WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric layers

  1. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling;

    2011-01-01

    . This portion of the atmosphere is extremely important, both scientifically and operationally, because it is the region within which surface lander spacecraft must operate and also determines exchanges of heat, momentum, dust, water, and other tracers between surface and subsurface reservoirs and the free...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauer, Petr

    Praha : Česká technika - nakladatelství ČVUT, 2006 - (Ambrož, P.; Masáková, Z.), s. 11-18 [Doktorandské dny 2006. Katedra matematiky FJFI ČVUT, Praha (CZ), 10.11.2006-24.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : atmospheric boundary layer * numerical simulation * finite element method Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality

  3. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  4. Characteristics of the Martian atmosphere surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, G. D.; Haberle, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers extend elements of various terrestrial boundary layer models to Mars in order to estimate sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes within the Martian atmospheric surface layer. To estimate the molecular viscosity and thermal conductivity of a CO2-H2O gas mixture under Martian conditions, parameterizations were developed. Parameterizations for specific heat and and binary diffusivity were also determined. The Prandtl and Schmidt numbers derived from these thermophysical properties were found to range from 0.78 - 1.0 and 0.47 - 0.70, respectively, for Mars. Brutsaert's model for sensible and latent heat transport within the interfacial sublayer for both aerodynamically smooth and rough airflow was experimentally tested under similar conditions, validating its application to Martian conditions. For the surface sublayer, the researchers modified the definition of the Monin-Obukhov length to properly account for the buoyancy forces arising from water vapor gradients in the Martian atmospheric boundary layer. This length scale was then utilized with similarity theory turbulent flux profiles with the same form as those used by Businger et al. and others. It was found that under most Martian conditions, the interfacial and surface sublayers offer roughly comparable resistance to sensible heat and water vapor transport and are thus both important in determining the associated fluxes.

  5. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  6. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  7. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  8. Convection and Chemistry in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Petersen

    1999-01-01

    The earth’s troposphere is the lowest layer of the atmosphere and has a thickness of about 10 km. It is the layer that contains most of the mass (80%) of the atmosphere. All weather phenomena that we experience have their origin in the troposphere. It is the stage for some well-known environmental problems: climate change, ozone smog, and acidification. These problems are related to the trace amount of gases that are emitted into the troposphere from anthropogenic sources. Alth...

  9. CFD Modeling of Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on Computational Fluid Dynamics models that focus on modeling the airflow in a neutrally stratified surface-layer. Physical processes like the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, that are important to the...... atmospheric boundary-layer, are mostly ignored so far. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include atmospheric stability and the Coriolis effect. Within the present work a RANS model framework is developed and implemented into...

  10. Aspects of the atmospheric surface layers on Mars and Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Landberg, L.;

    2002-01-01

    mean flow on Mars is found to obey the same scaling laws as on Earth. The largest micrometeorological differences between the two atmospheres are associated with the low air density of the Martian atmosphere. Together with the virtual absence of water vapour, it reduces the importance of the...... for the same surface features. The scaling laws have been validated analysing the Martian surface-layer data for the relations between the power spectra of wind and temperature turbulence and the corresponding mean values of wind speed and temperature. Usual spectral formulations were used based on...... the scaling laws ruling the Earth atmospheric surface layer, whereby the Earth's atmosphere is used as a standard for the Martian atmosphere....

  11. Inhomogeneities in molecular layers of Mira atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wittkowski, M; Ireland, M; Karovicova, I; Ohnaka, K; Scholz, M; van Wyk, F; Whitelock, P; Wood, P R; Zijlstra, A A

    2011-01-01

    We obtained K-band spectro-interferometric observations of the Miras R Cnc, X Hya, W Vel, and RW Vel with a spectral resolution of 1500 using the VLTI/AMBER instrument. We obtained concurrent JHKL photometry using the the Mk II instrument at the SAAO. Our sources have wavelength-dependent visibility values that are consistent with earlier low-resolution AMBER observations of S Ori and with the predictions of dynamic model atmosphere series based on self-excited pulsation models. The wavelength-dependent UD diameters show a minimum near the near-continuum bandpass at 2.25 um. They increase by up to 30% toward the H2O band at 2.0 um and by up to 70% at the CO bandheads. The dynamic model atmosphere series show a consistent wavelength-dependence, and their parameters such as the visual phase, effective temperature, and distances are consistent with independent estimates. The closure phases have significantly wavelength-dependent non-zero values indicating deviations from point symmetry. For example, the R Cnc cl...

  12. Atmospheric boundary layer over steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil A.; Druzhinin, Oleg; Kandaurov, Alexander A.; Ermakova, Olga S.; Ezhova, Ekaterina V.; Esau, Igor; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-08-01

    Turbulent air-sea interactions coupled with the surface wave dynamics remain a challenging problem. The needs to include this kind of interaction into the coupled environmental, weather and climate models motivate the development of a simplified approximation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interaction processes. This study proposes a quasi-linear model of wind-wave coupling. It formulates the approach and derives the model equations. The model is verified through a set of laboratory (direct measurements of an airflow by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique) and numerical (a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique) experiments. The experiments support the central model assumption that the flow velocity field averaged over an ensemble of turbulent fluctuations is smooth and does not demonstrate flow separation from the crests of the waves. The proposed quasi-linear model correctly recovers the measured characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface.

  13. Simulation of aerosol substance transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezhenin, A. A.; Raputa, V. F.; Shlychkov, V. Ð. ń.

    2014-11-01

    A model for the reconstruction of the surface concentration of a heavy non-homogeneous substance transfered in the atmosphere is proposed. The model is used to simulate the snow surface contamination by benzo(a)pyren in the vicinity of Power Station-3 in the city of Barnaul. The effects of wind rotation in the atmospheric boundary layer on the field of long-term aerosol substance are assessed.

  14. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Turner, DD [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Chilson, P [University of Oklahoma; Blumberg, WG [University of Oklahoma; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Jacobsen, EP [University of Oklahoma; Wharton, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  15. Numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennes, L.; Bodnar, T.; Kozel, K.; Sladek, I. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics; Fraunie, P. [Universite Toulon et du Var, La Garde (France). Lab. de Sondages Electromagnetiques de l' Environment Terrestre

    2001-07-01

    The work deals with the numerical solution of viscous turbulent steady flows in the atmospheric boundary layer including pollution propagation. For its description we use two different mathematical models: - a model based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows - a model based on a system of boundary layer equations. These systems are completed by two transport equations for the concentration of passive pollutants and the potential temperature in conservative form, respectively, and by an algebraic turbulence model. (orig.)

  16. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on t...

  17. Numerical modelling of the atmospheric mixing-layer diurnal evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduce a numeric procedure to determine the temporal evolution of the height, potential temperature and mixing ratio in the atmospheric mixing layer. The time and spatial derivatives were evaluated via forward in time scheme to predict the local evolution of the mixing-layer parameters, and a forward in time, upstream in space scheme to predict the evolution of the mixing-layer over a flat region with a one-dimensional advection component. The surface turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat were expressed using a simple sine wave that is function of the hour day and kind of the surface (water or country). (author)

  18. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...... in the boundary layer. In the current study, another approach has been implemented to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on Immersed Boundary Method and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer. An initial boundary...... based on the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [2] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than a typical required grid size for such problems. LES simulations are...

  19. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Characteristics during BOBMEX-Pilot Experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Bhat; S Ameenulla; M Venkataramana; K Sengupta

    2000-06-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer characteristics observed during the BOBMEX-Pilot experiment are reported. Surface meteorological data were acquired continuously through an automatic weather monitoring system and manually every three hours. High resolution radiosondes were launched to obtain the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere. The study area was convectively active, the SSTs were high, surface air was warm and moist, and the surface air moist static energy was among the highest observed over the tropical oceans. The mean sea air temperature difference was about 1.25°C and the sea skin temperature was cooler than bucket SST by 0.5°C. The atmospheric mixed layer was shallow, fluctuated in response to synoptic conditions from 100 m to 900 m with a mean around 500 m.

  20. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2012-01-01

    simulation and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid......Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM...

  1. Laboratory simulation of rotating atmospheric boundary layer flows over obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study fits in the frame of a research program concerning in general the dynamics of airflow in the atmospheric boundary layer and in particular the influence of terrestrial rotation on the movements of air masses interacting with natural extended obstacles (mountains). The experiment has been performed by the method of hydraulic simulation, using schematic models at reduced scale in a channel placed on a rotating platform. Only the case of a neutral atmosphere was considered; the wake of an obstacle with semi-circular section and the reciprocal interaction of two obstacles of this kind placed perpendicular to the flow were studied

  2. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    periods of analysis, that under both barotropic and baroclinic conditions, the model predicts the gradient and geostrophic wind well, explaining for a particular case an 'unusual' backing of the wind. The observed conditions at the surface, on the other hand, explain the differences in wind veering. The......Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed...... simulated winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general....

  3. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Elena-Carmen Teleman; Radu Silion; Elena Axinte; Radu Pescaru

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence sca...

  4. Computation of 2D stratified flows in atmospheric boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tauer, M.; Šimonek, J.; Kozel, Karel; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, v. v. i., 2009 - (Jonáš, P.; Uruba, V.), s. 47-48 ISBN 978-80-87012-21-5. [Colloquium Fluid Dynamics 2009. Praha (CZ), 21.10.2009-23.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/0977 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : computation stratified flows * Navier-Stokes equations * atmospheric boundary layer Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  5. Numerical solution of 2D flows in atmospheric boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonek, J.; Tauer, J.; Kozel, K.; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Příhoda, Jaromír

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, v. v. i., 2008 - (Jonáš, P.; Uruba, V.), s. 51-52 ISBN 978-80-87012-14-7. [Colloquium FLUID DYNAMICS 2008. Praha (CZ), 22.10.2008-24.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400760405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : numerical simulation * atmospheric boundary layer * stratified flow Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  6. Albedo muons in upper layers of the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The albedo muon fluxes are calculated in the energy range 50≤E≤1000 MeV in the upper atmospheric layers. It is shown that the anisotropy degree of albedo muon flux in the stratosphere increases with the muon energy increase, and according to the absolute values the albedo muon flux becomes comparable with the direct albedo proton fluxes at energies > 200 MeV. 8 refs.; 2 figs

  7. Clear-air radar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Turker

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the design and operation of a high-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM- CW) radar system to study the structure and dynamics of clear-air turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This sensitive radar can image the vertical structure of the ABL with both high spatial and temporal resolutions, and provide both qualitative information about the morphology of clear-air structures and quantitative information on the intensity of fluctuations in refractive-index of air. The principles of operation and the hardware and data acquisition characteristics of the radar are described in the dissertation. In October 1999, the radar participated in the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study (CASES'99) Experiment to characterize the temporal structure and evolution of the boundary-layer features in both convective and stable conditions. The observed structures include clear-air convection, boundary layer evolution, gravity waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, stably stratified layers, and clear-air turbulence. Many of the S-band radar images also show high- reflectivity returns from Rayleigh scatterers such as insects. An adaptive median filtering technique based on local statistics has, therefore, been developed to discriminate between Bragg and Rayleigh scattering in clear-air radar observations. The filter is tested on radar observations of clear air convection with comparison to two commonly used image processing techniques. The dissertation also examines the statistical mean of the radar-measured C2n for clear-air convection, and compares it with the theoretical predictions. The study also shows that the inversion height, local thickness of the inversion layer, and the height of the elevated atmospheric layers can be estimated from the radar reflectivity measurements. In addition, comparisons to the radiosonde-based height estimates are made. To examine the temporal and spatial structure of C2n , the dissertation

  8. Coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling: effects on atmospheric boundary layer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, F. K.; Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Daniels, M. H.; Rihani, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Newly-developed coupled land-atmosphere models which incorporate both subsurface and atmospheric moisture dynamics have the potential to change our understanding of the hydrologic cycle. This presentation describes the effects of coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling on simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer. Both field observations and simulations indicate strong sensitivity of atmospheric dynamics to land-surface conditions, in particular surface soil moisture. Simulations of atmospheric flow in Owens Valley (California) and in the Riviera Valley (Switzerland) show strong sensitivity to land-surface conditions, thus motivating the need for more accurate representations of soil moisture. In addition to influences from weather and seasonal changes, soil moisture dynamics respond to diurnal heat fluxes on the land surface. Using our new fully-coupled groundwater-atmosphere model, we have demonstrated correlations of soil moisture and land-surface heat fluxes with groundwater fluctuations on short, diurnal time scales. By explicitly calculating groundwater dynamics for our domain of interest, we are able to produce realistic time- and space-varying soil moisture distributions that naturally correspond to variations in topography and surface evaporation. Simulations in idealized and real watersheds are shown to illustrate these effects. The observed variations in surface moisture distribution have large impacts on the moisture and temperature structure in the atmosphere, leading to changes in boundary layer depth and convective motions as compared to standard soil moisture representations. Our coupled model framework will allow detailed investigation of the complex cycle of land-atmosphere processes affecting moisture distributions in the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  9. The collapse of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiel, B J H; Clercx, H J H [Department of Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Moene, A F [Department of Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands); Jonker, H J J, E-mail: b.j.h.v.d.wiel@tue.nl [Department of Multi-scale Pysics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    A well-known phenomenon in the atmospheric boundary layer is the fact that winds may become very weak in the evening after a clear sunny day. In these quiet conditions usually hardly any turbulence is present. Consequently this type of boundary layer is referred to as the quasi-laminar boundary layer. In spite of its relevance, the appearance of laminar boundary layers is poorly understood and forms a long standing problem in meteorological research. Here we investigate an analogue problem in the form of a stably stratified channel flow. The flow is studied with a simplified atmospheric model as well as with Direct Numerical Simulations. Both models show remarkably similar behaviour with respect to the mean variables such as temperature and wind speed. The similarity between both models opens new way for understanding and predicting the laminarization process. Mathematical analysis on the simplified model shows that relaminarization can be understood from the existence of a definite limit in the maximum sustainable heat flux under stably stratified conditions. This fascinating aspect will be elaborated in future work.

  10. The height of the atmospheric boundary layer during unstable conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryning, S.E.

    2005-11-01

    The height of the convective atmospheric boundary layer, also called the mixed-layer, is one of the fundamental parameters that characterise the structure of the atmosphere near the ground. It has many theoretical and practical applications such as the prediction of air pollution concentrations, surface temperature and the scaling of turbulence. However, as pointed out by Builtjes (2001) in a review paper on Major Twentieth Century Milestones in Air Pollution Modelling and Its Application, the weakest point in meteorology data is still the determination of the height of the mixed-layer, the so-called mixing height. A simple applied model for the height of the mixed-layer over homogeneous terrain is suggested in chapter 2. It is based on a parameterised budget for the turbulent kinetic energy. In the model basically three terms - the spin-up term and the production of mechanical and convective turbulent kinetic energy - control the growth of the mixed layer. The interplay between the three terms is related to the meteorological conditions and the height of the mixed layer. A stable layer, the so-called entrainment zone, which is confined between the mixed layer and the free air above, caps the mixed layer. A parameterisation of the depth of the entrainment zone is also suggested, and used to devise a combined model for the height of the mixed layer and the entrainment zone. Another important aspect of the mixed layer development exists in coastal areas where an internal boundary layer forms downwind from the coastline. A model for the growth of the internal boundary layer is developed in analogy with the model for mixed layer development over homogeneous terrain. The strength of this model is that it can operate on a very fine spatial resolution with minor computer resources. Chapter 3 deals with the validation of the models. It is based in parts on data from the literature, and on own measurements. For the validation of the formation of the internal boundary layer

  11. Behaviour of tracer diffusion in simple atmospheric boundary layer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available 1-D profiles and time series from an idealised atmospheric boundary layer model are presented, which show agreement with boundary layer measurements of polar NOx. Diffusion models are increasingly being used as the framework for studying tropospheric air chemistry dynamics. Models based on standard boundary layer diffusivity profiles have an intrinsic behaviour that is not necessarily intuitive, due to the variation of turbulent diffusivity with height. The simple model presented captures the essence of the evolution of a trace gas released at the surface, and thereby provides both a programming and a conceptual tool in the analysis of observed trace gas evolution. A time scale inherent in the model can be tuned by fitting model time series to observations. This scale is then applicable to the more physically simple but chemically complex zeroth order or box models of chemical interactions.

  12. Wind Tunnel Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    To simulate the interaction of large Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the laboratory, we implement a variant of Counihan's technique [Counihan 1969] in which a combination of a castellated barrier, elliptical vortex generators, and floor roughness elements is used to create an artificial ABL profile in a standard closed loop wind tunnel. To examine the development and formation of the artificial ABL hotwire and SPIV measurements were taken at various downstream locations with changes in wall roughness, wall type, and vortex generator arrangements. It was found possible to generate a boundary layer at Reθ ~106 , with a mean velocity that followed the 1/7 power law of a neutral ABL over rural terrain and longitudinal turbulence intensities and power spectra that compare well with the data obtained for high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layers [Hultmark et al. 2010]. Supported by Hopewell Wind Power Ltd., and the Princeton Grand Challenges Program.

  13. Radiative instabilities of atmospheric jets and boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex flows occur in the atmosphere and they can be source of internal gravity waves. We focus here on the sources associated with radiative and shear (or Kelvin-Helmholtz) instabilities. Stability studies of shear layers in a stably stratified fluid concern mainly cases where shear and stratification are aligned along the same direction. In these cases, Miles (1961) and Howard (1961) found a necessary condition for stability based on the Richardson number: Ri ≥ 1/4. In this thesis, we show that this condition is not necessary when shear and stratification are not aligned: we demonstrate that a two-dimensional planar Bickley jet can be unstable for all Richardson numbers. Although the most unstable mode remains 2D, we show there exists an infinite family of 3D unstable modes exhibiting a radiative structure. A WKBJ theory is found to provide the main characteristics of these modes. We also study an inviscid and stratified boundary layer over an inclined wall with non-Boussinesq and compressible effects. We show that this flow is unstable as soon as the wall is not horizontal for all Froude numbers and that strongly stratified 3D perturbations behave exactly like compressible 2D perturbations. Applications of the results to the jet stream and the atmospheric boundary layer are proposed. (author)

  14. Problems in the simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows. [natural wind environment in atmospheric boundary layer for aerospace and aeronautical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The realistic simulation of flow in the atmospheric boundary layers at heights greater than two kilometers is discussed. Information concerning horizontally homogeneous and statistically stationary atmospheric boundary layer flows is presented. The problems related to the incorporation of the information into atmospheric wind simulation programs are analyzed. The information which the meteorologist must acquire in order to provide a basis for improving the simulation of atmospheric boundary flows is explained.

  15. Atmospheric corrosion evaluation of galvanised steel by thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of certain metals, such as zinc, from outdoor constructions due to atmospheric corrosion is of some concern. For risk assessments the evaluation of the amount of released metal is of importance. Various methods can be used to study the release of metals. These include those using radiotracers, such as thin layer activation (TLA). To verify the reliability of TLA with respect to conventional techniques in the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion, galvanised steel was exposed to a mild marine environment. The amount of zinc in the corrosion products, released through artificial leaching, at different time intervals was evaluated by TLA and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). A good correlation between the results was found indicating the feasibility of TLA for these release studies

  16. Segregation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer - A Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugi, Ralph; Berger, Martina; Zelger, Michael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Rohrer, Franz; Holland, Frank; Lu, Keding; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Sörgel, Matthias; Kramm, Gerhard; Mölders, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Segregation is a well known topic in technical chemistry and means an incomplete mixing of the reactants. Incomplete mixing reduces the rate of reaction which is of utmost importance in technical chemistry but has been payed less attention in atmospheric chemistry. Different observational and modelling studies on chemical reactions in the turbulent and convective atmospheric boundary layer are analysed for the influences of segregation in the systems NO ‑ NO2 ‑ O3 and OH + V OCs (with main focus on isoprene). Also some estimates on reactions like HO2 + NO (an important recycling mechanism for OH) will be given. Especially, different terms of the intensity of segregation IS (correlation coefficients, standard deviations of mixing ratios) are compared and are related to characteristics of the flow regimes, such as mixing conditions and Damköhler numbers. Also influences of fluctuations of actinic fluxes are discussed which influence the mostly photo chemically driven reactions that were investigated.

  17. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Koucká Knížová, Petra; Potužníková, Kateřina

    Sofia: Space Research and Technologies Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2015 - (Georgieva, K.; Kirov, B.; Danov, D.), s. 73-76 ISSN 2367-7570. [Workshop “Solar Influences on the Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Atmosphere” /7th/. Sunny Beach (BG), 01.06.2015-05.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13042; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2440; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-24688S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : coherent structures * ionospheric Es layer * neutral middle atmosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://ws-sozopol.stil.bas.bg/2015Sunny/Proceedings2015.pdf

  18. A wavenumber-frequency spectral model for atmospheric boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the need to characterize power fluctuations in wind farms, we study spatio-temporal correlations of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer in terms of the joint wavenumber-frequency spectrum of the streamwise velocity fluctuations. To this end, we perform a theoretical analysis of a simple advection model featuring the advection of small- scale velocity fluctuations by the mean flow and large-scale velocity fluctuations. The model is compared to data from large-eddy simulations (LES). We find that the model captures the trends observed in LES, specifically a Doppler shift of frequencies due to the mean flow as well as a Doppler broadening due to random sweeping effects

  19. Study of atmospheric aerosols and mixing layer by LIDAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LIDAR (laser radar) is an active remote sensing technique, which allows for the altitude-resolved observation of several atmospheric constituents. A typical application is the measurement of the vertically resolved aerosol optical properties. By using aerosol particles as a marker, continuous determination of the mixing layer height (MLH) can also be obtained by LIDAR. Some examples of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and MLH extracted from a 1-year LIDAR data set collected in Milan (Italy) are discussed and validated against in situ data (from a balloon-borne optical particle counter). Finally a comparison of the observation-based MLH with relevant numerical simulations (mesoscale model MM5) is provided. (authors)

  20. Numerical simulation of 3D flows in atmospheric boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonek, Jiří; Kozel, K.; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    Praha : Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, v. v. i, 2012 - (Šimurda, D.; Kozel, K.), s. 93-96 ISBN 978-80-87012-40-6. [Topical Problems of Fluid Mechanics 2012 . Praha (CZ), 15.02. 2012 -17.02. 2012 ] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : numerical solution * atmospheric boundary layer * Navier-Stokes equation s Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  1. Behaviour of tracer diffusion in simple atmospheric boundary layer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available 1-D profiles and time series from an idealised atmospheric boundary layer model are presented, which show agreement with measurements of polar photogenic NO and NO2. Diffusion models are increasingly being used as the framework for studying tropospheric air chemistry dynamics. Models based on standard boundary layer diffusivity profiles have an intrinsic behaviour that is not necessarily intuitive, due to the variation of turbulent diffusivity with height. The relatively simple model provides both a programming and a conceptual tool in the analysis of observed trace gas evolution. A time scale inherent in the model can be tuned by fitting model time series to observations. This scale is then applicable to the more physically simple but chemically complex zeroth order or box models of chemical interactions.

  2. The theoretical model of atmospheric turbulence spectrum in surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shida; Liu, Shikuo; Xin, Guojun; Liang, Fuming

    1994-12-01

    It is shown that the slope of energy spectrum obtained from the velocity solution of Kdv—Burgers equation lies between —5/3 and—2 in the dilogarithmic coordinates paper. The spectrum is very close to one of Kolmogorov's isotropic turbulence and Frisch's intermittent turbulence in inertial region. In this paper, the Kdv-Burgers equation to describe atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is obtained. In the equation, the 1 / R e corresponds to dissipative coefficient v, R /2 t to dispersive coefficient β, then ( v/2 β)2 corresponds to 1 / R 2 e • Ri. We prove that the wave number corresponding to maximum energy spectrum S(k) decreases with the decrease of stability (i.e., the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 in eddy—containing region. And the spectrim amplitude decreases with the increase of ( v / 2 β)2 (i.e., the decrease of stability). These results are consistent with actual turbulence spectrum of atmospheric surface layer from turbulence data.

  3. Atmospheric boundary layers in storms: advanced theory and modelling applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Zilitinkevich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent planetary boundary layers (PBLs control the exchange processes between the atmosphere and the ocean/land. The key problems of PBL physics are to determine the PBL height, the momentum, energy and matter fluxes at the surface and the mean wind and scalar profiles throughout the layer in a range of regimes from stable and neutral to convective. Until present, the PBLs typical of stormy weather were always considered as neutrally stratified. Recent works have disclosed that such PBLs are in fact very strongly affected by the static stability of the free atmosphere and must be treated as factually stable (we call this type of the PBL "conventionally neutral" in contract to the "truly neutral" PBLs developed against the neutrally stratified free flow. It is common knowledge that basic features of PBLs exhibit a noticeable dependence on the free-flow static stability and baroclinicity. However, the concern of the traditional theory of neural and stable PBLs was almost without exception the barotropic nocturnal PBL, which develops at mid latitudes during a few hours in the night, on the background of a neutral or slightly stable residual layer. The latter separates this type of the PBL from the free atmosphere. It is not surprising that the nature of turbulence in such regimes is basically local and does not depend on the properties of the free atmosphere. Alternatively, long-lived neutral (in fact only conditionally neutral or stable PBLs, which have much more time to grow up, are placed immediately below the stably stratified free flow. Under these conditions, the turbulent transports of momentum and scalars even in the surface layer - far away from the PBL outer boundary - depend on the free-flow Brunt-Väisälä frequency, N. Furthermore, integral measures of the long-lived PBLs (their depths and the resistance law functions depend on N and also on the baroclinic shear, S. In the traditional PBL models both non-local parameters N and S

  4. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Carmen Teleman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence scales of the wind action in urban environment were conducted. The data obtained were processed and analyzed and interpreted with specific software. The results are used for a synthesis regarding the scales of turbulence of the model of flow and the actual accuracy of measurements. The paper presents some of the important elements of this synthesis.

  5. Aeroelectric structures and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Anisimov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex electrical measurements with the use of sodar data show that electric field pulsation analysis is useful for electrodynamics/turbulence monitoring under different conditions. In particular, the number of aeroelectric structures (AES generated per hour is a convenient measure of the turbulence intensity. During convectively unstable periods, as many as 5–10 AES form per hour. Under stable conditions, AES occasionally form as well, indicating the appearance of occasional mixing events reflected in the electric field perturbations. AES magnitudes under stable conditions are relatively small, except in special cases such as high humidity and fog. The analysis of electric field (EF spectra gives additional useful information on the parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer and its turbulence. A rather sharp change in the spectrum slope takes place in the vicinity of 0.02 Hz under stable conditions. The characteristic slope of the spectrum and its change are reproduced in a simple model of EF formation.

  6. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Knížová, Petra Koucká; Potužníková, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    The present paper shows results from the summer campaign performed during geomagnetically quiet period from June 1 to August 31, 2009. Within time-series of stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures at pressure levels 10-0.1 hPa, mesospheric winds measured in Collm, Germany, and the sporadic E-layer parameters foEs and hEs measured at the Pruhonice station we detected specific coherent wave-bursts in planetary wave domain. Permanent wave-like activity is observed in all analyzed data sets. However, the number of wave-like structures persistent in large range of height from the stratosphere to lower ionosphere is limited. The only coherent modes that are detected on consequent levels of the atmosphere are those corresponding to eigenmodes of planetary waves.

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Upper Atmospheric Temperature 4 Layer Microwave, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 4 Layer Upper Atmosphere Temperature (UAT) Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature...

  8. Estimation of atmospheric mixing layer height from radiosonde data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mixing layer height (h is an important parameter for understanding the transport process in the troposphere, air pollution, weather and climate change. Many methods have been proposed to determine h by identifying the turning point of the radiosonde profile. However, substantial differences have been observed in the existing methods (e.g., the potential temperature (θ, relative humidity (RH, specific humidity (q and atmospheric refractivity (N methods. These differences are associated with the inconsistency of the temperature and humidity profiles in a boundary layer that is not well mixed, the changing measurability of the specific humidity and refractivity with height, the measurement error of humidity instruments within clouds, and the general existence of clouds. This study proposes a method to integrate the information of temperature, humidity and cloud to generate a consistent estimate of h. We apply this method to high vertical resolution (~ 30 m radiosonde data that were collected at 79 stations over North America during the period from 1998 to 2008; the data are obtained from the Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate Data Center (SPARC. The results show good agreement with those from N method as the information of temperature and humidity contained in N; however cloud effects that are included in our method increased the reliability of h. Furthermore, our results agree well with the independent h that was determined from lidar observations. From 1988 to 2008, the climatological h over North America was 1675± 303 m with a strong east–west gradient: higher values (generally greater than 1800 m occurred over the Midwest US, and lower values (usually less than 1400 m occurred over Alaska and the US west coast.

  9. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  10. Diurnal Variation of Air Temperature in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Likso

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to illustrate the nature of the diurnal temperature variations in the atmospheric surface layer in all seasons a set of hourly observations at the Zagreb-Maksimir Observatory (Croatia, measured at three different levels (5 cm, 50 cm and 2 m above ground during the year 2005, was used. An approximate method for calculating air temperature at 5 cm, using the air temperature at 2 m, is presented. For this purpose, hourly data (screen height temperature, cloudiness, air pressure at barometer level and wind speed at 2 m collected at the Zagreb-Maksimir Observatory during the summer season of 2005 have been used. Th is method is based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Estimated values have been compared with observations. The results obtained are the most accurate for cloudy weather, and the least accurate in the case of clear sky. A systematic error of this approach was discovered using a clustering procedure and is briefly discussed.

  11. Diurnal Variation of Air Temperature in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Likso

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to illustrate the nature of the diurnal temperature variations in the atmospheric surface layer in all seasons a set of hourly observations at the Zagreb-Maksimir Observatory (Croatia, measured at three different levels (5 cm, 50 cm and 2 m above ground during the year 2005, was used. An approximate method for calculating air temperature at 5 cm, using the air temperature at 2 m, is presented. For this purpose, hourly data (screen height temperature, cloudiness, air pressure at barometer level and wind speed at 2 m collected at the Zagreb-Maksimir Observatory during the summer season of 2005 have been used. Th is method is based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Estimated values have been compared with observations. The results obtained are the most accurate for cloudy weather, and the least accurate in the case of clear sky. A systematic error of this approach was discovered using a clustering procedure and is briefly discussed.

  12. Height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange under conditions of stable atmospheric stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamardin, A. P.; Nevzorova, I. V.; Odintsov, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    In the work, we consider estimates of the height of layer of intense turbulent heat exchange in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, made with the use of meteorological acoustic radar (sodar). Dependence of this height on temperature gradient is analyzed. Current temperature stratification of the atmosphere in the layer with height up to 1 000 m was determined with the help of MTP-5 meteorological temperature profiler.

  13. Total Solar Eclipses and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoev, A.; Stoeva, P.; Kuzin, S.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of three total solar eclipses on meteorological parameters is discussed in the paper. Measurements were conducted at the village of Ravnets,General Toshevo municipality, Bulgaria, 1999,in Manavgat, near Antalya, Turkey, 2006 and in Tian Huang Ping, China, 2009. The observed decrease of the sky illumination (incoming solar radiation) during the eclipses was proportional to the percentage of solar coverage. The after eclipse sky illumination level is due to the effect of the natural change of the solar elevation angle. For the 1999 TSE it did not regain its pre eclipse value, it has exactly the same value for the 2006 TSE, and, It is three times larger than the pre eclipse value for the 2009 TSE. This fact can be easily explained by the Local Time of the maximum of the eclipses: LT 13:12, LT 12:58, and LT 09:34, respectively. Measurements showed significant changes in the surface air temperature. The minimum of the air temperature during the 2009 TSE (Tmin=4.5°C) was measured 6 min after the end of the total phase. This minimal temperature drop and larger time lag can be explained with the huge artificial lake near the place of observation, which minimizes the temperature response due to its larger heat capacity. During the 1999 TSE, minimal temperature (Tmin=6.4°C) is measured 7 min 30 s after the total phase, and for the 2006 TSE (Tmin=5°C) - 5 min. It is in accordance with the fact that the temperature minima at residential/commercial stations occurred in general, before the minima at stations in agricultural terrains. In 2006 we were at the yard of the hotel, and in 1999 in the countryside. The wind velocity drops during the total phase as a result of the cooling and stabilization of the atmospheric boundary layer. The wind direction during the total phase changes and the wind begins to blow in the same direction as the direction of motion of the lunar shadow on the earth. Cirrus and cirrostratus clouds were observed during the 2006 total solar

  14. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system (e.g. Andreas and Cash, 1999). So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models (e.g. Tjernström et al., 2005). Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV, called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO), has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO has been used under Arctic conditions at Longyear airport, Spitsbergen in March/April 2009. Besides vertical profiles up to 1500 m and horizontal surveys at flight levels of 100 and 200 m, SUMO could measure vertical profiles for the first time simultaneously in a horizontal distance of 1 km; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This has been the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms” or "flocks”. With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs. In addition, the Advanced Research Weather Forecasting model (AR-WRF version 3.1) has been run in high resolution (grid size: 1 km). First results of a sensitivity study where ABL schemes have been tested and compared with

  15. Three-Dimensional Motion Estimation of Atmospheric Layers From Image Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Héas, Patrick; Memin, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    International audience In this paper, we address the problem of estimating three-dimensional motions of a stratified atmosphere from satellite image sequences. The analysis of three-dimensional atmospheric fluid flows associated with incomplete observation of atmospheric layers due to the sparsity of cloud systems is very difficult. This makes the estimation of dense atmospheric motion field from satellite images sequences very difficult. The recovery of the vertical component of fluid mot...

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...... transport, are mostly ignored. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, the present work focuses on atmospheric flows that include stability and Coriolis effects. The influence of these effects on the whole atmospheric boundary-layer are examined using a Reynolds-averaged Navier...

  17. Fluxes and Mixing Processes in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Erik Olof

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric models are strongly dependent on the turbulent exchange of momentum, sensible heat and moisture (latent heat) at the surface. Oceans cover about 70% of the Earth’s surface and understanding the processes that control air-sea exchange is of great importance in order to predict weather and climate. In the atmosphere, for instance, hurricane development, cyclone intensity and track depend on these processes. Ocean waves constitute an obvious example of air-sea interaction and can cau...

  18. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messager

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics. The loss of heat by turbulent processes suggests that this kind of oceanic feature is an important and persistent source of heat for the atmosphere.

  19. On the modeling of electrical boundary layer (electrode layer) and derivation of atmospheric electrical profiles, eddy diffusion coeffcient and scales of electrode layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri N Kulkarni

    2010-02-01

    Electrode layer or electrical boundary layer is one of the charge generators in the global atmospheric electric circuit. In spite of this we find very few model studies and few measurements of it in the literature. Using a new technique it is shown that in this layer, the space charge density varies exponentially in vertical. A new experimental method based on the surface measurements is discussed to determine all the characteristic scales and an average electrical and meteorological state of an electrode layer. The results obtained are in good agreement with the previous studies. So, it is suggested that an exponential space charge density profile will no longer be an assumption in the case of electrode layer studies. The profiles of atmospheric electric field and electrical conductivity are also derived and a new term named as electrode layer constant is introduced.

  20. Behavior of self-confined spherical layer of light radiation in the air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behavior of thin spherical layer of intensive light in an inhomogeneous atmosphere is considered. It is shown that the behavior is similar to puzzling and mysterious behavior of ball lightnings. Under assumption that ball lightning moves along the gradient of atmosphere air density process of ball lightning penetration in a salon of a flying airplane is analyzed

  1. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land–atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few secon...

  2. Height of convective layer in planetary atmospheres with condensable and non-condensable greenhouse substances

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; V. G. Gorshkov; Pujol, T.

    2003-01-01

    Convection reduces greenhouse effect by transporting a certain amount of non-radiative dynamic energy to the upper atmosphere, where this energy dissipates and radiates into space without interaction with greenhouse substances in the lower atmosphere. In this paper we show that the height of the convective layer zc is finite and independent of atmospheric optical thickness τs at large values of the latter. We derive an analytical formula for z...

  3. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  4. On the Nature, Theory, and Modeling of Atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baklanov, Alexander A.; Grisogono, Branko; Bornstein, Robert;

    2011-01-01

    The gap between our modern understanding of planetary boundary layer physics and its decades-old representations in current operational atmospheric models is widening, which has stimulated this review of the current state of the art and an analysis of the immediate needs in boundary layer theory...

  5. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  6. Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation: Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendby, T.M.; Myhre, C.L.; Stebel, K.; Edvardsen, K; Orsolini, Y.; Dahlback, A.

    2012-07-01

    This is an annual report describing the activities and main results of the monitoring programme: Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation for 2011. 2011 was a year with generally low ozone values above Norway. A clear decrease in the ozone layer above Norway during the period 1979-1997 stopped after 1998 and the ozone layer above Norway seems now to have stabilized.(Author)

  7. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Koucká Knížová, Petra; Potužníková, Kateřina

    136 B, December (2015), s. 155-162. ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-24688S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2440 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : critical frequency foEs * mesospheric temperature * mesospheric winds * planetary waves * Rossby mode * sporadic layer * stratospheric temperature Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682615001273

  8. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Koucká Knížová, Petra; Kouba, Daniel; Potužníková, Kateřina

    Prague: International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2015. A12p-155. [Earth and Environmental Sciences for Future Generations. General Assembly of International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics /26./. 22.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ionospheric Es layer * coherent structures Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.iugg2015prague.com/abstractcd/data/HtmlApp/main.html#0

  9. Simulation of a 5MW wind turbine in an atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents detached eddy simulation (DES) results of a 5MW wind turbine in an unsteady atmospheric boundary layer. The evaluation performed in this article focuses on turbine blade loads as well as on the influence of atmospheric turbulence and tower on blade loads. Therefore, the turbulence transport of the atmospheric boundary layer to the turbine position is analyzed. To determine the influence of atmospheric turbulence on wind turbines the blade load spectrum is evaluated and compared to wind turbine simulation results with uniform inflow. Moreover, the influences of different frequency regimes and the tower on the blade loads are discussed. Finally, the normal force coefficient spectrum is analyzed at three different radial positions and the influence of tower and atmospheric turbulence is shown

  10. Some aspects of atmospheric dispersion in the stratified atmospheric boundary layer over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    the Gaussian plume model concept with the spread parameters described in terms of the Pasquill stability classification or Monin-Obukhov similarity relationships are used. Other model types are Lagrangian particle models which also are parameterized in terms of Monin-Obukhov similarity relationships....... The applied models describe adequately the dispersion process in a weakly stable atmosphere, but fail during very stable atmospheric conditions. This suggests that Monin-Obukhov similarity theory is an adequate tool for the parameterization of the input parameters to atmospheric dispersion models...... during weakly stable conditions, but that more detailed parameterisations including other physical processes than those covered by the Monin-Obukhov theory should be developed for the very stable atmosphere....

  11. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, Aymeric; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2012-01-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments on board Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbite...

  12. The influence of the atmospheric boundary layer on nocturnal layers of noctuids and other moths migrating over southern Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Curtis Ron; Chapman, Jason W.; Reynolds, Donald R.; Barlow, Janet Fraser; Alan D. Smith; Woiwod, Ian P.

    2006-01-01

    Insects migrating at high altitude over southern Britain have been continuously monitored by automatically-operating, vertical-looking radars over a period of several years. During some occasions in the summer months, the migrants were observed to form well-defined layer concentrations, typically at heights of 200-400 m, in the stable night-time atmosphere. Under these conditions, insects are likely to have control over their vertical movements and are selecting flight heights which are favou...

  13. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lauros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical profile of particle number distribution does not correspond to observations. Instead organic induced nucleation leads to good agreement confirming the relevance of the aerosol formation mechanism including organic compounds emitted by biosphere.

    Simulation of aerosol concentration inside the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation days shows highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing most important characteristics of particle dynamics inside the atmospheric boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles at the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Dual Nature of Heat Flux in Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of heat flux (H) with respect to the stability parameter (ζ) in stable surface layer (SSL) is analyzed with in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS) theory. The analytical expressions of H are obtained as functions of wind speed (U) and wind shear (dU/dz) using the linear similarity functions and accordingly two cases, (i) U = δ (constant) and (ii) dU/dz = δ are considered. The mathematical analysis shows that the magnitude of H increases with ζ till it attains a maximum value at ζ =ζc and then starts decreasing with increasing stability suggesting the dual characteristic of heat flux with stability parameter. The point of maximum heat flux is found to be dependent on the roughness length (z0) as well as the height above the surface. An attempt has been made to analyze the sensitivity of this dual characteristic of H with ζ using the non-linear similarity functions. The analysis shows that the dual nature of H persists in the case of linear as well as non-linear similarity functions. However, the point of extremum appears to be dependent on the nature of the similarity functions. Turbulent data over a tropical site Ranchi (India) is analyzed to validate the observed nature of H with the theoretical nature as predicted by MOS. The analysis of observational data reveals the non-existence of any preferred stability state in SSL as speculated by Wang and Bras (2010, 2011) and supports the conclusions of Malhi 1995, Derbyshire 1999, van de Wiel et al. 2007, Basu et al. 2008, and van de Wiel et al. 2011. Thus, the non-uniqueness of MOS equations does not appear to be a mathematical artifact and it is consistent with the observations as far as the nature of heat flux with respect to stability parameter in SSL is concerned.

  15. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    OpenAIRE

    C. Messager; Swart, S

    2016-01-01

    The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atm...

  16. 3D Water Vapor Field in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed with Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Späth, F.; A. Behrendt; Muppa, S. K.; S. Metzendorf; A. Riede; V. Wulfmeyer

    2016-01-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) determines fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies which show that this high resolution combined with 2- and 3-dimensional scans allows for new insights in the 3-dimensional structure of the water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In spring 2013, th...

  17. Review of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Yagüe Anguis, Carlos; otros, ...

    2015-01-01

    Flow in a stably stratified environment is characterized by anisotropic and intermittent turbulence and wavelike motions of varying amplitudes and periods. Understanding turbulence intermittency and wave-turbulence interactions in a stably stratified flow remains a challenging issue in geosciences including planetary atmospheres and oceans. The stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) commonly occurs when the ground surface is cooled by longwave radiation emission such as at night over land s...

  18. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Chima C. Ngumah; Jude N. Ogbulie; Justina C. Orji; Ekperechi S. Amadi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD) of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD...

  19. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  20. Layer-by-layer assembly of thin organic films on PTFE activated by cold atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth András

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An air diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge is used to activate the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE samples, which are subsequently coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and tannic acid (TAN single, bi- and multilayers, respectively, using the dip-coating method. The surfaces are characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Attenuated Total Reflection – Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. The XPS measurements show that with plasma treatment the F/C atomic ratio in the PTFE surface decreases, due to the diminution of the concentration of CF2 moieties, and also oxygen incorporation through formation of new C–O, C=O and O=C–O bonds can be observed. In the case of coated samples, the new bonds indicated by XPS show the bonding between the organic layer and the surface, and thus the stability of layers, while the gradual decrease of the concentration of F atoms with the number of deposited layers proves the creation of PVP/TAN bi- and multi-layers. According to the ATR-FTIR spectra, in the case of PVP/TAN multilayer hydrogen bonding develops between the PVP and TAN, which assures the stability of the multilayer. The AFM lateral friction measurements show that the macromolecular layers homogeneously coat the plasma treated PTFE surface.

  1. About an ozone layer dynamics in the atmosphere above Kazakhstan territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summary of achievements in the field of ozone layer protection in atmosphere is presented. The stratosphere ozone changes above Kazakhstan territory on the base of ozone-measuring station data during 1973-1992 are given. It was established that the sum ozone departures have been decreased on minus of 3,2 % every year in comparison with average values. This process can conduct to increase of ultraviolet radiation coming to lower troposphere layers

  2. UK-ADMS - a new approach to modelling dispersion in the earth's atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System is described in considerable detail. The principle modules are dealt with. A key to the methodology is that vertical profiles of mean velocity, temperature and turbulence in the boundary layer depend on the relative values of the height above the ground, the height of the boundary layer, and a length scale determined by the friction velocity and the heat flux and air temperature at the surface. The models can be used at any location. (AB) (15 refs.)

  3. Anode layer in a high-current arc in atmospheric pressure nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian A [ESAB Welding and Cutting Products and Francis Marion University, Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2005-11-21

    An anode layer in a high-current atmospheric nitrogen arc was modelled. Calculations were made in a one-dimensional approximation at current densities in the range 500-3000 A cm{sup -2}. Two-temperature approximation was used. We calculated the distributions of both electron and heavy particle temperatures, the concentrations of charged and neutral particles and the electric field inside the anode layer. It was shown that for the conditions that exist in the anode layer of a high-current atmospheric pressure arc in nitrogen (a) the concentration of the molecular ions is negligible and (b) the concentration of atoms exceeds the concentration of molecules everywhere in the anode layer except in a narrow region close to the anode. Calculation showed that the electric field decreases towards the anode, and then close to the anode it rises again. Contrary to the situation in argon, the present calculations showed that in nitrogen the electric field in the anode layer is always accelerating. However, the average electric field in the anode layer is weaker than in the adjacent arc column (the so-called negative anode layer voltage). The voltage drop in the Langmuir sheath is also negative. It is shown that the main difference in anode layer voltages between an arc in nitrogen and an arc in argon is due to the high reactive thermal conductivity in nitrogen.

  4. Implementation of a boundary layer heat flux parameterization into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. McGrath-Spangler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a given amount of surface flux is inversely proportional to the depth of the boundary layer. Overshooting thermals that entrain free tropospheric air down into the boundary layer modify the characteristics and depth of the lower layer through the insertion of energy and mass. This alters the surface energy budget by changing the Bowen ratio and thereby altering the vegetative response and the surface boundary conditions. Although overshooting thermals are important in the physical world, their effects are unresolved in most regional models. A parameterization to include the effects of boundary layer entrainment was introduced into a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model (SiB-RAMS. The parameterization is based on a downward heat flux at the top of the boundary layer that is proportional to the heat flux at the surface. Results with the parameterization show that the boundary layer simulated is deeper, warmer, and drier than when the parameterization is turned off. These results alter the vegetative stress factors thereby changing the carbon flux from the surface. The combination of this and the deeper boundary layer change the concentration of carbon dioxide in the boundary layer.

  5. Impact of Different Aerosols on the Evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The present work analyzes the effect of aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over Shangdianzi in Beijing.A one-dimensional ABL model and a radiative transfer scheme are incorporated to develop the structure of the ABL.The diurnal variation of the atmospheric radiative budget,atmospheric heating rate,sensible and latent heat fluxes,surface and the 2 m air temperatures as well as the ABL height,and its perturbations due to the aerosols with different single-scattering albedo (SSA) are studied by comparing the aerosol-laden atmosphere to the clean atmosphere.The results show that the absorbing aerosols cause less reduction in surface evaporation relative to that by scatting aerosols,and both surface temperature and 2 m temperature decrease from the clean atmosphere to the aerosol-laden atmosphere.The greater the aerosol absorption,the more stable the surface layer.After 12:00 am,the 2 m temperature increases for strong absorption aerosols.In the meantime,there is a slight decrease in the 2 m temperature for purely scattering aerosols due to radiative cooling.The purely scattering aerosols decrease the ABL temperature and enhance the capping inversion,further reducing the ABL height.

