scenario because still in India our primary source of income is agriculture. Atmospheric abundance of two major gaseous inorganic (Nr) species i.e NH3 and NO2 has been measured for one year, on monthly basis. Average concentrations of NH3 at urban and rural site have been recorded as 40.4 ±16.8 and 51.57 ±22.8 μg/m3 respectively. The average concentrations of NO2 have been recorded as 24.4 ±13.5 and 18.8 ± 12.6 μg/m3 at urban & rural site respectively. Study, also presents seasonal and diurnal variations of gaseous reactive nitrogen species at urban & rural sites to observe the contribution of different the sources of atmospheric Nr. Dynamics of Nr at both sites will be discussed in details at the conference.

  3. In situ and denuder-based measurements of elemental and reactive gaseous mercury with analysis by laser-induced fluorescence - results from the Reno Atmospheric Mercury Intercomparison Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Anthony J.; Everhart, Stephanie; Bauer, Dieter; Remeika, James; Tatum Ernest, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    The University of Miami (UM) deployed a sequential two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (2P-LIF) instrument for the in situ measurement of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), during the Reno Atmospheric Mercury Intercomparison Experiment (RAMIX) campaign. A number of extended sampling experiments, typically lasting 6-8 h but on one occasion extending to ˜ 24 h, were conducted, allowing the 2P-LIF measurements of Hg(0) concentrations to be compared with two independently operated instruments using gold amalgamation sampling coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic (CVAFS) analysis. At the highest temporal resolution, ˜ 5 min samples, the three instruments measured concentrations that agreed to within 10-25 %. Measurements of total mercury (TM) were made by using pyrolysis to convert total oxidized mercury (TOM) to Hg(0). TOM was then obtained by difference. Variability in the ambient Hg(0) concentration limited our sensitivity for measurement of ambient TOM using this approach. In addition, manually sampled KCl-coated annular denuders were deployed and analyzed using thermal dissociation coupled with single-photon LIF detection of Hg(0). The TOM measurements obtained were normally consistent with KCl denuder measurements obtained with two Tekran speciation systems and with the manual KCl denuder measurements but with very large uncertainty. They were typically lower than measurements reported by the University of Washington (UW) Detector for Oxidized Hg Species (DOHGS) system. The ability of the 2P-LIF pyrolysis system to measure TM was demonstrated during one of the manifold HgBr2 spikes but the results did not agree well with those reported by the DOHGS system. The limitations of the RAMIX experiment and potential improvements that should be implemented in any future mercury instrument intercomparison are discussed. We suggest that instrumental artifacts make a substantial contribution to the discrepancies in the reported measurements over the

  4. Evaluation of heavy metals in atmospheric emissions from automotive industry by total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Weber Neto, Jose, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de, E-mail: aesvives@unimep.b [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo

    2009-07-01

    This study had as goal to determine heavy metals and other elements (Ba, Br, Ca, Pb, Cl, Cr, Sr, Fe, Mn, Ni, K, Si, Ti and Zn) in atmospheric pollutants generated by an automotive industry located in the city of Engenheiro Coelho, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The sampling and sample preparation procedures were based on methods established by the Company of Sanitation and Technology (CETESB L9.234) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA - Method 29). The analysis was performed at XRF Beamline (D09B-XRF) in the Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory (Campinas/SP). A white beam of synchrotron radiation was used for sample and standard excitation which were irradiated by 100 seconds. For X-ray lines detection, a Ge (HP) detector with 150 eV of resolution at 5.9 keV was employed. For zinc, iron, barium, calcium and potassium, the values obtained were in the range of 30 mg/Nm{sup 3} and, for other elements, the concentrations were approximately 1 mg/Nm{sup 3}. The sum of As, Be, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te and Zn concentration was compared with the limits established by CONAMA 264/1999 and SEMA 041/2002 resolutions (7.0 mg/Nm{sup 3}) and it was observed that, for all samples, sums are higher than the permissive value mainly due to the high concentration of zinc. Detection limits for SR-TXRF technique were 0.10 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Pb and 0.02 mug/Nm{sup 3} for Zn. (author)

  5. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Grant

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available If increases in net primary productivity (NPP caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation must be hastened. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and plant translocation with changes in Ca. Algorithms developed from these hypotheses were tested in the ecosystem model ecosys against changes in N and C cycling measured over several years under ambient vs. elevatedCa in Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE experiments at the Duke Forest in North Carolina, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory forest in Tennessee, and the USDA research forest in Wisconsin, USA. Simulating more rapid soil N mineralization was found to be vital for modelling sustained increases in NPP measured under elevated vs. ambient Ca at all three FACE sites. This simulation was accomplished by priming decomposition of N-rich humus from increases in microbial biomass generated by increased litterfall modelled under elevated Ca. Simulating more rapid nonsymbiotic N2 fixation, root N uptake and plant N translocation under elevated Ca was found to make much smaller contributions to modelled increases in NPP, although such contributions might be greater over longer periods and under more N-limited conditions than those simulated here. Greater increases in NPP with Ca were also modelled with increased temperature and water stress, and with coniferous vs. deciduous plant functional types. These increases were also associated with changes in N cycling.

  6. Thermal mineralization behavior of PFOA, PFHxA, and PFOS during reactivation of granular activated carbon (GAC) in nitrogen atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Takata, Mitsuyasu; Takemine, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Katsuya

    2015-09-11

    Waste disposal site is one of the important sinks of chemicals. A significant amount of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) have been brought into it. Because of their aqueous solubility, PFASs are released to landfill effluent waters, from which PFASs are efficiently collected by adsorption technique using granular activated carbon (GAC). The exhausted GAC is reactivated by heating processes. The mineralization of PFASs during the reactivation process was studied. Being thermally treated in N2 atmosphere, the recovery rate of mineralized fluorine and PFC homologues including short-chained perfluorocarboxylic acids was determined. If the reagent form of PFOA, PFHxA, and PFOS were treated at 700 °C, the recovery of mineralized fluorine was less than 30, 46, and 72 %, respectively. The rate increased to 51, 74, and 70 %, if PFASs were adsorbed onto GAC in advance; moreover, addition of excess sodium hydroxide (NaOH) improved the recovery to 74, 91, and 90 %. Residual PFAS homologue was less than 1 % of the original amount. Steamed condition did not affect destruction. The significant role of GAC was to suppress volatile release of PFASs from thermal ambient, whereas NaOH enhanced destruction and retained mineralized fluorine on the GAC surface. Comparing the recovery of mineralized fluorine, the degradability of PFOS was considered to be higher than PFOA and PFHxA. Whole mass balance missing 9~26 % of initial amount suggested formation of some volatile organofluoro compounds beyond analytical coverage.

  7. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, R. F.

    2013-11-01

    If increases in net primary productivity (NPP) caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and nutrient conservation must also be increased. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biological fixation, root nutrient uptake and plant nutrient conservation with changes in Ca. Algorithms developed from these hypotheses were tested in the ecosystem model ecosys against changes in N and C cycling measured over several years under ambient vs. elevated Ca in Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments in the USA at the Duke Forest in North Carolina, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory forest in Tennessee, and the USDA research forest in Wisconsin. More rapid soil N mineralization was found to be vital for simulating sustained increases in NPP measured under elevated vs. ambient Ca at all three FACE sites. This simulation was accomplished by priming decomposition of N-rich humus from increases in microbial biomass generated by increased litterfall modelled under elevated Ca. Greater nonsymbiotic N2 fixation from increased litterfall, root N uptake from increased root growth, and plant N conservation from increased translocation under elevated Ca were found to make smaller contributions to simulated increases in NPP. However greater nutrient conservation enabled larger increases in NPP with Ca to be modelled with coniferous vs. deciduous plant functional types. The effects of these processes on productivity now need to be examined over longer periods under transient rises in Ca and a greater range of site conditions.

  8. Effects of atmospheric CO(2) on longleaf pine: productivity and allocation as influenced by nitrogen and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, S A; Runion, G B; Mitchell, R J; Rogers, H H; Amthor, J S

    1997-06-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings were exposed to two concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) (365 or 720 micro mol mol(-1)) in combination with two N treatments (40 or 400 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)) and two irrigation treatments (target values of -0.5 or -1.5 MPa xylem pressure potential) in open-top chambers from March 1993 through November 1994. Irrigation treatments were imposed after seedling establishment (i.e., 19 weeks after planting). Seedlings were harvested at 4, 8, 12, and 20 months. Elevated CO(2) increased biomass production only in the high-N treatment, and the relative growth enhancement was greater for the root system than for the shoot system. In water-stressed trees, elevated CO(2) increased root biomass only at the final harvest. Root:shoot ratios were usually increased by both the elevated CO(2) and low-N treatments. In the elevated CO(2) treatment, water-stressed trees had a higher root:shoot ratio than well-watered trees as a result of a drought-induced increase in the proportion of plant biomass in roots. Well-watered seedlings consistently grew larger than water-stressed seedlings only in the high-N treatment. We conclude that available soil N was the controlling resource for the growth response to elevated CO(2) in this study. Although some growth enhancement was observed in water-stressed trees in the elevated CO(2) treatment, this response was contingent on available soil N.

  9. Spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur using ion-exchange resin collectors in Rocky Mountain National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Roop, Heidi A.; Nanus, Leora; Fenn, Mark E.; Sexstone, Graham A.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes and streams in Class 1 wilderness areas in the western United States (U.S.) are at risk from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S), and protection of these resources is mandated under the Federal Clean Air Act and amendments. Assessment of critical loads, which are the maximum exposure to pollution an area can receive without adverse effects on sensitive ecosystems, requires accurate deposition estimates. However, deposition is difficult and expensive to measure in high-elevation wilderness, and spatial patterns in N and S deposition in these areas remain poorly quantified. In this study, ion-exchange resin (IER) collectors were used to measure dissolved inorganic N (DIN) and S deposition during June 2006-September 2007 at approximately 20 alpine/subalpine sites spanning the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Results indicated good agreement between deposition estimated from IER collectors and commonly used wet + dry methods during summer, but poor agreement during winter. Snowpack sampling was found to be a more accurate way of quantifying DIN and S deposition during winter. Summer DIN deposition was significantly greater on the east side of the park than on the west side (25-50%; p ≤ 0.03), consistent with transport of pollutants to the park from urban and agricultural areas to the east. Sources of atmospheric nitrate (NO3-) were examined using N isotopes. The average δ15N of NO3- from IER collectors was 3.5‰ higher during winter than during summer (p coverage of deposition monitoring/modeling programs and thus may enable policy makers to better protect sensitive natural resources in Class 1 Wilderness areas.

  10. 青岛大气气溶胶中水溶性有机氮对总氮的贡献%Contribution of Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen to Total Nitrogen in Atmospheric Aerosols in Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石金辉; 韩静; 范得国; 祁建华; 高会旺

    2011-01-01

    Organic nitrogen (ON) is a quantitatively important component of reactive nitrogen in atmospheric aerosols. Deposition of ON in seawater from atmosphere could enhance primary productivity, as well as with the changes in the phytoplankton community composition. 64 total suspended particles (TSP) samples collected at Qingdao from January to December in 2008 were applied to analyze the concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen in aerosols. Concentrations of ON in Qingdao aerosols ranged from 30 to 2 073 nmol.m -3 ( 100-12 157 p mol-g-1 ) , with the highest values occurring in December, followed in March and April and the lowest values in June to September. ON mean concentration in TSP in 2008 was 430 nmol·m -3 (2 323 μmol.g-1 ). The contribution of ON to total nitrogen (TN) was (37.5 ± 21.6)%, with the maximum presenting in December and the minimum in September. The distribution of organic nitrogen in aerosols was significantly affected by the weather conditions. During haze and fog episodes, the concentrations of ON in the aerosols were 789 nmol·m-3 and 412 nmol.m-3, respectively, 4 times and twice higher than that during clear episodes. However, the particle mass concentrations in haze and fog days were comparable with that in clear days. During dust episodes, the concentration of particles was 5 times higher than that during clear episodes while ON concentration slightly enhanced 0.4 times. The ON concentration in aerosols after raining was 57 nmol. m -3 ,decreased 80% than that before raining due to the efficient wet scavenging.%有机氮是大气气溶胶中重要的氮组分,其沉降入海后不仅能够促进海洋初级生产力的增长,还可能影响海洋生态系统的群落结构.利用2008年1~12月在青岛采集的64个总悬浮颗粒物样品,分析了其中水溶性有机氮的浓度.气溶胶中有机氮的浓度为30~2 073 nmol·m-3(100~12 157 μmol·g-1),以12月浓度最高,3、4月次之,6~9

  11. Allowed energetic pathways for the three-body recombination reaction of nitrogen monoxide with the hydroxyl radical and their potential atmospheric implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca D´Ottone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The OH initiated oxidation of nitric oxide (NO is an important atmospheric reaction being, during the day time, the main channel that leads to the formation of HONO a reservoir species for both OH and odd nitrogen. This work reports ab initio study of the Potential Energy Surface (PES of NO + OH using density functional theory calculations conducted at the B3LYP level of theory with a 6-311g (d,p basis set. We confirmed experimental observations pointing out that the main channel for this reaction is the formation the HONO. From the addition of OH to NO both cis and trans isomers of HONO were found to be the formed as stable intermediate, both having a negative enthalpy of formation relative to the reactants, the cis isomer being more stable than the trans one. The ab initio calculations were extended to include the hydrogen extraction mechanism with its respective transition state to investigate the potential existence of a reaction channel leading to the formation of NO2 + H, that was found not to be of significant interest.

  12. Atmospheric transport of urban-derived NH(x): Evidence from nitrogen concentration and delta(15)N in epilithic mosses at Guiyang, SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Yan; Xiao, Hua-Yun; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Li, You-Yi; Xiao, Hong-Wei

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen concentration and delta15N in 175 epilithic moss samples were investigated along four directions from urban to rural sites in Guiyang, SW China. The spatial variations of moss N concentration and delta15N revealed that atmospheric N deposition is dominated by NHx-N from two major sources (urban sewage NH3 and agricultural NH3), the deposition of urban-derived NHx followed a point source pattern characterized by an exponential decline with distance from the urban center, while the agricultural-derived NHx was shown to be a non-point source. The relationship between moss N concentration and distance (y=1.5e(-0.13x)+1.26) indicated that the maximum transporting distance of urban-derived NHx averaged 41 km from the urban center, and it could be determined from the relationship between moss delta(15)N and distance [y=2.54ln(x)-12.227] that urban-derived NHx was proportionally lower than agricultural-derived NHx in N deposition at sites beyond 17.2 km from the urban center. Consequently, the variation of urban-derived NHx with distance from the urban center could be modeled as y=56.272e(-0.116x)-0.481 in the Guiyang area.

  13. Glutamine Synthetases GLN1;2 and GLN2 in Relation to Arabidopsis Growth Response to Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Varying Nitrogen Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vurrakula, Swathi

    cues and adjusting it to the plant internal status. The two major types of GS include cytosolic GS1 (five isoforms in Arabidopsis, GLN1;1 to GLN1;5) and a single chloroplastic GS2. GS draws its substrates from carbon skeletons to synthesize amino acids. Thus, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are closely....... Plants grown under elevated CO2 absorbed ammonia from the atmosphere, except with a high ammonium supply. GLN1;2 had a non-redundant role in determining vegetative growth and ammonium tolerance in response to elevated CO2. Under elevated CO2, GLN1;2 was compensable by GLN2 in assimilating nitrate...... but not ammonium. Reduced GS1 activity correlated with increased ammonia emissions from leaf surface, markedly so with an increased supply of both ammonium and CO2. GLN1;2 was also found to play a vital role in assimilating high levels of nitrate. Under current CO2 levels (400ppm) GLN2 had a non-redundant role...

  14. The influence of annealing in nitrogen atmosphere on the electrical, optical and structural properties of spray- deposited ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikhmayies, S.J. [Applied Science Private Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Physics; Abu El-Haija, N.M.; Ahmad-Bitar, R.N. [Jordan Univ., Amman (Jordan). Dept. of Physics

    2009-07-01

    Thin-film zinc oxide (ZnO) has many applications in solar cell technology and is considered to be a candidate for the substitution of indium tin oxide and tin oxide. ZnO thin films can be prepared by thermal evaporation, rf-sputtering, atomic layer deposition, chemical vapor deposition, sol-gel, laser ablation and spray pyrolysis technique. Spray pyrolysis has received much attention because of its simplicity and low cost. In this study, large area and highly uniform polycrystalline ZnO thin films were produced by spray pyrolysis using a home-made spraying system on glass substrates at 450 degrees C. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the ZnO films were enhanced by annealing the thin films in nitrogen atmosphere. X-ray diffraction revealed that the films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite structure. The preferential orientation did not change with annealing, but XRD patterns revealed that some very weak lines had grown. There was no noticeable increase in the grain size. The transmittance of the films increased as a result of annealing. It was concluded that post-deposition annealing is essential to improve the quality of the ZnO thin films. The electrical properties improved due to a decrease in resistivity. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Development of gas chromatography-flame ionization detection system with a single column and liquid nitrogen-free for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengtang; Mu, Yujing; Zhang, Chenglong; Zhang, Zhibo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Sheng, Jiujiang; Quan, Jiannong

    2016-01-04

    A liquid nitrogen-free GC-FID system equipped with a single column has been developed for measuring atmospheric C2-C12 hydrocarbons. The system is consisted of a cooling unit, a sampling unit and a separation unit. The cooling unit is used to meet the temperature needs of the sampling unit and the separation unit. The sampling unit includes a dehydration tube and an enrichment tube. No breakthrough of the hydrocarbons was detected when the temperature of the enrichment tube was kept at -90 °C and sampling volume was 400 mL. The separation unit is a small round oven attached on the cooling column. A single capillary column (OV-1, 30 m × 0.32 mm I.D.) was used to separate the hydrocarbons. An optimal program temperature (-60 ∼ 170 °C) of the oven was achieved to efficiently separate C2-C12 hydrocarbons. There were good linear correlations (R(2)=0.993-0.999) between the signals of the hydrocarbons and the enrichment amount of hydrocarbons, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 5%, and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the hydrocarbons were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppbv for sampling volume of 400 mL. Field measurements were also conducted and more than 50 hydrocarbons from C2 to C12 were detected in Beijing city.

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and its effects on DNA damage in lung cancer cells exposed to atmospheric pressure helium/oxygen plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Choi, Ji Ye; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of the operating parameters on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the gas and liquid phases exposed to atmospheric pressure a pulsed-dc helium plasma jets. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. And the nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas and liquids. Exposure of plasma to cancer cells increases the cellular levels of RONS, which has been linked to apoptosis and the damage of cellular proteins, and may also indirectly cause structural damage to DNA. To identify the correlation between the production of RONS in cells and plasmas, various assay analyses were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549) cells. In addition, the effect of additive oxygen gas on the plasma-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells was investigated. It was observed that DNA damage was significantly increased with helium/oxygen plasma compared to with pure helium plasma.

  17. Numerical simulation of the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in water by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their effects on Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuse, Kazumasa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We have used two types of numerical simulations to examine biological effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated in water by an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) that irradiates the water surface. One is numerical simulation for the generation and transport of RONS in water based on the reaction-diffusion-advection equations coupled with Poisson equation. The rate constants, mobilities, and diffusion coefficients used in the equations are obtained from the literature. The gaseous species are given as boundary conditions and time evolution of the concentrations of chemical species in pure water is solved numerically as functions of the depth in one dimension. Although it is not clear how living organisms respond to such exogenous RONS, we also use numerical simulation for metabolic reactions of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and examine possible effects of such RONS on an in-silico model organism. The computation model is based on the flux balance analysis (FBA), where the fluxes of the metabolites in a biological system are evaluated in steady state, i.e., under the assumption that the fluxes do not change in time. The fluxes are determined with liner programming to maximize the growth rate of the bacteria under the given conditions. Although FBA cannot be directly applied to dynamical responses of metabolic reactions, the simulation still gives insight into the biological reactions to exogenous chemical species generated by an APP. Partially supported by JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  18. Laser-induced Fluorescence and Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the Determination of Reactive Species in the Effluent of Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xuekai; Razavi, Hamid; Lu, Xinpei; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    OH radicals and O atoms are important active species in various applications of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet (RT-APPJ). So the determination of absolute density of OH radicals and O atoms in RT-APPJs is necessary. In this work, the time and spatially resolved OH radicals density of a RT-APPJ are measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. In addition, the spatial distribution of the emitting species along the axial direction of the jet is of interest and is measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute OH density of the RT-APPJ is about 2.0 × 1013 cm-3 at 5 mm away from the plasma jet nozzle and 1 μs after the discharge. The OH density reaches a maximum when H2O concentration in helium gas flow is about 130ppm. In order to control the OH density, the effect of voltage polarity, applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulse width on the OH density are also investigated and discussed. O atoms are investigated by TA-LIF. It is demonstrated that the O atoms density reaches a maximum when O2 percent is about 0.3% in pure He and the lifetime of O atoms in RT-APPJ is much longer (up to dozens of ms) than OH radicals.