  6. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in Meteoric ion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan; Plane, John M. C.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Nesvorný, David; Pokorný, Petr; Feng, Wuhu

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. However, the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors have not yet been detected at Mars (contrary to the permanent metal layers identified in the Earth's atmosphere). The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) and Halley-Type Comets (HTC) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. These vertical profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the formation of the sporadic ion layers observed below 100 km with a plasma density exceeding 104 cm-3 requires the combination of the three different influx sources considered by the ZDC model, with a significant asteroidal contribution. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  7. Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation: Annual report 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Svendby, Tove Marit; Edvardsen, Kåre; Hansen, Georg Heinrich; Stebel, Kerstin; Dahlback, Arne

    2015-01-01

    This is an annual report describing the activities and main results of the monitoring programme “Monitoring of the atmospheric ozone layer and natural ultraviolet radiation” for 2014. The ozone layer was below the long-term mean in spring 2014, but increased in April/May and was close to normal rest of the year. A clear decrease in total ozone above Norway during the period 1979-1997 stopped after 1998 and the ozone layer above Norway now seems to have stabilized.

  8. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Pilot project of measuring and computing system for mesoscale monitoring of atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkov, V. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Telminov, A. E.; Komarov, A. I.; Kobzev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Conception of design of measuring and computing system for monitoring atmospheric boundary layer is proposed. The system includes: stationary measuring complex consisting of four multiple-elevation ultrasonic weather stations and mobile measuring complex consisting of transportable weather station, touch probing system of weather data profile based on unmanned aerial vehicle and also Raman scattering gas analyzer, and new modification mercury gas analyzer.

  10. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  11. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of in-doped ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition at atmospheric pressure (spatial-ALD). Trimethyl indium (TMIn), diethyl zinc (DEZ) and deionized water have been used as In, Zn and O precursor, respectively. The metal content of the films is controlled in the range

  12. Spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition of InxGayZnzO for thin film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Cobb, B.; Sharma, A.; Grehl, T.; Brongersma, H.; Roozeboom, F.; Gelinck, G.; Poodt, P.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the nucleation and growth of InGaZnO thin films by spatial atmospheric atomic layer deposition. Diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl indium (TMIn), triethyl gallium (TEGa), and water were used as Zn, In, Ga and oxygen precursors, respectively. The vaporized metal precursors have been c

  13. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms and in modulating Earth’s reflectivity and climate1. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cy

  14. Equipment for atmospheric, spatial atomic layer deposition in roll-to-roll processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, R.; Poodt, P.; Olieslagers, R.; Lankhorst, A.; Boer, M. van den; Berg, D. van den; Asten, A. van; Roozeboom, F.

    2012-01-01

    A novel type of reactor has been designed for atmospheric atomic layer deposition (ALD) on flexible substrates. In the reactor, a flexible substrate slowly advances around a fast rotating drum. Gas bearing technology is used to prevent physical contact between the flexible substrate and the drum, an

  15. [Study on the infrared spectra and raman spectra of steel rusty layer with atmospheric corrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-mei

    2006-12-01

    In the present study two methods, infrared and Raman spectral analyses, were used to measure the rusty layer of samples with atmospheric corrosion from Qingdao. The main component rust phase of the rusty layer was observed, showing that the relative content of the rust phase varies with the change in corrosion time. The main component rust phases of the rusty layer were found to be alpha-Fe2O3 , gamma-FeOOH, alpha-FeOOH, delta-FeOOH and Fe3O4, with the relative content of each rust phase of A3 (1) rusty layer sample exhibiting the following relation: gamma-FeOOH> alpha-FeOOH>delta-FeOOH, and the relative contents of other rusty layer samples were found to follow the relation: gamma-FeOOH> delta-FeOOH>alpha-FeOOH. PMID:17361722

  16. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob;

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling...... of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit...... evolution 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented...

  17. An observational study of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer over Cabo Frio, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Franchito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of coastal upwelling on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in Cabo Frio (Brazil is investigated. For this purpose, radiosounding data collected in two experiments made during the austral summer (upwelling case and austral winter (no upwelling case are analysed. The results show that during the austral summer, cold waters that crop up near the Cabo Frio coast favour the formation of an atmospheric stable layer, which persists during the upwelling episode. Due to the low SSTs, the descending branch of the sea-breeze circulation is located close to the coast, inhibiting the development of a mixed layer mainly during the day. At night, with the reduction of the land-sea thermal contrast the descending motion is weaker, allowing a vertical mixing. The stable ABL favours the formation of a low level jet, which may also contribute to the development of a nocturnal atmospheric mixed layer. During the austral winter, due to the higher SSTs observed near the coast, the ABL is less stable compared with that in the austral summer. Due to warming, a mixed layer is observed during the day. The observed vertical profiles of the zonal winds show that the easterlies at low levels are stronger in the austral summer, indicating that the upwelling modulates the sea-breeze signal, thus confirming model simulations.

  18. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  19. Power Absorption of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves in a Partially Ionized Plasma Layer in Atmosphere Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭斌; 王晓钢

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the absorption, reflection, and transmission of electromagnetic waves in an unmagnetized uniform plasma layer covering a metal surface in atmosphere conditions.Instead of the absorption of the electromagnetic wave propagating only once in previous work on the plasma layer, a general formula of total power absorption by the plasma layer with an infinite time of reflections between the atmosphere-plasma interface and the metal surface has been derived for the first time. Effects of plasma parameters, especially the dependence of the fraction of positive ions, negative ions and electrons in plasmas on the power absorption processes are discussed. The results show that the existence of negative ions significantly reduces the power absorption of the electromagnetic wave. Absorptions of electromagnetic waves are calculated.

  20. Characterization of Rust Layer Formed on Low Alloy Steel Exposed in Marine Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The iron rust phases formed on Iow alloy steels containing different quantities of Cr element have been characterizedusing EPMA, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, optical microscopy etc. The ion selective properties of synthesized rust filmswith the same phase constituent as the atmospheric corrosion products were investigated using self-made apparatus.The results showed that corrosion loss of steels exposed in marine atmosphere decreased rapidly as the Cr contentof the steel was increased. Cr-containing steels were covered by a uniform compacted rust layer composed of fineparticles with an average diameter of several nanometers. Inner rust layer of Cr-containing steel (2 mass fraction)was composed of α-CrxFel-xOOH, with Cr content of about 5 mass fraction. Such rust layer showed cation selectiveproperty, and could depress the penetration of Cl- to contact substrate steel directly.

  1. Contribution of the Atmospheric Dynamics to the Sporadic Sodium Layer Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国韬; 王嘉珉; 刘炳模; 程学武; 万卫星; 龚顺生

    2002-01-01

    We report on a sporadic sodium layer (SSL) event observed by our Na fluorescence lidar at Wuhan, China (31°N, 114°E) on 16 March 1999, and we reveal some special behaviour. From careful analysis of various sodium content variations of the layer during the development of this SSL event, it is found that besides the sodium injection mechanism as expected, another mechanism which we call atmospheric dynamics also made a noticeable contribution to this SSL formation. Computer simulations confirmed that under the combined action ora suitable sodium injection and a bi-direction vertical wind field, an SSL profile can be reproduced with a pronounced SSL peak on a normal sodium layer, as we observed in this event. From these results, it is emphasized that atmospheric dynamics is important for SSL formation.

  2. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  3. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  4. 222Rn and 14CO2 concentrations in the surface layer of the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term monitoring of the Δ14C in the atmospheric near-ground CO2 has been realized in Bratislava and Zlkovce, situated near the nuclear power plant Jaslovske Bohunice. Until 1993, the monthly mean Δ14C values showed a high variability. The annual means of Δ14C were about 30 per mille higher at Zlkovce than in highly industrialised Bratislava. An important change in the behaviour of the 14C data has occurred since 1993. The records from both stations show the similar course, mainly due to the fact that there do not occur deep winter minima in Bratislava. This behaviour corresponds to the lower values of the total fossil fuel CO2 emissions in the years after 1993 when compared to the previous years. At present, both sets of data show that the 14C concentration is about 10% above the natural level. Since 1987 also the 222 Rn concentration in the surface layer of the atmosphere has been measured in Bratislava. These measurements provided an extensive set of the 222 Rn data characteristic for the inland environment with high level of atmospheric pollution. The seasonal and daily variations of the 222 Rn concentration were observed. The investigation of the relation between the monthly mean diurnal courses of the 222 Rn concentration and the atmospheric stability proved a high correlation between them. The 222 Rn data were used to interpret the anomalous Δ14C values in the surface layer of the atmosphere. (author)

  5. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  6. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Vanheerwaarden, C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-12-01

    We will present and discuss a conceptual modelling framework that can facilitate the understanding of the interactions between land processes and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics/chemistry at diurnal scales. This framework has been successful applied to the interpretation of field experiments, but also to identify the non-linear relations that occur at larger spatial and temporal scales. We will then discuss in depth the link between shallow cumulus and vegetation exchange of water and carbon dioxide. Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms, and in modulating the Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle is poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 the plant stomata will close leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. During the presentation, we will show that this causes a decline in boundary layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection

  7. Complex measurements of aerosol and ion characteristics in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikas, Iu. E.; Kolomiets, S. M.; Kornienko, V. I.; Mirme, A. A.; Sal'm, Ia. I.; Sergeev, I. Ia.; Tammet, Kh. F.

    Results of a comprehensive study of the characteristics of atmospheric ions and aerosols in the boundary layer during the summer season are reported. A study is also made of the kinetics of aerosol formation under conditions of high artificial ionization of the air by alpha and UV radiation. A high degree of correlation is shown to exist between atmospheric concentrations of medium ions and fine (less than 0.01 micron) aerosol. The results obtained support the radiation-chemical mechanism of aerosol formation.

  8. Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer and Its Application to Electromagnetic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    An important application of the atmospheric surface layer research is to characterize the near surface vertical gradients in temperature and humidity in order to predict radar and radio communication conditions in the environment. In this presentation, we will give an overview of a new research initiative funded under the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI): the Coupled Air-Sea Processes and EM Ducting Research (CASPER). The objective is to fully characterize the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as an electromagnetic (EM) propagation environment with the emphasis of spatial and temporal heterogeneities and surface wave/swell effects, both of which contravene the underlying assumptions of Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) used in coupled environmental forecast models. Furthermore, coastal variability in the inversion atop the MABL presents a challenge to forecast models and also causes practical issues in EM prediction models. These issues are the target of investigation of CASPER. CASPER measurement component includes two major field campaigns: CASPER-East (2015 Duck, NC) and CASPER-West (2018 southern California). This presentation will show the extensive measurements to be made during the CASPER -East field campaign with the focus on the marine atmospheric surface layer measurements with two research vessels, two research aircraft, surface flux buoy, wave gliders, ocean gliders, tethered balloons, and rawinsondes. Unlike previous research on the marine surface layer with the focus on surface fluxes and surface flux parameterization, CASPER field campaigns also emphasize of the surface layer profiles and the validation of the surface layer flux-profile relationship originally derived over land surfaces. Results from CASPER pilot experiment and preliminary results from CASPER-East field campaign will be discussed.

  9. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  10. Lidar-Observed Stress Vectors and Veer in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob; Patton, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    the Coriolis force is negligible, this is supposedly a good approximation. High-resolution large-eddy simulation data show that this is indeed the case even beyond the surface layer. In contrast, through analysis of WindCube lidar measurements supported by sonic measurements, the study shows that it......This study demonstrates that a pulsed wind lidar is a reliable instrument for measuring angles between horizontal vectors of significance in the atmospheric boundary layer. Three different angles are considered: the wind turning, the angle between the stress vector and the mean wind direction, and...

  11. Numerical study of the anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, I. L.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Reisgen, U.

    2016-03-01

    The anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges is studied numerically on the basis of the hydrodynamic (diffusion) equations for plasma components. The governing equations are formulated in a unified manner without the assumptions of thermal equilibrium, ionization equilibrium or quasi-neutrality. For comparison, a quasi-neutral model of the anode layer is also considered. The numerical computations are performed for an argon arc at typical values of the current density in anode layers (500-2000 A cm-2). The results of numerical modelling show that the common collisionless model of the sheath fails to describe the sheath region for the problem under consideration. For this reason, a detailed analysis of the anode sheath is performed using the results of unified modelling. In addition, the distributions of plasma parameters in the anode layer are analysed and the basic characteristics of the layer (anode voltage drop, sheath voltage drop, anode layer thickness, sheath thickness, heat flux to the anode) are calculated. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing theoretical predictions and experimental data. The dependence of the anode layer characteristics on the current density is also discussed.

  12. Numerical model of a non-steady atmospheric planetary boundary layer, based on similarity theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zilitinkevich, S.S.; Fedorovich, E.E.; Shabalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model of a non-stationary atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a horizontally homogeneous flat surface is derived on the basis of similarity theory. The two most typical turbulence regimes are reproduced: one corresponding to a convectively growing PBL and another correspon......A numerical model of a non-stationary atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a horizontally homogeneous flat surface is derived on the basis of similarity theory. The two most typical turbulence regimes are reproduced: one corresponding to a convectively growing PBL and another......-surface values of heat, water vapor and momentum fluxes. The internal structure of the PBL is considered self-similar. This allows one to represent the interaction between the air flow and the underlying surface by means of universal heat/mass transfer and resistance laws. Numerical experiments on the diurnal...

  13. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O2 plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al2O3 films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10−5 gm−2d−1

  14. Experimental Study of the EM Transmission Properties of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, T.; Friehe, C.; Anderson, K.

    2003-04-01

    The propagation of electro-magnetic signals over the ocean is primarily affected by atmospheric refraction and scattering from the rough ocean surface. Wave-guides (also known as refractive ducts) occurring in the first tens of meters above the sea surface have been modeled extensively, as they influence communications. However, discrepancies between models and measurements have been detected. Here we study experimentally the structure of the atmospheric refractive index and the ocean surface statistics, pertinent to EM signals scattering. The structure and the dynamics the marine atmospheric boundary layer is profoundly affected by the ocean surface waves, which deform the mean wind flow streamlines. In the presence of gradients of the atmospheric humidity and temperature, the deformation of the streamlines displaces the sheared profiles of these quantities and leads to wave-induced fluctuations of the atmospheric refractive index. As a result, radio and optical signals propagating over the ocean encounter a semi-periodic refractive structure, which along with the turbulence can degrade signal's energy. The wave-induced fluctuations of the refractive index are unique to the oceanic environment. Their structure function does not follow the power 2/3 scaling law, valid for turbulent fluctuations, and thus their influence should be studied separately. We analyze data of atmospheric turbulence, humidity, temperature, and sea surface temperature and waves from the Rough Evaporation Duct experiment, conducted in part from the instrument platform FLIP in the open ocean North of Oahu, Hawaii.

  15. Characteristics of aerosol at a lower atmospheric layer in DRAGON field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUJI, M.; Azuma, Y.; Kitakoga, S.; Sano, I.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution arises severely over East Asia with the rapid economic development nowadays. Monitoring the atmospheric environment, as one of the purposes, an intensive field campaign, Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON), was carried out in the spring of year 2012, led by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At that time, atmospheric phenomena such as Yellow sand and haze events were observed at Nara in the western part of Japan, as one of the DRAGON observation sites. The atmospheric events were characterized with the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data. As a result of the data analysis, it was found that more light-absorbing and smaller particles dominated at the lower than upper atmospheric layer for the Kosa event in particular. A backward trajectory analysis suggested that the Yellow sand event traveled over the East Asian industrial cities, which could lead to a mixture of sand and air pollutants with moderate particle size and light-absorptivity. In addition, visibility observation was evaluated quantitatively with AERONET data in the DRAGON campaign since eye observation was inherently semi-quantitative. The extinction coefficient estimated from visibility was compared to that from AERONET. As a result, it was found that the extinction coefficients were generally consistent to each other. But there were some discrepancies, which could be caused with the atmospheric phenomena or aerosol types. It is confirmed that visibility is strongly influenced with aerosols in the case of severe atmospheric phenomena in particular.

  16. Isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate in a tropical marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Savarino, Joel; Morin, Samuel; Erbland, Joseph,; Grannec, Francis; Patey, Matthew D.; Vicars, William; Alexander, Becky; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term observations of the reactive chemical composition of the tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) are rare, despite its crucial role for the chemical stability of the atmosphere. Recent observations of reactive bromine species in the tropical MBL showed unexpectedly high levels that could potentially have an impact on the ozone budget. Uncertainties in the ozone budget are amplified by our poor understanding of the fate of NOx (= NO + NO2), particularly the importance of nighttime chemi...

  17. WAVELET TRANSFORM METHOD FOR DERIVING ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER HEIGHT FROM LIDAR SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJITHA PALETI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet method of determining the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL height from lidar signals is presented in this paper. The wavelet covariance transform (WCT method employed determines the significant gradient in the measured lidar signals. Using this method, the accuracy of ABL height detection enhances with increased dilation length. The developed wavelet algorithm is coded in MATLAB software and has a provision to alter the dilation length in real-time for a given translation estimate.

  18. Thin layer chromatography/desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry of lipids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    Praha: Ústav organické chemie a biochemie AV ČR, 2016 - (Kuda, O.). s. 30 ISBN 978-80-86241-54-8. [Česká lipidomická konference /5./. 21.04.2016-22.04.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * ambient mass spectrometry * thin layer chromatography * lipids Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  19. On the Impact of Wind Farms on a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth in the number of wind turbines installed worldwide, a demand exists for a clear understanding of how wind farms modify land-atmosphere exchanges. Here, we conduct three-dimensional large-eddy simulations to investigate the impact of wind farms on a convective atmospheric boundary layer. Surface temperature and heat flux are determined using a surface thermal energy balance approach, coupled with the solution of a three-dimensional heat equation in the soil. We study several cases of aligned and staggered wind farms with different streamwise and spanwise spacings. The farms consist of Siemens SWT-2.3-93 wind turbines. Results reveal that, in the presence of wind turbines, the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer is modified, the boundary-layer height is increased, and the magnitude of the surface heat flux is slightly reduced. Results also show an increase in land-surface temperature, a slight reduction in the vertically-integrated temperature, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the surface heat flux.

  20. Observational study of atmospheric surface layer and coastal weather in northern Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric surface layer is the interaction medium between atmosphere and Earth's surface. Better understanding of its turbulence nature is essential in characterizing the local weather, climate variability and modeling of turbulent exchange processes. The importance of Middle East region, with its unique geographical, economical and weather condition is well recognized. However, high quality micrometeorological observational studies are rare in this region. Here we show experimental results from micrometeorological observations from an experimental site in the coastal region of Qatar during August-December 2015. Measurements of winds are obtained from three sonic anemometers installed on a 9 m tower placed at Al Ghariyah beach in northern Qatar (26.08 °N, 51.36 °E). Different surface layer characteristics is analyzed and compared with earlier studies in equivalent weather conditions. Monthly statistics of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and heat index are made from concurrent observations from sonic anemometer and weather station to explore variations with surface layer characteristics. The results also highlights potential impact of sea breeze circulation on local weather and atmospheric turbulence. The observed daily maximum temperature and heat index during morning period may be related to sea breeze circulations. Along with the operational micrometeorological observation system, a camera system and ultrasonic wave measurement system are installed recently in the site to study coastline development and nearshore wave dynamics. Overall, the complete observational set up is going to provide new insights about nearshore wind dynamics and wind-wave interaction in Qatar.

  1. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  2. Flux-Profile Relationship for Dust Concentration in the Stratified Atmospheric Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, L. S.; Chamecki, M.; Gillies, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    Flux-profile relationships are usually obtained under the assumption that the mean field of interest is in equilibrium with the associated surface fluxes. In this study, the existence of an equilibrium state for dust concentration in the atmospheric surface layer above sources and sinks is evaluated using large-eddy simulation. Results show that for steady-state turbulence and negligible horizontal advection, an equilibrium mean vertical profile of dust concentration is reached after one boundary-layer eddy turnover time. This is true for cases over a source or sink, under different atmospheric stabilities, and for particles with negligible or significant settling velocity. A new model relating the net surface flux to the vertical concentration profile that accounts for both atmospheric stability and particle settling velocity is proposed. The model compares well with the simulation results for all particle sizes and atmospheric stability conditions evaluated, and it can be used to estimate the concentration profile based on the surface flux, and also to estimate the surface flux by fitting the vertical concentration profile. The resulting equation can be considered as an extension of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to the concentration of settling particles, such as mineral dust, sea-salt, pollen and other suspended aerosols.

  3. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  4. On the parametrization of the planetary boundary layer of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yordanov, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria); Syrakov, D.; Kolarova, M. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The investigation of the dynamic processes in the planetary boundary layer presents a definite theoretical challenge and plays a growing role for the solution of a number of practical tasks. The improvement of large-scale atmospheric weather forecast depends, to a certain degree, on the proper inclusion of the planetary boundary layer dynamics in the numerical models. The modeling of the transport and the diffusion of air pollutants is connected with estimation of the different processes in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and needs also a proper PBL parametrization. For the solution of these practical tasks the following PBL models;(i) a baroclinic PBL model with its barotropic version, and (ii) a convective PBL model were developed. Both models are one dimensional and are based on the similarity theory and the resistance lows extended for the whole PBL. Two different PBL parametrizations under stable and under convective conditions are proposed, on the basis of which the turbulent surface heat and momentum fluxes are estimated using generalized similarity theory. By the proposed parametrizations the internal parameters are calculated from the synoptic scale parameters as geostrophyc wind, potential temperature and humidity given at two levels (ground level and at 850 hPa) and from them - the PBL profiles. The models consists of two layers: a surface layer (SL) with a variable height and a second (Ekman layer) over it with a constant with height turbulent exchange coefficient. (au) 14 refs.

  5. Nonlinear Dependence of the Phase Screen Structure Function on the Atmospheric Layer Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Mathar, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The phase structure function accumulated by two parallel rays after transmission through a layer of turbulent air is best known by a proportionality to the 5/3rd power of the lateral distance in the aperture, derived from an isotropic Kolmogorov spectrum of the refractive index. For a von-Karman spectrum of the refractive index, a dependence involving a modified Bessel function of the ratio of the distance over the outer scale is also known. A further standard proposition is a proportionality to the path length through the atmospheric layer. The manuscript modifies this factor through a refined calculation of an integral representation of the structure function. The correction establishes a sub-linearity as the lateral distance grows in proportion to the layer thickness; it is more important for large than for small outer scales.

  6. The vertical structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Lingen; MA Yongfeng; LU Changgui; LIN Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The tropopause height and the atmospheric boundary layer (PBL) height as well as the variation of inversion layer above the floating ice surface are presented using GPS (global position system ) radiosonde sounding data and relevant data obtained by China’s fourth arctic scientific expedition team over the central Arctic Ocean (86◦-88◦N, 144◦-170◦W ) during the summer of 2010. The tropopause height is from 9.8 to 10.5 km, with a temperature range between-52.2 and-54.1◦C in the central Arctic Ocean. Two zones of maximum wind (over 12 m/s) are found in the wind profile, namely, low-and upper-level jets, located in the middle troposphere and the tropopause, respectively. The wind direction has a marked variation point in the two jets from the southeast to the southwest. The average PBL height determined by two methods is 341 and 453 m respectively. These two methods can both be used when the inversion layer is very low, but the results vary significantly when the inversion layer is very high. A significant logarithmic relationship exists between the PBL height and the inversion intensity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.66, indicating that the more intense the temperature inversion is, the lower the boundary layer will be. The observation results obviously differ from those of the third arctic expedition zone (80◦-85◦N). The PBL height and the inversion layer thickness are much lower than those at 87◦-88◦N, but the inversion temperature is more intense, meaning a strong ice-atmosphere interaction in the sea near the North Pole. The PBL structure is related to the weather system and the sea ice concentration, which affects the observation station.

  7. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  8. Composition of the earth's atmosphere by shock-layer radiometry during the PAET entry probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, E. E.; Arnold, J. O.; Page, W. A.; Reynolds, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination of the composition of the earth's atmosphere obtained from onboard radiometer measurements of the spectra emitted from the bow shock layer of a high-speed entry probe is reported. The N2, O2, CO2, and noble gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere were determined to good accuracy by this technique. The results demonstrate unequivocally the feasibility of determining the composition of an unknown planetary atmosphere by means of a multichannel radiometer viewing optical emission from the heated atmospheric gases in the region between the bow shock wave and the vehicle surface. The spectral locations in this experiment were preselected to enable the observation of CN violet, N2(+) first negative and atomic oxygen emission at 3870, 3910, and 7775 A, respectively. The atmospheric gases were heated and compressed by the shock wave to a peak temperature of about 6100 K and a corresponding pressure of 0.4 atm. Complete descriptions of the data analysis technique and the onboard radiometer and its calibration are given.

  9. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  10. Effects of initiating anaerobic digestion of layer-hen poultry dung at sub-atmospheric pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chima C. Ngumah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of initiating anaerobic digestion (AD of dry layer-hen poultry dung at the sub-atmospheric pressure of -30 cmHg on biodegradation, biogasification, and biomethanation. The setup was performed as a batch process at an average ambient temperature of 29±2 0C and a retention time of 15 days. Comparisons were made with two other experiments which were both begun at ambient atmospheric pressure; one was inoculated with digestate from a previous layer-hen dung AD, while the other was not inoculated. The bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure, ambient atmospheric pressure without inoculum, and ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculum showed the following for biogas and biomethane yields respectively: 16.8 cm3 g-1 VS and 15.46 cm3 g 1 VS, 25.10 cm3 g-1 VS and 12.85 cm3 g-1 VS, 21.44 cm3 g-1 VS and 14.88 cm3 g 1 VS. In the same order, after AD, the following values were recorded for volatile solids and total viable counts (prokaryotes and fungi in the digestates: 40.33% and 23.22 x 106 cfu mL-1, 43.42% and 22.17 x 106 cfu mL-1, 41.11% and 13.3 x 106 cfu mL-1. The feedstock showed values of 83.93% and 3.98 x 106 cfu mL-1 for volatile solids and total viable count respectively. There was a slight difference in the volatile solids of the digestates of the three bioreactors after AD. The pH recorded for the feedstock slurry before AD was 7.9 at 30oC, while after AD, the digestates from all the three bioreactors showed the same pH of 5.9 at 29 0C. Statistical analysis using ANOVA showed no significant difference in biogas yields of the feedstock for the three bioreactors (A, B, C. ANOVA showed no significant difference for biomethane yields in the bioreactors initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and for those initiated at ambient atmospheric pressure with inoculums. However, it showed significant difference in the bioreactor initiated at sub-atmospheric pressure and that initiated at ambient atmospheric

  11. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  12. Large-eddy simulation of an infinitely large wind farm in a stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2010-09-01

    When deployed as large arrays, wind turbines interact among themselves and with atmospheric boundary layer. To optimize their geometric arrangements, accurate knowledge of wind-turbine array boundary layer is of great importance. In this study, we integrated large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique, and used it to study the characteristics of wind-turbine wake in an idealized wind farm inside a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer (SBL). The wind turbines, with a rotor diameter of 112m and a tower height of 119m, were placed in a well-known SBL turbulent case that has a boundary layer height of approximately 180m. The super-geostrophic nocturnal jet near the top of the boundary layer was eliminated due to the energy extraction and the enhanced mixing of momentum. Non-axisymmetric behavior of wake structure was observed in response to the non-uniform incoming turbulence, the Coriolis effects, and the rotational effects induced by blade motions. The turbulence intensity in the simulated turbine wakes was found to reach a maximum at the top-tip level and a downwind distance of approximately 3-5 rotor diameters from the turbines. The Coriolis effects caused a skewed spatial structure and drove certain amount of turbulent energy away from the center of the wake. The SBL height was increased, while the magnitudes of the surface momentum flux and the surface buoyancy flux were reduced by approximately 30%. The wind farm was also found to have a strong effect on area-averaged vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat, which highlights the potential impact of wind farms on local meteorology.

  13. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  14. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  15. Fraunhofer Lidar Prototype in the Green Spectral Region for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Wu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A lidar detects atmospheric parameters by transmitting laser pulse to the atmosphere and receiving the backscattering signals from molecules and aerosol particles. Because of the small backscattering cross section, a lidar usually uses the high sensitive photomultiplier and avalanche photodiode as detector and uses photon counting technology for collection of weak backscatter signals. Photon Counting enables the capturing of extremely weak lidar return from long distance, throughout dark background, by a long time accumulation. Because of the strong solar background, the signal-to-noise ratio of lidar during daytime could be greatly restricted, especially for the lidar operating at visible wavelengths where solar background is prominent. Narrow band-pass filters must therefore be installed in order to isolate solar background noise at wavelengths close to that of the lidar receiving channel, whereas the background light in superposition with signal spectrum, limits an effective margin for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR improvement. This work describes a lidar prototype operating at the Fraunhofer lines, the invisible band of solar spectrum, to achieve photon counting under intense solar background. The photon counting lidar prototype in Fraunhofer lines devised was used to observe the atmospheric boundary layer. The SNR was improved 2-3 times by operating the lidar at the wavelength in solar dark lines. The aerosol extinctions illustrate the vertical structures of aerosol in the atmospheric boundary over Qingdao suburban during summer 2011.

  16. Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al2O3 films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100 °C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.11–0.13 nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of ±2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76 ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1 m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5 mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD

  17. Recent progress in acoustic travel-time tomography of the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Ostashev

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography of the atmospheric surface layer (ASL is based on measurements of the travel times of sound propagation between sources and receivers which constitute a tomography array. Then, the temperature and wind velocity fields inside the tomographic volume or area are reconstructed using different inverse algorithms. Improved knowledge of these fields is important in many practical applications. Tomography has certain advantages in comparison with currently used instrumentation for measurement of the temperature and wind velocity. In this paper, a short historical overview of acoustic tomography of the atmosphere is presented. The main emphasis is on recent progress in acoustic tomography of the ASL. The tomography arrays that have been used so far are discussed. Inverse algorithms for reconstruction of the temperature and wind velocity fields from the travel times are reviewed. Some results in numerical simulations of acoustic tomography of the ASL and reconstruction of the turbulence fields in tomography experiments are presented and discussed.

  18. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  19. Simulation of impact assesment of crown forest fires on boudary layer of atmosphere using software PHOENICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soprunenko, Elina E.; Perminov, Valeriy; Reyno, Vladimir V.; Loboda, Egor L.

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical model of heat and mass transfer of crown forest fire is used in this paper, which is developed on the base of experimental research data and laws and methods of mechanics of reacting media. The numerical calculation carried out using software PHOENICS for non stationary three dimensional case. K-Ɛ model of turbulence is taken into account. It is studied the influence of temperature and wind velocity in boundary layer of atmosphere on the turbulent kinematic viscosity coefficient value and distribution of temperature above the crown forest fire front.

  20. CVD diamond deposition under atmospheric conditions on steel with a silicon intermediate layer

    OpenAIRE

    Prieske, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize dry metal forming, the requirements of the surface layer, e.g. to load-bearing capacity and tribological properties are increasing. Therefore, the feasibility of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond onto tool steel 1.2379 under atmospheric conditions without a vacuum chamber is investigated, so that there is no limit according to the size of the tool. For the deposition of CVD diamond coatings, a laser-based plasma CVD process combined with a physical vapour dep-osi...

  1. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Evolution with Lidar in Buenos Aires from 2008 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer top height evolution is obtained from 2008 to 2011 in Buenos Aires using the multiwavelength lidar located at CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) (34°33' S; 58°30' W; 17 m asl). Algorithms recognition based on covariance wavelet transform are applied to obtain seasonal statistics. This method is being evaluated for use in the Lidar Network in Argentina and it is being deployed in Patagonia region currently. The technique operates in real time in both low and high aerosol loads and with almost no human supervision.

  2. Numerical Solution of 2D and 3D Atmospheric Boundary Layer Stratified Flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonek, J.; Kozel, K.; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    Berlín : Springer, 2011 - (Fořt, J.; Fürst, J.; Halama, J.; Herbin, R.; Hubert, R.), s. 723-730 ISBN 978-3-642-20670-2. [FVCA Internationa Symposium /6./. Praha (CZ), 06.06.2011-10.6.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : CFD * finite volume method * variable density flows * atmospheric boundary layer flows Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.springerlink.com/content/p7r28m682x638510

  3. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SURFACE LAYER STRUCTURE ON INCONEL 600 OXIDIZED IN A CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Haouam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Samples of Inconel 600 were isothermally oxidized in a controlled atmosphere with a special mounting at high-temperature oxidation. Along with this experimental study, a simulation of thermodynamic behavior of the material in the same oxidation conditions was carried out using the Thermo-Calc code. The thermodynamic modeling is able to predict the phase nature and its distribution in the structure of the surface layer resulting from the corrosion of the material in thermodynamic equilibrium in the absence of mechanical stress. The results of this simulation are supplemented to results obtained from the analysis by glow discharge spectrometry (GDS which is performed on the samples tested.

  4. Wind instability of a foam layer sandwiched between the atmosphere and the ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri M; Mond, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of short gravity waves is examined in order to explain the recent findings of the decrease in momentum transfer from hurricane winds to sea waves. A three-fluid configuration of a foam layer between the atmosphere and the ocean is suggested to provide signifficant stabilization of the system and shifting the marginal critical wavelength to the shortwave part of the spectrum. It is conjectured that such stabilization leads to the observed drag reduction. The high contrasts in three fluid densities provide a universal mechanism for stabilizing surface perturbations.

  5. Transfer of radioactive aerosol from unit shelter in boundary atmosphere layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of transfer of radioactive aerosol in boundary atmosphere layer in case of normal conditions of unit Shelter and in ceases of different emergency scenarios was performed. In cases of normal condition of unit Shelter the additional radioactive contamination of surface air in close ChNPP zone is the result of simultaneous activities of two sources: unorganized removal of radioactive aerosols from 'Shelter' gaps and release of aerosol particles through ventilating duct of power block 3 and 4. A software shell was created to implement computation mathematical models to evaluate transfer of radioactive aerosol from unit 'Shelter'

  6. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  7. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS) solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta C.; Nugusse H.; Kokilavani S.P.; Schmidt J.; Stoevesandt B.

    2014-01-01

    We validate the simpleFoam (RANS) solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1) for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's bl...

  8. Application of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Ferrite Layers for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F; Federmann, S; Taborelli, M; Schulz, C; Bobzin, K; Wu, J

    2013-01-01

    A common problem in all kinds of cavity-like structures in particle accelerators is the occurrence of RF-resonances. Typically, ferrite plates attached to the walls of such structures as diagnostic devices, kickers or collimators, are used to dampen those undesired modes. However, the heat transfer rate from these plates to the walls is rather limited. Brazing ferrite plates to the walls is not possible in most cases due to the different thermal expansion coefficients. To overcome those limitations, atmospheric plasma spraying techniques have been investigated. Ferrite layers with a thickness from 50 μm to about 300 μm can be deposited on metallic surfaces like stainless steel exhibiting good thermal contact and still reasonable absorption properties. In this paper the technological aspects of plasma deposition are discussed and results of specifically developed RF loss measurement procedures for such thin magnetically lossy layers on metal are presented.

  9. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  10. The Oblique Incident Effects of Electromagnetic Wave in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; JIANG Zhonghe; HU Xiwei; LIU Minghai

    2008-01-01

    The propagating behaviours, i.e. phase shift, transmissivity, reflectivity and absorptivity, of an electromagnetic (EM) wave in a two-dimensional atmospheric pressure plasma layer are described by the numerical solutions of integral-differential Maxwell's equations through a generalized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. These propagating behaviours are found to be strongly affected by five factors: two EM wave characteristics relevan.t to the oblique incident and three dimensionless factors. The two EM wave factors are the polarization mode (TM mode or TE mode) and its incident angle. The three dimensionless factors are: the ratio of the maximum electron density to the critical density n0/ncr, the ratio of the plasma layer width to the wave length d/λ, and the ratio of the collision frequency between electrons and neutrals to the incident wave frequency ve0/f.

  11. The Analyses of Turbulence Characteristics in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Zhang, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Turbulent characteristics in the atmospheric surface layer are investigated using a data-driven method, Hilbert spectral analysis. The results from empirical mode decomposition display a set of intrinsic mode functions whose characteristic scales suggest a dyadic filter-bank property. It can be concluded from the joint probability density function of the intrinsic mode functions that the turbulent properties are totally different under different stratifications: the amplitudes (or energies) are arranged according to the stability parameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] for stable conditions, but tend to cluster randomly for unstable cases. The intermittency analyses reveal that second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display a power-law behaviour in the inertial subrange, and that the scaling exponent functions deviate from the theoretical values due to the strong intermittency in the stable boundary layer.

  12. Scaling of the asymptotic entropy jump in the superadiabatic layers of stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Magic, Zazralt

    2016-01-01

    Stellar structure calculations are able to predict precisely the properties of stars during their evolution. However, convection is still modelled by the mixing length theory; therefore, the upper boundary conditions near the optical surface do not agree with asteroseismic observations. We want to improve how the outer boundary conditions are determined in stellar structure calculations. We study realistic 3D stellar atmosphere models to find alternative properties. We find that the asymptotic entropy run of the superadiabatic convective surface layers exhibit a distinct universal stratification when normalised by the entropy minimum and jump. The normalised entropy can be represented by a 5th order polynomial very accurately, and a 3rd order polynomial also yields accurate coefficients. This generic entropy stratification or the solar stratification, when scaled by the entropy jump and minimum, can be used to improve the modelling of superadiabatic surface layers in stellar structure calculations. Furthermor...

  13. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  14. Atmospheric boundary layer top height in South Africa: measurements with lidar and radiosonde compared to three atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Korhonen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric lidar measurements were carried out at Elandsfontein measurement station, on the eastern Highveld approximately 150 km east of Johannesburg in South Africa (SA throughout 2010. The height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL top was continuously measured using a~Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended. High atmospheric variability together with a large surface temperature range and significant seasonal changes in precipitation were observed, which had an impact on the vertical mixing of particulate matter (PM, and hence, on the PBL evolution. The results were compared to radio soundings, CALIOP (Cloud–Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization space-borne lidar measurements and three atmospheric models that followed different approaches to determine the PBL top height. These models included two weather forecast models operated by ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts and SAWS (South African Weather Service and one mesoscale prognostic meteorological and air pollution regulatory model TAPM (The Air Pollution Model. The ground-based lidar used in this study was operational for 4935 h during 2010 (49% of the time. The PBL top height was detected 86% of the total measurement time (42% of the total time. Large seasonal and diurnal variations were observed between the different methods utilised. Comparison of lidar measurements to the models indicated that the ECMWF model agreed the best with mean absolute difference of 15.4%, while the second best correlation was with the SAWS model with corresponding difference of 20.1%. TAPM was found to have a tendency to underestimate the PBL top height. The wind speeds in SAWS operated and TAPM models were strongly underestimated which probably led to underestimation of the vertical wind and turbulence and thus underestimation of the PBL top height. High variation was found when lidar measurements were compared to radiosonde measurements. This could be partially due

  15. Estimating the atmospheric boundary layer height over sloped, forested terrain from surface spectral analysis during BEARPEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL height (zi over complex, forested terrain is estimated based on the power spectra and the integral length scale of horizontal winds obtained from a three-axis sonic anemometer during the BEARPEX (Biosphere Effects on Aerosol and Photochemistry Experiment. The zi values estimated with this technique showed very good agreement with observations obtained from balloon tether sonde (2007 and rawinsonde (2009 measurements under unstable conditions (z/L < 0 at the coniferous forest in the California Sierra Nevada. The behavior of the nocturnal boundary layer height (h and power spectra of lateral winds and temperature under stable conditions (z/L > 0 is also presented. The nocturnal boundary layer height is found to be fairly well predicted by a recent interpolation formula proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007, although it was observed to only vary from 60–80 m during the experiment. Finally, significant directional wind shear was observed during both day and night with winds backing from the prevailing west-southwesterlies in the ABL (anabatic cross-valley circulation to consistent southerlies in a layer ~1 km thick just above the ABL before veering to the prevailing westerlies further aloft. We show that this is consistent with the forcing of a thermal wind driven by the regional temperature gradient directed due east in the lower troposphere.

  16. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphas...

  17. Modeling the Evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Coupled to the Land Surface for Three Contrasting Nights in CASES-99

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The modeling and prediction of the stable boundary layer over land is a persistent, problematic feature in weather. climate, and air quality topics. Here, the performance of a state-of-the-art single-column boundary layer model is evaluated with observations from the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere-Surf

  18. A Method for Deriving the Boundary Layer Mixing Height from MODIS Atmospheric Profile Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Feng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer is the medium of energy, moisture, momentum and pollutant exchange between the surface and the atmosphere. In this paper, a method to derive the boundary layer mixing height (MH was introduced and applied over the Heihe river basin. Atmospheric profiles from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Sepctroradiometer (MODIS instrument onboard the NASA-Aqua satellite were used for the high spatial resolution of this method. A gap-filling method was used to replace missing MODIS data. In situ MH data were also calculated from HIWATER (Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research and WATER (Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research observational radiosonde sounding data from 2008 and 2012 using the Richardson number method combined with a subjective method. The MH occurs where there is an abrupt decrease in the MR (water vapor mixing ratio. The minimum vertical gradient of the MR is used to determine the MH. The method has an average RMSE of 370 m under clear skies and convective conditions. The seasonal variation in the MH at the Gaoya radiosonde station is also presented. The study demonstrates that remote sensing methodologies can successfully estimate the MH without the help of field measurements.

  19. Laboratory Simulations of Local Winds in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer via Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the atmospheric boundary layer, under high pressure conditions and negligible geostrophic winds, problems associated with pollution are the most critical. In this situation local winds play a major role in the evaluation of the atmospheric dynamics at small scales and in dispersion processes. These winds originate as a result of nonuniform heating of the soil, either when it is homogeneous or in discontinuous terrain in the presence of sea and/or slopes. Depending on the source of the thermal gradient, local winds are classified into convective boundary layer, sea and land breezes, urban heat islands, and slope currents. Local winds have been analyzed by (i simple analytical models; (ii numerical models; (iii field measurements; (iv laboratory measurements through which it is impossible to completely create the necessary similarities, but the parameters that determine the phenomenon can be controlled and each single wind can be separately analyzed. The present paper presents a summary of laboratory simulations of local winds neglecting synoptic winds and the effects of Coriolis force. Image analysis techniques appear suitable to fully describe both the individual phenomenon and the superposition of more than one local wind. Results do agree with other laboratory studies and numerical experiments.

  20. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  1. Flow around new wind fence with multi-scale fractal structure in an atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Joon; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling atmospheric boundary-layer flows with engineered structures, such as porous wind fences or windbreaks, has been of great interest to the fluid mechanics and wind engineering community. Previous studies found that the regular mono-scale grid fence of 50% porosity and a bottom gap of 10% of the fence height are considered to be optimal over a flat surface. Significant differences in turbulent flow structure have recently been noted behind multi-scale fractal wind fences, even with the same porosity. In this study, wind-tunnel tests on the turbulent flow and the turbulence kinetic energy transport of 1D and 2D multi-scale fractal fences under atmospheric boundary-layer were conducted. Velocity fields around the fractal fences were systematically measured using Particle Image Velocimetry to uncover effects of key parameters on turbulent flows around the fences at a Reynolds number of approximately 3.6x104 based on the free-stream speed and fence height. The turbulent flow structures induced by specific 1D/2D multi-scale fractal wind fences were compared to those of a conventional grid fence. The present results would contribute to the design of new-generation wind fences to reduce snow/sand deposition on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges.

  2. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  3. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  4. Characterization of oxide layers of heat-resisting alloys in oxidizing and oxidizing/sulfidizing atmospheres by deuterium permeation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium permeation measurements are suitable to characterize the integrity of layers, which are preoxidized or in-situ oxidized on high temperature alloys. The permeation through metal alloys with a growing oxidized layer is described by a model with a time dependence of the permeation flux related to the growth of the oxide layer. The behaviour of the layers, which are oxidized at different oxidizing atmospheres, are investigated in this work. By permeation test, parabolic rate constants, impeding factors, as well as permeability, diffusivity and the solubility of deuterium for the oxide layers are obtained. The measurement are continued in sulfidizing atmosphere for testing such layers as corrosion barrier. In correlation with microstructural post examinations it is found that permeation measurement can be utilized as a method for investigating high-temperature corrosion. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of ozone content in different atmospheric layers using ground-based Fourier transform spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Ya. A.; Timofeev, Yu. M.; Poberovskii, A. V.; Eremenko, M.; Dufour, G.

    2015-03-01

    For the first time in Russia, using ground-based measurements of direct solar infrared radiation, we derived data on ozone content in different layers of the atmosphere. The measurements were conducted with the help of a Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier spectrometer in 2009-2012 in Petergof, which is 30 km west of the center of St. Petersburg. The errors in determining the ozone content by this method in the troposphere (0-12 km), in the stratosphere (12-50 km), in the layers of 10-20 and 20-50 km, and in the layers of 12-18, 18-25, and 25-50 km were ~4, 3, 3-5, and 4-7% (taking into account the instrumental and methodological errors, as well as the errors in specifying the temperature profile), respectively. The seasonal variation of tropospheric ozone content in the layer of 12-18 km is characterized by a clearly expressed maximum in March and a minimum in November, with amplitudes of 30 and 40%, respectively. For the layer of 18-25 km, the maximum and minimum are reached in the winter-spring period and late summer, respectively; the amplitude of the seasonal variation is ~20%. The amplitude of the annual variation in ozone content in the layer of 25-50 km is around 30%, with a maximum close to the summer solstice and a minimum close to the winter solstice. Over the three years of observations, the growth in the ozone content in this layer was ~10% per year of its value averaged over the time period. Comparisons of ground-based measurements with satellite measurements (by the IASI instrument) of tropospheric ozone revealed a discrepancy of (3.4 ± 17)% for both ensembles. The correlation between the two ensembles is 0.76-0.84 (depending on the season). Comparisons between ground-based and satellite measurements (by the MLS instrument) of stratospheric ozone revealed no systematic discrepancies of the two ensembles. The rms errors were 13, 6, and 5% for the layers of 10-20, 20-50, and 10-50 km, respectively; the coefficients of correlations between the two types of

  6. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  7. An analytical model for dispersion of material in the atmospheric planetary boundary layer in presence of precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical model for the dispersion of particulates and finely divided material released into the atmosphere near the ground is presented. The possible precipitation when the particles are dense enough and large enough to have deposition velocity, is taken into consideration. The model is derived analytically in the mixing layer or Ekman boundary layer where the mixing process is a direct consequence of turbulent and convective motions generated in the boundary layer. (author)

  8. Forecast of surface layer meteorological parameters at Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Fini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at proving the feasibility of the forecast of all the most relevant classical atmospherical parameters for astronomical applications (wind speed and direction, temperature) above the ESO ground-base site of Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model called Meso-Nh. In a precedent paper we have preliminarily treated the model performances obtained in reconstructing some key atmospherical parameters in the surface layer 0-30~m studying the bias and the RMSE on a statistical sample of 20 nights. Results were very encouraging and it appeared therefore mandatory to confirm such a good result on a much richer statistical sample. In this paper, the study was extended to a total sample of 129 nights between 2007 and 2011 distributed in different parts of the solar year. This large sample made our analysis more robust and definitive in terms of the model performances and permitted us to confirm the excellent performances of the model. Besides, we present an independent analysis of the model p...