  19. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  20. Modelling the contribution of short-range atmospheric and hydrological transfers to nitrogen fluxes, budgets and indirect emissions in rural landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Drouet

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial interactions within a landscape may lead to large inputs of reactive nitrogen (Nr transferred from cultivated areas and farms to oligotrophic ecosystems and induce environmental threats such as acidification, nitric pollution or eutrophication of protected areas. The paper presents a new methodology to estimate Nr fluxes at the landscape scale by taking into account spatial interactions between landscape elements. This methodology includes estimates of indirect Nr emissions due to short-range atmospheric and hydrological transfers. We used the NitroScape model which integrates processes of Nr transformation and short-range transfer in a dynamic and spatially distributed way to simulate Nr fluxes and budgets at the landscape scale. Four configurations of NitroScape were implemented by taking into account or not the atmospheric, hydrological or both pathways of Nr transfer. We simulated Nr fluxes, especially direct and indirect Nr emissions, within a test landscape including pig farms, croplands and unmanaged ecosystems. Simulation results showed the ability of NitroScape to simulate patterns of Nr emissions and recapture for each landscape element and the whole landscape. NitroScape made it possible to quantify the contribution of both atmospheric and hydrological transfers to Nr fluxes, budgets and indirect Nr emissions. For instance, indirect N2O emissions were estimated at around 21% of the total N2O emissions. They varied within the landscape according to land use, meteorological and soil conditions as well as topography. This first attempt proved that the NitroScape model is a useful tool to estimate the effect of spatial interactions on Nr fluxes and budgets as well as indirect Nr emissions within landscapes. Our approach needs to be further tested by applying Nitro

  1. One year of urban background fluorescent aerosol measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Online aerosol fluorescence is a popular methodology for detecting bioaerosols in the atmosphere. In recent years there has been considerable effort into refining the technique to be able to distinguish between different bioaerosol classes such as pollen, spores and bacteria. A near continuous record of aerosol fluorescence measurements has been recorded at an urban background observation site in Birmingham, UK for the year 2015. Fluorescence measurements were performed using the Biral aerosol fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) which measures both UV and visible fluorescence resulting from the excitation of aerosol particles at 280 nm. Speciation of the fluorescent particles into different bioaerosol class is possible with the AFS but the lack of particle sizing makes the task difficult compared to other techniques. In addition to the fluorescence measurements, further campaign mode measurements were also generated for size segregated total particle numbers, ozone, nitrogen oxides and other chemical species. These measurements allow for the influence of road traffic on the concentration of fluorescent particle to be determined. This presentation will provide an in depth look into how bioaerosol concentrations and speciation (pollen, spores and bacteria) change throughout the year. These changes will be linked to local and regional meteorology and climate. In particular, the consequences of the unusually warm UK winter upon bioaerosol concentrations will be highlighted.

  2. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of Air Fluorescence Yield measured by AIRFLY

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Bohacova, M; Buonomo, B; Busca, N; Cazon, L; Chemerisov, S D; Conde, M E; Crowell, R A; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Doubrava, M; Esposito, A; Facal, P; Franchini, F J; Horandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Kasprzyk, T E; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuhlmann, S; Mazzitelli, G; Nozka, L; Obermeier, A; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Rídky, J; Rizi, V; Rodríguez, G; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Ulrich, A; Yusof, Z M; Vacek, V; Valente, P; Verzi, V; Waldenmaier, T

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules over a wide range of atmospheric parameters, corresponding to altitudes typical of the cosmic ray shower development in the atmosphere. We have studied the temperature and humidity dependence of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in air. Results for the 313.6 nm, 337.1 nm, 353.7 nm and 391.4 nm bands are reported in this paper. We found that the temperature and humidity dependence of the quenching process changes the fluorescence yield by a sizeable amount (up to 20%) and its effect must be included for a precise estimation of the energy of ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  3. Atmospheric COS measurements and satellite-derived vegetation fluorescence data to evaluate the terrestrial gross primary productivity of CMIP5 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peylin, Philippe; MacBean, Natasha; Launois, Thomas; Belviso, Sauveur; Cadule, Patricia; Maignan, Fabienne

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the fate of the ecosystem carbon stocks and their sensitivity to climate change strongly relies on our ability to accurately model the gross carbon fluxes, i.e. photosynthesis and respiration. The Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) simulated by the different terrestrial models used in CMIP5 show large differences however, not only in terms of mean value but also in terms of phase and amplitude, thus hampering accurate investigations into carbon-climate feedbacks. While the net C flux of an ecosystem (NEE) can be measured in situ with the eddy covariance technique, the GPP is not directly accessible at larger scales and usually estimates are based on indirect measurements combining different tracers. Recent measurements of a new atmospheric tracer, the Carbonyl sulphide (COS), as well as the global measurement of Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF) from satellite instruments (GOSAT, GOME2) open a new window for evaluating the GPP of earth system models. The use of COS relies on the fact that it is absorbed by the leaves in a similar manner to CO2, while there seems to be nothing equivalent to respiration for COS. Following recent work by Launois et al. (ACP, 2015), there is a potential to evaluate model GPP from atmospheric COS and CO2 measurements, using a transport model and recent parameterizations for the non-photosynthetic sinks (oxic soils, atmospheric oxidation) and biogenic sources (oceans and anoxic soils) of COS. Vegetation uptake of COS is modeled as a linear function of GPP and the ratio of COS to CO2 rate of uptake by plants. For the fluorescence, recent measurements of SIF from space appear to be highly correlated with monthly variations of data-driven GPP estimates (Guanter et al., 2012), following a strong dependence of vegetation SIF on photosynthetic activity. These global measurements thus provide new indications on the timing of canopy carbon uptake. In this work, we propose a dual approach that combines the strength of both COS and SIF

  4. 低氮胁迫对耐低氮玉米品种苗期光合及叶绿素荧光特性的影响%Effects of low nitrogen stress on photosynthetic characteristics and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of maize cultivars tolerant to low nitrogen stress at the seedling stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 罗延宏; 余东海; 孔凡磊; 杨世民; 袁继超

    2015-01-01

    Objectives] Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters are often used to evaluate the function of photosynthetic organs and the influence of the environment pressure. Tolerance to low nitrogen stress are largely different with different maize genotypes, which can be reflected through photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics. In this paper, the response of four maize cultivars to low nitrogen stress were compared at the seedling stage for the purpose of further understanding of the mechanism of their low nitrogen tolerance.[Methods]A completely random two-factor pot experiment was conducted in greenhouse. The main factor was maize cultivars, two tolerant cultivars of Zhenghong 311 and Chengdan 30 , two non-tolerant cultivars of Xianyu 508 and Beisan 2;The second factor was N levels: N 15 mmol/L ( CK, Hoagland nutrition solution ) , 0. 5 mmol/L ( low N stress, LN1), N:0. 05 mmol/L(extremely low N stress, LN2). The items were measured, including individual plant dry matter and nitrogen accumulation, relative chlorophyll content ( SPAD ) of leaves, and the photosynthesis parameters. [Results]The dry matter and nitrogen accumulation amounts of per plant, relative chlorophyll content (SPAD)of leaves, net photosynthetic rate(Pn), stomatal conductance(Gs), transpiration rate(Tr), variable fluorescence( Fv ) , maximum fluorescence ( Fm ) , potential activity of PSⅡ( Fv/F0 ) , the primary maximum photochemical efficiency of PSⅡ( Fv/Fm) , effective light quantum yield of PSⅡ( Fv′/Fm′) and photochemical quenching coefficient( qP ) of the four maize hybrids are declined sharply under the low nitrogen stress conditions. Compared with the low nitrogen sensitive maize cultivars, the reduced ranges of these parameters of the low nitrogen tolerant maize cultivars are much lower. In contrast to the above parameters, the intercellular CO2 concentrations are remarkably increased in the tested maize hybrids, and the concentration increases of the low nitrogen

  5. Dry and Wet Atmospheric Deposition of Nitrogen into Shaoguan, Guangdong Province%广东韶关地区大气氮干湿沉降特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思言; 陈瑾; 卢平; 李来胜; 陈中颖

    2014-01-01

    2012年4月─2013年9月利用自动分离干湿沉降的采样器对广东省韶关市降雨和干沉降进行采集,分析样品降雨量、降尘量及氮营养盐干湿沉降浓度,计算各指标干湿沉降通量,利用沉降通量分析其影响因素及季节性变化趋势,为该地区大气氮沉降的通量预测及其环境管理提供支持,并为其生态环境中污染物的控制与减排提供科学依据。结果表明,观测期间总氮干沉降通量、湿沉降通量和总沉降通量平均值分别为47.73、295.7和310.5 kg·km-2·month-1。氨态氮、硝酸盐氮与有机氮干沉降通量平均值分别为17.39、12.98和17.37 kg·km-2·month-1,其湿沉降通量平均值分别为132.4、117.0和46.23 kg·km-2·month-1。总氮湿沉降通量占总氮总沉降通量平均比例为83.19%,说明总氮沉降通量以湿沉降为主。影响因素方面,总氮干沉降通量与降尘量无相关性;湿沉降受降雨量影响较大,所以受雨季影响,韶关地区4─6月总氮湿沉降负荷较大。成分组成上,干沉降中氨态氮平均占总氮比例35.48%,硝酸盐氮平均占27.96%,有机氮平均占36.55%,因此该地区氮营养盐干沉降中以氨态氮和有机氮为主;氮营养盐湿沉降以氨态氮和硝酸盐氮为主,氨态氮平均占总氮比例46.87%,硝酸盐氮平均占40.64%,有机氮平均比例为12.49%,说明该地区湿沉降同时受到农业活动和工业活动的影响。季节变化上,氮营养盐干沉降通量由大到小依次为冬季、春季、秋季、夏季,湿沉降通量春季较高,夏秋两季较低。%To help predicate the atmospheric nitrogen deposition fluxes and provide scientific basises for ecological environment pollution control and abatement assist environmental, the characteristics of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Shaoguan, Guangdong Province were investigated. In the study, the dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition samples

  6. Impact of nitrogen fertilization on soil–Atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges in eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zheng, Hua; Chen, Falin; Li, Ruida; Yang, Miao; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Lan, Jun; Xiang, Xuewu

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary to sustain productivity in eucalypt plantations, but it can increase the risk of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the response of soil greenhouse gas emissions to N fertilization might be influenced by soil characteristics, which is of great significance for accurately assessing greenhouse gas budgets and scientific fertilization in plantations. We conducted a two-year N fertilization experiment (control [CK], low N [LN], middle N [MN] and high N [HN] fertilization) in two eucalypt plantations with different soil characteristics (higher and lower soil organic carbon sites [HSOC and LSOC]) in Guangxi, China, and assessed soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges. The annual mean fluxes of soil CO2, CH4, and N2O were separately 153–266 mg m-2 h-1, -55 –-40 μg m-2 h-1, and 11–95 μg m-2 h-1, with CO2 and N2O emissions showing significant seasonal variations. N fertilization significantly increased soil CO2 and N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake at both sites. There were significant interactions of N fertilization and SOC level on soil CO2 and N2O emissions. At the LSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was only significantly higher than the CK treatment in the HN treatment, but, at the HSOC site, the annual mean flux of soil CO2 emission was significantly higher for both the LN (or MN) and HN treatments in comparison to the CK treatment. Under the CK and LN treatments, the annual mean flux of N2O emission was not significantly different between HSOC and LSOC sites, but under the HN treatment, it was significantly higher in the HSOC site than in the LSOC site. Correlation analysis showed that changes in soil CO2 and N2O emissions were significantly related to soil dissolved organic carbon, ammonia, nitrate and pH. Our results suggested significant interactions of N fertilization and soil characteristics existed in soil–atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges, which should be considered in assessing

  7. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on gross nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a permanent grassland: A field pulse-labeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Keidel, Lisa; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    To predict ecosystem reactions to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) it is essential to understand the interactions between plant carbon input, microbial community composition and activity and associated nutrient dynamics. Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed next to an enhanced biomass production an unexpected strong positive feedback effect on ecosystem respiration and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. The overall goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of eCO2 and carbon input on microbial community composition and activity as well as the associated nitrogen dynamics, N2O production and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study on permanent grassland. A combination of 13CO2 pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), gross N transformation rates, pool size dependent N2O and N2 emissions as well as N species dependent plant N uptake rates and the origin of the CO2 respiration have been quantified. Microbial analyses include exploring changes in the composition of microbial communities involved in the turnover of NH4+, NO3-, N2O and N2, i.e. ammonia oxidizing, denitrifying, and microbial communities involved in dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). mRNA based analyses will be employed to comparably evaluate the long-term effects of eCO2 on the structure and abundance of these communities, while transcripts of these genes will be used to target the fractions of the communities which actively contribute to N transformations. We quantified the contribution of mycorrhizae on N2O emissions and observed the phenological development of the mycorrhizae after the labeling.