  9. An analytical model for radioactive pollutant release simulation in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weymar, Guilherme J.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: guicefetrs@gmail.com, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com, E-mail: bejbodmann@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Buske, Daniela; Quadros, Regis, E-mail: danielabuske@gmail.com, E-mail: quadros99@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica

    2013-07-01

    Simulations of emission of radioactive substances in the atmosphere from the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra 1 are a necessary tool for control and elaboration of emergency plans as a preventive action for possible accidents. In the present work we present an analytical solution for radioactive pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere, solving the time-dependent three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation. The experiment here used as a reference in the simulations consisted of the controlled releases of radioactive tritiated water vapor from the meteorological tower close to the power plant at Itaorna Beach. The wind profile was determined using experimental meteorological data and the micrometeorological parameters were calculated from empirical equations obtained in the literature. We report on a novel analytical formulation for the concentration of products of a radioactive chain released in the atmospheric boundary layer and solve the set of coupled equations for each chain radionuclide by the GILTT solution, assuming the decay of all progenitors radionuclide for each equation as source term. Further we report on numerical simulations, as an explicit but fictitious example and consider three radionuclides in the radioactive chain of Uranium 235. (author)

  10. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  11. Cloud radiative forcing induced by layered clouds and associated impact on the atmospheric heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Qiaoyi; Li, Jiming; Wang, Tianhe; Huang, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of cloud fraction, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud radiative heating rate (CRH) of the single-layered cloud (SLC) and the multi-layered cloud (MLC), and their differences is presented, based on the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR and 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR products on the global scale. The CRH at a given atmospheric level is defined as the cloudy minus clear-sky radiative heating rate. The statistical results show that the globally averaged cloud fraction of the MLC (24.9%), which is primarily prevalent in equatorial regions, is smaller than that of the SLC (46.6%). The globally averaged net radiative forcings (NET CRFs) induced by the SLC (MLC) at the top and bottom of the atmosphere (TOA and BOA) and in the atmosphere (ATM) are-60.8 (-40.9),-67.5 (-49.6), and 6.6 (8.7) W m-2, respectively, where the MLC contributes approximately 40.2%, 42.4%, and 57% to the NET CRF at the TOA, BOA, and in the ATM, respectively. The MLC exhibits distinct differences to the SLC in terms of CRH. The shortwave CRH of the SLC (MLC) reaches a heating peak at 9.75 (7.5) km, with a value of 0.35 (0.60) K day-1, and the differences between SLC and MLC transform from positive to negative with increasing altitude. However, the longwave CRH of the SLC (MLC) reaches a cooling peak at 2 (8) km, with a value of-0.45 (-0.42) K day-1, and the differences transform from negative to positive with increasing altitude. In general, the NET CRH differences between SLC and MLC are negative below 7.5 km. These results provide an observational basis for the assessment and improvement of the cloud parameterization schemes in global models.

  12. Momentum Transfer Between an Atmospheric and an Oceanic Layer at the Synoptic and the Mesoscale: An Idealized Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, A.; Wirth, A.

    2016-04-01

    We consider air-sea interaction at the (atmospheric) synoptic and the mesoscale due to momentum transfer only. Two superposed one-layer fine-resolution shallow-water models are numerically integrated, where the upper layer represents the atmosphere and the lower layer the ocean. The frictional force between the two layers is implemented using a quadratic drag law and experiments with different values of the surface drag coefficient are performed. The actual energy loss of the atmosphere and the energy gain by the ocean, due to the interfacial shear, is determined and compared to estimates based on average speeds. The correlation between the vorticity in the atmosphere and the ocean is determined. Results differ from previous investigations where the exchange of momentum was considered at basin scale. It is shown that the ocean has a passive role, absorbing kinetic energy at nearly all times and locations, results showing that the energy input to the ocean increases almost quadratically with the value of the drag coefficient. Due to the feeble velocities in the ocean, the energy transfer depends only weakly on the oceanic velocity. The ocean dynamics leave nevertheless their imprint on atmospheric dynamics, leading to a quenched disordered state of the atmosphere-ocean system for the highest value of the drag coefficient considered. This finding questions the ergodic hypothesis for the idealized configuration studied here. The ergodic hypothesis is at the basis of a large number of experimental, observational and numerical results in ocean, atmosphere and climate dynamics.

  13. Solutions of atmospheric dispersion equation and parameters in the boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing interest in studies of atmospheric aerosols in the context of their impact and atmospheric chemistry associated. In this work attention was paid to mathematical relationship to evaluate air dispersion concentrations under different conditions.The material in the present thesis is organized in three chapters in the following way:In chapter (1), we describe as. In section 1-1, General introduction. In section 1-2. Study atmosphere boundary layer, in section 1-3.Study atmospheric diffusion, In section 1-4, defined the concentration, In section 1-5, Defined the dispersion and diffusion .In section 6.Characterization of Turbulent Diffusion.In chapter (2), we derive a simple solution of the steady state, dimensional diffusion equation that describes advection in the direction of the wind and diffusion in the vertical direction using separation method. The separation method has been found to give solution, which agrees well with observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. In section 1, we study the mathematically analogous problem of dispersal pollution over area sources. In section 2-2, we give a description of the analytical method, In section 2-3, we give a description of the numerical method while in section 2-4 and 2-5, we give an application of the method to the calculation of dispersal of sulfur dioxide in a 2-h, steady state period in the atmosphere of Nashville. Tennessee.In chapter (3), we estimated the concentration of PM10 (where it is the portion of particulate matter in the air having an aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED) less than or equal to 10 μm) and compare horizontal flux calculations presented by (Veranth et al. (2003)) with emissions measured from a dispersion model applied to the same data. The next section is used to study the system of computing Horizontal fluxes. In section 3-2, using the mathematical techniques to derived the parameters such as the expressions and the mean plume velocity (where the mathematical

  14. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  15. Using a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to Simulate the Interaction between Land Surface Processes and Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Semi-Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树华; 乐旭; 胡非; 刘辉志

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to study the interaction between land surface and atmospheric boundary layer processes. The scheme is composed of two main parts:atmospheric boundary layer processes and land surface processes. Compared with SiB and BATS, which are famous for their detailed parameterizations of physical variables, this simplified model is more convenient and saves much more computation time. Though simple, the feasibility of the model is well proved in this paper. The numerical simulation results from MSPAS show good agreement with reality. The scheme is used to obtain reasonable simulations for diurnal variations of heat balance, potential temperature of boundary layer, and wind field, and spatial distributions of temperature, specific humidity, vertical velocity,turbulence kinetic energy, and turbulence exchange coefficient over desert and oasis. In addition, MSPAS is used to simulate the interaction between desert and oasis at night, and again it obtains reasonable results.This indicates that MSPAS can be used to study the interaction between land surface processes and the atmospheric boundary layer over various underlying surfaces and can be extended for regional climate and numerical weather prediction study.

  16. The role of interfacial water layer in atmospherically relevant charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Indrani

    Charge separation at interfaces is important in various atmospheric processes, such as thunderstorms, lightning, and sand storms. It also plays a key role in several industrial processes, including ink-jet printing and electrostatic separation. Surprisingly, little is known about the underlying physics of these charging phenomena. Since thin films of water are ubiquitous, they may play a role in these charge separation processes. This talk will focus on the experimental investigation of the role of a water adlayer in interfacial charging, with relevance to meteorologically important phenomena, such as atmospheric charging due to wave actions on oceans and sand storms. An ocean wave generates thousands of bubbles, which upon bursting produce numerous large jet droplets and small film droplets that are charged. In the 1960s, Blanchard showed that the jet droplets are positively charged. However, the charge on the film droplets was not known. We designed an experiment to exclusively measure the charge on film droplets generated by bubble bursting on pure water and aqueous salt solution surfaces. We measured their charge to be negative and proposed a model where a slight excess of hydroxide ions in the interfacial water layer is responsible for generating these negatively charged droplets. The findings from this research led to a better understanding of the ionic disposition at the air-water interface. Sand particles in a wind-blown sand layer, or 'saltation' layer, become charged due to collisions, so much so, that it can cause lightning. Silica, being hydrophilic, is coated with a water layer even under low-humidity conditions. To investigate the importance of this water adlayer in charging the silica surfaces, we performed experiments to measure the charge on silica surfaces due to contact and collision processes. In case of contact charging, the maximum charge separation occurred at an optimum relative humidity. On the contrary, in collisional charging process, no

  17. Ice Layers as an Indicator of Summer Warmth and Atmospheric Blocking in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, E. P.; Wake, C. P.; Kreutz, K. J.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2009-12-01

    A new snowpit and shallow firn core was extracted from near Kahiltna Pass (2970 m) in Denali National Park, Alaska in May 2008. The 23.12 m-long record spans autumn 2003 to spring 2008 with an average annual accumulation rate of 2.43 m water equivalent. Density, accumulation rate and δD time series are presented (Fig. 1) and compared with meteorological observations. Clusters of ice layers reveal the occurrence of occasional above freezing temperatures during the summertime. The annual cumulative number of degrees above freezing at the closest grid point in the NCEP Reanalysis dataset (62.5°W 150.0°W 700 hPa) correlates amazingly well with annual ice layer thickness (r=0.99), and astoundingly high correlation coefficients (0.94-1.00) between annual ice layer thickness and regional station temperatures indicate ice layer thickness can be used as a proxy for mean and extreme summertime temperatures across interior Alaska. Three melting events lasted two weeks or longer and were associated with a “Rex block” (aka “high-over-low block”) pattern and downstream trough over Hudson Bay as seen with 500 hPa geopotential heights. Most shorter melting events were associated with a cut-off low traversing the Gulf of Alaska. The extraction of a surface-to-bedrock core from this location should be able to provide a high quality record of summer temperature and atmospheric blocking variability for the last several hundred years. Figure 1. Kahiltna Pass firn core density (top curve), high resolution δD (high-res bottom curve), and smoothed δD (smooth curve), peak summer markers (black diamonds), peak winter markers (black squares), and significant δD events (open black circles) with a time scale as the abscissa. The arrows indicate the thickest ice layer (0.13 m) in the record and its associated spike in δD. The relative thickness of the density layers does not correspond to their relative physical thickness because of linear interpolation between reference horizons

  18. Numerical modelling of pollution dispersion in 3D atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benes, L.; Bodnar, T.; Kozel, K. [Czech Technical Univ. of Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics; Fraunie, Ph. [Univ. de Toulon et du Var, La Garde (France). Lab. de Sondages Electromagnetiques et Environnemental Terrestre

    2002-07-01

    The main goal of this work is to present the applicable models and numerical methods for solution of flow and pollution dispersion in 3D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Mathematical models are based on the system of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations and its simplifications. The sets of governing equations are completed by the transport equations for passive impurities and potential temperature. A simple algebraic turbulent closure model is used. The thermal stability phenomenon is taken into account. For each mathematical model a numerical scheme based on finite-difference or finite-volume discretization is proposed and discussed. Some results of numerical tests are presented for pollution dispersion from point sources and flows over simple geometries. (orig.)

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  20. Isotope discrimination and partitioning exercises at the scale of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J.; Helliker, B.; Bakwin, P.; Davis, K.; Torn, M.

    2003-12-01

    During the daytime the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is typically well mixed by convection up to about 1.5 km and moves across the land about 500 km per day. Underlying ecosystems modify carbon dioxide in the ABL through photosynthesis and respiration, and ABL air is ultimately replaced by air from the overlying free troposphere. Hence, measurements of carbon dioxide and isotopes in the ABL and the free troposphere offer the potential for regionally integrated estimates of isotope discrimination. We use tall-tower and airplane measurements of carbon dioxide and carbon and oxygen isotopes to develop estimates of ABL-scale isotope discrimination. We then utilize ecosystem-level measurements of the isotope ratio of respiration and land surface model estimates of photosynthetic discrimination to deconvolve net carbon dioxide fluxes into the gross components of photosynthesis and respiration at the regional scale.

  1. Continuous atmospheric boundary layer observations in the coastal urban area of Barcelona during SAPUSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandolfi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of surface mixed layer (SML, decoupled residual/convective layer (DRCL and aerosol backscatter coefficient were performed within the Barcelona (Spain boundary layer from September to October 2010 (30 days in the framework of the SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies field campaign. Two near-infrared ceilometers (Jenoptik CHM15K, vertically and horizontally probing (only vertical profiles are herein discussed, were deployed. Ceilometer-based DRCLs (1761 ± 363 m a.g.l. averaged over the campaign duration were twice as high as the mean SML (904 ± 273 m a.g.l.. Both DRCL and SML showed a marked SML diurnal cycle. Ceilometer data were compared with potential temperature profiles measured by daily radiosounding (twice a day, midnight and midday to interpret the boundary layer structure in the coastal urban area of Barcelona. The overall agreement (R2 = 0.80 between the ceilometer-retrieved and radiosounding-based SML heights (h revealed overestimation of the SML by the ceilometer (Δh=145 ± 145 m. After separating the data in accordance with different atmospheric scenarios, the lowest SML (736 ± 183 m and DRCL (1573 ± 428 m were recorded during warm North African (NAF advected air mass. By contrast, higher SML and DRCL were observed during stagnant Regional (REG (911 ± 234 m and 1769 ± 314 m, respectively and cold Atlantic (ATL (965 ± 222 m and 1878 ± 290 m, respectively air masses. In addition to being the lowest, the SML during the NAF scenario frequently showed a flat upper boundary throughout the day possibly because of the strong winds from the Mediterranean Sea limiting the midday SML convective growth. The mean backscatter coefficients were calculated at two selected heights representative of middle and top SML portions, i.e. β500 = 0.59 ± 0.45 Mm−1 sr−1 and β800 = 0.87 ± 0.68 Mm−1 sr−1 at 500 m and 800 m a.g.l., respectively. The highest backscatter coefficients were

  2. Methods of editing cloud and atmospheric layer affected pixels from satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, P. R. (Principal Investigator); Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.; Johnson, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Practical methods of computer screening cloud-contaminated pixels from data of various satellite systems are proposed. Examples are given of the location of clouds and representative landscape features in HCMM spectral space of reflectance (VIS) vs emission (IR). Methods of screening out cloud affected HCMM are discussed. The character of subvisible absorbing-emitting atmospheric layers (subvisible cirrus or SCi) in HCMM data is considered and radiosonde soundings are examined in relation to the presence of SCi. The statistical characteristics of multispectral meteorological satellite data in clear and SCi affected areas are discussed. Examples in TIROS-N and NOAA-7 data from several states and Mexico are presented. The VIS-IR cluster screening method for removing clouds is applied to a 262, 144 pixel HCMM scene from south Texas and northeast Mexico. The SCi that remain after cluster screening are sited out by applying a statistically determined IR limit.

  3. New expressions for the surface roughness length and displacement height in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jian-Zhong; Li Hui-Jun; Zhang Kai

    2007-01-01

    An alternative model for the prediction of surface roughness length is developed. In the model a new factor is introduced to compensate for the effects of wake diffusion and interactions between the wake and roughness obstacles.The experiments are carried out by the use of the hot wire anemometry in the simulated atmospheric boundary layer in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, a new expression for the zero-plane displacement height is proposed for the square arrays of roughness elements, which highlights the influence of free-stream speed on the roughness length. It appears that the displacement height increases with the wind speed while the surface roughness length decreases with Reynolds number increasing. It is shown that the calculation results based on the new expressions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  5. The NOx dependence of bromine chemistry in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custard, K. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Pratt, K. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Orlando, J. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E.; Hall, S. R.; Flocke, F.; Mauldin, L.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pöhler, D.; S., General; Zielcke, J.; Simpson, W. R.; Platt, U.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Cantrell, C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    Arctic boundary layer nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO) are naturally produced in and released from the sunlit snowpack and range between 10 to 100 pptv in the remote background surface layer air. These nitrogen oxides have significant effects on the partitioning and cycling of reactive radicals such as halogens and HOx (OH + HO2). However, little is known about the impacts of local anthropogenic NOx emission sources on gas-phase halogen chemistry in the Arctic, and this is important because these emissions can induce large variability in ambient NOx and thus local chemistry. In this study, a zero-dimensional photochemical kinetics model was used to investigate the influence of NOx on the unique springtime halogen and HOx chemistry in the Arctic. Trace gas measurements obtained during the 2009 OASIS (Ocean - Atmosphere - Sea Ice - Snowpack) field campaign at Barrow, AK were used to constrain many model inputs. We find that elevated NOx significantly impedes gas-phase halogen radical-based depletion of ozone, through the production of a variety of reservoir species, including HNO3, HO2NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), BrNO2, ClNO2 and reductions in BrO and HOBr. The effective removal of BrO by anthropogenic NOx was directly observed from measurements conducted near Prudhoe Bay, AK during the 2012 Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX). Thus, while changes in snow-covered sea ice attributable to climate change may alter the availability of molecular halogens for ozone and Hg depletion, predicting the impact of climate change on polar atmospheric chemistry is complex and must take into account the simultaneous impact of changes in the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic combustion sources. This is especially true for the Arctic, where NOx emissions are expected to increase because of increasing oil and gas extraction and shipping activities.

  6. Large eddy simulations and reduced models of the Unsteady Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, M.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2013-12-01

    Most studies of the dynamics of Atmospheric Boundary Layers (ABLs) have focused on steady geostrophic conditions, such as the classic Ekman boundary layer problem. However, real-world ABLs are driven by a time-dependent geostrophic forcing that changes at sub-diurnal scales. Hence, to advance our understanding of the dynamics of atmospheric flows, and to improve their modeling, the unsteady cases have to be analyzed and understood. This is particularly relevant to new applications related to wind energy (e.g. short-term forecast of wind power changes) and pollutant dispersion (forecasting of rapid changes in wind velocity and direction after an accidental spill), as well as to classic weather prediction and hydrometeorological applications. The present study aims to investigate the ABL behavior under variable forcing and to derive a simple model to predict the ABL response under these forcing fluctuations. Simplifications of the governing Navier-Stokes equations, with the Coriolis force, are tested using LES and then applied to derive a physical model of the unsteady ABL. LES is then exploited again to validate the analogy and the output of the simpler model. Results from the analytical model, as well as LES outputs, open the way for inertial oscillations to play an important role in the dynamics. Several simulations with different variable forcing patterns are then conducted to investigate some of the characteristics of the unsteady ABL such as resonant frequency, ABL response time, equilibrium states, etc. The variability of wind velocity profiles and hodographs, turbulent kinetic energy, and vertical profiles of the total stress and potential temperature are also examined. Wind Hodograph of the Unsteady ABL at Different Heights - This figure shows fluctuations in the mean u and v components of the velocity as time passes due to variable geostrophic forcing

  7. On determination of formaldehyde content in atmospheric boundary layer for overcast using DOAS technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postylyakov, Oleg; Borovski, Alexander; Ivanov, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is involved in a lot of chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Taking into account that HCHO basically undergo by photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radical within a few hours, short-lived VOCs and direct HCHO emissions can cause local HCHO enhancement over certain areas, and, hence, exceeding background level of HCHO can be examined as a local pollution of the atmosphere by VOCs or existence of a local HCHO source. Several retrieval algorithms applicable for DOAS measurements in cloudless were previously developed. A new algorithm applicable for overcast and cloudless sky and its error analysis is briefly introduced by this paper. Analysis of our HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast shows that when one know the cloud base height, but doesn't know cloud optical depth, the typical errors of HCHO total content retrieval are less than 10% for snow season, less than 5% for snow-free seasons, and reaches 40-45% for season with non-stable snow cover. In case one knows both the cloud base height and the cloud optical depth, the typical errors are about 5% for snow season, less than 2.5% for snow-free seasons, and are within about 10-30% for season with non-stable snow cover. Given above error estimations are valid if the HCHO layer is below the cloud base. The errors dramatically increase when HCHO layer penetrates into clouds in both cases. The first preliminary results of HCHO VCD retrieval for overcast are shown. The average difference of the HCHO VCDs for wind from Moscow megapolis and wind from few urbanized areas is about 0.8×1016 mol×cm-2 and approximately corresponds to estimates of influence of Moscow megapolis observed in clear-sky conditions.

  8. Vertical concentration profiles of dust particles in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Freire Grion, Livia; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2013-11-01

    The study of the emission of dust particles from soil surfaces into the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) has important applications to different environmental problems, from local air quality to large-scale aerosol transport and its interaction with climate. Due to the difficulty of measuring surface dust flux, a model relating it to the vertical profile of mean concentration is needed. In this study, we use Large-Eddy Simulation of the ABL to evaluate the effects of particle size and turbulence on the relationship between dust flux and concentration profiles. Results show that for very small particles (less than 5 micrometers) the settling velocity is usually negligible and the mean concentration displays a logarithmic profile. For large particles (more than 30 micrometers), there is an approximate balance between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling, so that Prandtl's power-law solution holds. However, a more general solution including non-zero net fluxes and gravitational settling exists, and it is in agreement with LES results for all particle sizes. Effects of atmospheric stability are also investigated. Funding from the Science Without Borders program (CNPq, Brazil) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  10. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  11. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core

  12. On the '-1' scaling of air temperature spectra in atmospheric surface layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Katul, G. G.; Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral properties of scalar turbulence at high wavenumbers have been extensively studied in turbulent flows, and existing theories explaining the k-5/3 scaling within the inertial subrange appear satisfactory at high Reynolds numbers. Equivalent theories for the low wavenumber range have been comparatively lacking because boundary conditions prohibit attainment of such universal behavior. A number of atmospheric surface layer (ASL) experiments reported a k-1 scaling in air temperature spectra ETT(k) at low wavenumbers but other experiments did not. Here, the occurrence of a k-1 scaling in ETT(k) in an idealized ASL flow across a wide range of atmospheric stability regimes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Experiments reveal a k-1 scaling persisted across different atmospheric stability parameter values (ζ) ranging from mildly unstable to mildly stable conditions (-0.1budget models and upon using a Heisenberg eddy viscosity as a closure to the spectral flux transfer term, conditions promoting a k-1 scaling are identified. Existence of a k-1 scaling is shown to be primarily linked to an imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance. The role of the imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance in controlling the existence of a '-1' scaling suggests that the '-1' scaling in ETT(k) does not necessarily concur with the '-1' scaling in the spectra of longitudinal velocity Euu(k). This finding explains why some ASL experiments reported k-1 in Euu(k) but not ETT(k). It also differs from prior arguments derived from directional-dimensional analysis that lead to simultaneous k-1 scaling in Euu(k) and ETT(k) at low wavenumbers in a neutral ASL.

  13. A coupled atmosphere and multi-layer land surface model for improving heavy rainfall simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haggag

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A multi-layer land surface model (SOLVEG is dynamically coupled to the non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (MM5 in order to represent better spatial variations and changes in land surface characteristics compared with the land surface parameterization schemes included in the MM5. In this coupling, calculations of the atmosphere and land surface models are carried out as independent tasks of different processors; a model coupler controls these calculations and data exchanges among models using Message Passing Interface (MPI. This coupled model is applied to the record-breaking heavy rain events occurred in Kyushu Island, the southernmost of Japan's main islands, from 20 July to 25 July in 2006. The test computations are conducted by using both the developed coupled model and the original land surface parameterization of MM5. The result of these computations shows that SOLVEG reproduce higher ground temperature than land surface parameterization schemes in the MM5. This result indicates the feedback of land surface processes between MM5 and SOLVEG plays an important role in the computation. The most pronounced difference is in the rainfall simulation that shows the importance of coupling SOLVEG and MM5. The coupled model accurately reproduces the heavy rainfall events observed in Kyushu Island compared to the original MM5 from both the spatial and temporal point of view. This paper clearly shows that realistic simulation of rainfall event strongly depends on land-surface processes interacting with cloud development that depends on surface heat and moisture fluxes, which in turn are mainly determined by land surface vegetation and soil moisture storage. Soil temperature/moisture changes significantly affect the localized precipitation and modest improvement in the land surface representation can enhance the heavy rain simulation. MM5-SOLVEG coupling shows a clear image of land surface-atmosphere interactions and the dynamic feedback on

  14. Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihani, Jehan Fouad

    Previous observational and modeling studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of atmospheric processes to land surface and subsurface conditions. The extent of the connection between these processes, however, is not yet fully understood. A sufficient understanding is needed of the circumstances under which these coupled processes might play a more significant role and when they might be simplified into the decoupled systems so frequently modeled in practice. This work focuses on the effects of terrain and soil moisture heterogeneity in changing water table depth and energy fluxes at the land surface, and how this might impact the development and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. A three-dimensional, variably saturated groundwater model coupled to a three dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (PF.ARPS) is used here to study the two-way feedback between the subsurface, land-surface, and atmosphere for both idealized cases and a real watershed. This is done by addressing the following key questions: How do terrain, soil moisture heterogeneity, and subsurface properties affect the planetary boundary layer? What are the effects of water table depth on land surface fluxes and boundary layer development and depth? What times of the diurnal cycle and which locations within a watershed demonstrate stronger feedbacks between the subsurface and the atmosphere? These questions are first addressed for idealized simulations designed to illustrate subsurface-surface feedbacks on one hand, and land-atmosphere feedbacks on the other hand. The coupled hydrologic model is then used to simulate real conditions over the Little Washita watershed in Oklahoma with the goal of addressing the above questions for a real watershed, and exploring the two-way feedback between the atmospheric boundary layer and the water table. The coupled simulations are compared to non-coupled atmospheric simulations initialized with simplified and realistic soil moisture profiles. Effects of a

  15. Nonequilibrium Response of the Daytime Atmospheric Boundary Layer to Mesoscale Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, James; Jayaraman, Bajali; Haupt, Sue; Lee, Jared

    2015-11-01

    The essential turbulence structure of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is driven by interactions between shear and buoyancy. A relatively strong inversion layer ``lid'' typically confines the ABL turbulence, whose height grows during the day with increasing surface heat flux (Q0) to ~ 1-2 km before collapsing with Q0 towards the day's end. The 3D ``microscale'' ABL turbulence is forced largely in the horizontal by winds above the capping inversion at the ``mesoscale'' at the O(100) km scale. Whereas the ``canonical'' ABL is in equilibrium and quasi-stationary, quasi-2D weather dynamics at the mesoscale is typically nonstationary at sub-diurnal time scales. We study the consequences of nonstationarity in the quasi-2D mesoscale forcing in horizontal winds and solar heating on the dynamics of ABL turbulence and especially on the potential for significant deviations from the canonical equilibrium state. We apply high-fidelity LES of the dry cloudless ABL over Kansas in July forced at the mesoscale (WRF) with statistical homogeneity in the horizontal. We find significant deviations from equilibrium that appear in a variety of interesting ways. One of the more interesting results is that the changes in mesoscale wind direction at the diurnal time scale can destabilize the ABL and sometimes cause a transition in ABL eddy structure that are normally associated with increased surface heating. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by the Penn State ICS.

  16. A Study On Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Characteristics At Anand, India Using Lsp Experimental Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Lykossov, V. N.; Mohanty, U. C.

    An attempt is made to study the planetary boundary layer (PBL) characteristics during the winter period at Anand (22.4°N, 72.6°E), a semi-arid region, which is located in the western part of India. A one-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) closure model is used for the study. The structure of the PBL,which consists of profiles of zonal and meridional components of wind,potential temperature and specific humidity, is simulated. A one-dimensional soil heat and moisture transport parameterization scheme is incorporated for the accurate representation of the energy exchange processes at the soil-atmosphere interface. The diurnal variation of fluxes of sensible heat, latent heat, shortwave radiation, net radiation and soil flux, soil temperature at different depths, Richardson number and TKE at the height of the constant flux layer is studied. The model predictions are compared with the available observations obtained from a special Land Surface Processes (LSP) experiment.

  17. Characteristics of Spatiotemporally Homogenized Boundary Layers at Atmospheric Reentry-like Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers approximating those found on the NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle thermal protection system during atmospheric reentry from the International Space Station have been studied by direct numerical simulation using a ``slow growth'' spatiotemporal homogenization approach recently developed by Topalian et al. The two data sets generated were Mae ~ 0 . 9 and 1 . 15 homogenized boundary layers possessing Reθ ~ 382 and 531, respectively. Edge-to-wall temperature ratios were approximately 4.15 and wall blowing velocities, vw+ =vw /uτ , were roughly 8 ×10-3 . The favorable pressure gradients had Pohlhausen parameters between 25 and 42. Nusselt numbers under 22 were observed. Small or negative displacement effects are evident. Near-wall vorticity fluctuations show qualitatively different profiles than observed by Spalart [J. Fluid Mech. 187 (1988)] or Guarini et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 414 (2000)] suggesting that the simulations have atypical structures perhaps as a consequence of wall blowing or the homogenization. This material is based in part upon work supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  18. Mechanistic modeling study on process optimization and precursor utilization with atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhang; He, Wenjie; Duan, Chenlong [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rongchen@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Shan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Spatial atomic layer deposition (SALD) is a promising technology with the aim of combining the advantages of excellent uniformity and conformity of temporal atomic layer deposition (ALD), and an industrial scalable and continuous process. In this manuscript, an experimental and numerical combined model of atmospheric SALD system is presented. To establish the connection between the process parameters and the growth efficiency, a quantitative model on reactant isolation, throughput, and precursor utilization is performed based on the separation gas flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and precursor mass fraction. The simulation results based on this model show an inverse relation between the precursor usage and the carrier gas flow rate. With the constant carrier gas flow, the relationship of precursor usage and precursor mass fraction follows monotonic function. The precursor concentration, regardless of gas velocity, is the determinant factor of the minimal residual time. The narrow gap between precursor injecting heads and the substrate surface in general SALD system leads to a low Péclet number. In this situation, the gas diffusion act as a leading role in the precursor transport in the small gap rather than the convection. Fluid kinetics from the numerical model is independent of the specific structure, which is instructive for the SALD geometry design as well as its process optimization.

  19. Mechanistic modeling study on process optimization and precursor utilization with atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatial atomic layer deposition (SALD) is a promising technology with the aim of combining the advantages of excellent uniformity and conformity of temporal atomic layer deposition (ALD), and an industrial scalable and continuous process. In this manuscript, an experimental and numerical combined model of atmospheric SALD system is presented. To establish the connection between the process parameters and the growth efficiency, a quantitative model on reactant isolation, throughput, and precursor utilization is performed based on the separation gas flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and precursor mass fraction. The simulation results based on this model show an inverse relation between the precursor usage and the carrier gas flow rate. With the constant carrier gas flow, the relationship of precursor usage and precursor mass fraction follows monotonic function. The precursor concentration, regardless of gas velocity, is the determinant factor of the minimal residual time. The narrow gap between precursor injecting heads and the substrate surface in general SALD system leads to a low Péclet number. In this situation, the gas diffusion act as a leading role in the precursor transport in the small gap rather than the convection. Fluid kinetics from the numerical model is independent of the specific structure, which is instructive for the SALD geometry design as well as its process optimization

  20. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  1. Isolating effects of terrain and soil moisture heterogeneity on the atmospheric boundary layer: Idealized simulations to diagnose land-atmosphere feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihani, Jehan F.; Chow, Fotini K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of terrain, soil moisture heterogeneity, subsurface properties, and water table dynamics on the development and behavior of the atmospheric boundary layer are studied through a set of idealized numerical experiments. The mesoscale atmospheric model Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) is used to isolate the effects of subsurface heterogeneity, terrain, and soil moisture initialization. The simulations are initialized with detailed soil moisture distributions obtained from offline spin-ups using a coupled surface-subsurface model (ParFlow-CLM). In these idealized simulations, we observe that terrain effects dominate the planetary boundary layer (PBL) development during early morning hours, while the soil moisture signature overcomes that of terrain during the afternoon. Water table and subsurface properties produce a similar effect as that of soil moisture as their signatures (reflected in soil moisture profiles, energy fluxes, and evaporation at the land surface) can also overcome that of terrain during afternoon hours. This is mostly clear for land surface energy fluxes and evaporation at the land surface. We also observe the coupling between water table depth and planetary boundary layer depth in our cases is strongest within wet-to-dry transition zones. This extends the findings of previous studies which demonstrate the subsurface connection to surface energy fluxes is strongest in such transition zones. We investigate how this connection extends into the atmosphere and can affect the structure and development of the convective boundary layer.

  2. Observed covariance between ecosystem carbon exchange and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics at a site in northern Wisconsin

    OpenAIRE

    C. Yi; Davis, K.; BAKWIN, P.; Denning, A.; Zhang, N.; Desai, A; Lin, J.; C. Gerbig

    2004-01-01

    Ecosystem CO2 exchange and atmosphere boundary layer (ABL) mixing are correlated diurnally and seasonally as they are both driven by solar insulation. Tracer transport models predict that these covariance signals produce a meridional gradient of annual mean CO2 concentration in the marine boundary layer that is half as strong as the signal produced by fossil fuel emissions. This rectifier effect is simulated by most global tracer transport models. However, observations to constrain the streng...

  3. Influence of the characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer on the vertical distribution of air pollutant in China's Yangtze River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Cao, Le

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution occurring in the atmospheric boundary layer is a kind of weather phenomenon which decreases the visibility of the atmosphere and results in poor air quality. Recently, the occurrence of the heavy air pollution events has become more frequent all over Asia, especially in Mid-Eastern China. In December 2015, the most severe air pollution in recorded history of China occurred in the regions of Yangtze River Delta and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei. More than 10 days of severe air pollution (Air Quality Index, AQI>200) appeared in many large cities of China such as Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Baoding. Thus, the research and the management of the air pollution has attracted most attentions in China. In order to investigate the formation, development and dissipation of the air pollutions in China, a field campaign has been conducted between January 1, 2015 and January 28, 2015 in Yangtze River Delta of China, aiming at a intensive observation of the vertical structure of the air pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer during the time period with heavy pollution. In this study, the observation data obtained in the field campaign mentioned above is analyzed. The characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer and the vertical distribution of air pollutants in the city Dongshan located in the center of Lake Taihu are shown and discussed in great detail. It is indicated that the stability of the boundary layer is the strongest during the nighttime and the early morning of Dongshan. Meanwhile, the major air pollutants, PM2.5 and PM10 in the boundary layer, reach their maximum values, 177.1μg m-3 and 285μg m-3 respectively. The convective boundary layer height in the observations ranges from approximately 700m to 1100m. It is found that the major air pollutants tend to be confined in a relatively shallow boundary layer, which represents that the boundary layer height is the dominant factor for controlling the vertical distribution of the air pollutants. In

  4. THE SEMI-GEOSTROPHIC ADAPTATION PROCESS WITH TWO-LAYER BAROCLINIC MODEL IN LOW LATITUDE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the adaptation process in low latitude atmosphere is discussed by means of a two-layer baroclinic model on the equator β plane, showing that the adaptation process in low latitude is mainly dominated by the internal inertial gravity waves. The initial ageostrophic energy is dispersed by the internal inertial gravity waves, and as a result, the geostrophic motion is obtained in zonal direction while the ageostrophic motion maintains in meridional direction, which can be called semi-geostrophic balance in barotropic model as well as semi-thermal-wind balance in baroclinic model. The vertical motion is determined both by the distribution of the initial vertical motion and that of the initial vertical motion tendency, but it is unrelated to the initial potential vorticity. Finally, the motion tends to be horizontal. The discussion of the physical mechanism of the semi-thermal-wind balance in low latitude atmosphere shows that the achievement of the semi-thermal-wind balance is due to the adjustment between the stream field and the temperature field through the horizontal convergence and divergence which is related to the vertical motion excited by the internal inertial gravity waves. The terminal adaptation state obtained shows that the adaptation direction between the mean temperature field and the shear flow field is determined by the ratio of the scale of the initial ageostrophic disturbance to the scale of one character scale related to the baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation. The shear stream field adapts to the mean temperature field when the ratio is greater than 1, and the mean temperature field adapts to the shear stream field when the ratio is smaller than 1.

  5. Speciated atmospheric mercury in the marine boundary layer of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjie; Ci, Zhijia; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Guo, Jia

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to identify the spatial and temporal distributions of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), and fine particulate mercury (HgP2.5) in the marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS), and to investigate the relationships between mercury species and meteorological parameters. The mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP2.5 were 2.03 ng m-3, 2.5 pg m-3, and 8.2 pg m-3 in spring, and 2.09 ng m-3, 4.3 pg m-3, and 8.3 pg m-3 in fall. Reactive mercury (RGM + HgP2.5) represented export in the MBL was GEM and the direct outflow of reactive mercury was very small. Moreover, GEM concentrations over the BS were generally higher than those over the YS both in spring and fall. Although RGM showed a homogeneous distribution over the BS and YS both in spring and fall, the mean RGM concentration in fall was significantly higher than that in spring. In contrast, the spatial distribution of HgP2.5 generally reflected a gradient with high levels near the coast of China and low levels in the open sea, suggesting the significant atmospheric mercury outflow from China. Interestingly, the mean RGM concentrations during daytime were significantly higher than those during nighttime both in spring and fall, while the opposite results were observed for HgP2.5. Additionally, RGM positively correlates with air temperature while negatively correlates with relative humidity. In conclusion, the elevated atmospheric mercury levels in the BS and YS compared to other open seas suggested that the human activities had a significant influence on the oceanic mercury cycle downwind of China.

  6. Continuous atmospheric boundary layer observations in the coastal urban area of Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandolfi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of Surface Mixed Layer (SML, Decoupled Residual/Convective Layer (DRCL and aerosol backscatter coefficient were performed within the Barcelona (NE Spain boundary layer from September to October 2010 (30 days in the framework of the SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems Using Synergistic Strategies field campaign. Two near-infrared ceilometers (Jenoptik CHM15K vertically and horizontally-probing (only vertical profiles are discussed were deployed during SAPUSS and compared with potential temperature profiles measured by daily radiosounding (midnight and midday to interpret the boundary layer structure in the urban area of Barcelona. Ceilometer-based DRCL (1761±363 m a.g.l. averaged over the campaign duration were twice as high as the mean SML (904±273 m a.g.l. with a marked SML diurnal cycle. The overall agreement between the ceilometer-retrieved and radiosounding-based SML heights (R2=0.8 revealed overestimation of the SML by the ceilometer (Δh=145±145 m. After separating the data in accordance with different atmospheric scenarios, the lowest SML (736±183 m and DRCL (1573±428 m were recorded during warm North African (NAF advected air mass. By contrast, higher SML and DRCL were observed during stagnant regional (REG (911±234 m and 1769±314 m, respectively and cold Atlantic (ATL (965±222 m and 1878±290 m, respectively air masses. The SML during the NAF scenario frequently showed a flat upper boundary throughout the day because of strong winds from the Mediterranean Sea that limit the midday SML convective growth observed during ATL and REG scenarios. The mean backscatter coefficients were calculated at two selected heights as representative of middle and top SML portions, i.e. β500=0.59±0.45 M m−1 sr−1 and β800=0.87±0.68 M m−1 sr−1 at 500 m and 800 m a.g.l., respectively. The highest backscatter coefficients were

  7. Deposition of multi-layer films of hexafluoropropene - ethylene composite polymer with jet-type plasma reactor at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-layer films of hexafluoropropene - ethylene composite polymer were deposited with a jet-type plasma reactor on poly (ethylene terephthalate) films, which were used as base films, at atmospheric pressure. The multi-layer films were made up by decreasing the flow rate of ethylene gas gradually and increasing that of hexafluoropropene gas simultaneously during the plasma-polymerization. Those films showed low enough peel force, whose value was near that of a Teflon sheet used as a control. Moreover, the bond strength between the multi-layer film and the base film became stronger than that between a plasma-polymerized hexatluoropropene film and the base film. (author)

  8. Interactions between soil moisture and Atmospheric Boundary Layer at the Brazilian savana-type vegetation Cerrado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, L. R.; Siqueira, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Before the large people influx and development of the central part of Brazil in the sixties, due to new capital Brasília, Cerrado, a typical Brazilian savanna-type vegetation, used to occupy about 2 million km2, going all the way from the Amazon tropical forest, in the north of the country, to the edges of what used to be of the Atlantic forest in the southeast. Today, somewhat 50% of this area has given place to agriculture, pasture and managed forests. It is forecasted that, at the current rate of this vegetation displacement, Cerrado will be gone by 2030. Understanding how Cerrado interacts with the atmosphere and how this interaction will be modified with this land-use change is a crucial step towards improving predictions of future climate-change scenarios. Cerrado is a vegetation adapted to a climate characterized by two very distinct seasons, a wet season (Nov-Mar) and dry season (May-Ago), with April and October being transitions between seasons. Typically, based on measurements in a weather station located in Brasilia, 75% of precipitation happens in the wet-season months and only 5% during dry-season. Under these circumstances, it is clear that the vegetation will have to cope with long periods of water stress. In this work we studied using numerical simulations, the interactions between soil-moisture, responsible for the water stress, with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). The numerical model comprises of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere model where the biophysical processes are represented with a big-leaf approach. Soil water is estimated with a simple logistic model and with water-stress effects on stomatal conductance are parameterized from local measurements of simultaneous latent-heat fluxes and soil moisture. ABL evolution is calculate with a slab model that considers independently surface and entrainment fluxes of sensible- and latent- heat. Temperature tropospheric lapse-rate is taken from soundings at local airport. Simulations of 30-day dry

  9. Effects on the atmospheric boundary layer of a solar eclipse in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Anna

    2010-05-01

    On 1 August 2008, a total solar eclipse took place in the Arctic and in Longyearbyen, the main settlement in the High Arctic archipelago of Svalbard (78° 13' N, 15° 37' E), the maximum solar coverage was 93%. The eclipse had a large impact on the atmospheric boundary layer and the local weather in general around Longyearbyen triggering a fog that lasted for three days. This fog grounded all air traffic to and from Svalbard and so in addition to the change in local weather, the eclipse also had economic and social consequences. Approximately 60% of Svalbard is covered with permanent ice and snow. Permafrost underlies most of the surface. In Longyearbyen, the midnight sun is present between 19 April and 23 August and so on the day of the eclipse the sun was about 30 degrees above the horizon at noon and 6 degrees above at midnight. A rare opportunity therefore occurred to study what happens when the sunlight is suddenly decreased after several months with no dark night. The maximum solar coverage at Longyearbyen took place at 10.41 Local Standard Time. The incoming shortwave radiation had then decreased from approximately 300 W m-2 before the start of the eclipse to 20 W m-2, i.e. less radiation than during a normal cloud free night at the same location at the same time of the year. Observations of turbulence and mean meteorological parameters were taken both over land and over a large fjord in the vicinity of Longyearbyen. In addition, cloud observations were recorded. Data have been analysed in detail from 31 July to 2 August, i.e., from one day before to one day after the eclipse. The simultaneous observations over land and over water showed that the atmospheric response was much faster and stronger over land than over water. Over land, the air temperature sank by 0.3-1.5°C, wind speed decreased, turbulent fluctuations were significantly reduced and the atmospheric stability changed from unstable to stable. Over the fjord, no clear minima in these parameters

  10. Statistics of Absolute and Relative Dispersion in the Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer: A Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosio, A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the different scales of turbulent motion on plume dispersion in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) is studied by means of a large-eddy simulation (LES). In particular, the large-scale (meandering) and small-scale (relative diffusion) contributions are separated by analy

  11. Retrieval of structure functions of air temperature and refractive index from large eddy simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Fedorovich, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology is presented to infer the refractive-index structure function parameter and the structure parameters for temperature and humidity from numerical simulations of the turbulent atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL). The method employs spatial and temporal averaging of multiple reali

  12. Estimation of the ozone formation rate in the atmospheric boundary layer over a background region of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antokhin, P. N.; Antokhina, O. Y.; Belan, B. D.

    2015-11-01

    The ozone formation rate in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the ozone inflow from the free atmosphere have been studied experimentally. The obtained estimates are based on the data of airborne sounding carried out over a background region of Western Siberia. As a result, it is obtained that the rate of ozone inflow from the upper atmospheric layers is only 20% of the rate of photochemical formation of ozone inside ABL. The vertical profiles of ozone flows in ABL have been additionally calculated based on the k-theory with the approach proposed by Troen and Mahrt. It has been shown in the calculations that the maximum of the ozone concentration in ABL is formed due to photochemical reactions from precursor gases.

  13. Scaling laws of turbulence intermittency in the atmospheric boundary layer: the role of stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Cesari, Rita; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Bursting and intermittent behavior is a fundamental feature of turbulence, especially in the vicinity of solid obstacles. This is associated with the dynamics of turbulent energy production and dissipation, which can be described in terms of coherent motion structures. These structures are generated at random times and remain stable for long times, after which they become suddenly unstable and undergo a rapid decay event. This intermittent behavior is described as a birth-death point process of self-organization, i.e., a sequence of critical events. The Inter-Event Time (IET) distribution, associated with intermittent self-organization, is typically a power-law decay, whose power exponent is known as complexity index and characterizes the complexity of the system, i.e., the ability to develop self-organized, metastable motion structures. We use a method, based on diffusion scaling, for the estimation of system's complexity. The method is applied to turbulence velocity data in the atmospheric boundary layer. A neutral condition is compared with a stable one, finding that the complexity index is lower in the neutral case with respect to the stable one. As a consequence, the crucial birth-death events are more rare in the stable case, and this could be associated with a less efficient transport dynamics.

  14. Near-wake instability and sensitivity analysis of wind turbines immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Francesco; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, François

    2014-11-01

    In wind farms, the separation distance among wind turbines is mainly determined by the downstream recovery of wind turbine wakes, which affects in turn power production and fatigue loads of downstream turbines. Thus, the optimization of a wind farm relies on the understanding of the single wake dynamics and a better characterization of their interactions within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This work is focused on the stability analysis of vorticity structures present in wind turbine wakes. In order to take into account the effects of a non-uniform incoming wind investing the turbine, a 3D local stability analysis is performed on the non-axisymmetric swirling wake prevailing at different downstream stations. Different wind shear and veer of the incoming wind can now be investigated, together with a 3D non-isotropic turbulent velocity field. This procedure enables to perform stability analysis of wind turbine wakes for wind conditions very similar to the ones experienced in reality. The present analysis is carried out on wind tunnel data acquired in the wake of a down-scaled three-bladed wind turbine. The Reynolds stresses are taken into account via eddy-viscosity models calibrated on the experimental data. Furthermore, the effect of an external perturbation in the wake flow is investigated through linear sensitivity. This analysis represents a preliminary step for control of wind turbine wakes, and optimization of wake interactions and power harvesting.