  8. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu-Ri [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jae-Sung [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Doo-Hoon [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701, 447-1 Wokgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Mahn, E-mail: kmkim@yuhs.ac [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-29

    Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/β-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/β-TCP scaffolds. - Highlights: ► Non-thermal plasma increased OH- and decreased C on biphasic scaffold. ► Non-thermal plasma had no effect on surface roughness. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in hydrophilic surface. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in better cell attachment and proliferation. ► Non-thermal plasma treatment on biphasic scaffold is useful for tissue engineering.

  9. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Ferreira, M C; Barreto, A S

    2008-01-01

    1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (Pale, Soft and Exudative (PSE)-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. 2. Breasts were selected according to luminance (L*) and pH(24): L >/= 51 and pH 5.8 for dark colour. Sliced meat was packaged under aerobic or MAP conditions with 50% N(2) and 50% CO(2), then stored in the dark at 0 +/- 1 degrees C for periods of 12 or 25 d. Meat under aerobic conditions was evaluated for microbiological characteristics and TVB-N on d 0, 5 and 12. This evaluation was extended to include d 19 and 25 when samples were under MAP conditions. 3. The dark meat group after 12 d of storage in aerobiosis presented significantly higher plate counts of aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic micro-organisms and higher TVB-N than other meat colour categories. The shelf life of turkey meat under MAP was one week longer for intermediate and light colour meat (20 d) than for dark meat. TVB-N values of 20 to 30 mg NH(3)/100 g turkey meat correspond to advanced spoilage stages. We proposed 14 mg NH(3)/100 g as the limit of freshness acceptability for turkey meat. 4. TVB-N was an indicator of turkey meat microbial spoilage but was not a suitable early predictor for microbial spoilage and in particular for turkey meat stored under MAP conditions because counts of micro-organisms were moderately correlated (Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae) with this index, as they were inhibited by MAP gas mixture and storage temperature used in the present study.

  10. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  11. variation in wet deposition of nitrogen from atmosphere in typical areas of Chongqing%重庆典型地区大气湿沉降氮的时空变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁玲; 周鑫斌; 辜夕容; 黄建国

    2009-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to investigate spatio-temporal changes in wet deposition of nitrogen from atmosphere in Chongqing area. Rainfall in successive three years was collected from three test sites, including a forestry site and two urban sites near and far from city, and analyzed for variable nitrogen concentrations. Total nitrogen (TN) in rainfall ranged from (3.94±0.50) mg L~(-1) to (4.56±1.01) mg L~(-1),averaged (4.27±0.73) mg L~(-1). NH_4~+-N accounted for 44.9%, NO_3~--N for 27.4% and DON (dissolved organic nitrogen) for 27.5% of TN in rainfall, respectively, indicating largest contribution of NH_4~+-N to wet deposition of nitrogen from atmosphere. The concentrations of nitrogen in rainfall varied seasonally, I.e. Winter > summer > spring and autumn. Nitrogen deposition in rainfall tended to decrease from the urban area near the city to forestry site far from city. TN concentrations in rainfall were 4.56 mg L~(-1)(urban area near the city), 4.32 mg L~(-1)(urban area far from city) and 3.94 mg L~(-1)(forestry area), respectively. Even though there were no correlations between nitrogen concentrations (NH_4~+-N、NO_3~--N、DON and TN) in rainfall and the amount of precipitation, wet deposition of nitrogen from atmosphere were positively correlated to the amount of rainfall. The amount of nitrogen deposition from rainfall in Chongqing, which was higher than critical index of nitrogen load in water and probably harmful to water resources in Three Gorge′s Area, varied spatio-temporally due to ground nitrogen emission and the amount of rainfall.%验连续3a采集雨样研究了重庆市郊区和林区大气湿沉降氮的时空变化.结果表明,重庆市近郊区、远郊区和林区3个采样点雨水总氮浓度范围为(3.94±0.50)~(4.56±1.01)mg L~(-1),平均(4.27±0.73)mg L~(-1).NH_4~+-N、NO_3~--N和DON占TN百分比例分别为44.9%、27.4%和27.5%.降雨中NH_4~+-N对氮沉降量的贡献率最大.在时间尺度上,不同季节降

  12. Effects of different concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus on chlorophyll biosynthesis,chlorophyll a fluorescence,and photosynthesis In Larix olgensis seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Chu; Wang Zhengquan; Sun Hailong; Guo Shenglei

    2006-01-01

    In our experiments,one-year-old Larix olgensis seedlings were cultivated in sand,and supplied with solutions with different concentrations of nitrate or phosphate.The effects of nitrogen and phosphorus supply on chlorophyll biosynthesis,total nitrogen content,and photosynthetic rate were studied.The experimental results are listed below: 1) 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthetic rate increased as nitrate concentrations supplied to larch seedlings increased from 1 to 8 mmol/L.But the rate decreased by 17% when nitrate concentration increased to 16 mmol/L,in contrast to the control.Under phosphate treatments,ALA synthetic rates were similar to those under nitrate treatments.The activities of porphobilinogen (PBG)synthase reached a maximum when larch seedlings were supplied with 8 mmol/L of nitrate or 1 mmol/L of phosphate.2) When larch seedlings were supplied with 8 mmol/L of nitrate and 0.5 mmol/L of phosphate,the contents of chlorophyll a,chlorophyll b,total chlorophyll,and carotenoids reached a maximum.The total nitrogen contents in leaves increased as nitrate concentrations increased.3) When phosphate concentrations increased from 0.125 to 1 mmol/L,the total nitrogen contents in leaves slightly increased;however,continuous increase of phosphate concentrations resulted in the decrease in total nitrogen contents in leaves.When nitrate concentrations increased from 1 to 8 mmol/L,soluble protein contents in leaves increased in general,and continuous increase of nitrate concentrations induced a decrease in soluble protein contents in leaves.Under treatment of 0.25 mmol/L of phosphate,the soluble protein contents reached a maximum.4) In general,Fv/Fm increased as nitrate concentrations increased from 1 to 8 mmol/L,and continuous increase of nitrate concentration resulted in decrease in FvlFm.The similar changes occurred under phosphate treatments.As nitrate concentrations increased from 1 to 8 mmol/L,photosynthetic rates gradually increased,but when nitrate

  13. 2D modeling and simulation of the flow dynamics, electric field and reactions in a low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration and CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Juray; Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    In atmospheric-pressure plasma reactors, the flow dynamics can be complex, determine the reactor performance and complicate scale-up. Coupling computational fluid dynamics to the calculation of the electric field and plasma chemistry is challenging because of the numerical stiffness introduced by the difference in time scale of the different phenomena involved. Focusing on low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure pure nitrogen plasma, a model and model reduction based solution strategy to deal with the numerical stiffness are presented and evaluated. The influence of the electric field on the flow dynamics and species concentration fields is first qualitatively studied by means of 2D simulations of a sharp-end plate-to-plane configuration. Next, a specific reactor prototype for low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for in-line surface treatments is simulated to illustrate the importance of accounting for the detailed flow dynamics.

  14. Study of cell-differentiation and assembly of photosynthetic proteins during greening of etiolated Zea mays leaves using confocal fluorescence microspectroscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yutaka; Katoh, Wataru; Tahara, Yukari

    2013-04-01

    Fluorescence microspectroscopy observations were used to study the processes of cell differentiation and assemblies of photosynthesis proteins in Zea mays leaves under the greening process. The observations were done at 78K by setting the sample in a cryostat to avoid any undesired progress of the greening process during the measurements. The lateral and axial spatial resolutions of the system were 0.64μm and 4.4μm, respectively. The study revealed the spatial distributions of protochlorophyllide (PChld) in both the 632-nm-emitting and 655-nm-emitting forms within etiolated Zea mays leaves. The sizes of the fluorescence spots attributed to the former were larger than those of the latter, validating the assignment of the former and latter to the prothylakoid and prolamellar bodies, respectively. In vivo microspectroscopy observations of mature Zea mays leaves confirmed the different photosystem II (PS I)/photosystem I (PS II) ratio between the bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (MS) cells, which is specific for C4-plants. The BS cells in Zea mays leaves 1h after the initiation of the greening process tended to show fluorescence spectra at shorter wavelength side (at around 679nm) than the MS cells (at around 682nm). The 679-nm-emitting chlorophyll-a form observed mainly in the BS cells was attributed to putative precursor complexes to PS I. The BS cells under 3-h greening showed higher relative intensities of the PS I fluorescence band at around 735nm, suggesting the reduced PS II amount in the BS cells in this greening stage.

  15. Nitrogen content, {sup 15}N natural abundance and biomass of the two pleurocarpous mosses Pleurozium schreberi (Brid.) Mitt. and Scleropodium purum (Hedw.) Limpr. in relation to atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solga, A. [Nees-Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, University of Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 170, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: a.solga@uni-bonn.de; Burkhardt, J. [Institute of Plant Nutrition, University of Bonn, Karlrobert-Kreiten-Strasse 13, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Zechmeister, H.G. [Institute of Ecology and Conservation Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, A-1091 Vienna (Austria); Frahm, J.-P. [Nees-Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, University of Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 170, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The suitability of the two pleurocarpous mosses Pleurozium schreberi and Scleropodium purum for assessing spatial variation in nitrogen deposition was investigated. Sampling was carried out at eight sites in the western part of Germany with bulk deposition rates ranging between 6.5 and 18.5 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the effect of deposition on the nitrogen content of the two species, its influence on {sup 15}N natural abundance ({delta}{sup 15}N values) and on productivity was examined. Annual increases of the mosses were used for all analyses. Significant relationships between bulk N deposition and nitrogen content were obtained for both species; {delta}{sup 15}N-values reflected the ratio of NH{sub 4}-N to NO{sub 3}-N in deposition. A negative effect of nitrogen input on productivity, i.e. decreasing biomass per area with increasing N deposition due to a reduction of stem density, was particularly evident with P. schreberi. Monitoring of N deposition by means of mosses is considered an important supplement to existing monitoring programs. It makes possible an improved spatial resolution, and thus those areas that receive high loads of nitrogen are more easily discernible. - Mosses are useful as monitors of nitrogen deposition.

  16. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  17. Effects of Nitrogen Rate on the Characteristics of Photosynthesis and Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.)%氮肥水平对马铃薯光合及叶绿素荧光特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑顺林; 杨世民; 李世林; 袁继超

    2013-01-01

    以3个品种为材料,采用随机区组设计,在田间试验条件下,研究了施氮水平对春、秋马铃薯Solanum Tuberosum L.光合和叶绿素荧光特性的影响,以期为合理氮肥运筹,提高马铃薯光能利用提供理论依据.结果表明:①增施氮肥因提高了功能叶的叶绿素质量分数而显著影响春、秋马铃薯的净光合速率及其对光照强度和CO2体积分数的响应,但影响的程度和趋势在春、秋马铃薯之间有一定差异.在试验的处理范围内,春马铃薯功能叶的最大净光合速率(Am)、表观量子效率(ψ)随施氮水平的增加而提高,而秋马铃薯的Am和ψ则随氮肥用量的增加先增后减,春薯光合作用的光饱和点和补偿点均大于秋薯,表明马铃薯光合作用的氮肥效应受栽培季节的影响;②氮肥水平对马铃薯功能叶片叶绿素的荧光特性也有一定影响,适量的氮肥可以提高最大光化学效率(Fv/Fm)、实际光化学效率(ΦpsⅡ)和电子传递速率(ETR),降低光化学猝灭系数(qP)和非光化学猝灭系数(qN),从而增加PsⅡ天线色素对光能的捕获效率,降低光能的热耗散,提高PsⅡ的光化学效率;③不同马铃薯品种的光合与叶绿素荧光特性及其对氮肥的响应存在一定差异,在秋播和中高氮水平下,川芋117的Am、羧化效率(CE)、Fv/Fm、ΦpsⅡ、ETR和qP等光合和叶绿素荧光参数均高于青薯2号.%Two field experiments were conducted with three potato varieties in spring and autumn in Ya'an, Sichuan province to study the effects of nitrogen rate on the characteristics of photosynthesis and chloro-phyll fluorescence of the plants. The main results were as follows: 1) The increase in nitrogen rate increased the chlorophyll content of the functional leaves and thus significantly improved the net photosyn-thetic rate (Pn) and its response to light intensity and CO2 concentration of both spring and autumn potato. However, some differences between

  18. Fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA: Variability of concentrations and possible constituents and sources of particles in various spectral clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, E.; Rosen, J. M.; Hill, S. C.; Wang, Y.; Pan, Y. L.

    2013-02-01

    The UV-excited laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectra of single atmospheric particles and the three-band integrating-nephelometer elastic scattering of atmospheric aerosol were measured during four approximately 24-h periods on May 2007 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA. Aerosol scattering measurements in the nephelometer red channel (50-nm band centered at 700-nm) ranged from around 3-10 times the molecular (Rayleigh) scattering background. On average 22.8% of particles with size greater than about 1 μm diameter have fluorescence above a preset fluorescence threshold. A hierarchical cluster analysis indicates that most of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra fall into about 10 categories (spectral clusters) as found previously at other geographic sites (Pinnick et al., 2004; Pan et al., 2007). The clusters include spectra characteristic of various humic/fulvic acids, humic-like-substances (HULIS), chemically aged terpenes, fungal spores, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bacteria, cellulose/pollens, and mixtures of various organic carbon compounds. By far the most populated cluster category is similar to those of chemically aged terpenes/humic-materials; on average this population comprises about 62% of fluorescent particles. Clusters with spectra similar to that of some HULIS aerosol contain on average 10.0% of particles; those characteristic of some fungal spores (or perhaps mixtures of aromatic organic compounds) 8.4% of particles; bacteria-like spectra 1.6% of particles; and cellulose/pollen-like spectra 0.8% of particles. Measurements of fluorescent particles over relatively short (24 min) periods reveal that the concentrations of particles in the most populated clusters are highly correlated, suggesting that the particles populating them derive from the same region; these particles might be composed of crustal material coated with secondary organic carbon. On the other hand, concentrations of particles having cellulose-like spectra are generally

  19. 湿沉降氮对2种禾本科植物中氮含量的影响%Effects of Atmosphere Deposition on Nitrogen Content of Two Poaceae Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林菲; 史锟

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] It was to study nitrogen use efficiency under the condition of deposition of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), further revealing the difference in gene variation.[Method] A pot experiment was conducted under 3 treatments of rainwater, ammonium-N (aN) and nitrate-N (nN).[Result] In the treatments of aN and nN, the biomass and N contents in plants were obviously higher than those in rainwater treatment, while the largest biomass(36.116 g) was observed in nN treatment. The absorption to aN was best to perennial ryegrass while nN to barley. According to the differential analysis of N content, treatments of both aN and nN was nitrogen superfluous, which led to release excessive N to the atmosphere, and the rainwater treatment and the control were N deficient, the largest N absorption from atmosphere was 0.698 g in rainwater treatment.[Conclusion] Average N use efficiency contributed by atmosphere N deposition ranged from 1.321%-6.116%, while the control of barley had the highest of 6.116%.

  20. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  1. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  2. Atmospheric deposition and accumulation of heavy metals and nitrogen in Natura 2000 sites in Germany; Atmosphaerische Deposition und Anreicherung von Schwermetallen und Stickstoff in Natura-2000-Gebieten Deutschlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Winfried; Pesch, Roland; Kratz, Werner; Holy, Marcel [Hochschule Vechta (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Landschaftsoekologie; Zechmeister, Harald [Wien Univ. (Austria); Harmens, Harry [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd (United Kingdom); Fagerli, Hilde [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo (Norway). Research and Development Dept.; Ilyin, Ilia [EMEP, Moscow (Russian Federation). Meteorological Synthesizing Centre East

    2010-12-15

    Under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution mosses are used to map the bioaccumulation of heavy metals and nitrogen throughout Europe. To this end, since 1990 mosses were sampled and analyzed chemically every five years. The goal of this article is to apply the moss survey data for assessing the bioaccumulation of Cd, Pb and N in German Natura 2000 Sites of Community Importance (SCI). The temporal trends of the heavy metal bioaccumulation within SCIs were analyzed using a multi metal index (MMI) calculated by means of geostatistics and percentile statistics. For nitrogen, only monitoring values for 2005 were available for the assessment. The geostatistically estimated values of the metal and nitrogen concentrations in mosses were transformed to estimated deposition values by use of regression analyses. Subsequently, the results were integrated into the assessment of the German SCIs. Highest metal loads within SCIs were detected in 1990, followed by a continuous decrease to 2000 and a significant increase until 2005. Regarding N, a median of 1.5 % nitrogen in the dry mass was calculated. The deposition values calculated from the moss estimates resulted in median values of 0.33 g/ha/a for Cd, 8.2 g/ha/a for Pb and 16.7 kg/ha/a for nitrogen. The Moss-Monitoring is the only environmental monitoring programme which enables statistically sound estimations of the exposure of SCI to environmental contaminants in terms of heavy metal and nitrogen deposition and bioaccumulation. (orig.)

  3. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  4. Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emission induced by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Buonomo, B; Busca, N; Cazon, L; Chemerisov, S D; Conde, M E; Crowell, R A; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Doubrava, M; Esposito, A; Facal, P; Franchini, F J; Horandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Kasprzyk, T E; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuhlmann, S; Mazzitelli, G; Nozka, L; Obermeier, A; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Rídky, J; Rizi, V; Rodríguez, G; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Ulrich, A; Yusof, Z M; Vacek, V; Valente, P; Verzi, V; Waldenmaier, T

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10^18 eV) cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules, which are excited by the cosmic ray shower particles along their path in the atmosphere. We have made a precise measurement of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in dry air. We measured the relative intensities of 34 fluorescence bands in the wavelength range from 284 to 429 nm with a high resolution spectrograph. The pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum was also measured from a few hPa up to atmospheric pressure. Relative intensities and collisional quenching reference pressures for bands due to transitions from a common upper level were found in agreement with theoretical expectations. The presence of argon in air was found to have a negligible effect on the fluorescence yield. We estimated that the systematic uncertainty on the cosmic ray shower energy due to the pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum i...

  5. [Characteristics of Atmospheric Nitrogen Wet Deposition and Associated Impact on N Transport in the Watershed of Red Soil Area in Southern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhuo; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Xu, Ya-juan; Yu, Gui-rui

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Qianyanzhou Xiangxi River Basin in the rainy season was monitored to measure different nitrogen form concentrations of rainfall and rainfall-runoff process, in order to explore the southern red soil region of nitrogen wet deposition characteristics and its influence on N output in watershed. The results showed that there were 27 times rainfall in the 2014 rainy season, wherein N wet deposition load reached 43.64-630.59 kg and N deposition flux were 0.44-6.43 kg · hm(-2), which presented a great seasonal variability. We selected three rainfall events to make dynamic analysis. The rainfall in three rainfall events ranged from 8 to 14mm, and the deposition load in the watershed were from 18.03 to 41.16 kg and its flux reached 0.18 to 0.42 kg · hm(-2). Meanwhile, this three rainfall events led to 4189.38 m3 of the total runoff discharge, 16.72 kg of total nitrogen (TN) load and 4.64 kg · hm(-2) of flux, wherein dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) were 9.64 kg and 2.68 kg · hm(-2), ammonium-nitrogen (NH(4+)-N) were 2.93 kg and 0.81 kg · hm(-2), nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3-)-N) were 5.60 kg and 1.56 kg · hm(-2). The contribution rate of N wet deposition to N output from watershed reached 56%-94% , implying that the rainfall-runoff had tremendous contribution to N loss in this small watershed. The concentrations of TN in water had exceeded 1.5 mg · L(-1) of eutrophication threshold, which existed an eutrophication potential.

  6. 闽北果园生态系统大气氮湿沉降研究%Study on Wet Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen in Orchard Ecosystem of Northern Fujian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘尔平; 刘桂生; 雷俊杰

    2012-01-01

    研究了2011年3月至2012年2月期间闽北果园生态系统中大气氮素湿沉降浓度、沉降量的变化规律.结果表明:监测期间降水中总氮(TN)、无机氮(TIN)、溶解有机氮(DON)、铵态氮(NH4+-N)和硝态氮(N03- -N)的平均浓度分别为2.11、1.07、1.04、0.65和0.42 mg/L.湿沉降氮量有明显的季节性变化,春、夏季高,秋、冬季低.TN年沉降量为23.19 kg/hm2,其中NH4+ -N、NO3--N和DON年沉降量分别占TN年沉降量的30.60%、20.02%和49.38%.%The wet - deposition concentration and amount of atmospheric nitrogen in the orchard ecosystem of northern Fujian province were studied from May, 2011 to February, 2012. The results indicated that the average concentration of total nitrogen (TN) , total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) , dissolved organic nitrogen ( DON) , ammonium nitrogen ( NH4 - N) and nitrate nitrogen ( NO3 -N ) in the rainwater during monitoring was 2.11, 1. 07, 1.04, 0. 65 and 0.42 mg/L, respectively. The amount of nitrogen wet - deposition had an obvious seasonal change, and it was high in spring and summer, low in autumn and winter. Annual TN wet - deposition amount was 23. 19 kg/hm2 , and the annual wet - deposition amount of NH4 + - N, NO3 - N and DON accounted for 30. 60% , 20.02% and 49. 38% of the annual TN wet -deposition amount, respectively.

  7. Atmospheric ammonia measurements at low concentration sites in the northeastern USA: implications for total nitrogen deposition and comparison with CMAQ estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the relative importance of dry deposition of ammonia (NH3) gas at several headwater areas of the Susquehanna River, the largest single source of nitrogen pollution to Chesapeake Bay, including three that are remote from major sources of NH3 emissions (CTH, ARN, and K...