  15. Simulations of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Farms in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezaveh, Seyed Hossein; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Lohry, Mark; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Wind power is an abundant and clean source of energy that is increasingly being tapped to reduce the environmental footprint of anthropogenic activities. The vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) technology is now being revisited due to some important advantages over horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTS) that are particularly important for farms deployed offshore or in complex terrain. In this talk, we will present the implementation and testing of an actuator line model (ALM) for VAWTs in a large eddy simulation (LES) code for the atmospheric boundary layer, with the aim of optimizing large VAWT wind farm configurations. The force coefficients needed for the ALM are here obtained from blade resolving RANS simulations of individual turbines for each configuration. Comparison to various experimental results show that the model can very successfully reproduce observed wake characteristic. The influence of VAWT design parameters such as solidity, height to radius ratio, and tip speed ratio (TSR) on these wake characteristics, particularly the velocity deficit profile, is then investigated.

  16. One year of 222Rn concentration in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-year time series of 222Rn measured in a rural area in the North of Italy in 1997 is analyzed. The scope of the investigation is to better understand the behavior of this common atmospheric tracer in relation to the meteorological conditions at the release site. Wavelet analysis is used as one of the investigation tools of the time series. The measurements and scalograms of 222Rn are compared to those of wind-speed, pressure, relative humidity, temperature and NOx. The use of wavelet analysis allows the identification of the various scales controlling the influence of the meteorological variables on 222Rn dispersion in the surface layer that are not visible through classical Fourier analysis or direct time series inspection. The analysis of the time series has identified specific periods during which the usual diurnal variation of radon is superimposed to a linear growth thus indicating the build up of concentration at the measurement level. From these specific cases an estimate of the surface flux of 222Rn is made. By means of a simple model these special cases are reproduced.

  17. Micro-pulse upconversion Doppler lidar for wind and visibility detection in the atmospheric boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Haiyun; Wang, Chong; Shentu, Guoliang; Qiu, Jiawei; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a versatile, eyesafe, compact and direct detection Doppler lidar is developed using upconversion single-photon detection method. An all-fiber and polarization maintaining architecture is realized to guarantee the high optical coupling efficiency and the system stability. Using integrated-optic components, the conservation of etendue of the optical receiver is achieved by manufacturing a fiber-coupled periodically poled Lithium niobate waveguide and an all-fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The so-called double-edge direct detection is implemented using a single-channel FPI and a single upconversion detector, incorporating time-division multiplexing method. The relative error of the system is lower than 0.1% over 9 weeks. To show the robust of the system, atmospheric wind and visibility over 48 hours are detected in the boundary layer. In the intercomparison experiments, lidar shows good agreement with the ultrasonic wind sensor (Vaisala windcap WMT52), with standard deviation of 1.04 ...

  18. Specifying the conspicuous features of the ozone layer depletion for Pakistan's atmospheric region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Events such as the huge industrial emissions of Chlorofluoro Carbons (CFCs) provide almost visible example of man-made atmospheric pollution and global unbalance of the natural ecology. Among other scientific and socio-economic fallouts from this, the phenomenon of ozone layer depletion (OLD) is particularly disturbing. It has already attracted wide attention throughout the globe by way of 1987 Montreal protocol. This paper looks into the effectiveness of autoregressive model and predicts the menacing influence of the OLD. As such, with reference to the data for stratospheric region of Pakistan, this communication presents the confidence interval for the population mean of OLD for a significant level of probability. Then it considers the estimation of autoregressive model of order one for forecasting time series on monthly basis from 1970 to 1994, by identifying a set of related predictors. Autoregressive technique produces fairly accurate results as compared to the least squared estimate. We also consider the issue of validating the model by displaying predicted and observed data, by residual analysis, and by autocorrelation functions. (author)

  19. Reduced-order FSI simulation of NREL 5 MW wind turbine in atmospheric boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta-Mena, Javier; Campbell, Robert; Lavely, Adam; Jha, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    A partitioned fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver based on an actuator-line method solver and a finite-element modal-dynamic structural solver is used to evaluate the effect of blade deformation in the presence of a day-time, moderately convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The solver components were validated separately and the integrated solver was partially validated against FAST. An overview of the solver is provided in addition to results of the validation study. A finite element model of the NREL 5 MW rotor was developed for use in the present simulations. The effect of blade pitching moment and the inherent bend/twist coupling of the rotor blades are assessed for both uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases. The results suggest that blade twisting in response to pitching moment and the bend/twist coupling can have a significant impact on rotor out-of-plane bending moment and power generated for both the uniform inflow and the ABL turbulence cases.

  20. Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Limitations of the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald; LeMone, Margaret; Mahrt, Larry

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment are further analyzed for both day- and nighttime as a follow-on to the investigation of the nighttime turbulence in Sun et al. (2012). The behavior of momentum and heat fluxes is investigated as functions of wind speed and the bulk temperature difference between observation heights and the surface. Vertical variations of momentum and heat flux at a given height z are correlated and are explained in terms of the energy and heat balance in a layer above the ground surface in which the surface heating/cooling and momentum sink need to be included. In addition, the surface also plays an important role in constraining the size of the dominant turbulent eddies, which is directly related to turbulence strength and the length scale of turbulence generation. The turbulence generation is not related to local vertical gradients especially under neutral condition as assumed in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on the observed relationships between momentum and heat fluxes, a new bulk formula for turbulence parameterization is developed to mainly examine the above-mentioned surface effects on vertical variation of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. The new understanding of the observed relationships between these turbulent variables and mean variables explains the observed nighttime turbulence regime change observed in Sun et al. (2012) as well as the daytime momentum and heat flux variations with height up to the maximum observation height of 55 m.

  1. The Tturbulent Structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Small Northern Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repina, I.; Stepanenko, V.; Artamonov, A.; Barskov, K.; Polukhov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Wetland and freshwater ecosystems of the Northern Europe are an important natural source of atmospheric methane. Adequate calculation of gas emission from the northern territories requires calculation of balances of heat, moisture, and gases at the surface of water bodies on the sub-grid scale in the climate models. We carried out measurements in North Karelia on the lake Verkhneye (White Sea Biological Station of Moscow State University). The purpose of the study is evaluation of turbulent transport in the system "lake water- near-surface air - surrounding forest" in the winter season. We used an array of acoustic anemometers mounted at different distances from the lake shore. Measurements were taken at two heights in the center of the lake. It was revealed that the intensity of the turbulent transfer essentially depends on the height and location of sensors, and the wind direction. Stratification in the near-to-surface air probably does not play significant role. Besides, there is no constant-flux layer. The later makes Monin and Obukhov similarity theory (which is used in most of the parameterizations for calculating turbulent flows) inapplicable in this case. The work was sponsored by RFBR 14-05-91752, 14-05-91764, 15-35-20958.

  2. Adjustment of the summertime marine atmospheric boundary layer to the western Iberia coastal morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Isabel T.; Santos, Aires J.; Belo-Pereira, Margarida; Oliveira, Paulo B.

    2016-04-01

    During summer (June, July, and August), northerly winds driven by the Azores anticyclone are prevalent over western Iberia. The Quick Scatterometer Satellite 2000 to 2009 summertime estimates reveal a broad high wind speed (≥7 ms-1) area extending about 300 km from shore and along the entire Iberian west coast. Nested in this large high-speed region, preferred maximum regions anchored in the Iberian major capes, Finisterre, Roca, and S. Vicente, are found. Composite analyses of wind maxima were performed to diagnose the typical summertime synoptic-scale pressure distribution associated with these smaller size high-speed regions. The flow low-level structure was further studied with a mesoscale numerical prediction model for three northerly events characterized by typical summertime synoptic conditions. A low-level coastal jet, setting the background conditions to the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) response to topography, was found in the three cases. The causes for wind maximum downwind capes were investigated, focusing on the hypothesis that western Iberia MABL responds to hydraulic forcing. For the three events supercritical and transcritical flow conditions were identified and expansion fan signatures were found downwind each cape. Aircraft measurements, performed during one of the events, gave additional evidence of the expansion fan leeward Cape Roca. The importance of other forcing mechanisms was also assessed by considering the hypothesis of downslope wind acceleration and found to be in direct conflict with soundings and surface observations.

  3. Validation of the simpleFoam (RANS solver for the atmospheric boundary layer in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We validate the simpleFoam (RANS solver in OpenFOAM (version 2.1.1 for simulating neutral atmospheric boundary layer flows in complex terrain. Initial and boundary conditions are given using Richards and Hoxey proposal [1]. In order to obtain stable simulation of the ABL, modified wall functions are used to set the near-wall boundary conditions, following Blocken et al remedial measures [2]. A structured grid is generated with the new library terrainBlockMesher [3,4], based on OpenFOAM's blockMesh native mesher. The new tool is capable of adding orographic features and the forest canopy. Additionally, the mesh can be refined in regions with complex orography. We study both the classical benchmark case of Askervein hill [5] and the more recent Bolund island data set [6]. Our purpose is two-folded: to validate the performance of OpenFOAM steady state solvers, and the suitability of the new meshing tool to generate high quality structured meshes, which will be used in the future for performing more computationally intensive LES simulations in complex terrain.

  4. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Arellano, de J.V.G.

    2013-01-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vila-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10. 1007/s10546-013-9816-z, 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab mo

  5. Large eddy simulation of a large wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Under conventionally neutral conditions, the boundary layer is frequently capped by an inversion layer, which counteracts vertical entrainment of kinetic energy. Very large wind farms are known to depend on vertical entrainment to transport energy from above the farm towards the turbines. In this study, large eddy simulations of an infinite wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer are performed. By carefully selecting the initial potential-temperature profile, the influence of the height and the strength of a capping inversion on the power output of a wind farm is investigated. Results indicate that both the height and the strength have a significant effect on the boundary layer flow, and that the height of the neutral boundary layer is effectively controlled by the capping inversion. In addition, it is shown that the vertical entrainment rate decreases for increasing inversion strength or height. In our infinite wind-farm simulations, varying the inversion characteristics leads to differences in power extraction on the order of 13% ± 0.2% (for increasing the strength from 2.5 to 10 K), and 31% ± 0.4% (for increasing the height from 500 to 1500 m). A detailed analysis of the mean kinetic-energy equation is included, showing that the variation in power extraction originates from the work done by the driving pressure gradient related to the boundary layer height and the geostrophic angle, while entrainment of kinetic energy from the free atmosphere does not play a significant role. Also, the effect of inversion strength on power extraction is energetically not related to different amounts of energy entrained, but explained by a difference in boundary layer growth, leading to higher boundary layers for lower inversion strengths. We further present a simple analytical model that allows to obtain wind-farm power output and driving power for the fully developed regime as function of Rossby number and boundary layer height.

  6. Artificial periodic irregularities in the lower ionosphere, atmospheric waves and sporadic E-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Egerev, M. N.; Tolmacheva, A. V.; Vyakhirev, V. D.

    2010-05-01

    The long-term researches have shown that artificial periodic irregularities (API) created in the ionosphere plasma are a good means for the ionosphere diagnostics. In the report we present the new applications of the API technique for experimental studies of the lower ionosphere, atmospheric waves and sporadic E-layers. The applications are based on the new so-called two-frequency method of the API creation for the ionosphere diagnostic. The main results of the ionosphere studies carried out in 2006-2009 by the API technique using SURA heating facility are presented. API are formed in the field of a powerful standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one by the ionosphere (Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities- Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength or the one-half the power wavelength λ/2. Ionosphere diagnostic is carried out in the API relaxation stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. The two frequency method bases upon the API creation and the scattering of the probe waves from API at two different frequencies that is having different spatial periods of the quasi periodic structure. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the ionosphere plasma. Relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The API relaxation time depends on the power wavelength and the ambipolar diffusion rate. It means that API having different spatial scales destroys with different time scales ?. The API spatial scale depends on the refractive index n that is determined by the electron density N. It is shown the ratio of API relaxation times ? at two frequencies f1 and f2, measured at the same heights, is connected with the frequencies ratio and the refractive index ratio. The measurement of

  7. Atmospheric controls on soil moisture-boundary layer interactions: Three-dimensional wind effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findell, Kirsten L.; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2003-04-01

    This paper expands the one-dimensionally based CTP-HIlow framework for describing atmospheric controls on soil moisture-boundary layer interactions [, 2003] to three dimensions by including low-level wind effects in the analysis. The framework is based on two measures of atmospheric thermodynamic properties: the convective triggering potential (CTP), a measure of the temperature lapse rate between approximately 1 and 3 km above the ground surface, and a low-level humidity index, HIlow. These two measures are used to distinguish between three types of early morning soundings: those favoring rainfall over dry soils, those favoring rainfall over wet soils, and those whose convective potential is unaffected by the partitioning of fluxes at the surface. The focus of this paper is the additional information gained by incorporating information about low-level winds into the CTP-HIlow framework. Three-dimensional simulations using MM5 and an analysis of observations from the FIFE experiment within this framework highlight the importance of the winds in determining the sensitivity of convection to fluxes from the land surface. A very important impact of the 3D winds is the potential for low-level backing or unidirectional winds with great shear to suppress convective potential. Because of this suppression of convection in certain wind conditions, far fewer simulations produced rain than would be anticipated based solely on the 1D framework of understanding. However, when the winds allowed, convection occurred in a manner consistent with the 1D-based expectations. Generally speaking, in the regime where dry soils were expected to have an advantage, convection was triggered over dry soils more often than over wet; in the regime where wet soils were expected to have an advantage, convection was more frequently triggered over wet soils than over dry. Additionally, when rainfall occurred in both simulations with wet soils and simulations with dry soils for a given day, rainfall

  8. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  9. Forecasting of aerosol extinction of the sea and coastal atmosphere surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, G. A.

    2010-04-01

    The focus of our study is the extinction and optical effects due to aerosol in a specific coastal region. The aerosol microphysical model of the marine and coastal atmosphere surface layer is considered. The model is made on the basis of the long-term experimental data received at researches of aerosol sizes distribution function (dN/dr) in the band particles sizes in 0.01 - 100 μk. The model is developed by present time for the band of heights is 0 - 25 m. Bands of wind speed is 3 - 18 km/s, sizes fetch is up to 120 km, RH = 40 - 98 %. Key feature of model is parameterization of amplitude and width of the modes as functions of fetch and wind speed. In the paper the dN/dr behavior depending at change meteorological parameters, heights above sea level, fetch (X), wind speed (U) and RH is show. On the basis of the developed model with usage of Mie theory for spheres the description of last version of developed code MaexPro (Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles) for spectral profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients α(λ) calculations in the wavelength band, equal λ = 0.2 - 12 μm is presented. The received results are compared models NAN and ANAM. Also α(λ) profiles for various wind modes (combinations X and U) calculated by MaexPro code are given. The calculated spectrums of α(λ) profiles are compared with experimental data of α(λ) received by a transmission method in various geographical areas.

  10. Large eddies modulating flux convergence and divergence in a disturbed unstable atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhongming; Liu, Heping; Russell, Eric S.; Huang, Jianping; Foken, Thomas; Oncley, Steven P.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of large eddies on turbulence structures and flux transport were studied using data collected over a flat cotton field during the Energy Balance Experiment 2000 in the San Joaquin Valley of California in August 2000. Flux convergence (FC; larger fluxes at 8.7 m than 2.7 m) and divergence (FD) in latent heat flux (LE) were observed in a disturbed, unstable atmospheric surface layer, and their magnitudes largely departed from the prediction of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. From our wavelet analysis, it was identified that large eddies affected turbulence structures, scalar distribution, and flux transport differently at 8.7 m and 2.7 m under the FC and FD conditions. Using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition, time series data were decomposed into large eddies and small-scale background turbulence, the time-domain characteristics of large eddies were examined, and the flux contribution by large eddies was also determined quantitatively. The results suggest that large eddies over the frequency range of 0.002 Hz < f < 0.02 Hz (predominantly 300-400 m) enhanced the vertical velocity spectra more significantly at 8.7 m than 2.7 m, leading to an increased magnitude of the cospectra and thus LE at 8.7 m. In the FD case, however, these large eddies were not present and even suppressed in the vertical velocity spectra at 8.7 m. Consequently, the cospectra divergence over the low-frequency ranges primarily caused the LE divergence. This work implies that large eddies may either improve or degrade the surface energy balance closure by increasing or decreasing turbulent fluxes, respectively.

  11. Modelling of atmospheric boundary-layer flow in complex terrain with different forest parameterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work explores the accuracy of two approaches that account for the effects of the forest canopy on the wind flow by using a RANS-based model. The first approach implements additional terms in the RANS equations (canopy model), whilst the second one uses large values of roughness length and a zero-plane displacement height. The model uses a limited-length-scale k-ε turbulence closure that considers processes occurring in the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer (ABL) such as the Coriolis effects. Both the forest and the ABL implementations are compared with experimental data obtained from 118 m high met masts installed in a large mountain- range site with mixed forest characteristics for neutral stability cases. In order to perform a meaningful comparison at multiple mast locations, a novel methodology is presented which allows the selection of a velocity bin for a given wind direction and a stability class that minimizes the error of using short-term measurement periods at some masts compared to long-term wind statistics from a reference mast. Based on the outcome of the model validation it is possible to conclude that more consistent results are obtained by the canopy model since it reduces the uncertainty in the selection of correct input parameters in the large-roughness approach. The errors in the vertical profiles of velocity and turbulence intensity are reduced by the forest model by almost 63% and 11%, respectively, compared to the standard configuration (no forest). The large-roughness method reduces the error in the velocity profiles by 54% while the predictions of turbulence intensity are barely improved

  12. Atmospheric mercury over the marine boundary layer observed during the third China Arctic Research Expedition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Kang; Zhouqing Xie

    2011-01-01

    TGM measurements on board ships have proved to provide valuable complementary information to measurements by a ground based monitoring network.During the third China Arctic Research Expedition (from July 11 to September 24,2008),TGM concentrations over the marine boundary layer along the cruise path were in-situ measured using an automatic mercury vapor analyzer.Here we firstly reported the results in Japan Sea,North Western Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea,where there are rare reports.The value ranged between 0.30 and 6.02 ng/m3 with an average of (1.52 ± 0.68) ng/m3,being slightly lower than the background value of Northern Hemisphere (1.7 ng/m3).Notably TGM showed considerably spatial and temporal variation.Geographically,the average value of TGM in Bering Sea was higher than those observed in Japan Sea and North Western Pacific Ocean.In the north of Japan Sea TGM levels were found to be lower than 0.5 ng/m3 during forward cruise and displayed obviously diurnal cycle,indicating potential oxidation of gaseous mercury in the atmosphere.The pronounced episode was recorded as well.Enhanced levels of TGM were observed in the coastal regions of southern Japan Sea during backward cruise due primarily to air masses transported from the adjacent mainland reflecting the contribution from anthropogenic sources.When ship returned back and passed through Kamchatka Peninsula TGM increased by the potential contamination from volcano emissions.

  13. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro [Production Technology Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd. , 1-1 Suehiro-cyo, Tsurumiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 230-0045 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 221-8755 (Japan); Harada, Kenji [Department of Computer Science, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Nishii, Junji, E-mail: nishii@es.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Corona discharge formed an alkali depletion layer on a glass surface. • Introduction of hydrogen accelerated the depletion layer thickness. • Thickness was doubled compared with that in air. • Efficient formation of proton at an anode needle end was one cause. • Applied voltage across the glass plate in hydrogen was 2.7 times that in air. - Abstract: Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H{sub 2} atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H{sup +} with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air.

  14. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Corona discharge formed an alkali depletion layer on a glass surface. • Introduction of hydrogen accelerated the depletion layer thickness. • Thickness was doubled compared with that in air. • Efficient formation of proton at an anode needle end was one cause. • Applied voltage across the glass plate in hydrogen was 2.7 times that in air. - Abstract: Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H2 atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H+ with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air

  15. Characterization of wake turbulence in a wind turbine array submerged in atmospheric boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar

    Wind energy is becoming one of the most significant sources of renewable energy. With its growing use, and social and political awareness, efforts are being made to harness it in the most efficient manner. However, a number of challenges preclude efficient and optimum operation of wind farms. Wind resource forecasting over a long operation window of a wind farm, development of wind farms over a complex terrain on-shore, and air/wave interaction off-shore all pose difficulties in materializing the goal of the efficient harnessing of wind energy. These difficulties are further amplified when wind turbine wakes interact directly with turbines located downstream and in adjacent rows in a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In the present study, an ABL solver is used to simulate different atmospheric stability states over a diurnal cycle. The effect of the turbines is modeled by using actuator methods, in particular the state-of-the-art actuator line method (ALM) and an improved ALM are used for the simulation of the turbine arrays. The two ALM approaches are used either with uniform inflow or are coupled with the ABL solver. In the latter case, a precursor simulation is first obtained and data saved at the inflow planes for the duration the turbines are anticipated to be simulated. The coupled ABL-ALM solver is then used to simulate the turbine arrays operating in atmospheric turbulence. A detailed accuracy assessment of the state-of-the-art ALM is performed by applying it to different rotors. A discrepancy regarding over-prediction of tip loads and an artificial tip correction is identified. A new proposed ALM* is developed and validated for the NREL Phase VI rotor. This is also applied to the NREL 5-MW turbine, and guidelines to obtain consistent results with ALM* are developed. Both the ALM approaches are then applied to study a turbine-turbine interaction problem consisting of two NREL 5-MW turbines. The simulations are performed for two ABL stability

  16. MOSE: optical turbulence and atmospherical parameters operational forecast at ESO ground-based sites. II: atmospherical parameters in the surface layer [0-30] m

    CERN Document Server

    Lascaux, Franck; Fini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This article is the second of a series of articles aiming at proving the feasibility of the forecast of all the most relevant classical atmospherical parameters for astronomical applications (wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity) and the optical turbulence (Cn2 and the derived astro-climatic parameters like seeing, isoplanatic angle, wavefront coherence time...). This study is done in the framework of the MOSE project, and focused above the two ESO ground-bases sites of Cerro Paranal and Cerro Armazones. In this paper we present the results related to the Meso-Nh model ability in reconstructing the surface layer atmospherical parameters (wind speed intensity, wind direction and absolute temperature, [0-30] m a.g.l.). The model reconstruction of all the atmospherical parameters in the surface layer is very satisfactory. For the temperature, at all levels, the RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) is inferior to 1{\\deg}C. For the wind speed, it is ~2 m/s, and for the wind direction, it is in the ran...

  17. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio; Harada, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2014-05-01

    Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H2 atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H+ with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air.

  18. A numerical model of the transport and diffusion of Peronospora tabacina spores in the evolving atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chengwei; Pal Arya, S.; Davis, Jerry; Main, Charles E.

    Numerical solutions of the diffusion equation of Peronospora tabacina spores from a finite-area source over flat terrain in the evolving convective boundary layer are presented. Temporal variations in the release of spores, atmospheric stability, wind speed, and eddy diffusivity are considered. The model also includes the vertical variations of wind and eddy diffusivity. The model results indicate that ground level concentrations decrease with time as wind speed and eddy diffusivity increase in the evolving convective boundary layer. The loss of P. tabacina spores due to deposition at the surface also decrease with increasing instability and wind speed. Deposition is found to be particularly important close to the source area.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Double-Layer and Graded Composite Coatings of YSZ Obtained by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio, Pablo; Rayón, Emilio; Salvador, María Dolores; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sánchez, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Double-layer and graded composite coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia were sprayed on metallic substrates by atmospheric plasma spray. The coating architecture was built up by combining two different feedstocks: one micro- and one nanostructured. Microstructural features and mechanical properties (hardness and elastic modulus) of the coatings were determined by FE-SEM microscopy and nanoindentation technique, respectively. Additional adherence and scratch tests were carried out in order to assess the failure mechanisms occurring between the layers comprising the composites. Microstructural inspection of the coatings confirms the two-zone microstructure. This bimodal microstructure which is exclusive of the layer obtained from the nanostructured feedstock negatively affects the mechanical properties of the whole composite. Nanoindentation tests suitably reproduce the evolution of mechanical properties through coatings thickness on the basis of the position and/or amount of nanostructured feedstock used in the depositing layer. Adhesion and scratch tests show the negative effect on the coating adhesion of layer obtained from the nanostructured feedstock when this layer is deposited on the bond coat. Thus, the poor integrity of this layer results in lower normal stresses required to delaminate the coating in the adhesion test as well as minor critical load registered by using the scratch test.

  20. The atmospheric boundary layer over land and sea: Focus on the off-shore Southern Baltic and Southern North Sea region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    Lecture notes for a short course on the ideal atmospheric boundary layer and its characteristics for different types of real boundary layers, aiming at a discussion of the coastal conditions at the Southern Baltic and North Sea region. The notes are aimed at young scientists (e.g. PhD students) t......) that study the physics of the atmospheric boundary layer with the purpose of applying this knowledge for remote sensing techniques within offshore wind energy....

  1. Estimating Intermittency Exponent in Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Surface Layer Flows: A Robust Framework based on Magnitude Cumulant and Surrogate Analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, S; Lashermes, B; Arnéodo, A; Basu, Sukanta; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi; Lashermes, Bruno; Arneodo, Alain

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a novel framework based on magnitude cumulant and surrogate analyses to reliably detect and estimate the intermittency coefficient from short-length coarse-resolution turbulent time series. Intermittency coefficients estimated from a large number of neutrally stratified atmospheric surface layer turbulent series from various field campaigns are shown to remarkably concur with well-known laboratory experimental results. In addition, a surrogate-based hypothesis testing framework is proposed and shown to significantly reduce the likelihood of detecting a spurious non-zero intermittency coefficient from non-intermittent series. The discriminatory power of the proposed framework is promising for addressing the unresolved question of how atmospheric stability affects the intermittency properties of boundary layer turbulence.

  2. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2012-10-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as sounding system for the lowest 4 km of the atmosphere. Recently two main technical improvements have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation. The implementation of a 5-hole probe for determining the 3D flow vector with 100 Hz resolution and a faster temperature sensor has enhanced the measurement capabilities. Results from two recent field campaigns are presented. During the first one, in Denmark, the potential of the system to study the effects of wind turbines on ABL turbulence was shown. During the second one, the BLLAST field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees, SUMO data proved to be highly valuable for studying the processes of the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer.

  3. Impact of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the ventilation of a cubic building with two large opposite openings

    CERN Document Server

    Bastide, Alain; Boyer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer profile on the distribution of velocity in a building having two large openings. The knowledge of the flow form inside a building is useful to define a thermal environment favourable with thermal comfort and good air quality. In computational fluid dynamics, several profiles of atmospheric boundary layer can be used like logarithmic profiles or power profiles. This paper shows the impact of these profiles on the indoor airflow. Non-ventilated or ventilated parts of room are found. They show respectively ineffective ventilation and effective ventilation. A qualitative and global approach allows to observe the flows in a cubic building and to show the influence of each profile according to the external ground roughness and the incidence angle of the wind. Some zones, where occupants move, are named volumes of life. Ventilation is there observed using traditional tools in order to analyze quantitatively the ventilation of these zone...

  4. Research update : Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films : reactors, doping and devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hoye, Robert L.Z.; David Muñoz-Rojas; Nelson, Shelby F.; Andrea Illiberi; Paul Poodt; Fred Roozeboom; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-S...

  5. Decrease of the electric field penetration into the ionosphere due to low conductivity at the near ground atmospheric layer

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ampferer; V. V. Denisenko; Hausleitner, W.; Krauss, S.; G. Stangl; Boudjada, M. Y.; H. K. Biernat

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that lithospheric electromagnetic emissions are generated before earthquakes occurrence. In our study, we consider the physical penetration mechanism of the electric field from the Earth's surface, through the atmosphere-ionosphere layers, and until its detection in space by satellites. A simplified approach is investigated using the electric conductivity equation, i.e., ∇ˆσ·∇Φ)=0 in the case of a vertical inclina...

  6. Study on the atmospheric boundary layer and its influence on regional air quality over the Pearl River delta

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, M.(Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States of America); Wu, D.; Fan, Q.; B. M. Wang; Li, H W; S. J. Fan

    2013-01-01

    To study the structure of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and its influence on regional air quality over the Pearl River delta (PRD), two ABL intensive observations were conducted at Panyu (urban station) and Xinken (non-urban station, near estuary) of PRD during October 2004 and July 2006, respectively. Based on the ABL intensive observation data analysis, the typical weather condition type associated with poor air quality over PRD could be summarized into two kinds: the warmed perio...

  7. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2008-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transform...

  8. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transfo...

  9. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aer...

  10. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, Andreas; Hasselbach, Jan; Lauer, Peter; Baumann, Robert; Franke, Klaus; Gurk, Christian; Schlager, Hans; Weingartner, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    International audience Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airb...

  11. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; P. Lauer; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; H. Schlager; Weingartner, E.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by ai...

  12. Evaluation of the similarty functions Fm and Fh for the stable atmospheric boundary layer: range of validity

    OpenAIRE

    Viana, S.; Yague, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Redondo Apraiz, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Poster EGU Turbulent transfer is one of the most important processes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), showing many difficulties in stable situations (SBL): non stationary conditions, presence of internal gravity waves, intermittency, decoupling from the surface fluxes, etc. • The Monin-Obukhov (M-O) Theory is a suitable framework for presenting micrometeorological data, as well as for extrapolating and predicting certain micrometeorological information where direct measure...

  13. Advances and limitations of atmospheric boundary layer observations with GPS occultation over southeast Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL over the southeast (SE Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1–2 km as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., −157 N-unit km−1 and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The $N$-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding −110 N-unit km−1 at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL

  14. Advances and limitations of atmospheric boundary layer observations with GPS occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL over the southeast (SE Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1–2 km as observed from the radiosondes. Whereas, the ECMWF analyses systematically underestimate ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., −157 N-unit km−1 and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias inside the ABL. Simulation study using refractivity profiles based on radiosondes reveals that the N-biases are significant and the magnitudes of biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding −110 N-unit km−1 at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very sharp refractivity gradient and the large RO bending angle due to ducting allow reliable detection of ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show the deepening of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows systematically higher ABL heights overall and reveals different

  15. Advances and Limitations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations with GPS Occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the southeast (SE) Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1-2 kilometer) as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., -157 N-unit per kilometer) and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias) inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding -110 N-unit per kilometer) at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL heights as compared to the ECMWF analysis

  16. Influence of the nucleation layer annealing atmosphere on the resistivity of GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Weike, E-mail: luowk688@163.com; Li, Liang; Li, Zhonghui; Dong, Xun; Peng, Daqing; Zhang, Dongguo; Xu, Xiaojun

    2015-06-05

    Graphical abstract: LT-PL spectra of GaN samples A, B and C with sheet resistance of 1.1 × 10{sup 4} Ω/sq, 5.5 × 10{sup 4} Ω/sq and 1.0 × 10{sup 8} Ω/sq, respectively. - Highlights: • HR-GaN was fabricated by optimizing the nucleation layer annealing (NL) atmosphere. • The morphology of NLs annealed in different atmosphere has been investigated. • The resistance of GaN increased with density of edge type threading dislocations. • The PL results indicate that the HR-GaN is achieved due to the compensation of acceptor states. - Abstract: High-resistance (HR) GaN with sheet resistance of 1.0 × 10{sup 8} Ω/sq was grown on sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Sheet resistance of the GaN film increases 4 orders of magnitude by changing the nucleation layer (NL) annealing atmosphere from H{sub 2} to N{sub 2}. It is observed that the morphology of the NLs strongly depends on the annealing atmosphere. The analysis results based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and etch pit density (EPD) measurements demonstrate that the density of edge-type threading dislocations increases with the proportion of the N{sub 2} in the annealing atmosphere. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra is employed to analyze the optical properties of GaN films. The XRD and PL results indicate the primary compensating mechanism is due to acceptor levels introduced by the increase in edge-type threading dislocations density. It is concluded that the annealing atmosphere of the NL controls sizes and densities of the nucleation islands, which affect electrical properties of GaN epitaxial films through changing the ratio of edge to screw/mixed-type threading dislocations.

  17. Influence of the nucleation layer annealing atmosphere on the resistivity of GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: LT-PL spectra of GaN samples A, B and C with sheet resistance of 1.1 × 104 Ω/sq, 5.5 × 104 Ω/sq and 1.0 × 108 Ω/sq, respectively. - Highlights: • HR-GaN was fabricated by optimizing the nucleation layer annealing (NL) atmosphere. • The morphology of NLs annealed in different atmosphere has been investigated. • The resistance of GaN increased with density of edge type threading dislocations. • The PL results indicate that the HR-GaN is achieved due to the compensation of acceptor states. - Abstract: High-resistance (HR) GaN with sheet resistance of 1.0 × 108 Ω/sq was grown on sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Sheet resistance of the GaN film increases 4 orders of magnitude by changing the nucleation layer (NL) annealing atmosphere from H2 to N2. It is observed that the morphology of the NLs strongly depends on the annealing atmosphere. The analysis results based on high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and etch pit density (EPD) measurements demonstrate that the density of edge-type threading dislocations increases with the proportion of the N2 in the annealing atmosphere. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra is employed to analyze the optical properties of GaN films. The XRD and PL results indicate the primary compensating mechanism is due to acceptor levels introduced by the increase in edge-type threading dislocations density. It is concluded that the annealing atmosphere of the NL controls sizes and densities of the nucleation islands, which affect electrical properties of GaN epitaxial films through changing the ratio of edge to screw/mixed-type threading dislocations

  18. Non-steady dynamics of atmospheric turbulence interaction with wind turbine loadings through blade-boundary-layer-resolved CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh

    Modern commercial megawatt-scale wind turbines occupy the lower 15-20% of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). The current trend of increasing wind turbine diameter and hub height increases the interaction of the wind turbines with the upper ASL which contains spatio-temporal velocity variations over a wide range of length and time scales. Our interest is the interaction of the wind turbine with the energetic integral-scale eddies, since these cause the largest temporal variations in blade loadings. The rotation of a wind turbine blade through the ABL causes fluctuations in the local velocity magnitude and angle of attack at different sections along the blade. The blade boundary layer responds to these fluctuations and in turn causes temporal transients in local sectional loads and integrated blade and shaft bending moments. While the integral scales of the atmospheric boundary layer are ˜ O(10--100m) in the horizontal with advection time scales of order tens of seconds, the viscous surface layer of the blade boundary layer is ˜ O(10 -- 100 mum) with time scales of order milliseconds. Thus, the response of wind turbine blade loadings to atmospheric turbulence is the result of the interaction between two turbulence dynamical systems at extremely disparate ranges of length and time scales. A deeper understanding of this interaction can impact future approaches to improve the reliability of wind turbines in wind farms, and can underlie future improvements. My thesis centers on the development of a computational framework to simulate the interaction between the atmospheric and wind turbine blade turbulence dynamical systems using a two step one-way coupled approach. Pseudo-spectral large eddy simulation (LES) is used to generate a true (equilibrium) atmospheric boundary layer over a flat land with specified surface roughness and heating consistent with the stability state of the daytime lower troposphere. Using the data from the

  19. Continuous atmospheric boundary layer observations in the coastal urban area of Barcelona, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Pandolfi, M.; Martucci, G.; X. Querol; Alastuey, A.; F. Wilsenack; Frey, S.; C. D. O'Dowd; Dall'Osto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous measurements of Surface Mixed Layer (SML), Decoupled Residual/Convective Layer (DRCL) and aerosol backscatter coefficient were performed within the Barcelona (NE Spain) boundary layer from September to October 2010 (30 days) in the framework of the SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems Using Synergistic Strategies) field campaign. Two near-infrared ceilometers (Jenoptik CHM15K) vertically and horizontally-probing (only vertical profiles are discussed) were deployed during SAPUSS and ...

  20. Continuous atmospheric boundary layer observations in the coastal urban area of Barcelona during SAPUSS

    OpenAIRE

    Pandolfi, M.; Martucci, G.; X. Querol; Alastuey, A.; F. Wilsenack; Frey, S.; C. D. O'Dowd; Dall'Osto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous measurements of surface mixed layer (SML), decoupled residual/convective layer (DRCL) and aerosol backscatter coefficient were performed within the Barcelona (Spain) boundary layer from September to October 2010 (30 days) in the framework of the SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies) field campaign. Two near-infrared ceilometers (Jenoptik CHM15K), vertically and horizontally probing (only vertical profiles are herein discussed), were deployed. Ceilometer-...

  1. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  2. Wavelength dependence of polarization. XXXX. Venus upper atmosphere aerosol layers from polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous photometric and polarimetric observations of Venus have indicated the presence of a thin layer of small particles above the usual cloud layers. We sensed some characteristics of this upper layer on the basis of the Meudon and Pic-du-Midi regional polarization survey, covering from 1950 to 1972. Optical thicknesses of the order of several percent with particle radii of around 0.2 μm are indicated. The refraction index is not known. Although this layer is apparently globally permanent, variations occur regionally and with time

  3. Characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Chos Malal site (Province of Neuquen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site of Chos Malal is located on the north of the Province of Neuquen (Argentina).Cordillera del Viento is a mountain located 30 km northward, it is 90 km long, with average heights of 2800 m and with intense winds.This region has the adequate characteristics to be one of the best zones of the Norpatagonia for the exploitation of wind resources.Nevertheless, the existing wind speed data of the place is disconcerting.The biggest amount of information proceeds from the old weather station of the 'Secretaria de Agricultura y Ganaderia de la Nacion Argentina' Office and from the National Weather Service 'Servicio Meteorologico Nacional de Argentina' (SMN). Results from this data (1941-1960 period) shows that the mean annual wind speed is only 2.8 m/s.This value is conservative, probably due to the method employed on the measurement, which consisted of the estimation through the Beaufort scale, or the over-estimation error of the calms, as the one detected by Barros for the South of Patagonia.Due to this discordance, it was decided to evaluate the resource with modern instrumental. Afterwards, automatic weather stations were installed (Davis model Monitor II and Wizard) at the airport of Chos Malal (S 37 26 49; W 70 13 53; 852 m msl) with sensors at 2.5m, 10m and 18m above ground level.With this data (period 2000-2004) this study was oriented to characterize some aspects of the atmospheric boundary layer, the air turbulence and the relation between average wind speed and gusts.The annual average velocity (2000-2004) was 3.78 m/s, 35% greater than meteorological statistics from SMN (1941-1950 and 1951-1960 decades). The maximum velocity was 7.35 m/s, almost twice the average wind speed. With the measured data at 10 m, the Weibull distribution was calculated, using the form factor K = 1.2; and the scale factor C = 3.95. Also the wind rose was calculated, where the maximum frequency was produced at WNW.During 5 days of November of 2001, simultaneous observations at 2

  4. Scaling properties of velocity and temperature spectra above the surface friction layer in a convective atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. McNaughton

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We report velocity and temperature spectra measured at nine levels from 1.42 meters up to 25.7 m over a smooth playa in Western Utah. Data are from highly convective conditions when the magnitude of the Obukhov length (our proxy for the depth of the surface friction layer was less than 2 m. Our results are somewhat similar to the results reported from the Minnesota experiment of Kaimal et al. (1976, but show significant differences in detail. Our velocity spectra show no evidence of buoyant production of kinetic energy at at the scale of the thermal structures. We interpret our velocity spectra to be the result of outer eddies interacting with the ground, not "local free convection".

    We observe that velocity spectra represent the spectral distribution of the kinetic energy of the turbulence, so we use energy scales based on total turbulence energy in the convective boundary layer (CBL to collapse our spectra. For the horizontal velocity spectra this scale is (zi εo2/3, where zi is inversion height and εo is the dissipation rate in the bulk CBL. This scale functionally replaces the Deardorff convective velocity scale. Vertical motions are blocked by the ground, so the outer eddies most effective in creating vertical motions come from the inertial subrange of the outer turbulence. We deduce that the appropriate scale for the peak region of the vertical velocity spectra is (z εo2/3 where z is height above ground. Deviations from perfect spectral collapse under these scalings at large and small wavenumbers are explained in terms of the energy transport and the eddy structures of the flow.

    We find that the peaks of the temperature spectra collapse when wavenumbers are scaled using (z1/2 zi1/2. That is, the lengths of the thermal structures depend on both the lengths of the

  5. Influence of deposition atmosphere on photocatalytic activity of TiO2/SiOx double-layers prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TiO2/SiOx double-layers have been prepared at room temperature by RF magnetron sputtering. The TiO2 top-layer was deposited in an Ar atmosphere, while the SiOx bottom-layer was deposited in an Ar/O2 atmosphere. Samples were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence techniques. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue; the results showed that the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2/SiOx double-layers was superior to that of the TiO2 single-layers. The presence of the SiOx bottom-layer improved the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 layer because it may act as a trap for electrons generated in the TiO2 layer thus preventing electron-hole recombinations.

  6. Observations of atmospheric trace gases by MAX-DOAS in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianxin; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Zhou, Haijin; Du, Libin; Qu, Junle; Chen, Chao; An, Quan; Wu, Chengxuan; Wang, Xiufen

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric trace gases exist in the atmosphere of the earth rarely. But the atmospheric trace gases play an important role in the global atmospheric environment and ecological balance by participating in the global atmospheric cycle. And many environmental problems are caused by the atmospheric trace gases such as photochemical smog, acid rain, greenhouse effect, ozone depletion, etc. So observations of atmospheric trace gases become very important. Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) developed recently is a kind of promising passive remote sensing technology which can utilize scattered sunlight received from multiple viewing directions to derive vertical column density of lower tropospheric trace gases like ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. It has advantages of simple structure, stable running, passive remote sensing and real-time online monitoring automatically. A MAX-DOAS has been developed at Shandong Academy of Sciences Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation (SDIOI) for remote measurements of lower tropospheric trace gases (NO2, SO2, and O3). In this paper, we mainly introduce the stucture of the instrument, calibration and results. Detailed performance analysis and calibration of the instrument were made at Qingdao. We present the results of NO2, SO2 and O3 vertical column density measured in the coastal boundary layer over Jiaozhou Bay. The diurnal variation and the daily average value comparison of vertical column density during a long-trem observation are presented. The vertical column density of NO2 and SO2 measured during Qingdao oil pipeline explosion on November 22, 2013 by MAX-DOAS is also presented. The vertical column density of NO2 reached to a high value after the explosion. Finally, the following job and the outlook for future possible improvements are given. Experimental calibration and results show that the developed MAX-DOAS system is reliable and credible.

  7. On the numerical modfeling of 3D-atmospheric boundary layer flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beneš, Luděk; Sládek, Ivo; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    Karlsruhe : Forshungszentrum Karrlsruhe GmbH, 2004 - (Suppan, P.), s. 340-344 ISBN 3-923704-44-5. [Harmonisation within atmospheric Dispersion modeling for regulatory purposes. Garmisch-Partenkirchen (DE), 01.06.2004-04.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 715.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : atmosphere * pollution * numerical simulation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  8. The impact of dynamic processes on chemistry in atmospheric boundary layers over tropical and boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Ouwersloot, H.G.

    2013-01-01

    Improving our knowledge of the atmospheric processes that drive climate and air quality is very relevant for society. The application of this knowledge enables us to predict and mitigate the effects of human induced perturbations to our environment. Key factors in the current and future climate evolution are related to the emissions and atmospheric presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrocarbons. The latter group of chemical species, on which special emphasis is placed in this dissertation,...

  9. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the unmanned research aircraft Carolo P360 "ALADINA" (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN situ Aerosol) for investigating the horizontal and vertical distribution of ultrafine particles in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). It has a wingspan of 3.6 m, a maximum take-off weight of 25 kg and is equipped with aerosol instrumentation and meteorological sensors. A first application of the system, together with the unmanned research aircraft MASC (Multi-Purpose Airborne Carrier) of the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (EKUT), is described. As small payload for ALADINA, two condensation particle counters (CPC) and one optical particle counter (OPC) were miniaturised by re-arranging the vital parts and composing them in a space-saving way in the front compartment of the airframe. The CPCs are improved concerning the lower detection threshold and the response time to less than 1.3 s. Each system was characterised in the laboratory and calibrated with test aerosols. The CPCs are operated in this study with two different lower detection threshold diameters of 11 and 18 nm. The amount of ultrafine particles, which is an indicator for new particle formation, is derived from the difference in number concentrations of the two CPCs (ΔN). Turbulence and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer are described by measurements of fast meteorological sensors that are mounted at the aircraft nose. A first demonstration of ALADINA and a feasibility study were conducted in Melpitz near Leipzig, Germany, at the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station of the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) on 2 days in October 2013. There, various ground-based instruments are installed for long-term atmospheric monitoring. The ground-based infrastructure provides valuable additional background information to embed the flights in the continuous atmospheric context and is used for validation of the airborne results. The development of the

  10. Improving the Representation of the Nocturnal Near-Neutral Surface Layer in the Urban Environment with a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Syed Zahid; Bélair, Stéphane; Mailhot, Jocelyn; Leroyer, Sylvie

    2013-06-01

    A new approach to improve the representation of surface processes in the Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) atmospheric model associated with the exchanges between the urban canopy and the atmosphere is presented. Effects of the urban canopy on the evolution of surface-layer wind, temperature, moisture, and turbulence are directly parametrized in order to allow realistic interactions between the canopy elements (i.e., roofs, roads, and walls) and the atmosphere at GEM's multiple vertical levels that are positioned inside the canopy. Surface energy budgets as implemented in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) scheme have been used to determine temperatures of the urban canopy elements for the proposed multilayer scheme. Performance of the multilayer scheme is compared against standard implementations of the TEB scheme for one nighttime intensive observation period of the Joint Urban 2003 experiment held in Oklahoma City, USA. Although the new approach is found to have a negligible impact on urban surface-layer wind profiles, it improves the prediction of near-neutral nocturnal profiles of potential temperature close to the surface. The urban heat island effect is simulated with a better accuracy by the multilayer approach. The horizontal temperature gradient across the central business district of the city along the direction of flow is also reasonably well captured by the proposed scheme.

  11. Variability of Atmospheric Boundary Layer height over the tropical oceans - A study using atmospheric refractivity profiles from multi campaign in-situ and satellite radio occultation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, M.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over the tropical oceans controls and regulates the influx of water vapour into the free atmosphere due to evaporation. The availability of in situ data for determining the ABL characteristics over tropical oceans are limited to different ship based campaigns and hence restricted in spatial and temporal coverage. For ABL studies the Radio Occultation (RO) based satellite data over tropical oceans have good temporal and spatial coverage but limited in temporal and spatial resolution. Atmospheric refractivity profiles are extensively used in many studies to determine the ABL height from both platforms. The present study attempts to use the advantages in both in-situ and satellite (RO) based data to quantify the variability in the ABL height over the tropical oceans. All studies done so far to identify the ABL height from RO derived refractivity profiles rely extensively on the detection of the minimum refractivity gradient (MRG) below ~6 km along with additional threshold criteria. This leads to an over estimation of ABL heights especially in presence of strong subsidence inversion caused by local/ mesoscale/ synoptic scale processes where the MRG lies significantly above the ABL. The present study attempts to quantify this over estimation using atmospheric refractivity profiles derived from thermo-dynamical parameters from radiosonde ascents over the tropical ocean, suggests an improved method of ABL detection and quantifies the variability so deduced. Over 1000 radiosonde ascents from four ship cruises conducted during DYNAMO 2011 field campaign over the tropical Indian Ocean are used for the purpose. ABL heights determined from radiosonde data using traditional methods (using virtual potential temperature and specific humidity) are compared with those identified from simulated atmospheric refractivity profiles from same data (using prevalent methods for RO) to quantify the over estimation. A new method of ABL detection from

  12. Inner Structure of Atmospheric Inversion Layers over Haifa Bay in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikin, N.; Galanti, E.; Reisin, T. G.; Mahrer, Y.; Alpert, P.

    2015-09-01

    Capping inversions act as barriers to the vertical diffusion of pollutants, occasionally leading to significant low-level air pollution episodes in the lower troposphere. Here, we conducted two summer campaigns where global positioning system radiosondes were operated in Haifa Bay on the eastern Mediterranean coast, a region of steep terrain with significant pollution. The campaigns provided unique high resolution measurements related to capping inversions. It was found that the classical definition of a capping inversion was insufficient for an explicit identification of a layer; hence additional criteria are required for a complete spatial analysis of inversion evolution. Based on the vertical temperature derivative, an inner fine structure of inversion layers was explored, and was then used to track inversion layers spatially and to investigate their evolution. The exploration of the inner structure of inversion layers revealed five major patterns: symmetric peak, asymmetric peak, double peak, flat peak, and the zig-zag pattern. We found that the symmetric peak is related to the strongest inversions, double peak inversions tended to break apart into two layers, and the zig-zag pattern was related to the weakest inversions. Employing this classification is suggested for assistance in following the evolution of inversion layers.

  13. EM Propagation in Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Analysis of RED Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, T.; Friehe, C. A.

    2002-05-01

    The pattern of propagation for EM signals over the ocean is a combined result of the atmospheric refraction and scattering from the rough ocean surface. Here we study experimentally the structure of the atmospheric refractive index and the ocean surface statistics, pertinent to scattering. We are also interested in fluctuations of the refractive index induced by the ocean surface waves, which along with the turbulence contribute to the random refraction. However, these fluctuations exhibit behavior different from turbulence (e.g. their structure function does not follow the 2/3 scaling valid for the turbulent fluctuations) and require to be studied separately. We analyze data of atmospheric turbulence, humidity, temperature, and sea surface temperature and waves from the Rough Evaporation Duct experiment, conducted in part from the instrument platform FLIP in the open ocean north of Oahu, Hawaii.

  14. Some questions concerning safety on emergency landing in dense layers of the atmosphere of radionuclide energy sources based on plutonium-238 for autonomous station ``MARS-94/96''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhorin, Oleg I.; Pustovalov, Alexey A.; Zhabin, Vladimir N.; Greenberg, Edward I.; Nilolaev, Vadim S.; Sokolov, Nikolay A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes results of investigations of questions concerning integrity keeping for an ampula containing radionuclide fuel (Pu-238) under conditions of emergency landing in dense layers of the atmosphere and under conditions of fire on launching pad.

  15. Diurnal Variations of Air Pollution and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure in Beijing During Winter 2000/2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; XU Xiangde; DING Guoan; ZHOU Mingyu; CHENG Xinghong

    2005-01-01

    The diurnal variations of gaseous pollutants and the dynamical and thermodynamic structures of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the Beijing area from January to March 2001 are analyzed in this study using data from the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Field Experiment (BECAPEX). A heavy pollution day (22 February) and a good air quality day (24 February) are selected and individually analyzed and compared to reveal the relationships between gaseous pollutants and the diurnal variations of the ABL. The results show that gaseous pollutant concentrations exhibit a double-peak-double-valley-type diurnal variation and have similar trends but with different magnitudes at different sites in Beijing. The diurnal variation of the gaseous pollutant concentrations is closely related to (with a 1-2 hour delay of)changes in the atmospheric stability and the mean kinetic energy in the ABL.

  16. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  17. High-Resolution Properties of the Equatorial Pacific Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer from Lidar and Radiosonde Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D. I.; Eichinger, W. E.; Barr, S.; Cottingame, W.; Hynes, M. V.; Keller, C. F.; Lebeda, C. F.; Poling, D. A.

    1996-07-01

    A `thermostat' mechanism for cooling the Equatorial pacific is being tested with data collected during the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment. The Los Alamos National Laboratory participated by fielding two shipboard lidars that collected nearly continuous data over the Pacific from 10 to 21 March 1993 as the ship sailed from Guadalcanal to Christmas Island. A Raman lidar measured water vapor mixing ratio in the lower troposphere, especially in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), and an aerosol backscatter lidar measured height and thickness of clouds to an altitude of 20 km. The data collected from these two lidars were used to determine ocean-atmosphere phenomenology, which in turn, affects the climatology of the Central Pacific.Agreement between coincident radiosonde and the Raman water vapor lidar measurements was typically within ±0.25 g kg1 of water. Divergence between the two instruments occurred at transitions between distinct layers in the lower marine atmosphere. Reasons for this divergence will be discussed. Above the ABL the lidar and radiosonde are in excellent agreement. A wealth of detail is apparent in the lidar-derived profiles. For example, there are large variations in water vapor mixing ratio-the expression of the inherent low-frequency, intermittent, atmospheric turbulence that produces spatially discrete features such as convective plumes. These features define the structure and extent of the ABL. Using the ABL structural characteristics, an analysis of the relationship between entrainment zone (EZ) height and observed sea surface temperature (SST) revealed counterintuitive behavior-that the height of the EZ decreases as SST increases in the range between 27° and 3°C.

  18. Layering Principles from One Approach to Isentropic Analysis and Modeling of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulker, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorologists often treat potential temperature (theta)—the temperature a parcel would have if moved adiabatically to the surface—as a vertical coordinate. The resulting layers (isentropes) are lagrangian-like. Bosart, in a 2002 tribute to Reed, writes "PV as a tracer [along isentropes] enabled Reed, Danielson … to adopt a Lagrangian perspective in studies of cyclogenesis and upper-level frontogenesis." Bosart also mentions Shapiro's work on clear-air turbulence and Bleck's modeling: "Bleck ... simulated cyclogenesis using a simple model [on] surfaces of constant potential temperature." From the author's work helping Bleck and Shapiro with isentropic analysis and modeling, the following principles are offered as potentially useful in defining reusable, consistent data layers across space and time in multiple domains. Monotonicity— Layers reflect transformed coordinates, mappable to/from elevation, hence strictly monotonic across the geographic domain. I.e., layers cannot intersect. Bleck devised an invertible algorithm mapping pressure along soundings to a coordinate resembling potential temperature (departing only to maintain monotonicity). A collection of these (at one observing time) is a sampled representation of the transform between (lat, lon, elev) and (lat, lon, theta). Suggested principle: Data layers possess, for a geographic sample set, invertible algorithms to map between elevation and a monotonic transform coordinate. Intralayer Interpolation — The transformed coordinate may need evaluation at points not in the sample set. The Bleck/Shapiro work showed how easily monotonicity is violated when gridding sample data. This problem was solved via another transform: interpolation on the log of layer differences (i.e., thickness). Suggested principle: Data layers possess a monotonicity-preserving algorithm to interpolate coordinate values to geographic points not in the sample set.Representation— The Bleck/Shapiro work entailed no data sharing

  19. A laboratory study of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the atmospheric boundary layer: soot as a reactive substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Dominik; Rossi, Michel,

    2005-01-01

    The present work deals with two subjects. The interaction of NO2 and HONO with different types of soot are examined in the first part whereas in the second part an experimental set-up is presented which has been built in order to measure the kinetics of the degradation of organic compounds by OH radicals. Both soot particles as well as NO2 are mainly produced by fossil fuel and biomass burning. The two species are therefore ubiquitous in the atmospheric boundary layer where they may react wit...

  20. A laboratory study of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the atmospheric boundary layer: soot as a reactive substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Dominik

    2000-01-01

    The present work deals with two subjects. The interaction of NO2 and HONO with different types of soot are examined in the first part whereas in the second part an experimental set-up is presented which has been built in order to measure the kinetics of the degradation of organic compounds by OH radicals. Both soot particles as well as NO2 are mainly produced by fossil fuel and biomass burning. The two species are therefore ubiquitous in the atmospheric boundary layer where they may react wit...

  1. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAP...

  2. Variation of 222Rn concentration in outdoor air due to variation of the atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation of 222Rn concentration in outdoor air, returns of a monostatic acoustic sounder and sensible heat flux are simultaneously observed at Okayama-shi in Japan. The sensible heat flux is measured with an eddy correlation method using a sonic anemometer and a copper-constantan thermocouple thermometer. Using height of a surface-based inversion layer obtained by the acoustic sounder returns and two 222Rn concentrations during the presence of the surface-based inversion layer, the exhalation rate of 222Rn at this site is estimated to be about 0.01 Bq.m-2.s-1, which agrees well within the exhalation rate of 222Rn estimated at Nagoya-shi in Japan. Using the estimated exhalation rates of 222Rn and the variation of the 222Rn concentration in the daytime, heights of mixing layers are estimated. These heights of the mixing layers are larger than the height of the mixing layer estimated using the sensible heat flux and the representative vertical profile of the autumnal night time air temperature in this area. (author)

  3. Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer from radiosonde observations along eastern end of monsoon trough of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sagarika; Dwivedi, Arun K.; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a comparison of two methods for the calculation of the height of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), using balloon-borne GPS radiosonde data is presented. ABL has been characterized using vertical profiles of meteorological parameter. The gradient of virtual potential temperature (𝜃 v ) profile for the determination of mixed layer heights (MLH) and the mean value of turbulent flow depth (TFD) obtained from the vertical profile of Bulk Richardson Number (R i B ) have been used in this study. One-year data have been used for the study. There is large seasonal variability in MLH with a peak in the summer and winter whereas the TFD remained steady throughout the year. Results from the present study indicate that the magnitudes of TFD are often larger than the MLH.

  4. Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer from radiosonde observations along eastern end of monsoon trough of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sagarika Chandra; Arun K Dwivedi; Manoj Kumar

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a comparison of two methods for the calculation of the height of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), using balloon-borne GPS radiosonde data is presented. ABL has been characterized using vertical profiles of meteorological parameter. The gradient of virtual potential temperature (v) profile for the determination of mixed layer heights (MLH) and the mean value of turbulent flow depth (TFD) obtained from the vertical profile of Bulk Richardson Number () have been used in this study. Oneyear data have been used for the study. There is large seasonal variability in MLH with a peak in the summer and winter whereas the TFD remained steady throughout the year. Results from the present study indicate that the magnitudes of TFD are often larger than the MLH.

  5. Description of the atmospheric circulation in the boundary layer over a tropical island: Case study of Guadeloupe Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocoste, Thomas; Dorville, Jean-François; Jacoby-Koaly, Sandra; Roussas, André

    2016-04-01

    Over past two decades the use of atmospheric sounding methods as Sodars, Lidar equipped drones increased sharply. Compare to weather balloon, these modern methods allow measure of profile at constant heights during long period. There are few studies using this type of equipment in tropical climates and lesser on small island. Wind regime on island of diameter less than 50 km are mostly considered as oceanic. Many author consider that thermal effect are negligible in land. But recent observations and simulations show importance of the thermal circulation at small- and meso- scales particularly in atmospheric pollution process. Up to 2009 no wind profile data were available continuously to study atmospheric circulation in Guadeloupe Archipelago (GA) which is one of the islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. In first approximation wind was evaluated based on measures done at the most upwind island of the GA for many application as wind power and atmospheric pollution. From 2009 to 2012 a measurement campaign of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) have been performed by the University of Antilles (UA) in GA. To assess effects of dynamic of ABL on air quality in sub urban area, particularly during the sunset and sunrise, UA monitored two sites with a weather station and a doppler sodar (REMTECH PAO). Both sites are close to the sea with one in a coastal area and the other in an open landfill surrounded by densely populated building and a mangrove swamp. Thermal and chemical measurements with a portable mass spectrometer were made in the vicinity of the landfill and showed the existence of urban heat islands. This study presents the first Doppler Sodar long measurements campaign in GA. Statistical analysis of the three year of doppler sodar data (i.e. wind components and its fluctuations) allow to identified and characterized the complex circulations on the two sites in the ABL between 25 and 500m above the sea level. Orographic and thermal effects due to urban area were

  6. A Simple Model for the Vertical Transport of Reactive Species in the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, Donald H.; Gurarie, David; Jensen, Niels Otto

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a simple, steady-state, one-dimensional second-order closure model to obtain continuous profiles of turbulent fluxes and mean concentrations of non-conserved scalars in a convective boundary layer without shear. As a basic tool we first set up a model for conserved species with ...

  7. Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.;

    2000-01-01

    boundary layer (SBL). Instrumentation deployed on two meteorological masts (of heights 10 m and 100 m) included five sonic anemometers, 15 thermocouples, five cup anemometers and three propeller anemometers, humidity sensors and radiometers. A Sensitron mini-sodar and a tethered balloon were also operated...

  8. Modelization of a large wind farm, considering the modification of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, A.; Gomez-Elvira, R. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Mecanica de Fluidos, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Madrid (Spain); Frandsen, S.; Larsen, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A method is presented to adapt existing models of wind farms to very large ones that may affect the whole planetary boundary layer. An internal boundary layer is considered that starts developing at the leading edge of the farm until it reaches, sufficiently far downstream, the top of the planetary boundary layer, and a new equilibrium region is reached. The wind farm is simulated by an artificial roughness that is function of the turbine spacing, drag and height. From this model the flow conditions are calculated at a certain reference height and then are used as boundary conditions for a numerical code used to model a wind farm. Three-dimensional effects are considered by applying appropriate conditions at the sides of the farm. Calculations are carried out to estimate the energy production in large wind farms, and it is found that additional losses due to modification of the planetary boundary layer may be of importance for wind farms of size larger than about 100 km. (au)

  9. Experimental and theoretical study of the atmospheric boundary layer over the paris area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis studied the urban boundary layer dynamic behaviour over the Paris area by comparing urban (Paris) and suburban (Palaiseau) dynamic data such as lidars, sodars, sonic anemometers. All the data were obtained during the ECLAP experiment, specifically performed to characterize the differences between a city and its near environment. (author)

  10. Atomic layer deposition of platinum clusters on titania nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goulas, A.; Van Ommen, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of platinum nanoclusters with a narrow size distribution on TiO2 nanoparticles using atomic layer deposition. With MeCpPtMe3 and ozone as reactants, the deposition can be carried out at a relatively low temperature of 250 degrees C. Our approach of working with suspended na

  11. The profile of upwelling 11-micron radiance through the atmospheric boundary layer overlying the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Denise E.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the gradient of 11-micron radiance from the ocean surface were made with spaceborne AVHRR and with radiometers carried on research vessels in California and east Florida waters. The results obtained for the radiance gradient at a variety of atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with radiative transfer calculations, suggesting that there was no significant error in the water vapor absorption parameters used in the calculations. The results confirm earlier predictions that, for a typical viewing factor (i.e., zenith angle 60 deg) and for mid-latitude standard water vapor conditions, the 11-micron radiant flux measured by a spaceborne sensor will be dominated by the atmospheric contribution to the total outgoing radiation in this 'window' region.

  12. Utilization of a thin layer electrochemical system to study the atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the radioactive wastes deep underground disposal, it is necessary to forecast the aging of metallic containers over millions of years. The deterioration results particularly of the atmospheric corrosion. The aim of this study is to propose models describing the corrosion processes during the storage, in order to evaluate the containers design. In this framework the influence of a thin electrolyte film in contact with the metal is studied. (A.L.B.)

  13. Characterisation of PMMA/ATH Layers Realised by Means of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Powder Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Wallenhorst, Lena M.; Sebastian Dahle; Matej Vovk; Lisa Wurlitzer; Leander Loewenthal; Nils Mainusch; Christoph Gerhard; Wolfgang Viöl

    2015-01-01

    We report on the characteristics of aluminium trihydrate filled poly(methyl methacrylate) composite (PMMA/ATH) coatings realised by plasma deposition at atmospheric pressure. For this purpose, PMMA/ATH powder was fed to a plasma jet where the process and carrier gas was compressed air. The deposited coatings were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. Further, the raw material was characterised before deposition. It was found that, with respect ...

  14. On the marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Denny P Alappattu; D Bala Subrahamanyam; P K Kunhikrishnan; K M Somayaji; G S Bhat; R Venkatesan; C B S Dutt; A Bagavath Singh; V K Soni; A S Tripathi

    2008-07-01

    Detailed measurements were carried out in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) which covered both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal during March to May 2006. In this paper, we present the meteorological observations made during this campaign. The latitudinal variation of the surface layer turbulent fluxes is also described in detail.

  15. DIFFUSION IN THE VICINITY OF STANDARD-DESIGN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS-I. WIND-TUNNEL EVALUATION OF DIFFUSIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A SIMULATED SUBURBAN NEUTRAL ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large meteorological wind tunnel was used to simulate a suburban atmospheric boundary layer. The model-prototype scale was 1:300 and the roughness length was approximately 1.0 m full scale. The model boundary layer simulated full scale dispersion from ground-level and elevated ...

  16. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s-1. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes

  17. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  18. Influence of annealing in H atmosphere on the electrical properties of Al2O3 layers grown on p-type Si by the atomic layer deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Stübner, R.; Langa, S.; Wende, U.; Kaiser, B.; Conrad, H.; Schenk, H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study the electrical properties of 100 nm and 400 nm alumina films grown by the atomic layer deposition technique on p-type Si before and after a post-deposition annealing at 440 °C and after a dc H plasma treatment at different temperatures are investigated. We show that the density of interface states is below 2 × 1010 cm-2 in these samples and this value is significantly lower compared to that reported previously in thinner alumina layers (below 50 nm). The effective minority carrier lifetime τg,eff and the effective surface recombination velocity seff in untreated p-type Si samples with 100 nm and 400 nm aluminum oxide is comparable with those obtained after thermal oxidation of 90 nm SiO2. Both, a post-deposition annealing in forming gas (nitrogen/hydrogen) at elevated temperatures and a dc H-plasma treatment at temperatures close to room temperature lead to the introduction of negatively charged defects in alumina films. The results obtained in samples annealed in different atmospheres at different temperatures or subjected to a dc H plasma treatment allow us to correlate these centers with H-related defects. By comparing with theory we tentatively assign them to negatively charged interstitial H atoms.

  19. A Large-eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) offer some advantages over their horizontal axis counterparts, and are being considered as a viable alternative to conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Nevertheless, a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs is observed in the wind energy community with respect to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to study the wake of a single VAWT, placed in the atmospheric boundary layer, using large-eddy simulation (LES) coupled with actuator line model (ALM). It is noteworthy that this is the first time that such a study is being performed. To do this, for a typical 1 MW VAWT design, first, the variation of power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed using LES-ALM, and an optimum combination of chord length and tip-speed ratio is obtained. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulent wake flow statistics. Keywords: vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT); VAWT wake; Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL); large eddy simulation (LES); actuator line model (ALM); turbulence.

  20. Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

    2013-01-01

    The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

  1. Using of standard marine radar for determination of a water surface and an atmosphere near-surface layer parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, Nikolay A.; Bakhanov, Victor V.; Ermoshkin, Aleksei V.; Kazakov, Vasily I.; Kemarskaya, Olga N.; Titov, Victor I.; Troitskaya, Yulia I.

    2014-10-01

    At present time radar methods of the seas and oceans diagnostics are actively developing. Using of the radar stations based on satellites and planes allows to receive information on a sea surface and a atmosphere near-surface layer with coverage of big water surface areas independently of day time. The developed methods of satellite radio images processing can be applied to marine radar stations. In Institute of Applied Physics RAS works on sea surface diagnostics systems development on the basis of standard marine radar are actively conducted. Despite smaller coverage of the territory in comparison with satellite data, marine radar have possibility to record spatially temporary radar images and to receive information on a surrounding situation quickly. This work deals with results of the researches which were conducted within the international expedition in the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2012 on a route Rotterdam (Netherlands) - Ushuaya (Argentina) - Antarctica — Ushuaya. During this expedition a complex measurements of a sea surface, a atmosphere near-surface layer parameters and subsurface currents in the wide range of hydroweather conditions, including the storm were carried out. The system developed in IAP RAS on the basis of a marine radar ICOM MR-1200RII and the ADC (Analog Digital Converter) block for data recording on the personal computer was used. Display of a non-uniform near-surface current on sea surface radar images in storm conditions is shown. By means of the high-speed anemometer and meteorological station the measurements of the atmosphere parameters were carried out. Comparison of the anemometer data with calculated from radar images is carried out. Dependence of radar cross section from wind speed in the wide range of wind speeds, including storm conditions is investigated. Possibility of marine radar using for surface waves intensity and ice situation estimates also as icebergs detection is shown.

  2. The WELSONS experiment: overview and presentation of first results on the surface atmospheric boundary-layer in semiarid Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Frangi

    Full Text Available This study presents the preliminary results of the local energy budget and dynamic characteristics of the surface atmospheric boundary-layer (SBL during the WELSONS (wind erosion and losses of soil nutrients in semiarid Spain experiment. Some Mediterranean regions suffer land degradation by wind erosion as a consequence of their particular soil and climate conditions and inappropriate agricultural practice. In Spain, where land degradation by water erosion is well known, the lack of field studies to quantify soils losses by wind erosion resulted in the European Community organizing a scientific program for this specific issue. The European programme known as WELSONS was devoted to study the wind erosion process in central Aragon (NE Spain. This multidisciplinary experiment, which began in 1996 and finished in 1998, was carried out over an agricultural soil which was left fallow. Within the experimental field, two plots were delimited where two tillage treatments were applied, a mould-board ploughing (or conventional tillage denoted CT and chisel ploughing (reduced tillage denoted RT. This was to study on bare soil the influence of tillage method on surface conditions, saltation flux, vertical dust flux, erosion rates, dynamics characteristics such as friction velocity, roughness length, etc., and energy budget. The partitioning of the available energy, resulting from the dynamics of the SBL, are quite different over the two plots because of their own peculiar soil and surface properties. The first results show that the RT treatment seems to provide a wind erosion protection. Because of the long data recording time and particular phenomena (formation of a crust at the soil surface, very dry conditions, high wind speed for instance, these microclimatological data acquired during the WELSONS programmes may be helpful to test atmospheric boundary-layer models coupled with soil models.

    Key words: Hydrology (desertification - Meterology and

  3. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  4. Turbulent Characterization of atmospheric surface layer over non-homogeneous terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 15000 wind and temperature profiles from a 100 m tower located in CEDER (Soria, Spain) have been analyzed. Using profiles in close neutral conditions, two main parameters of surface layer were obtained. Results show a great dependence of these parameters (Z0 roughness length and u friction velocity) on flow conditions and terrain (tinctures. Difficulty finding neutral conditions in this type of terrain (gently rolling and scattered bush) and in this latitude , is also remarkable. (Author) 91 refs

  5. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  6. Wind Energy and the Turbulent Nature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Wächter, Matthias; Hölling, Michael; Morales, Allan; Milan, Patrick; Mücke, Tanja; Peinke, Joachim; Reinke, Nico; Rinn, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of developing a sustainable and renewable energy supply within the next decades requires collaborative efforts as well as new concepts in the fields of science and engineering. Here we give an overview on the impact of small-scale properties of atmospheric turbulence on the wind energy conversion process. Special emphasis is given to the noisy and intermittent structure of turbulence and its outcome for wind energy conversion and utilization. Experimental, theoretical, analytical, and numerical concepts and methods are presented. In particular we report on new aspects resulting from the combination of basic research, especially in the field of turbulence and complex stochastic systems, with engineering applications.

  7. Modelling the impact of Baltic Sea upwelling on the atmospheric boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Sproson, David; Sahlée, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Coastal upwelling, with a strong sea-surface temperature (SST) signal, is extremely common in the Baltic Sea during the summer months. Although the spatial scale of upwelling is small, its high frequency of occurrence in the semi-enclosed basin may allow the SST signature to have significant feedback onto the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we develop a method to remove the signature of upwelling from SST fields, and use these modified SST fields as the lower boundary condition of an atmosph...

  8. Atmospheric conditions associated with high and low summertime ozone levels in the boundary layer over some eastern Mediterranean airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabokas, Pavlos D.; Thouret, Valerie; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Volz-Thomas, Andreas; Boulanger, Damien; Repapis, Christos C.

    2013-04-01

    Thanks to the vertical atmospheric measurements of the MOZAIC program, enhanced ozone mixing ratios in the lower troposphere over the Eastern Mediterranean have been found, frequently exceeding the 60 ppb, 8-h EU air quality standard, whereas ozone between 700 hPa and 400 hPa was only slightly (3-5 ppb, 5-10%) higher than over Central Europe. Also, the examination of the highest and lowest ozone levels in the lower troposphere (1.5-5 km) over some airports in the Eastern Mediterranean area showed the lower-tropospheric ozone variability over there is controlled mainly by the synoptic meteorological conditions, combined with local topographical and meteorological features. In particular, the highest ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere and subsequently in the boundary layer in the area are associated with large scale subsidence of ozone rich air masses from the upper troposphere under anticyclonic conditions while the lowest ozone concentrations are associated with low pressure conditions inducing uplifting of boundary layer air, poor in ozone and rich in relative humidity, to the lower troposphere. In order to further evaluate the observed high rural ozone levels during summertime, vertical summer ozone profiles measured by MOZAIC in the period 1994-2008 over the Eastern Mediterranean basin (Cairo, Tel-Aviv, Heraklion, Rhodes, Antalya) are analyzed, focusing in the boundary layer (0-1.5 km). First, vertical profiles collected during extreme days with very high or very low tropospheric ozone mixing ratios are examined. Also, the average profiles of ozone, relative humidity, carbon monoxide, vertical temperature gradient and wind speed corresponding to the 7% highest and the 7% lowest ozone mixing ratios for the height layers of 0-500m, 500-1000m and 1000-1500m for Cairo and Tel-Aviv are examined along with the corresponding composite maps of geopotential heights at 850 hPa and 925 hPa. In addition, analyses of backward trajectories, using the FLEXPART model

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel-chrome-bor-silicon layers produced by the atmospheric plasma spray process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the influence of plasma spray parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of NiCrBSi coatings deposited by the atmospheric plasma spray (APS process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma spray coatings are determined by the interaction of plasma ions with powder particles when the rate and temperature of plasma particles are transferred to powder particles. The interaction effect directly depends on the time the powder particles spend in plasma, and that time is defined by the deposition distance for each type of powder, depending on the grain size, melting temperature and specific mass. In order to obtain homogeneous and dense coatings, three distances (70,120 and 170 mm from the substrate were used in the research. The coating of the best structural and mechanical characteristics was remelted and fused to the base in order to obtain a better structure. Self - fluxing NiCrBSi alloys are widely used because of the good resistance of boride, carbide and silicide solid phases to wear and corrosion. The morphology of powder particles was examined in the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope, while the microstructure of the layers was assessed using a light microscope. The microstructural analysis of the deposited layers was performed in accordance with the Pratt-Whitney standard. The mechanical properties of the layers were assessed by applying the HV0.3 method for microhardness testing and tensile testing was applied to test bond strength.

  10. UAS and DTS: Using Drones and Fiber Optics to Measure High Resolution Temperature of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predosa, R. A.; Darricau, B.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the lowest part of the atmosphere that directly interacts with the planet's surface. The development of the ABL plays a vital role, as it affects the transport of atmospheric constituents such as air pollutants, water vapor, and greenhouse gases. Measurements of the processes in the ABL have been difficult due to the limitations in the spatial and temporal resolutions of the equipment as well as the height of the traditional flux tower. Recent advances in the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and distributed temperature sensing (DTS) technologies have provided us with new tools to study the complex processes in ABL. We conducted a series of pioneering experiments in Eastern Oregon using a platform that combines UAV and DTS to collect data during morning and evening transitions in the ABL. The major components of this platform consists of a quad-copter, a DTS computer unit, and a set of customized fiber optic cables. A total of 75 flights were completed to investigate: (1) the capability of a duplexed fiber optic cable to reduce noise in the high spatial and temporal temperature measurements taken during the morning transition; (2) the possibility of using fiber optic cable as "wet bulb" thermometer to calculate relative humidity in the ABL at high spatial and temporal resolution. The preliminary results showed that using a fiber optic cable in a duplexed configuration with the UAV-DTS platform can effectively reduce noise level during the morning transition data collection. The customized "wet bulb" fiber optic cable is capable of providing information for the calculation of relative humidity in the ABL at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. From this study, the UAV-DTS platform demonstrated great potential in collecting temperature data in the ABL and with the development of atmospheric sensor technologies, it will have more applications in the future.

  11. Heat transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer during an intense cold air outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    1988-01-01

    The generation of the virtual heat flux in the convective MABL associated with the January 28, 1986 intense cold air airbreak offshore of the Carolinas is studied. A technique based on the joint frequency distribution of the virtual potential temperature and vertical motion (Mahrt and Paumier, 1984) is used. The results suggest that, if buoyancy is mainly driven by the temperature flux, the physical processes for generating buoyancy flux are about the same for boundary layers over land and ocean, even with different convective regimes.

  12. Observation of the atmospheric sodium layer with a magneto-optical filter (MOF)

    CERN Document Server

    Guida, R; Guida, Roberto; Cacciani, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The Mesosphere is interested by important chemical and dynamical phenomena, so observation of its Sodium layer's behavior has became a common target of several research plans all over the world. In order to study its dynamical and chemical variation during daytime (so the solar flux, which is not localized, stimulates the Sodium emission) we want to observe from the space continuously the Sodium emission (and perform differential analysis looking for periodic changes), using a small telescope with a Magneto-Optical Filter and a image sensor.

  13. Characteristics of particulate radionuclides in the atmospheric surface layer of the 30-km zone of Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the inhalation dose assessment, reliable estimations are necessary of the average volume concentration of particle bound radionuclides in the atmosphere specifying the nuclide composition, the activity distribution in the different particle size ranges and the solubility characteristics of the nuclides. For that purpose, the analysis of measurement series is presented of the daily average activity concentrations of 137Cs and 144Ce and their temporal and spatial variability. From 1986 till 1994, samples were taken with high-volume samplers and multicascade impactors; the number concentrations of aerosol particles and the number concentrations of 'hot' particles were determined for different conditions with an Aerosol Particle Sizer and a Rotating Arm Impactor. The data demonstrate a decrease the atmospheric concentrations of 137Cs and 144Ce with time larger than caused by radioactive decay alone. A statistical analysis showed a high level of fluctuations in the concentration of radionuclides in air with maxima exceeding the annual average by 10 to 20 times. The analysis of 88 experimental radioactivity size distributions at Zapolie and Pripyat for winddriven resuspension conditions have shown that the measured distributions are generally very wide and differ from the log-normal distribution in the most cases. At Zapolie, the mean air concentrations of 137Cs, discriminated in four size ranges, showed an increasing part of inhalable particles with time since the accident. In 1993, the inhalable fraction was about 48% of the total concentration. The size distribution of atmospheric 137Cs particulate activity during these periods of enhanced resuspension showed a similar common shape with two maxima, the first in the 2-4 μm range, and the second in the 12-20 μm range. The estimated radioactive loading of particles showed an enrichment of resuspended radionuclides compared with soil particles. The highest enrichment factor was found for large particles, the lowest

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thermal structure of the venus atmosphere in the middle cloud layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkin, V M; Kerzhanovich, V V; Lipatov, A N; Shurupov, A A; Seiff, A; Ragent, B; Young, R E; Ingersoll, A P; Crisp, D; Elson, L S; Preston, R A; Blamont, J E

    1986-03-21

    Thermal structure measurements obtained by the two VEGA balloons show the Venus middle cloud layer to be generally adiabatic. Temperatures measured by the two balloons at locations roughly symmetric about the equator differed by about 6.5 kelvins at a given pressure. The VEGA-2 temperatures were about 2.5 kelvins cooler and those of VEGA-1 about 4 kelvins warmer than temperatures measured by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe at these levels. Data taken by the VEGA-2 lander as it passed through the middle cloud agreed with those of the VEGA-2 balloon. Study of individual frames of the balloon data suggests the presence of multiple discrete air masses that are internally adiabatic but lie on slightly different adiabats. These adiabats, for a given balloon, can differ in temperature by as much as 1 kelvin at a given pressure. PMID:17748084

  16. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height under marine upstream flow conditions at a coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting (WRF) model shows similar behavior compared to the lidar observations. The seasonal diurnal variation of the BLH for 2010, derived from the wind lidar and ceilometer thresholds, shows similar BLHs but generally higher values compared to that from WRF. No clear BLH diurnal variation is observed......We investigate several lidar-type instruments and methodologies for boundary layer height (BLH) estimation during 2 days at a coastal site for winds that experience marine upstream flow conditions. Wavelet and profile fitting procedures on the aerosol backscatter signals from a ceilometer and an...... aerosol lidar reveal similar BLHs, but their agreement depends on the presence of clouds and the instrument signal, among others. BLHs derived by a threshold on the carrier-to-noise profiles of a wind lidar agree well with those derived by using a threshold on the backscatter profile of the ceilometer and...

  17. Standard deviation of vertical two-point longitudinal velocity differences in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1971-01-01

    Statistical estimates of wind shear in the planetary boundary layer are important in the design of V/STOL aircraft, and for the design of the Space Shuttle. The data analyzed in this study consist of eleven sets of longitudinal turbulent velocity fluctuation time histories digitized at 0.2 sec intervals with approximately 18,000 data points per time history. The longitudinal velocity fluctuations were calculated with horizontal wind and direction data collected at the 18-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, and 150-m levels. The data obtained confirm the result that Eulerian time spectra transformed to wave-number spectra with Taylor's frozen eddy hypothesis possess inertial-like behavior at wave-numbers well out of the inertial subrange.

  18. Scaling Of Turbulence In The Atmospheric Surface-Layer: Which Anisotropy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to provide an insight into the fundamental relationships between large and small scale wind velocity fluctuations within the boundary layer through careful analysis of measuring mast wind velocities. The measuring mast was in a wind farm on top of a mountain (with steep inclines of about 30°) on an island surrounded by the sea which meant the horizontal mean flow fluctuations were dominated by buoyancy forces and vertical shears at large scales (above 500m). Thus using a variety of methods including spectral, integrated spectral, integrated cospectral and multifractal analysis we were able to clearly dispel the relevance of 2D turbulence and give on the contrary some credence to the multifractal anisotropic model.

  19. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoye, Robert L. Z., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L., E-mail: rlzh2@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jld35@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Muñoz-Rojas, David [LMGP, University Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, F-3800 Grenoble (France); Nelson, Shelby F. [Kodak Research Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650 (United States); Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Roozeboom, Fred [Holst Centre/TNO Thin Film Technology, Eindhoven, 5656 AE (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, Eindhoven, 5600 MB (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics.

  20. MAN-MADE RADIONUCLIDES IN THE NEAR-THE-GROUND ATMOSPHERIC LAYER DUE TO THE FUKUSHIMA ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bulgakov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents information about the main observation results of radiometric departments of the Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring for changes in the radiation situation on the territory of Russia following the accident at the Fukushima NPP. The obtained experimental data allowed to conclude that the volumetric activities of radionuclides in the near-the-ground  atmospheric layer were by 3 to 6 orders of magnitude below the permissible volumetric activity set by Radiation Safety Standards (NRB-99/2009, and the correction to the density of soil contamination by cesium-137 was by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less than the decrease of the density of contamination with this isotope of the global origin due to radioactive decay.

  1. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) has recently emerged as an appealing technique for rapidly producing high quality oxides. Here, we focus on the use of AP-SALD to deposit functional ZnO thin films, particularly on the reactors used, the film properties, and the dopants that have been studied. We highlight how these films are advantageous for the performance of solar cells, organometal halide perovskite light emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors. Future AP-SALD technology will enable the commercial processing of thin films over large areas on a sheet-to-sheet and roll-to-roll basis, with new reactor designs emerging for flexible plastic and paper electronics

  2. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  3. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Hasselbach, J.; Lauer, P.; Baumann, R.; Franke, K.; Gurk, C.; Schlager, H.; Weingartner, E.

    2008-05-01

    Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel)-1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel)-1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC). Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dpemissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  4. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2015-03-01

    The temperature measurements of the rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observation Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope, and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a reduction of the measurement uncertainty of 70% during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field of view in the near range. An example of a low-level temperature measurement is presented which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer 100 m above the ground.

  5. The Role of Large-Coherent-Eddy Transport in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Based on CASES-99 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald H.; LeMone, Margaret A.; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of momentum and heat fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment is extended throughout the diurnal cycle following the investigation of nighttime turbulence by Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69:338-351, 2012). Based on the observations, limitations of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) are examined in detail. The analysis suggests that strong turbulent mixing is dominated by relatively large coherent eddies that are not related to local vertical gradients as assumed in MOST. The HOckey-Stick Transition (HOST) hypothesis is developed to explain the generation of observed large coherent eddies over a finite depth and the contribution of these eddies to vertical variations of turbulence intensity and atmospheric stratification throughout the diurnal cycle. The HOST hypothesis emphasizes the connection between dominant turbulent eddies and turbulence generation scales, and the coupling between the turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence potential energy within the turbulence generation layer in determining turbulence intensity. For turbulence generation directly influenced by the surface, the HOST hypothesis recognizes the role of the surface both in the vertical variation of momentum and heat fluxes and its boundary effect on the size of the dominant turbulence eddies.

  6. Observations of high rates of NO2 – HONO conversion in the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prinn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous acid (HONO plays a significant role in the atmosphere, especially in the polluted troposphere. Its photolysis after sunrise is an important source of hydroxyl free radicals (OH. Measurements of nitrous acid and other pollutants were carried out in the Kathmandu urban atmosphere during January–February 2003, contributing to the sparse knowledge of nitrous acid in South Asia. The results showed average nocturnal levels of HONO (1.7±0.8 ppbv, NO2 (17.9±10.2 ppbv, and PM10 (0.18±0.11 mg m−3 in urban air in Kathmandu. Surprisingly high ratios of chemically formed secondary [HONO] to [NO2] (up to 30% were found, which indicates unexpectedly efficient chemical conversion of NO2 to HONO in Kathmandu. The ratios of [HONO]/[NO2] at nights are much higher than previously reported values from measurements in urban air in Europe, North America and Asia. The influence of aerosol plumes, relative humidity, aerosol surface and ground reactive surface, temperature on NO2-HONO chemical conversion were discussed. The high humidity, strong and low inversion layer at night, and serious aerosol pollution burden may explain the particularly efficient conversion of NO2 to HONO.

  7. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 m tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes are used to retrieve the contribution of the budget terms in the scalar conservation equation. On the basis of the daytime evolution of turbulent fluxes, we calculate the budget terms by assuming that turbulent fluxes follow a linear profile with height. This assumption is carefully tested and the deviation from linearity is quantified. The budget calculation allows us to assess the importance of advection of heat and CO2 during day hours for three selected days. It is found that, under nonadvective conditions, the diurnal variability of temperature and CO2 is well reproduced from the flux divergence measurements. Consequently, the vertical transport due to the turbulent flux plays a major role in the daytime evolution of both scalars and the advection is a relatively small contribution. During the analyzed days with a strong contribution of advection of either heat or carbon dioxide, the flux divergence is still an important contribution to the budget. For heat, the quantification of the advection contribution is in close agreement with results from a numerical model. For carbon dioxide, we qualitatively corroborate the results with a Lagrangian transport model. Our estimation of advection is compared with traditional estimations based on the Net Ecosystem-atmosphere Exchange (NEE)

  8. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height under marine upstream flow conditions at a coastal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    PeñA, A.; Gryning, S.-E.; Hahmann, A. N.

    2013-02-01

    AbstractWe investigate several lidar-type instruments and methodologies for boundary layer height (BLH) estimation during 2 days at a coastal site for winds that experience marine upstream flow conditions. Wavelet and profile fitting procedures on the aerosol backscatter signals from a ceilometer and an aerosol lidar reveal similar BLHs, but their agreement depends on the presence of clouds and the instrument signal, among others. BLHs derived by a threshold on the carrier-to-noise profiles of a wind lidar agree well with those derived by using a threshold on the backscatter profile of the ceilometer and are used as reference for a 10 day BLH intercomparison. Furthermore, the BLHs from the aerosol analysis are comparable to those derived from wind speed and direction profiles from combined mast/wind lidar measurements. The BLH derived from simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model shows similar behavior compared to the lidar observations. The seasonal diurnal variation of the BLH for 2010, derived from the wind lidar and ceilometer thresholds, shows similar BLHs but generally higher values compared to that from WRF. No clear BLH diurnal variation is observed neither from the observations nor from the WRF model outputs, except in summer for the latter. Both observations and WRF model simulations reveal higher BLHs during autumn compared to spring time. These BLHs are used to evaluate the intra-annual variation and show high peaks in September, November, and February.

  9. A Numerical Study of Sea Breeze and Spatiotemporal Variation in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Hainan Island, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian-Qian; Cai, Xu-Hui; Song, Yu; Kang, Ling

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations of sea breezes and the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at Hainan Island, China during summer and winter are discussed. The different behaviour of sea breezes and the ABL on the leeward and windward sides of the island are examined, and it is found that offshore flows are more likely to create a strong sea-breeze signature, whereas the process of sea-breeze development under onshore flows is difficult to capture. At the location where the sea-breeze signal is remarkable, the height of the coastal ABL displays an abnormal decrease, corresponding to a transitional point from a continental ABL to a thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formed under sea-breeze conditions. This is corroborated by the sudden increase in the water vapour mixing ratio and/or wind speed, indicating the arrival of the sea breeze. Regarding the spatial distribution, the TIBL height decreases abruptly just ahead of the sea-breeze front, and above the cold air mass. When the sea-breeze front occurs with a raised head, a cold air mass is separated from the sea-breeze flow and penetrates inland. This separation is attributed to the interaction between the sea breeze and valley breeze, while the dry airflow entraining to the sea-breeze flow may also partially contribute to this air mass separation.

  10. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (Φm and for temperature (Φh. It uses three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h at tree top, local z/L(z, and the local bulk Richardson number (Ri, within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h > 0 conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy Φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. Furthermore, Φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri| < 1. When local |Ri| > 1, |Φm| decreases with |Ri| in a power function, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local Φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., the local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with the local temperature gradient, the local Φh increases with the local Ri when Ri < 1. However, Φh does not change with Ri (or much more scattered when Ri > 1. The relationship between local Φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  11. Local flux-profile relationships of wind speed and temperature in a canopy layer in atmospheric stable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of the physics of the canopy layer pose challenges to the determination and use of traditional universal functions so helpful in the atmospheric surface layer. Progress toward "universal-like functions" such as those provided by Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for the canopy layer has been modest. One of the challenges lies in that the assumptions underlying Monin-Obukhov similarity theory do not hold within a canopy layer. This paper thus examines the local flux-profile relations for wind (φm and for temperature (φh using three different stability parameters, i.e., h/L(h at tree top, local z/L(z, and local bulk Richardson number (Ri, within a tall forest canopy in nighttime stable (indicated by h/L(h>0 conditions. Results suggest that the in-canopy φm can be described using the local Richardson number Ri. φm is found to increase linearly with Ri in the upper canopy layer for |Ri|<1. When local |Ri|>1, |φm| decreases with |Ri|, a result consistent for all levels of measurements within the canopy. When both local φh and local Ri are positive, i.e., local downward turbulent heat flux is consistent with local temperature gradient, local φh increases with local Ri when Ri<1 but does not change with Ri (or much more scattered when Ri>1. The relationship between local φh and Ri disappears when counter-gradient heat transfer occurs in strongly stable conditions. A self-correlation analysis is used to examine the influence of self-correlation and the physical meaning of these relationships.

  12. Study on the atmospheric boundary layer and its influence on regional air quality over the Pearl River delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the structure of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL and its influence on regional air quality over the Pearl River delta (PRD, two ABL intensive observations were conducted at Panyu (urban station and Xinken (non-urban station, near estuary of PRD during October 2004 and July 2006, respectively. Based on the ABL intensive observation data analysis, the typical weather condition type associated with poor air quality over PRD could be summarized into two kinds: the warmed period before cold front (WPBCF and the subsidence period controlled by tropical cyclone (SPCTC. Two typical polluted cases (affected by WPBCF and SPCTC, respectively and one clean (not-polluted case were chosen for detail analysis. It was found that the continuously low or calm ground wind would lead to pollutant accumulation. The local circulation, such as sea–land breezes and heat–island circulation, played an important role in these polluted cases. The recirculation was significant in polluted cases; steady transport occurred in the clean case. Ventilation index (VI was quite different between polluted cases and the clean case: in WPBCF cases, the peak VI was from 184 to 3555 m2 s−1; on SPCTC days, the peak VI was from 1066 to 4363 m2 s−1; on the clean day, the peak VI was 10 885 m2 s−1 and much larger than all polluted cases. The 24-h average VI on polluted days was from 169 to 2858 m2 s−1 and also much smaller than that of the clean day. VI is a good reference index for pollution judgment. The peak mixing heights were smaller than 700 m in WPBCF cases, and were smaller than 800 m in SPCTC cases. During WPBCF polluted case, only surface inversion layer appeared. In the period of land breeze, surface inversion layer height was about 50 m, but in the period of sea breeze, surface inversion layer height would increase, and reach the maximum height, which was about 600 m. During SPCTC polluted case, there were several inversion layers that appeared at different

  13. Closing the Dimethyl Sulfide Budget in the Tropical Marine Boundary Layer during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Conley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen research flights were conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130 near Christmas Island (2° N, 157° W during the summer of 2007 as part of the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE. In order to tightly constrain the scalar budget of DMS, fluxes were measured at various levels in the marine boundary layer (MBL from near the surface (30 m to the top of the mixed layer (500 m providing greater accuracy of the flux divergence calculation in the DMS budget. The observed mean mole fraction of DMS in the MBL exhibited the well known diurnal cycle, ranging from 50 pptv in the daytime to 110 pptv at night. Contributions from horizontal advection are included using a multivariate regression of all DMS flight data from within the MBL to estimate the mean gradients and trends. With this technique we consider the residual term in the DMS budget as an estimate of overall photochemical oxidation. Error analysis of the various terms in the DMS budget indicate that chemical losses acting on time scales of up to 110 h can be inferred with this technique. On average, photochemistry accounted for 7.3 ppt hr−1 loss rate for the seven daytime flights, with an estimated error of 0.6 ppt/hr. The loss rate due to expected OH oxidation is sufficient to explain the net DMS destruction without invoking the action of additional oxidants (e.g. reactive halogens. The observed ocean flux of DMS averaged 3.1 (±1.5μmol m−2 d−1, and generally decreased throughout the sunlit hours. The average entrainment flux at the top of the MBL was 2.5 μmol m−2 d−1; therefore the flux divergence term in the budget equation only contributed an average increase of 1.3 ppt hr−1 to the mean MBL mole fraction. Over the entire mission, the horizontal advection contribution to the overall budget was 0.2 ppt hr−1, indicating a mean atmospheric DMS gradient nearly

  14. Closing the dimethyl sulfide budget in the tropical marine boundary layer during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bandy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen research flights were conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130 near Christmas Island (2° N, 157° W during the summer of 2007 as part of the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE. In order to tightly constrain the scalar budget of DMS, vertical eddy fluxes were measured at various levels in the marine boundary layer (MBL from ~30 m to the top of the mixed layer (~500 m providing improved accuracy of the flux divergence calculation in the DMS budget. The observed mean mole fraction of DMS in the MBL exhibited the well-known diurnal cycle, ranging from 50–95 pptv in the daytime to 90–110 pptv at night. Contributions from horizontal advection are included using a multivariate regression of all DMS flight data within the MBL to estimate the mean gradients and trends. With this technique we can use the residual term in the DMS budget as an estimate of overall photochemical oxidation. Error analysis of the various terms in the DMS budget indicate that chemical losses acting on time scales of up to 110 h can be inferred with this technique. On average, photochemistry accounted for ~7.4 ppt hr −1 loss rate for the seven daytime flights, with an estimated error of 0.6 ppt hr−1. The loss rate due to expected OH oxidation is sufficient to explain the net DMS destruction without invoking the action of additional oxidants (e.g., reactive halogens. The observed ocean flux of DMS averaged 3.1 (±1.5 μmol m−2 d−1, and generally decreased throughout the sunlit hours. Over the entire mission, the horizontal advection contribution to the overall budget was merely -0.1 ppt hr−1, indicating a mean atmospheric DMS gradient nearly perpendicular to the east-southeasterly trade winds and the chlorophyll gradient in the equatorial upwelling ocean. Nonetheless, horizontal advection was a significant term in the budget of any given flight, ranging from −1

  15. Large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: Influence of unsteady forcing, baroclinicity, inversion strength and stability on the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    The largest wind turbines today often reach heights where traditional models of the wind speed and how it varies with height no longer can be expected to apply. For accurate assessment of wind energy resources and loads on wind turbines, there is a need for better understanding of the flow of air...... above the atmospheric surface layer. Continuous and detailed measurements of mean winds and turbulence above the surface layer are expensive and difficult to obtain. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of the atmospheric flow can be an attractive alternative or supplement to field experiments. In...