  8. Nitrogen Fixation in Denitrified Marine Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Fernandez; Laura Farías; Osvaldo Ulloa

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria), whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate wat...

  9. 上海地区应用充氮气调储粮技术分析报告%EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON APPLICATION OF NITROGEN CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE IN THE AREA OF SHANG HAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪小琴

    2016-01-01

    上海地区气候温和湿润,储粮中较易发生虫害,粮食品质下降较快。通过开展充氮气调储粮相关研究课题,研究充氮气调储粮技术在上海地区推广应用的可行性。结果表明,充氮气调储粮对保持粮食品质、防治储粮虫害孳生、降低仓储劳动强度、提高粮食食品安全等具有积极的作用,适合在上海地区推广和应用。%The climate is mild and humid in Shanghai region ,making insects grow quickly and grain quality dete-riorates rapidly .The report aims to study the practicability of using nitrogen controlled atmosphere in grain storage by experimental study .The results show that nitrogen controlled atmosphere can keep grain quali-ty ,prevent and control pests ,reduce labour intensity and keep food safety .T he technology is suitable for application in Shanghai region .

  10. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Normalized Atmospheric Deposition for 2002, Total Inorganic Nitrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This tabular data set represents the average normalized atmospheric (wet) deposition, in kilograms per square kilometer multiplied by 100, of Total Inorganic...

  11. Optical and electrical characteristics of a single surface DBD micro-discharge produced in atmospheric-pressure nitrogen and synthetic air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimek, M.; Prukner, V.; Schmidt, J.

    2011-05-01

    Basic opto-electrical characteristics of a single micro-discharge generated in a surface DBD reactor with a coplanar electrode arrangement were studied with nanosecond time resolution. The discharge electrode geometry based on machinable glass-ceramic was optimized in order to get a system free of the circulating dielectric liquids that are frequently used to insulate and cool metallic electrodes. The build-up and decay of UV-vis-NIR emission by a single micro-discharge unaffected by concurrent or preceding discharge events was inspected during the first 10 µs of the micro-discharge evolution in nitrogen and in synthetic air. Obtained emission waveforms show a great similarity between the surface and volume streamers. The streamer volume-averaged N2(A) concentrations of ~8 × 1014 cm-3 were estimated at t = 1 µs decay time and concentrations of ~(2-4) × 1015 cm-3 were estimated during the streamer propagation phase in nitrogen.

  12. Are climate warming and enhanced atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen threatening tufa landscapes in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Du, Jie; Lugli, Stefano; Ren, Jinhai; Xiao, Weiyang; Chen, Pan; Tang, Ya

    2016-08-15

    Massive deposition of calcium carbonate in ambient temperature waters (tufa) can form magnificent tufa landscapes, many of which are designated as protected areas. However, tufa landscapes in many areas are threatened by both local anthropogenic activities and climate change. This study, for the first time, posed the question whether the tufa landscape degradation (characterized by tufa degradation and increased biomass of green algae) in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve of China is partially caused by regional air pollution and climate warming. The results indicate that wet deposition (including rain and snow) polluted by anthropogenic SO2, NOx, and NH3 emissions dissolves exposed tufa and may considerably reduce tufa deposition rate and even cause tufa dissolution within shallow waters. These effects of wet deposition on tufa enhanced as pH of wet deposition decreased from 8.01 to 5.06. Annual Volume Weighted Mean concentration of reactive nitrogen (including NH4(+) and NO3(-)) in wet deposition (26.1μmolL(-1)) was 1.8 times of the corresponding value of runoff (14.8μmolL(-1)) and exceeded China's national standard of total nitrogen in runoff for nature reserves (14.3μmolL(-1)), indicating a direct nitrogen fertilization effect of wet deposition on green algae. As water temperature is the major limiting factor of algal growth in Jiuzhaigou and temperature in the top layer (0-5cm) of runoff (depth<1m, no canopy coverage of trees and shrubs) was significantly higher at the sites with increased biomass of green algae (p<0.05), climate warming in this region would favor algal growth. In sum, this study suggests that climate warming and enhanced sulfur and nitrogen deposition have contributed to the current degradation of tufa landscape in Jiuzhaigou, but in order to quantify the contributions, further studies are needed, as many other anthropogenic and natural processes also influence tufa landscape evolution.

  13. Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments, and many of them are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. However, ironically, nitrogenase, the enzyme that is responsible for the reduction of N2, is extremely sensitive to

  14. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  15. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma and comparison to thermal and chemical based methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Xie, H.; Esveld, D.C.; Abee, T.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is s

  16. LIFETIME AND TEMPORAL OCCURRENCE OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAE ON PONDEROSA PINE (PINUS PONDEROSA LAWS.) SEEDLINGS GROWN UNDER VARIED ATMOSPHERIC CO-2 AND NITROGEN LEVELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change(elevated atmospheric CO-2,and altered air temperatures,precipitation amounts and seasonal patterns)may affect ecosystem processes by altering carbon allocation in plants,and carbon flux from plants to soil.Mycorrhizal fungi,as carbon sinks, are among the first soil...

  17. A reduced fraction of plant N derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) and reduced rhizobial nifH gene numbers indicate a lower capacity for nitrogen fixation in nodules of white clover exposed to long-term CO2 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T.; Bowatte, S.; Newton, P. C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Using the δ15N natural abundance method, we found that the fraction of nitrogen derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) in field-grown white clover (Trifolium repens L.) plants was significantly lower (72.0% vs. 89.8%, p = 0.047 in a grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 13 yr using free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE). Twelve months later we conducted an experiment to investigate the reasons behind the reduced N fixation. We took cuttings from white clover plants growing in the FACE and established individual plants in a glasshouse using soil from the appropriate ambient or elevated CO2 treatments. The established plants were then transplanted back into their "rings of origin" and sampled over a 6-week period. We used molecular ecological analyses targeting nifH genes and transcripts of rhizobia in symbiosis with white clover (Trifolium repens L.) to understand the potential mechanisms. Shoot biomass was significantly lower in eCO2, but there was no difference in nodule number or mass per plant. The numbers of nifH genes and gene transcripts per nodule were significantly reduced under eCO2, but the ratio of gene to transcript number and the strains of rhizobia present were the same in both treatments. We conclude that the capacity for biological nitrogen fixation was reduced by eCO2 in white clover and was related to the reduced rhizobia numbers in nodules. We discuss the finding of reduced gene number in relation to factors controlling bacteroid DNA amount, which may imply an influence of nitrogen as well as phosphorus.

  18. Influence of thermal treatment in N{sub 2} atmosphere on chemical, microstructural and optical properties of indium tin oxide and nitrogen doped indium tin oxide rf-sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroescu, H.; Anastasescu, M.; Preda, S.; Nicolescu, M.; Stoica, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy, Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Stefan, N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor 409, RO-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kampylafka, V.; Aperathitis, E. [FORTH-IESL, Crete (Greece); Modreanu, M. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Zaharescu, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy, Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Gartner, M., E-mail: mgartner@icf.ro [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy, Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-08-31

    We report the influence of the normal thermal treatment (TT) and of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the microstructural, optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) and nitrogen doped indium tin oxide (ITO:N) thin films. The TT was carried out for 1 h at 400 °C and the RTA for 1 min up to 400 °C, both in N{sub 2} atmosphere. The ITO and ITO:N films were deposited by reactive sputtering in Argon, and respectively Nitrogen plasma, on Si with (100) and (111) orientation. The present study brings data about the microstructural and optical properties of ITO thin films with thicknesses around 300–400 nm. Atomic Force Microscopy analysis showed the formation of continuous and homogeneous films, fully covered by quasi-spherical shaped particles, with higher roughness values on Si(100) as compared to Si(111). Spectroscopic ellipsometry allowed the determination of film thickness, optical band gap as well as of the dispersion curves of n and k optical constants. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of diffraction peaks corresponding to the same nominal bulk composition of ITO, but with different intensities and preferential orientation depending on the substrate, atmosphere of deposition and type of thermal treatment. - Highlights: ► Stability of the films can be monitored by experimental ellipsometric spectra. ► The refractive index of indium tin oxide film on 0.3–30 μm range is reported. ► Si(100) substrate induces rougher film surfaces than Si(111). ► Rapid thermal annealing and normal thermal treatment lead to stable conductive film. ► The samples have a higher preferential orientation after rapid thermal annealing.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of ground and satellite column measurements of NO2 and O3 over the Atlantic Ocean during the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Douglas K.; Najjar, Raymond G.; Tzortziou, Maria; Abuhassan, Nader; Thompson, Anne M.; Kollonige, Debra E.

    2016-12-01

    In situ measurements of O3 and nitrogen oxides (NO + NO2 ≡ NOx) and remote sensing measurements of total column NO2 and O3 were collected on a ship in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen to Coastal Ecosystems (DANCE) campaign in July-August 2014, 100 km east of the mid-Atlantic United States. Relatively clean conditions for both surface in situ mixing ratio and total column O3 and NO2 measurements were observed throughout the campaign. Increased surface and column NO2 and O3 amounts were observed when a terrestrial air mass was advected over the study region. Relative to ship-based total column measurements using a Pandora over the entire study, satellite measurements overestimated total column NO2 under these relatively clean atmospheric conditions over offshore waters by an average of 16%. Differences are most likely due to proximity, or lack thereof, to surface emissions; spatial averaging due to the field of view of the satellite instrument; and the lack of sensitivity of satellite measurements to the surface concentrations of pollutants. Total column O3 measurements from the shipboard Pandora showed good correlation with the satellite measurements (r = 0.96), but satellite measurements were 3% systematically higher than the ship measurements, in agreement with previous studies. Derived values of boundary layer height using the surface in situ and total column measurements of NO2 are much lower than modeled and satellite-retrieved boundary layer heights, which highlight the differences in the vertical distribution between terrestrial and marine environments.

  20. Modelling changes in nitrogen cycling to sustain increases in forest productivity under elevated atmospheric CO2 and contrasting site conditions

    OpenAIRE

    R. F. Grant

    2013-01-01

    If increases in net primary productivity (NPP) caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (Ca) are to be sustained, key N processes such as soil mineralization, biological fixation, root uptake and nutrient conservation must also be increased. Simulating the response of these processes to elevated Ca is therefore vital for models used to project the effects of rising Ca on NPP. In this modelling study, hypotheses are proposed for changes in soil mineralization, biolo...

  1. Quantification of β-carotene, retinol, retinyl acetate and retinyl palmitate in enriched fruit juices using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    A detailed optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was carried out for developing liquid chromatographic (HPLC) techniques, using both fluorescence and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of preforms of vitamin A: retinol (R), retinyl acetate (RA), retinyl palmitate (RP) and β-carotene (β-C). The HPLC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of methanol and water, with gradient elution. The APCI-MS and fluorescence spectra permitted the correct identification of compounds in the analyzed samples. Parameters affecting DLLME were optimized using 2 mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 150 μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent). The precision ranged from 6% to 8% (RSD) and the limits of detection were between 0.03 and 1.4 ng mL(-1), depending on the compound. The enrichment factor values were in the 21-44 range. Juice samples were analyzed without saponification and no matrix effect was found when using fluorescence detection, so calibration was possible with aqueous standards. However, a matrix effect appeared with APCI-MS, in which case it was necessary to apply matrix-matched calibration. There was great variability in the forms of vitamin A present in the juices, the most abundant ester being retinyl acetate (0.04 to 3.4 μg mL(-1)), followed by the amount of retinol (0.01 to 0.16 μg mL(-1)), while retinyl palmitate was not detected, except in the milk-containing juice, in which RP was the main form. The representative carotenoid β-carotene was present in the orange, peach, mango and multifruit juices in high amounts. The method was validated using two certified reference materials.