  16. Diurnal and vertical variability of the sensible heat and carbon dioxide budgets in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casso-Torralba, P.; de Arellano, J. V. -G.; Bosveld, F.; Soler, M.R.; Vermeulen, A.; Werner, C.; Moors, E.

    2008-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric surface layer are studied by analyzing measurements from a 213 in tower in Cabauw (Netherlands). Observations of thermodynamic variables and CO2 mixing ratio as well as vertical profiles of the turbulent fluxes are used to retrieve the contribution of the budget terms in the scalar conservation equation. On the basis of the daytime evolution of turbulent fluxes, we calculate the budget terms by assuming that turbulent fluxes follow a linear profile with height. This assumption is carefully tested and the deviation ftom linearity is quantified. The budget calculation allows us to assess the importance of advection of heat and CO2 during day hours for three selected days. It is found that, under nonadvective conditions, the diurnal variability of temperature and CO2 is well reproduced from the flux divergence measurements. Consequently, the vertical transport due to the turbulent flux plays a major role in the daytime evolution of both scalars and the advection is a relatively small contribution. During the analyzed days with a strong contribution of advection of either heat or carbon dioxide, the flux divergence is still an important contribution to the budget. For heat, the quantification of the advection contribution is in close agreement with results from a numerical model. For carbon dioxide, we qualitatively corroborate the results with a Lagrangian transport model. Our estimation of advection is compared with, traditional estimations based on the Net Ecosystem-atmosphere Exchange (NEE). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Exploring atmospheric boundary layer characteristics in a severe SO2 episode in the north-eastern Adriatic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Klaić

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Stable atmospheric conditions are often connected with the occurrence of high pollution episodes especially in urban or industrial areas. In this work we investigate a severe SO2 episode observed on 3–5 February 2002 in a coastal industrial town of Rijeka, Croatia, where very high daily mean concentrations (up to 353.5 μg m−3 were measured. The episode occurred under high air pressure conditions, which were accompanied with a fog and low wind speeds. Three air quality models (50-km EMEP model, 10-km EMEP4HR model and 1-km CAMx model were used to simulate SO2 concentrations fields and to evaluate the relative contribution of distant and local pollution sources to observed concentrations. Results suggest that the episode was caused predominately by local sources. Furthermore, using three-dimensional, higher-order turbulence closure mesoscale meteorological model (WRF, the wind regimes and thermo-dynamical structure of the lower troposphere above the greater Rijeka area (GRA were examined in detail. Modelled atmospheric fields suggest several factors whose simultaneous acting was responsible for elevated SO2 concentrations. Established small scale wind directions supported the transport of air from nearby industrial areas with major pollution sources towards Rijeka. This transport was associated with strong, ground-based temperature inversion and correspondingly, very low mixing layer (at most up to about 140 m. Additionally, the surface winds in Rijeka were light or almost calm thus, preventing ventilation of polluted air. Finally, a vertical circulation cell formed between the mainland and a nearby island, supported the air subsidence and the increase of static stability.

  18. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  19. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B{&}W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  20. Application and Limitations of GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) Data for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Detection over the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent changes in the Arctic environment, it is important to monitor the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) properties over the Arctic Ocean, especially to explore the variability in ABL clouds (such as sensitivity and feedback to sea ice loss). For example, radiosonde and satellite observations of the Arctic ABL height (and low-cloud cover) have recently suggested a positive response to sea ice loss during October that may not occur during the melt season (June-September). Owing to its high vertical and spatiotemporal resolution, an independent ABL height detection algorithm using GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) refractivity in the Arctic is explored. Similar GPS-RO algorithms developed previously typically define the level of the most negative moisture gradient as the ABL height. This definition is favorable for subtropical oceans where a stratocumulus-topped ABL is often capped by a layer of sharp moisture lapse rate (coincident with the temperature inversion). The Arctic Ocean is also characterized by stratocumulus cloud cover, however, the specific humidity does not frequently decrease in the ABL capping inversion. The use of GPS-RO refractivity for ABL height retrieval therefore becomes more complex. During winter months (December-February), when the total precipitable water in the troposphere is a minimum, a fairly straightforward algorithm for ABL height retrieval is developed. The applicability and limitations of this method for other seasons (Spring, Summer, Fall) is determined. The seasonal, interannual and spatial variability in the GPS-derived ABL height over the Arctic Ocean, as well as its relation to the underlying surface (ice vs. water), is investigated. The GPS-RO profiles are also explored for the evidence of low-level moisture transport in the cold Arctic environment.

  1. Simultaneous middle and upper atmosphere radar and ionospheric sounder observations of midlatitude E region irregularities and sporadic E layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T.; Takahashi, O.; Otsuka, Y.; Nozaki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Kita, K.

    2002-10-01

    We made middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar observations of midlatitude E region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the summer of 1999 and 2000. Sporadic E (Es) layer was monitored with a routine ionosonde, and its altitude was measured with an FM-CW sounder (FCS). In this paper we draw attention to two findings. First, we show that quasiperiodic (QP) radar echoes appearing before 0200 LT are more enhanced with increasing foEs - fbEs, which means that the FAI generation is closely related to localized density gradients within Es, and extend from 100 to 130 km in altitude, while Es altitudes determined from the FCS soundings are between 100 and 110 km. The latter fact suggests that existing models for the QP echo generation, which require a deep modulation of Es altitude, are not applicable to our observational results. We propose a new working model for generating QP echoes in which polarization electric fields originated from high-density plasma clouds within Es are mapped upward along the geomagnetic field to produce relatively weak irregularities above the Es layer. Second, we show new findings obtained from the current observations, namely, two types of QP echoes that occur below 100 km in the morning: one is the morning QP (MQP) echoes with periods of 4-8 min, and the other is the QP echoes with periods of ˜1 min. The latter type can be categorized as low-altitude QP echoes that were found from previous nighttime MU radar observations. Until now the MU radar QP echoes have been believed to occur above 100 km for the period from sunset to midnight. Although we do not know the generation mechanisms of the low-altitude MQP echoes, we suppose that these echoes might be caused by a weak Es that exists below 100 km.

  2. Atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over the Pearl River Delta, China during summer 2006: measurement and model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Fan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric conditions are often connected with the occurrence of high pollution episodes especially in urban areas. As part of the PRIDE-PRD2006 intensive campaign, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL measurements were carried out at Qingyuan, Panyu and Xinken in the Pearl River Delta (PRD from 1 July to 30 July of 2006. It was found that in summer, the surface winds in PRD are more controlled by the south, and there usually is vertical wind shear at the height of 800 m or so, therefore, PRD is often influenced by the tropical cyclone/typhoon. The subsidence and precipitation from a tropical cyclone will affect the air quality of PRD. Under the subsidence, the wind speed in ABL and the height of ABL will decrease and result in high level concentrations. When the background wind speed is small or calm, the wind profile at Panyu and Xinken change dramatically with height, which is perhaps caused by the local circulations, such as the sea land breeze. For more understanding about the ABL of PRD, the simulations by the WRF mesoscale model were used to analyse the ABL characteristics in PRD. From three kinds of weather condition simulations (subsidence days, rainy days and sunny days by WRF model, it was found that the simulated temperature, wind fields in these three cases were moderately consistent with the measurements. The results show that the diurnal variation of ABL in subsidence days and sunny days are obvious, but the diurnal variation of ABL on rainy days is not obvious. The ABL is obviously affected by the local circulation and the features of ABL are different in various stations. A simulation focus on high pollution episode during the subsidence days from 12–15 July 2006, occurred under high pressure conditions, accompanied by a tropical cyclone "Bilis". Comparing the simulated vertical wind fields and temperature structure with the ABL measurements at Xinken, Panyu and Qingyuan station, it was found that, the modelled and measured

  3. Numerical and experimental study of the load of an object due to the effects of a flow field in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, V.; Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Pospíšil, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 135-140. ISSN 1998-0159 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0060 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : atmospheric boundary layer ABL * bluff body * CFD * ELES * SAS * wind tunnel Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://www.naun.org/cms.action?id=7632

  4. The effect of unsteady and baroclinic forcing on predicted wind profiles in Large Eddy Simulations: Two case studies of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik;

    2013-01-01

    and in relevant atmospheric fields (e.g. temperature) that occur at larger scales must be imposed through boundary conditions or as external forcing. In this work we study the influence of such variations on the wind profile in Large Eddy Simulations of daytime atmospheric boundary layers, by comparing....... The applied domain-scale pressure gradient and its height- and time-dependence are estimated from LIDAR measurements of the wind speed above the atmospheric boundary layer in the Høvsøre case, and from radio soundings and a network of ground-based pressure sensors in the Hamburg case. In the two case studies......-scale subsidence and advection, tend to reduce agreement with measurements, relative to the Høvsøre case. The Hamburg case illustrates that measurements of the surface pressure gradient and relatively infrequent radio soundings alone are not sufficient for accurate estimation of a height- and time...

  5. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAPA ion source has made this experimental arrangement broadly available, also for small laboratories. The approach was successfully applied for the characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on TLC plates, such as a mixture of pyrazole derivatives, alkaloids (nicotine and sparteine), and an extract from a drug tablet consisting of paracetamol, propyphenazone, and caffeine. The laser pointer used was capable of ablating organic compounds without the need of application of any additional substances (matrices, staining, etc.) on the TLC spots. The detection limit of the proposed method was estimated to be 35 ng/cm(2) of a pyrazole derivative. PMID:26563110

  6. Two fast temperature sensors for probing of the atmospheric boundary layer using small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Wildmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two types of temperature sensors are designed and tested: a thermocouple and a fine wire resistance thermometer. The intention of this study is to figure out which kind of measurement principle is in general more suited for atmospheric boundary layer meteorology with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA. The sensors are calibrated in a NIST traceable climate chamber and validated in flight against tower measurements, radiosondes and remote sensing. The sensors have a measurement range of at least −10–50 °C, an absolute RMS error of less than ±0.2 K which is stable over the lifetime of the sensors, and a resolution of about 0.01 K. Both devices are tested for typical errors like radiation error and adiabatic heating, as well as for their dynamic response. Spectral resolutions of up to approximately 10 Hz can be obtained with both sensors, which makes them suitable for turbulence measurement. Their low cost of less than 100 EUR in pure hardware is a major advantage for research with small RPA.

  7. Passive Effluent Diffusion in a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer: An Airborne Approach to Locating Sources and Estimating Their Emission Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suard, Maxime

    We studied the near field dispersion of natural gas plumes leaking from transmission lines and diffusing in a convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), with the intent of providing an aerial system of leak detection and pinpointing, as well as quantitative leak rate estimation. We used high frequency measurements of methane and ethane concentrations on a fixed wing aircraft using high rate spectroscopic gas concentration measurements. We looked for characteristics of the effluent concentration field which can be related to the distance from the effluent source, and developed an empirical approach to effluent source position estimation from airborne effluent concentration measurements. From a mass-balance approach we developed a practical method of effluent leak rate estimation based on airborne effluent concentration measurements. Since gathering experimental data was costly and time-expensive, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results were also investigated. Results showed that analysis of effluent concentration variability is likely to provide information about the position of the effluent source. The developed leak rate estimation method provided encouraging results showing that such an approach is able to yield relatively accurate leak rate estimates. LES results proved to be very useful as they helped to provide guidelines for experiments as well as to deepen our understanding of the diffusion dynamics of turbulent effluent plumes.

  8. The Estimation of Surface Latent Heat Flux over the Ocean and its Relationship to Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Vandemark, Doug; Evans, Keith; Miller, David O.; Demoz, Belay B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new technique combining active and passive remote sensing instruments for the estimation of surface latent heat flux over the ocean is presented. This synergistic method utilizes aerosol lidar backscatter data, multi-channel infrared radiometer data, and microwave scatterometer data acquired onboard the NASA P-313 research aircraft during an extended field campaign over the Atlantic ocean in support of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) in September of 1994. The 10 meter wind speed derived from scatterometers and lidar-radiometer inferred near-surface moisture are used to obtain an estimate of the surface flux of moisture via a bulk aerodynamic formula. The results are compared with the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) daily average latent heat flux and show reasonable agreement. However, the SSM/I values are biased low by about 15 W/sq m. In addition, the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) height, entrainment zone thickness and integrated lidar backscatter intensity are computed from the lidar data and compared with the magnitude of the surface fluxes. The results show that the surface latent heat flux is most strongly correlated with entrainment zone depth, MABL height and the integrated MABL lidar backscatter, with corresponding correlation coefficients of 0.39, 0.43 and 0.71, respectively.

  9. Tedlar bag sampling technique for vertical profiling of carbon dioxide through the atmospheric boundary layer with high precision and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristen; Jensen, Michael L; Balsley, Ben B; Davis, Kenneth; Birks, John W

    2004-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas other than water vapor, and its modulation by the biosphere is of fundamental importance to our understanding of global climate change. We have developed a new technique for vertical profiling of CO2 and meteorological parameters through the atmospheric boundary layer and well into the free troposphere. Vertical profiling of CO2 mixing ratios allows estimates of landscape-scale fluxes characteristic of approximately100 km2 of an ecosystem. The method makes use of a powered parachute as a platform and a new Tedlar bag air sampling technique. Air samples are returned to the ground where measurements of CO2 mixing ratios are made with high precision (< or =0.1%) and accuracy (< or =0.1%) using a conventional nondispersive infrared analyzer. Laboratory studies are described that characterize the accuracy and precision of the bag sampling technique and that measure the diffusion coefficient of CO2 through the Tedlar bag wall. The technique has been applied in field studies in the proximity of two AmeriFlux sites, and results are compared with tower measurements of CO2. PMID:15296321

  10. Chemical relations between atmospheric aerosols, deposition and stone decay layers on historic buildings at the mediterranean coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, K.; Van Grieken, R.

    To evaluate the effects of the environment on weathering of historical buildings in the Mediterranean Basin, an elaborate study has been carried out at four monuments, with specific interest directed on the action of air pollution and marine salts. The composition of the atmosphere around the monuments has been investigated by monitoring the aerosols and the total deposition. These results are combined with the stone decay phenomena to interpret the deterioration at the respective monuments. In Eleusis, Greece, a highly industrialized area, high concentrations of heavy metals and sulphate are found in the aerosols and deposition and in the decay layers of the stone, while the marine influence is obscured, in spite of its location close to the sea. In Malta and in Cadiz (Spain), the influence of the sea dominates in the stone weathering process. In Bari (Italy), next to the effects of marine aerosols on the stone decay inside and outside the building, high concentrations of sulphate are observed on the outside stones. The aerosols and depositions reflect a relatively small influence of anthropogenic derived elements; this points out the action of gaseous SO 2 on the stones.

  11. Immersed boundary methods for high-resolution simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  12. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, K A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-12

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  13. Contrasting atmospheric boundary layer chemistry of methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 above polar snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Friel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydroperoxides (ROOH were measured at Summit, Greenland (72.97° N, 38.77° W in summer 2003 (SUM03 and spring 2004 (SUM04 and South Pole in December 2003 (SP03. The two dominant hydroperoxides were H2O2 and CH3OOH (from here on MHP with average (±1σ mixing ratios of 1448 (±688 pptv, 204 (±162 and 278 (±67 for H2O2 and 578 (±377 pptv, 139 (±101 pptv and 138 (±89 pptv for MHP, respectively. In early spring, MHP dominated the ROOH budget and showed night time maxima and daytime minima, out of phase with the diurnal cycle of H2O2, suggesting that the organic peroxide is controlled by photochemistry, while H2O2 is largely influenced by temperature driven exchange between the atmosphere and snow. Highly constrained photochemical box model runs yielded median ratios between modeled and observed MHP of 52%, 148% and 3% for SUM03, SUM04 and SP03, respectively. At Summit firn air measurements and model calculations suggest a daytime sink of MHP in the upper snow pack, which decreases in strength through the spring season into the summer. Up to 50% of the estimated sink rates of 1–5×1011 molecules m−3 s−1 equivalent to 24–96 pptv h−1 can be explained by photolysis and reaction with the OH radical in firn air and in the quasi-liquid layer on snow grains. Rapid processing of MHP in surface snow is expected to contribute significantly to a photochemical snow pack source of formaldehyde (CH2O. Conversely, summer levels of MHP at South Pole are inconsistent with the prevailing high NO concentrations, and cannot be explained currently by known photochemical precursors or transport, thus suggesting a missing source. Simultaneous measurements of H2O2, MHP and CH2O allow to constrain the NO background today and potentially also in the past using ice cores, although it seems less likely that MHP is preserved in firn and ice.

  14. Atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over the Pearl River Delta, China, during the summer of 2006: measurement and model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Fan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the PRIDE-PRD2006 intensive campaign, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL measurements were performed in Qingyuan, Panyu, and Xinken over the Pearl River Delta (PRD on 1–30 July 2006. During the summer, the surface winds over the PRD are generally controlled by the south, usually with vertical wind shear at a height of approximately 800 m. Subsidence and precipitation from a tropical cyclone affects the air quality of the PRD. Under subsidence, wind speed in the ABL and the height of the ABL decrease and result in high-level concentrations. When the background wind speed is small or calm, the wind profile in Panyu and Xinken changes dramatically with height, which is perhaps caused by local circulation, such as sea-land breezes. To better understand the ABL of the PRD, simulations that used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale model were utilized to analyze the ABL characteristics over the PRD. Based on three types of weather condition simulations (i.e., subsidence days, rainy days, and sunny days, the WRF model revealed that the simulated temperature and wind fields in these three cases were moderately consistent with the measurements. The results showed that diurnal variations of the ABL height on subsidence days and sunny days were obvious, but diurnal variations of the ABL height on rainy days were not apparent. The ABL is obviously affected by local circulation, and the ABL features are different at various stations. A simulation focused on a high pollution episode during the subsidence days on 12–15 July 2006, occurred under high-pressure conditions, accompanied by the tropical cyclone "Bilis". A comparison of the simulated vertical wind fields and temperature structure with the ABL measurements at Xinken, Panyu, and Qingyuan stations found that the modeled and measured atmospheric fields revealed two different types of ABL characteristics over the PRD. When the surface winds over the PRD were light or nearly calm

  15. Contrasting atmospheric boundary layer chemistry of methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 above polar snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Friel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric hydroperoxides (ROOH were measured at Summit, Greenland (72.97° N, 38.77° W in summer 2003 (SUM03 and spring 2004 (SUM04 and South Pole in December 2003 (SP03. The two dominant hydroperoxides were H2O2 and CH3OOH (from here on MHP with average(±1σ mixing ratios of 1448(±688 pptv, 204(±162 and 278(±67 for H2O2 and 578(±377 pptv, 139(±101 pptv and 138(±89 pptv for MHP, respectively. In early spring, MHP dominated the ROOH budget and showed night time maxima and daytime minima, out of phase with the diurnal cycle of H2O2, suggesting that the organic peroxide is controlled by photochemistry, while H2O2 is largely influenced by temperature driven exchange between the atmosphere and snow. Highly constrained photochemical box model runs yielded median ratios between modeled and observed MHP of 52%, 148% and 3% for SUM03, SUM04 and SP03, respectively. At Summit firn air measurements and model calculations suggest a daytime sink of MHP in the upper snow pack, which decreases in strength through the spring season into the summer. Up to 50% of the estimated sink rates of 1–5×1011 molecules m−3 s−1 equivalent to 24–96 pptv h−1 can be explained by photolysis and reaction with the OH radical in firn air and in the quasi-liquid layer on snow grains. Rapid processing of MHP in surface snow is expected to contribute significantly to a photochemical snow pack source of formaldehyde (CH2O. Conversely, summer levels of MHP at South Pole are inconsistent with the prevailing high NO concentrations, and cannot be explained currently by known photochemical precursors or transport, thus suggesting a missing source. Simultaneous measurements of H2O2, MHP and CH2O allow to constrain the NO background today and potentially also in the past using ice cores, although it seems less likely that MHP is preserved in firn and ice.

  16. Impact of atmospheric forcing on heat content variability in the sub-surface layer in the Japan/East Sea, 1948-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Dmitry; Gusev, Anatoly; Diansky, Nikolay

    2016-04-01

    Based on numerical simulations the study investigates impact of atmospheric forcing on heat content variability of the sub-surface layer in Japan/East Sea (JES), 1948-2009. We developed a model configuration based on a INMOM model and atmospheric forcing extracted from the CORE phase II experiment dataset 1948-2009, which enables to assess impact of only atmospheric forcing on heat content variability of the sub-surface layer of the JES. An analysis of kinetic energy (KE) and total heat content (THC) in the JES obtained from our numerical simulations showed that the simulated circulation of the JES is being quasi-steady state. It was found that the year-mean KE variations obtained from our numerical simulations are similar those extracted from the SODA reanalysis. Comparison of the simulated THC and that extracted from the SODA reanalysis showed significant consistence between them. An analysis of numerical simulations showed that the simulated circulation structure is very similar that obtained from the PALACE floats in the intermediate and abyssal layers in the JES. Using empirical orthogonal function analysis we studied spatial-temporal variability of the heat content of the sub-surface layer in the JES. Based on comparison of the simulated heat content variations with those obtained from natural observations an assessment of the atmospheric forcing impact on the heat content variability was obtained. Using singular value decomposition analysis we considered relationships between the heat content variability and wind stress curl as well as sensible heat flux in winter. It was established the major role of sensible heat flux in decadal variability of the heat content of the sub-surface layer in the JES. The research was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant N 14-05-00255) and the Council on the Russian Federation President Grants (grant N MK-3241.2015.5)

  17. Near-Surface Wind Predictions in Complex Terrain with a CFD Approach Optimized for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Forthofer, J.; Butler, B.; Shannon, K.

    2014-12-01

    Near-surface wind predictions are important for a number of applications, including transport and dispersion, wind energy forecasting, and wildfire behavior. Researchers and forecasters would benefit from a wind model that could be readily applied to complex terrain for use in these various disciplines. Unfortunately, near-surface winds in complex terrain are not handled well by traditional modeling approaches. Numerical weather prediction models employ coarse horizontal resolutions which do not adequately resolve sub-grid terrain features important to the surface flow. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are increasingly being applied to simulate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows, especially in wind energy applications; however, the standard functionality provided in commercial CFD models is not suitable for ABL flows. Appropriate CFD modeling in the ABL requires modification of empirically-derived wall function parameters and boundary conditions to avoid erroneous streamwise gradients due to inconsistences between inlet profiles and specified boundary conditions. This work presents a new version of a near-surface wind model for complex terrain called WindNinja. The new version of WindNinja offers two options for flow simulations: 1) the native, fast-running mass-consistent method available in previous model versions and 2) a CFD approach based on the OpenFOAM modeling framework and optimized for ABL flows. The model is described and evaluations of predictions with surface wind data collected from two recent field campaigns in complex terrain are presented. A comparison of predictions from the native mass-consistent method and the new CFD method is also provided.

  18. The Impact of Upstream Flow on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer in a Valley on a Mountainous Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Bianca; Kalthoff, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive measurements on the mountainous island of Corsica were used to investigate how the mountain atmospheric boundary layer (mountain ABL) in a valley downstream of the main mountain ridge was influenced by the upstream flow. The data used were mainly collected with the mobile observation platform KITcube during the first special observation period of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX) in 2012 and were based on various in situ, remote sensing and aircraft measurements. Two days in autumn 2012 were analyzed in detail. On these days the mountain ABL evolution was a result of convection and thermally-driven circulations as well as terrain-induced dynamically-driven flows. During periods when dynamically-driven flows were dominant, warm and dry air from aloft with a large-scale westerly wind component was transported downwards into the valley. On one day, these flows controlled the mountain ABL characteristics in a large section of the valley for several hours, while on the other day their impact was observed in a smaller section of the valley for about 1 h only. To explain the observations we considered a theoretical concept based on uniform upstream stratification and wind speed, and calculated the non-dimensional mountain height and the horizontal aspect ratio of the barrier to relate the existing conditions to diagnosed regimes of stratified flow past a ridge. On both days, wave breaking, flow splitting and lee vortices were likely to occur. Besides the upstream conditions, a reduction of stability in the valley seemed to be important for the downward transport to reach the ground. The spatio-temporal structure of such a mountain ABL over complex terrain, which was affected by various interacting flows, differed a lot from that of the classical ABL over homogeneous, flat terrain and it is stressed that the traditional ABL definitions need to be revised when applying them to complex terrain.

  19. Application of remotely piloted aircraft systems in observing the atmospheric boundary layer over Antarctic sea ice in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius O. Jonassen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to explore the potential of combining measurements from fixed- and rotary-wing remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS to complement data sets from radio soundings as well as ship and sea-ice-based instrumentation for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL profiling. This study represents a proof-of-concept of RPAS observations in the Antarctic sea-ice zone. We present first results from the RV Polarstern Antarctic winter expedition in the Weddell Sea in June–August 2013, during which three RPAS were operated to measure temperature, humidity and wind; a fixed-wing small unmanned meteorological observer (SUMO, a fixed-wing meteorological mini-aerial vehicle, and an advanced mission and operation research quadcopter. A total of 86 RPAS flights showed a strongly varying ABL structure ranging from slightly unstable temperature stratification near the surface to conditions with strong surface-based temperature inversions. The RPAS observations supplement the regular upper air soundings and standard meteorological measurements made during the campaign. The SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles agree very well and, excluding cases with strong temperature inversions, 70% of the variance in the difference between the SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles can be explained by natural, temporal, temperature fluctuations. Strong temperature inversions cause the largest differences, which are induced by SUMO's high climb rates and slow sensor response. Under such conditions, the quadcopter, with its slower climb rate and faster sensor, is very useful in obtaining accurate temperature profiles in the lowest 100 m above the sea ice.

  20. On the role of atmosphere-ocean interactions in the expected long-term changes of the Earth's ozone layer caused by greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    It is well known that anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere produce a global warming of the troposphere and a global cooling of the stratosphere. The expected stratospheric cooling essentially influences the ozone layer via increased polar stratospheric cloud formation and via temperature dependences of the gas phase reaction rates. One more mechanism of how greenhouse gases influences the ozone layer is enhanced water evaporation from the oceans into the atmosphere because of increasing temperatures of the ocean surface due to greenhouse effect. The subject of this paper is a study of the influence of anthropogenic pollution of the atmosphere by the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, N2O and ozone-depleting chlorine and bromine compounds on the expected long-term changes of the ozone layer with taking into account an increase of water vapour content in the atmosphere due to greenhouse effect. The study based on 2-D zonally averaged interactive dynamical radiative-photochemical model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The model allows to self-consistently calculating diabatic circulation, temperature, gaseous composition of the troposphere and stratosphere at latitudes from the South to North Poles, as well as distribution of sulphate aerosol particles and polar stratospheric clouds of two types. It was supposed in the model that an increase of the ocean surface temperature caused by greenhouse effect is similar to calculated increase of atmospheric surface temperature. Evaporation rate from the ocean surface was computed in dependence of latitude. The model time-dependent runs were made for the period from 1975 to 2100 using two IPCC scenarios depicting maximum and average expected increases of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The model calculations show that anthropogenic increasing of water vapour abundance in the atmosphere due to heating of the ocean surface caused by greenhouse effect gives a sensible contribution to the expected ozone

  1. The use of kite observations to study air-sea interaction-controlled atmospheric surface layer profiles during the red experiment

    OpenAIRE

    DAVIDSON, KENNETH L.; Guest, Peter S.; Mabey, Deborah L.; Frederickson, Paul A.; Anderson, Kenneth D.

    2003-01-01

    The Roughness and Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment was designed to relate the effect of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) features as well as ocean surface roughness to near-surface high frequency electromagnetic propagation. For this, ABL and ocean surface data, as well as propagation data, were collected at mid-path locations in August and September 2001 off the windward coast of Oahu, Hawaii. The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and SPAWAR Systems Center, San Diego (SSC-SD) performed collab...

  2. Modification of surface layers of copper under the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepov, M. A.; Akhmadeev, Yu. Kh.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Kolubaeva, Yu. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Kostyrya, I. D.

    2011-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the action of the volumetric discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam on the surface of copper specimens are presented. The volumetric (diffuse) discharge in nitrogen and CO2 at atmospheric pressure was initiated by applying high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration to a tubular foil cathode. It has been found that the treatment of a copper surface by this type of discharge increases the hardness of the surface layer due to oxidation.

  3. Ångström coefficient as an indicator of the atmospheric aerosol type for a well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer : Part 1: Model development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuśmierczyk-Michulec, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    The physical and optical properties of an atmospheric aerosol mixture depend on a number of factors. The relative humidity influences the size of hydroscopic particles and the effective radius of an aerosol mixture. In consequence, values of the aerosol extinction, the aerosol optical thickness and

  4. Study of the wind velocity-layered structure in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere by using infrasound probing of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunchuzov, I.; Kulichkov, S.; Perepelkin, V.; Popov, O.; Firstov, P.; Assink, J. D.; Marchetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    The wind velocity structure in the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere (MLT) is studied with the recently developed method of infrasound probing of the atmosphere. The method is based on the effect of infrasound scattering from highly anisotropic wind velocity and temperature inhomogeneities in the middle and upper atmosphere. The scattered infrasound field propagates in the acoustic shadow zones, where it is detected by microbarometers. The vertical profiles of the wind velocity fluctuations in the upper stratosphere (30-52 km) and MLT (90-140 km) are retrieved from the waveforms and travel times of the infrasound signals generated by explosive sources such as volcanoes and surface explosions. The fine-scale wind-layered structure in these layers was poorly observed until present time by other remote sensing methods, including radars and satellites. It is found that the MLT atmospheric layer (90-102 km) can contain extremely high vertical gradients of the wind velocity, up to 10 m/s per 100 m. The effect of a fine-scale wind velocity structure on the waveforms of infrasound signals is studied. The vertical wave number spectra of the retrieved wind velocity fluctuations are obtained for the upper stratosphere. Despite the difference in the locations of the explosive sources all the obtained spectra show the existence of high vertical wave number spectral tail with a -3 power law decay. The obtained spectral characteristics of the wind fluctuations are necessary for improvement of gravity wave drag parameterizations for numerical weather forecast.

  5. A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Shamsoddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a future sustainable energy vision, in which diversified conversion of renewable energies is essential, vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs exhibit some potential as a reliable means of wind energy extraction alongside conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs. Nevertheless, there is currently a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs as compared to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to, for the first time, study the wake of a single VAWT placed in the atmospheric boundary layer using large-eddy simulation (LES. To do this, we use a previously-validated LES framework in which an actuator line model (ALM is incorporated. First, for a typical three- and straight-bladed 1-MW VAWT design, the variation of the power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed by performing 117 simulations using LES-ALM. The optimum combination of solidity (defined as N c / R , where N is the number of blades, c is the chord length and R is the rotor radius and tip-speed ratio is found to be 0.18 and 4.5, respectively. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulence wake flow statistics. It is found that for this case, the maximum velocity deficit at the equator height of the turbine occurs 2.7 rotor diameters downstream of the center of the turbine, and only after that point, the wake starts to recover. Moreover, it is observed that the maximum turbulence intensity (TI at the equator height of the turbine occurs at a distance of about 3.8 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine. As we move towards the upper and lower edges of the turbine, the maximum TI (at a certain height increases, and its location moves relatively closer to the turbine. Furthermore, whereas both TI and turbulent momentum flux fields show clear vertical asymmetries (with larger magnitudes at the

  6. Persistent unstable atmospheric boundary layer enhances sensible and latent heat loss in a tropical great lake: Lake Tanganyika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Piet; Antenucci, Jason P.

    2010-06-01

    Energy fluxes across the surface of lakes regulate heat storage and affect the water balance. Sensible and latent heat fluxes are affected by atmospheric stability, especially for large lakes. We examined the effect of atmospheric stability on the heat fluxes on seasonal time scales at Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, by estimating hourly sensible and latent heat fluxes and net radiation using thermistor chains and meteorological stations. The atmosphere was almost always unstable, in contrast to the atmosphere above North American Great Lakes which is unstable in winter and stable in summer. Persistent atmospheric instability resulted in a 13% and 18% increase in the annual mean heat loss by latent and sensible heat fluxes, respectively, relative to conditions of neutral stability. The persistent unstable atmosphere is caused by a higher water surface temperature compared with air temperature, which we argue is the case in general in (sub)tropical lakes. Low humidity further enhanced the frequency of unstable conditions and enhanced the exchange of heat and vapor from the lake to the atmosphere. The estimated heat fluxes were sensitive to the temporal scale of data inputs and to the local values of parameters such as air density. To our knowledge this is the first paper that demonstrates and quantifies the effect of atmospheric stability on latent and sensible heat fluxes from a lake on an annual basis, using data collected from the lake surface.

  7. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a semi arid region during the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Praveena Krishnan; P K Kunhikrishnan; S Muraleedharan Nair; Sudha Ravindran; Radhika Ramachandran; D B Subrahamanyam; M Venkata Ramana

    2004-09-01

    This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters during the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at Ahmedabad (23° 21′N, 72° 36′E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event provided by nature is utilised to document the surface layer effects during the eclipse period using measurements of high frequency fluctuations of temperature, tri-axial wind components as well as mean parameters such as temperature, humidity, wind speed and subsoil temperature. Analysis showed that during the eclipse period, the turbulence parameters were affected leading to the suppression of the turbulence process, the main dynamic process in the atmospheric boundary layer, while the mean parameters showed variations within the natural variability of the observational period. The spectra of the wind components and temperature indicated decrease in spectral power by one order in magnitude during the eclipse period. The rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy is found to decrease by more than one order during the eclipse period. The stability parameter showed a change from unstable to stable condition during the period of eclipse and back to unstable condition by the end of eclipse.

  8. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  9. Deuterium retention in the carbon co-deposition layers deposited by magnetron sputtering in D2/He atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon was deposited on Si and W substrates using a D2/He plasma in a radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The deposited layers were examined with ion beam analysis (IBA), Raman spectra analysis (RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The growth rate of the layers deposited at 2.5 Pa total pressure and 300 K decreased with increasing He fraction in the D2/He gas mixture. The deuterium concentration in the layers deposited on the Si substrate increased from 14% to 28% when the flow rate of the He gas relative to the D2 gas was varied from 0.125 to 0.5, but the deuterium concentration in the layers on a W substrate decreased from 24% to 14%. Deuterium or helium retention and the layer thickness all significantly decreased when the substrate temperature was increased from 423 K to 773 K. Raman analysis showed that the deposited layers were amorphous deuterated-carbon layers (named a-C: D layer) and the extent of bond disorder increased dramatically with the increasing helium content in the film. Blisters and bubbles occurred in the films for high helium content in the films, and surface cracking and exfoliation were also observed

  10. Ångström coefficient as an indicator of the atmospheric aerosol type for a well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer: Part 1: Model development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kuśmierczyk-Michulec

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The physical and optical properties of an atmospheric aerosol mixture depend on a number of factors. The relative humidity influences the size of hydroscopic particles and the effective radius of an aerosol mixture. In consequence, values of the aerosol extinction, the aerosol optical thickness and the Ångström coefficient are modified. A similar effect is observed when the aerosol composition changes. A higher content of small aerosol particles causes the effective radius of an aerosol mixture to decrease and the Ångström coefficient to increase. Both effects are analysed in this paper. The parameters of the size distribution and the type of components used to represent natural atmospheric aerosol mixtures are based on experimental data. The main components are sea-salts (SSA, anthropogenic salts (WS, e.g. NH4HSO4, NH4NO3, (NH42 SO4, organic carbon (OC and black carbon (BC. The aerosol optical thickness is modelled using the external mixing approach. The influence of relative humidity on the optical and physical properties of the following aerosol mixtures is investigated: (SSA & WS, (SSA & OC, (SSA & BC, (SSA, WS & OC and (WS, OC & BC. It is demonstrated that the Ängström coefficient can be used as a rough indicator of the aerosol type.

  11. Design, testing and demonstration of a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) and payload for measuring wind speed and particulate matter in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Kevin Donald Alexander

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the layer of air directly influenced by the Earth's surface and is the layer of the atmosphere most important to humans as this is the air we live in. Methods for measuring the properties of the ABL include three general approaches: satellite based, ground based and airborne. A major research challenge is that many contemporary methods provide a restricted spatial resolution or coverage of variations of ABL properties such as how wind speed varies across a landscape with complex topography. To enhance our capacity to measure the properties of the ABL, this thesis presents a new technique that involves a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) equipped with a customized payload for measuring wind speed and particulate matter. The research presented herein outlines two key phases in establishing the proof of concept of the payload and its integration on the sUAS: (1) design and testing and (2) field demonstration. The first project focuses on measuring wind speed, which has been measured with fixed wing sUASs in previous research. but not with a helicopter sUAS. The second project focuses on the measurement of particulate matter, which is a major air pollutant typically measured with ground-based sensors. Results from both proof of concept projects suggest that ABL research could benefit from the proposed techniques. .

  12. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3–0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality. - Highlights: • Role of atmospheric boundary layer depth on particle concentration

  13. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xhu@ou.edu [Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, and School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072 (United States); Ma, ZhiQiang, E-mail: zqma@ium.cn [Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100089 (China); Lin, Weili [Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Center for Atmospheric Watch and Services, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081 (China); Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin [Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Chemistry, Center for Atmospheric Watch and Services, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, 100081 (China); Fuentes, Jose D. [Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xue, Ming [Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, and School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (∼ 1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O{sub 3} pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. - Highlights: • Low mixed layer exacerbates air pollution over the North China Plain (NCP) • Warm advection from the Loess

  14. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (∼ 1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O3 pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. - Highlights: • Low mixed layer exacerbates air pollution over the North China Plain (NCP) • Warm advection from the Loess Plateau

  15. Detecting spectrally localized components of lunar tide-frequency in time-series of the electric field vertical component of the earth atmosphere boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Isakevich, V V; Isakevich, D V

    2016-01-01

    Using the signal eigenvectors and components analyser (Grunskaya L.V., Isakevich V.V., Isakevich D.V. the RF Utility Model Patent 116242 of 30.09.2011) made it possible to detect non-coherent complex-period components localized at lunar tide frequencies in the time-series of the electric field vertical component of the Earth atmosphere boundary layer. The detected components are unobservable by means of spectral analysis quadrature scheme. The probability of the detected effects being pseudo-estimates is not more than 0.00025

  16. Lifetimes of organic photovoltaics: photochemistry, atmosphere effects and barrier layers in ITO-MEHPPV:PCBM-aluminium devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Cruys-Bagger, N.;

    2005-01-01

    Large area polymer photovoltaic cells based on poly[(2-methoxy-5-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and [6,6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were prepared. The lifetimes of the photovoltaic cells were studied in terms of the atmosphere, handling, electrode treatment...

  17. Wave energy in white dwarf atmospheres. I - Magnetohydrodynamic energy spectra for homogeneous DB and layered DA stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiative damping of acoustic and MHD waves that propagate through white dwarf photospheric layers is studied, and other damping processes that may be important for the propagation of the MHD waves are calculated. The amount of energy remaining after the damping processes have occurred in different types of waves is estimated. The results show that lower acoustic fluxes should be expected in layered DA and homogeneous DB white dwarfs than had previously been estimated. Acoustic emission manifests itself in an enhancement of the quadrupole term, but this term may become comparable to or even lower than the dipole term for cool white dwarfs. Energy carried by the acoustic waves is significantly dissipated in deep photospheric layers, mainly because of radiative damping. Acoustically heated corona cannot exist around DA and DB white dwarfs in a range T(eff) = 10,000-30,000 K and for log g = 7 and 8. However, relatively hot and massive white dwarfs could be exceptions.

  18. Estimating the surface layer refractive index structure constant over snow and sea ice using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory with a mesoscale atmospheric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun; Wu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Honghua; Tian, Qiguo; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong; Li, Xuebin

    2016-09-01

    Since systematic direct measurements of refractive index structure constant ( Cn2) for many climates and seasons are not available, an indirect approach is developed in which Cn2 is estimated from the mesoscale atmospheric model outputs. In previous work, we have presented an approach that a state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model called Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory which can be used to estimate surface layer Cn2 over the ocean. Here this paper is focused on surface layer Cn2 over snow and sea ice, which is the extending of estimating surface layer Cn2 utilizing WRF model for ground-based optical application requirements. This powerful approach is validated against the corresponding 9-day Cn2 data from a field campaign of the 30th Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). We employ several statistical operators to assess how this approach performs. Besides, we present an independent analysis of this approach performance using the contingency tables. Such a method permits us to provide supplementary key information with respect to statistical operators. These methods make our analysis more robust and permit us to confirm the excellent performances of this approach. The reasonably good agreement in trend and magnitude is found between estimated values and measurements overall, and the estimated Cn2 values are even better than the ones obtained by this approach over the ocean surface layer. The encouraging performance of this approach has a concrete practical implementation of ground-based optical applications over snow and sea ice. PMID:27607648

  19. Thermodynamic structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean during pre-INDOEX and INDOEX-FFP campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Ramana

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL height for the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX study period are examined using the data collected through Cross-chained LORAN (Long-Range Aid to Navigation Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS launchings during the Northern Hemispheric winter monsoon period. This paper reports the results of the analyses of the data collected during the pre-INDOEX (1997 and the INDOEX-First Field Phase (FFP; 1998 in the latitude range 14°N to 20°S over the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean. Mixed layer heights are derived from thermodynamic profiles and they indicated the variability of heights ranging from 400m to 1100m during daytime depending upon the location. Mixed layer heights over the Indian Ocean are slightly higher during the INDOEX-FFP than the pre-INDOEX due to anomalous conditions prevailing during the INDOEX-FFP. The trade wind inversion height varied from 2.3km to 4.5km during the pre-INDOEX and from 0.4km to 2.5km during the INDOEX-FFP. Elevated plumes of polluted air (lofted aerosol plumes above the marine boundary layer are observed from thermodynamic profiles of the lower troposphere during the INDOEX-FFP. These elevated plumes are examined using 5-day back trajectory analysis and show that one group of air mass travelled a long way from Saudi Arabia and Iran/Iraq through India before reaching the location of measurement, while the other air mass originates from India and the Bay of Bengal.

  20. Results of Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Atmospheric Turbulence, Internal Gravity Waves and Sporadic-E Layers by Resonant Scattering of Radio Waves on Artificial Periodic Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) formed by the powerful standing radio waves in the ionospheric plasma give the good chance for the lower ionosphere comprehensive studies. In this paper we present some applications of the API technique for experimental studies of sporadic E-layers (E _{s}), internal gravity waves and turbulent events in the lower ionosphere. API are formed in the field of the standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one from the ionosphere (in more details about the API technique one can see in the book Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength Lambda or one-half the powerful wavelength lambda/2. API diagnostics are carried out at the API relaxation or decay stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. Based on the measurement of an amplitude and a phase of the API scattered signal their relaxation time and regular vertical plasma velocity are measured. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the non-uniformly heated plasma. The relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The diffusion time is tau=(K (2) D _{a}) (-1) where K=2pi/Lambda and D _{a} is the ambipolar diffusion rate. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the API relaxation time in comparison the diffusion time. Determination of the turbulent velocity is based on this fact. The vertical plasma velocity is determined by measuring the phase of the scattered signal. Atmospheric waves having the periods from 5-10 minutes to 5-6 hours give the contribution to temporal variations of the velocity. Parameters and effects of atmospheric waves and the turbulence on the API relaxation process are presented. Determination of the masses of the

  1. Observation studies on the influence of atmospheric boundary layer characteristics associate with air quality in dry season over the Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shaojia; Wu, Meng; Li, Haowen; Liao, Zhiheng; Fan, Qi; Zhu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the very important factors influence on air quality in dry season over the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. Based on the sounding data at six stations (Xinken,Dongguan, Sanshui, Nanhai, Shunde, and Heshan) which obtained from three times ABL experiments carried in dry season over PRD, the influence of wind and temperature vertical structure to the air quality over PRD has been studied with wind and temperature profiles, inversion layer, recirculation factor (RF), atmospheric boundary layer height (ABLH) and ventilation index (VI). It was found that the vertical wind of PRD could be divided in typical three layers according two wind shears appeared in 800 m and 1300 m. The thickness of calm or lower wind speed layer in pollution days was 500-1000m thicker than that of clean days, and its last time also much longer than that of clean days. The frequency of surface inversion in pollution days was about 35%,the mean thickness was about 100 m. With the influence of sea breeze, the frequency and thickness of surface inversion layer at Xinken station was a little lower than that in inland. Influenced by sea-land breezes and urban heat-island circulation, the RF of pollution days in coastal and urban area was quite smaller than that of clean days. During sea-land breezes days, the pollutants would be transported back to inland in nighttime with the influence of sea breeze, and resulted in 72.7% sea-land breezes was pollution days. The evolution of ABL was very typical in PRD during dry season. In pollution days, daily ABLH in PRD was lower than 500 m, daily VI was about 500-1500 m2/s. In clean days, daily VI was much larger than 2500 m2/s. An improved conceptual model of ABL influence on poor air quality and the parameters of the ABL characteristics associate with poor air quality in dry season over PRD had been summarized.