  2. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory - A Calorimeter for UHECR

    CERN Document Server

    Keilhauer, B

    2006-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 10$^{18.5}$ eV. Currently the first part of the Observatory nears completion in the southern hemisphere in Argentina. One detection technique uses over 1600 water Cherenkov tanks at ground where samples of secondary particles of extensive air showers (EAS) are detected. The second technique is a calorimetric measurement of the energy deposited by EAS in the atmosphere. Charged secondary particles of EAS lose part of their energy in the atmosphere via ionization. The deposited energy is converted into excitation of molecules of the air and afterwards partly emitted as fluorescence light mainly from nitrogen in the wavelength region between 300 and 400 nm. This light is observed with 24 fluorescence telescopes in 4 stations placed at the boundary of the surface array. This setup provides a combined measurement of the longitudinal shower development and the lateral particle distribution at ground of the...

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  4. Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen and greenhouse gases at the NitroEurope core flux measurement sites: Measurement strategy and first data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiba, U.; Drewer, J.; Tang, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    The NitroEurope project aims to improve understanding of the nitrogen (N) cycle at the continental scale and quantify the major fluxes of reactive N by a combination of reactive N measurements and modelling activities. As part of the overall measurement strategy, a network of 13 flux ‘super sites...... by a network of low-cost flux measurements (Level-2, 9 sites) and a network to infer reactive N fluxes at 58 sites (Level-1), for comparison with carbon (C) flux measurements. Measurements at the Level-3 sites include high resolution N2O, NO (also CH4, CO2) fluxes, wet and dry N deposition, leaching of N and C...

  5. Reply to "Critical assessment of the current state of scientific knowledge, terminology, and research needs concerning the ecological effects of elevated atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fengxue; Zhang, Yuandong; Huang, Mei; Tao, Bo; Yan, Huimin; Guo, Rui; Li, Jie

    2017-03-01

    In their assessment, Pan et al. (2016) criticize that our estimation of 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1 in 2010 underestimates the total nitrogen (N) deposition amounts by a factor around two by comparing with the estimation of Xu et al. (2015). Our paper entitled "Nitrogen deposition and its effect on carbon storage in Chinese forests during 1981-2010" aims to evaluate the influence of elevated N deposition in China on carbon storage in forest ecosystems by using a process-based model. As limited by observed N deposition dataset availability, we developed a simple algorithm to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations in N deposition based on the relationships among N deposition, precipitation, N fertilizer use, and fuel consumption with reference to the method of Lin et al. (2000). Our results show that the rate of N deposition increased by 0.058 g N m-2 yr-1 between 1981 and 2010. The N deposition rate in 2010 was 2.32 g N m-2 yr-1, and it showed a large spatial variation from 0 to 0.25 g N m-2 yr-1 on the northwestern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to over 4.5 g N m-2 yr-1 in the southeastern China. We really underestimated the total N deposition in China because we were lack of dry deposition observation dataset in our research. However, we think Pan et al. (2016) overestimated the difference between our estimation and that in Xu et al. (2015). It should be encouraged to discuss the past and current status of N deposition in China based on both observation and simulation. All comments, assessments and suggestions contribute to promote the scientific understanding of N deposition and its influence on ecosystems.

  6. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  7. SOIL CONTAMINATION BY NITROGEN COMPOUNDS DURING ORGANIC FUEL COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Bubnov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a transition mechanism of flue gas nitrogen oxides being formed due to organic fuel combustion from atmosphere into soil. Mechanisms of nitrogen compound origination and transformation in atmosphere and their transition into soil have been presented in the paper. The paper recommends a generalized equation for mathematical description of nitrogen migration into soil. 

  8. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey XIX. B-type Supergiants - Atmospheric Parameters and Nitrogen Abundances to Investigate the Role of Binarity and the Width of the Main Sequence

    CERN Document Server

    McEvoy, C M; Evans, C J; Kalari, V M; Markova, N; Simón-Díaz, S; Vink, J S; Walborn, N R; Crowther, P A; de Koter, A; de Mink, S E; Dunstall, P R; Hénault-Brunet, V; Herrero, A; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Apellániz, J Maíz; Najarro, F; Puls, J; Sana, H; Schneider, F R N; Taylor, W D

    2014-01-01

    TLUSTY non-LTE model atmosphere calculations have been used to determine atmospheric parameters and nitrogen (N) abundances for 34 single and 18 binary B-type supergiants (BSGs). The effects of flux contribution from an unseen secondary were considered for the binary sample. We present the first systematic study of the incidence of binarity for a sample of BSGs across the theoretical terminal age main sequence (TAMS). To account for the distribution of effective temperatures of the BSGs it may be necessary to extend the TAMS to lower temperatures. This is consistent with the derived distribution of mass discrepancies, projected rotational velocities (vsini) and N abundances, provided that stars cooler than this temperature are post RSG objects. For the BSGs in the Tarantula and previous FLAMES surveys, most have small vsini. About 10% have larger vsini (>100 km/s) but surprisingly these show little or no N enhancement. All the cooler BSGs have low vsini of <70km/s and high N abundance estimates, implying t...

  9. 液氮充注气调保鲜运输厢内环境因素间耦合关系%Coupling effect of environmental factors in fresh-keeping transportation container with controlled atmosphere by liquid nitrogen injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩谞; 吕恩利; 陆华忠; 张东霞; 许锦锋; 杨松夏

    2012-01-01

    为掌握液氮充注气调运输保鲜环境因素间的耦合关系,搭建了气调运输保鲜环境调控试验平台.通过试验分别研究了制冷、高压雾化加湿、液氮充注气调、换气等调节过程对保鲜环境中温度、相对湿度、氧气体积分数、二氧化碳体积分数等参数的影响.结果表明:液氮充注气调在快速降低氧气体积分数的同时,对温度和相对湿度影响均较大;制冷在降低温度的同时,对相对湿度影响较大;采用高压雾化加湿时,对温度影响较小,空气压缩机吸入外界空气将对氧气体积分数产生较大影响,而吸入厢体内气体对氧气体积分数影响均很小;换气对厢体内氧气体积分数和二氧化碳体积分数影响较大.研究结果可供气调运输保鲜环境综合调控提供参考.%In order to research the environmental factors coupling effect in fresh-keeping transportation with controlled atmosphere, an experimental platform for environmental control was established. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of regulation process such as refrigeration, high-pressure atomizing humidification, liquid nitrogen injection and ventilation on temperature, humidity, O2 concentration, and CO2 concentration of the fresh-keeping environment. Results indicated that liquid nitrogen injection during controlled atmosphere process could rapidly reduce the O2 concentration, meanwhile significantly affecting temperature and humidity in the container. Similarly, refrigeration had a great impact on the humidity when decreasing the temperature. High-pressure atomizing humidification made little effect on temperature when increasing the humidity, whereas the compressor intaking the air outside the container would exerted dramatic effect on the volume fraction of O2 than intaking the air inside. Ventilation had great influence on the volume fraction of O2 and CO2. The results can provide references for integrated control strategy

  10. Electrocatalytic Synthesis of Ammonia at Room Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure from Water and Nitrogen on a Carbon-Nanotube-Based Electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiming; Perathoner, Siglinda; Ampelli, Claudio; Mebrahtu, Chalachew; Su, Dangsheng; Centi, Gabriele

    2017-03-01

    Ammonia is synthesized directly from water and N2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow electrochemical cell operating in gas phase (half-cell for the NH3 synthesis). Iron supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was used as the electrocatalyst in this half-cell. A rate of ammonia formation of 2.2×10(-3)  gNH3  m(-2)  h(-1) was obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow of N2 , with stable behavior for at least 60 h of reaction, under an applied potential of -2.0 V. This value is higher than the rate of ammonia formation obtained using noble metals (Ru/C) under comparable reaction conditions. Furthermore, hydrogen gas with a total Faraday efficiency as high as 95.1 % was obtained. Data also indicate that the active sites in NH3 electrocatalytic synthesis may be associated to specific carbon sites formed at the interface between iron particles and CNT and able to activate N2 , making it more reactive towards hydrogenation.

  11. Atmospheric emission of nitrogen oxide from kraft recovery boilers in Sweden; Kartlaeggning av NO{sub x}-utslaepp fraan sodapannor i Sverige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjoerk, Anders; Herstad Swaerd, Solvie [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2000-05-01

    Recovery boiler NO{sub x} emissions are low compared with those from power boilers. However tighter environmental requirements to decrease the acidic emissions implies that all sources have to be addressed. There are an ongoing evaluation and development of NO{sub x} control technologies in the pulp industry. Basically air staging, selective catalytic reduction, SCR, and selective noncatalytic reduction, SNCR, have been discussed. Other NO{sub x} control options may be available as a result of ongoing research and development. As a background in the work to reduce the acid rain it has been considered necessary to have a good picture of the NO{sub x} emission from recovery boilers, and the Thermal Engineering Research Institute in Sweden have therefore sponsored this study. The intention is to give a good general view and try to explain the reasons for the large differences between boilers. Data from the 30 kraft recovery boilers which were in operation in Sweden during 1999 have been collected. Both NO{sub x} levels and specific conditions which could have an influence on the level have been included. The evaluation show a clear correlation between the nitrogen content in the liquor and the NO{sub x} level. It seams also that a long retention time in the furnace give an opportunity to reduce the amount of nitrogen oxide. For most boilers in Sweden the NO{sub x} levels are reported in mg/MJ and comparison could be done between different types of boilers. However for recovery boilers there could be a large uncertainty in the calculation which gives the amount (mg) of NO{sub x}, the definition of the heat input to be used (MJ) is either not clear. As a base for the study the measured concentration in ppm is used instead. The reported values are in the range of 30 - 100 ppm, however the majority of the boilers operate in a more narrow range 60-80 ppm. Air staging and other combustion methods could not reasonably reduce the NO{sub x} emission with more than 20% in the

  12. 氮素水平对转C4光合基因水稻花期剑叶PSⅡ荧光特性的影响%Responses of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Characteristics to Nitrogen in Flag Leaves of C4 Photosynthetic Enzymes Transgenic Rice during the Reproductive Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏晓东; 李霞; 郭士伟; 陈平波

    2013-01-01

    There was close relationship between nitrogen use efficiency and photosynthetic capability. C4 photo-synthetic gene transgenic rice had higher light use efficiency and CO2 assimilation compared to traditional C3 rice cultivars. However, whether nitrogen had influence on photosynthesis of these transgenic rice cultivars was unknown Chlorophyll fluorescence can reflect intrinsic characteristics using fast measurement without any damage to leaves, and is usually used as probe of photosynthesis. In the present study, the pepc (PC) ,ppdk (PK)and pepc + ppdk (CK) transgenic rice plants were used as experimental materials with their wild type Kitaaki( WT) to investigate the responses of photosynthetic characteristics to different nitrogen levels in C4 photosynthetic gene transgenic rice at the late reproductive stage. Changes in SPAD values, morphological parameters were measured in flag leaves of four cultivars under different nitrogen levels. The analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic curves and some related parameters were also done under three nitrogen levels(0. 7 mmol/L N-1/4N low nitrogen,3 mmol/L N-1N control, 6 mmol/L N-2N high nitrogen)at the late reproductive stage using fast chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic technology, in order to explore the effects of nitrogen on photosystem Ⅱ ( PS Ⅱ ) function of C4 photosynthetic gene transgenic rice flag leaves. The results showed that 1/4N treatment increased root length,decreased plant height,leaf area and chlorophyll contents of flag leaves in all cultivars, while 2N treatment increased leaf area and chlorophyll contents. C4 photosynthetic gene transgenic plants exposed to 1/4N treatment had higher chlorophyll contents, and PC had longest root length and largest leaf area of flag leaves, which indicated that they had more morphological advantage under 1/4N treatment than wild type. The fluorescence O-J-I-P curves changes were found in all cultivars under 1/4N treatment. The K phase (at 300 μs) increased and C

  13. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  14. Nitrogen gas flushing can be bactericidal: the temperature-dependent destiny of Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4 under a pure N2 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia; Alatossava, Tapani

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative Pseudomonas and Gram-positive Bacillus are the most common spoilage bacteria in raw and pasteurized milk, respectively. In previous studies, nitrogen (N2) gas flushing treatments of raw and pasteurized milk at cold chain-temperatures inhibited bacterial spoilage and highlighted different susceptibilities to the N2 treatment with the exclusion of certain bacterial types. Here, we investigated the effects of pure N2 gas flushing on representative strains of these genera grown in mono- or co-cultures at 15 and 25°C. Bacillus weihenstephanensis, a frequent inhabitant of fluid dairy products, is represented by the genome-sequenced KBAB4 strain. Among Pseudomonas, P. tolaasii LMG 2342(T) and strain C1, a raw milk psychrotroph, were selected. The N2 gas flushing treatment revealed: (1) temperature-dependent responses; (2) inhibition of the growth of both pseudomonads; (3) emergence of small colony variants (SCVs) for B. weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 at 15°C induced by the N2 treatment or when grown in co-culture with Pseudomonas strains; (4) N2 gas flushing modulates (suppressed or stimulated) bacterial antagonistic reactions in co-cultures; (5) most importantly, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed that at 25°C the majority of the KBAB4 cells were killed by pure N2 gas flushing. This observation constitutes the first evidence that N2 gas flushing has bactericidal effects.

  15. Measurement of OH (X2Σ) in immediate vicinity of dielectric surface under pulsed dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure using two geometries of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi; Negishi, Nobuaki

    2014-04-01

    The behavior of the ground state OH radical was studied in humid air using pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge. The validity of OH measurement in immediate vicinity of the dielectric surface was discussed using two geometries of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement, and surface distribution and temporal profiles of OH were examined. A comparison of parallel- and perpendicular-LIF techniques for OH measurement revealed that OH was mostly produced in a region several tens of μm above the dielectric surface. The surface distribution profile of OH agreed well with that of N2(C), and in both cases, the total production generated by a discharge pulse was proportional to the discharge energy. The OH local density in surface streamer channels was estimated to be 1.3 × 1015 cm-3 according to the decay rate of OH, which was similar to that in corona discharge. Additionally, the local density of OH remained constant regardless of discharge energies. These results indicate that the yield of OH increased with the discharge energy owing to expansion of the surface streamer region, increase in streamer radius or thickness or the number of branches, whereas the local density of OH in the streamer channel remained constant regardless of discharge energy.

  16. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected.

  17. Effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration, irradiance, and soil nitrogen availability on leaf photosynthetic traits of Polygonum sachalinense around natural CO2 springs in northern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Noriyuki; Onoda, Yusuke; Hikosaka, Kouki

    2010-09-01

    Long-term exposure to elevated CO2 concentration will affect the traits of wild plants in association with other environmental factors. We investigated multiple effects of atmospheric CO2 concentration, irradiance, and soil N availability on the leaf photosynthetic traits of a herbaceous species, Polygonum sachalinense, growing around natural CO2 springs in northern Japan. Atmospheric CO2 concentration and its interaction with irradiance and soil N availability affected several leaf traits. Leaf mass per unit area increased and N per mass decreased with increasing CO2 and irradiance. Leaf N per area increased with increasing soil N availability at higher CO2 concentrations. The photosynthetic rate under growth CO2 conditions increased with increasing irradiance and CO2, and with increasing soil N at higher CO2 concentrations. The maximal velocity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation (V (cmax)) was affected by the interaction of CO2 and soil N, suggesting that down-regulation of photosynthesis at elevated CO2 was more evident at lower soil N availability. The ratio of the maximum rate of electron transport to V (cmax) (J (max)/V (cmax)) increased with increasing CO2, suggesting that the plants used N efficiently for photosynthesis at high CO2 concentrations by changes in N partitioning. To what extent elevated CO2 influenced plant traits depended on other environmental factors. As wild plants are subject to a wide range of light and nutrient availability, our results highlight the importance of these environmental factors when the effects of elevated CO2 on plants are evaluated.

  18. 缙云山大气氮湿沉降组成及其变化特征%Composition and temporal variation of atmospheric nitrogen wet deposition in Jinyun Mountain, southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙素琪; 王云琦; 王玉杰; 张会兰; 于雷; 唐晓芬; 朱锦奇; 周彬

    2013-01-01

    Field observation of nitrogen wet deposition in Jinyun Mountain,the natural conservation station of southwestern China,was fixed collected by APS-2A precipitation-dust automatic acquisition instrument from May to October 2012,based on which the composition,monthly and seasonal variation of nitrogen wet deposition were analyzed.Results showed that:1) the concentration of NH4+-N was higher than that of NO3--N and DON (dissolved organic nitrogen),indicating that emission load of NH3 within this area was generally high; 2) the major form of atmospheric reactive nitrogen in Jinyun Mountain area was reduced nitrogen NH4+-N,which primarily came from agricultural productivity; 3) the average concentrations of NO3-N,NH4+-N and DON in precipitation were (0.441 ±0.304),(0.821 ±0.480) and (0.203 ± 0.211) mg/L during the monitoring period,respectively,of which the above three nitrogen forms ranked in NH4+-N > NO3--N > DON ; 4) the highest concentrations of NO3--N,NH4+-N and DON all occurred in May,and the average values were (0.642 ± 0.292),(1.273 ± 0.739) and (0.329 ±0.231) kg/hm2,accounted for 29.76%,56.27% and 13.98% of the total nitrogen wet deposition,respectively; 5) nitrogen concentration was weakly correlated with rainfall and rainfall intensity,while the total nitrogen wet deposition presented an obvious linear correlation with the precipitation amount (P <0.01),which demonstrates that nitrogen wet deposition is mainly affected by rainfall,but rainfall and rainfall intensity have little impact on N concentration.%采用APS-2A型降水降尘自动采集仪,定位收集2012年5-10月重庆缙云山自然保护站的湿沉降数据,分析该地区大气氮湿沉降浓度及沉降的组成、月变化及季节变化.结果表明:1)相对于NO3--N和DON(可溶性有机氮),降雨中NH4+-N的质量浓度较高,说明该地区NH3的排放量较高;2)缙云山地区大气活性氮主要是还原态的NH4+-N,其主要来源于农业生产;3)

  19. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  20. Changes in species richness and composition in European acidic grasslands over the past 70 years: the contribution of cumulative atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre, C.; Ranke, T.; Diekmann, M. [Institute of Ecology, FB 2, University of Bremen, Leobener Str., DE-28359 Bremen (Germany); Stevens, C.J.; Dise, N.B. [Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 GD (United Kingdom); Bleeker, A. [Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Peppler-Lisbach, C. [Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Oldenburg, PO Box 2503, DE-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Gowing, D.J.G. [The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dorland, E. [Utrecht University, Institute of Environmental Biology, Section of Landscape Ecology, PO Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht (Netherlands); Bobbink, R. [B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University, PO Box 9010, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    Our study investigates the negative impact of nitrogen (N) deposition on species richness in acidic grasslands, based on a temporal comparison of vegetation data spanning a period of almost 70 years. We compiled a large data base of plots assigned to the Violion caninae grassland type, composed of managed, but unfertilized semi-natural grasslands on nutrient-poor, acidic soils. In total 1114 plots, mainly from Great Britain, the Netherlands and Germany, were compiled, dating back to 1939. Environmental site information included geographical and soil (mean Ellenberg values) variables as well as estimates of cumulative N and sulphur (S) deposition since 1939. Statistical analyses were carried out separately for the data subsets from the three regions. In all regions, the vegetation differentiation was mainly related to soil acidity and nutrient availability, as well as to the year of sampling and the cumulative amounts of N and S deposition. Plot-species richness of vascular plants and bryophytes (analysed for Great Britain only) decreased with time and analyses suggest these are affected by various factors, notably soil pH, but also latitude and cumulative N deposition. The latter explained more of the variation in species number than the year of sampling and cumulative S deposition, which supports the interpretation that the decline in species richness is mainly caused by increasing N availability and less by altered management and soil acidification. For Great Britain and Germany, cumulative N deposition showed a strong negative relationship with several biodiversity measures, especially the proportion of dicots, whereas it was positively related to the proportion of grass species. In general, our results give temporal evidence for the negative effect of N deposition on species richness in semi-natural vegetation.

  1. Evaluating the Contributions of Atmospheric Deposition of Carbon and Other Nutrients to Nitrification in Alpine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldani, K. M.; Mladenov, N.; Williams, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Colorado Front Range of the Rocky Mountains contains undeveloped, barren soils, yet in this environment there is strong evidence for a microbial role in increased nitrogen (N) export. Barren soils in alpine environments are severely carbon-limited, which is the main energy source for microbial activity and sustenance of life. It has been shown that atmospheric deposition can contain high amounts of organic carbon (C). Atmospheric pollutants, dust events, and biological aerosols, such as bacteria, may be important contributors to the atmospheric organic C load. In this stage of the research we evaluated seasonal trends in the chemical composition and optical spectroscopic (fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance) signatures of snow, wet deposition, and dry deposition in an alpine environment at Niwot Ridge in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado to obtain a better understanding of the sources and chemical character of atmospheric deposition. Our results reveal a positive trend between dissolved organic carbon concentrations and calcium, nitrate and sulfate concentrations in wet and dry deposition, which may be derived from such sources as dust and urban air pollution. We also observed the presence of seasonally-variable fluorescent components that may be attributed to fluorescent pigments in bacteria. These results are relevant because atmospheric inputs of carbon and other nutrients may influence nitrification in barren, alpine soils and, ultimately, the export of nitrate to alpine watersheds.

  2. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  3. Improvements to the c