  2. Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System modeled surface layer refractivity in the Roughness and Evaporation Duct experiment 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, D. Adam

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited A study of the performance of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) was performed based on collected METOC properties affecting radar propagation during the Roughness and Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment conducted off the windward coast of Oahu, HI. The measured refractivity influencing parameters (SST, air temperature, humidity, and wind speed) were compared to COAMPS predicted values. Using the NPS bulk e...

  3. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF NICKEL- CHROME - BOR - SILICON LAYERS PRODUCED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC PLASMA SPRAY PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of plasma spray parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of NiCrBSi coatings deposited by the atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma spray coatings are determined by the interaction of plasma ions with powder particles when the rate and temperature of plasma particles are transferred to powder particles. The interaction effect directly depends on the time the powder particles spend in p...

  4. Isolating Effects of Water Table Dynamics, Terrain, and Soil Moisture Heterogeneity on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Coupled Models

    OpenAIRE

    Rihani, Jehan

    2010-01-01

    Previous observational and modeling studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of atmospheric processes to land surface and subsurface conditions. The extent of the connection between these processes, however, is not yet fully understood. A sufficient understanding is needed of the circumstances under which these coupled processes might play a more significant role and when they might be simplified into the decoupled systems so frequently modeled in practice. This work focuses on the effects o...

  5. The constitution of the atmospheric layers and the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of hot hydrogen-rich white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennes, Stephane

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the atmospheric properties of hot, H-rich, DA white dwarfs that is based on optical, UV, and X-ray observations aimed at predicting detailed spectral properties of these stars in the range 80-800 A. The divergences between observations from a sample of 15 hot DA white dwarfs emitting in the EUV/soft X-ray range and pure H synthetic spectra calculated from a grid of model atmospheres characterized by Teff and g are examined. Seven out of 15 DA stars are found to consistently exhibit pure hydrogen atmospheres, the remaining seven stars showing inconsistency between FUV and EUV/soft X-ray data that can be explained by the presence of trace EUV/soft X-ray absorbers. Synthetic data are computed assuming two other possible chemical structures: photospheric traces of radiatively levitated heavy elements and a stratified hydrogen/helium distribution. Predictions about forthcoming medium-resolution observations of the EUV spectrum of selected hot H-rich white dwarfs are made.

  6. Effects of Initial Drivers and Land Use on WRF Modeling for Near-Surface Fields and Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the simulation performance of mesoscale models in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, two reanalysis initial datasets (NCEP FNL and ERA-Interim and two MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land-use datasets (from 2001 and 2010 are used in WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting modeling. The model can reproduce the variations of 2 m temperature (T2 and 2 m relative humidity (RH2, but T2 is overestimated and RH2 is underestimated in the control experiment. After using the new initial drive and land use data, the simulation precision in T2 is improved by the correction of overestimated net energy flux at surface and the RH2 is improved due to the lower T2 and larger soil moisture. Due to systematic bias in WRF modeling for wind speed, we design another experiment that includes the Jimenez subgrid-scale orography scheme, which reduces the frequency of low wind speed and increases the frequency of high wind speed and that is more consistent with the observation. Meanwhile, the new drive and land-use data lead to lower boundary layer height and influence the potential temperature and wind speed in both the lower atmosphere and the upper layer, while the impact on water vapor mixing ratio is primarily concentrated in the lower atmosphere.

  7. Ground-Based Cloud and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations for the Project: High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsikko, A.; Ebell, K.; Ulrich, U.; Schween, J. H.; Bohn, B.; Görsdorf, U.; Leinweber, R.; Päschke, E.; Baars, H.; Seifert, P.; Klein Baltink, H.

    2014-12-01

    The German research initiative ''High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction, HD(CP)2'' aims for an improved representation of clouds and precipitation in climate models. Model development and its evaluation require comprehensive observational datasets. A specific work package was established to create uniform and documented observational datasets for the HD(CP)2 data base. Datasets included ground-based remote-sensing (Doppler lidars, ceilometers, microwave radiometers, and cloud radars) and in-situ (meteorological and radiation sensors) measurements. Four supersites (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE), Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory - Richard Assmann Observatory (RAO), and Leipzig Aerosol and Cloud Remote Observations System (LACROS) in Germany, and Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (Cesar) in the Netherlands) are finalizing the operational procedures to provide quality controlled (and calibrated if possible) remote-sensing and in-situ observations, retrievals on atmospheric boundary layer state (e.g. winds, mixing layer height, humidity and temperature), and cloud macro and micro physical properties with uncertainty estimations or at least quality flags. During the project new processing and retrieval methods were developed if no commonly agreed or satisfying methods were available. Especially, large progress was made concerning uncertainty estimation and automated quality control. Additionally, the data from JOYCE are used in a radiative closure studies under cloudy conditions to evaluate retrievals of cloud properties. The current status of work progress will be presented.

  8. A concurrent precursor inflow method for LES of atmospheric boundary layer flows with variable inflow direction for coupling with meso-scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munters, Wim; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2014-11-01

    In order to incorporate multiple scales of meteorological phenomena in atmospheric simulations, subsequent nesting of meso-scale models is often used. However, the spatial and temporal resolution in such models is too coarse to resolve the three-dimensional turbulent eddies that are characteristic for atmospheric boundary layer flows. This motivates the development of tools to couple meso-scale models to Large-Eddy Simulations (LES), in which turbulent fluctuations are explicitly resolved. A major challenge in this area is the spin-up region near the inlet of the LES in which the flow has to evolve from a RANS-like inflow, originating from the meso-scale model, to a fully turbulent velocity field. We propose a generalized concurrent precursor inflow method capable of imposing boundary conditions for time-varying inflow directions. The method is based on a periodic fully-developed precursor boundary-layer simulation that is dynamically rotated with the wind direction that drives the main LES. In this way realistic turbulent inflow conditions are applied while still retaining flexibility to dynamically adapt to meso-scale variations in wind directions. Applications to wind simulations with varying inflow directions, and comparisons to conventional coupling methods are shown. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No: 306471). CM is supported by NSF (Grant No. 1243482).

  9. Carrier transport mechanism on ZnO nanorods/p-Si heterojunction diodes with various atmospheres annealing hydrothermal seed-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annealing in various atmospheres (vacuum, N2, and O2) was employed for a hydrothermal seed-layer. The influence on ZnO nanorods (NRs) and carrier transport of ZnO NRs/p-Si heterojunction diodes (HJDs) was investigated. In this work, a hydrothermal method was employed to prepare a seed-layer on a Si substrate, and then annealing at 450 °C in various atmospheres was carried out to improve the subsequent growth of ZnO NRs according to the same method. Observations indicated that ZnO NRs with an O2-annealed seed-layer have a higher nucleation density and absorb fewer OH groups or O2− ions, and hence they have fewer defect-level centres. This leads to a very large rectification ratio of 1.9 × 105 in the ZnO NRs/p-Si HJDs because oxygen atoms compensate for the oxygen vacancy-related defects. More band-gap states are present at the ZnO/p-Si interface for the vacuum annealing sample, and this enables recombination-tunnelling transport with a rather large ideality factor of 7 at forward voltage less than 0.7 V. In contrast, diffusion–recombination transport was obtained in the N2- and O2-annealed samples with ideality factors as low as 2.4 and 2.2, respectively. - Highlights: ► Annealing in various atmospheres (vacuum, N2, and O2) for hydrothermal seed-layers. ► Carrier transport in ZnO nanorods (NRs)/p-Si heterojunction diodes (HJDs). ► Vacuum-annealed ZnO NRs/p-Si HJDs demonstrate recombination-tunnelling transport. ► N2- and O2-annealed ZnO NRs/p-Si HJDs reveal diffusion–recombination transport. ► Large rectification ratio of 1.9 × 105 in the O2-annealed ZnO NRs/p-Si HJDs.

  10. Improved Heterojunction Quality in Cu2O-based Solar Cells Through the Optimization of Atmospheric Pressure Spatial Atomic Layer Deposited Zn1-xMgxO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievskaya, Yulia; Hoye, Robert L Z; Sadhanala, Aditya; Musselman, Kevin P; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) was used to deposit n-type ZnO and Zn1-xMgxO thin films onto p-type thermally oxidized Cu2O substrates outside vacuum at low temperature. The performance of photovoltaic devices featuring atmospherically fabricated ZnO/Cu2O heterojunction was dependent on the conditions of AP-SALD film deposition, namely, the substrate temperature and deposition time, as well as on the Cu2O substrate exposure to oxidizing agents prior to and during the ZnO deposition. Superficial Cu2O to CuO oxidation was identified as a limiting factor to heterojunction quality due to recombination at the ZnO/Cu2O interface. Optimization of AP-SALD conditions as well as keeping Cu2O away from air and moisture in order to minimize Cu2O surface oxidation led to improved device performance. A three-fold increase in the open-circuit voltage (up to 0.65 V) and a two-fold increase in the short-circuit current density produced solar cells with a record 2.2% power conversion efficiency (PCE). This PCE is the highest reported for a Zn1-xMgxO/Cu2O heterojunction formed outside vacuum, which highlights atmospheric pressure spatial ALD as a promising technique for inexpensive and scalable fabrication of Cu2O-based photovoltaics. PMID:27500923

  11. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  12. Micromechanical and microstructural investigation of steel corrosion layers of variable age developed under impressed current method, atmospheric or saline conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Dehoux, A; Bouchelaghem, Fatiha; BERTHAUD, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have gathered the conclusions of an experimental campaign dedicated to the microstructural characterization and the determination of the local elastic properties of various natural and artificial corrosion product layers. The results of micro-indentation testing and Raman spectroscopy coupled with a semi-quantitative analysis have been presented for the whole set of investigated materials, from early-age (2 weeks) corrosion products to 660 years-old massive corroded samples....

  13. Quantifying Aerial Concentrations of Maize Pollen in the Atmospheric Surface Layer Using Remote-Piloted Airplanes and Lagrangian Stochastic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylor, Donald E.; Boehm, Matthew T.; Shields, Elson J.

    2006-07-01

    The extensive adoption of genetically modified crops has led to a need to understand better the dispersal of pollen in the atmosphere because of the potential for unwanted movement of genetic traits via pollen flow in the environment. The aerial dispersal of maize pollen was studied by comparing the results of a Lagrangian stochastic (LS) model with pollen concentration measurements made over cornfields using a combination of tower-based rotorod samplers and airborne radio-controlled remote-piloted vehicles (RPVs) outfitted with remotely operated pollen samplers. The comparison between model and measurements was conducted in two steps. In the first step, the LS model was used in combination with the rotorod samplers to estimate the pollen release rate Q for each sampling period. In the second step, a modeled value for the concentration Cmodel, corresponding to each RPV measured value Cmeasure, was calculated by simulating the RPV flight path through the LS model pollen plume corresponding to the atmospheric conditions, field geometry, wind direction, and source strength. The geometric mean and geometric standard deviation of the ratio Cmodel/Cmeasure over all of the sampling periods, except those determined to be upwind of the field, were 1.42 and 4.53, respectively, and the lognormal distribution corresponding to these values was found to fit closely the PDF of Cmodel/Cmeasure. Model output was sensitive to the turbulence parameters, with a factor-of-100 difference in the average value of Cmodel over the range of values encountered during the experiment. In comparison with this large potential variability, it is concluded that the average factor of 1.4 between Cmodel and Cmeasure found here indicates that the LS model is capable of accurately predicting, on average, concentrations over a range of atmospheric conditions.

  14. Synthesis of multi-layer graphene films on copper tape by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphene films were successfully synthesized by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method. Methane (CH4) gas and copper (Cu) tapes were used as a carbon source and a catalyst, respectively. The CVD temperature and time were in the range of 800–1000 °C and 10 s to 45 min, respectively. The role of the CVD temperature and time on the growth of graphene films was investigated in detail via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The results of SEM images and Raman spectra show that the quality of the graphene films was improved with increasing of CVD temperature due to the increase of catalytic activity. (paper)

  15. Modeling the feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer during a severe fog-haze event over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Tao, Minghui; Zhu, Lingyun

    2016-04-01

    The feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer over the North China Plain (NCP) is analyzed by conducting numerical experiments with and without the aerosol direct and indirect effects via a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model(WRF-Chem). The numerical experiments are performed for the period of 2-26 January 2013, during which a severe fog-haze event (10-15 January 2013) occurred, with the simulated maximum hourly surface PM2.5 concentration of ~600 μg m-3, minimum atmospheric visibility of ~0.3 km, and 10-100 hours of simulated hourly surface PM2.5 concentration above 300 μg m-3 over NCP. A comparison of model results with aerosol feedback against observations indicates that the model can reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature, relative humidity (RH), wind, surface PM2.5 concentration, atmospheric visibility, and aerosol optical depth reasonably well. Analysis of model results with and without aerosol feedback shows that during the fog-haze event aerosols lead to a significant negative radiative forcing of ~20 to ~140 W m-2 at the surface and a large positive radiative forcing of 20-120 W m-2 in the atmosphere and induce significant changes in meteorological variables with maximum changes during 09:00-18:00 local time (LT) over urban Beijing and Tianjin and south Hebei: the temperature decreases by 0.8-2.8 °C at the surface and increases by 0.1-0.5 °C at around 925 hPa, while RH increases by about 4-12% at the surface and decreases by 1-6% at around 925 hPa. As a result, the aerosol-induced equivalent potential temperature profile change shows that the atmosphere is much more stable and thus the surface wind speed decreases by up to 0.3 m s-1 (10 %) and the atmosphere boundary layer height decreases by 40-200 m (5-30 %) during the daytime of this severe fog-haze event. Owing to this more stable atmosphere during 09:00-18:00, 10-15 January, compared to the surface PM2

  16. Modeling the feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer during a severe fog-haze event over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Zhang, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, L.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.; Tao, M.; Zhu, L.

    2015-04-01

    The feedback between aerosol and meteorological variables in the atmospheric boundary layer over the North China Plain (NCP) is analyzed by conducting numerical experiments with and without the aerosol direct and indirect effects via a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem). The numerical experiments are performed for the period of 2-26 January 2013, during which a severe fog-haze event (10-15 January 2013) occurred, with the simulated maximum hourly surface PM2.5 concentration of ~600 ug m-3, minimum atmospheric visibility of ~0.3 km, and 10-100 hours of simulated hourly surface PM2.5 concentration above 300 ug m-3 over NCP. A comparison of model results with aerosol feedback against observations indicates that the model can reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature, relative humidity (RH), wind, surface PM2.5 concentration, atmospheric visibility, and aerosol optical depth reasonably well. Analysis of model results with and without aerosol feedback shows that during the fog-haze event aerosols lead to a significant negative radiative forcing of -20 to -140 W m-2 at the surface and a large positive radiative forcing of 20-120 W m-2 in the atmosphere and induce significant changes in meteorological variables with maximum changes during 09:00-18:00 local time (LT) over urban Beijing and Tianjin and south Hebei: the temperature decreases by 0.8-2.8 °C at the surface and increases by 0.1-0.5 °C at around 925 hPa, while RH increases by about 4-12% at the surface and decreases by 1-6% at around 925 hPa. As a result, the aerosol-induced equivalent potential temperature profile change shows that the atmosphere is much more stable and thus the surface wind speed decreases by up to 0.3 m s-1 (10%) and the atmosphere boundary layer height decreases by 40-200 m (5-30%) during the daytime of this severe fog-haze event. Owing to this more stable atmosphere during 09:00-18:00, 10-15~January, compared to the surface PM2

  17. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, J. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France); Reguer, S.; Vantelon, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dillmann, P. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); IRAMAT UMR 5060 CNRS, Gif sur Yvette (France); Neff, D. [SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire Archeomateriaux et Prevision de l' Alteration (LAPA), Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Guillot, I. [UMR 7182 CNRS and UPEC, Universite Paris-Est, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), Thiais (France)

    2010-05-15

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase's stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated. (orig.)

  18. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, J.; Réguer, S.; Vantelon, D.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Guillot, I.

    2010-05-01

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase’s stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated.

  19. Study of the effect of wind speed on evaporation from soil through integrated modeling of atmospheric boundary layer and shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarzani, Hossein; Smits, Kathleen; Tolene, Ryan; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2013-04-01

    The study of the interaction between the land and atmosphere is paramount to our understanding of many emerging problems to include climate change, the movement of green house gases such as possible leaking of sequestered CO2 and the accurate detection of buried objects such as landmines. Soil moisture distribution in the shallow subsurface becomes a critical factor in all these problems. The heat and mass flux in the form of soil evaporation across the land surface couples the atmospheric boundary layer to the shallow subsurface. The coupling between land and the atmosphere leads to highly dynamic interactions between the porous media properties, transport processes and boundary conditions, resulting in dynamic evaporative behavior. However, the coupling at the land-atmospheric interface is rarely considered in most current models and their validation for practical applications. This is due to the complexity of the problem in field scenarios and the scarcity of field or laboratory data capable of testing and refining coupled energy and mass transfer theories. In most efforts to compute evaporation from soil, only indirect coupling is provided to characterize the interaction between non-isothermal multiphase flows under realistic atmospheric conditions even though heat and mass flux are controlled by the coupled dynamics of the land and the atmospheric boundary layer. In earlier drying modeling concepts, imposing evaporation flux (kinetic of relative humidity) and temperature as surface boundary condition is often needed. With the goal of improving our understanding of the land/atmospheric coupling, we developed a model based on the coupling of Navier-Stokes free flow and Darcy flow in porous medium. The model consists of the coupled equations of mass conservation for the liquid phase (water) and gas phase (water vapor and air) in porous medium with gas phase (water vapor and air) in free flow domain under non-isothermal, non-equilibrium conditions. The boundary

  20. Detecting components spectrally localized at astrophysical process frequencies in time series of the electric field vertical component of the earth atmosphere boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Grunskaya, L V; Isakevich, D V; Sushkova, L T

    2016-01-01

    Signal eigenvectors and components analyser (RF Utility model patent 116242) was used to explore the time-series of the electric field vertical component Ez in the Earth atmosphere boundary layer. There have been detected non-coherent complex-periodic components localized at the frequencies of gravity-wave impact of binary stars and at the frequency of axion-photon interaction. These components cannot be detected by means of quadrature scheme of spectral analysis and have RMS values from 0.05 V/m to 0.5 V/m at binary stars gravity-wave impact frequencies and from 0.7 V/m to 2.7 V/m at axion-photon interaction frequency. It was also demonstrated that the axion-photon interaction frequency modulates the amplitude

  1. Estimates of regional surface carbon dioxide exchange and carbon and oxygen isotope discrimination during photosynthesis from concentration profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrating properties of the atmospheric boundary layer allow the influence of surface exchange processes on the atmosphere to be quantified and estimates of large-scale fluxes of trace gases and plant isotopic discrimination to be made. Five flights were undertaken over two days in and above the convective boundary layer (CBL) in a vegetated region in central Siberia. Vertical profiles of CO2 and H2O concentrations, temperature and pressure were obtained during each flight. Air flask samples were taken at various heights for carbon and oxygen isotopic analysis of CO2. Two CBL budget methods were compared to estimate regional surface fluxes of CO2 and plant isotopic discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O. Flux estimates were compared to ground-based eddy covariance measurements. The fluxes obtained for CO2 using the first method agreed to within 10% of fluxes measured in the forest at the study site by eddy covariance. Those obtained from the second method agreed to within 35% when a correction was applied for air loss out of the integrating column and for subsidence. The values for 13C discrimination were within the range expected from knowledge of C3 plant discriminations during photosynthesis, while the inferred 18O discrimination varied considerably over the two-day period. This variation may in part be explained by the enrichment of chloroplast water during the day due to evaporation from an initial signature in the morning close to source water. Additional potential complications arising from the heterogeneous nature of the landscape are discussed

  2. Experimental evaluation of a model for the influence of coherent wind lidars on their remote measurements of atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Kapp, Stefan; Kristensen, Leif; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2011-11-01

    Affordable coherent wind lidars based on modern telecom components have recently emerged on the wind energy market spurred by high demand of the industry for compact and accurate remote sensing wind and turbulence profilers. Today, hundreds of ground based wind lidars that achieve the range resolution by either focusing a continuous-wave laser beam or by gating a pulsed laser beam are used for measuring mean wind and turbulence profiles in the lower atmospheric boundary-layer. However, detailed understanding of the influence of the spatial filtering of the lidars on their precise assessment of turbulence is still a challenge. For assessment of the fine structure turbulence, and in particular for the easy and fast assessment of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy from measurements in the Kolmogorov inertial subrange, we havemodeled the atmospheric velocity structure functions and spectra obtainable from fixed-orientation along-beam wind measurements by these lidars. The dissipation rate retrieval model is experimentally evaluated with data obtained with a pulsed lidar pointing horizontally into horizontally homogeneous turbulence encountered at the top level of a 125 m tall meteorological tower, equipped with an in-situ turbulence measurement device (a three-dimensional sonic anemometer) for intercomparison. Our experimental study has revealed that the easily manageable analytical model accounts well for the observed fine structure turbulent spectra and their dependence on the pointing direction of the lidar beam relative to the mean wind direction. The results demonstrate that turbulence dissipation rates, and hence boundary-layer turbulence, can easily be obtained from wind lidar-based fine structure measurements.

  3. Characteristics and mechanisms of the sudden warming events in the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer: A case study using WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Gan, Ruhui

    2015-10-01

    Although sudden nocturnal warming events near the earth's surface in Australia and the United States have been examined in previous studies, similar events observed occasionally over the Loess Plateau of Northwest China have not yet been investigated. The factors that lead to these warming events in such areas with their unique topography and climate remain not clear. To understand the formation mechanisms and associated thermal and dynamical features, a nocturnal warming event recorded in Gansu Province (northwest of the Loess Plateau) in June 2007 was investigated by using observations and model simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Observations showed that this near-surface warming event lasted for 4 h and the temperature increased by 2.5°C. During this event, a decrease in humidity occurred simultaneously with the increase of temperature. The model simulation showed that the nocturnal warming was caused mainly by the transport of warmer and drier air aloft downward to the surface through enhanced vertical mixing. Wind shear played an important role in inducing the elevated vertical mixing, and it was enhanced by the continuous development of the atmospheric baroclinicity, which converted more potential energy to kinetic energy.

  4. Surface and optical properties of indium tin oxide layer deposition by RF magnetron sputtering in argon atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudar, H. Hakan; Korkmaz, Şadan; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on the characterization and properties of transparent and conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited in argon atmosphere. ITO thin films were coated onto glass substrates by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique at 75 and 100 W RF powers. Structural characteristics of producing films were investigated through X-ray diffraction analysis. UV-Vis spectrophotometer and interferometer were used to determine transmittance, absorbance and reflectance values of samples. The surface morphology of the films was characterized by atomic force microscope. The calculated band gaps were 3.8 and 4.1 eV for the films at 75 and 100 W, respectively. The effect of RF power on crystallinity of prepared films was explored using mentioned analysis methods. The high RF power caused higher poly crystallinity in the produced samples. The thickness and refractive index values for all samples increased respect to an increment of RF power and were calculated as 20, 50 nm and 1.71, 1.86 for samples at 75 and 100 W, respectively. Finally, the estimated grain sizes for all prepared films decreased with increasing of 2 θ degrees, and the number of crystallite per unit volume was calculated. It was found that nearly all properties including sheet resistance and resistivity depend on the RF power.

  5. Bromide and other ions in the snow, firn air, and atmospheric boundary layer at Summit during GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Dibb

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas phase soluble bromide in the boundary layer and in firn air, and Br in aerosol and snow, were made at Summit, Greenland (72.5° N, 38.4° W, 3200 m a.s.l. as part of a larger investigation into the influence of Br chemistry on HOx cycling. The soluble bromide measurements confirm that photochemical activation of Br in the snow causes release of active Br to the overlying air despite trace concentrations of Br in the snow (means 15 and 8 nmol Br kg−1 of snow in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Mixing ratios of soluble bromide above the snow were also found to be very small (mean <1 ppt both years, with maxima of 3 and 4 ppt in 2007 and 2008, respectively, but these levels clearly oxidize and deposit long-lived gaseous elemental mercury and may perturb HOx partitioning. Concentrations of Br in surface snow tended to increase/decrease in parallel with the specific activities of the aerosol-associated radionuclides 7Be and 210Pb. Earlier work has shown that ventilation of the boundary layer causes simultaneous increases in 7Be and 210Pb at Summit, suggesting there is a pool of Br in the free troposphere above Summit in summer time. Speciation and the source of this free tropospheric Br are not well constrained, but we suggest it may be linked to extensive regions of active Br chemistry in the Arctic basin which are known to cause ozone and mercury depletion events shortly after polar sunrise. If this hypothesis is correct, it implies persistence of the free troposphere Br for several months after peak Br activation in March/April. Alternatively, there may be a ubiquitous pool of Br in the free troposphere, sustained by currently unknown sources and processes.

  6. Bromide and other ions in the snow, firn air, and atmospheric boundary layer at Summit during GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Dibb

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of gas phase soluble bromide in the boundary layer and in firn air, and Br in aerosol and snow, were made at Summit, Greenland (72.5° N, 38.4° W, 3200 m a.s.l. as part of a larger investigation into the influence of Br chemistry on HOx cycling. The soluble bromide measurements confirm that photochemical activation of Br in the snow causes release of active Br to the overlying air despite trace concentrations of Br in the snow (means 15 and 8 nmol Br kg−1 of snow in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Mixing ratios of soluble bromide above the snow were also found to be very small (mean <1 ppt both years, with maxima of 3 and 4 ppt in 2007 and 2008, respectively, but these levels clearly oxidize and deposit long-lived gaseous elemental mercury and may perturb HOx partitioning. Concentrations of Br in surface snow tended to increase/decrease in parallel with the specific activities of the aerosol-associated radionuclides 7Be and 210Pb. Earlier work has shown that ventilation of the boundary layer causes simultaneous increases in 7Be and 210Pb at Summit, suggesting there is a pool of Br in the free troposphere above Summit in summer time. Speciation and the source of this free tropospheric Br are not well constrained, but we suggest it may be linked to extensive regions of active Br chemistry in the Arctic basin which are known to cause ozone and mercury depletion events shortly after polar sunrise. If this hypothesis is correct, it implies persistence of the free troposphere Br for several months after peak Br activation in March/April. Alternatively, there may be a~ubiquitous pool of Br in the free troposphere, sustained by currently unknown sources and processes.

  7. The distribution of atmospheric black carbon in the marine boundary layer over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas in July - October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Vladimir P.; Kopeikin, Vladimir M.; Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Novigatsky, Alexander N.; Pankratova, Natalia V.; Starodymova, Dina P.; Stohl, Andreas; Thompson, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles are highly efficient at absorbing visible light, which has a large potential impact on Arctic climate. However, measurement data on the distribution of BC in the atmosphere over the North Atlantic and the Russian Arctic Seas are scarce. We present measurement data on the distribution of atmospheric BC in the marine boundary layer of the North Atlantic and Baltic, North, Norwegian, Barents, White, Kara and Laptev Seas from research cruises during July 23 to October 6, 2015. During the 62nd and 63rd cruises of the RV "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh" air was filtered through Hahnemuhle fineart quarz-microfibre filters. The mass of BC on the filter was determined by measurement of the attenuation of a beam of light transmitted through the filter. Source areas were estimated by backwards trajectories of air masses calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT model (http://www.arl.noaa.gov/ready.html) and FLEXPART model (http://www.flexpart.eu). During some parts of the cruises, air masses arrived from background areas of high latitudes, and the measured BC concentrations were low. During other parts of the cruise, air masses arrived from industrially developed areas with strong BC sources, and this led to substantially enhanced measured BC concentrations. Model-supported analyses are currently performed to use the measurement data for constraining the emission strength in these areas.

  8. A case study of effects of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence, wind speed, and stability on wind farm induced temperature changes using observations from a field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Geng; Zhou, Liming; Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Roy, Somnath Baidya; Harris, Ronald A.; Cervarich, Matthew Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies using satellite observations show that operational wind farms in west-central Texas increase local nighttime land surface temperature (LST) by 0.31-0.70 °C, but no noticeable impact is detected during daytime, and that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the magnitude of this warming are likely determined by those in the magnitude of wind speed. This paper further explores these findings by using the data from a year-long field campaign and nearby radiosonde observations to investigate how thermodynamic profiles and surface-atmosphere exchange processes work in tandem with the presence of wind farms to affect the local climate. Combined with satellite data analyses, we find that wind farm impacts on LST are predominantly determined by the relative ratio of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) induced by the wind turbines compared to the background TKE. This ratio explains not only the day-night contrast of the wind farm impact and the warming magnitude of nighttime LST over the wind farms, but also most of the seasonal variations in the nighttime LST changes. These results indicate that the diurnal and seasonal variations in the turbine-induced turbulence relative to the background TKE play an essential role in determining those in the magnitude of LST changes over the wind farms. In addition, atmospheric stability determines the sign and strength of the net downward heat transport as well as the magnitude of the background TKE. The study highlights the need for better understanding of atmospheric boundary layer and wind farm interactions, and for better parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing in numerical weather prediction and climate models.

  9. Influence of small-scale North Atlantic sea surface temperature patterns on the marine boundary layer and free troposphere: a study using the atmospheric ARPEGE model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Marie; Terray, Laurent; Boé, Julien; Maisonnave, Eric; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution global atmospheric model is used to investigate the influence of the representation of small-scale North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) patterns on the atmosphere during boreal winter. Two ensembles of forced simulations are performed and compared. In the first ensemble (HRES), the full spatial resolution of the SST is maintained while small-scale features are smoothed out in the Gulf Stream region for the second ensemble (SMTH). The model shows a reasonable climatology in term of large-scale circulation and air-sea interaction coefficient when compared to reanalyses and satellite observations, respectively. The impact of small-scale SST patterns as depicted by differences between HRES and SMTH shows a strong meso-scale local mean response in terms of surface heat fluxes, convective precipitation, and to a lesser extent cloudiness. The main mechanism behind these statistical differences is that of a simple hydrostatic pressure adjustment related to increased SST and marine atmospheric boundary layer temperature gradient along the North Atlantic SST front. The model response to small-scale SST patterns also includes remote large-scale effects: upper tropospheric winds show a decrease downstream of the eddy-driven jet maxima over the central North Atlantic, while the subtropical jet exhibits a significant northward shift in particular over the eastern Mediterranean region. Significant changes are simulated in regard to the North Atlantic storm track, such as a southward shift of the storm density off the coast of North America towards the maximum SST gradient. A storm density decrease is also depicted over Greenland and the Nordic seas while a significant increase is seen over the northern part of the Mediterranean basin. Changes in Rossby wave breaking frequencies and weather regimes spatial patterns are shown to be associated to the jets and storm track changes.

  10. Influence of orographically induced transport process on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the distribution of trace gases; Einfluss orographisch induzierter Transportprozesse auf die Struktur der atmosphaerischen Grenzschicht und die Verteilung von Spurengasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossmann, M.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of terrain on the structure of the atmospheric boundary-layer and the distribution of trace gases during periods of high atmospheric pressure was studied by means of meteorological and air-chemical data collected in September 1992 during the TRACT experiment in the transition area between the upper Rhine valley and the northern Black Forest. The emphasis was on the investigation of the development of the convective boundary layer, the formation of thermally induced circulation systems, and the orographic exchange between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere. Thanks to the extensive measurements, phenomena not yet described in literature could be verified by case studies, and processes that had only been established qualitatively could be quantified. (orig.)

  11. Perturbations to the Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of the Diurnally-Varying Atmospheric Boundary Layer Due to an Extensive Wind Farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V.; Parlange, M. B.; Calaf, M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of extensive terrestrial wind farms on the spatio-temporal structure of the diurnally-evolving atmospheric boundary layer is explored. High-resolution large-eddy simulations of a realistic diurnal cycle with an embedded wind farm are performed. Simulations are forced by a constant geostrophic velocity with time-varying surface boundary conditions derived from a selected period of the CASES-99 field campaign. Through analysis of the bulk statistics of the flow as a function of height and time, it is shown that extensive wind farms shift the inertial oscillations and the associated nocturnal low-level jet vertically upwards by approximately 200 m; cause a three times stronger stratification between the surface and the rotor-disk region, and as a consequence, delay the formation and growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) by approximately 2 h. These perturbations are shown to have a direct impact on the potential power output of an extensive wind farm with the displacement of the low-level jet causing lower power output during the night as compared to the day. The low-power regime at night is shown to persist for almost 2 h beyond the morning transition due to the reduced growth of the CBL. It is shown that the wind farm induces a deeper entrainment region with greater entrainment fluxes. Finally, it is found that the diurnally-averaged effective roughness length for wind farms is much lower than the reference value computed theoretically for neutral conditions.

  12. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  13. Study of the effect of soil disturbance on vapor transport through integrated modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer and shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Wallen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil-water evaporation is one of the governing processes responsible for controlling water and energy exchanges between the land and atmosphere. Despite its wide relevance and application in many natural and manmade environments (e.g. soil tillage practices, wheel-track compaction, fire burn environments, textural layering and buried ordinances), there are very few studies of evaporation from disturbed soil profiles. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of soil disturbance and capillary coupling on water distribution and fluxes. We modified a theory previously developed by the authors that allows for coupling single-phase (gas), two-component (air and water vapor) transfer in the atmosphere and two-phase (gas, liquid), two-component (air and water vapor) flow in porous media at the REV scale under non-isothermal, non-equilibrium conditions to better account for the hydraulic and thermal interactions within the media. Modeling results were validated and compared using precision data generated in a two-dimensional soil tank consisting of a loosely packed soil surrounded by a tightly packed soil. The soil tank was outfitted with an array of sensors for the measurement of wind velocity, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and weight. Results demonstrated that, by using this coupling approach, it is possible to predict the different stages of the drying process in heterogeneous soils with good accuracy. Evaporation from a heterogeneous soil consisting of a loose and tight packing condition is larger than the homogeneous equivalent systems. Liquid water is supplied from the loosely packed soil region to the tightly packed soil regions, sustaining a longer Stage I evaporation in the tightly packed regions with overall greater evaporation rate than uniform homogeneous packing. In contrast, lower evaporation rates from the loosely packed regions are observed due to a limited liquid water supply resulting from capillary flow to the

  14. The structures of the atmospheric boundary layer in the Yellow Sea summer fog-a comparison study with the spring fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.-P.; Ren, Z.-P.; Yang, Y.-Q.; Wang, X.-G.; Xu, X.-L.

    2010-07-01

    The Yellow Sea is a highly foggy area in spring-summer (April to July) seasons. A Yellow Sea fog case occurred on July 7-11, 2008 is investigated by the data from the sea buoy stations, high-resolution digital sounding instruments and other observations and from a three-dimensional mesoscale model (WRF). Espcially, the boundary layer structure are analyzed and simulated, and the comparison is made between the summer fog case and a spring fog case in May 2-3, 2008. The results are as follows (1) In summer fog, the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) is less stable (almost no temperature inversion)than that in spring fog and the summer fog is thicker in elevation due to the development of turbulence and plenty of moisture supply advected by the East Asian summer monsoon in the low level of the MABL; whereas in spring fog the MABL is very stable with pronounced temperature inversion and the moisture is mainly transported by a shallow local anticyclone in the Yellow Sea surface and traped close to a very low level, thus leading to thin fog. (2) In summer, the southerly air column in the MABL is of similar physical features since it comes from the southern ocean, producing the less vertical gradient both in temperature and in humidity (no obvious dry layer). In contrast, in spring the southerly sea surface air is cooling gradualy as it passes the cold Yellow Sea, but the air at about 950 hPa is westerly from inland that is dry and warm by the increased solar radiation, thus forming temerature inversion and evident dry layer over the sea. (3) The surface air temperature (SAT) is obviously higher than the sea surface temperature (SST) in the process of the summer fog, and the SAT does not derease or even increase in the fog, which is related to the weaker long wave radiation at the fog top and the huge amount of latent heat; while in spring sea fog the SAT decreases rapidly and is even lower than the SST in the peak phase of the fog due to strong long wave radiation

  15. A global view of the extratropical tropopause transition layer from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer O3, H2O, and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Boone, C. D.; Manney, G. L.; Walker, K. A.

    2009-04-01

    The global behavior of the extratropical tropopause transition layer (ExTL) is investigated using O3, H2O, and CO measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on Canada's SCISAT-1 satellite obtained between February 2004 and May 2007. The ExTL depth is derived using H2O-O3 and CO-O3 correlations. The ExTL top derived from H2O-O3 shows an increase from roughly 1-1.5 km above the thermal tropopause in the subtropics to 3-4 km (2.5-3.5 km) in the north (south) polar region, implying somewhat weaker troposphere-stratosphere-transport in the Southern Hemisphere. The ExTL bottom extends ˜1 km below the thermal tropopause, indicating a persistent stratospheric influence on the troposphere at all latitudes. The ExTL top derived from the CO-O3 correlation is lower, at 2 km or ˜345 K (1.5 km or ˜335 K) in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. Its annual mean coincides with the relative temperature maximum just above the thermal tropopause. The vertical CO gradient maximizes at the thermal tropopause, indicating a local minimum in mixing within the tropopause region. The seasonal changes in and the scales of the vertical H2O gradients show a similar pattern as the static stability structure of the tropopause inversion layer (TIL), which provides observational support for the hypothesis that H2O plays a radiative role in forcing and maintaining the structure of the TIL.

  16. Some questions concerning safety on emergency landing in dense layers of the atmosphere of radionuclide energy sources based on plutonium-238 for autonomous station open-quote open-quote MARS-94/96 close-quote close-quote

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes results of investigations of questions concerning integrity keeping for an ampula containing radionuclide fuel (Pu-238) under conditions of emergency landing in dense layers of the atmosphere and under conditions of fire on launching pad. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. An ocean-land-atmosphere coupled model for tropical cyclone landfall processes: The multi-layer ocean model and its verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yihong; YU Runling; LI Yongping

    2006-01-01

    POM (Princeton ocean model) tentatively taken as the ocean part of an ocean-land-atmosphere coupled model is verified for the ultimate purpose of studying the landfall process of tropical cyclone (TC) in the western North Pacific. The POM is tested with monthly mean wind stress in the summer and given lateral boundary conditions. The results indicate that the equilibrium state of the ocean is in accordance with the climate mean, with the error in sea surface temperature (salinity) less than 0.5 ℃ (0.5). The simulated ocean currents are reasonable as well. Several numerical experiments are designed to verify the oceanic response to a stationary or moving TC. It is found that the results agree fairly well with the previous work, including both the drop magnitude and the distribution of sea temperature. Compared with the simple two-layer ocean model used by some other studies, the response of the ocean to a TC is more logical here. The model is also verified in a real case with a TC passing the neighborhood of a buoy station. It is shown that the established ocean model can basically reproduce the sea surface temperature change as observed.

  18. Impact of storm-induced cooling of sea surface temperature on large turbulent eddies and vertical turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer of Hurricane Isaac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuting; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan; Gao, Cen

    2016-01-01

    Roll vortices in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are important to oil operation and oil spill transport. This study investigates the impact of storm-induced sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on the roll vortices generated by the convective and dynamic instability in the ABL of Hurricane Isaac (2012) and the roll induced transport using hindcasting large eddy simulations (LESs) configured from the multiply nested Weather Research & Forecasting model. Two experiments are performed: one forced by the Unified Wave INterface - Coupled Model and the other with the SST replaced by the NCEP FNL analysis that does not include the storm-induced SST cooling. The simulations show that the roll vortices are the prevalent eddy circulations in the ABL of Isaac. The storm-induced SST cooling causes the ABL stability falls in a range that satisfies the empirical criterion of roll generation by dynamic instability, whereas the ABL stability without considering the storm-induced SST cooling meets the criterion of roll generation by convective instability. The ABL roll is skewed and the increase of convective instability enhances the skewness. Large convective instability leads to large vertical transport of heat and moisture; whereas the dominant dynamic instability results in large turbulent kinetic energy but relatively weak heat and moisture transport. This study suggests that failure to consider roll vortices or incorrect initiation of dynamic and convective instability of rolls in simulations may substantially affect the transport of momentum, energy, and pollutants in the ABL and the dispersion/advection of oil spill fume at the ocean surface.

  19. Seasonal variation of local atmospheric circulations and boundary layer structure in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and implications for air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Shuhua; Qian, Tingting; Xue, Ming; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu

    2015-12-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences frequent heavy haze pollution in fall and winter. Pollution was often exacerbated by unfavorable atmospheric boundary layer (BL) conditions. The topography in this region impacts the BL processes in complex ways. Such impacts and implications on air quality are not yet clearly understood. The BL processes in all four seasons in BTH are thus investigated in this study using idealized simulations with the WRF-Chem model. Results suggest that seasonal variation of thermal conditions and synoptic patterns significantly modulates BL processes. In fall, with a relatively weak northwesterly synoptic forcing, thermal contrast between the mountains and the plain leads to a prominent mountain-plain breeze circulation (MPC). In the afternoon, the downward branch of the MPC, in addition to northwesterly warm advection, suppresses BL development over the western side of BTH. In the eastern coastal area, a sea-breeze circulation develops late in the morning and intensifies during the afternoon. In summer, southeasterly BL winds allow the see-breeze front to penetrate farther inland (˜150 km from the coast), and the MPC is less prominent. In spring and winter, with strong northwesterly synoptic winds, the sea-breeze circulation is confined in the coastal area, and the MPC is suppressed. The BL height is low in winter due to strong near-surface stability, while BL heights are large in spring due to strong mechanical forcing. The relatively low BL height in fall and winter may have exacerbated the air pollution, thus contributing to the frequent severe haze events in the BTH region.

  20. Growth of ∼5 cm2V−1s−1 mobility, p-type Copper(I oxide (Cu2O films by fast atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD at 225°C and below

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Muñoz-Rojas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phase pure, dense Cu2O thin films were grown on glass and polymer substrates at 225°C by rapid atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD. Carrier mobilities of 5 cm2V−1s−1 and carrier concentrations of ∼1016 cm−3 were achieved in films of thickness 50 - 120 nm, over a >10 cm2 area. Growth rates were ∼1 nm·min−1 which is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional ALD.. The high mobilities achieved using the atmospheric, low temperature method represent a significant advance for flextronics and flexible solar cells which require growth on plastic substrates.

  1. Growth of ˜5 cm2V-1s-1 mobility, p-type Copper(I) oxide (Cu2O) films by fast atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD) at 225°C and below

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Rojas, D.; Jordan, M.; Yeoh, C.; Marin, A. T.; Kursumovic, A.; Dunlop, L. A.; Iza, D. C.; Chen, A.; Wang, H.; MacManus Driscoll, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Phase pure, dense Cu2O thin films were grown on glass and polymer substrates at 225°C by rapid atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD). Carrier mobilities of 5 cm2V-1s-1 and carrier concentrations of ˜1016 cm-3 were achieved in films of thickness 50 - 120 nm, over a >10 cm2 area. Growth rates were ˜1 nm.min-1 which is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional ALD.. The high mobilities achieved using the atmospheric, low temperature method represent a significant advance for flextronics and flexible solar cells which require growth on plastic substrates.

  2. Growth of ∼5 cm2V−1s−1 mobility, p-type Copper(I) oxide (Cu2O) films by fast atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD) at 225°C and below

    OpenAIRE

    D. Muñoz-Rojas; Jordan, M.; Yeoh, C; A. T. Marin; A. Kursumovic; Dunlop, L. A.; Iza, D. C.; Chen, A; Wang, H.; J. L. MacManus Driscoll

    2012-01-01

    Phase pure, dense Cu2O thin films were grown on glass and polymer substrates at 225°C by rapid atmospheric atomic layer deposition (AALD). Carrier mobilities of 5 cm2V−1s−1 and carrier concentrations of ∼1016 cm−3 were achieved in films of thickness 50 - 120 nm, over a >10 cm2 area. Growth rates were ∼1 nm·min−1 which is two orders of magnitude faster than conventional ALD.. The high mobilities achieved using the atmospheric, low temperature method represent a significant advance for flextron...

  3. A case study of CO2, CO and particles content evolution in the suburban atmospheric boundary layer using a 2-μm Doppler DIAL, a 1-μm backscatter lidar and an array of in-situ sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network of remote and in-situ sensors was deployed in a Paris suburb in order to evaluate the mesoscale evolution of the daily cycle of CO2 and related tracers in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and its relation to ABL dynamics and nearby natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks. A 2-μ m heterodyne Doppler differential absorption lidar, which combines measurements of (1) structure of the atmosphere (2) radial velocity, and (3) CO2 differential absorption was a particularly unique element of the observational array. We analyse the differences in the diurnal cycle of CO, CO2, lidar reflectivity (a proxy for aerosol content) and H2O using the lidar, airborne measurements in the free troposphere and ground-based measurements made at two sites located few kilometres apart. We demonstrate that vertical mixing dominates the early morning drawdown of CO and aerosol content trapped in the former nocturnal layer but not the H2O and CO2 mixing ratio variations. Surface fluxes, vertical mixing and advection all contribute to the ABL CO2 mixing ratio decrease during the morning transition, with the relative importance depending on the rate and timing of ABL rise. We also show evidence that when the ABL is stable, small-scale (0.1-km vertical and 1-km horizontal) gradients of CO2 and CO are large. The results illustrate the complexity of inferring surface fluxes of CO2 from atmospheric budgets in the stable boundary layer. (authors)

  4. Interpretive Data Layer Showing Distribution of Modern Features Within National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminitration (NOAA) Survey H11250 (H11250G_MOD, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, has...

  5. Interpretive Data Layer Showing the Framework Geology of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Survey H11250 (H11250G_GEOL, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, has...

  6. The role of ozone atmosphere-snow gas exchange on polar, boundary-layer tropospheric ozone ? a review and sensitivity analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Helmig, D.; Ganzeveld, L.; Butler, T; Oltmans, S J

    2006-01-01

    Recent research on snowpack processes and atmosphere-snow gas exchange has demonstrated that chemical and physical interactions between the snowpack and the overlaying atmosphere have a substantial impact on the composition of the lower troposphere. These observations also imply that ozone deposition to the snowpack possibly depends on parameters including the quantity and composition of deposited trace gases, solar irradiance, snow temperature and the substrate below the ...

  7. The influence of the mechanisms of transfer in carburizing atmospheres on the surface metal layer; Einfluss der Uebertragungsmechanismen von Aufkohlungsatmosphaeren auf die Metallrandschicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, F. [LOI Thermprocess GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the mechanism of transfer in carburizing atmospheres is discussed using examples of carburization. It became apparent that a direct relationship between mass transfer and the product of partial pressures p{sub CO}xp{sub H2} could not be disproved, since the H{sub 2} content of the atmospheres had not been stated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Einfluss der Uebertragungsmechanismen von Aufkohlungsatmosphaeren an Aufkohlungsbeispielen wird diskutiert. Dabei stellte sich heraus, dass die direkte Abhaengigkeit des Stoffueberganges vom Partialdruckprodukt p{sub CO}xp{sub H2} nicht widerlegt werden konnte, zumal der H{sub 2}-Gehalt der Atmosphaeren nicht genannt wurde. (orig.)

  8. Observations of high rates of NO2 – HONO conversion in the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer in Kathmandu, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Y.; B. Galle; A. Panday; Hodson, E; Prinn, R.; Wang, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) plays a significant role in the atmosphere, especially in the polluted troposphere. Its photolysis after sunrise is an important source of hydroxyl free radicals (OH). Measurements of nitrous acid and other pollutants were carried out in the Kathmandu urban atmosphere during January–February 2003, contributing to the sparse knowledge of nitrous acid in South Asia. The results showed average nocturnal levels of HONO (1.7±0.8 ppbv), NO2 (17.9±10.2 ppbv),...

  9. Influence of heat treatment in nitrogen atmosphere on structure and superconducting properties of pure niobium stannide layers prepared by electrochemical codeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrolytically codeposited single-phase layers of Nb3Sn with tin concentration within the limits of 19-25 at.% were annealed in nitrogen environment at 850 and 1000 deg C. X ray diffraction analysis, microscopic examination and measurements of critical temperature and critical current made it possible to conclude that the heat treatment in nitrogen results in partial decomposition of Nb3Sn with formation of niobium nitrides and beta-Sn and in a decrease of critical current and the temperature of superconducting transition. All specimens display degradation of superconducting properties as compared to initial layers. 23 refs.; 2 figs

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of the atmospheric boundary layer over the paris area; Etude experimentale et theorique de la couche limite atmospherique en agglomeration parisienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menut, L

    1997-12-15

    This thesis studied the urban boundary layer dynamic behaviour over the Paris area by comparing urban (Paris) and suburban (Palaiseau) dynamic data such as lidars, sodars, sonic anemometers. All the data were obtained during the ECLAP experiment, specifically performed to characterize the differences between a city and its near environment. (author)

  11. Using a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to Study the Sensitivity of Land Surface and Boundary Layer Processes to Soil and Vegetation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树华; 乐旭; 刘辉志; 胡非

    2004-01-01

    A series of sensitivity tests are performed to test the stability and sensibility of the Modified Soil-PlantAtmosphere Scheme (MSPAS), which was wholly introduced in a previous paper. The numerical simulation results from the experiments show good agreement with physical reality. Besides, some of the results are illuminating. Together with the first paper, it is concluded that MSPAS is a simple but effective model,and it is practically valuable in the research work of desertification control and reforestation in China

  12. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Detected by a Fraunhofer Lidar over Qingdao Suburb%夫琅禾费暗线激光雷达探测青岛市郊大气边界层

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张薇; 吴松华; 宋小全; 靳磊

    2013-01-01

    激光雷达通过接收微弱的回波信号进行大气探测,具有高时空分辨率等优点,但由于受到强烈太阳背景光的影响,激光雷达白天探测的信噪比提高受到限制,难以对大气物理参数及大气边界层进行全天时同等性能观测.针对此问题,研制了一种新波长、工作在夫琅禾费暗线下的光子计数激光雷达,进而利用夫琅禾费光子计数激光雷达对青岛市郊的大气边界层进行观测实验.发射激光选取太阳暗线波长,激光雷达白天探测的信噪比提高了2~3倍,昼夜探测性能相当.由探测数据反演得到的消光系数显示了2011年夏季青岛郊区大气边界层气溶胶的垂直分布结构特征.%Lidar with high spatial and temporal resolution detects atmospheric parameters by receiving the echo signal signal.Because of the disturbance of strong solar background light,the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of lidar in the daytime is greatly restricted so that the atmospheric parameters and characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer are hardly observed with consistent quality through day and night.The photon counting lidar prototype in Fraunhofer dark lines is devised to solve this problem.The atmospheric boundary layer of Qingdao suburb is observed using the lidar.The SNR is improved 2~3 times by operating the lidar at the wavelength of solar dark lines.The extinction coefficient obtained by inversion of the detected data illustrates the vertical structures of aerosol in the atmospheric boundary over Qingdao suburb during summer 2011.

  13. Turbulent Characterization of atmospheric surface layer over non-homogeneous terrain; Caracterizacion turbulenta de la capa superficial atmosferica en un terreno no homogeneo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artinano Rodriguez de Torres, B.

    1989-07-01

    About 15000 wind and temperature profiles from a 100 m tower located in CEDER (Soria, Spain) have been analyzed. Using profiles in close neutral conditions, two main parameters of surface layer were obtained. Results show a great dependence of these parameters (Z{sub 0} roughness length and u friction velocity) on flow conditions and terrain (tinctures. Difficulty finding neutral conditions in this type of terrain (gently rolling and scattered bush) and in this latitude , is also remarkable. (Author) 91 refs.

  14. A case study of atmospheric boundary layer features during winter over a tropical inland station – Kharagpur (22.32°N, 87.32°E)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Denny P Alappattu; P K Kunhikrishnan; Marina Aloysius; M Mohan

    2009-08-01

    The local weather and air quality over a region are greatly influenced by the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) structure and dynamics. ABL characteristics were measured using a tethered balloon-sonde system over Kharagpur (22.32°N, 87.32°E, 40m above MSL), India, for the period 7 December 2004 to 30 December 2004, as a part of the Indian Space Research Organization– Geosphere Biosphere Program (ISRO–GBP) Aerosol Land Campaign II. High-resolution data of pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction were archived along with surface layer measurements using an automatic weather station. This paper presents the features of ABL, like ABL depth and nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) depth. The sea surface winds from Quikscat over the oceanic regions near the experiment site were analyzed along with the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis winds over Kharagpur to estimate the convergence of wind, moisture and vorticity to understand the observed variations in wind speed and relative humidity, and also the increased aerosol concentrations. The variation of ventilation coefficient (VC), a factor determining the air pollution potential over a region, is also discussed in detail.

  15. Improved memory performance of metal—oxide—nitride—oxide—silicon by annealing the SiO2 tunnel layer in different nitridation atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal—oxide—nitride—oxide—silicon (MONOS) capacitors with thermally grown SiO2 as the tunnel layer are fabricated, and the effects of different ambient nitridation (NH3, NO and N2O) on the characteristics of the memory capacitors are investigated. The experimental results indicate that the device with tunnel oxide annealed in NO ambient exhibits excellent memory characteristics, i.e. a large memory window, high program/erase speed, and good endurance and retention performance (the charge loss rate is 14.5% after 10 years). The mechanism involved is that much more nitrogen is incorporated into the tunnel oxide during NO annealing, resulting in a lower tunneling barrier height and smaller interface state density. Thus, there is a higher tunneling rate under a high electric field and a lower probability of trap-assisted tunneling during retention, as compared to N2O annealing. Furthermore, compared with the NH3-annealed device, no weak Si—H bonds and electron traps related to the hydrogen are introduced for the NO-annealed devices, giving a high-quality and high-reliability SiON tunneling layer and SiON/Si interface due to the suitable nitridation and oxidation roles of NO. (semiconductor devices)

  16. The sensitivity of a coupled atmospheric-oceanic model to variations in the albedo and absorptivity of a stratospheric aerosol layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable uncertainty exists regarding the precise physical parameters of a smoke or aerosol cloud that would be injected into the lower stratosphere by a catastrophic event such as a nuclear war, a major volcanic eruption, or an asteroid impact. In this paper, the sensitivity of the sea surface temperature of a one-dimensional coupled atmospheric-oceanic model to variations in the albedo and absorptivity of an aerosol cloud introduced into the lower stratosphere is examined. Zonally averaged results are produced for two latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The temperature response of the oceans to forcings by a cloud with realistic aerosol properties is examined, with particular emphasis on the impact on the surface climate on time scales of 6 months to 2 years

  17. Photochemistry in planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Graedel, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Widely varying paths of evolutionary history, atmospheric processes, solar fluxes, and temperatures have produced vastly different planetary atmospheres. The similarities and differences between the earth atmosphere and those of the terrestrial planets (Venus and Mars) and of the Jovian planets are discussed in detail; consideration is also given to the photochemistry of Saturn, Uranus, Pluto, Neptune, Titan, and Triton. Changes in the earth's ancient atmosphere are described, and problems of interest in the earth's present troposphere are discussed, including the down wind effect, plume interactions, aerosol nucleation and growth, acid rain, and the fate of terpenes. Temperature fluctuations in the four principal layers of the earth's atmosphere, predicted decreases in the ozone concentration as a function of time, and spectra of particles in the earth's upper atmosphere are also presented. Finally, the vertical structure of the Venus cloud system and the thermal structure of the Jovian planets are shown graphically.

  18. Research on Corona Layer of Needle-plate Discharge in Atmosphere%大气中针板放电电晕层的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志强; 刘铁; 苗欣宇; 郭威

    2013-01-01

    In the experimet the images of needle-plate corona discharge are obtained. The gray value and thickness of corona layer was measured by reading luminescence data using photoshop software. The result shows that corona luminous intensity is relatively uniform after corona. With the discharge voltage increasing, a bright and uneven area is created in the tip place. With the increase of needlepoint distance, luminous intensity initially decreased slowly, following diminished rapidly and finally declined slowly. When corona area appeared luminous at different points, its intensity approximate linearly increases with the increase of the voltage. The thickness of corona layer rapidly grew, then there would be a stable region, with the increase of voltage, thickness of corona layer developed from flat to ascending.%通过对针板电晕放电实验,得到发光图像,并针对发光图像,描述了电晕层形貌.利用photoshop软件读取发光照片数据,测量出电晕层的灰度值和厚度.结果表明,在放电起晕后电晕发光强度在层内相对均匀,随着放电电压增大,在针尖处会产生一个明亮而不均匀的区域.发光强度随距针尖距离的变化规律为首先缓慢减小,然后迅速减小,最后又变得缓慢减小.当电晕区不同定点出现发光后,其发光强度随电压的增大表现出近似线性增强的趋势.起晕后电晕层厚度快速增长,随后会出现一个稳定区,当电压继续增大,电晕层厚度由平直向上升发展.

  19. Effect of Derating and Shutting Down of Turbines on the Extracted Power of Large Wind Farms in Thermally-Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Wind power is being increasingly employed to help meet an increasing energy demand in a more environmentally friendly manner and, consequently, large wind farms consisting of thousands of turbines have been constructed and deployed in various areas. Due to a multitude of factors, the layout of these multi-turbine arrays is not always optimized for maximum wind farm power extraction. Additionally, the shutting down or derating of certain wind turbines may impact the efficiency of large wind farms. In this study, a large eddy simulation (LES) of a fully developed wind turbine array boundary layer is performed in thermally stratified conditions. The impact on the overall plant performance, quantified by the collective extracted power of the turbines, is explored using a systematic shut down and derating of selected turbines.

  20. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  1. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Facchini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of aerosol size-distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central- and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp=50 nm particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  2. IIP Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) demonstration of CO retrieval, including multi-layer, from atmospheric data acquired simultaneously in the solar reflective region near 2.3 um and the thermal emissive region near 4.7 um

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthaler, J. L.; Kumer, J.; Roche, A. E.; Rairden, R. L.; Blatherwick, R.; Hawat, T.; Desouza-Machado, S.; Hannon, S.; Chatfield, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) have been developed to demonstrate measurement capability, when deployed in space, for multi-layer retrieval of CO from spectral measurements acquired in the solar reflective (SR) region ~ 4281 to 4301 cm-1 and in the thermal InfraRed (TIR) region ~ 2110 to 2165 cm-1. We describe joint deployment at Denver University (DU) with co-investigators there of the TIMS, and of the DU colleagues FTS, to acquire simultaneous measurements of atmospheric spectra in the SR and the TIR. The FTS provided validation radiance data for the TIMS. The TIMS retrievals of CO, H2O and CH4 agreed well with validation vs these as retrieved from the DU data, AIRS retrieval, standard models and ECMWF. The TIMS CO retrievals included column retrieved from the just the SR data, column retrieved from just the TIR data, and a simple two-layer retrieval from the combined data sets. The data were acquired in an operational mode that mimicked the operations in a conceptual application that would provide footprints, coverage, refresh time as in the Decadal Survey GEO-CAPE mission statement. Very encouraging CO precisions were achieved, e.g., the TIMS CO column retrieval from the SR data demonstrated better than the 10% precision requirement as listed on slide 32 of the GEO-CAPE Reference document http://geo- cape.larc.nasa.gov/docs/GEOMAC_FinalReport_no_costs.ppt

  3. Predicting the dry deposition of atmospheric aerosol particles onto forests using a size-resolved multi-layer second-order closure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Launianen, S.; Gronholm, T.; Katul, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    Biological aerosol particles are now receiving significant attention given their role in air quality, climate change, and spreading of allergens and other communicable diseases. A major uncertainty in their quantification is associated with complex transport processes governing their generation and removal inside canopies. It has been known for some time now that the commonly used first-order closure to link mean concentration gradients with turbulent fluxes is problematic. The presence of a mean counter-gradient momentum transport in an open trunk space exemplifies such failure. Here, instead of employing K-theory, a size-resolved second-order multilayer model for dry particle deposition is proposed. The starting point of the proposed model is a particle flux budget in which the production, transport, and dissipation terms are modeled. Because these terms require higher-order velocity statistics, this flux budget is coupled with a conventional second-order closure scheme for the flow field within the canopy sub-layer. The failure of conventional K-theory for particle fluxes are explicitly linked to the onset of a mean counter or zero - gradient flow attributed to a significant particle flux transport term. The relative importance of these terms in the particle flux budget and their effects on the foliage particle collection terms for also discussed for each particle size. The proposed model is evaluated against published multi-level measurements of sized-resolved particle fluxes and mean concentration profiles collected within and above a tall Scots pine forest in Hyytiala, Southern Finland. The main findings are that (1) first-order closure schemes may be still plausible for modeling particle deposition velocity, especially in the particle size range smaller than 1 μm when the turbulent particle diffusivity is estimated from higher order flow statistics; (2) the mechanisms leading to the increased trend of particle deposition velocity with increasing friction

  4. Clean Air Slots Amid Atmospheric Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2002-01-01

    This article investigates the mechanism for those layers in the atmosphere that are free of air borne pollution even though the air above and below them carry pollutants. Atmospheric subsidence is posed as a mechanism for this phenomenon.

  5. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  6. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel. Pt. II. Marine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the results obtained in the MICAT project for mild steel specimens exposed for 1 to 4 years in 47 marine atmospheres in the Ibero-American region. All these atmospheres were characterized for climatology, pollution and corrosion rates according to ISO standards. Complementary morphological and chemical characterization of the steel corrosion product layers (SCPLs) formed in these atmospheres was carried out. The overall analysis of results contributes to understanding, in a systematic way, how atmospheric corrosivity categories can be correlated with corrosion mechanisms. Special aspects of the atmospheres, from pure to mixed marine, were considered. (orig.)

  7. Stratosphere and ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human activities disturb natural balance of earth atmosphere, in short time in comparison with time of great climatic evolutions of the past. Rapid destruction of ozone layer, modifications of chemical balances in Arctic by similar processes to which observed in Antarctic, first experimental views of ozone decreasing in stratosphere and increasing in troposphere, are indications of human perturbation in ozone layer balance which protect us from solar radiation. 17 figs., 6 tabs., 27 refs

  8. 边界层参数化方案对陆气相互作用影响的模拟研究%Simulation research of influence of planetary boundary layer scheme improvement on land-atmosphere interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑益群; 高俊岭; 曾新民

    2011-01-01

    利用湍流动能闭合方法对区域气候模式RegCM3中的边界层参数化方案进行了改进,然后利用中国东部典型旱、涝年资料进行了改进效果对比试验,并着重分析了边界层参数化方案改进对陆气相互作用的影响,结果表明:采用湍流动能闭合方法可以更合理的描述边界层的高度及其日变化,较为真实地描述边界层的物理过程,使得陆—气间通量及大气各层垂直扩散项的计算和日变化更加合理.同时对降水、气温等气候要素的模拟有一定的改善,尤其是对直接受边界层参数化方案影响的温度的模拟,其改善更为明显.%The planetary boundary layer scheme of RegCM3 is improved by using turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure scheme. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data of 1994/1998 are employed to test the effects of the TKE scheme on regional climate modeling. The results show that: after employing TKE closure scheme, the physical process in boundary layer can be described more realistically, and the flux between land and atmosphere can be accounted for more reasonably. The simulated precipitation and temperature are also improved to some extent by using TKE closure scheme.

  9. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  10. Exploring the atmosphere using smartphones

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Martín; Stari, Cecilia; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the inner layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, are determinant for the earth's life. In this experience we explore the first hundreds of meters using a smartphone mounted on a quadcopter. Both the altitude and the pressure are obtained using the smartphone's sensors. We complement these measures with data collected from the flight information system of an aircraft. The experimental results are compared with the International Standard Atmosphere and other simple approximations: isothermal and constant density atmospheres.

  11. Aircraft vertical profiling of variation of CO2 over a Canadian Boreal Forest Site: a role of advection in the changes in the atmospheric boundary layer CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period of July 8-13, 2002, we collected vertical profiles by aircraft of meteorological variables and atmospheric CO2 over the OBS (old black spruce) site located in Boreal Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Sites in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada. We have used the data from the morning and afternoon flights to calculate the regional daily afternoon CO2 flux for the days July 8-11. These daily fluxes were then compared to those obtained by the boundary layer budget method and by the eddy covariance measurements on the tower at the OBS site. We identified the importance of changes in the CO2 concentration by advection to the flux estimates. In addition, we provide arguments to suggest that subseasonal temporal averaging might not, at least in some cases, eliminate advective bias contribution to the flux estimates. Because the advective influence is large and highly directional, even on seasonal and interannual timescales, it is advisable that flux estimates based on CO2 concentration change at a site contain dynamic description of an air parcel transport history

  12. Detection of Atmospheric Composition Based on Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jinye; Tong Yala; Yang Xiaoling; Gong Jiaoli [School of science, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China); Gong Wei, E-mail: yezi.zh@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A summary overview about the types of lidar and their own applications on atmosphere detection is presented. Measurement of atmospheric aerosols by Mie lidar and Raman lidar is focused. The vertical profiles of aerosols in the atmosphere are retrieved. And at the same time, through analyzing aerosol vertical content distribution, the atmosphere boundary layer and the cloud are also observed. All the results show that the lidar has good performance on detecting the atmospheric composition.

  13. Detection of Atmospheric Composition Based on Lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary overview about the types of lidar and their own applications on atmosphere detection is presented. Measurement of atmospheric aerosols by Mie lidar and Raman lidar is focused. The vertical profiles of aerosols in the atmosphere are retrieved. And at the same time, through analyzing aerosol vertical content distribution, the atmosphere boundary layer and the cloud are also observed. All the results show that the lidar has good performance on detecting the atmospheric composition.

  14. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  15. Neutral atmosphere influence on sporadic E layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Koucká Knížová, Petra; Potužníková, Kateřina

    Sozopol : Space Research and Technologies Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2015. s. 17. [Workshop “Solar Influences on the Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Atmosphere” /7th/. 01.06.2015-05.06.2015, Sunny Beach] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://ws-sozopol.stil.bas.bg/2015Sunny/abstract_book2015.pdf

  16. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  17. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  18. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  19. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossfield, Ian J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics and circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress, while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  20. Atmospheric turbulence and diffusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (well known in the atmospheric dispersion community as the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory, ATDL) is one of several field facilities of NOAAs Air Resources Laboratory, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The laboratory conducts research on matters of atmospheric diffusion and turbulent exchange, concerning air quality. ATDD focuses attention on the physics of the lower atmosphere, with special emphasis on the processes contributing to atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and air-surface exchange, and on the development of predictive capabilities using the results of this research. Research is directed toward issues of national and global importance related to the missions of DOE, to DOE's Oak Ridge Field Office, and to NOAA. The program is divided into four major projects: plume transport and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer, complex topography, canopy micrometeorology, and air-surface exchange

  1. 用SA雷达测量近地面层大气折射率场%Using SA radar for measurement of atmospheric refractive index fields of near-surface layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡帆; 王凌震; 周文嫣; 喜度; 徐芬

    2011-01-01

    通过测量近地面层的水汽变化,可以研究中小尺度雷暴系统的初生和发展,进而可以根据水汽数据帮助作出未来中小尺度天气过程的临近预报.因此,水汽探测具有重要的研究和应用价值.研究和实验证明,目前我国大量布网的SA多谱勒天气雷达,能够开展大气折射率场的探测,并用探测到的折射率场反演水汽的变化.本文对用SA雷达实现这种探测的一些关键性技术问题进行了论述.通过这项研究,将扩大sA雷达的探测能力,弥补近地面水汽资料的不足,帮助研究对流性中小尺度天气系统的生消演变与水汽场变化的关系,有望改善数值模式对中小尺度系统的预报能力.%Through the survey of the change of surface layer water vapor, we may investigate newborn and developing process of meso-microscale thunderstorm system, furthermore, we may carry out the short-period forecast of meso-microscale synoptic process according to the water vapor data.Therefore,the water vapor survey is of great value to the research and application.Our research and experiment have shown that widely deployed SA radar can be utilized for measurement of atmospheric refraction index field and further can infer the change of water vapor.This article discuses some key technology of the detection by SA radar.This research may extend detecting capability of SA radar which compensates the insufficiency of ground water vapor information and help study the relationship of meso-microscale convection system evolution to water vapour field change.It can also be expected to improve forecast capability of meso-microscale system in numerical model.

  2. 原位研究 PCB-ENIG 在吸附薄液膜下的大气腐蚀行为%In situ investigation of atmospheric corrosion behavior of PCB-ENIG under adsorbed thin electrolyte layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易盼; 肖葵; 丁康康; 李刚; 董超芳; 李晓刚

    2016-01-01

    通过阴极极化曲线、交流阻抗谱以及 SEM、XPS,原位研究了相对湿度对无电镀镍金印制电路板(PCB-ENIG)在吸附薄液膜下的影响机制。结果表明:PCB-ENIG 板在薄液膜下的阴极过程主要包括 O2、腐蚀产物和 H2O 的还原过程。阴极电流密度随相对湿度的增加而增加,并且均小于溶液中阴极电流密度,表明扩散过程并不是阴极氧化还原过程的控制步骤。极化电位较负时,75%和85%相对湿度下的阴极极化电流密度逐渐减小。随着腐蚀产物的增加,试验后期腐蚀过程由阳极过程控制。%The effects of relative humidity (RH) on a printed circuit board finished with electroless nickel immersion gold (PCB-ENIG) under an adsorbed thin electrolyte layer (ATEL) were investigated in situ via the measurement of cathodic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to clearly elaborate the corrosion behavior of PCB-ENIG in the atmospheric environment. Results indicated that the cathodic process of PCB-ENIG under ATEL was dominated by the reduction of dissolved oxygen, corrosion products, and H2O. The cathodic current density of PCB-ENIG increased progressively with increasing RH. Moreover, its cathodic current density in the solution was greater than that under ATEL. This result demonstrated that the diffusion process was not the controlling step during the limiting reduction of cathodic oxygen. When the polarization potentials were located in a more negative region, the cathodic polarization current density gradually decreased under 75% and 85% RH. Notably, the anodic process became the controlling step in the extremely thin liquid film during the remainder of the experiment.

  3. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    CERN Document Server

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  4. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design......” implications and qualities of the approach are identified through concrete examples of a design case, which also investigates the qualities and implications of addressing atmospheres both as design concern and user experience....

  5. Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan; Barman, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The study of exoplanetary atmospheres is one of the most exciting and dynamic frontiers in astronomy. Over the past two decades ongoing surveys have revealed an astonishing diversity in the planetary masses, radii, temperatures, orbital parameters, and host stellar properties of exoplanetary systems. We are now moving into an era where we can begin to address fundamental questions concerning the diversity of exoplanetary compositions, atmospheric and interior processes, and formation histories, just as have been pursued for solar system planets over the past century. Exoplanetary atmospheres provide a direct means to address these questions via their observable spectral signatures. In the last decade, and particularly in the last five years, tremendous progress has been made in detecting atmospheric signatures of exoplanets through photometric and spectroscopic methods using a variety of space-borne and/or ground-based observational facilities. These observations are beginning to provide important constraints...

  6. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    . Nevertheless, people’s experience of the environment is sought manipulated in a variety of contexts, often without offering a less ‘true’ experience of a situation than if it had not been manipulated by people. In fact, orchestrations of space are often central to sociality, politics and aesthetics. This...... introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  7. Air-sea interaction in tropical atmosphere: influence of ocean mixing on atmospheric processes

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Dariusz B.

    2016-01-01

    One the major factors determining the development and evolution of atmospheric convection is the sea surface temperature and its variability. Results of this thesis show that state of atmospheric convection impacts the diurnal distribution of thermal energy in the upper ocean. Under calm and clear sky conditions a shallow warm layer of several meters depth develops on the surface of the ocean. This warm layer drives an anomalous flux from the ocean to the atmosphere. A novel Kelvin wave traje...

  8. Spatial correlation exp erimental analysis of atmospheric optical turbulence in the near ground layer%近地面大气光学湍流空间相关特性的实验研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩; 梅海平; 钱仙妹; 饶瑞中

    2015-01-01

    本文提出了基于光纤湍流传感器阵列的大气光学湍流空间相关函数测量原理,并确定了具体的测量方案和数据统计方法.利用光纤湍流传感器阵列在近地面开展了大气光学湍流空间相关特性的实验测量研究,尽可能全面地展示光学湍流空间相关函数的各种形式.结果表明,大气光学湍流的一维空间相关函数主要表现为两种结构形态,其一,58.7%基本符合各向同性湍流空间相关函数模型,其相关函数在一定尺度范围内呈现随尺度的增大而减小的趋势,当超过该尺度时,相关系数接近于0;其二,另有37.9%表现为与尺度无关,相关系数维持在0附近小幅度随机振荡.不难发现:光学湍流的空间相关特性主要取决于湍流的强弱和湍流是否得以充分发展,同时,湍流的相干结构将引起空间相关函数的小幅度振荡.以空间布点探测直接获取光学湍流空间相关函数的方法,不仅为分析湍流空间结构奠定了实验基础,同时,也为进一步建立非K湍流模型提供了理论开端.%Atmospheric optical turbulence means refractive index random fluctuation of atmosphere. In this article, according to the concept of correlation function, the measurement principle, measurement schemes, and data processing method of spatial correlation function are given based on a high-quality fiber optical turbulence sensing array. Determining the statistical time and the calculation principle of the spatial correlation is the main point of current research. Emphasis is put on demonstrating the kinds of structural forms and analyzing the impact elements of spatial correlation function in turbulence as clear as possible. Using the sensing array, experimental measurement is promoted in the near ground layer and many forms of correlation functions are revealed. Results show that there are two main structural forms of the spatial correlation function: the first one shows an isotropy

  9. Backscatter lidar measurement of aerosol stratification in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Martucci, Giovanni; Thomann, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric aerosol, its stratification and the principal dynamics controlling the air exchange at the top and the base of the aerosol layers are of key importance for understanding critical atmospheric phenomena such as the transport and impact of air pollution, the destruction of the ozone layer and the evolution of the greenhouse effect. In particular, it is the detection of stratification within the atmospheric boundary layer, the lower Troposphere and the regions around the Tropopaus...

  10. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  11. Atmospheric Smell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    awareness. Subsequently, visitor interviews revealed how a museum-staged hospital atmosphere of an art installation was directly addressed owing to its smell. Curiously, this observation speaks against prevailing literature portraying smell as the ‘mute sense’, and what is more, the museum display did not...... alter smell curatorially. Rather, smell was gestured through non-olfactory effects and it was put in words metonymically, gesturing a reversibly synaesthetic atmosphere of a hospital. Visitor conversations revealed how smell could be poignantly picked up in situ, yet not until frequenting the museum...

  12. Climate and atmospheric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the scientific journal of the Humboldt university is dedicated to results of research work carried out to the greatest extent at the meteorological institute in the last two years on the area of climate and atmospheric research. The traditional research areas of the institute are climatology and the dynamics of the atmosphere, in particular the atmospherical boundary layer. Considering the high probability of a global climatic fluctuation due to the anthropogenic change of composition of the atmosphere and other climate-relevant factors imminent in the next century, climatological research today is an important part of global and regional environmental research. From the necessity of determination and evaluation of the effect of climatic fluctuations on nature and society the contours of a new interdisciplinary research area are already visible now. This is suitable as hardly any other area to be the supporting idea of environmental research at universities. The contributions contained in the issue already consider, in addition to results on climate diagnosis, also results on aspects of climate effect research. (orig./KW)

  13. 24. Atmosphere and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Earth's atmosphere is changing, and we do not fully understand what the effect of those changes will be on our own lives, much less the lives of our children. It is easy to imagine effects that could be catastrophic for life on this planet. Yet, in the face of these possibilities and our inadequate understanding of Earth processes, anthropogenic emissions of trace gases - pollutants that affect climate, the ozone layer, and human health - continue. Tables give information on the following: CO2 emissions from industrial processes, 1989; Other greenhouse gas emissions, 1989; Atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases, 1959-90; World CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1950-89; Sulfur and nitrogen emissions, 1970-89; and Common anthropogenic pollutants, 1980-89

  14. Exploring the Atmosphere Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martin; Vogt, Patrik; Stari, Cecilia; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of the inner layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, are determinant for Earth's life. In this experience we explore the first hundreds of meters using a smartphone mounted on a quadcopter. Both the altitude and the pressure are obtained using the smartphone's sensors. We complement these measures with data collected from the…

  15. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the...

  16. Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  17. Analysis on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure and Its Effect on Air Pollution over Urumqi City in Winter%乌鲁木齐冬季大气边界层结构特征及其对大气污染的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 武疆艳; 李霞; 彭成海; 王中伟

    2011-01-01

    Effect of meteorological conditions of atmospheric boundary layer on air pollutant dispersion is significant,but there have been few studies on atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Urumqi yet.During December 11-20,2005,the sounding experiment in urban atmospheric boundary layer over Urumqi City was performed six times a day.Atmospheric boundary layer conditions,such as wind,temperature,mixing layer depth and temperature inversion,were analyzed.The results show that wind speed near ground surface was often lower than 3 m/s,and it was increased gradually with the increase of height below 600 m.The temperature inversion of ground-based and low level-elevated was higher than 1 ℃/100 m,and the daily mean mixing layer depth was 274 m.The meteorological conditions in two durations of air pollution at severe and light levels were compared.Wind speed was lower and temperature was higher during severe air pollution than that during light air pollution.In addition,the temperature inversion intensity during light air pollution was very high(4.5 ℃/100 m),but its inversion depth was low(166 m).The results reveal that the severe air pollution in Urumqi was mainly caused by the simultaneous decrease of wind speed in atmospheric boundary layer,labilization of the prevailing wind direction near ground surface,continuous surface temperature increase,and formation of unstable stratification below exhaustsmoke height of chimneys.The formation and stable continuance of the thick temperature inversion resulted in a long duration of severe air pollution.%基于2005年12月11~20日乌鲁木齐每日6次的低空1.5 km的加密气象探空观测资料,分析乌鲁木齐大气边界层的风、温、混合层高度、逆温等特征。观测期内5 d是重污染,其他时间为轻微污染,重点分析由轻微污染向重污染演变的气象条件。结果表明:观测期平均混合层高度274 m;低空逆温的出现频率明显多于接地逆

  18. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS) contains over 100 data sets pertaining to permafrost and frozen ground topics. It also contains detailed...

  19. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  20. Role of boundary layer processes on the mixed layer CO2-budget

    OpenAIRE

    D. Pino; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2010-01-01

    The diurnal and vertical variability of temperature, humidity and specially CO2 in the atmospheric boundary layer is studied by combining detailed observations taken at Cabauw (The Netherlands), Large-Eddy simulations (LES) and mixed layer theory. The research focus on the role played by the entrainment and other boundary layer driven processes on the distribution and diurnal evolution of CO2 in the boundary layer. The relative importance of this entrained air to ventilate CO2 will be analyze...

  1. Reflection and transmission of polarized light by planetary atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the reflection and transmission of sunlight by planetary atmospheres is studied, taking full account of the polarization of light. The atmospheres are treated as being locally plane-parallel, and are assumed to consist of a number of homogeneous layers, the lowest one being either a ground surface or a semi-infinite homogeneous layer. (Auth.)

  2. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Schneider, Tapio; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J. B.

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric flows are governed by the equations of fluid dynamics. These equations are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifest itself only weakly through interactions of nontrivial mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. Here we show how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. However, it does not capture important turbulent transport terms in the turbulence kinetic energy budget. Second, we study the evolution of two-dimensional large-scale waves, which are representative of waves seen in Earth's upper atmosphere. We demonstrate that a cumulant expansion truncated at second order (CE2) can capture the evolution of such waves and their nonlinear interaction with the mean flow in some circumstances, for example, when the wave amplitude is small enough or the planetary rotation rate is large enough. However, CE2 fails to capture the flow evolution when strongly nonlinear eddy-eddy interactions that generate small-scale filaments in surf zones around critical layers become important. Higher-order closures can capture these missing interactions. The results point to new ways in which the dynamics of turbulent boundary layers may be represented in climate models, and they illustrate different classes

  3. On hydrodynamic instability of the ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that instability may be arisen when the large-scale waves propagate in the ozone layer of Earth's atmosphere. The instability criterion suitable both for the acoustic waves and for the Rossby waves is found. Moreover, the possibility of the spatially located dissipative Rossby vortical structures formation in this layer is established

  4. The Influence of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure on PM2.5 Concentration Over Dongguan Region%东莞地区冬季大气边界层结构对PM2.5影响的观测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴蒙; 吴兑; 范绍佳; 廖志恒; 樊琦

    2015-01-01

    Based on the observational wind profile data,temperature sounding data and the hourly PM2.5 concentration data from the boundary layer observation experiment in Dongguan region during December 2013,the influence of atmospheric boundary layer structure on PM2.5 concentration in Dongguan region has been discussed.It was found that the PM2.5 air pollution weather occurred in winter of Dongguan re-gion was mostly influenced by the weather system of weak southward moving cold air.Under the control of continental cold high,the evolution of atmospheric boundary layer structure was very typical.During the PM2.5 air pollution situation,the daily mean height of mixing layer in daytime was lower than 600 m sometimes,the pollutants accumulated persistently and its concentration increased gradually with the low atmospheric boundary layer height.The height of stable boundary layer in nighttime was about 100 m.By reason of the law height of stable boundary layer in nighttime,the peak PM2.5 concentration occurred in nighttime.The vertical wind field of Dongguan region had obvious three layer construction.The lower layer with slow wind speed made the pollutants accumulate inside atmospheric boundary layer and hard to diffuse.The middle layer which appeared in a very low height with slow wind speed gave rise to the pol-lutants be compression inside lower layer further.Under the control of continental cold high in winter,the inversion layer appeared frequently in Dongguan region during PM2.5 air pollution situation.The height of low altitude inversion base was about 700 m with a large thickness and intensity;the surface inversion oc-curred in nighttime frequently with a thickness of about 100 m.%利用2013年12月在东莞地区开展大气边界层观测试验得到的垂直风温资料和逐时 PM2.5质量浓度资料,研究了东莞地区大气边界层结构对 PM2.5质量浓度的影响的。结果表明:在大陆冷高压控制下,东莞地区的边界层结构演化

  5. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  6. The global atmospheric electrical circuit and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, R G

    2004-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for physical links among clouds, global temperatures, the global atmospheric electrical circuit and cosmic ray ionisation. The global circuit extends throughout the atmosphere from the planetary surface to the lower layers of the ionosphere. Cosmic rays are the principal source of atmospheric ions away from the continental boundary layer: the ions formed permit a vertical conduction current to flow in the fair weather part of the global circuit. Through the (inverse) solar modulation of cosmic rays, the resulting columnar ionisation changes may allow the global circuit to convey a solar influence to meteorological phenomena of the lower atmosphere. Electrical effects on non-thunderstorm clouds have been proposed to occur via the ion-assisted formation of ultrafine aerosol, which can grow to sizes able to act as cloud condensation nuclei, or through the increased ice nucleation capability of charged aerosols. Even small atmospheric electrical modulations on the aerosol size distribution ca...

  7. Processes affecting the stable isotope composition of calcite during precipitation on the surface of stalagmites: Laboratory experiments investigating the isotope exchange between DIC in the solution layer on top of a speleothem and the CO2 of the cave atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreybrodt, Wolfgang; Hansen, Maximilian; Scholz, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical derivation of the exchange time, τex, needed to establish isotopic equilibrium between atmospheric CO2 in a cave and HCO3- dissolved in a thin water film covering the surface of a speleothem. The result is τex = τredex · [HCO3-]/ (KH · pCO2 cave) , where τredex depends on the depth, a, of the water film and on temperature. [HCO3-] is the concentration of bicarbonate, pCO2 cave the partial pressure of CO2, and KH is Henry's constant. To test the theory we prepared stagnant or flowing thin films of a NaHCO3 solution and exposed them at 20 °C to an CO2 containing atmosphere of pCO2 500, 12,500, or 25,000 ppmV and defined isotope composition. The δ13C and δ18O values of the DIC in the solution were measured as a function of the exposure time. For stagnant films with depths between 0.06 and 0.2 cm the δ13C values exhibit an exponential approach towards isotope equilibrium with the atmospheric CO2 with exchange time, τex. The δ18O values first evolve towards isotopic equilibrium with atmospheric CO2, reach a minimum value and then drift away from the isotopic equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 approaching a steady state caused by isotopic exchange of oxygen with water. The experimental findings are in satisfactory agreement with the theoretical predictions. To further investigate isotope evolution in cave analogue conditions, a water film containing 5 mmol/L of NaHCO3 with a depth of 0.013 cm flowing down an inclined borosilicate glass plate was exposed to an atmosphere with pCO2 = 500 ppmV at a temperature of 20 °C. The δ13C and δ18O values were measured as a function of flow (exposure) time, t. The isotope compositions in the DIC of the water film decrease linear in time by δDIC (t) =δDIC (0) - (δDIC (0) -δDIC (∞)) · t /τex where δDIC (0) is the initial isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the water film and δDIC (∞) its final value. From these data an exchange time τex of ca. 7000 s was obtained

  8. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  9. Atmospheric pollution. From processes to modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air quality, greenhouse effect, ozone hole, chemical or nuclear accidents.. All these phenomena are tightly linked to the chemical composition of atmosphere and to the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants. This book aims at supplying the main elements of understanding of 'atmospheric pollutions': stakes, physical processes involved, role of scientific expertise in decision making. Content: 1 - classifications and scales: chemical composition of the atmosphere, vertical structure, time scales (transport, residence); 2 - matter/light interaction: notions of radiative transfer, application to the Earth's atmosphere; 3 - some elements about the atmospheric boundary layer: notion of scales in meteorology, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), thermal stratification and stability, description of ABL turbulence, elements of atmospheric dynamics, some elements about the urban climate; 4 - notions of atmospheric chemistry: characteristics, ozone stratospheric chemistry, ozone tropospheric chemistry, brief introduction to indoor air quality; 5 - aerosols, clouds and rains: aerosols and particulates, aerosols and clouds, acid rains and leaching; 6 - towards numerical simulation: equation of reactive dispersion, numerical methods for chemistry-transport models, numerical resolution of the general equation of aerosols dynamics (GDE), modern simulation chains, perspectives. (J.S.)

  10. Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garai, A.; Pardyjak, E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous laboratory and atmospheric experiments have shown that turbulence influences the surface temperature in a convective boundary layer. The main objective of this study is to examine land-atmosphere coupled heat transport mechanism for different stability conditions. High frequency infrared im

  11. Atmospheric science and power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randerson, D. (ed.)

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  12. The effect of annealing atmosphere on magnetoelectric coupling of the La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} layered heterostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingxian, E-mail: wxlltx@126.com [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455002 (China); Wang, Hongwei [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455002 (China); Ju, Lin; Tang, Zhenjie; Ma, Dongwei [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455002 (China); Li, Kuoshe [National Engineering Research Central for Rare earth Materials, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The epitaxial La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} (LSMO/BTO) layered heterostructure was grown on (001) oriented LaAlO{sub 3} single-crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Our results showed that the in-situ annealing process in oxygen made the LSMO/BTO interface possess higher oxygen content than that of the one annealing in vacuum, which leaded to the LSMO film presented higher magnetic permeability and higher saturated magnetization. The P–E hystersis loop only could be detected in the sample annealing in oxygen. The ME voltage coefficient of the LSMO/BTO heterostructure annealing in oxygen was higher than that of the one annealing in vacuum, which suggested a more effective ME coupling. It was a combined effect of the two main ME coupling mechanisms, including strain mediation, and polarized carrier mediation.

  13. Nonlinear Ekman Layer Theories and Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Zhemin; FANG Juan; WU Rongsheng

    2006-01-01

    Based on the classical Ekman theory, a series of intermediate boundary layer models, which retain the nonlinear advective process while discard embellishments, have been proposed with the intention to understand the complex nonlinear features of the atmospheric boundary layer and its interaction with the free atmosphere. In this paper, the recent advances in the intermediate boundary-layer dynamic models are reviewed. Several intermediate models such as the boundary-layer models incorporating geostrophic momentum approximation, Ekman momentum approximation, and the weak nonlinear Ekman-layer model are a major theme.With inspection of the theoretical frameworks, the physical meaning and the limitations of each intermediate model are discussed. It is found that the qualitative descriptions of the nonlinear nature in Ekman layer made by the intermediate models are fairly consistent though the details may be different. As the application of the intermediate models is concerned, the application of the intermediate models to the study of the topographic boundary layer, frontogenesis, low-level frontal structure, and low-level jet are especially summarized in this paper. It is shown that the intermediate boundary-layer models have great potential in illustrating the low-level structures of the weather and climate systems as they are coupled with the free atmospheric models.In addition, the important remaining scientific challenges and a prospectus for future research on the intermediate model are also discussed.

  14. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  15. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS OF MIXED LAYER DYNAMICS: TESTS OF PARAMETERIZED ENTRAINMENT MODELS OF MIXED LAYER GROWTH RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidar measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer height, the entrainment zone, wind speed and direction, ancillary temperature profiles and surface flux data were used to test current parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear ai...

  16. Ohmic Dissipation in the Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, Rosalba; Rauscher, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Hot Jupiter atmospheres exhibit fast, weakly-ionized winds. The interaction of these winds with the planetary magnetic field generates drag on the winds and leads to ohmic dissipation of the induced electric currents. We study the magnitude of ohmic dissipation in representative, three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We find that ohmic dissipation can reach or exceed 1% of the stellar insolation power in the deepest atmospheric layers, in models with and without dragged winds. Such power, dissipated in the deep atmosphere, appears sufficient to slow down planetary contraction and explain the typically inflated radii of hot Jupiters. This atmospheric scenario does not require a top insulating layer or radial currents that penetrate deep in the planetary interior. Circulation in the deepest atmospheric layers may actually be driven by spatially non-uniform ohmic dissipation. A consistent treatment of magnetic drag and ohmic dissipation is required to further elucidate t...

  17. Application of Radar Systems for Remote Monitoring of Lower Atmosphere Layers' Chemical composition%应用雷达系统遥测低气压层化学成分

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ivon.,VA; Niko.,VV

    2000-01-01

    The remote monitoring of the chemical composition of the lower atmos ph ere layers problem solving can be done through application of radar systems (RS) working in the range of superhigh frequencies (SHF) on resonance frequencies of contamination gases' rotation molecule spectrum. In this research, methods of p arameters and gas contamination dynamics determination are studied. The determin ation is done through obtaining the radar information taking into consideration the special characteristics of absorption lines that are adequate to the real co nditions. The evaluation of RS technical potential is done.%应用雷达系统测定污染气体旋转分子光谱共振频率的超高频范围, 从而解决遥测低气压层的化学成分.本文对参数和气体污染动力学的测定方法进行了研究. 通过综合考虑雷达信息和适合实际情况的吸收线特性来进行测定.对雷达系统的技术潜力做了评估.

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a the morphology of steel corrosion products and corrosion product layers; and b long-term atmospheric corrosion ( > 10 years.

    La corrosión atmosférica del acero suave es un tema de gran amplitud que ha sido tratado por muchos autores en numerosas regiones del mundo. Este artículo de compilación incorpora publicaciones relevantes sobre esta temática, en particular sobre la naturaleza de los productos de corrosión atmosférica, mecanismos y cinética de los procesos de corrosión atmosférica, prestando una atención especial a dos aspectos sobre los que la información publicada ha sido menos abundante: a morfología de los productos de corrosión del acero y capas de productos de corrosión, y b corrosión atmosférica a larga duración (> 10 años.

  19. Atmosphere and ocean in radioactive balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes an extension of a classical model in the theory of radioactive equilibrium of planetary layers. it is elaborated in the spirit of the Eddington approximation, by virtue of which analytical solutions become feasible. The extension consists in allowing for the (isotropically diffuse) reflection of solar radiation at the interface between a planet's atmosphere and its surface layer. Since the model also incorporates absorption of short-wave radiation, it l encompasses earlier models of the same kind. As an illustration, it is applied to calculating the 11 temperature profiles of both the earth's atmosphere and its ocean

  20. Seasonal Cycle Experiment on the Climate Sensitivity Due to a Doubling of CO2 with an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a simple mixed-layer ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Warren M.; Meehl, Gerald A.

    1984-10-01

    for the 2×CO2 case compared to the control. Areas of significant differences correspond to similar regions of large differences seen in the 3-year seasonal means. Certain regions experience summer drying seen in other studies, but zonal mean soil moisture differences show increases of soil moisture at mid and high latitudes of the northern hemisphere year-round, with a relative minimum of increase in late summer. These differences are attributed to large increases of soil moisture in late spring that persist into summer and cause a positive feedback with precipitation and low clouds. This inhibits continental warming and limits summer drying seen in the zonal mean as a result of the doubling of CO2. A comparison of the present experiment with the previous swamp model experiments is consistent with other studies in that the extent of sea ice in the control case critically influences the climatic response to increased CO2 such that more extensive sea ice is associated with a larger response. The seasonal cycle along with ocean heat storage in the mixed layer model are shown to be important in producing a more realistic simulation of the present climate than does the swamp experiment and, presumably, a more credible response to increased CO2. However, in the context of recent studies the overextensive sea ice in the present mixed layer model suggests that the inclusion of ocean heat transport from a fully computed ocean model and a resulting sea ice distribution closer to the observed would possibly produce less of a response to increased CO2.